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Sample records for dade county missouri

  1. Energy recovery in Metro-Dade County

    SciTech Connect

    Sloan, Garrett; Henderson, Tom

    1981-01-01

    In a draft report issued by the Metropolitan Dade County Planning Department, it is reported that Dade County depends almost entirely on oil, natural gas, and nuclear fuel to meet its energy needs. Consequently, one of the energy policies proposed by the Commission is that the recyclying of materials and products should be encouraged when the recycling process is economical, energy efficient, and environmentally sound. Two energy recovery projects, one old and one new, which embody the goal of this policy are described. In fiscal 1978, an average of 408,000 cubic feet of digestor was recovered from the anaerobic digestors at the Virginia Key Central District Wastewater Treatment Plant. The digester gas, with a heat content of 720 Btu's/cubic feet, is treated, stored and burned in internal combustion engines which drive blowers that supply air to the activated sludge tanks. With No. 2 fuel oil prices at $.60 per gallon, it is estimated that about $453,000 per year (755,000 gallons/year) are saved in fuel costs. In April, 1979, construction began in Dade County on the largest resource recovery facility in the US to incorporate the wet processig approach to energy recovery from waste. In this approach water is added to the waste stream to form a slurry. The slurry is then treated using processes developed for the pulp and paper industry, such as centrifugation, screening, thickening, and dewatering. The fuel that is produced contains from 20 to 50% moisture and has a heating value of about 3000 to 5000 Btu's/lb. In addition, steel, aluminum, glass, and mixed nonferous metals will be recovered.

  2. The Economic Impact of Miami-Dade Community College on Dade County. Research Report No. 86-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Dwight

    A study was conducted to investigate the economic effects of external funds flowing into Dade County because of the existence of Miami-Dade Community College (MDCC). After establishing that most of MDCC's funding comes from external sources and that 85% of its 8,000 employees reside in Dade County, the study sought answers to questions pertaining…

  3. Cutting Electricity Costs in Miami-Dade County, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, Carlos; Oliver, LeAnn; Kronheim, Steve; Gonzalez, Jorge; Woods-Richardson, Kathleen

    2011-01-01

    Miami-Dade County, Florida will be piping methane gas from their regional landfill to the adjacent wastewater plant to generate a significant portion of the massive facility's future electricity needs.

  4. Cutting Electricity Costs in Miami-Dade County, Florida

    ScienceCinema

    Alvarez, Carlos; Oliver, LeAnn; Kronheim, Steve; Gonzalez, Jorge; Woods-Richardson, Kathleen;

    2013-05-29

    Miami-Dade County, Florida will be piping methane gas from their regional landfill to the adjacent wastewater plant to generate a significant portion of the massive facility's future electricity needs.

  5. Statistical Abstract, Dade County Public Schools, 1983-84.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL. Office of Educational Accountability.

    This document combines and consolidates several statistical reports published separately in prior years. The report is designed to present a summary of statistical information on the status of public education in Dade County, Florida. It discusses school organization, pupils, educational programs, achievement and other outcomes of schooling,…

  6. Statistical Abstract, Dade County Public Schools, 1984-1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL. Office of Educational Accountability.

    This document combines and consolidates the following statistical reports published separately prior to 1983-84: (1) "The Status of Education" (formerly the Superintendent's Annual Statistical Report); (2) "Selected Statistical Information--Individual Dade County Public Schools"; (3) "Ethnic Characteristics of Students and Staff"; and (4)…

  7. Statistical Abstract 1985-86. Dade County Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL. Office of Educational Accountability.

    Combining and consolidating statistical reports published separately prior to 1983-84, this document presents statistical information on the status of public education in Dade County, Florida, in terms of organization, educational programs and services, achievement, and other outcomes of schooling. Multi-year statistics on student population,…

  8. Destination of Dade County Public High School Graduates. Information Capsule.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Cathy

    This study, which uses data from the Florida Department of Education Readiness for College reports, tracks Dade County Public High School (DCPS) graduates' entries into Florida colleges during the year following their graduation. During the 1996-1997 year, 43% (5,773 graduates) did not enter public secondary education in Florida. Of the 7,805…

  9. The Private Management of Public Schools: The Dade County, Florida, Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Deborah Lawson

    In 1990, the Dade County Public School System (DCPS) in Dade County, Florida, entered into a 5-year contract with a private company, Educational Alternatives Incorporated (EAI), to manage the educational services at South Pointe Elementary School. This paper presents findings of an evaluation of the DCPS-EAI collaboration at South Pointe. Data…

  10. Altitude of water table, Biscayne Aquifer, Dade County, Florida, May 1980

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ratzlaff, Karl W.

    1981-01-01

    Average May water levels for the Biscayne aquifer in Dade County , Florida, were contoured (contour interval 1 and 2 feet) on a 1:96,000-scale map. Maps are prepared for periods of low and high water levels to provide water managers with information about water levels in Dade County and how they are affected by water-management practices. (USGS)

  11. Altitude of water table, Biscayne Aquifer, Dade County, Florida, March 1979

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ratzlaff, Karl W.

    1981-01-01

    Average March water levels for the Biscayne aquifer in Dade County, Florida, were contoured (contour interval 1 and 2 feet) on a 1:96,000-scale map. Maps are prepared for periods of low and high water levels to provide water managers with information about water levels in Dade County and how they are affected by water-management practices. (USGS)

  12. Altitude of water table, Biscayne Aquifer, Dade County, Florida, October 1979

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ratzlaff, Karl W.

    1981-01-01

    Average October water levels for the Biscayne aquifer in Dade County, Florida, were contoured (contour interval 1 and 2 feet) on a 1:96,000-scale map. Maps are prepared for periods of low and high water levels to provide water managers with information about water levels in Dade County and how they are affected by water-management practices. (USGS)

  13. Teacher Quality Roadmap: Improving Policies and Practices in the Miami-Dade County Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on Teacher Quality, 2012

    2012-01-01

    In partnership with the Urban League of Greater Miami, the National Council on Teacher Quality (NCTQ) released "Teacher Quality Roadmap: Improving Policies and Practices in Miami," an in-depth study of the work rules Miami-Dade teachers. This look at the state of teacher policies in Miami-Dade County Public Schools explores the district's contract…

  14. Hurricane modification and adaptation in Miami-Dade County, Florida.

    PubMed

    Klima, Kelly; Lin, Ning; Emanuel, Kerry; Morgan, M Granger; Grossmann, Iris

    2012-01-17

    We investigate tropical cyclone wind and storm surge damage reduction for five areas along the Miami-Dade County coastline either by hardening buildings or by the hypothetical application of wind-wave pumps to modify storms. We calculate surge height and wind speed as functions of return period and sea surface temperature reduction by wind-wave pumps. We then estimate costs and economic losses with the FEMA HAZUS-MH MR3 damage model and census data on property at risk. All areas experience more surge damages for short return periods, and more wind damages for long periods. The return period at which the dominating hazard component switches depends on location. We also calculate the seasonal expected fraction of control damage for different scenarios to reduce damages. Surge damages are best reduced through a surge barrier. Wind damages are best reduced by a portfolio of techniques that, assuming they work and are correctly deployed, include wind-wave pumps. PMID:22146005

  15. Hurricane Modification and Adaptation in Miami-Dade County, Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klima, K.; Lin, N.; Emanuel, K.; Morgan, G.; Grossmann, I.

    2012-12-01

    Annual losses from tropical cyclones (TCs) in the United States are estimated to average about $10-billion/year. Damages can be caused by wind, storm surge, and floods. Some U.S. coastal areas experience high TC wind speeds and contain geophysical features vulnerable to storm surges and flooding. Since the Miami-Dade County coastline contains a range of topography, bathymetry and infrastructure with different susceptibilities to TCs, optimal policy choices regarding methods to reduce TC damages depend strongly on locale. Various adaptation techniques, including "hardening", are available to reduce damages from TCs. Strategies to reduce the intensity of a TC, while still hypothetical, offer a very different approach to reducing damages. Here we investigate tropical cyclone wind and storm surge damage reduction for five areas along the Miami-Dade County coastline either by hardening buildings or by the hypothetical application of wind-wave pumps to modify storms. We calculate surge height and wind speed as functions of return period and sea surface temperature reduction by wind-wave pumps. We then estimate costs and economic losses with the FEMA HAZUS-MH MR3 damage model and census data on property at risk. All areas experience more surge damages for short return periods, and more wind damages for long periods. The return period at which the dominating hazard component switches depends on location. We also calculate the seasonal expected fraction of control damage for different scenarios to reduce damages. Surge damages are best reduced through a surge barrier. Wind damages are best reduced by a portfolio of techniques that, assuming they work and are correctly deployed, include wind-wave pumps.

  16. Cultural and Economic Mediation Among Spanish Speaking Migrant Farm Workers in Dade County, Florida.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferster, Lucian Edward

    Based on the study "Migrant Children in Florida", this paper discusses the Spanish speaking farm workers who migrate to Dade County yearly to harvest the tomato and fresh vegetable crops. During the fall of 1969 and the spring of 1970, questionnaires were given to a random sample of 9,065 adult migrant workers in Florida counties with significant…

  17. Index of hydrologic data for selected sites in Dade County, Florida, 1923-80

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sonenshein, R.S.; Causaras, C.R.; Fish, John E.

    1984-01-01

    A comprehensive assessment of the surficial aquifers of southeast Florida, including the Biscayne aquifer, was begun in 1979 by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the South Florida Water Management District. In the initial phase of the study, an inventory was made of existing data available in the files of the U.S. Geological Survey and other public agencies of Dade, Broward, and Palm Beach Counties. This report indexes, through tables and maps, the ground-water quality, ground-water level, surface-water stage, and geologic data bases for Dade County. (USGS)

  18. A Study of Technology Leadership among Elementary Public School Principals in Miami-Dade County

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grey-Bowen, Judith E.

    2010-01-01

    Technology leadership is a strong part of principal leadership, which is essential to the successful technology integration in schools. However, research is limited in the area of principals' technology leadership and their professional development needs. Therefore, the purpose of this descriptive study is to examine Miami-Dade County elementary

  19. Miami-Dade County Public Schools Statistical Abstract 2004-2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Research Services, Miami-Dade County Public Schools, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to present, in summary fashion, statistical information on the status of public education in Miami-Dade County. Information is provided in the areas of organization, educational programs and services, achievement, and other outcomes of schooling. Also included are multi-year statistics on student population,…

  20. Miami-Dade County Public Schools Statistical Abstract 2005-2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Research Services, Miami-Dade County Public Schools, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to present, in summary fashion, statistical information on the status of public education in Miami-Dade County. Information is provided in the areas of organization, educational programs and services, achievement, and other outcomes of schooling. Also included are multi-year statistics on student population,…

  1. Miami-Dade County Public Schools Statistical Abstract 2006-2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Research Services, Miami-Dade County Public Schools, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to present, in summary fashion, statistical information on the status of public education in Miami-Dade County. Information is provided in the areas of organization, educational programs and services, achievement, and other outcomes of schooling. Also included are multi-year statistics on student population,…

  2. Miami-Dade County Public Schools Statistical Abstract 2007-2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Research Services, Miami-Dade County Public Schools, 2008

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to present, in summary fashion, statistical information on the status of public education in Miami-Dade County. Information is provided in the areas of organization, educational programs and services, achievement, and other outcomes of schooling. Also included are multi-year statistics on student population,…

  3. HOUSING FOR FLORIDA'S MIGRANTS, A SURVEY OF MIGRATORY FARM LABOR HOUSING IN DADE COUNTY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MIRENGOFF, WILLIAM; SHOSTACK, ALBERT

    AT THE PEAK OF THE 1955-56 WINTER SEASON, 1,300 FAMILIES AND 5,600 SINGLE MIGRANT WORKERS WERE LIVING IN DADE COUNTY'S URBAN AREAS AND 71 LABOR CAMPS. MOST LIVED IN OVERCROWDED QUARTERS, BUT THE UNITS WERE SOUNDLY CONSTRUCTED. WATER AND SEWAGE WERE ADEQUATE, BUT THERE WERE MANY STRUCTURAL DEFICIENCIES, INCLUDING LACK OF SCREENS AND LACK OF…

  4. Empowering Students through Creativity: Art Therapy in Miami-Dade County Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isis, Patricia D.; Bush, Janet; Siegel, Craig A.; Ventura, Yehoshua

    2010-01-01

    Miami-Dade County Public Schools (M-DCPS) has been at the forefront of integrating art therapy in schools since 1979, helping children with emotional/behavioral disabilities become more receptive to academic involvement while maximizing their social and emotional potential. This article describes the history, development, current configuration,…

  5. Land Acquisition Practices of the Miami-Dade County School District. Special Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Legislature, Tallahassee. Office of Program Policy Analysis and Government Accountability.

    This review, requested by the Florida Legislature, answers six questions about Miami-Dade County School District's land acquisition practices. The six questions are: (1) Does the district effectively identify its facility needs and plan for those needs? (2) Does the district acquire the land it needs? (3) Has the district adopted land acquisition…

  6. Evaluative Summary of the Dade County Public Schools Elementary Gifted Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Robert A.; Goldinher, Martin R.

    The Elementary Gifted Program in the Dade County Public Schools (DCPS), Florida, serves approximately 2,000 elementary school students through 13 school-center programs and 12 recently implemented home-school-based programs. The school-center program involves transportation from the home school to the center two days per week, while the…

  7. Evaluation of the Dade County Public Schools Roving Leaders Outreach Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Donald R.

    The Roving Leaders Center, one of the Dade County (Florida) Public Schools' Educational Alternative Outreach Programs, is designed as a last resort beyond the opportunity schools. Although it originally involved counselors who visited the schools, it now consists of a classroom, recreation room, offices, and reception area. It is staffed by a…

  8. A Study of Technology Leadership among Elementary Public School Principals in Miami-Dade County

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grey-Bowen, Judith E.

    2010-01-01

    Technology leadership is a strong part of principal leadership, which is essential to the successful technology integration in schools. However, research is limited in the area of principals' technology leadership and their professional development needs. Therefore, the purpose of this descriptive study is to examine Miami-Dade County elementary…

  9. Production of biomass fuel for resource recovery: Trash recycling in Dade County, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Mauriello, P.J.; Brooks, K.G.

    1997-12-01

    Dade County, Florida has been in the forefront of resources recovery from municipal solid waste since the early 1980`s. The County completed its 3,000 tons per day (six days per week) refuse derived fuel waste-to-energy facility in 1982. The Resources Recovery facility is operated under a long-term agreement with Montenay-Dade, Ltd. The trash processing capability of this facility was upgraded in 1997 to process 860 tons per day (six days per week) of trash into a biomass fuel which is used off-site to produce electrical energy. Under current Florida law, facilities like trash-to-fuel that produce alternative clean-burning fuels for the production of energy may receive credit for up to one-half of the state`s 30 percent waste reduction goal.

  10. Solar-heated municipal swimming pools, a case study: Dade County, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, M.

    1981-09-01

    The experience of installing a solar energy system to heat the water in the swimming pool in one of Dade County, Florida's major parks is described and the mechanics of solar heated swimming pools are explained. The solar heating system consists of 216 unglazed polypropylene tube collectors, a differential thermostat, and the distribution system. The performance and economics of the system are discussed as well as future plants. (LEW)

  11. Ground-water quality in selected areas serviced by septic tanks, Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pitt, William A.; Mattraw, H.C.; Klein, Howard

    1975-01-01

    During 1971-74, the U.S. Geological Survey investigated the chemical, physical, bacteriological, and virological characteristics of the ground water in five selected areas serviced by septic tanks in Dade County, Florida. Periodic water samples were collected from multiple-depth groups of monitor wells ranging in depth from 10 to 60 ft at each of the five areas. Analyses of ground water from base-line water-quality wells in inland areas remote from urban development indicated that the ground water is naturally high in organic nitrogen, ammonia, organic carbon and chemical oxygen demand. Some enrichment of ground water with sodium provided a possible key to differentiating septic-tank effluent from other urban ground-water contaminant sources. High ammonia nitrogen, phosphorus, and the repetitive detection of fecal coliform bacteria were characteristic of two 10-foot monitor wells that consistently indicated the presence of septic-tank effluent in ground water. Dispersion, dilution, and various chemical processes have presumably prevented accumulation of septic-tank effluent at depths greater than 20 ft, as indicated by the 65 types of water analyses used in the investigation. Fecal coliform bacteria were present on one or two occasions in many monitor wells but the highest concentration, 1,600 colonies/100 ml, was related to storm-water infiltration rather than septic-tank discharge. Areal variations in the composition and the hydraulic conductivity of the sand and limestone aquifer had the most noticeable influence on the overall ground-water quality. The ground water in the more permeable limestone in south Dade County near Homestead contained low concentrations of septic-tank related constituents, but higher concentrations of dissolved sulfate and nitrate. The ground water in north Dade County, where the aquifer is less permeable, contained the highest dissolved iron, manganese, COD, and organic carbon.

  12. Enrollment in Medicare Advantage Plans in Miami-Dade County: Evidence of Status Quo Bias?

    PubMed Central

    Sinaiko, Anna D.; Afendulis, Christopher C.; Frank, Richard G.

    2013-01-01

    Evidence from behavioral economics reveals that decision-making in health care settings can be affected by circumstances and choice architecture. This paper conducts an analysis of choice of private Medicare plans (Medicare Advantage plans) in Miami-Dade County. We provide a detailed description of the choice of MA plans available in Miami over much of the program’s history. Our analysis suggests that first becoming eligible for Medicare is the key transition point for MA, and that there is significant status quo bias in the MA market. Policy that regulates the MA market should anticipate, monitor and account for this consumer behavior. PMID:25067857

  13. Enrollment in Medicare Advantage plans in Miami-Dade County: evidence of status quo bias?

    PubMed

    Sinaiko, Anna D; Afendulis, Christopher C; Frank, Richard G

    2013-08-01

    Evidence from behavioral economics reveals that decision-making in health care settings can be affected by circumstances and choice architecture. This paper conducts an analysis of choice of private Medicare plans (Medicare Advantage plans) in Miami-Dade County. We provide a detailed description of the choice of MA plans available in Miami over much of the program's history. Our analysis suggests that first becoming eligible for Medicare is the key transition point for MA, and that there is significant status quo bias in the MA market. Policy that regulates the MA market should anticipate, monitor and account for this consumer behavior. PMID:25067857

  14. Analysis of data acquired by synthetic aperture radar over Dade County, Florida, and Acadia Parish, Louisiana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.

    1983-01-01

    Results of digital processing of airborne X-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data acquired over Dade County, Florida, and Acadia Parish, Louisiana are presented. The goal was to investigate the utility of SAR data for land cover mapping and area estimation under the AgRISTARS Domestic Crops and Land Cover Project. In the case of the Acadia Paris study area, LANDSAT multispectral scanner (MSS) data were also used to form a combined SAR and MSS data set. The results of accuracy evaluation for the SAR, MSS, and SAR/MSS data using supervised classification show that the combined SAR/MSS data set results in an improved classification accuracy of the five land cover classes as compared with SAR-only and MSS-only data sets. In the case of the Dade County study area, the results indicate that both HH and VV polarization data are highly responsive to the row orientation of the row crop but not to the specific vegetation which forms the row structure. On the other hand, the HV polarization data are relatively insensitive to the orientation of row crop. Therefore, the HV polarization data may be used to discriminate the specific vegetation that forms the row structure.

  15. Child Health and Well-Being in Miami-Dade County: 2007 Baseline Survey Results. Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lippman, Laura; Guzman, Lina; Vandivere, Sharon; Atienza, Astrid; Rivers, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    In January through April 2007, the Children's Trust sponsored a population-based survey of parents of children ages birth through 17 in Miami-Dade County to provide a baseline of data on child health and well-being, and to discern unmet needs for services in the Trust's primary impact areas and strategic investments. The survey was conducted by…

  16. An overview of urban stormwater-management practices in Miami-Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chin, David A.

    2004-01-01

    Agencies with jurisdiction over stormwater-management systems in Miami-Dade County, Florida, include the Miami-Dade Department of Environmental Resources Management (DERM), South Florida Water Management District (SFWMD), and Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT). These agencies are primarily concerned with minor drainage systems that handle runoff from storms with return periods of 10 years or less (DERM), major drainage systems that handle runoff from storms with return periods of 25 years or more (SFWMD), and runoff from major roadways (FDOT). All drainage regulations require retention of at least a specified water-quality volume (defined volume of surface runoff), typically the first inch of runoff. The DERM and FDOT intensity duration frequency (IDF) curves used as a basis for design are similar but different, with differences particularly apparent for short-duration storms. The SFWMD 25-year 3-day storm incorporates an IDF curve that is substantially different from both the IDF curves of DERM and FDOT. A DERM methodology for designing closed exfiltration systems is applicable to storms of 1-hour duration, but is not applicable to all storms with a given T-year return period. A trench design that is applicable to all storms with a given T-year return period is presented as an alternative approach.

  17. FLOOD REDUCTION EFFICIENCY OF THE WATER-MANAGEMENT SYSTEM IN DADE COUNTY (MIAMI), FLORIDA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waller, Bradley G.

    1986-01-01

    Two tropical weather systems, Hurricane Donna (1960) and Tropical Storm Dennis (1981), produced nearly equivalent amounts of rainfall in a 48-hour period south of the Miami (Florida) area. These two systems caused extensive flooding over a 600-square mile area, which is primarily agricultural and low density residential. The 1960 and 1981 storms caused the highest water levels recorded in south Dade County since flood-control measures were initiated for south Florida in 1949. Ground-water levels during both storms rose 4 to 8 feet over most of the area causing widespread inundation. Operation of the water-management system in 1981 provided flood protection and rapid recession of ground-water levels thereby minimizing damage.

  18. Changes in saltwater intrusion in the Biscayne aquifer, Hialeah-Miami Springs area, Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klein, Howard; Ratzlaff, Karl W.

    1989-01-01

    A lobe of salty groundwater that had intruded the Hialeah-Miami Springs area municipal well field, adjacent to the Miami and Tamiami Canals in Dade County, Florida, was stabilized after flow-regulation structures were installed in the canals in 1946. However, in 1971, the saltwater began to readvance toward the center of the well field because of water level declines caused by large increases in withdrawals during a near-record dry season. To better protect the well field, a temporary flow-regulation structure, constructed in 1971, in the Tamiami Canal was moved in 1976 to a permanent site, about 3,000 ft farther seaward; this converted that tidal reach of canal to a controlled reach under a sustained freshwater head. This water management procedure resulted in dilution of the intruding saltwater lobe and a marked concentration of its size even though large municipal withdrawals continued. (USGS)

  19. Attenuation of stormwater contaminants from highway runoff within unsaturated limestone, Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waller, Bradley G.; Klein, Howard; Lefkoff, Lawrence J.

    1984-01-01

    Infiltration of stormwater in heavily urbanized parts of Dade County, Florida, is a prime source of recharge to the unconfined Biscayne aquifer, the sole source of drinking water for southeast Florida. Ponded stormwater at the test site contained greater concentrations of lead, zinc, manganese, nitrogen (except nitrate), and phosphorus than the water which percolated through the unsaturated limestone. Attenuation of some stormwater contaminants in the surface soils and limestone is indicated at the test site adjacent to a busy throughfare. Lead concentrations of 610 micrograms per kilogram and zinc concentrations of 91 micrograms per kilogram were found in the thin surface soils, nearly 20 times more than the concentrations of these metals at greater depth. In contrast, soil and rock sample at a control site remote from heavy traffic contained low concentrations of metals and showed little variation in concentration with depth. (USGS)

  20. Environmental Impacts of the Annual Agricultural Drawdown in Southern Miami-Dade County

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearns, E. J.; Renshaw, A.; Bellmund, S.

    2008-05-01

    Water managers annually manipulate groundwater storage in Southern Miami-Dade County at the end of the wet season to support agricultural interests. The so-called "agricultural drawdown" in Southern Miami-Dade County involves a 0.8 ft (0.24 m) reduction in groundwater stages via the release of large volumes of water each fall to Biscayne Bay. An average of 21.4 billion gallons (65,800 ac-ft or 8.1x107 m3) of freshwater are released each year from the Biscayne Aquifer via the C-103 and C-102 canals during the drawdown in anticipation of the winter growing season. The side-effects of this groundwater drawdown and loss of stored water are felt primarily by the environment in, and adjacent to, southern Biscayne Bay. Without the rapid drainage of freshwater, these large volumes of water would gradually leak into Biscayne Bay and its low-lying coastal wetlands, providing freshwater flows further into the dry season. The rapid and sudden release of water from the Biscayne Aquifer within a few weeks of the end of the wet season brings about an artificially early start to the dry season. The following dry season is thus unnaturally dry, leading to long periods of dry marshes and high salinities along the shoreline. The result threatens productive estuarine fish and shellfish habitat, enhances predation of nearshore species by marine fish, encourages exotic plant species within the coastal wetland zone, and promotes a loss of wading bird foraging habitat during nesting season. The threat of saltwater intrusion into the Biscayne Aquifer is enhanced by this operational practice as well, since sea levels are at their seasonal maximums in October and November. The effects of the agricultural drawdown, the possible enhancements to the coastal ecosystem that could be realized by its elimination, and its future within the context of the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan's Biscayne Bay Coastal Wetlands project will be explored.

  1. Evaluation of Confining Layer Integrity Beneath the South District Wastewater Treatment Plant, Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department, Dade County, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Starr, Robert Charles; Green, Timothy Scott; Hull, Laurence Charles

    2001-02-01

    A review has been performed of existing information that describes geology, hydrogeology, and geochemistry at the South District Wastewater Treatment Plant, which is operated by the Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department, in Dade County, Florida. Treated sanitary wastewater is injected into a saline aquifer beneath the plant. Detection of contaminants commonly associated with treated sanitary wastewater in the freshwater aquifer that overlies the saline aquifer has indicated a need for a reevaluation of the ability of the confining layer above the saline aquifer to prevent fluid migration into the overlying freshwater aquifer. Review of the available data shows that the geologic data set is not sufficient to demonstrate that a competent confining layer is present between the saline and freshwater aquifers. The hydrogeologic data also do not indicate that a competent confining layer is present. The geochemical data show that the freshwater aquifer is contaminated with treated wastewater, and the spatial patterns of contamination are consistent with upward migration through localized conduits through the Middle Confining Unit, such as leaking wells or natural features. Recommendations for collection and interpretation of additional site characterization data are provided.

  2. Evaluation of Confining Layer Integrity Beneath the South District Wastewater Treatment Plant, Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department, Dade County, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Starr, R.C.; Green, T.S.; Hull, L.C.

    2001-02-28

    A review has been performed of existing information that describes geology, hydrogeology, and geochemistry at the South District Wastewater Treatment Plant, which is operated by the Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department, in Dade County, Florida. Treated sanitary wastewater is injected into a saline aquifer beneath the plant. Detection of contaminants commonly associated with treated sanitary wastewater in the freshwater aquifer that overlies the saline aquifer has indicated a need for a reevaluation of the ability of the confining layer above the saline aquifer to prevent fluid migration into the overlying freshwater aquifer. Review of the available data shows that the geologic data set is not sufficient to demonstrate that a competent confining layer is present between the saline and freshwater aquifers. The hydrogeologic data also do not indicate that a competent confining layer is present. The geochemical data show that the freshwater aquifer is contaminated with treated wastewater, and the spatial patterns of contamination are consistent with upward migration through localized conduits through the Middle Confining Unit, such as leaking wells or natural features. Recommendations for collection and interpretation of additional site characterization data are provided.

  3. Hydrologic effects of well-field operations in a wetland, Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sonenshein, R.S.; Hofstetter, R.H.

    1990-01-01

    Water-level, canal stage and discharge, and rainfall data collected in a wetland in Dade County, Florida, were analyzed to determine the effects of pumping at the Northwest Well Field on water levels in the wetland. The Northwest Well Field is the first major well field in south Florida to be operated in a wetland, away from saltwater intrusion and the potential for contamination caused by urbanization. Duration curves were used to analyze trends in water levels for seven observation wells near the Northwest Well Field. One observation well is 5.5 miles north of the well field, three wells are outside the cone of depression of the well field, and three are within the cone of depression. The water level data were analyzed for four time periods that were determined by a double-mass analysis of cumulative rainfall and cumulative canal discharge. Before 1984, water levels in all seven wells were above land surface 25 to 50 percent of the time. Since the well field began operating in 1984, water levels in the three wells within the cone of depression have been above land surface less than 1 percent of the time. Water levels at the four wells outside the cone of depression showed no effect from pumping at the well field. Water levels have declined in 30 percent of the 65- square mile study area since the well field began operating. In 15 percent of the area, water levels have been lowered below land surface.

  4. Water-quality reconnaissance of the north Dade County solid-waste facility, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKenzie, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    A water-quality sampling reconnaissance of the north Dade County solid-waste disposal facility (landfill) near Carol City, Florida, was conducted during 1977-78. The purpose of the reconnaissance was to determine selected quality characteristics of the surface- and ground-water of the landfill and contiguous area; and to assess, generally, if leachate produced by the decomposition of landfill wastes was adversely impacting the downgradient water quality. Sampling results indicated that several water-quality characteristics were present in landfill ground water at significantly higher levels than in ground water upgradient or downgradient from the landfill. Moreover, many of these water-quality characteristics were found at slightly higher levels at down gradient site 5 than at upgradient site 1 which suggested that some downgradient movement of landfill leachate had occurred. For example, chloride and alkalinity in ground water had average concentrations of 20 and 290 mg/L at background wells (site 1), 144 and 610 mg/L at landfill wells (sites 2 and 4), and 29 and 338 mg/L at downgradient wells (site 5). A comparison of the 1977-78 sampling results with the National Primary and Secondary Drinking Water Regulations indicated that levels of iron and color in ground water of the study area frequently exceeded national maximum contaminant levels, dissolved solids, turbidity, lead, and manganese occasionally exceeded regulations. Concentrations of iron and levels of color and turbidity in some surface water samples also exceeded National maximum contaminant levels. (USGS)

  5. Water quality at and adjacent to the south Dade County solid-waste disposal facility, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKenzie, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    A water-quality reconnaissance was conducted at the south Dade County solid-waste landfill near Goulds, Florida, from December 1977 through August 1978. The landfill is located directly on the unconfined Biscayne aquifer, which, in the study area, is affected by saltwater intrusion. Water samples collected from six monitor well sites at two depths and four surface-water sites were analyzed to determine the chemical, physical, and biological conditions of the ground water and surface water of the study area. Results indicated that water quality beneath the landfill was highly variable with location and depth. Leachate was generally more evident in the shallow wells and during the dry-season sampling, but was greatly diluted and dispersed in the deep wells and during the wet season. High concentrations of contaminants were generated primarily in areas of the landfill with the most recent waste deposits. Chloride (limited to the shallow wells and the dry season), alkalinity, ammonia, iron, manganese, lead, phosphorus, and organic nitrogen indicate leachate contamination of the aquifer. Water-quality characteristics in the surface waters were generally only slightly above background levels. (USGS)

  6. Profile of the Older Population Living in Miami-Dade County, Florida: An Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Zevallos, Juan C; Wilcox, Meredith L; Jean, Naomie; Acuña, Juan M

    2016-05-01

    Florida has the greatest proportion (19%) of older population (65 years or older) in the United States. The age distribution of its residents, in conjunction with a major shift in the leading cause of death within all age groups from acute illnesses to chronic disease, creates unprecedented health care challenges for the state. The objective of this study is to profile the older population living in Miami-Dade County (MDC) using 3 population-based, household-based surveys conducted over the past 5 years.This study examined cross-sectional data (demographics, health outcomes, risk factors, health assess, and utilization) collected from probability-sampled, household-based surveys conducted in 3 areas of MDC: north Miami-Dade, Little Haiti, and South Miami. The questionnaire was administered face-to-face by trained interviewers in English, Spanish, French, or Creole. Analyses were restricted to households containing at least 1 member aged 65 years or older (n = 935). One consenting adult answered the questionnaire on behalf of household members.The mean age of the respondent (60% females) was 60 years. Overall, respondents were predominantly African-Americans, Hispanics, and blacks of Haitian origin. One-third of all households fell below the US poverty thresholds. One-quarter of all households had at least 1 member who was uninsured within the year before the survey. Twenty percent of households had at least 1 member with an acute myocardial infarction or stroke during the year before the survey. Bone density tests and blood stool tests were strikingly underutilized. The health outcomes most prevalent within household members were cardiovascular diseases followed by cancer, anxiety/depression, obesity, asthma, and bone fractures. Twenty percent of households reported having at least 1 current smoker. Overall, emergency rooms were the most commonly used places of care after doctor's offices.Findings of 3 household-based surveys show a predominantly elderly, female, uninsured, and poor minority populations living in MDC, FL. The reported use of preventive services was constrained, and emergency room use was often reported as a main resource for health care. Cardiovascular disease, cancer, bone fractures, and related risk factors were the most prevalent health outcomes. PMID:27196466

  7. Correlation analysis of a ground-water level monitoring network, Miami-Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prinos, Scott T.

    2005-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey cooperative ground-water monitoring program in Miami-Dade County, Florida, expanded from 4 to 98 continuously recording water-level monitoring wells during the 1939-2001 period. Network design was based on area specific assessments; however, no countywide statistical assessments of network coverage had been performed for the purpose of assessing network redundancy. To aid in the assessment of network redundancy, correlation analyses were performed using S-PLUS 2000 statistical analysis software for daily maximum water-level data from 98 monitoring wells for the November 1, 1973, to October 31, 2000 period. Because of the complexities of the hydrologic, water-supply, and water-management systems in Miami-Dade County and the changes that have occurred to these systems through time, spatial and temporal variations in the degree of correlation had to be considered. To assess temporal variation in correlation, water-level data from each well were subdivided by year and by wet and dry seasons. For each well, year, and season, correlation analyses were performed on the data from those wells that had available data. For selected wells, the resulting correlation coefficients from each year and season were plotted with respect to time. To assess spatial variation in correlation, the coefficients determined from the correlation analysis were averaged. These average wet- and dry-season correlation coefficients were plotted spatially using geographic information system software. Wells with water-level data that correlated with a coefficient of 0.95 or greater were almost always located in relatively close proximity to each other. Five areas were identified where the water-level data from wells within the area remained correlated with that of other wells in the area during the wet and dry seasons. These areas are located in or near the C-1 and C-102 basins (2 wells), in or near the C-6 and C-7 basins (2 wells), near the Florida Keys Aqueduct Authority Well Field (2 wells), near the Hialeah-Miami Springs Well Field (6 wells), and near the West Well Field (21 wells). Data from the remaining 65 wells (most of the wells in the network) generally were not correlated with those of other wells during both the wet and dry seasons with an average coefficient of 0.95 or greater for the comparison. Because many of the wells near the West Well Field and some near the Hialeah-Miami Springs Well Field had not been in operation for very long (most having been installed in 1994), the averaged correlation coefficients for these wells were often determined using only a few seasons of data. For the few instances where water-level data were found to be well correlated on average for a lengthy period of record, short-term declines in correlation were often identified. In general, it would be beneficial to compare data for longer periods of record than currently available.

  8. Vegetative changes in a wetland in the vicinity of a well field, Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hofstetter, R.H.; Sonenshein, R.S.

    1990-01-01

    Plant communities present in 1978 and 1986 were analyzed at 250 random points on stereoscopic pairs of aerial photographs for four study sites in the vicinity of the Northwest Well Field in Dade County, Florida. Sites NW and NE lie northwest of the well field beyond the cone of depression. Site SW lies in the outer part of the cone, and site SE lies within the cone of depression. Relative frequency values for several plant types including herbs, shrubs-small trees, and trees were analyzed by the Heterogeneity G-test to determine heterogeneity among sites in 1978 and 1986. In 1978, all four sites were dominated by plant communities having herbs, shrubs, or a mixture thereof. The communities at sites NW and NE were similar, and those at SE and SW were somewhat similar. In 1986, sites NW, NE, and SE were dominated by a mixture of shrubs and trees. Only at site SW was the relative frequency of occurrence of herbaceous plants still high. At each site, there was a decrease in herbaceous vegetation and an increase in woody vegetation during this period, with the increase in trees being greatest at site SE. Time between the start of the well-field operation in May 1983 and the January 1986 photographs was insufficient to allow determination of any direct effects of the well field on the vegetation. Ground-level observations in 1987 and 1988 indicate a trend toward continued increase in dominance of woody plants and a decrease in herbaceous wetland vegetation. Development of a forest of the exotic pest tree melaleuca is occurring at all four sites, but especially at site SE. Vegetative changes between 1978 and 1986 are attributed to an invasion of the exotic species melaleuca, a shortened hydroperiod, and natural succession within the plant communities.

  9. Geologic and hydrogeologic frameworks of the Biscayne aquifer in central Miami-Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wacker, Michael A.; Cunningham, Kevin J.; Williams, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Evaluations of the lithostratigraphy, lithofacies, paleontology, ichnology, depositional environments, and cyclostratigraphy from 11 test coreholes were linked to geophysical interpretations, and to results of hydraulic slug tests of six test coreholes at the Snapper Creek Well Field (SCWF), to construct geologic and hydrogeologic frameworks for the study area in central Miami-Dade County, Florida. The resulting geologic and hydrogeologic frameworks are consistent with those recently described for the Biscayne aquifer in the nearby Lake Belt area in Miami-Dade County and link the Lake Belt area frameworks with those developed for the SCWF study area. The hydrogeologic framework is characterized by a triple-porosity pore system of (1) matrix porosity (mainly mesoporous interparticle porosity, moldic porosity, and mesoporous to megaporous separate vugs), which under dynamic conditions, produces limited flow; (2) megaporous, touching-vug porosity that commonly forms stratiform groundwater passageways; and (3) conduit porosity, including bedding-plane vugs, decimeter-scale diameter vertical solution pipes, and meter-scale cavernous vugs. The various pore types and associated permeabilities generally have a predictable vertical spatial distribution related to the cyclostratigraphy. The Biscayne aquifer within the study area can be described as two major flow units separated by a single middle semiconfining unit. The upper Biscayne aquifer flow unit is present mainly within the Miami Limestone at the top of the aquifer and has the greatest hydraulic conductivity values, with a mean of 8,200 feet per day. The middle semiconfining unit, mainly within the upper Fort Thompson Formation, comprises continuous to discontinuous zones with (1) matrix porosity; (2) leaky, low permeability layers that may have up to centimeter-scale vuggy porosity with higher vertical permeability than horizontal permeability; and (3) stratiform flow zones composed of fossil moldic porosity, burrow related vugs, or irregular vugs. Flow zones with a mean hydraulic conductivity of 2,600 feet per day are present within the middle semiconfining unit, but none of the flow zones are continuous across the study area. The lower Biscayne aquifer flow unit comprises a group of flow zones in the lower part of the aquifer. These flow zones are present in the lower part of the Fort Thompson Formation and in some cases within the limestone or sandstone or both in the uppermost part of the Pinecrest Sand Member of the Tamiami Formation. The mean hydraulic conductivity of major flow zones within the lower Biscayne aquifer flow unit is 5,900 feet per day, and the mean value for minor flow zones is 2,900 feet per day. A semiconfining unit is present beneath the Biscayne aquifer. The boundary between the two hydrologic units is at the top or near the top of the Pinecrest Sand Member of the Tamiami Formation. The lower semiconfining unit has a hydraulic conductivity of less than 350 feet per day. The most productive zones of groundwater flow within the two Biscayne aquifer flow units have a characteristic pore system dominated by stratiform megaporosity related to selective dissolution of an Ophiomorpha-dominated ichnofabric. In the upper flow unit, decimeter-scale vertical solution pipes that are common in some areas of the SCWF study area contribute to high vertical permeability compared to that in areas without the pipes. Cross-hole flowmeter data collected from the SCWF test coreholes show that the distribution of vuggy porosity, matrix porosity, and permeability within the Biscayne aquifer of the SCWF is highly heterogeneous and anisotropic. Groundwater withdrawals from production well fields in southeastern Florida may be inducing recharge of the Biscayne aquifer from canals near the well fields that are used for water-management functions, such as flood control and well-field pumping. The SCWF was chosen as a location within Miami-Dade County to study the potential for such recharge to the Biscayne aquifer from the C–2 (Snapper Creek) canal that roughly divides the well field in half. Geologic, hydrogeologic, and hydraulic information on the aquifer collected during construction of monitoring wells within the SCWF could be used to evaluate the groundwater flow budget at the well-field scale.

  10. A method to estimate canal leakage to the Biscayne Aquifer, Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chin, D.A.

    1990-01-01

    The leakage characteristics of channels that partially penetrate the Biscayne aquifer and have reduced bed permeability were studied. Leakage characteristics were described in terms of a reach transmissivity-defined as the volume flow rate out of the channel per unit length of the channel per unit drawdown, where drawdown is defined as the difference in altitude between the water surface in the canal and the water table in the adjacent aquifer. A theoretical expression was developed to relate the reach transmissivity to the transmissivity of the formation, mean channel width, distance of drawdown measurement from the channel centerline, ratio of drawdowns on both sides of the channel, and local reach transmissivity associated with reduced bed permeability. This theoretical expression was verified using a fine-scale numerical model, which gave accurate results when drawdowns were measured beyond 10 aquifer depths from the side of the channel. Using the theoretical formulation, it is shown that the reach transmissivity employed in regional ground-water models, which are based on average drawdowns within a cell, depends on the size of the cell as well as the transmissivity of the formation, channel width, and local reach transmissivity due to reduced bed permeability. The theoretical reach transmissivity function was compared with field measurements at L-31N Canal and Snapper Creek Extension Canal in Dade County, Florida. Analyses of the data for both canals showed good agreement between the estimated and measured reach transmissivities. At L- 31N Canal, field measurements indicated that the local reach transmissivity was relatively uniform over a 2-mile reach of the channel (averaging 630 cubic feet per second per mile per foot), and the formation transmissivity was 1.8 x106 feet squared per day. At Snapper Creek Extension Canal, an approximate analysis was necessary due to the inability of the acoustic velocity meter to measure very low water velocities in the channel. Assuming an aquifer transmissivity of 1 x 106 feet squared per day, drawdown measurements indicated that the local reach transmissivity was about 400 cubic feet per second per mile per foot. The theoretical relation, combined with the local reach transmissivity and formation transmissivity, was sufficient to predict the leakage out of L-31N Canal and Snapper Creek Extension Canal for any drawdown scenario.

  11. Helicopter electromagnetic survey of the Model Land Area, Southeastern Miami-Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fitterman, David V.; Deszcz-Pan, Maria; Prinos, Scott T.

    2012-01-01

    This report describes a helicopter electromagnetic survey flown over the Model Land Area in southeastern Miami-Dade County, Florida, to map saltwater intrusion in the Biscayne aquifer. The survey, which is located south and east of Florida City, Florida, covers an area of 115 square kilometers with a flight-line spacing of 400 meters. A five-frequency, horizontal, coplanar bird with frequencies ranging from 400 to 100,000 Hertz was used. The data were interpreted using differential resistivity analysis and inversion to produce cross sections and resistivity depth-slice maps. The depth of investigation is as deep as 100 meters in freshwater-saturated portions of the Biscayne aquifer and the depth diminishes to about 50 meters in areas that are intruded by saltwater. The results compare favorably with ground-based, time-domain electromagnetic soundings and induction logs from observation wells in the area. The base of a high-resistivity, freshwater-saturated zone mapped in the northern 2 kilometers of the survey area corresponds quite well with the base of the surficial aquifer that has been determined by drilling. In general, saltwater in the survey area extends 9 to 12 kilometers inland from the coast; however, there is a long nose of saltwater centered along the Card Sound Road Canal that extends 15 kilometers inland. The cause of this preferential intrusion is likely due to uncontrolled surface flow along the canal and subsequent leakage of saltwater into the aquifer. Saltwater also extends farther inland in the area between U.S. Highway 1 and Card Sound Road than it does to the west of this area. Until 1944, a railroad grade occupied the current location of U.S. Highway 1. Borrow ditches associated with the railroad grade connected to Barnes Sound and allowed saltwater to flow during droughts and storm surges to within a few kilometers of Florida City. Relicts of this saltwater that settled to the bottom of the Biscayne aquifer can be seen in the helicopter electromagnetic data. The area to the west of U.S. Highway 1 is more resistive in the upper 10 meters than the area to the east of the road; this reflects the influence of surface-water flows that are blocked by U.S. Highway 1. Between Card Sound Road and U.S. Highway 1, resistivities are slightly lower compared to adjacent areas. In the southern portion of the survey area, the surficial aquifer underlying the Biscayne aquifer is more resistive; this indicates that it contains fresher water than that found at the base of the Biscayne aquifer.

  12. Are Hispanics the new ’Threat’? Minority Group Threat and Fear of Crime in Miami-Dade County*

    PubMed Central

    Eitle, David; Taylor, John

    2008-01-01

    Research examining the determinants of fear of crime has arguably raised more questions than it has answered. This exploratory study addresses one of the compelling questions that remains unanswered: what is the role of ethnicity, both at the community and individual levels, in understanding variation in fear of crime? Guided by racial or minority group threat theory, we examine the relative sizes of both the Black and Latino populations as indicators of minority group threat to determine their role in understanding individual fear of crime in a city where Latinos represent a much larger proportion of the population than Blacks (Miami-Dade County, Florida). Furthermore, the race and ethnic backgrounds of the respondents are also considered to evaluate their role in understanding variation in the fear of crime. Using both Census tract-level data and data collected from a NIDA sponsored grant that was part of a larger study about physically disabled residents, our findings reveal that in Miami-Dade County where Blacks are highly segregated from whites, the relative size of the Latino population is a predictor of fear of crime among white residents. Implications of this finding are considered, including a call for more nuanced research focusing on the predictors of fear of crime within multiethnic communities. PMID:19227693

  13. HIV/AIDS Knowledge and Beliefs among Haitian Adolescents in Miami-Dade County, Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcelin, Louis Herns; McCoy, H. Virginia; DiClemente, Ralph J.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined HIV/AIDS knowledge and beliefs in Haitian adolescents in an HIV epicenter, Miami-Dade Florida. This study examined survey data from 300 Haitian adolescents, aged 13 through 18, from both low- and middle-income neighborhoods. A sub-sample of 80 adolescents was selected for in-depth interviews and continuous observations with…

  14. A Report on the Cuban Students in the Dade County Public Schools, Miami, Florida: Working Papers on Meeting the Education Needs of Cultural Minorities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inclan, Rosa Guas

    This paper was commissioned by the Education Commission of the States to identify and discuss the educational needs of Cuban students in the United States. Historical background is presented in the first section with discussions of the characteristics of Cubans who were educated in Dade County, Florida, in the sixties and seventies and of the…

  15. Computation of the time-varying flow rate from an artesian well in central Dade County, Florida, by analytical and numerical simulation methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Merritt, Michael L.

    1997-01-01

    Simulation modeling techniques can by used advantageously in estimating artesian flow rates of wells in the upper Floridan Aquifer or for estimating transmissivity based in measured flow rates. The generalized aquifer model was useful in testing conceptual models of the relation between the various aquifers and confining layers beneath the surface of Dade County.

  16. Survey of Student Interest in Home Economics Wage-Earning Programs and Employment Opportunities in Home Economics Related Occupations in Dade County, Florida.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hein, Margaret R.

    Occupational areas and coincident student interest in home economics were surveyed in Dade County to provide a basis for future program planning. Surveyed were 11,402 junior and senior high school students enrolled in home and family education courses in May 1972 and 64 employers in home economics related occupations. A series of recommendations…

  17. An assessment of the ability of routine restaurant inspections to predict food-borne outbreaks in Miami-Dade County, Florida.

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, M A; Katz, D J; Suarez, J A

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study sought to determine the usefulness of restaurant inspections in predicting food-borne outbreaks in Miami-Dade County, Fla. METHODS: Inspection reports of restaurants with outbreaks in 1995 (cases; n = 51) were compared with those of randomly selected restaurants that had no reported outbreaks (controls; n = 76). RESULTS: Cases and controls did not differ by overall inspection outcome or mean number of critical violations. Only 1 critical violation--evidence of vermin--was associated with outbreaks (odds ratio = 3.3; 95% confidence interval = 1.1, 13.1). CONCLUSIONS: Results of restaurant inspections in Miami-Dade County did not predict outbreaks. If these findings are representative of the situation in other jurisdictions, inspection practices may need to be updated. PMID:11344897

  18. Using state-of-the-art technology to evaluate saltwater intrusion in the Biscayne aquifer of Miami-Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prinos, Scott T.

    2014-01-01

    The fresh groundwater supplies of many communities have been adversely affected or limited by saltwater intrusion. An insufficient understanding of the origin of intruded saltwater may lead to inefficient or ineffective water-resource management. A 2008–2012 cooperative U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and Miami-Dade County study of saltwater intrusion describes state-of-the art technology used to evaluate the origin and distribution of this saltwater.

  19. Ground-water quality near the northwest 58th Street solid-waste disposal facility, Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mattraw, H.C., Jr.; Hull, John E.; Klein, Howard

    1978-01-01

    The Northwest 58th Street solid-waste disposal facility, 3 miles west of a major Dade County municipal water-supply well field, overlays the Biscayne aquifer, a permeable, solution-riddled limestone which transmits leachates eastward at a calculated rate of 2.9 feet per day. A discrete, identifiable leachate plume has been recognized under and downgradient from the waste disposal facility. Concentrations of sodium, ammonia, and dissolved solids decreased with depth beneath the disposal area and downgradient in response to an advective and convective dispersion. At a distance of about one-half downgradient, the rate of contribution of leachate from the source to the leading edge of the plume was about equal to the rate of loss of leachate from the leading edge of the plume by diffusion and dilution by rainfall infiltration during the period August 1973 - July 1975. Heavy metals and pesticides are filtered, adsorbed by aquifer materials, or are precipitated near the disposal area. (Woodard-USGS)

  20. South Florida Ecosystem Program: quantifying freshwater discharge for coastal hydraulic control structures in eastern Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kapadia, Amit; Swain, Eric D.

    1996-01-01

    The South Florida Ecosystem Restoration Program is an intergovernmental effort, involving a number of agencies, to reestablish and maintain the ecosystem of south Florida. One element of the restoration effort is the development of a firm scientific basis for resource decision making. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), one of the agencies, provides scientific information as part of the South Florida Ecosystem Restoration Program. The USGS began their ow program, called the South Florida Ecosystem Program, in fiscal year 1995 for the purpose of gathering hydrologic, cartographic, and geologic data that relate to the mainland of south Florida, Florida Bay, and the Florida Keys and Reef ecosystems. As part of the South Florida Ecosystem Program, the USGS, in cooperation with the South Florida Water Management District (SFWMD), has conducted a study to determine discharge ratings for 16 coastal hydraulic control structures in eastern Dade County, Fla. (fig. 1 ). Discharge data are needed to quantify water that can be made available for water supply and ecosystem restoration and to calibrate regional hydrologic models.

  1. Occurrence and potential transport of selected pharmaceuticals and other organic wastewater compounds from wastewater-treatment plant influent and effluent to groundwater and canal systems in Miami-Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, Adam L.; Katz, Brian G.; Meyer, Michael T.

    2012-01-01

    An increased demand for fresh groundwater resources in South Florida has prompted Miami-Dade County to expand its water reclamation program and actively pursue reuse plans for aquifer recharge, irrigation, and wetland rehydration. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department (WASD) and the Miami-Dade Department of Environmental Resources Management (DERM), initiated a study in 2008 to assess the presence of selected pharmaceuticals and other organic wastewater compounds in the influent and effluent at three regional wastewater-treatment plants (WWTPs) operated by the WASD and at one WWTP operated by the City of Homestead, Florida (HSWWTP).

  2. Stochastic analyses to identify wellfield withdrawal effects on surface-water and groundwater in Miami-Dade County, Florida.

    PubMed

    Swain, Eric

    2012-12-30

    Several stochastic analyses were conducted in Miami-Dade County, Florida, to evaluate the effects of wellfield withdrawal on aquifer water levels, canal stage, and canal flow. Multiyear data for withdrawals at four water-supply wellfields, water levels at the S-121 canal control structure and groundwater head at a nearby monitoring well were used to determine the interrelation between wellfield withdrawals and water levels in the canal and aquifer. A spectral analysis was performed first on the wellfield withdrawals, showing similar patterns of fluctuations, but no well-defined seasonality. In order to compare water-level response with withdrawals at each wellfield, the intercorrelation effects between wellfields was removed through a 'causal chain' approach where the inter-wellfield correlation is used to isolate the wellfield/water-level correlation. Most computed correlations have magnitudes less than 5 percent, but with statistical significance above 90 percent. Results indicate that withdrawals from the wellfields most distant from the canal had no significant correlation to the canal levels. However the highest correlation was not at the wellfield closest to the canal, but at the two wellfields at the intermediate distance that have higher withdrawal rates. The hydraulic interconnectivity of the canal with the rest of the canal network, covering the study area, allows the canal equalizes with all connected canals. This explains why proximity to a particular canal location does not appear to be as important a factor as the withdrawal rate. Groundwater levels are more highly correlated to a wellfield on the same side of the canal, and to pumping wells in the same wellfield on the same side of the canal. This indicates that canals are an effective barrier and source/sink for the groundwater. Further nonlinear correlation analysis indicates that high withdrawal rates disproportionally affect water levels and are the predominant effect on the canal. PMID:22996000

  3. Effects of septic tank effluent on ground-water quality, Dade County, Florida: an interim report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pitt, William A., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Except at one site, no fecal coliforms were found below the 10-foot depth. Total coliforms exceeded a count of one colony per ml at the 60- foot depth at two sites. At one site a fecal streptococci count of 53 colonies per ml was found at the 60-foot depth and at another a count of seven colonies was found at the 40-foot depth. The three types of bacteria occur in higher concentration in the northern areas of the county than in the south. Bacteria concentrations were also higher where the septic tanks were more concentrated. 

  4. Effects of dried wastewater-treatment sludge application on ground-water quality in South Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howie, Barbara

    1992-01-01

    Four test fields in the south Dade agricultural area were studied to determine the effects of sludge application on ground-water quality. Two fields had been cultivated for 10 years or more, and two had not been farmed for at least 10 years. The fields were representative of the area's two soil types (Rockdale and Perrine marl) and two major crop types (row crops and groves). Before the application of sludge, wells upgradient of, within, and downgradient of each field were sampled for possible sludge contaminants at the end of wet and dry seasons. Municipal wastewater treatment sludge from the Dade County Water and Sewe Authority Department was then applied to the fields at varying application rates. The wells at each field were sampled over a 2-year period under different hydrologic conditions for possible sludge-related constituents (specific conductance, pH, alkalinity, nitrogen, phosphorus, total organic carbon, copper, iron, magnesium, manganese, potassium, zinc, arsenic, cadmium, chloride, chromium, lead, mercury, nickel, and sodium). Comparisons were made between water quality in the vicinity of the test fields and Florida Department of Environmental Regulation primary and secondary drinking-water regulations, an between water quality upgradient of, beneath, and downgradient of the fields. Comparisons between presludge and postsludge water quality did not indicate any improvement because of retention of agrichemicals by the sludge nor did they indicate any deterioration because of leaching from the sludge. Comparisons of water quality upgradient of the fields to water quality beneath and downgradient of the fields also did not indicate any changes related to sludge. Florida Department of Environmental Regulation primary and secondary drinking-water regulations wer exceeded at the Rockdale maximum-application field by mercury (9.5 ug/L (micrograms per liter)), and the Perrine marl maximum-application field by manganese (60 ug/L) and lead (85 ug/L), and at the Perrine marl row-crop field by mercury (5.2 ug/L). All other exceedances were either in presludge or upgradient samples, or they were for constituents or properties, such as iron and color, which typically exceed standards in native ground water. Acid-extractable and base-neutral compounds, volatile organic compounds, chlorophenoxy herbicides, organophosphorus insecticides, and organochlorine compounds were analyzed for one shallow well at each field twice annually. Those compounds that equaled or exceeded the detection limit after sludge was applied included benzene (0.3 and 1.2 ug/L), chloroform (0.2 and 0.3 ug/L), bis(2-Ethylhexyl)phthalate (29 and 42 ug/L), methylene chloride (14 ug/L), tolulene (0.2, 0.4, 0.5, 1.3, and 4.4 ug/L), 1, 1,1-trichloroethana (0.6 ug/L), trichloroethylene (0.3 ug/L), 2.4-D (0.01 ug/L), and xylene (0.3 ug/L). It ws not possible to ascertain the origin of these compounds becuase they are available from sources other than sludge.

  5. Evaluation of the use of reach transmissivity to quantify leakage beneath Levee 31N, Miami-Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nemeth, Mark S.; Wilcox, Walter M.; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M.

    2000-01-01

    A coupled ground- and surface-water model (MODBRANCH) was developed to estimate ground-water flow beneath Levee 31N in Miami-Dade County, Florida, and to simulate hydrologic conditions in the surrounding area. The study included compilation of data from monitoring stations, measurement of vertical seepage rates in wetlands, and analysis of the hydrogeologic properties of the ground-water aquifer within the study area. In addition, the MODBRANCH code was modified to calculate the exchange between surface-water channels and ground water using a relation based on the concept of reach transmissivity. The modified reach-transmissivity version of the MODBRANCH code was successfully tested on three simple problems with known analytical solutions. It was also tested and determined to function adequately on one field problem that had previously been solved using the unmodified version of the software. The modified version of MODBRANCH was judged to have performed satisfactorily, and it required about 60 percent as many iterations to reach a solution. Additionally, its input parameters are more physically-based and less dependent on model-grid spacing. A model of the Levee 31N area was developed and used with the original and modified versions of MODBRANCH, which produced similar output. The mean annual modeled ground-water heads differed by only 0.02 foot, and the mean annual canal discharge differed by less than 1.0 cubic foot per second. Seepage meters were used to quantify vertical seepage rates in the Everglades wetlands area west of Levee 31N. A comparison between results from the seepage meters and from the computer model indicated substantial differences that seemed to be a result of local variations in the hydraulic properties in the topmost part of the Biscayne aquifer. The transmissivity of the Biscayne aquifer was estimated to be 1,400,000 square feet per day in the study area. The computer model was employed to simulate seepage of ground water beneath Levee 31N. Modeled seepage rates were usually between 100 and 400 cubic feet per day per foot of levee, but extreme values ranged from about -200 to 500 cubic feet per day (positive values indicate eastward seepage beneath the levee). The modeled seepage results were used to develop an algorithm to estimate seepage based on head differential at selected monitoring stations. The algorithm was determined to adequately predict ground-water seepage.

  6. Quality of ground water in the Biscayne Aquifer in Miami-Dade, Broward, and Palm Beach counties, Florida, 1996-1998, with emphasis on contaminants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradner, Anne; McPherson, Benjamin F.; Miller, Ronald L.; Kish, George; Bernard, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    The high permeability of the sand and limestone sediments and shallow water table of the Biscayne aquifer make ground water vulnerable to contamination by human activities. To assess potential contamination in the aquifer, untreated ground water was sampled from 30 public-supply wells (40-165 feet deep) in Broward, Miami-Dade, and Palm Beach Counties, 32 shallow wells (10-50 feet deep) in a recently urbanized (residential and light commercial) part of Broward County, and 3 shallow reference wells in Broward County. Results from sample analyses indicate that major ions, pH, dissolved oxygen, nutrients, and trace element concentrations were generally within the range indicative of background concentrations, except for: (1) substantially higher bromide concentrations in water from public-supply wells in southern Miami-Dade County; (2) a few relatively high (greater than 2 milligrams per liter) concentrations of nitrate in water from public-supply wells near agricultural lands in Miami-Dade and southern Broward Counties; and (3) a few relatively high concentrations of arsenic (greater than 10 micrograms per liter) in water from some shallow urban wells near golf courses. Pesticides were detected in every public-supply well, in most of the shallow, urban monitoring wells (78 percent), and in one reference well; however, no pesticide concentration exceeded any drinking-water standard. Fifteen different pesticides or their degradation products were detected. The most frequently detected pesticides were atrazine and tebuthiuron; less frequently detected were the herbicides diuron, fenuron, prometon, metolachlor, simazine, and 2,6-diethylaniline. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were detected in most of the public-supply wells (77 percent) and shallow, urban wells (91 percent) and in two of the three reference wells. Thirty-two different VOCs were detected in ground water in the Biscayne aquifer, with cis-1,2-dichloroethene the most frequently detected VOC in the public-supply wells, followed by methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), 1,4-dichlorobenzene, and chloroform. Toluene, p-isopropyltoluene, and 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene were the most frequently detected VOCs in the shallow, urban wells. Concentrations of all VOCs were less than the maximum contaminant level (MCL) for public drinking water, except in two samples from public-supply wells near industrialized areas that had vinyl chloride concentrations (3 and 5 micrograms per liter) above the MCL of 1 microgram per liter.

  7. An Evaluation of Public School District Tobacco Policies in St. Louis County, Missouri

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbero, Colleen; Moreland-Russell, Sarah; Bach, Laura E.; Cyr, Julianne

    2013-01-01

    Background: One way to address tobacco use by youth is for primary and secondary schools to adopt and implement comprehensive tobacco policies. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the comprehensiveness of tobacco policies in St. Louis County, Missouri public school districts. Methods: We evaluated the strength of tobacco policies from all 23

  8. An Evaluation of Public School District Tobacco Policies in St. Louis County, Missouri

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbero, Colleen; Moreland-Russell, Sarah; Bach, Laura E.; Cyr, Julianne

    2013-01-01

    Background: One way to address tobacco use by youth is for primary and secondary schools to adopt and implement comprehensive tobacco policies. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the comprehensiveness of tobacco policies in St. Louis County, Missouri public school districts. Methods: We evaluated the strength of tobacco policies from all 23…

  9. Ground-water hydrology of the Dade City area, Pasco County, Florida : with emphasis on the hydrologic effects of pumping from the Floridan aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tibbals, C.H.; Anderson, Warren; Laughlin, Charles P.

    1980-01-01

    The Dade City area, northeast Pasco County, Florida, is an area of about 260 square miles. Of the approximately 32 million gallons per day pumped from the Floridan aquifer in the area in 1975, about 16 million gallons per day were pumped from an area of about 0.25 square miles by a citrus processing plant. There are essentially two producing zones in the Floridan aquifer in the Dade City area. The upper zone is from about 10 feet above to about 150 feet below National Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1929 , and the lower zone from about 300 to about 500 feet below NGVD of 1929. There is evidence of hydraulic interconnection of the upper and lower zones of the Floridan aquifer. This appears to be highly significant in terms of the geohydrology of the Floridan aquifer in the area, particularly with regard to its ground-water flow pattern, water quality, and aquifer hydraulic characteristics. In the immediate vicinity of the citrus processing plant, aquifer transmissivity may range from 200,000 to as much as 400,000 feet squared per day. It is probable the Floridan is only semiconfined in the immediate vicinity of the citrus processing plant. High aquifer transmissivity in the area is the reason why there are only a few feet of drawdown of the Floridan 's potentiometric level even near the center of the well field. (USGS)

  10. Occurrence of Organic Compounds in Source and Finished Samples from Seven Drinking-Water Treatment Facilities in Miami-Dade County, Florida, 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, Adam L.; Katz, Brian G.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department, conducted a reconnaissance study in 2008 to determine the occurrence of 228 organic compounds in raw, source (untreated) and finished (treated) drinking water at seven municipal water-treatment facilities in Miami-Dade County. Results of this sampling study showed that 25 (about 11 percent) of the 228 organic compounds were detected in at least one source water sample and 22 (about 10 percent) were detected in at least one finished water sample. The concentrations of organic compounds in source water samples were less than or equal to 0.2 (u or mu)g/L (micrograms per liter). The concentrations of organic compounds in finished water samples were generally less than or equal to 0.5 (u or mu)g/L, with the exception of bromoform (a possible disinfection byproduct) at estimated concentrations ranging from 0.7 to 2.8 (u or mu)g/L and diethyl phthalate (a plasticizer compound) at 2 (u or mu)g/L.

  11. Gonorrhea infections diagnosed among persons living with HIV/AIDS: identifying opportunities for integrated prevention services in New York City, Washington, DC, Miami/Dade County, and Arizona.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Melanie M; Schillinger, Julia A; Furness, Bruce W; Brewer, Toye; Newman, Daniel R; Pathela, Preeti; Skinner, Julia; Braunstein, Sarah; Shepard, Colin; Ahmed, Tashrik; Griffin, Angelique; Blank, Susan; Peterman, Thomas A

    2013-09-01

    : Persons living with HIV/AIDS who acquire new sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) pose a risk for enhanced transmission of both HIV and STDs. To describe the frequency of HIV coinfection among gonorrhea cases (GC), HIV and GC surveillance databases (2000-2008) were cross-matched in New York City (NYC), Washington, DC (DC), Miami/Dade County (MDC), and Arizona (AZ). During 2000-2008, 4.6% (9471/205,689) of reported GCs occurred among persons with previously diagnosed HIV: NYC (5.5%), DC (7.3%), MDC (4%), and AZ (2%). The overall HIV-GC coinfection rates increased over the study period in all 4 sites. Real-time data integration could allow for enhanced prevention among persons with HIV infection and acute STDs. PMID:23945254

  12. Description and field analysis of a coupled ground-water/surface-water flow model (MODFLOW/BRANCH) with modifications for structures and wetlands in southern Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swain, E.D.; Howie, Barbara; Dixon, Joann

    1996-01-01

    A coupled surface-water model (BRANCH) and ground-water model (MODFLOW) model were tested to simulate the interacting wetlands/surface-water/ ground-water system of southern Dade County. Several options created for the MODFLOW ground- ground-water model were used in representing this field situation. The primary option is the MODBRANCH interfacing software, which allows leakage to be accounted for between the MODFLOW ground-water model and the BRANCH dynamic model for simulation of flow in an interconnected network of open channels. A modification to an existing software routine, which is referred to as BCF2, allows cells in MODFLOW to rewet when dry--a requirement in representing the seasonal wetlands in Dade County. A companion to BCF2 is the modified evapotranspiration routine EVT2. The EVT2 routine changes the cells where evapotranspiration occurs, depending on which cells are wet. The Streamlink package represents direct connections between the canals and wetlands at locations where canals open directly into overland flow. Within the BRANCH model, the capability to represent the numerous hydraulic structures, gated spillways, gated culverts, and pumps was added. The application of these modifications to model surface-water/ground-water interactions in southern Dade County demonstrated the usefulness of the coupled MODFLOW/BRANCH model. Ground-water and surface-water flows are both simulated with dynamic models. Flow exchange between models, intermittent wetting and drying, evapotranspiration, and hydraulic structure operations are all represented appropriately. Comparison was made with a simulation using the RIV1 package instead of MODBRANCH to represent the canals. RIV1 represents the canals by user-defined stages, and computes leakage to the aquifer. Greater accuracy in reproducing measured ground- water heads was achieved with MODBRANCH, which also computes dynamic flow conditions in the canals, unlike RIV1. The surface-water integrated flow and transport two-dimensional model (SWIFT2D) was also applied to the southeastern coastal wetlands for comparison with the wetlands flow approximation made in MODFLOW. MODFLOW simulates the wetlands as a highly conductive upper layer of the aquifer, whereas SWIFT2D solves the hydrodynamic equations. Comparison in this limited test demonstrated no specific advantage for either method of representation. However, much additional testing on a wider variety of geometric and hydraulic situations, such as in areas with greater tidal or other dynamic forcing effects, is needed to make definite conclusions. A submodel of the existing southern Dade County model schematization was used to examine water-delivery alternatives proposed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. For this application, the coupled MODFLOW/BRANCH model was used as a design tool. A new canal and several pumps to be tested to maintain lower water levels in a residential area (while water levels in the Everglades are raised) were added to the model schematization. The pumps were assumed to have infinite supply capacity in the model so that their maximum pumping rates during the simulation could be used to determine pump sizes.

  13. Using High-Impact HIV Prevention to Achieve the National HIV/AIDS Strategic Goals in Miami-Dade County, Florida: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Carey, James W; LaLota, Marlene; Villamizar, Kira; McElroy, Tamara; Wilson, M Maximillion; Garcia, Jersey; Sandrock, Robert; Taveras, Janelle; Candio, Darline; Flores, Stephen A

    2015-01-01

    : In response to the release of the National HIV/AIDS Strategy, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention developed the "Enhanced Comprehensive HIV Prevention Planning" project, which provided support to health departments in 12 Metropolitan Statistical Areas with the highest AIDS prevalence to strengthen local HIV programs. We describe a case study of how 1 Metropolitan Statistical Area, Miami-Dade County, developed and implemented a locally tailored plan. Examples include actions to reinforce local partnerships and identify neighborhoods with highest unmet needs, an improved condom distribution system to assist local HIV care providers, collaboration with local stakeholders to establish a new walk-in center for transgender client needs, and overcoming incompatibilities in health department and Ryan White Program computer record systems to facilitate faster and more efficient patient services. These examples show how jurisdictions both within Florida and elsewhere can create low-cost and sustainable activities tailored to improve local HIV prevention needs. PMID:26785398

  14. The impact of Hurricane Andrew on deviant behavior among a multi-racial/ethnic sample of adolescents in Dade County, Florida: a longitudinal analysis.

    PubMed

    Khoury, E L; Warheit, G J; Hargrove, M C; Zimmerman, R S; Vega, W A; Gil, A G

    1997-01-01

    Findings from a longitudinal study are presented on the relationships between the problems and stresses resulting from Hurricane Andrew and posthurricane minor deviant behavior. The sample (N = 4,978) included Hispanic, African-American, and White non-Hispanic middle school students enrolled in Dade County, Florida public schools. Two waves of data were collected prior to the hurricane; a third was obtained approximately 6 months following the storm. Results indicated that females were likely to report higher levels of hurricane-related stress symptoms than males. After controlling for prehurricane levels of minor deviance, family support, and race/ethnicity, hurricane stress symptom level remained a significant predictor of posthurricane minor deviant behavior. The findings lend support to stress theories of social deviance. PMID:9018678

  15. Application of a Density-Dependent Numerical Model (MODHMS) to Assess Salinity Intrusion in the Biscayne Aquifer, North Miami-Dade County, Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guha, H.; Panday, S.

    2005-05-01

    Miami-Dade County is located at the Southeastern part of the State of Florida adjoining the Atlantic coast. The sole drinking water source is the Biscayne Aquifer, which is an unconfined freshwater aquifer, composed of marine limestone with intermediate sand lenses. The aquifer is highly conductive with hydraulic conductivity values ranging from 1,000 ft/day to over 100,000 ft/day in some areas. Saltwater intrusion from the coast is an immediate threat to the freshwater resources of the County. Therefore, a multilayer density-dependent transient groundwater model was developed to evaluate the saltwater intrusion characteristics of the system. The model was developed using MODHMS, a finite difference, fully coupled groundwater and surface water flow and transport model. The buoyancy term is included in the equation for unconfined flow and the flow and transport equations are coupled using an iterative scheme. The transport equation was solved using an adaptive implicit total variation diminishing (TVD) scheme and anisotropy of dispersivity was included for longitudinal, transverse, vertical transverse, and vertical longitudinal directions. The model eastern boundaries extended approximately 3.5 miles into the Atlantic Ocean while the western boundary extended approximately 27 miles inland from the coast. The northern and southern boundaries extend 6 miles into Broward County and up to the C-100 canal in Miami-Dade County respectively. Close to 2 million active nodes were simulated, with horizontal discretization of 500 feet. A total of nine different statistical analyses were conducted with observed and simulated hydraulic heads. The analysis indicates that the model simulated hydraulic heads matched closely with the observed heads across the model domain. In general, the model reasonably simulated the inland extent of saltwater intrusion within the aquifer, and matched relatively well with limited observed chloride data from monitoring wells along the coast. Saltwater intrusion in the Biscayne aquifer is the result of a combination of natural variations in recharge, evapotranspiration, ground-water withdrawals from the aquifer, and relative canal stages in comparison to tidal stages in the Biscayne Bay. Pre- and post wellfield pumpage scenarios were conducted to determine the effect of wellfield pumpage on saltwater intrusion. The model is being used for future water supply management scenarios and for evaluating the best placement of saltwater intrusion monitoring wells along the coast.

  16. Propaganda, Censorship, and Civic Education in Rural Missouri Schools during World War I: The Benton County Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, William I.

    This study describes the patriotic public rituals, the propaganda materials, and the censorship activities that were part of the school experience in Missouri during World War I. It also examines the apparent responses of two rural Benton County communities to those rituals, materials and activities. Benton County is a rural area of central…

  17. Monitoring and Numerical Modeling of Shallow CO{sub 2} Injection, Greene County, Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Rovey, Charles; Gouzie, Douglas; Biagioni, Richard

    2013-09-30

    The project titled Monitoring and Numerical Modeling of Shallow CO{sub 2} Injection, Greene County, Missouri provided training for three graduate students in areas related to carbon capture and storage. Numerical modeling of CO{sub 2} injection into the St. Francois aquifer at the Southwest Power Plant Site in Greene County, Missouri indicates that up to 4.1 x 10{sup 5} metric tons of CO{sub 2} per year could be injected for 30 years without exceeding a 3 MPa differential injection pressure. The injected CO{sub 2} would remain sequestered below the top of the overlying caprock (St. Francois confining unit) for more than 1000 years. Geochemical modeling indicates that portions of the injected CO{sub 2} will react rapidly with trace minerals in the aquifer to form various solid carbonate mineral phases. These minerals would store significant portions of injected CO{sub 2} over geologic time scales. Finally, a GIS data base on the pore-fluid chemistry of the overlying aquifer system in Missouri, the Ozark aquifer, was compiled from many sources. This data base could become useful in monitoring for leakage from future CO{sub 2} sequestration sites.

  18. Ten-Ecosystem Study (TES) site 9, Washington County, Missouri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Echert, W. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1979-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Sufficient spectral separability exists among softwood, hardwood, grassland, and water to develop a level 2 classification and inventory. Using the tested automatic data processing technology, softwood and grassland signatures can be extended across the county with acceptable accuracy; with more dense sampling, the hardwood signature probably could also be extended. Fall was found to be the best season for mapping this ecosystem.

  19. Statistical Analysis and Mapping of Water Levels in the Biscayne aquifer, Water Conservation Areas, and Everglades National Park, Miami-Dade County, Florida, 2000–2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prinos, Scott T.; Dixon, Joann F.

    2016-01-01

    Maps were created by importing site coordinates, summary water-level statistics, and completeness of record statistics into a geographic information system, and by interpolating between water levels at monitoring sites in the canals and water levels along the coastline. Raster surfaces were created from these data by using the triangular irregular network interpolation method. The raster surfaces were contoured by using geographic information system software. These contours were imprecise in some areas because the software could not fully evaluate the hydrology given available information; therefore, contours were manually modified where necessary. The ability to evaluate differences in water levels between 1990–1999 and 2000–2009 is limited in some areas because most of the monitoring sites did not have 80 percent complete records for one or both of these periods. The quality of the analyses was limited by (1) deficiencies in spatial coverage; (2) the combination of pre- and post-construction water levels in areas where canals, levees, retention basins, detention basins, or water-control structures were installed or removed; (3) an inability to address the potential effects of the vertical hydraulic head gradient on water levels in wells of different depths; and (4) an inability to correct for the differences between daily water-level statistics. Contours are dashed in areas where the locations of contours have been approximated because of the uncertainty caused by these limitations. Although the ability of the maps to depict differences in water levels between 1990–1999 and 2000–2009 was limited by missing data, results indicate that near the coast water levels were generally higher in May during 2000–2009 than during 1990–1999; and that inland water levels were generally lower during 2000–2009 than during 1990–1999. Generally, the 25th, 50th, and 75th percentiles of water levels from all months were also higher near the coast and lower inland during 2000–2009 than during 1990–1999. Mean October water levels during 2000–2009 were generally higher than during 1990–1999 in much of western Miami-Dade County, but were lower in a large part of eastern Miami-Dade County.

  20. Hydrologic conditions in urban Miami-Dade County, Florida, and the effect of groundwater pumpage and increased sea level on canal leakage and regional groundwater flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hughes, Joseph D.; White, Jeremy T.

    2014-01-01

    The extensive and highly managed surface-water system in southeastern Florida constructed during the 20th Century has allowed for the westward expansion of urban and agricultural activities in Miami-Dade County. In urban areas of the county, the surface-water system is used to (1) control urban flooding, (2) supply recharge to production well fields, and (3) control seawater intrusion. Previous studies in Miami-Dade County have determined that on a local scale, leakage from canals adjacent to well fields can supply a large percentage (46 to 78 percent) of the total groundwater pumpage from production well fields. Canals in the urban areas also receive seepage from the Biscayne aquifer that is derived from a combination of local rainfall and groundwater flow from Water Conservation Area 3 and Everglades National Park, which are west of urban areas of Miami-Dade County. To evaluate the effects of groundwater pumpage on canal leakage and regional groundwater flow, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) developed and calibrated a coupled surface-water/groundwater model of the urban areas of Miami-Dade County, Florida. The model was calibrated by using observation data collected from January 1997 through December 2004. The model calibration was verified using observation data collected from January 2005 through December 2010. A 1-year warmup period (January 1996 through December 1996) was added prior to the start of the calibration period to reduce the effects of inaccurate initial conditions on model calibration. The model is designed to simulate surface-water stage and discharge in the managed canal system and dynamic canal leakage to the Biscayne aquifer as well as seepage to the canal from the aquifer. The model was developed using USGS MODFLOW–NWT with the Surface-Water Routing (SWR1) Process to simulate surface-water stage, surface-water discharge, and surface-water/groundwater interaction and the Seawater Intrusion (SWI2) Package to simulate seawater intrusion, respectively. Automated parameter estimation software (PEST) and highly parameterized inversion techniques were used to calibrate the model to observed surface-water stage, surface-water discharge, net surface-water subbasin discharge, and groundwater level data from 1997 through 2004 by modifying hydraulic conductivity, specific storage coefficients, specific yield, evapotranspiration parameters, canal roughness coefficients (Manning’s n values), and canal leakance coefficients. Tikhonov regularization was used to produce parameter distributions that provide an acceptable fit between model outputs and observation data, while simultaneously minimizing deviations from preferred values based on field measurements and expert knowledge. Analytical and simulated water budgets for the period from 1996 through 2010 indicate that most of the water discharging through the salinity control structures is derived from within the urban parts of the study area and that, on average, the canals are draining the Biscayne aquifer. Simulated groundwater discharge from the urban areas to the coast is approximately 7 percent of the total surface-water inflow to Biscayne Bay and is consistent with previous estimates of fresh groundwater discharge to Biscayne Bay. Simulated groundwater budgets indicate that groundwater pumpage in some surface-water basins ranges from 13 to 27 percent of the sum of local sources of groundwater inflow. The largest percentage of groundwater pumpage to local sources of groundwater inflow occurs in the basins that have the highest pumping rates (C–2 and C–100 Basins). The ratio of groundwater pumpage to simulated local sources of groundwater inflow is less than values calculated in previous local-scale studies. The position of the freshwater-seawater interface at the base of the Biscayne aquifer did not change notably during the simulation period (1996–2010), consistent with the similar positions of the interface in 1984, 1995, and 2011 under similar hydrologic and groundwater pumping conditions. Landward movement of the freshwater-seawater interface above the base of the aquifer is more prone to occur during relatively dry years. The model was used to evaluate the effect of increased groundwater pumpage and (or) increased sea level on canal leakage, regional groundwater flow, and the position of the freshwater-seawater interface. Permitted groundwater pumping rates, which generally exceed historical groundwater pumping rates, were used for Miami-Dade County Water and Sewer Department groundwater pumping wells in the base-case future scenario. Base-case future and increased pumping scenario results suggest seawater intrusion may occur at the Miami-Springs well field if the Miami Springs, Hialeah, and Preston well fields are operated using current permitted groundwater pumping rates. Scenario simulations also show that, in general, the canal system limits the adverse effects of proposed groundwater pumpage increases on water-level changes and saltwater intrusion. Proposed increases (up to a 7 percent increase) in groundwater pumpage do not have a notable effect on movement of the freshwater-seawater interface. Increased groundwater pumpage increased lateral groundwater inflow into basins subject to additional groundwater pumpage; however, most (55 percent) of the additional groundwater extracted from pumping wells was supplied by changes in canal seepage and leakage in urban areas of the model. Increased sea level caused increased water-table elevations in urban areas and decreased hydraulic gradients across the system; the largest increases in water-table elevations occurred seaward of the salinity control structures. The extent of flood-prone areas and the percentage of time water-table elevations in flood-prone areas were less than 0.5 foot below land surface increased with increased sea level. Increased sea level also resulted in landward migration of the freshwater-seawater interface; the largest changes in the position of the interface occurred seaward of the salinity control structures except in parts of the model area that were inundated by increased sea level. Decreased water-table gradients reduced groundwater inflow, groundwater outflow, canal exchanges, surface-water inflow, and surface-water outflow through salinity control structures. Results for the scenario that evaluated the combination of increased groundwater pumpage and increased sea level did not differ substantially from the scenario that evaluated increased sea level alone. Groundwater inflow, groundwater outflow, and canal exchanges were reduced in urban areas of the study area as a result of decreased water-table gradients across the system, although reductions were less than those in the increased sea-level scenario. The decline in groundwater levels caused by increased groundwater pumpage was less under the increased sea-level scenario than under the increased groundwater-pumpage scenario. The largest reductions in surface-water outflow from the salinity control structures occurred with increased sea level and increased groundwater pumpage. The model was designed specifically to evaluate the effect of groundwater pumpage on canal leakage at the surface-water-basin scale and thus may not be appropriate for (1) predictions that are dependent on data not included in the calibration process (for example, subdaily simulation of high-intensity events and travel times) and (or) (2) hydrologic conditions that are substantially different from those during the calibration and verification periods. The reliability of the model is limited by the conceptual model of the surface-water and groundwater system, the spatial distribution of physical properties, the scale and discretization of the system, and specified boundary conditions. Some of the model limitations are manifested in model errors. Despite these limitations, however, the model represents the complexities of the interconnected surface-water and groundwater systems that affect how the systems respond to groundwater pumpage, sea-level rise, and other hydrologic stresses. The model also quantifies the relative effects of groundwater pumpage and sea-level rise on the surface-water and groundwater systems.

  1. HIV testing among sexually active Hispanic/Latino MSM in Miami-Dade County and New York City: opportunities for increasing acceptance and frequency of testing.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Heather A; Belcher, Lisa; O'Donnell, Lydia; Fernandez, M Isabel; Spikes, Pilgrim S; Flores, Stephen A

    2014-11-01

    HIV testing behavior is important in understanding the high rates of undiagnosed infection among Hispanic/Latino men who have sex with men (MSM). Correlates of repeat/recent testing (within the past year and ≥5 tests during lifetime) and test avoidance (never or >5 years earlier) were examined among 608 sexually active Hispanic/Latino MSM (Miami-Dade County and New York City). Those who reported repeat/recent testing were more likely to have incomes over $30,000, speak English predominately, and have visited and disclosed same-sex behavior to a health care provider (HCP) in the past year. Those who were classified as test avoiders were less likely to have incomes over $10,000 and to have seen an HCP in the past year. The main reason for not testing (in both groups) was fear of HIV positivity; however, twice as many test avoiders considered this their main reason, and more test avoiders had confidentiality concerns. Results suggest that messages to encourage testing among Hispanic/Latino MSM may be most effective if past testing patterns and reasons for not testing are considered. HCPs can play an important role by consistently offering HIV tests to MSM and tailoring messages based on prior testing histories. PMID:24920606

  2. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 4): Munisport Landfill site, Dade County, North Miami, FL. (First remedial action), July 1990. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-26

    The 291-acre Munisport Landfill site, including a 170-acre, inactive municipal landfill, is within the city of North Miami, Dade County, Florida. The city of North Miami leased 291 acres to Munisport for recreational development in 1971 which began filling low-lying areas of the site with clean fill and construction debris. In 1975, a temporary permit allowed solid waste to be used as fill above the water table. However, in 1976, a State inspection found twelve 55-gallon drums that were leaking wastes onsite; a violation was issued, and these drums were removed offsite by the city. Landfilling operations ceased in 1981, but closure has not yet taken place. Leachate from the landfill waste still poses a significant threat to the aquatic organisms in the Mangrove Preserve. The ground water is no longer used for potable purposes as a result of salt water intrusion. The contaminants of concern affecting the ground water include VOCs such as benzene and toluene; other organics; metals, such as arsenic, chromium, and lead; and other inorganics.

  3. Digital data and geologic map of the Powder Mill Ferry Quadrangle, Shannon and Reynolds counties, Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McDowell, Robert C.; Harrison, Richard W.; Lagueux, Kerry M.

    2000-01-01

    The geology of the Powder Mill Ferry 7 1/2-minute quadrangle , Shannon and Reynolds Counties, Missouri was mapped from 1997 through 1998 as part of the Midcontinent Karst Systems and Geologic Mapping Project, Eastern Earth Surface Processes Team. The map supports the production of a geologic framework that will be used in hydrogeologic investigations related to potential lead and zinc mining in the Mark Twain National Forest adjacent to the Ozark National Scenic Riverways (National Park Service). Digital geologic coverages will be used by other federal and state agencies in hydrogeologic analyses of the Ozark karst system and in ecological models.

  4. Biological Conditions in Streams of Johnson County, Kansas, and Nearby Missouri, 2003 and 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poulton, Barry C.; Rasmussen, Teresa J.; Lee, Casey J.

    2007-01-01

    Johnson County is one of the fastest growing and most populated counties in Kansas. Urban development affects streams by altering stream hydrology, geomorphology, water chemistry, and habitat, which then can lead to adverse effects on fish and macroinvertebrate communities. In addition, increasing sources of contaminants in urbanizing streams results in public-health concerns associated with exposure to and consumption of contaminated water. Biological assessments, or surveys of organisms living in aquatic environments, are crucial components of water-quality programs because they provide an indication of how well water bodies support aquatic life. This fact sheet describes current biological conditions of Johnson County streams and characterizes stream biology relative to urban development. Biological conditions were evaluated by collecting macroinvertebrate samples from 15 stream sites in Johnson County, Kansas, in 2003 and 2004 (fig. 1). Data from seven additional sites, collected as part of a separate study with similar objectives in Kansas and Missouri (Wilkison and others, 2005), were evaluated to provide a more comprehensive assessment of watersheds that cross State boundaries. Land-use and water- and streambed-sediment-quality data also were used to evaluate factors that may affect macroinvertebrate communities. Metrics are indices used to measure, or evaluate, macroinvertebrate response to various factors such as human disturbance. Multimetric scores, which integrated 10 different metrics that measure various aspects of macroinvertebrate communities, including organism diversity, composition, tolerance, and feeding characteristics, were used to evaluate and compare biological health of Johnson County streams. This information is useful to city and county officials for defining current biological conditions, evaluating conditions relative to State biological criteria, evaluating effects of urbanization, developing effective water-quality management plans, and documenting changes in biological conditions and water quality.

  5. Surficial materials investigation at the Weldon Spring Training Area St. Charles County, Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Rueff, M.L. )

    1993-03-01

    The Weldon Spring Training Area at Weldon Spring, St. Charles County, Missouri, is a portion of the former Weldon Spring Ordnance Works (WSOW) where trinitrotoluene (TNT) and dinitrotoluene (DNT) were manufactured during World War II. Nitroaromatic contaminants remain on the Weldon Spring Training Area (WSTA) despite several attempts to decontaminate the property since closure of the ordnance works in 1945. Much of the former WSOW property has been added to the US Environmental Protection Agency's National Priorities List of Superfund sites. As a result, the US Army Corps of Engineers has initiated further efforts to decontaminate and remediate the property. One of the initial steps of an environmental remediation action is characterization of the geologic setting at the site. Characterization and detailed mapping of surficial material units define the soil types and their origin. This information is critical to decision-making during the clean-up, and assists in defining potential contaminant migration pathways. In 1991, the US Army Corps of Engineers, Kansas city District requested the Missouri Department of Natural Resources, Division of Geology and Land Survey (MDNR-DGLS) to identify the surficial material units in the approximately 1,700-acre WSTA site and to define their engineering properties. The 12-month study included exploratory trenching and soil borings to characterize the surficial material units, laboratory testing to determine engineering properties of each surficial material unit, and detailed mapping and cross sections of the surficial material units utilizing the MDNR-DGLS Geographic Information System (GIS).

  6. Dade recovery plant producing electricity

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-06-01

    The 3000 tons/day resource recovery plant in Dade County (Florida) is described. Following a year-long contract dispute, the plant is said to be ready to: (1) accept four types of waste; (2) produce refuse-derived fuel; and (3) generate electricity for sale to Florida Power and Light at a rate of 285 million kilowatt hrs/year. Waste accepted include: (1) regular household garbage; (2) trash wastes including commercial refuse, furniture, rubber tires, appliances, tree cuttings, and other bulky items; (3) pathological wastes from hospitals and health centers; and (4) demolition materials which are routed directly to a landfill. The plant cost $165 million to construct and occupies 120 acres including 80 acres of landfill. The hydrasposal system includes four pulpers used to produce refuse-derived fuel (4300 Btu/lb). Flotation tanks and jigs are used to separate aluminium and non-ferrous metals (which are sold for recycling). The plant is described as having the potential of disposing of 60% of all the household and commercial solid wastes generated in Dade County. (MJJ)

  7. Computation of the time-varying flow rate from an artesian well in central Dade County, Florida, by analytical and numerical simulation methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Merritt, Michael L.

    1995-01-01

    To construct a digital simulation of a plume of brackish water in the surficial Biscayne aquifer of central Dade County, Florida, that originated from a flowing artesian well, it was necessary to quantify the rate of spillage and the consequent point-source loading of the aquifer. However, a flow-rate measurement (2,350 gallons per minute) made 2 months after drilling of the well in 1944 was inconsistent with later measurements (1,170 gallons per minute) in 1964, 1965, and 1969. Possible explanations were the: (1) drawdown of the aquifer over time; (2) raising of the altitude at which the water was discharged; (3) installation of 80 feet of 8-inch liner; (4) an increase in the density of the flowing water; and (5) gradual deterioration of the well casing. The first approach to reconciling the measured flow rates was to apply a form of the equation for constant-drawdown analysis often used to estimate aquifer transmissivity. Next, a numerical simulation analysis was made that pro- vided the means to account for friction loss in the well and recharge across vertically adjacent con- fining layers and from lateral boundaries. The numerical analysis required the construction of a generalized model of the subsurface from the surficial Biscayne aquifer to the cavernous, dolomitic Boulder Zone at a depth of 3,000 feet. Calibration of the generalized flow model required that the moddle confining unit of the Floridan aquifer system separating the artesian flow zone in the Upper Floridan aquifer from the Lower Floridan aquifer (the Boulder Zone) have a vertical hydraulic conductivity of at least 1 foot per day. The intermediate confining unit separating the flow zone from the surficial Biscayne aquifer was assigned a much lower hydraulic conductivity (0.01 foot per day or less). The model indicated that the observed mounding of Upper Floridan aquifer heads along the axis of the Florida Peninsula was related to the variable depth of the freshwater and brackish-water zone overlying deeper saline water. The analyses only partly reconciled the two rates. The second rate was accepted as representative of the con- ditions prevailing at the time of its measurement. On the basis of flowmeter logging, it was assumed that an additional 230 gallons per minute escaped through the corroded casing at that time. Factors not amenable to analysis, such as the inherent inaccuracy of the method of estimating flow from the well and possible error in estimating losses through the casing, could easily account for the remainder of the difference between the two measured rates.

  8. Water-quality data for the Missouri River and Missouri River alluvium near Weldon Spring, St. Charles County, Missouri, 1991--92

    SciTech Connect

    Kleeschulte, M.J.

    1993-12-31

    This report contains the water-quality data collected at two cross sections across the Missouri River and from monitoring wells in the Missouri River alluvium near Defiance, Missouri. The sampling results indicate the general water composition from the Missouri River changes with different flow conditions. During low-base flow conditions, the water generally contained about equal quantities of calcium and sodium plus potassium and similar quantities of bicarbonate and sulfate. During high-base flow conditions, water from the river predominantly was a calcium bicarbonate type. During runoff conditions, the water from the river was a calcium bicarbonate type, and sulfate concentrations were larger than during high-base flow conditions but smaller than during low-base flow conditions. The total and dissolved uranium concentrations at both the upstream and downstream cross sections, as well as from the different vertical samples across the river, were similar during each sampling event. However, sodium, sulfate, nitrate, and total and dissolved uranium concentrations varied with different flow conditions. Sodium and sulfate concentrations were larger during low-base flow conditions than during high-base flow or runoff conditions, while nitrate concentrations decreased during low-base flow conditions. Both total and dissolved uranium concentrations were slightly larger during runoff events than during low-base or high-base flow conditions.

  9. Origins and delineation of saltwater intrusion in the Biscayne aquifer and changes in the distribution of saltwater in Miami-Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prinos, Scott T.; Wacker, Michael A.; Cunningham, Kevin J.; Fitterman, David V.

    2014-01-01

    Intrusion of saltwater into parts of the shallow karst Biscayne aquifer is a major concern for the 2.5 million residents of Miami-Dade County that rely on this aquifer as their primary drinking water supply. Saltwater intrusion of this aquifer began when the Everglades were drained to provide dry land for urban development and agriculture. The reduction in water levels caused by this drainage, combined with periodic droughts, allowed saltwater to flow inland along the base of the aquifer and to seep directly into the aquifer from the canals. The approximate inland extent of saltwater was last mapped in 1995. An examination of the inland extent of saltwater and the sources of saltwater in the aquifer was completed during 2008–2011 by using (1) all available salinity information, (2) time-series electromagnetic induction log datasets from 35 wells, (3) time-domain electromagnetic soundings collected at 79 locations, (4) a helicopter electromagnetic survey done during 2001 that was processed, calibrated, and published during the study, (5) cores and geophysical logs collected from 8 sites for stratigraphic analysis, (6) 8 new water-quality monitoring wells, and (7) analyses of 69 geochemical samples. The results of the study indicate that as of 2011 approximately 1,200 square kilometers (km2) of the mainland part of the Biscayne aquifer were intruded by saltwater. The saltwater front was mapped farther inland than it was in 1995 in eight areas totaling about 24.1 km2. In many of these areas, analyses indicated that saltwater had encroached along the base of the aquifer. The saltwater front was mapped closer to the coast than it was in 1995 in four areas totaling approximately 6.2 km2. The changes in the mapped extent of saltwater resulted from improved spatial information, actual movement of the saltwater front, or a combination of both. Salinity monitoring in some of the canals in Miami-Dade County between 1988 and 2010 indicated influxes of saltwater, with maximum salinities ranging from 1.4 to 32 practical salinity units (PSU) upstream of the salinity control structures. Time-series electromagnetic induction log data from monitoring wells G–3601, G–3608, and G–3701, located adjacent to the Biscayne, Snapper Creek, and Black Creek Canals, respectively, and upstream of the salinity control structures, indicated shallow influxes of conductive water in the aquifer that likely resulted from leakage of brackish water or saltwater from these canals. The determination that saltwater influxes were recent is supported by the similarity in the oxygen and hydrogen stable isotope composition in samples from the Snapper Creek Canal, 1.6 kilometers (km) inland of a salinity control structure, and in samples from well G–3608, which is adjacent to the canal, as well as by the relative ages of the water sampled from well G–3608 and other wells open to the aquifer below the saltwater interface. Historical and recent salinity information from the Card Sound Road Canal, monitoring well FKS8 located adjacent to the canal, and the 2001 helicopter electromagnetic survey indicated that saltwater may occasionally leak from this canal as far inland as 15 km. This leakage may be prevented or reduced by a salinity control structure that was installed in May 2010. Saltwater also may have leaked from the Princeton Canal. Results of geochemical sampling and analysis indicate a close correspondence between droughts and saltwater intrusion. Tritium/helium-3 apparent (piston-flow) ages determined from samples of saltwater with chloride concentrations of about 1,000 milligrams per liter (mg/L) or greater generally corresponded to a period during which droughts were frequent. Comparison of average daily air temperatures in Miami, Florida, with estimates of recharge temperatures determined from the dissolved gas composition in water samples indicated that saltwater likely entered the aquifer in April or early May when water levels are typically at their lowest during the year. Conversely, most of the samples of freshwater with chloride concentrations less than about 1,000 mg/L indicate recharge temperatures corresponding to air temperatures in mid to late May when rainfall and water levels in the aquifer increase, and the piston-flow ages of these samples correspond to wet years. The piston-flow ages of freshwater samples generally were younger than ages of samples of saltwater. Saltwater samples that were depleted in boron, magnesium, potassium, sodium, and sulfate, and enriched in calcium relative to the concentrations theoretically produced by freshwater/seawater mixing, generally were found to be associated with areas where saltwater had recently intruded. The calcium to (bicarbonate + sulfate) molar ratios (Ca/(HCO3+SO4)) of these samples generally were greater than 1. Saltwater samples from some of the monitoring wells, however, indicated little or no enrichment or depletion of these ions relative to the theoretical freshwater/seawater mixing line, and the Ca/(HCO3+SO4) molar ratios of these samples generally were less than 1. Results indicated that aquifer materials are approaching equilibrium with seawater at these well locations.

  10. 40 CFR 81.326 - Missouri.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    .... Louis areas are maintenance areas for the 1-hour NAAQS for purposes of 40 CFR part 51 subpart X... affecting § 81.326 see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the... County Christian County Crawford County Dade County Dallas County Dent County Douglas County...

  11. 40 CFR 81.326 - Missouri.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    .... Louis areas are maintenance areas for the 1-hour NAAQS for purposes of 40 CFR part 51 subpart X... affecting § 81.326 see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the... County Christian County Crawford County Dade County Dallas County Dent County Douglas County...

  12. Cancer mortality and the method of chlorination of public drinking water: St. Louis City and St. Louis County, Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Marienfeld, C.J.; Collins, M.; Wright, H.; Reddy, R.; Shoop, G.; Rust, P.

    1986-09-01

    St. Louis City and St. Louis County, Missouri share the same public drinking water source, namely the Missouri River. The all cancer and most organ specific cancer mortality rates have been consistently and considerably higher for St. Louis City than for St. Louis County for the period 1960 through 1972. A change in the St. Louis County water treatment process, which included increasing the chlorine dosage and delaying the addition of ammonia to form chloramines until just prior to distribution, was instituted in 1955. St. Louis City has, by contrast, continued the lower chlorine level and early ammoniation. Trend analysis using the period 1960-67 and 1972-76 showed higher percentage as well as net cancer mortality rate per million increases for large bowel, liver and bladder cancers for St. Louis County. An apparent association between a probable increase in trihalomethane production in the St. Louis County water since 1955 and an increase in these specific cancer rates which exceed the increases in the St. Louis City rates appears to have been shown. This does not imply causality but is in general agreement with other studies which have examined water chlorination and cancer mortality.

  13. Effects of two stormwater management methods on the quality of water in the upper Biscayne aquifer at two commercial areas in Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKenzie, D.J.; Irwin, G.A.

    1988-01-01

    This study is part of a continued effort to assess the effects of urban stormwater recharge on the water quality of the Biscayne aquifer in southeast Florida. In this report, the water-quality effects on shallow ground water resulting from stormwater disposal by exfiltration trench and grassy swale were investigated at two small commercial areas in Dade County, Florida. One study area (airport ) was located near the Miami International Airport and had a drainage area of about 10 acres overlying a sandy soil; the other study area ( free zone ) was located at the Miami International Free Trade Zone and had a drainage area of about 20 acres overlying limestone. The monitoring design for each study area consisted of seven sites and included water-quality sampling of the stormwater in the catch basin of the exfiltration trench, ground water from two wells 1 foot from the trench (trench wells), two wells 20 feet from the trench, and ground water from two wells at the swale from April 1985 through May 1986. Eleven water-quality variables (target variables) commonly found in high levels in urban stormwater runoff were used as tracers to estimate possible changes in ground-water quality that may have been caused by stormwater recharge. Comparison of the distribution of target variables indicated that the concentrations tended to be greater in the stormwater in the exfiltration trench than in water from the two wells 1 foot from the trench at both study areas. The concentration difference for several target variables was statistically significant at the 5-percent level. Lead, for example, had median concentrations of 23 and 4 micrograms per liter, respectively, in stormwater and water from the two trench wells at the airport study area, and 38 and 2 micrograms per liter, respectively, in stormwater and groundwater at the free zone. Similar reductions in concentrations between stormwater and water from the two trench wells were indicated for zinc at both study areas and also for nitrogen, phosphorus, and organic content at the free zone. This trend suggested that the exfiltration trench at both study areas may function as a partial trap for some chemical substances present in stormwater. A comparison of the distribution of the 11 target variables and major ionic composition in water from the two trench wells and the two wells 20 feet from the trench did not indicate a notable horizontal stratification at either study area. A vertical difference between 10 and 15 feet, however, was indicated at the free zone with major ions in greater concentrations at 15 feet. The vertical variability in groundwater near the trench at the free zone may have been the result of stormwater dilution in the upper (10-foot ) zone. The groundwater quality at the swale was quite dissimilar to that near the exfiltration trench at both the airport and free zone study areas. Data indicated that the groundwater environment at both sales was anaerobic as evidenced by abundant ammonia nitrogen and iron and trace levels of sulfate. Anaerobic conditions at the swale may have been the result of poor drainage and high organic content of soils. Significant biochemical cycling in the ground water at the swales precluded any assessment of quality effects that may result from storm-water infiltration.

  14. Evaluation of Emerging Contaminants of Concern at the South District Wastewater Treatment Plant Based on Seasonal Events, Miami-Dade County, Florida, 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lietz, Arthur C.; Meyer, Michael T.

    2006-01-01

    The Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan has identified highly treated wastewater as a possible water source for the restoration of natural water flows and hydroperiods in selected coastal areas, including the Biscayne Bay coastal wetlands. One potential source of reclaimed wastewater for the Biscayne Bay coastal wetlands is the effluent from the South District Wastewater Treatment Plant in southern Miami-Dade County. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan Wastewater Reuse Technology Pilot Project Delivery Team, initiated a study to assess the presence of emerging contaminants of concern in the South District Wastewater Treatment Plant influent and effluent using current wastewater-treatment methods. As part of the study, 24-hour composite and discrete samples were collected at six locations (influent at plants 1 and 2, effluent pump, reuse train, chlorine dioxide unit, and ultraviolet pilot unit) at the plant during: (1) a dry-season, low-flow event on March 2-3, 2004, with an average inflow rate of 83.7 million gallons per day; (2) a wet-season, average-flow event on July 20-21, 2004, with an average inflow rate of 89.7 million gallons per day; and (3) high-rate disinfection tests on October 5 and 20, 2004, with average flow rates of 84.1 and 119.6 million gallons per day, respectively. During these four sampling events, 26, 27, 29, and 35 constituents were detected, respectively. The following transformations in concentration were determined in the waste stream: -100 to 180 percent at the effluent pump and -100 to 85 percent at the reuse train on March 2-3, 2004, and -100 to 1,609 percent at the effluent pump and -100 to 832 percent at the reuse train on July 20-21, 2004; -100 to -37 percent at the effluent pump, -100 to -62 percent at the reuse train, -100 to -56 percent at the chlorine dioxide unit, and -100 to -40 percent at the ultraviolet pilot unit on October 5, 2004; and -100 to -4 percent at the effluent pump, -100 to 17 percent at the reuse train, -100 to -40 percent at the chlorine dioxide unit, and -100 to -14 percent at the ultraviolet pilot unit on October 20, 2004. Samples were tested for detection of household and industrial (organic) wastewater compounds, pharmaceutical compounds, antibiotic compounds, and hormones in influent. Two 'known' endocrine disrupting compounds?17 beta-estradiol (E2) and diethoxynonylphenol? and four 'suspected' endocrine-disrupting compounds?1,4-dichlorobenzene, benzophenone, tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate, and tris(dichloroisopropyl) phosphate?were detected during these sampling events. Phenanthrene and indole showed the greatest concentration ranges and highest concentrations for the organic wastewater compounds. Acetaminophen showed the greatest concentration range and highest concentration, and warfarin showed the smallest concentration range for the pharmaceutical compounds. Sulfamethoxazole (a sulfonamide) showed the greatest concentration range and highest concentration, and sulfathiozole (also a sulfonamide) showed the smallest concentration range for the antibiotic compounds. Two hormones, 17 beta-estradiol (E2) and estrone (E1), were detected in influent. Samples were also tested for detection of organic wastewater compounds, pharmaceutical compounds, antibiotic compounds, and hormones in effluent. Indole showed the greatest concentration range and highest concentration, and triphenyl phosphate showed the smallest concentration range for the organic wastewater compounds. Dehydronifedipine showed the greatest concentration range and highest concentration, and warfarin had the smallest concentration range for the pharmaceutical compounds. Anhydro-erythromycin (a macrolide degradation product) showed the greatest concentration range, and sulfadiazine (a sulfonamide) and tetracycline showed the lowest concentration ranges for the antibiotic compounds. One hormone, 17 beta-estradiol (E2), was det

  15. Factors Affecting Compliance With Colorectal Cancer Screening Among Households Residing in the Largely Haitian Community of Little Haiti, Miami-Dade County, Florida

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Meredith Leigh; Acuña, Juan Manuel; de la Vega, Pura Rodriguez; Castro, Grettel; Madhivanan, Purnima

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The United States Black population is disproportionately affected by colorectal cancer (CRC) in terms of incidence and mortality. Studies suggest that screening rates are lower among Blacks compared with non-Hispanic Whites (NHWs). However, studies on CRC screening within Black subgroups are lacking. This study examined disparities in blood stool test (BST) compliance and colonoscopy use by race/ethnicity (Haitian, NHW, non-Hispanic Black [NHB], and Hispanic) among randomly selected households in Little Haiti, Miami-Dade County, Florida. This study used cross-sectional, health and wellness data from a random-sample, population-based survey conducted within 951 households in Little Haiti between November 2011 and December 2012. BST compliance and colonoscopy use were self-reported and defined, conservatively, as the use of BST within the past 2 years and the ever use of colonoscopy by any household member. Factors associated with BST compliance and colonoscopy use were identified using logistic regression models. Analyses were restricted to households containing at least 1 member ≥50 years (n = 666). Nearly half of the households were compliant with BST (rate [95% confidence interval (CI)] = 45% [41%–49%]) and completed colonoscopy (rate [95% CI] = 53% [49%–58%]). Compliance with BST was not associated with race/ethnicity (P = 0.76). Factors independently associated with BST compliance included low educational attainment (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 0.63, P = 0.03), being single (AOR = 0.47, P = 0.004), retirement (AOR = 1.96, P = 0.01), and the presence of diagnosed health problems (AOR = 1.24, P = 0.01). Colonoscopy use was lower among Haitian households (46%) compared with NHW (63%), NHB (62%), and Hispanic households (54%) (P = 0.002). Factors independently associated with colonoscopy use included identifying as NHB (compared with Haitian) (AOR = 1.80, P = 0.05), being single (AOR = 0.44, P = 0.001), retirement (AOR = 1.86, P = 0.02), lack of continuous insurance (AOR = 0.45, P < 0.001), and the presence of diagnosed health problems (AOR = 1.44, P < 0.001) and physical limitations/disabilities (AOR = 1.88, P = 0.05). Compliance with BST and use of colonoscopy are low within households in the Little Haiti community. Significant disparities in the use of colonoscopy exist between Haitian and NHB households. Barriers and facilitators of colonoscopy within each racial/ethnic group need to be identified as the next step to developing culturally appropriate, community-based interventions aimed at increasing colonoscopy use in this large minority population. PMID:25950687

  16. Development, description, and application of a geographic information system data base for water resources in Karst Terrane in Greene County, Missouri. Water resources investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Waite, L.A.; Thomson, K.C.

    1993-12-31

    A geographic information system data base was developed for Greene County, Missouri, to provide data for use in the planning for the protection of water resources. The data base contains the following map layers: geology, cave entrances and passages, county and quadrangle boundary, dye traces, faults, geographic names, hypsography, hydrography, lineaments. Ozark aquifer potentiometric surface, public land survey system, sinkholes, soils, springs, and transportation.

  17. Ground-water flow and ground- and surface-water interaction at the Weldon Spring quarry, St. Charles County, Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Imes, J.L.; Kleeschulte, M.J.

    1997-12-31

    Ground-water-level measurements to support remedial actions were made in 37 piezometers and 19 monitoring wells during a 19-month period to assess the potential for ground-water flow from an abandoned quarry to the nearby St. Charles County well field, which withdraws water from the base of the alluvial aquifer. From 1957 to 1966, low-level radioactive waste products from the Weldon Spring chemical plant were placed in the quarry a few hundred feet north of the Missouri River alluvial plain. Uranium-based contaminants subsequently were detected in alluvial ground water south of the quarry. During all but flood conditions, lateral ground-water flow in the bedrock from the quarry, as interpreted from water-table maps, generally is southwest toward Little Femme Osage Creek or south into the alluvial aquifer. After entering the alluvial aquifer, the ground water flows southeast to east toward a ground-water depression presumably produced by pumping at the St. Charles County well field. The depression position varies depending on the Missouri River stage and probably the number and location of active wells in the St. Charles County well field.

  18. Late Holocene and modern pollen records from three sites in Shannon and Carter Counties, southeast Missouri Ozarks

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, J.K. . Archaeometry Lab.)

    1993-03-01

    Palynological investigations of a small sinkhole bog (Buttonbush Bog) and two archaeological sites (Round Spring Shelter, Round Spring Site 23SH19 and Gooseneck Site 23CT54) located in Shannon and Carter counties, Missouri provide a 3,100 year record of vegetational change. Bryophytic polsters and surface samples were also collected in Shannon and Carter counties in the southeast Missouri Ozarks to determine modern pollen rain. A 302-cm core retrieved from Buttonbush Bog has a basal data of 3,130 [+-] 100 yr B.P. and a date of 1,400 [+-] 100 yr B.P. at 52--56 cm. The Buttonbush Bog pollen sequence is divided into three pollen-assemblage zones. The pollen spectra from Buttonbush Bog indicate that pine did not become well established in the southeast Missouri Ozarks until after 3,100 yr B.P. Zone 1 (the oldest) represents a mixed oak forest with minor components of pine and hickory. In Zone 2, pine values increase, indicating a shift to a pine-oak forest. The pollen sequence from Round Spring Shelter is divided into two pollen-assemblage zones. The lower zone (Zone 1) suggests the presence of a pine-oak forest in the vicinity of Round Spring prior to an Ambrosia rise at the top of the sequence in Zone 2. Regional pollen rain and variation in the local pollen rain are reflected by modern pollen spectra extracted from the bryophytic polsters surface samples. In this area the average regional pollen rain is dominated by pine, oak, hickory, and Ambrosia. The data are consistent with the mosaic of pine-oak and oak-hickory-pine forests characteristic of this region.

  19. Mineralogy and ore textures at the Iron Mountain mine, St. Francois County, Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Dudley, M.A.; Hagni, R.D. )

    1993-03-01

    The Iron Mountain mine, located in the St. Francois Mountains of southeast Missouri, approximately 80 miles southwest of St. Louis, Missouri, has been the third largest iron producer in Missouri. It is one of six known major iron deposits in the Southeast Missouri Iron Metallogenic Province. The deposit is in the form of a unique inverted cup-shaped body, and it is hosted by volcanic flows of Middle Proterozoic age. The iron mineralization occurred during Precambrian time as shown by the presence of pebbles of iron ore in the overlying Cambrian sediments. A study has been initiated based on drill core samples and data donated to the Missouri Geological Survey. Drill cores from more than 1,000 exploratory holes are available. Core samples from selected drill holes are being studied using various analytical, petrographic, ore microscopic, and geochemical methods. Hematite and, to a lesser extent, magnetite are the main ore minerals. The most abundant gangue minerals are andradite, quartz, calcite, actinolite, apatite, epidote, and chlorite. The ore occurs in two modes: massive veins and as matrix between brecciated host rock. Some of the veins exhibit crustiform ore and gangue mineral textures. Host rock alteration is uncommon, and in most places the contact with the ore is quite sharp. The objectives of this study are to examine the ore and gangue mineralogy, determine the causes of brecciation, utilize ore textural information to evaluate the relative roles of hydrothermal and magmatic processes in the origin of the deposit, and explore the relationships between the Iron Mountain deposit and, other iron deposits in Missouri, and assess how the deposit fits in with the Olympic Dam model.

  20. HYDROLOGIC CHARACTERIZATION OF TWO KARST RECHARGE AREAS IN BOONE COUNTY, MISSOURI

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Bonne Femme watershed, located in central Missouri, is a karst watershed in a rapidly urbanizing area. This study was undertaken to characterize the hydrology of two karst aquifers within this watershed before significant increases in impervious surface have occurred. The specific objectives of...

  1. Water-quality assessment and wastewater-management alternatives for Dardenne Creek in St Charles County, Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berkas, W.R.; Lodderhose, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    The quality of water in the 15 mile downstream reach of Dardenne Creek in St. Charles County, Missouri, was assessed to determine if it met the Missouri water quality standards. Concentrations of dissolved oxygen and total ammonia failed to meet water quality standards downstream from the Harvester-Dardenne and St. Peters Wastewater-Treatment Plants. The QUAL-II SEMCOG water quality model was calibrated and verified using two independent data sets from Dardenne Creek. Management alternatives using current, design capacity, and future expansion wastewater discharges from the St. Peters Wastewater-Treatment Plant were evaluated. Results of the computer simulation indicate that a nitrification-type advanced-treatment facility installed at the plant would produce a 5-day carbonaceous biochemical oxygen demand of 10 mg/L. An effluent limit of 5.0 mg/L of 5-day carbonaceous biochemical oxygen demand would further improve the water quality of Dardenne Creek; however, an additional treatment process, such as sand filtration, would be needed to meet this criterion. (USGS)

  2. Association of individual and systemic barriers to optimal medical care in people living with HIV/AIDS in Miami-Dade County.

    PubMed

    Wawrzyniak, Andrew J; Rodríguez, Allan E; Falcon, Anthony E; Chakrabarti, Anindita; Parra, Alexa; Park, Jane; Mercogliano, Kathleen; Villamizar, Kira; Kolber, Michael A; Feaster, Daniel J; Metsch, Lisa R

    2015-05-01

    Barriers to retention in HIV care are detrimental to patients' progress along the HIV continuum of care. Previous literature has focused on individual, client-level barriers, and interventions to address them. In contrast, less work has examined the role of system-level barriers on HIV care outcomes. This study seeks to understand how individual and systemic barriers individually are associated with clinic appointment attendance and virologic suppression in HIV-infected patients attending the largest HIV clinic in Miami-Dade, FL. In addition, we examined the synergistic effects of these barriers as potential syndemic factors on these health outcomes. Barriers to clinic attendance were determined in a face-to-face study interview with 444 HIV-infected outpatients (187 regular attenders, 191 irregular attenders, and 66 nonattenders) identified from electronic medical records. Compared with the other attendance groups, nonattenders had higher viral loads, were less likely to be virologically suppressed, had lower CD4 counts, had higher depressive symptoms, life chaos, lower quality of life, and higher rates of food insecurity, and recent drug use. Additionally, nonattenders compared with regular attenders had lower physician relationship ratings, had lower medical information clarity and more often reported transportation as a barrier to clinic attendance. When viewed as a syndemic, compared with patients not reporting any barriers, patients with 3 or more individual-level barriers were more likely to have a detectable viral load (odds ratio = 3.60, 95% CI: 1.71 to 7.61). Our findings suggest that patients presenting to the clinic with multiple barriers should be prioritized for assistance and future interventions to improve retention in care. Interventions should address multiple individual and system-level barriers simultaneously with particular attention to addressing depressive symptoms, organizational skills, relationship with the physician, and HIV-related health education. PMID:25867780

  3. The Association of Individual and Systemic Barriers to Optimal Medical Care in People Living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) in Miami-Dade County

    PubMed Central

    Wawrzyniak, Andrew J.; Rodríguez, Allan E.; Falcon, Anthony E.; Chakrabarti, Anindita; Parra, Alexa; Park, Jane; Mercogliano, Kathleen; Villamizar, Kira; Kolber, Michael A.; Feaster, Daniel J.; Metsch, Lisa R.

    2015-01-01

    Barriers to retention in HIV care are detrimental to patients’ progress along the HIV continuum of care. Previous literature has focused on individual, client-level barriers and interventions to address them. In contrast, less work has examined the role of system-level barriers on HIV care outcomes. The present study seeks to understand how individual and systemic barriers individually are associated with clinic appointment attendance and virologic suppression in HIV-infected patients attending the largest HIV clinic in Miami-Dade, Florida. In addition, we examined the synergistic effects of these barriers as potential syndemic factors on these health outcomes. Barriers to clinic attendance were determined in a face-to-face study interview with 444 HIV-infected outpatients (187 regular attenders, 191 irregular attenders, 66 non-attenders) identified from electronic medical records. Compared to the other attendance groups, non-attenders had higher viral loads, were less likely to be virologically suppressed, had lower CD4 counts, had higher depressive symptoms, life chaos, lower quality of life, and higher rates of food insecurity and recent drug use. Additionally, non-attenders compared to regular attenders had lower physician relationship ratings, had lower medical information clarity, and more often reported transportation as a barrier to clinic attendance. When viewed as a syndemic, compared to patients not reporting any barriers, patients with three or more individual-level barriers were more likely to have a detectable viral load (OR = 3.60, 95%CI [1.71, 7.61]). Our findings suggest that patients presenting to the clinic with multiple barriers should be prioritized for assistance and future interventions to improve retention in care. Interventions should address multiple individual and system level barriers simultaneously with particular attention to addressing depressive symptoms, organizational skills, relationship with the physician, and HIV-related health education. PMID:25867780

  4. Development, description, and application of a geographic information system data base for water resources in karst terrane in Greene County, Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waite, L.A.; Thomson, Kenneth C.

    1993-01-01

    A geographic information system data base was developed for Greene County, Missouri, to provide data for use in the protection of water resources. The geographic information system data base contains the following map layers: geology, cave entrances and passages, county and quadrangle boundary, dye traces, faults, geographic names, hypsography, hydrography, lineaments, Ozark aquifer potentio- metric surface, public land survey system, sink- holes, soils, springs, and transportation. Several serious incidents of ground-water contamination have been reported in the karst terrane developed in soluble carbonate rocks in Greene County. Karst terranes are environmentally sensitive because any contaminant carried by surface runoff has the potential for rapid transport through solution enlarged fractures to the ground-water system. In the karst terrane in Greene County, about 2,500 sinkholes have been located; these sinkholes are potential access points for contamination to the ground-water system. Recent examples of ground-water contamination by sewage, fertilizers, and hydrocarbon chemicals have demonstrated the sensitivity of ground water in the Greene County karst terrane to degradation. The ground-water system is a major source of drinking water for Greene County. The population in Greene County, which includes Springfield, the third largest city in Missouri, is rapidly increasing and the protection of the water resources of Greene County is an increasing concern.

  5. Hydrologic data for the Weldon Spring radioactive waste-disposal sites, St. Charles County, Missouri; 1984-1986

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kleeschulte, M.J.; Emmett, L.F.; Barks, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    Hydrologic and water quality data were collected during an investigation of the Weldon Spring radioactive waste disposal sites and surroundings area in St. Charles County, Missouri, from 1984 to 1986. The data consists of water quality analyses of samples collected from 45 groundwater and 27 surface water sites. This includes analyses of water from four raffinate pits and from the Weldon Spring quarry. Also included in the report are the results of a seepage run on north flowing tributaries to Dardenne Creek from Kraut Run to Crooked Creek. Mean daily discharge from April 1985 to April 1986 is given for two springs located about 1.5 mi north of the chemical plant. (USGS)

  6. Health assessment for Times Beach Site, Times Beach, St. Louis County, Missouri, Region 7. CERCLIS No. MOD980685226. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-02-19

    The Times Beach National Priorities List site is situated on the banks of the Meramec River in St. Louis County, about 30 miles southwest of St. Louis, Missouri. The roads within the City of Times Beach have been contaminated with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). After the 1982 flood, the City of Times Beach was evacuated and access has been restricted to only authorized personnel. Potential exposure pathways that could result from the site include ingestion of contaminated soil and fish or game animals that have bioconcentrated TCDD, dermal absorption upon contact with tainted soil, and inhalation of TCDD-entrained fugitive dusts. Flooding of Times Beach in 1982, 1983, and 1985 may have resulted in the migration of some TCDD off-site into the Meramec River. The levels of TCDD at the site are of concern and warrant continued site-access control, prevention of sediment runoff, and eventual removal of the TCDD.

  7. Preliminary investigation of groundwater occurrences in the Weldon Spring area, St. Charles County, Missouri. Further notes on problems of the Weldon Spring area, Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, C.M.; Theis, C.V.

    1983-06-01

    Groundwater occurrences in the area of Weldon Springs Ordnance Works, Weldon Springs, Missouri, to determine the subsurface conditions controlling its movement as a prerequisite to the location and design of structures contemplated by the Atomic Energy Commission. (ACR)

  8. Water-quality assessment of Peruque Creek, St Charles County, Missouri, July 1983 and July 1984

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berkas, W.R.

    1987-01-01

    Physical, chemical, and biological data collected along the downstream 24.1-river-mi reach of Peruque Creek, Missouri, on July 18-19, 1983 and July 9-10, 1984, were used to characterize the water quality conditions in the creek. Wastewater discharges into the creek at the Lake St. Louis sewage-disposal ponds and at the O'Fallon wastewater-treatment facility. The effluent from the sewage disposal ponds did not have a substantial effect on downstream water quality but that from the wastewater treatment facility caused the Missouri un-ionized ammonia standard of 0.1 mg/l as nitrogen to be exceeded downstream from the outflow. Discharge from the O'Fallon facility also caused all dissolved-oxygen concentrations measured downstream from the outflow to be less than the Missouri dissolved-oxygen standard of 5.0 mg/L. Attempts were made to calibrate and verify the QUAL-II/SEMCOG version water quality model. The model could not be adequately calibrated or verified, because of the non-uniform hydraulic conditions in Peruque Creek, which is characterized by slow velocities; long, deep pools; and inadequate mixing characteristics; and also the non-uniform quantity and quality of effluent discharged from the O'Fallon wastewater treatment facility. Thus, the assumptions of one-dimensional flow and steady-state conditions necessary for the model were not valid. The attempt to calibrate and verify the model indicated that during low-flow conditions the waste-load assimilative capacity of the downstream 17.9 river miles of Peruque Creek was limited. (USGS)

  9. Dieldrin and heptachlor residues in dead gray bats, Franklin County, Missouri--1976 versus 1977

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, D.R., Jr.; LaVal, R.K.; Krynitsky, A.J.

    1980-01-01

    Lethal dieldrin concentrations were found in the brains of dead gray bats (Myotis grisescens) collected during 1976 and 1977 beneath a maternity roost in a Missouri cave. In addition, residues of heptachlor epoxide, oxychlordane, cis-chlordane, and trans-nonachlor increased significantly in both brains and carcasses of bats collected during 1977. These increases appear to reflect a switch by local farmers from aldrin, dieldrin's parent compound, to heptachlor for the control of cutworms. They also constitute an additional threat to this colony of this endangered bat species.

  10. Pesticide contamination of endangered gray bats and their food base in Boone County, Missouri, 1982

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clawson, R.L.; Clark, D.R., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Gray bat guano from Devil's Icebox and Hunters Caves contained dieldrin at levels previously associated with gray bat mortality. Two of four gray bats found dead in Holton Cave had lethal brain concentrations of dieldrin. Twenty-five of 28 (86%) insect samples from bat foraging areas contained measurable dieldrin, heptachlor epoxide or both. Beetle samples were most heavily contaminated containing up to 2.2 ppm and 1.1 ppm heptachlor epoxide. The addition of Holton Cave brings to five the number of Missouri caves where gray bats have died of food chain pesticide poisoning.

  11. 78 FR 31998 - Missouri Disaster #MO-00064

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-28

    ... ADMINISTRATION Missouri Disaster MO-00064 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Missouri dated 05/21... the disaster: Primary Counties: Jefferson. Contiguous Counties: Missouri: Franklin, Saint...

  12. Study of secondhand smoke exposure in St. Louis City and County suggests need for comprehensive smoke-free Missouri law adoption.

    PubMed

    Moreland-Russell, Sarah; Cyr, Julianne; Benson, Peter; Colditz, Graham; Pulley, Deren; Barnoya, Joaquin

    2012-01-01

    This cross-sectional study provides information about secondhand smoke exposure across the St. Louis metro area and perceptions and attitudes about tobacco and health within the local hospitality industry. Results from this study support the need for passage and implementation of comprehensive smoke-free laws throughout Missouri, particularly in St. Louis City and County where efforts to pass comprehensive smoke-free laws have been unsuccessful. PMID:23362653

  13. Estimation of capture zones and drawdown at the Northwest and West Well Fields, Miami-Dade County, Florida, using an unconstrained Monte Carlo analysis: recent (2004) and proposed conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brakefield, Linzy K.; Hughes, Joseph D.; Langevin, Christian D.; Chartier, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Travel-time capture zones and drawdown for two production well fields, used for drinking-water supply in Miami-Dade County, southeastern Florida, were delineated by the U.S Geological Survey using an unconstrained Monte Carlo analysis. The well fields, designed to supply a combined total of approximately 250 million gallons of water per day, pump from the highly transmissive Biscayne aquifer in the urban corridor between the Everglades and Biscayne Bay. A transient groundwater flow model was developed and calibrated to field data to ensure an acceptable match between simulated and observed values for aquifer heads and net exchange of water between the aquifer and canals. Steady-state conditions were imposed on the transient model and a post-processing backward particle-tracking approach was implemented. Multiple stochastic realizations of horizontal hydraulic conductivity, conductance of canals, and effective porosity were simulated for steady-state conditions representative of dry, average and wet hydrologic conditions to calculate travel-time capture zones of potential source areas of the well fields. Quarry lakes, formed as a product of rock-mining activities, whose effects have previously not been considered in estimation of capture zones, were represented using high hydraulic-conductivity, high-porosity cells, with the bulk hydraulic conductivity of each cell calculated based on estimates of aquifer hydraulic conductivity, lake depths and aquifer thicknesses. A post-processing adjustment, based on calculated residence times using lake outflows and known lake volumes, was utilized to adjust particle endpoints to account for an estimate of residence-time-based mixing of lakes. Drawdown contours of 0.1 and 0.25 foot were delineated for the dry, average, and wet hydrologic conditions as well. In addition, 95-percent confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for the capture zones and drawdown contours to delineate a zone of uncertainty about the median estimates. Results of the Monte Carlo simulations indicate particle travel distances at the Northwest Well Field (NWWF) and West Well Field (WWF) are greatest to the west, towards the Everglades. The man-made quarry lakes substantially affect particle travel distances. In general near the NWWF, the capture zones in areas with lakes were smaller in areal extent than capture zones in areas without lakes. It is possible that contamination could reach the well fields quickly, within 10 days in some cases, if it were introduced into lakes nearest to supply wells, with one of the lakes being only approximately 650 feet from the nearest supply well. In addition to estimating drawdown and travel-time capture zones of 10, 30, 100, and 210 days for the NWWF and the WWF under more recent conditions, two proposed scenarios were evaluated with Monte Carlo simulations: the potential hydrologic effects of proposed Everglades groundwater seepage mitigation and quarry-lake expansion. The seepage mitigation scenario included the addition of two proposed anthropogenic features to the model: (1) an impermeable horizontal flow barrier east of the L-31N canal along the western model boundary between the Everglades and the urban areas of Miami-Dade County, and (2) a recharge canal along the Dade-Broward Levee near the NWWF. Capture zones and drawdown for the WWF were substantially affected by the addition of the barrier, which eliminates flow from the western boundary into the active model domain, shifting the predominant capture zone source area from the west more to the north and south. The 95-percent CI for the 210-day capture zone moved slightly in the NWWF as a result of the recharge canal. The lake-expansion scenario incorporated a proposed increase in the number and surface area of lakes by an additional 25 square miles. This scenario represents a 150-percent increase from the 2004 lake surface area near both well fields, but with the majority of increase proposed near the NWWF. The lake-expansion scenario substantially decreased the extent of the 210-day capture zone of the NWWF, which is limited to the lakes nearest the well field under proposed conditions.

  14. Assessment of Biological Conditions at Selected Stream Sites in Johnson County, Kansas, and Cass and Jackson Counties, Missouri, 2003 and 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poulton, Barry C.; Rasmussen, Teresa J.; Lee, Casey J.

    2007-01-01

    Macroinvertebrate samples were collected at 15 stream sites representing 11 different watersheds in Johnson County, Kansas, in 2003 and 2004 to assess biological conditions in streams and relations to environmental variables. Published data from an additional seven stream sites, one in Johnson County, Kansas, and six others in adjacent Cass and Jackson Counties in Missouri also were evaluated. Multimetric scores, which integrated a combination of measures that describe various aspects of biological community abundance and diversity, were used to evaluate and compare the biological health of streams. In addition, for 15 of 16 Johnson County stream sites, environmental data (streamflow, precipitation, and land use) and water- and sediment-quality data (primarily nutrients, indicator bacteria, and organic wastewater compounds) were used in statistical analyses to evaluate relations between macroinvertebrate metrics and variables that may affect them. The information is useful for defining current conditions, evaluating conditions relative to State aquatic-life support and total maximum daily load requirements, evaluating effects of urbanization, developing effective water-quality management plans, and documenting changes in biological condition and water quality. Biological conditions in selected Johnson County streams generally reflected a gradient in the degree of human disturbances upstream from the sites, including percentage of urban and agricultural land use as well as the presence, absence, and proximity of wastewater treatment discharges. In this report, the term gradient is used to describe a continuum in the conditions (biological, environmental, or land use) observed at the study sites. Upstream Blue River sites, downstream from primarily agricultural land use, consistently scored among the sites least impacted by human disturbance, and in some metrics these sites scored higher than the State reference site (Captain Creek). The term impact, as used in this report, refers to a negative biological response at a site associated with one or more human-induced sources of disturbance or stress. However, no sites, including the Captain Creek reference site, met Kansas Department of Health and Environment criteria for full support of aquatic life during the 2 years of sample collection. Upstream sites on Kill and Cedar Creeks also consistently scored among the least impacted. Sites less than 3 miles downstream from municipal wastewater treatment facility discharges (two Indian Creek sites) and sites with no wastewater discharge but with substantial impervious surface area within their respective watersheds (Tomahawk, Turkey, and Brush Creeks) consistently scored among the sites most impacted by human disturbance.

  15. The description of an effective sinkhole investigation approach: A case study of two sites in Greene County, Missouri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nwokebuihe, Stanley Chinedu

    Karst topographies pose danger to the environment. The associated gradual subsidence or sudden collapse of the ground can lead to loss of lives and damage to property. A sinkhole is the subsidence or collapse of the overburden into subsurface cavities. Sinkholes develop in different sizes, shapes and rates all over the world especially in areas where the bedrock can be dissolved by percolating slightly acidic surface water. Different methods have been used to investigate sinkholes. Boring is the most common of these methods. But the boring technique is quite inefficient; it only provides information of the subsurface conditions at the boring location thereby requiring multiple borings to more accurately characterize a sinkhole. Geophysical methods have also been used to investigate sinkholes including Gravity, Electromagnetic, Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW), Electrical Resistivity Tomography and Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR). But these methods work best in appropriate geological environments in mapping sinkholes. This project describes a framework for an efficient investigation of sinkholes. The study uses the combination of Aerial photographs, Topographic maps, geological maps and cross sections which are categorized as preliminary studies; appropriate geophysical methods (MASW and ERT) and a few borings to effectively characterize sinkholes. This approach was successfully applied in two case study sites located in Greene County, Missouri and is recommended for future sinkhole investigations where applicable.

  16. HANDBOOK OF OPERATION FOR THE SPECIAL SCHOOL DISTRICT OF ST. LOUIS COUNTY, MISSOURI.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saint Louis County Special School District Board of Education, Rock Hill, MO.

    A SPECIAL SCHOOL DISTRICT CREATED IN 1957 SERVES THE 25 SCHOOL DISTRICTS IN ST. LOUIS COUNTY. THE PHILOSOPHY AND ADMINISTRATIVE POLICIES OF THE DISTRICT ARE PRESENTED. A DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGICAL AND SOCIAL SERVICES SERVES CHILDREN IN SPECIAL CLASSES IN THE SPECIAL SCHOOL DISTRICT AND POTENTIAL CANDIDATES FOR CLASSES, AND ALSO OPERATES A PROGRAM…

  17. Technique for estimating the magnitude and frequency of floods in St. Louis County, Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spencer, Donald Webster; Alexander, Terry W.

    1978-01-01

    Equations and nomographs in this report can be used to estimate peak flood discharges having recurrence intervals up to 100 years in rural and urban areas of St. Louis County, MO. The basin characteristics significant at the 5-percent probability level were drainage area and percentage imperviousness. Drainage area can be measured from maps, while percentage of imperviousness can either be measured from aerial photographs or estimated from land-use projections. These equations are based upon the analysis of hydrologic data collected at 30 continuous-recording gaging stations with drainage areas ranging from 0.8 to 39.0 square miles, and with impervious areas ranging from 1 to 32 percent. (Woodard-USGS)

  18. 77 FR 17560 - Missouri Disaster #MO-00057

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-26

    ... ADMINISTRATION Missouri Disaster MO-00057 AGENCY: Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Missouri dated 03/15/2012..., Stone, Taney. Contiguous Counties: Missouri: Barry, Camden, Christian, Douglas, Greene, Hickory,...

  19. 78 FR 62326 - Missouri Disaster #MO-00067

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-16

    ... ADMINISTRATION Missouri Disaster MO-00067 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Missouri dated 10/08..., Taney. Contiguous Counties: Missouri: Camden, Christian, Douglas, Laclede, Maries, Miller, Ozark,...

  20. Chemistry of Selected Core Samples, Concentrate, Tailings, and Tailings Pond Waters: Pea Ridge Iron (-Lanthanide-Gold) Deposit, Washington County, Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grauch, Richard I.; Verplanck, Philip L.; Seeger, Cheryl M.; Budahn, James R.; Van Gosen, Bradley S.

    2010-01-01

    The Minerals at Risk and for Emerging Technologies Project of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Mineral Resources Program is examining potential sources of lanthanide elements (rare earth elements) as part of its objective to provide up-to-date geologic information regarding mineral commodities likely to have increased demand in the near term. As part of the examination effort, a short visit was made to the Pea Ridge iron (-lanthanide-gold) deposit, Washington County, Missouri in October 2008. The deposit, currently owned by Wings Enterprises, Inc. of St. Louis, Missouri (Wings), contains concentrations of lanthanides that may be economic as a primary product or as a byproduct of iron ore production. This report tabulates the results of chemical analyses of the Pea Ridge samples and compares rare earth elements contents for world class lanthanide deposits with those of the Pea Ridge deposit. The data presented for the Pea Ridge deposit are preliminary and include some company data that have not been verified by the USGS or by the Missouri Department of Natural Resources, Division of Geology and Land Survey (DGLS), Geological Survey Program (MGS). The inclusion of company data is for comparative purposes only and does not imply an endorsement by either the USGS or MGS.

  1. Year and age effects on residues of dieldrin and heptachlor in dead gray bats, Franklin County, Missouri--1976, 1977, and 1978

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, D.R., Jr.; Bunck, C.M.; Cromartie, E.; LaVal, R.K.

    1983-01-01

    Dead gray bats (Myotis grisescens) containing lethal concentrations of dieldrin were found beneath a maternity roost in Bat Cave Nos. 2 and 3, Franklin County, Missouri, in 1976, 1977 and 1978. Whereas residues of dieldrin, DDE [I, I --dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethylene] and PCB polychlorinated biphenyls in bats appeared not to change significantly over the 3 years, residues of heptachlor-related chemicals increased in 1977 to potentially dangerous concentrations and remained elevated in 1978. Lethal brain levels of dieldrin in adult bats (geometric mean = 12.1 ?g/g), compared with juvenile bats (geometric mean = 6.5 ?g/g), indicated that juveniles are nearly twice as sensitive. The estimated population of gray bats (as maximum number of nonflying young) at Bat Cave Nos. 2 and 3 in 1976 and 1978 was 1,800 bats, but in 1979 no bats were present. Dieldrin, perhaps in conjunction with heptachlor, may have caused the decline and disappearance of this colony. However, dieldrin was banned in 1974 and Missouri's authorization to use heptachlor on corn expired in 1981. Furthermore, three organophosphate insecticides (chlorpyrifos, dyfonate and mocap) are to be substituted. We hope that the gray bats remaining in this area of Missouri survive the residues of dieldrin and heptachlor still in their food chains and prove to be unaffected by the new organophosphates

  2. Compilation and preliminary interpretation of hydrologic data for the Weldon Spring radioactive waste-disposal sites, St Charles County, Missouri; a progress report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kleeschulte, M.J.; Emmett, L.F.

    1986-01-01

    The Weldon Spring Chemical Plant is located just north of the drainage divide separating the Mississippi River and the Missouri River in St. Charles County, Missouri. From 1957 to 1966 the plant converted uranium-ore concentrates and recycled scrap to pure uranium trioxide, uranium tetrafluoride, and uranium metal. Residues from these operations were pumped to four large pits that had been excavated near the plant. Small springs and losing streams are present in the area. Water overlying the residue in the pits has a large concentration of dissolved solids and a different chemical composition compared to the native groundwater and surface water. This difference is indicated by the concentrations of calcium, sodium, sulfate, nitrate, fluoride, uranium, radium, lithium, molybdenum, strontium, and vanadium, all of which are greater than natural or background concentrations. Water from Burgermeister Spring, located about 1.5 miles north of the chemical plant area, contains uranium and nitrate concentrations greater than background concentrations. Groundwater in the shallow bedrock aquifer moves northward from the vicinity of the chemical plant toward Dardenne Creek. An abandoned limestone quarry several miles southwest of the chemical plant also has been used for the disposal of radioactive waste and rubble. Groundwater flow from the quarry area is southward through the alluvium, away from the quarry and toward the Missouri River. The St. Charles County well field is located in the Missouri River flood plain near the quarry and the large yield wells are open to the Missouri River alluvial aquifer. Water from a well 4,000 ft southeast of the quarry was analyzed; there was no indication of contamination from the quarry. Additional water quality and water level data are needed to determine if water from the quarry moves toward the well field. Observation wells need to be installed in the area between the chemical plant, pits, and Dardenne Creek. The wells would be used to provide access for measurements of depth to ground water and for the collection of water samples from the shallow bedrock aquifer. (Lantz-PTT)

  3. 40 CFR 81.117 - Southeast Missouri Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... within the outermost boundaries of the area so delimited): In the State of Missouri: Bolinger County, Butler County, Cape Girardeau County, Carter County, Crawford County, Dent County, Dunklin County, Gasconade County, Iron County, Madison County, Maries County, Mississippi County, New Madrid......

  4. 40 CFR 81.117 - Southeast Missouri Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... within the outermost boundaries of the area so delimited): In the State of Missouri: Bolinger County, Butler County, Cape Girardeau County, Carter County, Crawford County, Dent County, Dunklin County, Gasconade County, Iron County, Madison County, Maries County, Mississippi County, New Madrid......

  5. 40 CFR 81.117 - Southeast Missouri Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... within the outermost boundaries of the area so delimited): In the State of Missouri: Bolinger County, Butler County, Cape Girardeau County, Carter County, Crawford County, Dent County, Dunklin County, Gasconade County, Iron County, Madison County, Maries County, Mississippi County, New Madrid......

  6. 40 CFR 81.117 - Southeast Missouri Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... within the outermost boundaries of the area so delimited): In the State of Missouri: Bolinger County, Butler County, Cape Girardeau County, Carter County, Crawford County, Dent County, Dunklin County, Gasconade County, Iron County, Madison County, Maries County, Mississippi County, New Madrid......

  7. Hydrology and cycling of nitrogen and phosphorus in Little Bean Marsh : a remnant riparian wetland along the Missouri River in Platte County, Missouri, 1996-97

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blevins, Dale W.

    2004-01-01

    The lack of concurrent water-quality and hydrologic data on riparian wetlands in the Midwestern United States has resulted in a lack of knowledge about the water-quality functions that these wetlands provide. Therefore, Little Bean Marsh, a remnant riparian wetland along the Missouri River, was investigated in 1996 and 1997 primarily to determine the magnitude and character of selected water-quality benefits that can be produced in such a wetland and to identify critical processes that can be managed in remnant or restored riparian wetlands for amelioration of water quality. Little Bean Marsh averages 69 hectares in size, has a maximum depth of about 1 meter, and the majority of the marsh is covered by macrophytes. In 1997, 41 percent of the water received by Little Bean Marsh was from direct precipitation, 14 percent was from ground-water seepage, 30 percent from watershed runoff, and 15 percent was backflow from Bean Lake. Although, Little Bean Marsh was both a ground-water recharge and discharge area, discharge to the marsh was three times the recharge to ground water. Ground-water levels closely tracked marsh water levels indicating a strong hydraulic connection between ground water and the marsh. Reduced surface runoff and ground-water availability are stabilizing influences on marsh hydrology and probably contribute to the persistence of emergent vegetation. The rapid hydraulic connection between Little Bean Marsh and ground water indicates that the hydrologic regime of most wetlands along the lower Missouri River is largely a function of the altitude of the marsh bottom relative to the altitude of the water table. More water was lost from the marsh through evapotranspiration (59 percent) than all other pathways combined. This is partially because the transpiration process of abundant macrophytes can greatly contribute to the evapotranspiration above that lost from open water surfaces. Surface outflow accounted for 36 percent and ground-water seepage accounted for only 5 percent of the losses. Large residence times allows the marsh to greatly affect water quality before water escapes as ground-water recharge or surface outflow. The shallowness of Little Bean Marsh and ion exclusion during ice formation caused the highest specific conductances of 1,100 to 1,300 microsiemens per centimeter at 25 degrees Celsius to occur during the winter. This concentration of dissolved solutes under ice can make wetlands more vulnerable to toxic contaminants than deeper surface-water bodies. Dissolved oxygen was less than 5 mg/L (milligrams per liter) for 3 to 4 months and near 0 mg/L for about 1 month in summer. Despite depths of less than 1 meter, temperature stratification persisted more than 3 months during the summers of 1996 and 1997, preventing mixing and contributing to periods of anoxia. Shallow depths and extended periods of anoxia in the marsh limit the ability of some organisms to escape high-temperature stress. Turbidity in Little Bean Marsh usually was low for several reasons: sediment loadings from the largely flood-plain drainage were low, emergent vegetation shade out algae and shield the water from wind, and high concentrations of bivalent cations increase flocculation rates of inorganic suspended material. The high concentrations of bivalent cations was largely because of a substantial amount of ground-water seepage into the marsh. Dissolved organic nitrogen was the dominant nitrogen species in Little Bean Marsh. Denitrification and biotic uptake kept more than 62 percent of nitrate (NO3) and 43 percent of ammonium (NH4) concentrations in marsh samples less than a detection limit of 0.005 mg/L. This contrasts with the Missouri River where inorganic NO3 dominates. Consequently, artificial flood-plain drainage that bypasses riparian wetlands likely deliver substantially more biotically available inorganic nitrogen to receiving waters than surface water that has been routed through a remnant wetland. Aver

  8. 10. Photocopy of photograph (from the Missouri Historical Society, St. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Photocopy of photograph (from the Missouri Historical Society, St. Louis, Missouri) Photographer unknown pre-1923 EAST FRONT AND SOUTH SIDE - Oakland, 7801 Genesta Street, Affton, St. Louis County, MO

  9. 3. Photocopy of postcard (from the Missouri Historical Society, Date ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Photocopy of postcard (from the Missouri Historical Society, Date unknown) Paul Piaget, Photographer, July 1967 EXTERIOR VIEW OF RAILROAD STATION BEFORE RESTORATION - Missouri-Pacific Railroad Station, Kirkwood, St. Louis County, MO

  10. Differences in Reservoir Bathymetry, Area, and Capacity Between December 20-22, 2005, and June 16-19, 2008, for Lower Taum Sauk Reservoir, Reynolds County, Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Gary L.; Richards, Joseph M.

    2008-01-01

    On December 14, 2005, the embankment of the upper reservoir at the Taum Sauk pump storage facility, Reynolds County, Missouri, catastrophically failed and flooded the East Fork Black River, depositing debris and sediment in Johnson's Shut-Ins State Park, the lower Taum Sauk Reservoir, and downstream in the Black River (location map). A bathymetric survey conducted December 20-22, 2005, documented the bathymetry of the lower Taum Sauk Reservoir after the upper reservoir failure (Rydlund, 2006). After subsequent excavation of sediment and debris from the lower reservoir by Ameren Union Electric (UE), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in collaboration with Roux Associates Inc., conducted a bathymetric survey of the lower Taum Sauk Reservoir on June 16-19, 2008, to prepare a current (2008) bathymetric map (fig. 1) for the lower reservoir, establish a current (2008) elevation-area and capacity table, and determine reservoir area and capacity differences between the 2005 and 2008 bathymetric surveys.

  11. A strategy for collecting ground-water data and developing a ground-water model of the Missouri River alluvial aquifer, Woodbury and Monona Counties, Iowa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buchmiller, Robert C.

    1988-01-01

    A ground-water-flow model and plan for obtaining supporting data are proposed for a part of the Missouri River alluvial aquifer in Woodbury and Monona Counties, Iowa. The proposed model and the use of the principle of superposition will aid in the interpretation of the relation between ground water and surface water in the study area, particularly the effect of lowered river stages on water levels in the alluvial aquifer. Information on the geometry, hydraulic characteristics, and water levels in the alluvial aquifer needs to be collected for use in the model and for model calibration. A plan to obtain hydrologic and geologic information by use of exploratory test-well drilling is proposed. Also proposed is a monitoring network to obtain information on the spatial and temporal variability of water levels within the study area.

  12. Groundwater-flow model and effects of projected groundwater use in the Ozark Plateaus Aquifer System in the vicinity of Greene County, Missouri - 1907-2030

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richards, Joseph M.

    2010-01-01

    Recent and historical periods of rapid growth have increased the stress on the groundwater resources in the Ozark aquifer in the Greene County, Missouri area. Historical pumpage from the Ozark aquifer has caused a cone of depression beneath Springfield, Missouri. In an effort to ease its dependence on groundwater for supply, the city of Springfield built a pipeline in 1996 to bring water from Stockton Lake to the city. Rapid population growth in the area coupled with the expanding cone of depression raised concern about the sustainability of groundwater as a resource for future use. A groundwater-flow model was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with Greene County, Missouri, the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers, and the Missouri Department of Natural Resources to assess the effect that increased groundwater demand is having on the long-term availability of groundwater in and around Greene County, Missouri. Three hydrogeologic units were represented in the groundwater-flow model: the Springfield Plateau aquifer, the Ozark confining unit, and the Ozark aquifer. The Springfield Plateau aquifer is less than 350 feet thick in the model area and generally is a low yield aquifer suitable only for domestic use. The Ozark aquifer is composed of a more than 900-foot thick sequence of dolomite and sandstone in the model area and is the primary aquifer throughout most of southern Missouri. Wells open to the entire thickness of the Ozark aquifer typically yield 1,000 gallons per minute or more. Between the two aquifers is the Ozark confining unit composed of as much as 98 feet of shale and limestone. Karst features such as sinkholes, springs, caves, and losing streams are present in both aquifers, but the majority of these features occur in the Springfield Plateau aquifer. The solution-enlarged fracture and bedding plane conduits in the karst system, particularly in the Springfield Plateau aquifer, are capable of moving large quantities of groundwater through the aquifer in relatively short periods of time. Pumpage rates in the model area increased from 1,093,268 cubic feet per day in 1962 to 2,693,423 cubic feet per day in 1987 to 4,330,177 cubic feet per day in 2006. Annual precipitation ranged from 25.21 inches in 1953 to 62.45 inches in 1927 from 1915 to 2006 in the model area. Recharge to the model was calculated as 2.53 percent of the annual precipitation and was varied annually. Recharge was distributed over the model area based on land slope and was adjusted in the city limits of Springfield to account for the impervious surface. A groundwater model with annual stress periods from 1907 to 2030 was developed using a transient calibration period from 1987 to 2006 and a prediction period from 2007 to 2030 to simulate flow in the Springfield Plateau aquifer and the Ozark aquifer. For the model area of approximately 2,870 square miles, the model hydrogeologic units and hydraulic properties were discretized into 253 rows, 316 columns, and 3 layers with the layer boundaries crossing hydrogeologic unit boundaries in some areas. The horizontal cell spacing was 1,000 feet by 1,000 feet. The model was calibrated by minimizing the difference between simulated head and observed water levels and simulated and observed flows in rivers and springs. Population and the associated groundwater use were estimated for 12 communities and the unincorporated area of Greene County based on past growth. Each was analyzed individually, and a low and high annual rate of growth relative to the 2006 population was computed for each community or group. Low growth rates ranged from 0.215 percent per year in Springfield to 6.997 percent per year in Rogersville. Total growth from 2006 to 2030 at the low growth rate ranged from 5.2 percent in Springfield to 167.9 percent in Rogersville. High growth rates ranged from 0.236 percent per year in Springfield to 7.345 percent per year in Rogersville. Total growth from 2006 to 2030 at the high g

  13. 76 FR 28841 - Missouri Disaster # MO-00048

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-18

    ... ADMINISTRATION Disaster Declaration 12576 and 12577 Missouri Disaster MO-00048 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business... the State of Missouri (FEMA-1980-DR), dated 05/09/2011. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes, and..., Mississippi, New Madrid, Saint Louis, Taney. Contiguous Counties (Economic Injury Loans Only):...

  14. Kids Count in Missouri, 1996 Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Citizens for Missouri's Children, St. Louis.

    This report is published for the purpose of improving the well-being of Missouri's children by heightening awareness of children's issues within local communities and by promoting more effective responses to children's needs throughout the state. The report documents the status of children in all 115 Missouri counties. Following an Executive…

  15. Crumbling Schools: Tens of Millions Wasted in Slow, Sloppy Construction, and Miami-Dade Children Are the Losers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cenziper, Debbie; Grotto, Jason

    This series of articles examines the condition of public schools and public school construction in Florida's Miami and Dade Counties. To prepare the series, the Miami Herald studied thousands of pages of construction records, correspondence, school district reports, and accounting statements over 15 years. It analyzed state and national…

  16. Agricultural land cover mapping in the context of a geographically referenced digital information system. [Carroll, Macon, and Gentry Counties, Missouri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoner, E. R.

    1982-01-01

    The introduction of soil map information to the land cover mapping process can improve discrimination of land cover types and reduce confusion among crop types that may be caused by soil-specific management practices and background reflectance characteristics. Multiple dates of LANDSAT MSS digital were analyzed for three study areas in northern Missouri to produce cover types for major agricultural land cover classes. Digital data bases were then developed by adding ancillary data such as digitized soil and transportation network information to the LANDSAT-derived cover type map. Procedures were developed to manipulate the data base parameters to extract information applicable to user requirements. An agricultural information system combining such data can be used to determine the productive capacity of land to grow crops, fertilizer needs, chemical weed control rates, irrigation suitability, and trafficability of soil for planting.

  17. Geohydrologic data for the St. Charles County well field and public-water supply, 1985-91, and projected public-water supply, 1995 and 2000,for St. Charles County, Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mugel, D.N.

    1993-01-01

    The St. Charles County well field consists of 8 wells that penetrate the entire thickness of the Missouri River alluvial aquifer. The wells range from 98 to 116 ft deep. The lower 40 ft of each well is screened and open to the aquifer. The specific capacities of the wells calculated soon after well completion ranged from 115 to 248 gal/min/ft of drawdown. Transmissivities range from 900 to 60,200 sq ft/day. Hydraulic conductivities range from 23 to 602 ft/day. Storage coefficients range from 0.005 to 0.2. A tracer test determined effective porosity ranging from 0.21 to 0.32. A point dilution test determined a groundwater velocity of 0.83 ft/day. From 1985-91, the average daily water supply from the St. Charles County well field and water- treatment plant increased from 5.76 to 10.23 Mgal/day, an increase from 36.2 to 42.2 percent of the total quantity of water supplied by major public-water suppliers in St. Charles County. The average daily water supply from the well field and water-treatment plant is projected to increase to 11.0 Mgal/day during 1995 and 12.2 Mgal/day during 2000. The St. Charles County Water Department's projections of peak daily demands from customers indicate that these demands will exceed the capacity of the water-treatment plant during 1995 and will exceed the capacities of both the well field and water-treatment plant during 2000.

  18. Analysis of alternative modifications for reducing backwater flooding at the Honey Creek coal strip-mine reclamation site in Henry County, Missouri. Water Resources Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, T.W.

    1990-01-01

    Studies to determine the hydrologic conditions in mined and reclaimed mine areas, as well as areas of proposed mining, have become necessary with the enactment of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977. Honey Creek in Henry County, Missouri, has been re-routed to flow through a series of former strip mining pits which lie within the Honey Creek coal strip mine reclamation site. During intense or long duration rainfalls within the Honey Creek basin, surface runoff has caused flooding on agricultural land near the upstream boundary of the reclamation site. The calculated existing design discharge (3,050 cubic feet per second) water-surface profile is compared to the expected water-surface profiles from three assumed alternative channel modifcations within the Honey Creek study area. The alternative channel modifications used in these analyses include (1) improvement of channel bottom slope, (2) relocation of spoil material, and (3) improved by-pass channel flow conditions. The alternative 1, 2, and 3 design discharge increase will reduce the agricultural field current (1990) frequency of backwater flooding from a 3-year to a 6.5-year event.

  19. Geohydrologic data for the St. Charles County well field and public-water supply 1985-91, and projected public-water supply, 1995 and 2000, for St. Charles County, Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Mugel, D.N.

    1996-10-01

    Geohydrologic data for this well field and public water supply data for St. Charles County were compiled to assist US DOE in developing the St. Charles County well field contingency plan to ensure a supply of water in the event that the well field becomes contaminated from wastes (radioactive, nitroaromatic, other) stored in the Weldon Spring quarry. The well field consists of 8 wells penetrating the entire thickness of the Missouri River alluvial aquifer and is 98-116 feet deep. Aquifer tests were conducted on 3 occasions at 3 different locations in the well field. Calculated transmissivities range from 900 to 60,200 feet squared per day; hydraulic conductivities ranged from 23 to 602 feet/day. Calculated/estimated storage coefficients ranged from 0.005 to 0.2. Tracer test showed effective porosity of 0. 21-0.32. Point dilution showed a ground-water velocity of 0.83 foot/day. From 1985-91, ave daily water supply from the well field and water treatment plant increased from 5.76 to 10.23 Mgd; this is projected to increase to 11.0 Mgd in 1995 and to 12.2 Mgd in 2000. The water department`s projections of peak daily demands from customers indicate that these demands will exceed the capacity of the treatment plant in 1995 and will exceed the capacities of the well field and plant during 2000.

  20. Regional assessment of nonforestry related biomass resources: Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-11-01

    This document is a collection of spreadsheets detailing in a county by county manner the agricultural crop, agricultural wastes, municipal waste and industrial wastes of Missouri that are potential biomass energy resources.

  1. Geologic map of the Jam Up Cave and Pine Crest quadrangles, Shannon, Texas, and Howell Counties, Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weary, David J.; Orndorff, Randall C.; Repetski, John E.

    2013-01-01

    The Jam Up Cave and Pine Crest 7.5-minute quadrangles are located in south-central Missouri within the Salem Plateau region of the Ozark Plateaus physiographic province. About 2,400 to 3,100 feet (ft) of flat-lying to gently dipping Lower Paleozoic sedimentary rocks, mostly dolomite, chert, sandstone, and orthoquartzite, overlie Mesoproterozoic igneous basement rocks. Unconsolidated residuum, colluvium, terrace deposits, and alluvium overlie the sedimentary rocks. Numerous karst features, such as sinkholes, caves, and springs, have formed in the carbonate rocks. Many streams are spring fed. The topography is a dissected karst plain with elevations ranging from about 690 ft where the Jacks Fork River exits the northeastern corner of the Jam Up Cave quadrangle to about 1,350 ft in upland areas along the north-central edge and southwestern corner of the Pine Crest quadrangle. The most prominent physiographic feature is the valley of the Jacks Fork River. This reach of the upper Jacks Fork, with its clean, swiftly-flowing water confined by low cliffs and bluffs, provides one of the most beautiful canoe float trips in the nation. Most of the land in the quadrangles is privately owned and used primarily for grazing cattle and horses and growing timber. A large minority of the land within the quadrangles is publicly owned by the Ozark National Scenic Riverways of the National Park Service. Geologic mapping for this investigation was conducted in 2005 and 2006.

  2. 76 FR 78967 - Second Tier Environmental Impact Statement: Jackson County, MO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-20

    ... Federal Highway Administration Second Tier Environmental Impact Statement: Jackson County, MO AGENCY... Cutoff interchange in Jackson County, Missouri. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. Peggy J. Casey... of the Blue Ridge Cutoff interchange in Jackson County, Missouri. The project length is...

  3. Using LiDAR, Aerial Photography, and Geospatial Technologies to Reveal and Understand Past Landscapes in Four West Central Missouri Counties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, R. Zane

    This dissertation focuses on Hugh Prince's principle of using the present (in this case as seen through remotely sensed imagery) to understand the past via relict features. I studied ghost towns, cemeteries, and abandoned railroads via NAIP and LiDAR imagery in four west-central Missouri Counties (Carroll, Chariton, Lafayette, and Saline). The remnants of ghost towns, cemeteries, and abandoned railroads ("relict features") often manifest themselves in surface spatial patterns and terrain deformation. Each sensor offers unique advantages and disadvantages due to the design and construction of the sensor. LiDAR can strip away vegetation to present a bare earth model (a DTM) of terrain, useful in the detection of features revealed by subtle elevation and terrain changes. Specifically, LiDAR was useful for revealing historic roads and depressions in ghost towns, exposing abandoned railroad beds under tree canopies, and for the detection of monuments and other larger features in cemeteries. In addition, LiDAR also proves useful for uncovering previously undocumented roads and offers precise locations of railroad beds that were previously uncertain. NAIP presents a researcher with a color (either natural color or near-infrared) birds-eye view of the earth, revealing spatial patterns on the surface of the earth. For ghost towns, NAIP imagery was most useful for the detection of historic roads in recently abandoned ghost towns. NAIP imagery was also useful for the detection of abandoned railroads where the bed is exposed or when there is a single tree line in the bed and for visualizing the spatial patterning of cemeteries.

  4. 40 CFR 81.118 - Southwest Missouri Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., Johnson County, Laclede County, Lafayette County, Lawrence County, McDonald County, Miller County, Morgan... municipalities (as defined in section 302(f) of the Clean Air Act, 42 U.S.C. 1857h(f)) geographically located within the outermost boundaries of the area so delimited): In the State of Missouri: Barton County,...

  5. 40 CFR 81.118 - Southwest Missouri Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., Johnson County, Laclede County, Lafayette County, Lawrence County, McDonald County, Miller County, Morgan... municipalities (as defined in section 302(f) of the Clean Air Act, 42 U.S.C. 1857h(f)) geographically located within the outermost boundaries of the area so delimited): In the State of Missouri: Barton County,...

  6. 40 CFR 81.118 - Southwest Missouri Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., Johnson County, Laclede County, Lafayette County, Lawrence County, McDonald County, Miller County, Morgan... municipalities (as defined in section 302(f) of the Clean Air Act, 42 U.S.C. 1857h(f)) geographically located within the outermost boundaries of the area so delimited): In the State of Missouri: Barton County,...

  7. 40 CFR 81.118 - Southwest Missouri Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., Johnson County, Laclede County, Lafayette County, Lawrence County, McDonald County, Miller County, Morgan... municipalities (as defined in section 302(f) of the Clean Air Act, 42 U.S.C. 1857h(f)) geographically located within the outermost boundaries of the area so delimited): In the State of Missouri: Barton County,...

  8. Miami Dade College and the Engaging Power of the Arts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Higher Education Outreach and Engagement, 2013

    2013-01-01

    In this essay, the president of Miami Dade College describes the anchoring role that the institution plays in the Miami metropolitan region, with a particular emphasis on the many arts and cultural contributions. These efforts, combined with the economic and workforce development endeavors, make Miami Dade College a model anchor institution.

  9. Effects of wastewater effluent discharge and treatment facility upgrades on environmental and biological conditions of the upper Blue River, Johnson County, Kansas and Jackson County, Missouri, January 2003 through March 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graham, Jennifer L.; Stone, Mandy L.; Rasmussen, Teresa J.; Poulton, Barry C.

    2010-01-01

    The Johnson County Blue River Main Wastewater Treatment Facility discharges into the upper Blue River near the border between Johnson County, Kansas and Jackson County, Missouri. During 2005 through 2007 the wastewater treatment facility underwent upgrades to increase capacity and include biological nutrient removal. The effects of wastewater effluent on environmental and biological conditions of the upper Blue River were assessed by comparing an upstream site to two sites located downstream from the wastewater treatment facility. Environmental conditions were evaluated using previously and newly collected discrete and continuous data, and were compared with an assessment of biological community composition and ecosystem function along the upstream-downstream gradient. This evaluation is useful for understanding the potential effects of wastewater effluent on water quality, biological community structure, and ecosystem function. In addition, this information can be used to help achieve National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) wastewater effluent permit requirements after additional studies are conducted. The effects of wastewater effluent on the water-quality conditions of the upper Blue River were most evident during below-normal and normal streamflows (about 75 percent of the time), when wastewater effluent contributed more than 20 percent to total streamflow. The largest difference in water-quality conditions between the upstream and downstream sites was in nutrient concentrations. Total and inorganic nutrient concentrations at the downstream sites during below-normal and normal streamflows were 4 to 15 times larger than at the upstream site, even after upgrades to the wastewater treatment facility were completed. However, total nitrogen concentrations decreased in wastewater effluent and at the downstream site following wastewater treatment facility upgrades. Similar decreases in total phosphorus were not observed, likely because the biological phosphorus removal process was not optimized until after the study was completed. Total nitrogen and phosphorus from the wastewater treatment facility contributed a relatively small percentage (14 to 15 percent) to the annual nutrient load in the upper Blue River, but contributed substantially (as much as 75 percent) to monthly loads during seasonal low-flows in winter and summer. During 2007 and 2008, annual discharge from the wastewater treatment facility was about one-half maximum capacity, and estimated potential maximum annual loads were 1.6 to 2.4 times greater than annual loads before capacity upgrades. Even when target nutrient concentrations are met, annual nutrient loads will increase when the wastewater treatment facility is operated at full capacity. Regardless of changes in annual nutrient loads, the reduction of nutrient concentrations in the Blue River Main wastewater effluent will help prevent further degradation of the upper Blue River. The Blue River Main Wastewater Treatment Facility wastewater effluent caused changes in concentrations of several water-quality constituents that may affect biological community structure and function including larger concentrations of bioavailable nutrients (nitrate and orthophosphorus) and smaller turbidities. Streambed-sediment conditions were similar along the upstream-downstream gradient and measured constituents did not exceed probable effect concentrations. Habitat conditions declined along the upstream-downstream gradient, largely because of decreased canopy cover and riparian buffer width and increased riffle-substrate fouling. Algal biomass, primary production, and the abundance of nutrient-tolerant diatoms substantially increased downstream from the wastewater treatment facility. Likewise, the abundance of intolerant macroinvertebrate taxa and Kansas Department of Health and Environment aquatic-life-support scores, derived from macroinvertebrate data, significantly decreased downstream from the wastewater

  10. Department Reengineering Improves Service at Miami-Dade Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menendez, Alfredo

    2002-01-01

    Details the process of reengineering Miami-Dade Community College's maintenance department to lower costs while increasing services. Changes included work flow, communications, purchasing, staffing, and technology methods. (EV)

  11. KIDS COUNT in Missouri 1994 Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Citizens for Missouri's Children, St. Louis.

    This KIDS COUNT report examines statewide trends in the well-being of Missouri's children. The statistical portrait is organized by county and is based on 11 outcome measures of children's well-being: (1) students enrolled in free/reduced lunch programs; (2) births to mothers without high school diplomas; (3) low birthweight infants; (4) infant…

  12. Urban Evapotranspiration and Carbon Dioxide Flux in Miami - Dade, Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernier, T.; Hopper, W.

    2010-12-01

    Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide (CO2) concentrations are leading indicators of secular climate change. With increasing awareness of the consequences of climate change, methods for monitoring this change are becoming more important daily. Of particular interest is the carbon dioxide exchange between natural and urban landscapes and the correlation of atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Monitoring Evapotranspiration (ET) is important for assessments of water availability for growing populations. ET is surprisingly understudied in the hydrologic cycle considering ET removes as much as 80 to over 100% of precipitation back into the atmosphere as water vapor. Lack of understanding in spatial and temporal ET estimates can limit the credibility of hydrologic water budgets designed to promote sustainable water use and resolve water-use conflicts. Eddy covariance (EC) methods are commonly used to estimate ET and CO2 fluxes. The EC platform consist of a (CSAT) 3-D Sonic Anemometer and a Li-Cor Open Path CO2/ H2O Analyzer. Measurements collected at 10 Hz create a very large data sets. A EC flux tower located in the Snapper Creek Well Field as part of a study to estimate ET for the Miami Dade County Water and Sewer project. Data has been collected from December 17, 2009 to August 30, 2010. QA/QC is performed with the EdiRe data processing software according to Ameri-flux protocols. ET estimates along with other data--latent-heat flux, sensible-heat flux, rainfall, air temperature, wind speed and direction, solar irradiance, net radiation, soil-heat flux and relative humidity--can be used to aid in the development of water management policies and regulations. Currently, many financial institutions have adopted an understanding about baseline environmental monitoring. The “Equator Principle” is an example of a voluntary standard for managing social and environmental risk in project financing and has changed the way in which projects are financed.

  13. Spillway Entering Missouri River

    The water from the spillway enter the Missouri River. The spillway water is the darker water, which is sediment and the Missouri River is the more clear water. Photo taken by USGS personnel on a Civil Air Patrol flight....

  14. Solar-energy workshops held at Miami-Dade Public Libraries, 1981-1982. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1982-01-01

    Over a two year period, the Miami-Dade Public Library System gave 12 free solar energy programs throughout Dade County in its various branches; Solar Water Heater Workshops, where registered participants actually took part in building or putting together a solar water heater. Kick-off programs were also given free-of-charge by a number of local solar companies, to inform the audience about solar energy in general and the solar workshops in particular. Average registered attendance at these workshops was twenty, not including the crowds of onlookers at the outdoor building sessions or the earlier kick-off programs, which often had an audience of sixty or more. A later phone check of ten workshop participants picket at random revealed four who had built or were building their own solar systems, three who were considering the purchase of -or had already bought - a domestic solar water heater, one who was reported to be no longer interested by his son, and two who could not be reached. One of the completed heaters has been donated to a local Girl Scout troop, where it is on permanent exhibit; another will be placed in a new library branch, with appropriate publicity about its source. Florida Power and Light, which formerly viewed our early workshops with suspicion, sent a speaker to our final program to announce financial assistance to those who wanted to buy a solar hot water heater.

  15. Occurrence and origin of Escherichia coli in water and sediments at two public swimming beaches at Lake of the Ozarks State Park, Camden County, Missouri, 2011-13

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Jordan L.; Schumacher, John G.; Burken, Joel G.

    2014-01-01

    In the past several years, the Missouri Department of Natural Resources has closed two popular public beaches, Grand Glaize Beach and Public Beach 1, at Lake of the Ozarks State Park in Osage Beach, Missouri when monitoring results exceeded the established Escherichia coli (E. coli) standard. As a result of the beach closures, the U.S. Geological Survey and Missouri University of Science and Technology, in cooperation with the Missouri Department of Natural Resources, led an investigation into the occurrence and origins of E. coli at Grand Glaize Beach and Public Beach 1. The study included the collection of more than 1,300 water, sediment, and fecal source samples between August 2011 and February 2013 from the two beaches and vicinity. Spatial and temporal patterns of E. coli concentrations in water and sediments combined with measurements of environmental variables, beach-use patterns, and Missouri Department of Natural Resources water-tracing results were used to identify possible sources of E. coli contamination at the two beaches and to corroborate microbial source tracking (MST) sampling efforts. Results from a 2011 reconnaissance sampling indicate that water samples from Grand Glaize Beach cove contained significantly larger E. coli concentrations than adjacent coves and were largest at sites at the upper end of Grand Glaize Beach cove, indicating a probable local source of E. coli contamination within the upper end of the cove. Results from an intensive sampling effort during 2012 indicated that E. coli concentrations in water samples at Grand Glaize Beach cove were significantly larger in ankle-deep water than waist-deep water, trended downward during the recreational season, significantly increased with an increase in the total number of bathers at the beach, and were largest during the middle of the day. Concentrations of E. coli in nearshore sediment (sediment near the shoreline) at Grand Glaize Beach were significantly larger in foreshore samples (samples collected above the shoreline) than in samples collected in ankle-deep water below the shoreline, significantly larger in the left and middle areas of the beach than the right area, and substantially larger than similar studies at E. coli- contaminated beaches on Lake Erie in Ohio. Concentrations of E. coli in the water column also were significantly larger after resuspension of sediments. Results of MST indicate a predominance of waterfowl-associated markers in nearshore sediments at Grand Glaize Beach consistent with frequent observations of goose and vulture fecal matter in sediment, especially on the left and middle areas of the beach. The combination of spatial and temporal sampling and MST indicate that an important source of E. coli contamination at Grand Glaize Beach during 2012 was E. coli released into the water column by bathers resuspending E. coli-contaminated sediments, especially during high-use days early in the recreational season.

  16. Morbidity surveillance following the midwest flood--Missouri, 1993.

    PubMed

    1993-10-22

    Heavy spring and summer rains during 1993 caused flooding by both the Mississippi and Missouri rivers and by streams in 84 of the 115 counties in Missouri; all 84 were declared federal disaster areas. The Mississippi River attained flood stage during July 15-August 2, and the Missouri River, during July 25-August 2; a total of 2,060,757 acres were submerged, and approximately 60,000 persons throughout Missouri were displaced (National Weather Service, unpublished data, 1993). At the request of the Missouri Department of Health, CDC provided assistance in implementing a surveillance system to monitor flood-related injuries and illnesses in the affected areas. This report presents preliminary findings of these surveillance efforts. PMID:8413166

  17. 78 FR 34428 - Missouri Central Railroad Company-Abandonment Exemption-in Cass, Henry, Johnson, and Pettis...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-07

    ..., Johnson, and Pettis Counties, MO; Central Midland Railway Company--Discontinuance of Service Exemption--in Cass, Henry, Johnson, and Pettis Counties, MO Missouri Central Railroad Company (MCRR) and...

  18. The Library Instruction Program at Miami-Dade South.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wine, Eugene

    1983-01-01

    Describes the library instruction program at Miami-Dade Community College, a self-instructional library skills program consisting of a two-part manual, review exercises, "hands-on" assignments, and computer-scored tests. Reports on faculty and student responses to the program. (DMM)

  19. General Education at Miami-Dade Community College. Draft Document.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miami-Dade Community Coll., FL.

    This document, based on input from faculty and students, presents a rationale, definition, and goal specification for general education at Miami-Dade Community College. Responsiveness to community education needs and "open admissions" are posited to be two important aspects of the mission of the community college. To integrate these mission…

  20. Public health assessment for Weldon Spring quarry/plant/pits (USDOE) St. Charles, St. Charles County, Missouri, region 7. Cerclis No. MO3210090004. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-30

    The U.S. Department of Energy Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (chemical plant site), is a former uranium processing facility located in eastern Missouri on the property of the former U.S. Army Weldon Spring Ordnance Works. Surface water, soil, sludge, sediment, and groundwater within the chemical plant site contain chemical and radioactive contaminants. The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) reviewed on-site chemical exposure information and site conditions. ATSDR also prepared several Health Consultations on chemical and radioactive contaminants in areas on and off the DOE chemical plant site. ATSDR also reviewed on-site and off-site radiological exposure information and conditions. The exposure scenarios ATSDR evaluated include: trespassers swimming in quarry or raffinate pits; reservists performing field activities in the training area; anglers fishing, hunters haunting, and hikers hiking in the conservation areas; residents drinking from off-site private wells; staff and students attending the Francis Howell High School; and consumers of crops (e.g., corn) grown in conservation areas.

  1. 76 FR 4893 - FFP Missouri 13, LLC, Grays Hydro, LLC; Notice Announcing Preliminary Permit Drawing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission FFP Missouri 13, LLC, Grays Hydro, LLC; Notice Announcing Preliminary Permit... River in Greene County, Pennsylvania.\\1\\ The applications were filed by FFP Missouri 13, LLC,...

  2. 78 FR 45960 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Missouri Department of Natural Resources, Jefferson City, MO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-30

    ... Department of Natural Resources professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Sac & Fox Nation, Oklahoma; Sac & Fox of Missouri in Kansas and Nebraska; and the Sac & Fox Tribe of the... University of Missouri-Columbia. The area of Pike County, MO, was ceded by the Sauk and Fox in a series...

  3. Assessing the economic energy and environmental benefits of implementing the electric vehicle station car program into the metro-dade transit system. Report for October 1994-March 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, T.A.

    1996-03-01

    The analysis reported on in this paper examines environmental, energy and economic benefits of implementing the Electric Vehicle Station Car Program (EVSC) in Dade County Florida. The specifics of each part of the energy, transportation and environmental impact of the urban commute for EV, Metro-Dade transit and ICE traveler are meshed into an integrated computer model which reflect different: (1) technologies and speeds; (2) energy demands and other resource needs; (3) system service level characteristics; (4) ridership levels; and (5) modal splits combined with other system differences. This computer model then integrates each public transportation mode`s unique (1) fuel consumption and (2) emission levels into the simulation. Finally, the model quantitatively combines this data with equivalent emissions, energy and other system information generated by the commuting automobile mode.

  4. Borehole Geophysical, Water-Level, and Water-Quality Investigation of a Monitoring Well Completed in the St. Francois Aquifer in Oregon County, Missouri, 2005-08

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schumacher, John G.; Kleeschulte, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    A deep (more than 2,000 feet) monitoring well was installed in an area being explored for lead and zinc deposits within the Mark Twain National Forest in southern Missouri. The area is a mature karst terrain where rocks of the Ozark aquifer, a primary source of water for private and public supplies and major springs in the nearby Eleven Point National Wild and Scenic River and the Ozark National Scenic Riverways, are exposed at the surface. The potential lead deposits lie about 2,000 feet below the surface within a deeper aquifer, called the St. Francois aquifer. The two aquifers are separated by the St. Francois confining unit. The monitoring well was installed as part of a series of investigations to examine potentiometric head relations and water-quality differences between the two aquifers. Results of borehole flowmeter measurements in the open borehole and water-level measurements from the completed monitoring well USGS-D1 indicate that a seasonal upward gradient exists between the St. Francois aquifer and the overlying Ozark aquifer from about September through February. The upward potentiometric heads across the St. Francois confining unit that separates the two aquifers averaged 13.40 feet. Large reversals in this upward gradient occurred during the late winter through summer (about February through August) when water levels in the Ozark aquifer were as much as 138.47 feet higher (average of 53.84 feet) than water levels in the St. Francois aquifer. Most of the fluctuation of potentiometric gradient is caused by precipitation and rapid recharge that cause large and rapid increases in water levels in the Ozark aquifer. Analysis of water-quality samples collected from the St. Francois aquifer interval of the monitoring well indicated a sodium-chloride type water containing dissolved-solids concentrations as large as 1,300 milligrams per liter and large concentrations of sodium, chloride, sulfate, boron, and lithium. In contrast, water in the overlying Ozark aquifer interval of the monitoring well was a calcium-magnesium-bicarbonate type water containing less than 250 milligrams per liter dissolved solids and substantially smaller concentrations of major and trace elements.

  5. By the Numbers: Minimum Attendance Laws and Inequality of Educational Opportunity in Missouri, 1865-1905

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morice, Linda C.; Hunt, John W.

    2007-01-01

    This study details the enactment of attendance laws for black pupils in Missouri and describes their effect by citing examples from two counties: St. Louis County and Polk County. The study is based on a review of primary sources yielding quantitative and qualitative data reported during the first 40 years of the attendance laws. A study of…

  6. Missouri River Rising

    The Missouri River at Bismarck, North Dakota. On June 23, 2011 the streamflow was approximately 152,000 cubic feet per second, stage approximately 18.90 feet. Photo taken by USGS personnel on a Civil Air Patrol flight....

  7. 75 FR 75721 - Environmental Impact Statement: Billings County, North Dakota

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-06

    ... Federal Highway Administration Environmental Impact Statement: Billings County, North Dakota AGENCY... Little Missouri River within a study area bounded by the northern border of the Billings County line, the... Administrator, Federal Highway Administration. BILLING CODE 4910-22-P...

  8. Blastomycosis in Missouri: epidemiology and risk factors for endemic disease.

    PubMed Central

    Cano, M. V.; Ponce-de-Leon, G. F.; Tippen, S.; Lindsley, M. D.; Warwick, M.; Hajjeh, R. A.

    2003-01-01

    Between 1992 and 1999, 93 cases of blastomycosis, including 25 laboratory confirmed cases, were identified in Missouri (annual incidence, 0.2/100,000 population). Mississippi County in southeastern Missouri had the highest incidence (12/100,000) with a much higher rate among blacks than whites in this county (43.21/100,000). The mortality rate, 44% was also higher among blacks. To determine risk factors for endemic blastomycosis, a case-control study was conducted among southeastern Missouri residents. Independent risk factors for blastomycosis were black race and a prior history of pneumonia. No environmental exposures or socioeconomic factors were significantly associated with increased risk. The increased risk among blacks may possibly be related to genetic factors, but further studies are needed to clarify this. However, heightened awareness of the disease and a better understanding of the risk factors are important and may lead to earlier diagnosis and start of treatment, possibly improving outcome. PMID:14596532

  9. FECAL BACTERIAL CONTAMINATION OF A KARST WATERSHED IN CENTRAL MISSOURI

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Bonne Femme watershed of Boone County, Missouri has a varied surface geology that includes karst topography with losing streams that are an especially vulnerable setting for ground water contamination. The study objective was to compare fecal contamination and detection of specific pathogenic wa...

  10. Water quality, selected chemical characteristics, and toxicity of base flow and urban stormwater in the Pearson Creek and Wilsons Creek Basins, Greene County, Missouri, August 1999 to August 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richards, Joseph M.; Johnson, Byron Thomas

    2002-01-01

    The chemistry and toxicity of base flow and urban stormwater were characterized to determine if urban stormwater was degrading the water quality of the Pearson Creek and Wilsons Creek Basins in and near the city of Springfield, Greene County, Missouri. Potentially toxic components of stormwater (nutrients, trace metals, and organic compounds) were identified to help resource managers identify and minimize the sources of toxicants. Nutrient loading to the James River from these two basins (especially the Wilsons Creek Basin) is of some concern because of the potential to degrade downstream water quality. Toxicity related to dissolved trace metal constituents in stormwater does not appear to be a great concern in these two basins. Increased heterotrophic activity, the result of large densities of fecal indicator bacteria introduced into the streams after storm events, could lead to associated dissolved oxygen stress of native biota. Analysis of stormwater samples detected a greater number of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) than were present in base-flow samples. The number and concentrations of pesticides detected in both the base-flow and stormwater samples were similar.Genotoxicity tests were performed to determine the bioavilability of chemical contaminants and determine the potential harmful effects on aquatic biota of Pearson Creek and Wilsons Creek. Genotoxicity was determined from dialysates from both long-term (approximately 30 days) and storm-event (3 to 5 days) semipermeable membrane device (SPMD) samples that were collected in each basin. Toxicity tests of SPMD samples indicated evidence of genotoxins in all SPMD samples. Hepatic activity assessment of one long-term SPMD sample indicated evidence of contaminant uptake in fish. Chemical analyses of the SPMD samples found that relatively few pesticides and pesticide metabolites had been sequestered in the lipid material of the SPMD; however, numerous PAHs and VOCs were detected in both the long-term and the storm-event exposures. It is suspected, based on the compounds detected in the SPMDs and the water samples, that the observed genotoxicity is largely the result of PAHs and VOCs that were probably derived from petroleum inputs or combustion sources. Therefore the water quality and thus the aquatic environments in the Pearson Creek and Wilsons Creek Basins are being degraded by urban derived contaminants.

  11. Missouri River Looking Upstream

    This is a comparison between the top photo taken on September 27, 2006 and the bottom photo taken June 8, 2011. These photos where both taken from the Double Ditch Indian Village, Bismarck, ND. This is the Missouri River at Double Ditch Indian Village looking north, upstream. Due to the flooding of ...

  12. Missouri River Spring Flood

    USGS Crews collecting a discharge measurement on the Missouri River downstream of Oahe Reservoir near Pierre, SD. Releases from Oahe Reservoir are at 80,000 cfs on May 27 and projected to increase to 150,000 by mid-June at the latest. Evacuations in Pierre, SD have been issued and ...

  13. Earthquake history of Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    von Hake, C. A.

    1974-01-01

    Most of Missouri's earthquake activity has been concentrated in the southeast corner of the State, which lies within the New Madrid seismic zone. As recently as Merch 29, 1972, the region was jolted by a magnitude 3.7 shock that was felt over a 168,000 square kilometre area including parts of Arkansas, Illinois, Mississippi, and Tennessee. 

  14. Southeast Missouri Helicopter Survey

    Residents and visitors should not be alarmed to witness a low-flying helicopter over southeastern Missouri starting in mid to late February, 2014. U.S. Geological Survey scientists will conduct a comprehensive, high-resolution airborne survey to study the rock layers under parts of Washington, Fran...

  15. Missouri Health Manpower, 1981.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri State Center for Health Statistics, Jefferson City.

    A sourcebook for 13 licensed health professions in Missouri is presented for 1980 and 1981. A brief overview of each profession is provided, along with statistical data concerning activity status, personal characteristics, practice characteristics, and place of professional education. The following professions are covered: chiropractors, dental…

  16. 7. VIEW OF 100 kV SWITCHYARD WITH MISSOURI RIVER IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW OF 100 kV SWITCHYARD WITH MISSOURI RIVER IN THE BACKGROUND. ALONG THE LEFT SIDE FROM THE FOREGROUND ARE THE U.S. GOVERNMENT STORAGE SHED, TOOL HOUSE, THREE-STALL GARAGE, AND PARTIAL VIEW OF POWERHOUSE ADDITION. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Rainbow Hydroelectric Facility, On north bank of Missouri River 2 miles Northeast of Great Falls, & end of Rainbow Dam Road, Great Falls, Cascade County, MT

  17. New Lower Mississippian Trilobites from the Chouteau Group of Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brezinski, D.K.

    2000-01-01

    Reexamination of existing trilobite collections from the Kinderhookian (Lower Mississippian) Chouteau Group of central and northeastern Missouri indicates that two different suites of trilobites are present in these two areas of the state. Moreover, the study of these collections has led to the erection of a new genus and four new species. The new genus, Ameropiltonia, is based on a new species, A. lauradanae. This genus and species is commonly confused with Breviphillipsia sampsoni (Vogdes). Elliptophillipsia rotundus, n. sp., differs from the type species of this genus by possessing a rounded frontal lobe to the glabella. The other new species, Perexigupyge chouteauensis and Richterella hessleri, are present in the Compton Limestone of Marion and Ralls counties of northeastern Missouri. Variations in trilobite species found in the Compton Limestone of central Missouri and the northeastern part of the state are interpreted to be environmentally related. It appears that the lime mudstone and wackestone lithologies characteristic of the Compton Limestone of central Missouri were deposited in a low-energy, subtidal shelf setting. The lime packstone-grainstone strata of northeastern Missouri are interpreted to have formed as a tidal sand belt on the eastern margin of the Burlington shelf.

  18. Human rabies - Missouri, 2008.

    PubMed

    2009-11-01

    On November 24, 2008, the Missouri State Public Health Laboratory notified CDC of suspected rabies in a man aged 55 years from Missouri. The man had been bitten by a bat 4--6 weeks before symptom onset and had not sought medical care at the time of the bite. After visiting two emergency departments (EDs) with symptoms consistent with rabies, he was hospitalized on November 23 and treated using the Milwaukee protocol. On November 26, infection with a rabies virus variant associated with silver-haired bats was confirmed. The patient died on November 30. This report summarizes the patient's treatment and clinical course. The report highlights the importance of raising public awareness of rabies, particularly the risk for rabies after bat and other wildlife exposures. Health-care providers should maintain a high clinical suspicion for rabies in patients with a recent animal bite history and unexplained encephalitis. PMID:19893481

  19. Human Rabies - Missouri, 2014.

    PubMed

    Pratt, P Drew; Henschel, Kathleen; Turabelidze, George; Grim, Autumn; Ellison, James A; Orciari, Lillian; Yager, Pamela; Franka, Richard; Wu, Xianfu; Ma, Xiaoyue; Wadhwa, Ashutosh; Smith, Todd G; Petersen, Brett; Shiferaw, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    On September 18, 2014, the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services (MDHSS) was notified of a suspected rabies case in a Missouri resident. The patient, a man aged 52 years, lived in a rural, deeply wooded area, and bat sightings in and around his home were anecdotally reported. Exposure to bats poses a risk for rabies. After two emergency department visits for severe neck pain, paresthesia in the left arm, upper body tremors, and anxiety, he was hospitalized on September 13 for encephalitis of unknown etiology. On September 24, he received a diagnosis of rabies and on September 26, he died. Genetic sequencing tests confirmed infection with a rabies virus variant associated with tricolored bats. Health care providers need to maintain a high index of clinical suspicion for rabies in patients who have unexplained, rapidly progressive encephalitis, and adhere to recommended infection control practices when examining and treating patients with suspected infectious diseases. PMID:26985578

  20. Higher Education Funding in Missouri

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Lori

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative case study was to examine perceptions of state legislators regarding funding of public higher education in the State of Missouri. To this end, I sought to determine how Missouri legislators perceive the purpose of higher education and the role the state government should play in funding it. The concept that higher

  1. Ulmaceae for Flora of Missouri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The family Ulmaceae is treated for the Flora of Missouri, a detailed floristic manual for the state published by the Missouri (State) Department of Conservation. Three genera and 11 species are recognized; full morphological descriptions, dichotomous keys, and brief summaries of geographical and ec...

  2. 33 CFR 117.687 - Missouri River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Missouri River. 117.687 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Missouri 117.687 Missouri River. The draws of the bridges across the Missouri River shall open on signal; except during the winter season between the...

  3. 33 CFR 117.687 - Missouri River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Missouri River. 117.687 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Missouri 117.687 Missouri River. The draws of the bridges across the Missouri River shall open on signal; except during the winter season between the...

  4. 33 CFR 117.687 - Missouri River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Missouri River. 117.687 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Missouri 117.687 Missouri River. The draws of the bridges across the Missouri River shall open on signal; except during the winter season between the...

  5. 33 CFR 117.687 - Missouri River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Missouri River. 117.687 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Missouri 117.687 Missouri River. The draws of the bridges across the Missouri River shall open on signal; except during the winter season between the...

  6. 33 CFR 117.687 - Missouri River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Missouri River. 117.687 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Missouri 117.687 Missouri River. The draws of the bridges across the Missouri River shall open on signal; except during the winter season between the...

  7. Human Monocytotropic Ehrlichiosis, Missouri

    PubMed Central

    Masters, Edwin; Hogrefe, Wayne; Walker, David H.

    2003-01-01

    To determine the incidence, clinical and laboratory characteristics, and utility of molecular diagnosis of human monocytotropic ehrlichiosis (HME) in the primary care setting, we conducted a prospective study in an outpatient primary care clinic in Cape Girardeau, Missouri. One hundred and two patients with a history of fever for 3 days (>37.7C), tick bite or exposure, and no other infectious disease diagnosis were enrolled between March 1997 and December 1999. HME was diagnosed in 29 patients by indirect immunofluorescent antibody assay and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Clinical and laboratory manifestations included fever (100%), headache (72%), myalgia or arthralgia (69%), chills (45%), weakness (38%), nausea (38%), leukopenia (60%), thrombocytopenia (56%), and elevated aspartate aminotransferase level (52%). Hospitalization occurred in 41% of case-patients. PCR sensitivity was 56%; specificity, 100%. HME is a prevalent, potentially severe disease in southeastern Missouri that often requires hospitalization. Because clinical presentation of HME is nonspecific, PCR is useful in the diagnosis of acute HME. PMID:14720399

  8. Evapotranspiration and Urban Carbon Dioxide Flux in Miami - Dade, Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernier, T.; Hopper, W.

    2011-12-01

    For most places on the planet, evapotranspiration is a major part in the hydrologic cycle. Its significance is important in climatic settings where there is dense vegetation and high amounts of precipitation. Evapotranspiration is a coupled process from evaporation and transpiration. Individually, these processes are influenced by numerous factors. Major attributes are temperature, humidity, wind speed, air pressure, sunlight intensity, soil water supply, and soil temperature. Large scale assessments of evapotranspiration have become essential in the quantification of regional water budgets. Due to the advancement of methods and instrumentation, the Eddy Covariance method can be applied with greater accuracy and precision to the quantification of Evapotranspiration, (ET) over large areas. This study focuses on ET within an active well-field in Miami Dade, Florida. The area has several varying output factors. The variability of input is from local precipitation events and artificial canal inflows to the water-shed in-conjunction with a complex hydrogeologic framework. In this region, ET represents the majority of the output. To have an accurate water budget, it is important that ET be computed with accuracy. Under conventional methods daily values would have high levels of inaccuracies due to hourly variation of the climatic factors. The Eddy Covariance method applies methods collected at a rapid speed of 10 samples per second from an H2O vapor gas analyzer. Current methodologies allows for corrections to be applied increasing data precision. Quality control using co-spectra's and friction velocity are used to verify data. CO2 observations, also collected at this station are used to assess baseline concentrations as well as an urban CO2 flux. CO2 sources are identified and plotted. As a final result, data output and processing steps are compared between EdiRe and EddyPro.

  9. Application transfer activity in Missouri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    Land use mapping of Missouri from LANDSAT imagery was investigated. Land resource classification included the inventory of mined land, accomplished with infrared aerial photography, plus topographic, geologic and hydrologic maps.

  10. Enrolled Students' Evaluation of Miami-Dade Community College Services. Research Report #94-10R.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Sylvia K.

    In winter 1994, a study was conducted at Miami-Dade Community College (M-DCC), in Florida, to determine credit students' perceptions of college services. Surveys were distributed to students in 200 credit courses requesting ratings for 21 college services with respect to the importance of the service for their "ideal" college and their level of…

  11. Miami-Dade Quality Counts: QRS Profile. The Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Trends, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a profile of Miami-Dade's Quality Counts prepared as part of the Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment Study. The profile consists of several sections and their corresponding descriptions including: (1) Program Information; (2) Rating Details; (3) Quality Indicators for Center-Based Programs; (4) Indicators for…

  12. The Development of a Criterion-Referenced Functional Literacy Test for Miami-Dade Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skellings, Louise Noah

    In recognition of the trend toward functional illiteracy, this study developed and evaluated a criterion-referenced functional literacy test for use in diagnosis and evaluation of Miami-Dade Community College English students. The instrument was pilot-tested on 135 composition students in the fall of 1976, then revised after item analysis and…

  13. Miami-Dade Community College 1984 Institutional Self-Study. Volume VI: South Campus Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miami-Dade Community Coll., FL.

    Part of a systematic, in-depth assessment of Miami-Dade Community College's (MDCC's) educational programs, student support systems, and selected campus-level activities, this volume of the college's institutional self-study report examines the impact and effectiveness of selected programs at MDCC's South Campus. The first section provides…

  14. Evaluation of the Dade-Monroe Multiagency Network for Severely Emotionally Disturbed Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasman, Marcy

    The evaluation report examines the Dade-Monroe Multiagency Network for Severely Emotionally Disturbed (SED) Students, a 3-year regional (Florida) project to improve education, mental health treatment, and residential services for this population. The program's main components--a regional case management system, a computerized information system,…

  15. Enrolled Student Evaluation of Miami-Dade Community College Services, 2000. Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bashford, Joanne

    This report presents the findings of an enrolled student survey administered to approximately 3,700 Miami-Dade Community College (M-DCC) (Florida) students during the 2000-2001 fall term. The survey was administered to regular credit students, English-as-a-Second-Language/English-Non-Speaking (ESL/ENS) students, and Postsecondary Adult Vocational…

  16. Mathematics in Missouri: Report of the Missouri K-16 Coalition to Missouri Coordinating Board for Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri State Coordinating Board for Higher Education, Jefferson City.

    In December 1997, three of Missouri's key educational boards--the State Board of Education, the Coordinating Board for Higher Education, and the University of Missouri Board of Curators--created an historic partnership among business, education, and political leaders. Known as the Missouri K-16 Coalition and composed of prominent Missourians…

  17. Electrical resistivity and porosity structure of the upper Biscayne Aquifer in Miami-Dade County, Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitman, Dean; Yeboah-Forson, Albert

    2015-12-01

    Square array electrical soundings were made at 13 sites in the Biscayne Aquifer distributed between 1 and 20 km from the shoreline. These soundings were modeled to investigate how resistivity varies spatially and with depth in the upper 15 m of the aquifer. Porosity was estimated from the modeled formation resistivity and observed pore fluid resistivity with Archie's Law. The models were used to interpolate resistivity and porosity surfaces at -2, -5, -8, and -15 m elevations. Modeled resistivity in the unsaturated zone is generally higher than 300 Ω m with the resistivity at sites with thick unsaturated zones greater than 1000 Ω m. Resistivity in the saturated zone ranges from 30 to 320 Ω m. At many sites in the western portions of the study area, resistivity is constant or increases with depth whereas sites in the center of the Atlantic Coastal Ridge exhibit a distinct low resistivity zone (ρ < 45 Ω m) at elevations ranging between -5 and -10 m. At one site near the shore of Biscayne Bay, the resistivity is less than 10 Ω m at -5 m elevation reflecting the presence of salt water in the aquifer. The estimated porosity ranges between 14% and 71% with modal values near 25%. The porosity structure varies both with depth and spatially. Western sites exhibit a high porosity zone at shallow depths best expressed in a NE-SW trending zone of 40-50% porosity situated near the western margin of the Atlantic Coastal Ridge. This zone roughly corresponds in depth with the Q5 chronostratigraphic unit of the Miami Fm. which constitutes the upper flow unit of the Biscayne Aquifer. The highest porosity (>50%) is seen at elevations below -5 m at sites in the center of the Atlantic Coastal Ridge and likely corresponds to solution features. The general NE-SW trend of the resistivity and porosity structure suggests a causal connection with the Pleistocene paleogeography and sedimentary environments.

  18. Trends in Alcohol, Drug and Cigarette Use Among Haitian Youth in Miami-Dade County, Florida

    PubMed Central

    Marcelin, Louis Herns; Vivian, James; DiClemente, Ralph; Shultz, James; Page, J. Bryan

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this article is to report on prevalence of drug and cigarette use among a segment of Haitian youth in the United States. The article is an argument in favor of contextualizing knowledge about drug use among young people across socioethnic lines. Because initiation of licit and illicit drugs tends to occur during adolescence, ethnic differentiation is crucial if we are to understand the drug experience among young people in the United States. Immigration, acculturation, and identity processes are critical in refuting the conventional racial categorization commonly used for interpretation of risks and behaviors among youth in the United States. The task of bringing empirical evidence to bear on drug use and drug choices by young people from different contexts will lead to the re-examination of patterns of drug use as well as to creative ways of conceptualizing these patterns. PMID:16870574

  19. Use of Farmers Markets by Mothers of WIC Recipients, Miami-Dade County, Florida, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Grin, Benjamin M.; Gayle, Tamara L.; Saravia, Diana C.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Farmers market-based interventions, including the Farmers’ Market Nutrition Program of the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC), represent a promising strategy for improving dietary behaviors in low-income communities. Little is known, however, about the health-related characteristics of low-income parents who frequent farmers markets in urban settings. The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between family-health factors and the use of farmers markets by mothers of WIC recipients. Methods We recruited a convenience sample of mothers of children seeking care at a primary care clinic in a large urban public hospital in Miami, Florida, in 2011 (n = 181 total). The clinic was adjacent to a newly established farmers market at the hospital. Each mother completed an interviewer-administered survey that included self-reported measures of maternal and child health, acculturation, dietary behaviors, food insecurity, and use of farmers markets. Results Reported use of farmers markets was independently associated with maternal history of diabetes (odds ratio [OR], 6.9; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3–38.3) and increased maternal vegetable (but not fruit) consumption (OR, 3.5; 95% CI, 1.5–8.1). Intended future use of farmers markets was independently associated with being unemployed (OR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.0–5.7), increased maternal vegetable consumption (OR, 2.5; 95% CI, 1.1–5.7), and food insecurity (OR, 3.6; 95% CI, 1.3–10.3). Conclusions This study provides a snapshot of factors associated with farmers market use in a diverse population of urban low-income families. Understanding these factors may inform public health approaches to increase fresh fruit and vegetable consumption in communities at high risk for preventable chronic conditions. PMID:23764344

  20. 50 Years after "Brown": Segregation in the Miami-Dade County Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, James

    2004-01-01

    Fifty years after the "Brown v. Board of Education" decision outlawed de jure segregation in American schools, many school districts remain segregated. Despite numerous efforts aimed at desegregation, residential segregation--the primary barrier to significant school desegregation--remains entrenched throughout the United States. The Miami-Dade…

  1. Hydrologic effects of area B flood control plan on urbanization of Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kohout, F.A.; Hartwell, J.H.

    1967-01-01

    Swampy low land (Area B) that fringes the Everglades west of Metropolitan Miami, Florida (Area A) probably will be urbanized in the future. Area B will be protected from flooding by huge pumps that will pump water westward from Area B over a levee system into Conservation Area 3B. The total capacity of the pumps will be about 13,400 cubic feet per second which is sufficient to lower water levels 2 inches per day in the 203 square miles of Area B. As this capacity is about equal to the highest gravity-flow discharge to the ocean through existing canals of the Miami area, a great potential. will exist, not only for control of floods, but also for beneficial control and management of a major segment of the water resources in southeastern Florida.

  2. St. Louis, Missouri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    St. Louis is tucked in a bend of the Mississippi River, just south of the point at which the Illinois River joins the larger Mississippi, and where the Missouri River flows in from the west. Drainage patterns to the east, on the Illinois side, are highlighted with green vegetation. Meandering rivers in the verdant Ozark Plateau appear to the south and west.

    This true-color view from NASA's Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) was taken with the instrument's downward looking (nadir) camera on October 15, 2005. The urban areas of greater St. Louis show up as grey-white, including nearby Kirkwood, Webster Groves, Clayton, University City, Ferguson, St. Ann, St. Charles, and East St. Louis. The region is home to nearly three million people.

    MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

  3. 76 FR 53020 - Missouri Disaster #MO-00052

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-24

    ... ADMINISTRATION Missouri Disaster MO-00052 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of Missouri (FEMA... Injury Loans Only): Missouri: Carroll, Clay, Clinton, Dekalb, Gentry, Jackson, Johnson, Nodaway,...

  4. 33 CFR 117.407 - Missouri River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Missouri River. 117.407 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Iowa § 117.407 Missouri River. See § 117.691, Missouri River listed under Nebraska. Kansas...

  5. 33 CFR 117.411 - Missouri River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Missouri River. 117.411 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Kansas § 117.411 Missouri River. The draws of the bridges across the Missouri River shall open on signal; except during the winter season between the...

  6. 33 CFR 117.411 - Missouri River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Missouri River. 117.411 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Kansas § 117.411 Missouri River. The draws of the bridges across the Missouri River shall open on signal; except during the winter season between the...

  7. 33 CFR 117.407 - Missouri River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Missouri River. 117.407 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Iowa § 117.407 Missouri River. See § 117.691, Missouri River listed under Nebraska. Kansas...

  8. 33 CFR 117.411 - Missouri River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Missouri River. 117.411 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Kansas § 117.411 Missouri River. The draws of the bridges across the Missouri River shall open on signal; except during the winter season between the...

  9. 33 CFR 117.411 - Missouri River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Missouri River. 117.411 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Kansas § 117.411 Missouri River. The draws of the bridges across the Missouri River shall open on signal; except during the winter season between the...

  10. 33 CFR 117.411 - Missouri River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Missouri River. 117.411 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Kansas § 117.411 Missouri River. The draws of the bridges across the Missouri River shall open on signal; except during the winter season between the...

  11. 33 CFR 117.407 - Missouri River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Missouri River. 117.407 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Iowa § 117.407 Missouri River. See § 117.691, Missouri River listed under Nebraska. Kansas...

  12. 33 CFR 117.407 - Missouri River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Missouri River. 117.407 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Iowa § 117.407 Missouri River. See § 117.691, Missouri River listed under Nebraska. Kansas...

  13. 33 CFR 117.407 - Missouri River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Missouri River. 117.407 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Iowa § 117.407 Missouri River. See § 117.691, Missouri River listed under Nebraska. Kansas...

  14. Celebrate Missouri Day in Your Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri State Dept. of Elementary and Secondary Education, Jefferson City.

    This booklet provides suggested activities that can be used to enrich the observance of Missouri Day, a day commemorative of Missouri history. The document includes a chart specifying the date of Missouri day from 1990 through 1995, always the third Wednesday of October. Activities are recommended for primary, elementary, middle, and secondary…

  15. Geology and ground water resources, Williams County, North Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Freers, Theodore F.; Armstrong, C.A.

    1970-01-01

    Williams County, in northwestern North Dakota, is located near the center of the structural and sedimentary Williston basin. The preglacial sedimentary formations beneath the county are as much as 14,828 feet thick. Their beds dip generally to the south except along the flanks of the north-south striking Nesson anticline in the eastern part of the county. Late Wisconsinan glacial deposits cover all of Williams County except along the Missouri River and other scattered small areas.

  16. Hydrocarbon release investigations in Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Fels, J.B.

    1996-09-01

    Hydrocarbon releases are among the most common environmental problems in Missouri, as well as across the country. Old, unprotected underground storage tanks and buried piping from the tanks to pumps are notorious sources of petroleum contamination at LUST (leaking underground storage tank) sites. Missouri has an estimated 5000 LUST sites across the state with the majority being simple spills into clay-rich soils or into a shallow perched water system. However, in the southern half of the state, where residual soils and karst bedrock are not conducive to trapping such releases, significant groundwater supplies are at risk. This article discusses the process used to identify the source of contamination.

  17. A Quaternary volcanic ash deposit in western Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Emerson, J.W. )

    1993-03-01

    Quaternary volcanic ash has been found in more than fifty localities in the midwest. The most widespread deposits originated from the Long Valley caldera, California; the Jemez calderas, New Mexico; or the Yellowstone caldera, Wyoming. Fission track dating has grouped the deposits into six separate ash falls ranging from 700,000--2,000,000 years old. A small volcanic ash deposit in western Missouri may be correlative with those found along the Kansas and Marais de Cygnes rivers in eastern Kansas. The ash deposit is in Northwest Bates County Missouri, exposed along a tributary to Miami Creek, four miles east of the Kansas state line. The ash layer is interbedded with alluvial terrace deposits and ranges from fifteen to thirty inches in thickness. It is inferred to have been deposited in a pond or oxbow lake. The color is white with a pale yellow tinge (Munsell 10YR 8/2). Shard examination shows that about 70% are flat bubble-wall types, about 20% have straight ridges, less than 10% are bubble-junction, and only a trace are vesicular. The closest known volcanic ash occurrence is an ash outcropping in a Kansas river terrace near DeSoto, KS, forty-five miles to the northwest. The DeSoto deposit has been identified as the .62 m.y. Lava Creek B ash from the Yellowstone caldera. A preliminary correlation of the Missouri ash with the DeSoto ash is based on similar shard morphology and color.

  18. Carroll Cave: a Missouri legend

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carroll Cave is one of the premiere caves of Missouri and the Ozarks region. At over 20 miles of surveyed passage, it is the 2nd longest cave in the state and 33rd longest in the nation. It is also the largest known cave formed in the Ordovician aged (443-485 million years ago) Gasconade Dolomite o...

  19. Prevocational Training. Missouri LINC Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Coll. of Education.

    This module is intended to provide resources to persons interested in developing a prevocational curriculum for handicapped students. It provides nine definitions; discusses the timing, goals, and curriculum for prevocational education; identifies the implications of the Carl Perkins Act for prevocational training in Missouri; and lists the steps…

  20. Cable Television in Sedalia, Missouri.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamkin, Kathryn Janel

    A field study was conducted of the status of cable television in Sedalia, Missouri. Based on interviews of city council members and staff members of Cablevision, the Sedalia cable franchise holder, the following issues were investigated: (1) subscription rates; (2) franchise negotiations; (3) quality of existing services; and (4) possible…

  1. Prevocational Training. Missouri LINC Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Coll. of Education.

    This module is intended to provide resources to persons interested in developing a prevocational curriculum for handicapped students. It provides nine definitions; discusses the timing, goals, and curriculum for prevocational education; identifies the implications of the Carl Perkins Act for prevocational training in Missouri; and lists the steps

  2. Missouri: Early Head Start Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Law and Social Policy, Inc. (CLASP), 2012

    2012-01-01

    Missouri's Early Head Start/Child Care Partnership Project expands access to Early Head Start (EHS) services for children birth to age 3 by developing partnerships between federal Head Start, EHS contractors, and child care providers. Head Start and EHS contractors that participate in the initiative provide services through community child care…

  3. Little Missouri River at Medora

    View of the Little Missouri River at Medora, North Dakota.  USGS personnel were their to measure streamflow and maintain the streamgage.  Streamflow was 34.8 cubic feet per second, gage height 1.93 feet.  ...

  4. 78 FR 62361 - Union Electric Company (dba Ameren Missouri); Missouri; Taum Sauk Pumped Storage Project; Notice...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-21

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Union Electric Company (dba Ameren Missouri); Missouri; Taum Sauk Pumped... Programmatic Agreement would be incorporated into any Order issuing a license. Union Electric Company (doing... Representative, Managing Supervisor, Hydro Licensing, Dam Safety & Hydro Engineering Department, Ameren...

  5. Flood-related mortality--Missouri, 1993.

    PubMed

    1993-12-10

    Public health surveillance documented the impact of flood-related morbidity following the floods in the midwestern United States during the summer of 1993 (1,2). Because of extensive flooding of the Missouri and Mississippi rivers and their tributaries, the Missouri Department of Health (MDH) initiated surveillance to monitor flood-related mortality. This report summarizes epidemiologic information about deaths in Missouri that resulted from riverine flooding and flash flooding during the summer and fall of 1993. PMID:8246857

  6. 76 FR 49431 - Missouri River Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-10

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Missouri River Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Missouri River Resource Advisory Committee will meet...

  7. Kids Count in Missouri, 2002 Data Book. Special Focus: Public Investments in Children [with] CD-ROM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Citizens for Missouri's Children, St. Louis.

    The tenth annual Kids Count data book provides information on measures of child well-being for the state of Missouri, its 114 counties, and the city of St. Louis. This statistical portrait is based on trends in 10 indicators of child well-being: (1) enrollment in free/reduced lunch; (2) births to mothers without high school diplomas; (3) low…

  8. Missouri's Teacher Career Ladder Program. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booker, Kevin; Glazerman, Steven

    2008-01-01

    Although Missouri has had a career ladder program for teachers since 1987, there has been little research examining the program's effects. This paper examines the program's effect on student achievement using longitudinal data on district math and reading scores for 524 Missouri school districts over a nine-year period. Our primary specification

  9. Missouri A+ Students: How Are They Doing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jochems, Jeffrey T.; Hammons, James O.; Stegman, Charles

    2006-01-01

    This nonexperimental study of Missouri's A+ Program compares the academic performance of these students with two similar groups of students at a community college in southwest Missouri. Significant differences were found between the three groups regarding cumulative GPA and number of developmental courses taken.

  10. 33 CFR 117.691 - Missouri River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Missouri River. 117.691 Section 117.691 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Nebraska 117.691 Missouri River. The draw of...

  11. 75 FR 52788 - Missouri Disaster #MO-00041

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Missouri Disaster MO-00041 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... State of MISSOURI (FEMA- 1934-DR), dated 08/17/2010. Incident: Severe Storms, Flooding, and...

  12. 33 CFR 117.941 - Missouri River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Missouri River. 117.941 Section 117.941 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements South Dakota 117.941 Missouri River. The draws...

  13. 40 CFR 81.416 - Missouri.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Missouri. 81.416 Section 81.416 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF... Visibility Is an Important Value 81.416 Missouri. Area name Acreage Public Law establishing Federal...

  14. 33 CFR 117.691 - Missouri River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Missouri River. 117.691 Section 117.691 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Nebraska 117.691 Missouri River. The draw of...

  15. 33 CFR 117.941 - Missouri River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Missouri River. 117.941 Section 117.941 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements South Dakota 117.941 Missouri River. The draws...

  16. 40 CFR 81.416 - Missouri.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Missouri. 81.416 Section 81.416 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF... Visibility Is an Important Value 81.416 Missouri. Area name Acreage Public Law establishing Federal...

  17. 33 CFR 117.941 - Missouri River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Missouri River. 117.941 Section 117.941 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements South Dakota 117.941 Missouri River. The draws...

  18. 40 CFR 81.416 - Missouri.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Missouri. 81.416 Section 81.416 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF... Visibility Is an Important Value 81.416 Missouri. Area name Acreage Public Law establishing Federal...

  19. 33 CFR 117.941 - Missouri River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Missouri River. 117.941 Section 117.941 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements South Dakota 117.941 Missouri River. The draws...

  20. 40 CFR 81.416 - Missouri.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Missouri. 81.416 Section 81.416 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF... Visibility Is an Important Value 81.416 Missouri. Area name Acreage Public Law establishing Federal...

  1. 40 CFR 81.416 - Missouri.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Missouri. 81.416 Section 81.416 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF... Visibility Is an Important Value 81.416 Missouri. Area name Acreage Public Law establishing Federal...

  2. 33 CFR 117.941 - Missouri River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Missouri River. 117.941 Section 117.941 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements South Dakota 117.941 Missouri River. The draws...

  3. 33 CFR 117.691 - Missouri River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Missouri River. 117.691 Section 117.691 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Nebraska 117.691 Missouri River. The draw of...

  4. 33 CFR 117.691 - Missouri River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Missouri River. 117.691 Section 117.691 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Nebraska 117.691 Missouri River. The draw of...

  5. 33 CFR 117.691 - Missouri River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Missouri River. 117.691 Section 117.691 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Nebraska 117.691 Missouri River. The draw of...

  6. 78 FR 48762 - Missouri Disaster #MO-00065

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-09

    ... ADMINISTRATION Missouri Disaster MO-00065 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Missouri dated 08/02..., Office of Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409 3rd Street SW., Suite...

  7. 76 FR 72020 - Missouri Disaster #MO-00051

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-21

    ... ADMINISTRATION Missouri Disaster MO-00051 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Missouri dated 11/09..., Fort Worth, TX 76155. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance,...

  8. 75 FR 57088 - Missouri Disaster #MO-00040

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-17

    ... ADMINISTRATION Missouri Disaster MO-00040 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Missouri dated 09/10... Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409 3rd Street, SW., Suite 6050, Washington,...

  9. Little Missouri River at Medora ND Comparison

    The Little Missouri River at Medora, North Dakota. Top photo taken by a USGS personnel in March of 1972, while the Little Missouri River was flooding the camp sites at Medora, ND. The bottom photo was taken by USGS Colton Rupp on May 24, 2011, with a discharge of 32,000 cfs and a gage...

  10. Religious Involvement and Perceptions of Control: Evidence from the Miami-Dade Health Survey.

    PubMed

    Pascoe, Anita E; Hill, Terrence D; Mossakowski, Krysia N; Johnson, Robert J

    2016-06-01

    This study uses data collected through the 2011 Miami-Dade Health Survey (n = 444) to test whether religious involvement is associated with three distinct control beliefs. Regression results suggest that people who exhibit high levels of religious involvement tend to report higher levels of the sense of control, self-control, and the health locus of control than respondents who exhibit low levels of religious involvement. Although this study suggests that religious involvement can promote perceptions of control over one's own life, this pattern is apparently concentrated at the high end of the distribution for religious involvement, indicating a threshold effect. PMID:26118384

  11. Water resources of Yankton County, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bugliosi, E.F.

    1986-01-01

    The major surface-water sources in Yankton County, South Dakota are Lewis and Clark Lake, Marindahl and Beaver Lakes, and the Missouri and James Rivers. The James River has an average flow of 375 cu ft/sec and the Missouri River at Yankton has an average flow of 26,410 cu ft/sec. Major aquifers are the Dakota, the Niobrara, and the Lower James-Missouri glacial outwash. Depth to the Dakota aquifer, which underlies the entire county, ranges from about 300 to more than 500 ft below land surface. Wells completed in this artesian aquifer below altitudes of 1 ,260 ft will flow from 3 to 60 gallons/min at the land surface when properly constructed. Recharge is by subsurface inflow from the west. The water is a calcium sulfate type and is suitable in most cases for domestic, livestock, and irrigation uses. The Niobrara aquifer, which underlies the northeast and southwest parts of the county, may be under artesian or water-table conditions. Well yields vary but usually are suitable only for domestic use. Recharge to the northeast part of the aquifer is from precipitation infiltrating the overlying glacial deposits. The southwest part receives recharge as subsurface inflow from the west and from precipitation. The water is a magnesium sulfate type. The Lower James-Missouri aquifer underlies almost 50% of the county. Water in the aquifer is present under both artesian and water-table conditions. Wells can be expected to yield at least 1,000 gallons/min. Recharge is from subsurface inflow from the north and west, the Missouri River to the south, and from precipitation. The water is predominantly calcium sodium sulfate type, and specific conductance and hardness average 1,910 micromhs and 870 milligrams/L, respectively. (USGS)

  12. Gray bats and pollution in Missouri and northern Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, D.R., Jr.; Bunck, C.M.; Cromartie, E.; LaVal, R.K.; Tuttle, M.D.

    1981-01-01

    Gray bats died with lethal brain concentrations of dieldrin and rising levels of heptachlor epoxide in 1976, 1977, and 1978 at Bat Caves No. 2-3, Franklin County, Missouri. The colony disappeared in 1979. Dieldrin was banned in 1974 and 1981 was the last year for heptachlor use in Missouri. The State is recommendiing three organophosphates (chlorpyrifos or Dursban, dyfonate or Fonophos, and ethoprop or Mocap) as substitutes for heptachlor. All three compounds have excellent records in the environment. Analyses of insects collected where bats of this colony fed showed beetles, particularly rove beetles (Staphylinidae), to be the most heavily contaminated part of the bat's diet. Lactation concentrated these residues so that levels in milk were approximately 30 times those in the insect diet. Gray bats found dead in caves in northern Alabama showed DDD (a DDT derivative) contamination. Bats from the colony at Cave Springs Cave on the Wheeler National Wildlife Refuge contained up to 29 ppm DDD in their brains, but this is probably less than one-half the lethal level. Bats from other colonies contained less. The DDD contamination enters the Terinessee River just above the Wheeler Refuge and is seen in gray bat colonies as far as 60 miles downriver.

  13. Condom use preferences among Latinos in Miami-Dade: emerging themes concerning men's and women's culturally-ascribed attitudes and behaviours.

    PubMed

    Sastre, Francisco; De La Rosa, Mario; Ibanez, Gladys E; Whitt, Elaine; Martin, Steven S; O'Connell, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    Among Latinos, cultural values such as machismo and marianismo may promote inconsistent condom use representing a significant risk factor for HIV infection. Yet there continues to be a need for additional research to explore the influence these cultural values have on Latino men and women's condom use attitudes and behaviours given increasing HIV rates of HIV infection among Latinos. The purpose of this study was to explore further Latino traditional culturally-ascribed attitudes and behaviour for emerging themes toward condom use among a diverse group of adult Latino men and women living in Miami-Dade County, Florida, USA. The study used a qualitative study-design and collected data from 16 focus groups with a total of 67 Latino men and women. Findings from the focus groups described attitudes and behaviours that counter traditional gender roles towards sex and expected sexual behaviours informed by machismo and marianismo. Common attitudes noted in the study include men's classification of women as dirty-clean to determine condom use and women's assertiveness during sexual encounters negotiating condom use--in favour and against it. As the findings of this study suggest, the process differ greatly between Latino men and women, having an impact on the risk behaviours in which each engage. PMID:25530309

  14. Space Radar Image of Missouri River, Glasgow, Missouri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is a false-color L-band image of an area near Glasgow, Missouri, centered at about 39.2 degrees north latitude and 92.8 degrees west longitude. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on its 50th orbit on October 3, 1994. The false-color composite was made by displaying the L-band (horizontally transmitted and received) return in red; the L-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received) return in green; and the sum of the two channels in blue. The area shown is approximately 37 kilometers by 25 kilometers (23 miles by 16 miles). The radar data, coupled with pre-flood aerial photography and satellite data and post-flood topographic and field data, are being used to evaluate changes associated with levee breaks in landforms, where deposits formed during the widespread flooding in 1993 along the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers. The distinct radar scattering properties of farmland, sand fields and scoured areas will be used to inventory floodplains along the Missouri River and determine the processes by which these areas return to preflood conditions. The image shows one such levee break near Glasgow, Missouri. In the upper center of the radar image is a region covered by several meters of sand, shown as blue regions below the bend in the river. West (left) of this dark area, a blue gap in the levee tree canopy can be seen, showing the area where the levee failed. Radar data such as these can help scientists more accurately assess the potential for future flooding in this region and how that might impact surrounding communities. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar(SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves, allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature and those changes which are induced by human activity. SIR-C was developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. X-SAR was developed by the Dornier and Alenia Spazio companies for the German space agency, Deutsche Agentur fuer Raumfahrtangelegenheiten (DARA), and the Italian space agency, Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI), with the Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft und Raumfahrt e.V.(DLR), the major partner in science, operations and data processing of X-SAR.

  15. 40 CFR 81.326 - Missouri.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... Louis areas are maintenance areas for the 1-hour NAAQS for purposes of 40 CFR part 51 subpart X... CFR Sections Affected which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and on GPO... Morgan County New Madrid County Newton County Oregon County Ozark County Pemiscot County Perry...

  16. 40 CFR 81.326 - Missouri.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CFR part 51 subpart X. Missouri—NO2 Designated area Does not meet primary standards Cannot be... CFR Sections Affected which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and at www.fdsys... Morgan County New Madrid County Newton County Oregon County Ozark County Pemiscot County Perry...

  17. Teachers of Life--Learners for Life: Faculty Stories in Service Learning from Miami-Dade Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miami-Dade Community Coll., FL.

    This publication contains faculty stories about experiences with service learning from Miami-Dade Community College. The stories are first-hand accounts of real learning and how lives change because of that experience. The stories come from teachers who see themselves as facilitators of a student's own active learning; who look for and commend…

  18. Enrolled Students' Evaluation of Miami-Dade Community College Educational Goals. Research Report #94-12R.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Sylvia K.

    In winter 1994, a study was conducted at Miami-Dade Community College (M-DCC), in Florida, to determine students' perceptions of the college's educational goals. Surveys were distributed to students in 200 courses, representing 5% of all classes offered in the term. Using a 5-point scale, students were asked to rate both the importance of 20…

  19. Miami-Dade Community College: Do Students Get What They Want? Research Report No. 88-25.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vorp, Ron

    A survey was conducted at Miami-Dade Community College (MDCC) to identify the functions that students feel are important for a community college to perform, the characteristics that students consider attractive in a college, and students' ratings of MDCC in terms of those same characteristics. Questionnaires were distributed in class to 4,700…

  20. The Curriculum Development Project for the Medical Laboratory Technology Program at Miami-Dade Junior College, Miami, Florida. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miami-Dade Junior Coll., FL. Div. of Allied Health Studies.

    During Phase I of an Allied Health Professions Basic Improvement Grant, a five-member committee developed a curriculum for a medical laboratory technology program at Miami-Dade Junior College by: (1) defining competencies which differentiate a certified laboratory assistant from a medical laboratory technician, (2) translating expected laboratory…

  1. Black Enrollment at Miami-Dade Community College: A Change in Composition. Research Report No. 88-27.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vorp, Ron

    A study was conducted to examine black student enrollment at Miami-Dade Community College (MDCC) in terms of changes in student characteristics and increases in proportions of black students who have a native language other than English, who have graduated from a high school outside of the United States, or who are citizens of a country other than

  2. Miami-Dade Community College: An Organizational Response to the Language and Communication Needs of Business and the Professions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cote, Ellyn Mirides

    In response to the expressed need for cooperation between the academic and business sectors, Miami-Dade Community College established a Center for Business and Industry at the College's Mitchell Wolfson Campus in the Miami business district to centralize college programs, marketing, and other ties with the local business community. This…

  3. Hydrology of Area 39, western region, interior coal province Kansas and Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Bevans, H.E.; Skelton, F.; Kenny, J.F.; Davis, J.V.

    1984-01-01

    Area 39 has an area of about 10,500 sq mi and includes all or parts of 13 Kansas counties and 14 Missouri counties. Major streams draining the area are the Marais des Cygnes (Osage), South Grand, Little Osage, Blackwater, Blue, and Little Blue Rivers, which are tributaries of the Missouri River. Mean annual rainfall in Area 39 ranges from 34 inches in the west to > 40 inches in the east. Agriculture and forests are the predominant land uses. Streams, ponds, and reservoirs provide about 94% of the water used in the area. Groundwater supplies are limited except in the Missouri and Marais des Cygnes (Osage) River valleys where wells in unconsolidated deposits may yield from 100 to 2,000 gal/min, and in the southeast part of the area where wells in consolidated aquifers of Ordovician age yield up to 600 gal/min of good quality water. Strippable coal reserves are present in Pennsylvanian rocks throughout many parts of the area. Coal mining activity has increased sharply since the 1960's; this mining is subject to state and federal reclamation laws. Erosion, sedimentation, water quality degradation, decline in groundwater levels, and diversion of surface drainage are typical problems associated with surface coal mining. 98 refs., 24 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. 76 FR 56492 - Environmental Impact Statement: St. Louis County, Missouri

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-13

    ... Charbonier Road between Earth City Expressway and Howdershell/Shackelford Road in northwestern St. Louis... flood-related detours between Charbonier Road and Earth City Expressway, (2) address capacity needs...

  5. 77 FR 48126 - Missouri River Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Missouri River Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Missouri River Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Helena, Montana....

  6. 6. Photocopy of 1895 photograph. From illustration in Missouri Botanical ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Photocopy of 1895 photograph. From illustration in Missouri Botanical Garden, Seventh Annual Report, 1896, p. 17. VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST THROUGH MUSEUM GATE - Missouri Botanical Garden, Cleveland Avenue Gatehouse, 2345 Tower Grove Avenue, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  7. Free Embryo Sampling in the Platte and Missouri Rivers

    Weekly sturgeon free embryo efforts were initiated on April 15, 2014 near the confluence of the Platte and Missouri Rivers.  Pictured is biologist Jeff Beasley preparing to deploy a sampling net into the Missouri River.   ...

  8. Index of hydrologic data for selected sites in Broward County, Florida, 1939-80

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sonenshein, R.S.; Fish, J.E.; Causaras, C.R.; Poore, D.M.

    1982-01-01

    A comprehensive assessment of the surficial aquifers, of southeast Florida, including the Biscayne aquifer, was begun in 1979 by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the South Florida Water Management District. In the initial phase of the study, an inventory was made of existing data available in the files of the U.S. Geological Survey and other public agencies of Dade, Broward, and Palm Beach counties. This report indexes through tables and maps, the ground-water quality, ground-water level, surface-water stage, and geologic data bases for Broward County. (USGS)

  9. Index of hydrologic data for selected sites in Palm Beach County, Florida, 1928-1980

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sonenshein, R.S.; Causaras, C.R.; Fish, John E.

    1986-01-01

    A regional assessment of the surficial aquifers in Dade, Broward , and Palm Beach Counties, Florida, including the Biscayne aquifer, was begun in 1979 by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the South Florida Water Management District. The purpose of the first phase of the project was to determine the geologic, hydrologic, and water quality data available in the files of the U.S. Geological Survey and other public agencies. This report summarizes, through tables and maps, the types of data available for Palm Beach County. (USGS)

  10. 76 FR 35263 - Missouri Disaster Number MO-00048

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-16

    ... ADMINISTRATION Missouri Disaster Number MO-00048 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 4... Missouri (FEMA-1980-DR), dated 05/09/ 2011. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes, and Flooding. Incident... of Missouri, dated 05/09/2011 is hereby amended to establish the incident period for this disaster...

  11. 76 FR 35262 - Missouri Disaster Number MO-00049

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-16

    ... ADMINISTRATION Missouri Disaster Number MO-00049 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 3... Only for the State of Missouri (FEMA-1980-DR), dated 05/09/2011. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes... Private Non-Profit organizations in the State of Missouri, dated 05/09/2011, is hereby amended...

  12. 76 FR 47638 - Missouri Disaster Number MO-00048

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-05

    ... ADMINISTRATION Missouri Disaster Number MO-00048 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 8... Missouri (FEMA-1980-DR), dated 05/09/ 2011. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes, and Flooding. Incident... INFORMATION: The notice of the President's major disaster declaration for the State of Missouri, dated...

  13. 76 FR 53926 - Missouri; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-30

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Missouri; Major Disaster and Related Determinations AGENCY... declaration of a major disaster for the State of Missouri (FEMA-4012-DR), dated August 12, 2011, and related... have determined that the damage in certain areas of the State of Missouri resulting from...

  14. 76 FR 72021 - Missouri Disaster Number MO-00052

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-21

    ... ADMINISTRATION Missouri Disaster Number MO-00052 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 2... Missouri (FEMA-4012-DR), Dated 08/12/ 2011. Incident: Flooding. Incident Period: 06/01/2011 through 08/01... major disaster declaration for the State of Missouri, dated 08/12/2011 is hereby amended to extend...

  15. 76 FR 34122 - Missouri Disaster Number MO-00048

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-10

    ... ADMINISTRATION Missouri Disaster Number MO-00048 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 3... Missouri (FEMA-1980-DR), dated 05/09/ 2011. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes, and Flooding. Incident... INFORMATION: The notice of the Presidential disaster declaration for the State of Missouri, dated...

  16. 76 FR 21936 - Missouri Disaster Number MO-00047

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-19

    ... ADMINISTRATION Missouri Disaster Number MO-00047 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1... Only for the State of Missouri (FEMA-1961-DR), dated 03/23/2011. Incident: Severe winter storm and... Private Non-Profit organizations in the State of Missouri, dated 03/23/2011, is hereby amended to...

  17. 33 CFR 162.105 - Missouri River; administration and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Missouri River; administration... Missouri River; administration and navigation. (a) Supervision. The District Commander, Eighth Coast Guard... Missouri River when lives, floating plant, or major shore installations and levees are endangered,...

  18. 76 FR 33806 - Missouri Disaster Number MO-00049

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-09

    ... ADMINISTRATION Missouri Disaster Number MO-00049 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 2... Only for the State of Missouri (FEMA-1980-DR), dated 05/09/2011. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes... Private Non-Profit organizations in the State of Missouri, dated 05/09/2011, is hereby amended to...

  19. 76 FR 34090 - Missouri; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-10

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Missouri; Major Disaster and Related Determinations AGENCY... declaration of a major disaster for the State of Missouri (FEMA-1980-DR), dated May 9, 2011, and related... determined that the damage in certain areas of the State of Missouri resulting from severe storms,...

  20. 76 FR 36165 - Missouri Disaster Number MO-00048

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-21

    ... ADMINISTRATION Missouri Disaster Number MO-00048 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 5... Missouri (FEMA-1980-DR), dated 05/09/ 2011. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes, and Flooding. Incident... INFORMATION: The notice of the Presidential disaster declaration for the State of Missouri, dated...

  1. 33 CFR 162.105 - Missouri River; administration and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Missouri River; administration... Missouri River; administration and navigation. (a) Supervision. The District Commander, Eighth Coast Guard... Missouri River when lives, floating plant, or major shore installations and levees are endangered,...

  2. 33 CFR 162.105 - Missouri River; administration and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Missouri River; administration... Missouri River; administration and navigation. (a) Supervision. The District Commander, Eighth Coast Guard... Missouri River when lives, floating plant, or major shore installations and levees are endangered,...

  3. 75 FR 54923 - Missouri Disaster Number MO-00041

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-09

    ... ADMINISTRATION Missouri Disaster Number MO-00041 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1... Only for the State of Missouri (FEMA-1934-DR), dated 08/17/2010. Incident: Severe storms, flooding, and... Private Non-Profit organizations in the State of Missouri, dated 08/17/2010, is hereby amended to...

  4. 76 FR 31387 - Missouri Disaster Number MO-00048

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-31

    ... ADMINISTRATION Missouri Disaster Number MO-00048 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 2... Missouri (FEMA-1980-DR), dated 05/09/2011. Incident: Severe storms, tornadoes, and flooding. Incident... INFORMATION: The notice of the Presidential disaster declaration for the State of Missouri, dated...

  5. 76 FR 63700 - Missouri Disaster Number MO-00052

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-13

    ... ADMINISTRATION Missouri Disaster Number MO-00052 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ] ACTION: Amendment... of Missouri (FEMA-4012-DR), dated 08/12/ 2011. Incident: Flooding. Incident Period: 06/01/2011... the President's major disaster declaration for the State of Missouri, dated 08/12/2011 is...

  6. 78 FR 59045 - Missouri; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-25

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Missouri; Major Disaster and Related Determinations AGENCY... declaration of a major disaster for the State of Missouri (FEMA-4144-DR), dated September 6, 2013, and related... have determined that the damage in certain areas of the State of Missouri resulting from severe...

  7. 76 FR 40765 - Missouri Disaster Number MO-00048

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-11

    ... ADMINISTRATION Missouri Disaster Number MO-00048 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 7... Missouri (FEMA-1980-DR), dated 05/09/ 2011. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes, and Flooding. Incident... INFORMATION: The notice of the President's major disaster declaration for the State of Missouri, dated...

  8. 76 FR 38262 - Missouri Disaster Number MO-00048

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-29

    ... Administration Missouri Disaster Number MO-00048 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 6... Missouri (FEMA-1980-DR), dated 05/09/ 2011. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes, and Flooding. Incident... INFORMATION: The notice of the Presidential disaster declaration for the State of Missouri, dated...

  9. 33 CFR 162.105 - Missouri River; administration and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Missouri River; administration... Missouri River; administration and navigation. (a) Supervision. The District Commander, Eighth Coast Guard... Missouri River when lives, floating plant, or major shore installations and levees are endangered,...

  10. 78 FR 49592 - Missouri Disaster Number MO-00066

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-14

    ... ADMINISTRATION Missouri Disaster Number MO-00066 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1... Only for the State of Missouri (FEMA-4130-DR), dated 07/18/2013. Incident: Severe Storms, Straight-line... major disaster declaration for Private Non-Profit organizations in the State of MISSOURI, dated...

  11. 76 FR 36165 - Missouri Disaster Number MO-00049

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-21

    ... ADMINISTRATION Missouri Disaster Number MO-00049 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 4... Only for ] the State of Missouri (FEMA-1980-DR), dated 05/09/2011. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes... disaster declaration for Private Non-Profit organizations in the State of Missouri, dated 05/09/2011,...

  12. 75 FR 60152 - MISSOURI Disaster Number MO-00041

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-29

    ... ADMINISTRATION MISSOURI Disaster Number MO-00041 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 2... Only for the State of MISSOURI (FEMA-1934-DR), dated 08/17/2010. Incident: Severe Storms, Flooding, and... Private Non-Profit organizations in the State of MISSOURI, dated 08/17/2010, is hereby amended to...

  13. Counseling Manual on Health Careers in State of Missouri.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, John C., Ed.

    The manual contains listings of health and hospital occupations, state and national health organizations, Missouri colleges and universities, Missouri licensing boards of health professions, and training programs for health occupations in Missouri. This last section, comprising 288 pages, covers health administration, public health, anesthesia,…

  14. Missouri Rural School Board Governance and Student Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Zach; Webster, Amanda Beeler

    2009-01-01

    Through research, data collection, and analysis, this descriptive project examined rural Missouri school board governance practices. The study focused on Missouri rural schools with a student population of 400 to 1000. Effective school board members, as questionnaire respondents, were identified as having served rural Missouri school districts…

  15. Cruzan v. Director, Missouri Department of Health.

    PubMed

    1990-06-25

    The parents of Nancy Cruzan, a Missouri woman in a persistent vegetative state, petitioned to be allowed to order the termination of her artificially administered hydration and nutrition. A state trial court's authorization of the termination was reversed by the Missouri Supreme Court, which ruled that no one may order an end to life sustaining treatment for an incompetent patient in the absence of a valid living will or clear and convincing evidence of the patient's wishes. Cruzan was appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court, which affirmed (5-4) the Missouri decision, on the grounds that an incompetent person does not have the same constitutionally protected right as a competent person to refuse life sustaining treatment. In such cases a state may, but is not required to, recognize a family's decision making role, and may require clear and convincing proof of a patient's determination to forgo hydration and nutrition. PMID:12041283

  16. Toxicity and Geochemistry of Missouri Cave Stream Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawler, C. A.; Besser, J.; Wicks, C. M.

    2005-05-01

    Water and sediment quality are among the most important variables affecting the survival of stygobites. In Tumbling Creek Cave, Taney County Missouri the population of the endangered cave snail, Antrobia culveri, has declined significantly over the past decade. The cause of the population decline is unknown but could be related to the quality of streambed sediment in which the cave snail lives. The objective of this study was to determine the toxicity and concentrations of heavy metals in the sediment of Tumbling Creek Cave and five other caves in Missouri. These sediments were analyzed to assess possible point sources from within the recharge areas of the caves and to provide baseline geochemical data to which Tumbling Creek Cave sediments could be compared. Standard sediment toxicity tests and ICP-MS analysis for heavy metals were conducted. Survival and reproduction of the amphipod, Hyalella azteca, did not differ significantly between cave sediments and a control sediment. However the growth of amphipods differed significantly among sites and was significantly reduced in sediments from Tumbling Creek Cave relative to controls. Concentrations of several metals in sediments differed substantially among locations, with elevated levels of zinc and copper occurring in Tumbling Creek Cave. However, none of the measured metal concentrations exceeded sediment quality guidelines derived to predict probable effects on benthic organisms and correlations between sediment metal concentrations and toxicity endpoints were generally weak. While elevated metal levels may play a part in the cave snail's decline, other factors may be of equal or greater importance. Ongoing analyses of persistent organic contaminants and total organic carbon in cave sediments, along with continued water quality monitoring, may provide data that will allow us to better understand this complicated problem.

  17. An Evaluation of the Special Educational Project for Migrant Children in Dade County Public Schools, Miami, Florida.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Special Educational Project for Migrant Children, Naranja, FL.

    Evaluated are the various features of a project for the education of migrant children in a rural section of Florida. The objectives of the program were to ascertain the special educational needs of this population and to develop programs to meet their needs; to offer necessary supplemental and remedial activities and social and educational…

  18. Quality of the water in Borrow Ponds near a major highway interchange, Dade County, Florida, October-November 1977

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beaven, T.R.; McPherson, Benjamin F.

    1978-01-01

    Water, bottom sediment, and aquatic plants were sampled from ponds near a major south Florida highway interchange to document concentrations of selected constituents in an aquatic environment near heavy vehicular traffic. Generally, concentrations of constituents were within the range expected in an uncontaminated environment in south Florida. However, concentrations did exceed south Florida background levels or Environmental Protection Agency criteria in a few cases. Two trace elements--chromium (20 micrograms per liter) in ponded surface water and lead (500 micrograms per gram) in bottom sediment--exceeded background levels. Concentrations of dieldrin (22 micrograms per kilogram) and polychlorinated biphenyls (53 micrograms per kilogram) also exceed background levels in bottom sediment. The concentration of phenol (23 micrograms per liter) in ground water exceeded Environmental Protection Agency quality criteria by 22 micrograms per liter, but was within the background range for south Florida. Ten metals were detected in the cattail or algal samples, but only iron, manganese, and zinc were in higher concentrations than those in the bottom sediment. (Woodard-USGS)

  19. A Follow-up Study of the Implementation of Recommendations from Evaluations of Six Dade County Public Schools Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKay, Arlene G.

    This study was designed to: (1) assess how evaluation recommendations have been addressed by decision makers and administrators; (2) examine the impact of evaluations on program development; (3) identify factors affecting the utilization of evaluation findings and recommendations; and (4) provide recommendations to enhance utilization of…

  20. Areal extent of a plume of mineralized water from a flowing artesian well in Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waller, Bradley G.

    1982-01-01

    A flowing artesian well that taps the Floridan aquifer at Chekika Hammock State Park is contaminating the overlying Biscayne aquifer with saline water. The plume of mineralized water extends approximately 7 miles southeast of the well and ranges in width from 1 to 2 miles. The areal extent of contamination in the primary plume is approximately 12 square miles. The principal ions contaminating the Biscayne aquifer are chloride, sodium, and sulfate. (USGS)

  1. A Comparison of Individual and School Level Approaches to Merit Pay: A Case Study of the Dade County Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Provenzo, Eugene F., Jr.; And Others

    This policy study discusses two models of merit pay programs enacted in Florida: the Florida Meritorious Teacher Program and the Quality Instruction Incentives Program (QUIIP). Using the Motivation-Hygiene Theory (Herzberg et al.) as a theoretical framework, each program was analyzed from the perspective of how it worked as a motivator and source…

  2. Effects of bottom sediments on infiltration from the Miami and tributary canals to the Biscayne aquifer, Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Wesley L.

    1978-01-01

    Infiltration from the Miami Canal and its tributaries is an important source of recharge to the Biscayne aquifer in the vicinity of the Miami Springs-Hialeah well fields. Estimates of pumpage contributed by canal infiltration decreased from nearly 100 percent in the late 1940 's to 50 percent in May 1973 while well field pumpage increased from less than 50 Mgal/d to 120 Mgal/d. As increased withdrawals enlarge the well field 's cone of depression, the threat of saltwater intrusion during dry periods has been increased. Data on water quality, water levels, and canal bottom sediments indicate that sediments greatly impede infiltration from the canals in the areas most affected by pumping. Bottom sediments reduce coliform bacteria, pesticides, PCB, metals, and other suspended materials infiltrating canal water. (Woodard-USGS)

  3. Annotated bibliography of the geology and hydrology of the surficial aquifers in Dade, Broward, and Palm Beach counties, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Causaras, C.R.

    1982-01-01

    References and abstracts from 149 hydrologic and geologic investigations concerning the surficial aquifers of southeast Florida have been compiled to prepare an annotated bibliography. The references are listed alphabetically by the author 's name. (USGS)

  4. Public health assessment for Munisport landfill, North Miami, Dade County, Florida, Region 4. CERCLIS No. FLD084535442. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-28

    The Munisport Landfill site is an inactive landfill in, and owned by, the City of North Miami, Florida. The site is an urban area adjacent to the Oleta River Recreational Area, a state mangrove preserve, and Biscayne Bay. Soil, sediments, surface water, and ground water are contaminated. The authors selected ammonia, benzene, di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, cadmium, carbon disulfide, chloromethane, coliform bacteria, dieldrin, lead, methylene chloride, pentachlorophenol, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), styrene, vanadium, and zinc as contaminants of concern. Accidentally ingesting contaminated soil and surface water, and breathing contaminated smoke are completed human exposure pathways. Children who swam in the landfill lakes risked bacterial and viral infections. Based on the available data, the authors categorize the Munisport Landfill site as an indeterminate public health hazard.

  5. Family and cultural influences on cervical cancer screening among immigrant Latinas in Miami-Dade County, USA.

    PubMed

    Madhivanan, Purnima; Valderrama, Diana; Krupp, Karl; Ibanez, Gladys

    2016-06-01

    Cervical cancer disproportionately affects minorities, immigrants and low-income women in the USA, with disparities greatest among Latino immigrants. We examined barriers and facilitators to cervical cancer screening practices among a group of immigrant Latino women in Florida, USA. Between January and May 2013, six focus group discussions, involving 35 participants, were conducted among Hispanic women in Miami to explore their knowledge, beliefs about cervical cancer and facilitators and barriers to cervical cancer screening using a theoretical framework. The data showed that family support, especially from female relatives, was an important facilitator of screening and treatment. Women, however, reported prioritising family health over their own, and some expressed fatalistic beliefs about cancer. Major obstacles to receiving a Pap smear included fear that it might result in removal of the uterus, discomfort about being seen by a male doctor and concern that testing might stigmatise them as being sexually promiscuous or having a sexually transmitted disease. Targeted education on cancer and prevention is critically needed in this population. Efforts should focus on women of all ages since younger women often turn to older female relatives for advice. PMID:26671002

  6. An Acarologic Survey and Amblyomma americanum Distribution Map with Implications for Tularemia Risk in Missouri

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Heidi E.; Yates, Karen F.; Dietrich, Gabrielle; MacMillan, Katherine; Graham, Christine B.; Reese, Sara M.; Helterbrand, Wm. Steve; Nicholson, William L.; Blount, Keith; Mead, Paul S.; Patrick, Sarah L.; Eisen, Rebecca J.

    2011-01-01

    In the United States, tickborne diseases occur focally. Missouri represents a major focus of several tickborne diseases that includes spotted fever rickettsiosis, tularemia, and ehrlichiosis. Our study sought to determine the potential risk of human exposure to human-biting vector ticks in this area. We collected ticks in 79 sites in southern Missouri during June 7–10, 2009, which yielded 1,047 adult and 3,585 nymphal Amblyomma americanum, 5 adult Amblyomma maculatum, 19 adult Dermacentor variabilis, and 5 nymphal Ixodes brunneus. Logistic regression analysis showed that areas posing an elevated risk of exposure to A. americanum nymphs or adults were more likely to be classified as forested than grassland, and the probability of being classified as elevated risk increased with increasing relative humidity during the month of June (30-year average). Overall accuracy of each of the two models was greater than 70% and showed that 20% and 30% of the state were classified as elevated risk for human exposure to nymphs and adults, respectively. We also found a significant positive association between heightened acarologic risk and counties reporting tularemia cases. Our study provides an updated distribution map for A. americanum in Missouri and suggests a wide-spread risk of human exposure to A. americanum and their associated pathogens in this region. PMID:21363979

  7. An acarologic survey and Amblyomma americanum distribution map with implications for tularemia risk in Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, H.E.; Yates, K.F.; Dietrich, G.; MacMillan, K.; Graham, C.B.; Reese, S.M.; Helterbrand, Wm. S.; Nicholson, W.L.; Blount, K.; Mead, P.S.; Patrick, S.L.; Eisen, R.J.

    2011-01-01

    In the United States, tickborne diseases occur focally. Missouri represents a major focus of several tickborne diseases that includes spotted fever rickettsiosis, tularemia, and ehrlichiosis. Our study sought to determine the potential risk of human exposure to human-biting vector ticks in this area. We collected ticks in 79 sites in southern Missouri during June 7-10, 2009, which yielded 1,047 adult and 3,585 nymphal Amblyomma americanum, 5 adult Amblyomma maculatum, 19 adult Dermacentor variabilis, and 5 nymphal Ixodes brunneus. Logistic regression analysis showed that areas posing an elevated risk of exposure to A. americanum nymphs or adults were more likely to be classified as forested than grassland, and the probability of being classified as elevated risk increased with increasing relative humidity during the month of June (30-year average). Overall accuracy of each of the two models was greater than 70% and showed that 20% and 30% of the state were classified as elevated risk for human exposure to nymphs and adults, respectively. We also found a significant positive association between heightened acarologic risk and counties reporting tularemia cases. Our study provides an updated distribution map for A. americanum in Missouri and suggests a wide-spread risk of human exposure to A. americanum and their associated pathogens in this region. Copyright ?? 2011 by The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  8. Missouri Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan: Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri State Inter-Agency for Outdoor Recreation, Jefferson.

    The document is a summary of the Missouri State Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan, which was designed to provide guidelines for allocation of resources for needed recreation facilities. The plan identifies the present and future needs for outdoor recreation and recommends ways of meeting these needs. This 1967 document provides a brief history

  9. State Teacher Policy Yearbook, 2009. Missouri

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on Teacher Quality, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Missouri edition of the National Council on Teacher Quality's (NCTQ's) 2009 "State Teacher Policy Yearbook" is the third annual look at state policies impacting the teaching profession. It is hoped that this report will help focus attention on areas where state policymakers can make changes that will have a positive impact on teacher quality

  10. Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: Missouri

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    In grade 8 (the only grade in which subgroup trends were analyzed by achievement level), Missouri showed across-the-board gains--improvements in both reading and math at the basic, proficient and advanced levels for all racial/ethnic subgroups, low income students, and boys and girls. Results on achievement gaps were mixed. Comparable data were…

  11. Cottonwood in the Missouri Breaks National Monument

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Auble, G.; Scott, M.; Frazier, J.; Krause, C.; Merigliano, M.

    2005-01-01

    Concerns about cottonwood along the Wild and Scenic reach of the upper Missouri River include declining forests of sparse old trees with little recruitment of new individuals, impacts of cattle crazing and recreational use, and effects of flow alterations from operation of upstream dams and changes in tributary inflows.

  12. MAP OF ECOREGIONS OF IOWA AND MISSOURI

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ecoregions of Iowa and Missouri have been identified, mapped, and described and provide a geographic structure for environmental resources research, assessment, monitoring, and management. This project is part of a larger effort by the U.S. EPA to create a national, hierarch...

  13. Missouri River at Double Ditch Indian Village

    This is a comparison between the top photo taken on September 27, 2006 and the bottom photo taken June 8, 2011. These photos where both taken from the Double Ditch Indian Village, Bismarck, ND. This is the Missouri River at Double Ditch Indian Village looking downstream....

  14. Missouri DECA: 2010-2011 Policy Manual

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the Missouri DECA Policy Manual. This manual contains the following sections: (1) DECA Board of Directors; (2) State Sales Projects; (3) State Officers; (4) Districts; (5) Competitive Events; (6) General Conference Information; (7) Fall Leadership & State Officer Election Conference; (8) Central Region Leadership Conference;…

  15. 76 FR 29285 - Missouri Disaster #MO-00049

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-20

    ... ADMINISTRATION Missouri Disaster MO-00049 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the... Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409 3rd Street, SW., Suite 6050, Washington,...

  16. 78 FR 45283 - Missouri Disaster #MO-00066

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-26

    ... ADMINISTRATION Missouri Disaster MO-00066 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the... CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409 3rd Street...

  17. 76 FR 61130 - Missouri Disaster #MO-00054

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-03

    ... ADMINISTRATION Missouri Disaster MO-00054 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the..., Fort Worth, TX 76155. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance,...

  18. 2013 Missouri Minimum Standards for School Buses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicastro, Chris L.

    2012-01-01

    The revised minimum standards for school bus chassis and school bus bodies have been prepared in conformity with the Revised Statutes of Missouri (RSMo) for school bus transportation. The standards recommended by the 2010 National Conference on School Transportation and the Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (FMVSS) promulgated by the U. S.…

  19. 76 FR 18289 - Missouri Disaster #MO-00047

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION Missouri Disaster MO-00047 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY...: Submit completed loan applications to: U.S. Small Business Administration, Processing and Disbursement... of Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409 3rd Street, SW., Suite...

  20. 78 FR 56978 - Missouri Disaster #MO-00068

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-16

    ... ADMINISTRATION Missouri Disaster MO-00068 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY.... ADDRESSES: Submit completed loan applications to: U.S. Small Business Administration, Processing And..., Office of Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409 3rd Street SW., Suite...

  1. 76 FR 5856 - Missouri Disaster #MO-00046

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-02

    ...: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Missouri. Dated 01/28/2011. Incident: Severe Storms, High Winds, Hail, and Tornadoes. Incident Period: 12/30/2010 through 12/31/2010. Effective Date: 01/28/2011. Physical Loan Application Deadline Date: 03/29/2011....

  2. Noise Levels In Missouri Vocational Agriculture Shops.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weston, Curtis R.; Stewart, Bob R.

    1980-01-01

    A study was conducted to provide data about noise levels as a potential health hazard for students and instructors involved in vocational agriculture shop operations in Missouri. The grinder and radial arm saw were determined to be potential noise problems if operated continuously for 15 minutes or longer. (LRA)

  3. 78 FR 63909 - Missouri Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ... (45 FR 77027). You can also find later actions concerning the Missouri program and program amendments... Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement 30 CFR Part 925 [SATS No. MO-041-FOR; Docket ID: OSM... Regulatory Program AGENCY: Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement, Interior. ACTION:...

  4. Missouri Career Education. Career Resource Center Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Linda C.

    This bibliography contains a listing of 1276 materials in the Career Education Resource Center available for preview or short-term loan to Missouri educators. The first six sections classify materials by Elementary, Junior High, Senior High, Professional, Stereotyping, and Special Needs. Within each section materials are listed alphabetically by…

  5. Seeking Cooperation: Missouri's K-16 Coalition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Robert B.

    1999-01-01

    Missouri's diverse autonomous education system has embarked on a collaborative journey stimulated by average student performance, need for better college preparation, and concerns for a better-prepared workforce. Leaders from education, business, and government are collectively emphasizing a seamless educational system. Mathematics is the focus of…

  6. Missouri Minimum Standards for School Buses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicastro, Chris L.

    2008-01-01

    The revised minimum standards for school bus chassis and school bus bodies have been prepared in conformity with the Revised Statutes of Missouri (RSMo) for school bus transportation. The standards recommended by the 2005 National Conference on School Transportation and the Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (FMVSS) promulgated by the U. S.…

  7. Missouri School Health Education Profile, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri State Dept. of Elementary and Secondary Education, Jefferson City.

    This publication shows gains and losses for health education in Missouri's public schools. Data come from the School Health Education Profile, a survey that monitors the status of health education in public schools, including education to prevent HIV infection and other important health problems, at the middle, junior, and senior high school…

  8. Space Radar Image of St. Louis, Missouri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is a spaceborne radar image of the area surrounding St. Louis, Missouri, where the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers come together. The city of St. Louis is the bright gold area within a bend in the Mississippi River at the lower center of the image. The rivers show up as dark blue sinuous lines. Urbanized areas appear bright gold and forested areas are shown as a brownish color. Several bridges can be seen spanning the river near downtown St. Louis. The Missouri River flows east, from left to right, across the center of the image, and meets the Mississippi River, which flows from top to bottom of the image. A small stretch of the Illinois River is shown at the top of the image where it merges with the Mississippi. The Mississippi forms the state boundary between Illinois (to the right) and Missouri (to the left). Flat farmland areas within the river floodplains appear blue on the image. The major roadways that pass through the area can be seen radiating out from, and encircling, the city of St. Louis. These highways, the rivers and the bridges help maintain St. Louis' reputation as the 'Gateway to the West.

  9. Discover a Watershed: The Missouri Educators Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Project WET Foundation, 2004

    2004-01-01

    2005 IPPY Award Winner! Actively engaging students with 36 science-based, multidisciplinary, hands-on activities, this "Guide" is an award-winning learning tool covering the Missouri Basin's hydrology, geology, geography, tribes, settlement, cities, agriculture, industry, recreation, navigation, plant and animal species, issues, management and…

  10. Discover a Watershed: The Missouri Educators Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Project WET Foundation, 2004

    2004-01-01

    2005 IPPY Award Winner! Actively engaging students with 36 science-based, multidisciplinary, hands-on activities, this "Guide" is an award-winning learning tool covering the Missouri Basin's hydrology, geology, geography, tribes, settlement, cities, agriculture, industry, recreation, navigation, plant and animal species, issues, management and

  11. Missouri Small Farm Family Program. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enlow, George; And Others

    Records maintained by rural extension designees on the Missouri Small Farm Family Program, (initiated in 1972 by the cooperative extension service to help low income farm families learn to use available resources to improve their quality of life) provided data re: family characteristics, farm improvement progress, and improvement in the quality of…

  12. Censorship in Schools: A Missouri Community's Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Christie Lou

    When parents called for the removal of certain classroom and library materials from the Mexico, Missouri, public schools in 1982, the Mexico Board of Education unanimously refused their request. After separate complaints about the magazine "Humanist," a film of Shirley Jackson's story "The Lottery," as well as her book "The Lottery: Adventures of…

  13. Metamorphosis: How Missouri Rehabilitates Juvenile Offenders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dubin, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Juveniles convicted of serious offenses usually end up in large correctional facilities that focus on punishment--not rehabilitation. The state of Missouri, however, has found a better way to help end the cycle of crime: by creating a network of small facilities that provide therapy and educational opportunities, it has dramatically reduced…

  14. An alternative basin characteristic for use in estimating impervious area in urban Missouri basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Southard, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    A previous regression analysis of flood peaks on urban basins in St. Louis County, Missouri, indicated that the basin characteristics of percentage of impervious area and drainage area were statistically significant for estimating the 2-, 5-, 10-, 25-, 50-. and 100-yr peak discharges at ungaged urban basins. In this statewide regression analysis of the urban basins for Missouri, an alternative basin characteristic called the percentage of developed area was evaluated. A regression analysis of the percentage of developed area (independent variable), resulted in a simple equation for computing percentage of impervious area. The percentage of developed area also was evaluated using flood-frequency data for 23 streamflow gaging stations, and the use of this variable was determined to be valid. Using nationwide data, an urban basin characteristic known as the basin development factor was determined to be valid for inclusion in urban regression equations for estimating flood flows. The basin development factor and the percentage of developed area were compared for use in regression equations to estimate peak flows of streams in Missouri. The equations with the basin development factor produced peak flow estimates with slightly smaller average standard errors of estimate than the equation with the percentage of developed area; however, this study indicates that there was not enough statistical or numerical difference to warrant using the basin development factor instead of the percentage of developed area in Missouri. The selection of a basin characteristic to describe the physical conditions of a drainage basin will depend not only on its contribution to accuracy of regression equations, but also on the ease of determining the characteristics; the percentage of developed area has this advantage. A correlation analysis was made by correlating drainage area to percentage of impervious area, the percentage of developed area, and the basin development factor. The results of the analysis indicate that the three basin characteristics are independent of drainage area and appropriate to use in multiple-regression analysis. (Author 's abstract)

  15. Distribution of the Long-Horned Beetle, Dectes texanus, in Soybeans of Missouri, Western Tennessee, Mississippi, and Arkansas

    PubMed Central

    Tindall, Kelly V.; Stewart, Scott; Musser, Fred; Lorenz, Gus; Bailey, Wayne; House, Jeff; Henry, Robert; Hastings, Don; Wallace, Milus; Fothergill, Kent

    2010-01-01

    The long-horned beetle, Dectes texanus LeConte (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), is a stem-boring pest of soybeans, Glycine max (L.) Merrill (Fabales: Fabaceae). Soybean stems and stubble were collected from 131 counties in Arkansas, Mississippi, Missouri, and Tennessee and dissected to determine D. texanus infestation rates. All states sampled had D. texanus present in soybeans. Data from Tennessee and Arkansas showed sample infestations of D. texanus averaging nearly 40%. Samples from Missouri revealed higher infestation in the twelve southeastern counties compared to the rest of the state. Data from Mississippi suggested that D. texanus is not as problematic there as in Arkansas, Missouri, and Tennessee. Infestation rates from individual fields varied greatly (0100%) within states. In Tennessee, second crop soybeans (i.e. soybeans planted following winter wheat) had lower infestations than full season soybeans. A map of pest distribution is presented that documents the extent of the problem, provides a baseline from which changes can be measured, contributes data for emergency registration of pesticides for specific geographic regions, and provides useful information for extension personnel, crop scouts, and growers. PMID:21062147

  16. Award-winning cooperation: Missouri's waste tire to energy program

    SciTech Connect

    Galbraith, E.; Fester, D.

    1999-07-01

    Cooperation and planning among two state agencies and the University of Missouri produced benefits for all and gained national recognition for innovation. Abandoned waste Tire facilities in Missouri Pose a significant health threat to nearby residents. In addition to being mosquito breeding grounds, facilities have been set on fire. These fires have released enormous quantities of air toxics and particulate matter to the surrounding communities. Three Missouri institutions have created a unique partnership to begin cleaning up these facilities. The Missouri Department of Natural Resources, Missouri Department of Correction, and the University of Missouri- Columbia have transformed a waste stream into an emission reducing fuel stream. An air emission test at the university's coal fired power plant demonstrate that tire derived fuel (TDF) reduces emissions. Data presented will demonstrate a new method of reducing emission at coal-fired power plants while removing abandoned tires from the environment.

  17. Cruzan: clear and convincing? Missouri stands alone.

    PubMed

    Colby, W H

    1990-01-01

    In its September/October 1990 issue, the Hastings Center Report published six brief essays, with a short introduction by Courtney S. Campbell, under the collective title of "Cruzan: clear and convincing?" The individual authors and titles are: William H. Colby, "Missouri stands alone"; Pete Busalacchi, "How can they?"; Charles Baron, "On taking substituted judgment seriously"; John A. Robertson, "Cruzan: no rights violated"; Ronald E. Cranford, "A hostage to technology"; and Joanne Lynn and Jacqueline Glover, "Cruzan and caring for others." These articles present a range of responses from participants, parents, constitutional scholars, and caregivers to the U.S. Supreme Court's decision in Cruzan v. Director, Missouri Department of Health (June 25, 1990). William H. Colby is the attorney who represented the Cruzan family throughout its legal battle to have Nancy's feeding tube removed. PMID:2121666

  18. Aquatic macroinvertebrates of the lower Missouri River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poulton, Barry C.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Columbia Environmental Research Center (CERC), in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS), and the Missouri Department of Natural Resources (MDNR), has been conducting research on the aquatic macroinvertebrates of the lower Missouri River since the mid-1990s. This research was initiated in response to the need for comprehensive characterization of biological communities inhabiting aquatic habitats in large river systems that have historically been poorly studied. The USGS Status and Trends of Biological Resources Program provided partial funding for pilot studies that began in 1993 when the CERC was part of the USFWS. The purpose of this fact sheet is to provide stakeholders, scientists, management, and the general public with a basic summary of results from studies conducted by the CERC since that time period.

  19. Faults, fluids, and southeast Missouri MVT deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Clendenin, C.W.

    1993-03-01

    A number of interpretations have been proposed to explain regional Late Paleozoic flow paths responsible for the southeast Missouri Mississippi Valley-type (MVT) deposits. In each interpretation the driving force for regional flow is the Ouachita orogeny. Differences in interpretations stem directly from how faults are treated hydrologically and are possible depending on whether faults are ignored or treated as barriers to flow. Observations and geochemical data are used here to re-examine the paleohydrology of southeast Missouri. Fault style and facies patterns argue against assumptions of any idealized aquifer system. Specific observations show that faults are barriers to and pathways for fluid flow in a hydrologically compartmentalized region. Regional relations further suggest that fluid flow out of the Reelfoot rift was via faults in the Precambrian basement, and new isotope studies support such an interpretation.

  20. Soil moisture ground truth, Lafayette, Indiana, site; St. Charles Missouri, site; Centralia, Missouri, site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, E. B.

    1975-01-01

    The soil moisture ground-truth measurements and ground-cover descriptions taken at three soil moisture survey sites located near Lafayette, Indiana; St. Charles, Missouri; and Centralia, Missouri are given. The data were taken on November 10, 1975, in connection with airborne remote sensing missions being flown by the Environmental Research Institute of Michigan under the auspices of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Emphasis was placed on the soil moisture in bare fields. Soil moisture was sampled in the top 0 to 1 in. and 0 to 6 in. by means of a soil sampling push tube. These samples were then placed in plastic bags and awaited gravimetric analysis.

  1. Phosphates in some missouri refractory clays

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, R.B.; Foord, E.E.; Keller, D.J.; Keller, W.D.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes in detail phosphate minerals occurring in refractory clays of Missouri and their effect on the refractory degree of the clays. The minerals identified include carbonate-fluorapatite (francolite), crandallite, goyazite, wavellite, variscite and strengite. It is emphasized that these phosphates occur only in local isolated concentrations, and not generally in Missouri refractory clays. The Missouri fireclay region comprises 2 districts, northern and southern, separated by the Missouri River In this region, clay constitutes a major part of the Lower Pennsylvanian Cheltenham Formation. The original Cheltenham mud was an argillic residue derived from leaching and dissolution of pre-Pennsylvanian carbonates. The mud accumulated on a karstic erosion surface truncating the pre-Cheltenham rocks. Fireclays of the northern district consist mainly of poorly ordered kaolinite, with variable but minor amounts of illite, chlorite and fine-grained detrital quartz. Clays of the southern district were subjected to extreme leaching that produced well-ordered kaolinite flint clays. Local desilication formed pockets of diaspora, or more commonly, kaolinite, with oolite-like nubs or burls of diaspore ("burley" clay). The phosphate-bearing materials have been studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectral analysis (SEM-EDS) and chemical analysis. Calcian goyazite was identified in a sample of diaspore, and francolite in a sample of flint clay. A veinlet of wavellite occurs in flint clay at one locality, and a veinlet of variscite-strengite at another locality. The Missouri flint-clay-hosted francolite could not have formed in the same manner as marine francolite The evidence suggests that the Cheltenham francolite precipitated from ion complexes in pore water nearly simultaneously with crystallization of kaolinite flint clay from an alumina-silica gel. Calcian goyazite is an early diagenetic addition to its diaspore host. The wavellite and variscite-strengite veinlets are secondary, precipitated from ion complexes in ground water percolating along cracks in the flint clay. The flint clay host of the variscite-strengite veinlet contains strontian crandallite. All of the phosphates contain significant amounts of strontium. The source of P, Ca and Sr was the marine carbonates. Dissolution of these carbonates produced the argillic residue that became the primordial Cheltenham paludal mud, which ultimately altered to fireclay. Preliminary firing tests show that the presence of phosphates lowers fusion temperature. However, it is not clear whether poor refractoriness is due to the presence of phosphates, per se, or to Ca, Sr and other alkaline elements present in the phosphates.

  2. Missouri Annual Blind/Visually Impaired Literacy Study, December 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, per Section 162.1136 RSMo, conducts an annual study of the educational status of eligible blind/visually impaired students and reports the findings to the Missouri Legislature on December 1st each year. The information contained in this report pertains to the twelve data elements

  3. Career Education Evaluation in the State of Missouri

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lady, Robin E.; Wilhelm, Eric

    2010-01-01

    This doctoral team project focused on the state policies and procedures for evaluation of career education programs in Missouri. The project team worked with the Career Education department at the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education to investigate the current evaluation policies used. It was determined that the Career

  4. 33 CFR 207.306 - Missouri River; administration and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Missouri River; administration and navigation. 207.306 Section 207.306 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NAVIGATION REGULATIONS 207.306 Missouri River;...

  5. Missouri Annual Blind/Visually Impaired Literacy Study, December 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, per Section 162.1136 RSMo, conducts an annual study of the educational status of eligible blind/visually impaired students and reports the findings to the Missouri Legislature on December 1st each year. The information contained in this report pertains to the twelve data elements

  6. 33 CFR 207.306 - Missouri River; administration and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Missouri River; administration and navigation. 207.306 Section 207.306 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NAVIGATION REGULATIONS 207.306 Missouri River;...

  7. Missouri Public School Accountability Report. 2009-10 School Year

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Each year, the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education publishes an online "school accountability report card" for each public school district, each building and each charter school. This document provides a statewide report card on key accountability measures about Missouri public schools, including information required by the

  8. 33 CFR 207.306 - Missouri River; administration and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Missouri River; administration and navigation. 207.306 Section 207.306 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NAVIGATION REGULATIONS 207.306 Missouri River;...

  9. Missouri Journal of Research in Music Education, 1977-1981.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephenson, Jack R., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    This journal is devoted to the needs and interests of the school and college music teachers of Missouri and the United States. Articles in Volume 4, Number 1 are: "Index of Articles in the 'Colorado Journal of Research in Music Education,' 1964-1973" (S. Deich); "Index of Articles in the 'Missouri Journal of Research in Music Education,'…

  10. School Leadership Stability, Principal Moves, and Departures: Evidence from Missouri

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Bruce D.; Punswick, Eric; Belt, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study is to investigate and characterize principals' backgrounds, individual and school level factors associated with leadership stability, and principal career paths and exit behaviors in Missouri. Method: In this study, the authors construct two data sets of practicing school principals in the state of Missouri:

  11. IMPROVING DRINKING WATER QUALITY FOR SMALL RURAL COMMUNITIES IN MISSOURI

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project will combine expertise of three Missouri universities. led by Lincoln University of Missouri - an 1890 Historically black College & University (HBCU), with an integration of field and laboratory studies and technology transfer and staff training for selected s...

  12. 78 FR 50436 - Missouri; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-19

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Missouri; Major Disaster and Related Determinations AGENCY... declaration of a major disaster for the State of Missouri (FEMA-4130-DR), dated July 18, 2013, and related... Response and Recovery, Federal Emergency Management Agency, 500 C Street SW., Washington, DC 20472,...

  13. 75 FR 52964 - Missouri; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-30

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Missouri; Major Disaster and Related Determinations AGENCY... declaration of a major disaster for the State of Missouri (FEMA-1934-DR), dated August 17, 2010, and related determinations. DATES: Effective Date: August 17, 2010. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Peggy Miller,...

  14. 33 CFR 207.306 - Missouri River; administration and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Missouri River; administration and navigation. 207.306 Section 207.306 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 207.306 Missouri River; administration and navigation. (a) (b) General. The...

  15. 33 CFR 207.306 - Missouri River; administration and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Missouri River; administration and navigation. 207.306 Section 207.306 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 207.306 Missouri River; administration and navigation. (a) (b) General. The...

  16. Dieldrin mortality of lesser snow geese in Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Babcock, K.M.; Flickinger, Edward L.

    1977-01-01

    In March and April 1974, 157 lesser snow geese (Chen caerulescens) died from dieldrin poisoning during northward migration through western Missouri. Evidence strongly suggested that the mortality in Missouri resulted from delayed effects upon geese exposed to aldrin-treated rice seed on wintering areas in southeast Texas.

  17. Guidelines for Insuring Intellectual Freedom in Missouri's Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Library Association, Columbia.

    A statement of policy was developed by the Intellectual Freedom Committee of the Missouri Library Association as a means of carrying out its assigned responsibility "to make available such assistance and direction as deemed necessary and proper to any citizen of Missouri involved in a censorship incident." The Association is directly concerned…

  18. School Leadership Stability, Principal Moves, and Departures: Evidence from Missouri

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Bruce D.; Punswick, Eric; Belt, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study is to investigate and characterize principals' backgrounds, individual and school level factors associated with leadership stability, and principal career paths and exit behaviors in Missouri. Method: In this study, the authors construct two data sets of practicing school principals in the state of Missouri:…

  19. Missouri Journal of Research in Music Education, 1967-1971.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilton, Lewis B., Ed.

    1971-01-01

    This journal is devoted to the needs and interests of the school and college music teachers of Missouri and the United States. Articles in Volume 2, Number 1 are: "Progress Report on the Action Research Project in the Schools of Missouri" (D. Anderson); "Tension and Motion as Factors in Expressive Conducting" (J. A. Labuta); "Programmed…

  20. The Missouri Libraries Film Cooperative: Its Origins, History and Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Joseph W.

    The idea of public library film circuits was first proposed by the Carnegie Corporation in 1947. In 1948, one of two three-year grants was given to the Missouri State Library for the development of a statewide film circuit. Film packages of four to nine films were circulated among eleven libraries. Early conflicts with the University of Missouri's…

  1. 76 FR 9038 - Missouri; Emergency and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-16

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Missouri; Emergency and Related Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of the Presidential declaration of an emergency for the State of Missouri (FEMA-3317-EM), dated February 3, 2011, and...

  2. 76 FR 44025 - Missouri; Emergency and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-22

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Missouri; Emergency and Related Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of the Presidential declaration of an emergency for the State of Missouri (FEMA-3325-EM), dated June 30, 2011, and...

  3. Miami-Dade Community College 1984 Institutional Self-Study. Volume VII: Mitchell Wolfson New World Center Campus Study (Evaluation of the Center for Business and Industry).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miami-Dade Community Coll., FL.

    Part of a systematic, in-depth assessment of Miami-Dade Community College's (MDCC's) educational programs, student support systems, and selected campus-level activities, this volume of the college's institutional self-study report examines the impact and effectiveness of the Center for Business and Industry (CBI) at MDCC's Wolfson Campus.…

  4. Analysis of the Enrollment Loss among First-Time-in-College Students Attending Miami-Dade Community College. Research Report No. 95-07R.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brann, Herman I.

    From fall 1990 to fall 1994, Florida's Miami-Dade Community College (M-DCC) experienced a decline in enrollment among first-time-in-college students. To determine reasons for the decline, M-DCC examined characteristics and high school of origin of first-time students in the period, categorizing students as direct-entry (i.e., entering within 1…

  5. Miami-Dade Community College 1984 Institutional Self-Study. Volume VII: Mitchell Wolfson New World Center Campus Study (Evaluation of the Center for Business and Industry).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miami-Dade Community Coll., FL.

    Part of a systematic, in-depth assessment of Miami-Dade Community College's (MDCC's) educational programs, student support systems, and selected campus-level activities, this volume of the college's institutional self-study report examines the impact and effectiveness of the Center for Business and Industry (CBI) at MDCC's Wolfson Campus.

  6. Assessing and Improving Student Outcomes: What We Are Learning at Miami Dade College. Report No. 2 in the Culture of Evidence Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bashford, Joanne; Slater, Doug

    2008-01-01

    This report describes how Miami Dade College (MDC) has begun to develop a systematic and data-informed method for assessing and improving student outcomes across its large eight-campus college. Told from the point of view of MDC's Office of Institutional Effectiveness, the report recounts how the college has responded to the problem of poor…

  7. Improved Outcomes with Computer-Assisted Instruction in Mathematics and English Language Skills for Hispanic Students in Need of Remedial Education at Miami Dade College, Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vassiliou, John

    2011-01-01

    In this study, 180 first-time-in-college (FTIC) students at Miami Dade College, Florida in need of remedial instruction in basic mathematics, reading, and sentence skills utilized the A[superscript +]dvancer[R] College Readiness Online software. Significant results were found with increased ACCUPLACER[R] scores; number of students who avoided at…

  8. Program on State Agency Remote Sensing Data Management (SARSDM). [missouri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eastwood, L. F., Jr.; Gotway, E. O.

    1978-01-01

    A planning study for developing a Missouri natural resources information system (NRIS) that combines satellite-derived data and other information to assist in carrying out key state tasks was conducted. Four focal applications -- dam safety, ground water supply monitoring, municipal water supply monitoring, and Missouri River basin modeling were identified. Major contributions of the study are: (1) a systematic choice and analysis of a high priority application (water resources) for a Missouri, LANDSAT-based information system; (2) a system design and implementation plan, based on Missouri, but useful for many other states; (3) an analysis of system costs, component and personnel requirements, and scheduling; and (4) an assessment of deterrents to successful technological innovation of this type in state government, and a system management plan, based on this assessment, for overcoming these obstacles in Missouri.

  9. Evaluating Investment in Missouri River Restoration: The Missouri River Effects Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, R. B.; Fischenich, C. J.; Buenau, K. E.

    2014-12-01

    In excess of $700 million has been spent over the last 10 years on restoration of the Missouri River. During this time, restoration efforts have focused progressively on avoidance of jeopardy for three threatened or endangered species: interior least tern (Sternula antillarum), piping plover (Charadrius melodus), and the pallid sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus albus). In 2013, the US Army Corps of Engineers, the US Fish and Wildlife Service, and Missouri River stakeholders (through the Missouri River Recovery Implementation Committee) commissioned an Effects Analysis (EA; Murphy and Weiland, 2011) to evaluate the effects of this effort on the three species' populations and to project effects of future restoration. The EA includes synthesis of existing abiotic and biotic scientific information relating to species population processes, distributions, and habitat needs, as well as development of conceptual and quantitative models linking river context to its management and to species' responses. The EA also includes design of the next generation of hypothesis-driven science to support adaptive management of the species and the river. The Missouri River EA faces the challenge of evaluating how management of North America's largest reservoir storage system, 600 km of non-channelized mainstem, and nearly 1,200 km of channelized mainstem contribute to species' population dynamics. To support EA needs, the US Army Corps of Engineers is developing a new generation of reservoir simulation and routing models for the Missouri River basin, coupled with components to evaluate ecological and socio-economic metrics. The EA teams are developing coordinated models relating management to functional habitats and species' responses. A particular challenge faced by the EA is communicating the very different uncertainties in population dynamics between well-documented birds and the enigmatic fish, and the implications of this disparity in decision making, implementation, and adaptive management strategies.

  10. The Missouri Career Development and Teacher Excellence Plan: An Initial Study of Missouri's Career Ladder Program. A Technical Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schofer, Richard C.; And Others

    The Missouri Plan provides for direct participation of teachers in the planning, development, and implementation of the district career ladder plan. This study analyzed the appropriateness of the Missouri teacher incentive plan. In particular, the study sought to determine why districts did or did not choose to implement career ladder programs;…

  11. Competency Index for Graphic Arts Programs in Missouri. A Crosswalk of Selected Instructional Materials against Missouri's Competency Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This index was developed to help graphic arts instructors in Missouri use existing instructional materials and keep track of student progress on the VAMS system. The list was compiled by a committee of instructors who selected appropriate references and identified areas that pertained to Missouri competencies. The index lists competencies in these…

  12. Competency Index for Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Programs in Missouri. A Crosswalk of Selected Instructional Materials against Missouri's Competency Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This index was developed to help air conditioning and refrigeration instructors in Missouri use existing instructional materials and keep track of student progress on the VAMS system. The list was compiled by a committee of instructors who selected appropriate references and identified areas that pertained to Missouri competencies. The index lists…

  13. Brick and Click Libraries: Proceedings of an Academic Library Symposium (Northwest Missouri State University, Maryville, Missouri, October 14, 2005)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ury, Connie Jo., Ed.; Baudino, Frank, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    These proceedings document the fifth year of the "Brick and Click Libraries Symposium", held annually at Northwest Missouri State University in Maryville, Missouri. Thirty five peer-reviewed papers and abstracts, written by academic librarians, and presented at the symposium are included in this volume. Many of the entries have references and…

  14. Competency Index for Building Trades Programs in Missouri. A Crosswalk of Selected Instructional Materials against Missouri's Competency Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This index was developed to help building trades instructors in Missouri use existing instructional materials and keep track of student progress on the VAMS system. The list was compiled by a committee of instructors who selected appropriate references and identified areas that pertained to Missouri competencies. The index lists competencies in…

  15. ROCK PILE MOUNTAIN WILDERNESS STUDY AREA, MISSOURI.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pratt, Walden P.; Ellis, Clarence

    1984-01-01

    A geologic and mineral-occurrence survey of the Rock Pile Mountain Wilderness study area in southeastern Missouri indicates the area has little promise for the occurrence of energy and mineral resources. Exploratory drill holes on private land along the west side of the area encountered no mineralization, and none of the rocks or sediments exposed in the area contain any detectable evidence of significant mineralization. Drilling through the Bonneterre Formation, supplemented by geochemical studies of the drill-hole samples, would test the remote possibility of lead mineralization close to the contact with Precambrian rocks.

  16. Delineation of flooding within the upper Mississippi River Basin, flood of July 10 and 27, 1993, in Kansas City Missouri, and Kansas City, Kansas, and vicinity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perry, Charles A.; Clement, Ralph W.; Studley, Seth E.

    1997-01-01

    During spring and summer 1993, record flooding inundated many of the stream and river valleys in the upper Mississippi and the Missouri River Basins. The flooding was the result of widespread and numerous intense thunderstorms that, together with saturated soils, produced large volumes of runoff. The magnitude of flooding exceeded the 100-year discharge values (1-percent chance of exceedance in any given year) at many streamflow-gaging stations in Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wisconsin. The flooding was unusual because of its long duration and widespread severe damage. The Mississippi and the Missouri Rivers were above flood stage for more than 1 month at several locations along their lengths. Millions of acres of agricultural and urban lands were inundated for weeks, and unofficial damage estimates exceeded $10 billion in the flooded States (Parrett and others, 1993),During summer 1993, large parts of Kansas City, Missouri, and Kansas City, Kansas, and vicinity were flooded from overflows of the Missouri and the Kansas Rivers and numerous smaller tributaries, This report provides flood-peak elevation data and delineates the arcalcktent of the 1993 floods in the Kansas City metropolitan area for July 10 and 27, 1993 (fig. 1A, sheet 1: B, sheet 2: C, sheet 3). The 1993 flood elevations and extent of flooding are compared with flood-plain boundaries defined by Flood Insurance Studies conducted by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) for cities and counties in the area (U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, 1975–95).This report is one of a series of U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) investigations that document the effects of the 1993 flooding of the upper Mississippi and the Missouri River Basins and that improve the technical base from which flood-plain management decisions can be made by other agencies.

  17. Hydrogeology, water chemistry, and subsidence of underground coal mines at Huntsville, Missouri, July 1987 to December 1988. Water Resources Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Blevins, D.W.; Ziegler, A.C.

    1992-01-01

    Underground coal mining in and near Huntsville, in Randolph County in north-central Missouri, began soon after 1831. Mining in the Huntsville area was at its peak during 1903 and continued until 1966 when the last underground mine was closed and the economically recoverable coals under Huntsville had been mostly, if not completely, removed. The now abandoned mines are of concern to the public and to various State and Federal agencies for two reasons: (1) mine drainage acidifies streams and leaves large, soft, dangerous deposits of iron oxyhydroxides at mine springs and on streambeds (data on file at the Missouri Department of Natural Resources, Land Reclamation Commission), and (2) collapse of mine cavities sometimes causes surface subsidence resulting in property damage or personal injury. To address these concerns, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Missouri Department of Natural Resources, in 1987 initiated a study to: determine the location of mine springs, the seasonal variation of stream-water chemistry, and the effects of underground-mine water on flow and water quality of nearby ground water and receiving streams; and identify areas susceptible to surface subsidence because of mine collapse. The purpose of the report is to present the findings and data collected for the study.

  18. A Participatory Regional Partnership Approach to Promote Nutrition and Physical Activity Through Environmental and Policy Change in Rural Missouri

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Elizabeth A.; Estlund, Amy; Motton, Freda; Hipp, Pamela R.; Brownson, Ross C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Rural residents are less likely than urban and suburban residents to meet recommendations for nutrition and physical activity. Interventions at the environmental and policy level create environments that support healthy eating and physical activity. Community Context Healthier Missouri Communities (Healthier MO) is a community-based research project conducted by the Prevention Research Center in St. Louis with community partners from 12 counties in rural southeast Missouri. We created a regional partnership to leverage resources and enhance environmental and policy interventions to improve nutrition and physical activity in rural southeast Missouri. Methods Partners were engaged in a participatory action planning process that included prioritizing, implementing, and evaluating promising evidence-based interventions to promote nutrition and physical activity. Group interviews were conducted with Healthier MO community partners post intervention to evaluate resource sharing and sustainability efforts of the regional partnership. Outcome Community partners identified the benefits and challenges of resource sharing within the regional partnership as well as the opportunities and threats to long-term partnership sustainability. The partners noted that the regional participatory process was difficult, but the benefits outweighed the challenges. Interpretation Regional rural partnerships may be an effective way to leverage relationships to increase the capacity of rural communities to implement environmental and policy interventions to promote nutrition and physical activity. PMID:26068413

  19. AmeriFlux US-MOz Missouri Ozark Site

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Lianhong

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-MOz Missouri Ozark Site. Site Description - The site is located in the University of Missouri Baskett Wildlife Research area, situated in the Ozark region of central Missouri. The site is uniquely located in the ecologically important transitional zone between the central hardwood region and the central grassland region of the US. The land has been publically owned since the 1930s, and is on a land tract that was forested with the same dominant species before settlement in the early 1800s.

  20. Ecological dynamics of wetlands at Lisbon Bottom, Big Muddy National Fish and Wildlife Refuge, Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapman, Duane C.; Ehrhardt, Ellen A.; Fairchild, James F.; Jacobson, Robert B.; Poulton, Barry C.; Sappington, Linda C.; Kelly, Brian P.; Mabee, William R.

    2002-01-01

    The study documented the interaction between hydrology and the biological dynamics within a single spring season at Lisbon Bottom in 1999. The study goal was to provide information necessary for resource managers to develop management strategies for this and other units of the Big Muddy National Fish and Wildlife Refuge. Researchers studied the hydrology, limnology, and biological dynamics of zooplankton, macroinvertebrates, fish and waterbird communities. Lisbon Bottom is one of several parcels of 1993 flood-damaged land that was purchased from willing sellers by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service as part of the Big Muddy National Fish and Wildlife Refuge. Lisbon Bottom is a loop bend in the river near Glasgow in Howard County, Missouri between approximately river mile (RM) 213 to RM 219. Flooding at Lisbon in 1993 and 1995 breeched local levees and created a diverse wetland complex.

  1. Bathymetric surveys at highway bridges crossing the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers near St. Louis, Missouri, 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huizinga, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    The size of the scour holes observed at the surveyed sites likely was affected by the low to moderate flow conditions on the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers at the time of the surveys. The scour holes likely would be larger during conditions of increased flow. Artifacts of horizontal positioning errors were present in the data, but an analysis of the surveys indicated that most of the bathymetric data have a total propagated error of less than 0.33 foot.

  2. Descriptor data of Castanea accessions at the University of Missouri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chestnut, Castanea L., trees were propagated and planted in repositories at the Horticulture and Agroforestry Research Center, New Franklin, Missouri in 1996, 2002, 2009 with additional accessions acquired annually. Trees have been pruned, fertilized, irrigated, and pests controlled following Unive...

  3. Genotyping American Bittersweet in Missouri with TRAP technique

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    American bittersweet (Celastrus Scandens) in the family of Celastraceae is a diecious woody and shrubby vine native to Missouri. As a result of aggressive invasion of a morphologically similar vine named Oriental Bittersweet (Celastrus orbiculatus) and subsequent hybridization, American bittersweet ...

  4. BELL MOUNTAIN WILDERNESS STUDY AREA, MISSOURI.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pratt, Walden P.; Ellis, Clarence

    1984-01-01

    Geologic, geochemical, geophysical, and mineral-occurrence studies of the Bell Mountain Wilderness study area, Missouri indicate little promise for the occurrence of major base-metal resources. Abandoned prospects on the west side of Shut-in Creek were opened on narrow sulfide-bearing quartz veins in Precambrian volcanic rocks. These veins contain lead, copper, and trace amounts of silver, but they do not constitute a resource at present, and evidence from this study suggests little promise for resources at depth. Unusually high amounts of trace metals in panned concentrates from several drainages on the west side of the area indicate areas of probable resource potential for low-grade lead-zinc deposits buried at depths of a few hundred feet.

  5. Space Radar Image of Glascow, Missouri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is a false-color L-band image of an area near Glasgow, Missouri, centered at about 39.2 degrees north latitude and 92.8 degrees west longitude. The image was acquired using the L-band radar channel (horizontally transmitted and received and horizontally transmitted/vertically received) polarizations combined. The data were acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on orbit 50 on October 3,1994. The area shown is approximately 37 kilometers by 25 kilometers (23 miles by 16 miles). The radar data, coupled with pre-flood aerial photography and satellite data and post-flood topographic and field data, are being used to evaluate changes associated with levee breaks in landforms, where deposits formed during the widespread flooding in 1993 along the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers. The distinct radar scattering properties of farmland, sand fields and scoured areas will be used to inventory floodplains along the Missouri River and determine the processes by which these areas return to preflood conditions. The image shows one such levee break near Glasgow, Missouri. In the upper center of the radar image, below the bend of the river, is a region covered by several meters of sand, shown as dark regions. West (left) of the dark areas, a gap in the levee tree canopy shows the area where the levee failed. Radar data such as these can help scientists more accurately assess the potential for future flooding in this region and how that might impact surrounding communities. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves, allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature and those changes which are induced by human activity. SIR-C was developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. X-SAR was developed by the Dornier and Alenia Spazio companies for the German space agency, Deutsche Agentur fuer Raumfahrtangelegenheiten (DARA), and the Italian space agency, Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI), with the Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft und Raumfahrt e.V.(DLR), the major partner in science, operations and data processing of X-SAR.

  6. 78 FR 57876 - DeSoto and Boyer Chute National Wildlife Refuges; Washington County, Nebraska, and Harrison and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-20

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service DeSoto and Boyer Chute National Wildlife Refuges; Washington County, Nebraska... National Wildlife Refuges (Refuges, NWRs) for public review and comment. In this EA/Draft CCP, we describe... Manager, DeSoto and Boyer Chute National Wildlife Refuges, 1434 316th Lane, Missouri Valley, IA 51555....

  7. Visualizing impact structures using high-resolution LiDAR-derived DEMs: A case study of two structures in Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Finn, Michael P.; Krizanich, Gary W.; Evans, Kevin R.; Cox, Melissa R.; Yamamoto, Kristina H.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence suggests that a crypto-explosive hypothesis and a meteorite impact hypothesis may be partly correct in explaining several anomalous geological features in the middle of the United States. We used a primary geographic information science (GIScience) technique of creating a digital elevation model (DEM) of two of these features that occur in Missouri. The DEMs were derived from airborne light detection and ranging, or LiDAR. Using these DEMs, we characterized the Crooked Creek structure in southern Crawford County and the Weaubleau structure in southeastern St. Clair County, Missouri. The mensuration and study of exposed and buried impact craters implies that the craters may have intrinsic dimensions which could only be produced by collision. The results show elevations varying between 276 and 348 m for Crooked Creek and between 220 and 290 m for Weaubleau structure. These new high- resolution DEMs are accurate enough to allow for precise measurements and better interpretations of geological structures, particularly jointing in the carbonate rocks, and they show greater definition of the central uplift area in the Weaubleau structure than publicly available DEMs.

  8. Space Radar Image of Missouri River - TOPSAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This is a combined radar and topography image of an area along the Missouri River that experienced severe flooding and levee failure in the summer of 1993. The meandering course of the Missouri River is seen as the dark curving band on the left side of the image. The predominantly blue area on the left half of the image is the river's floodplain, which was completely inundated during the flood of 1993. The colors in the image represent elevations, with the low areas shown in purple, intermediate areas in blue, green and yellow, and the highest areas shown in orange. The total elevation range is 85 meters (279 feet). The higher yellow and orange area on the right side of the image shows the topography and drainage patterns typical of this part of the midwestern United States. Dark streaks and bands in the floodplain are agricultural areas that were severely damaged by levee failures during the flooding. The region enclosed by the C-shaped bend in the river in the upper part of the image is Lisbon Bottoms. A powerful outburst of water from a failed levee on the north side of Lisbon Bottoms scoured a deep channel across the fields, which shows up as purple band. As the flood waters receded, deposits of sand and silt were left behind, which now appear as dark, smooth streaks in the image. The yellow areas within the blue, near the river, are clumps of trees sitting on slightly higher ground within the floodplain. The radar 'sees' the treetops, and that is why they are so much higher (yellow) than the fields. The image was acquired by the NASA/JPL Topographic Synthetic Aperture Radar system (TOPSAR) that flew over the area aboard a DC-8 aircraft in August 1994. The elevations are obtained by a technique known as radar interferometry, in which the radar signals are transmitted by one antenna, and echoes are received by two antennas aboard the aircraft. The two sets of received signals are combined using computer processing to produce a topographic map. Similar techniques can be used to map the Earth's topography from satellites and from the space shuttle. The brightness of the image represents the radar backscatter at C-band, in the vertically transmitted and received polarization. The image is centered south of the town of Glasgow in central Missouri, at 39.1 degrees north latitude and 92.9 degrees west longitude. The area shown is about 5 km by 10 km (3.1 by 6.2 miles). Radar and topography data such as these are being used by scientists to more accurately assess the potential for future flooding in this region and how that might impact surrounding communities. Radar and interferometry processing for this image was performed at JPL; image generation was performed at Washington University, St. Louis.

  9. 76 FR 4725 - Apria Healthcare Customer Service Department; Fourteen Locations in Missouri Cameron, Cape...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-26

    ... Employment and Training Administration Apria Healthcare Customer Service Department; Fourteen Locations in... Healthcare, Customer Service Department, Thirteen Locations in Missouri: Cameron, Cape Girardeau, Columbia... St. Peters, Missouri. The notice was published in the Federal Register on September 3, 2010 (75...

  10. 30 CFR 925.20 - Approval of the Missouri abandoned mine land reclamation plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Approval of the Missouri abandoned mine land..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE MISSOURI 925.20 Approval of the Missouri abandoned mine land reclamation plan. The Secretary approved...

  11. A Study of the Mentoring Program for First Year School Superintendents in Missouri

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolsey, Tina

    2013-01-01

    Mentoring first-year superintendents in Missouri began as an informal process with the pairing of a veteran superintendent (mentor) with a first-year superintendent (protege) by the Missouri Association of School Administrators (MASA). The adoption of the Career Continuous Professional Certification by the Missouri State Board of Education

  12. 40 CFR 81.65 - Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma... Designation of Air Quality Control Regions 81.65 Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region,...

  13. 77 FR 58352 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; State of Missouri

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-20

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; State of Missouri AGENCY... Implementation Plan (SIP) revision submitted by the state of Missouri on September 21, 2010. This revision... values for the Air Quality Index. These revisions would make Missouri's rules consistent with...

  14. 40 CFR 81.65 - Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma... Designation of Air Quality Control Regions 81.65 Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region,...

  15. 30 CFR 925.20 - Approval of the Missouri abandoned mine land reclamation plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Approval of the Missouri abandoned mine land..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE MISSOURI 925.20 Approval of the Missouri abandoned mine land reclamation plan. The Secretary approved...

  16. 76 FR 11190 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; State of Missouri

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-01

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; State of Missouri AGENCY... Implementation Plan (SIP) revision submitted by the state of Missouri to add two new rules which implement... set by the rules will strengthen the Missouri SIP. EPA's approval of this SIP revision is being...

  17. 30 CFR 925.20 - Approval of the Missouri abandoned mine land reclamation plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Approval of the Missouri abandoned mine land..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE MISSOURI 925.20 Approval of the Missouri abandoned mine land reclamation plan. The Secretary approved...

  18. 40 CFR 81.65 - Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma... Designation of Air Quality Control Regions 81.65 Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region,...

  19. 40 CFR 81.65 - Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma... Designation of Air Quality Control Regions 81.65 Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region,...

  20. 76 FR 60518 - Missouri; Amendment No. 3 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-29

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Missouri; Amendment No. 3 to Notice of a Major Disaster... notice of a major disaster declaration for the State of Missouri (FEMA-4012-DR), dated August 12, 2011... for the State of Missouri is hereby amended to include the following area among those areas...

  1. 30 CFR 925.15 - Approval of Missouri regulatory program amendments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Approval of Missouri regulatory program..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE MISSOURI 925.15 Approval of Missouri regulatory program amendments. The following is a list of the...

  2. 30 CFR 925.15 - Approval of Missouri regulatory program amendments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Approval of Missouri regulatory program..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE MISSOURI 925.15 Approval of Missouri regulatory program amendments. The following is a list of the...

  3. 76 FR 58291 - Missouri; Amendment No. 2 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-20

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Missouri; Amendment No. 2 to Notice of a Major Disaster... notice of a major disaster declaration for the State of Missouri (FEMA-4012-DR), dated August 12, 2011... for the State of Missouri is hereby amended to include the Public Assistance program for the...

  4. 30 CFR 925.15 - Approval of Missouri regulatory program amendments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Approval of Missouri regulatory program..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE MISSOURI 925.15 Approval of Missouri regulatory program amendments. The following is a list of the...

  5. 30 CFR 925.20 - Approval of the Missouri abandoned mine land reclamation plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Approval of the Missouri abandoned mine land..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE MISSOURI 925.20 Approval of the Missouri abandoned mine land reclamation plan. The Secretary approved...

  6. 40 CFR 81.65 - Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma... Designation of Air Quality Control Regions 81.65 Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region,...

  7. 75 FR 73066 - FFP Missouri 13, LLC; Grays Hydro, LLC; Notice of Competing Preliminary Permit Applications...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-29

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission FFP Missouri 13, LLC; Grays Hydro, LLC; Notice of Competing Preliminary..., 2010. On May 18, 2010, FFP Missouri 13, LLC and Grays Hydro, LLC filed applications, pursuant to...: FFP Missouri 13, LLC's project (Project No. 13763-000) would consist of: (1) An excavated...

  8. Impact of Discontinued Obstetrical Services in Rural Missouri: 1990-2002

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sontheimer, Dan; Halverson, Larry W.; Bell, Laird; Ellis, Mark; Bunting, Pamela Wilbanks

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This study examines the potential relationship between loss of local obstetrical services and pregnancy outcomes. Methods: Missouri Hospital Association and Missouri Department of Health birth certificate records were used as sources of information. All member hospitals of the Missouri Hospital Association that were located in cities of…

  9. 77 FR 11958 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; State of Missouri; Regional Haze...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-28

    ...EPA is proposing a limited approval of a revision to the Missouri State Implementation Plan (SIP) submitted by the State of Missouri through the Missouri Department of Natural Resources (MDNR) on August 5, 2009, and supplemental information submitted on January 30, 2012, that addresses regional haze for the first implementation period. This revision addresses the requirements of the Clean Air......

  10. Celebrating CTE Month 2008: Missouri Students, Teachers Lobby with State Lawmakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidwai, Sabrina

    2008-01-01

    More than 100 students and teachers from Missouri Career and Technical Student Organizations gathered at the State Capitol Building in Jefferson City, Missouri, to participate in the Missouri Association for Career and Technical Education's (MACTE) Annual Legislative Day on February 13. During the morning session, participants listened to state

  11. Training Needs of School Board Members in the State of Missouri

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossmiller, Susan; O'Brien, Melody F.

    2013-01-01

    This project examined the training needs of school board members in the state of Missouri. Of the 520 school districts in Missouri, 382 are members of the Missouri School Boards Association (MSBA). The school board members of the MSBA schools were surveyed in this project. Data was gathered relating to the training needs of board members with 1 to…

  12. Missouri Assessment Program (MAP), Spring 2000: Intermediate Social Studies, Released Items, Grade 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri State Dept. of Elementary and Secondary Education, Jefferson City.

    The Social Studies Missouri Assessment Program (MAP) was designed to be administered in three sessions, two of which use items specifically developed for Missouri with input from Missouri teachers and one of which uses selected portions of the nationally normed Terra Nova Test, developed by CTB/McGraw-Hill. Anchor papers for constructed-response…

  13. Missouri Assessment Program (MAP), Spring 2000: High School Social Studies, Released Items, Grade 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri State Dept. of Elementary and Secondary Education, Jefferson City.

    The Social Studies Missouri Assessment Program (MAP) was designed to be administered in three sessions, two of which use items specifically developed for Missouri from Missouri teachers and one of which uses selected portions of the nationally normed Terra Nova Test, developed by CTB/McGraw-Hill. Anchor papers for constructed-response items were…

  14. Celebrating CTE Month 2008: Missouri Students, Teachers Lobby with State Lawmakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidwai, Sabrina

    2008-01-01

    More than 100 students and teachers from Missouri Career and Technical Student Organizations gathered at the State Capitol Building in Jefferson City, Missouri, to participate in the Missouri Association for Career and Technical Education's (MACTE) Annual Legislative Day on February 13. During the morning session, participants listened to state…

  15. 30 CFR 925.25 - Approval of Missouri abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...; land acquisition, management and disposal; database. November 29, 1994 August 24, 1995 RSMo 444.810.2... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Approval of Missouri abandoned mine land... STATE MISSOURI § 925.25 Approval of Missouri abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments....

  16. 30 CFR 925.25 - Approval of Missouri abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...; land acquisition, management and disposal; database. November 29, 1994 August 24, 1995 RSMo 444.810.2... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Approval of Missouri abandoned mine land... STATE MISSOURI § 925.25 Approval of Missouri abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments....

  17. 30 CFR 925.25 - Approval of Missouri abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...; land acquisition, management and disposal; database. November 29, 1994 August 24, 1995 RSMo 444.810.2... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Approval of Missouri abandoned mine land... STATE MISSOURI § 925.25 Approval of Missouri abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments....

  18. Habitat and Hydrology Condition Indices for the Upper Mississippi, Missouri, and Ohio Rivers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Habitat and hydrology indices were developed to assess the conditions in reaches of the impounded Upper Mississippi River, the Fort Peck and Garrison reaches of the Upper Missouri River, the Missouri National Recreational River, and the channelized Lower Missouri River, and the O...

  19. Modeling Climate Change and Sturgeon Populations in the Missouri River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wildhaber, Mark L.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Columbia Environmental Research Center (CERC), in collaboration with researchers from the University of Missouri and Iowa State University, is conducting research to address effects of climate change on sturgeon populations (Scaphirhynchus spp.) in the Missouri River. The CERC is conducting laboratory, field, and modeling research to identify causative factors for the responses of fish populations to natural and human-induced environmental changes and using this information to understand sensitivity of sturgeon populations to potential climate change in the Missouri River drainage basin. Sturgeon response information is being used to parameterize models predicting future population trends. These models will provide a set of tools for natural resource managers to assess management strategies in the context of global climate change. This research complements and builds on the ongoing Comprehensive Sturgeon Research Program (CSRP) at the CERC. The CSRP is designed to provide information critical to restoration of the Missouri River ecosystem and the endangered pallid sturgeon (S. albus). Current research is being funded by USGS through the National Climate Change Wildlife Science Center (NCCWSC) and the Science Support Partnership (SSP) Program that is held by the USGS and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The national mission of the NCCWSC is to improve the capacity of fish and wildlife agencies to respond to climate change and to address high-priority climate change effects on fish and wildlife. Within the national context, the NCCWSC research on the Missouri River focuses on temporal and spatial downscaling and associated uncertainty in modeling climate change effects on sturgeon species in the Missouri River. The SSP research focuses on improving survival and population estimates for pallid sturgeon population models.

  20. Application of the Concerns-Based Adoption Model to the installation of telemedicine in a rural Missouri nursing home.

    PubMed

    Armer, Jane M; Harris, Kimberly; Dusold, Julie M

    2004-01-01

    The Concerns-Based Adoption Model (C-BAM) was developed in education for the purpose of implementing innovations and change within the school/college system. This study used the principles of the C-BAM and, for the first time, applied them to the process (implementation/training) and product (computer) of the telemedicine technologies in a rural nursing home setting in Missouri. Three rural counties of the 23 Missouri Telemedicine Network sites were chosen to pilot implementation of the computer as one mode of telemedicine technology. One rural nursing home was enlisted for an in-depth study to examine how telemedicine would affect communication between and among community health professionals. Methodological triangulation was used to study individuals' concerns about and utilization of telemedicine through interviews, participant observations, chart reviews, and the Stages of Concern (SOC) survey. Responses to the SOC over time are reported here. The participants consisted of nursing home employees: administration, nursing, housekeeping, and dietary. Forty-three of 52 employees participated in the SOC survey at Time 1 (preimplementation). Twelve months later, 40 participated in the SOC survey at Time 2. While the majority of respondents expressed awareness of the technology, they also expressed a high concern for informational and personal implications. Concern scores in all subscales decreased at Time 2. Findings from this study provided feedback for the implementation and training phases of the project. Most importantly, findings support the appropriateness of this educational model to the healthcare setting. PMID:15076128

  1. Missouri Journal of Research in Music Education, 1972-1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilton, Lewis B., Ed.

    1976-01-01

    This journal is devoted to the needs and interests of the school and college music teachers of Missouri and the United States. Articles in Volume 3, Number 1 are: "The Parker Road Project: An Experiment of the Effects of Young Audience Concerts and a Related Curriculum on the Cognitive and Affective Development of Elementary School Children" (J.…

  2. Missouri: The History of a User Friendly Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Wayne

    1990-01-01

    Notes that University of Missouri at Columbia has been major training ground in counseling psychology for more than 40 years. Explores its development and influence on the field through use of historical archives and comments from faculty, graduates, and American Psychological Association site visit reports. (Author/NB)

  3. Biogeography of Missouri. Instructional Unit. Conservation Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castillon, David A.

    This unit is designed to help social studies or science teachers incorporate ecological concepts into the teaching of science and Missouri geography. The unit includes: (1) a topic outline; (2) general unit objectives; (3) an introduction to basic biogeographical concepts; (4) descriptions of the glaciated prairie, unglaciated prairie, ozark, and

  4. Addressing the STEM Workforce Challenge: Missouri. BHEF Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Business-Higher Education Forum (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    While states and the federal government have put efforts in place to increase the size of the workforce trained in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) to meet innovation demands, there continues to be a nationwide shortage of students who are interested in and prepared for such careers. Missouri is no exception to this problem, one

  5. Accelerating the College and Career Readiness of Missouri's Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Missouri is in the process of transitioning to new English language arts and mathematics standards that will better prepare students to be successful in college and their careers. Time, effort, and resources must be dedicated to effective implementation in order to realize the promise of these new common core state standards. This state card

  6. An Analysis of Community Use Policies in Missouri School Districts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eyler, Amy A.; Swaller, Erin M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Joint use or community use policies are state-, district-, or school-level policies that allow for shared use of space or facilities between a school and a city or private organization. For this study, we (1) created an inventory of community use policies within Missouri school districts; (2) analyzed the policies for content, and (3)

  7. Frequency and Correlates of Campus Crime: Missouri Public Postsecondary Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Seunghee

    2012-01-01

    Data from 34 public postsecondary institutions in Missouri showed liquor- and drug-related offenses and burglary as the most frequent campus crimes. Four-year institutions, institutions with a greater number of students, full-time students, younger students, out-of-state students, and a larger percentage of program completion were positively

  8. Food Safety for Healthy Missouri Families: Evaluation of Program Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comer, Marcus M.

    2002-01-01

    The food safety knowledge of 22 inner-city Missouri youth from low-income families was assessed before and after a 4-week summer program. Posttest results showed dramatic changes in beliefs. However, topics such as irradiation, eating raw cookie dough, and safety of produce in grocery stores showed little change. (SK)

  9. MICROSCOPICAL ANALYSIS OF AEROSOLS COLLECTED IN ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study of the concentration of total suspended particulates (TSP) was conducted at two sampling sites in St. Louis, Missouri during July 1975. One site located at the southeastern boundary of the city was adjacent to an industrial area. The other sampling site was located in the...

  10. The Missouri Report: Achieving the National Education Goals, 1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Governor's Office, Jefferson City.

    This report on Missouri's efforts to achieve the six National Education Goals for the year 2000 includes indicators to assess the state's progress in meeting those goals and program descriptions. Measures to achieve goal 1, to ensure that all children start school ready to learn, include education for preschoolers and their families, family crisis…

  11. Rendezvous with the World: Missouri Southern State University's Themed Semesters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stebbins, Chad

    2011-01-01

    Although most universities emphasize study abroad as the primary vehicle to internationalize the campus, in reality only a small percentage of students actually participate in this endeavor. The internationally themed semesters at Missouri Southern State University (MSSU) reach virtually every student, and provide a global perspective and cultural…

  12. Library Media Centers: Accessibility Issues in Rural Missouri

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, John E.; Lynch, Debra M.

    2006-01-01

    Based on a study by Cox (2004), this article deals with the needs of students with visual, hearing, and orthopedic impairments in terms of full access to school library media centers. Fictitious vignettes of student concerns as well as possible answers and thought-provoking questions expand Cox's rural Missouri-based study to a much wider audience…

  13. Support Services: University of Missouri-Columbia. Creating Employment Opportunities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregory, Martha Wille, Ed.

    This training module was developed to introduce postsecondary personnel to the support services available for students with disabilities at the University of Missouri-Columbia. The module covers the definition and philosophy of support services, including the development of rehabilitation services, independent living, and the disability rights…

  14. Missouri Curriculum Guide for Alcohol-Related Traffic Offenders' Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Don; McClain, Robert

    This document contains the second edition of the Alcohol or Drug Related Traffic Offenders' Program (ARTOP) curriculum guide developed by the Missouri Department of Mental Health to reduce alcohol-related traffic offenses by presenting factual information about the physical effects of alcohol on the body and on driving skills. The materials…

  15. Missouri Journal of Research in Music Education, 1989-1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koch, Franklin W., Ed.; Sims, Wendy L., Ed.; Pembrook, Randall G., Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This journal is devoted to the needs and interests of the school and college music teachers of Missouri and the United States. Articles in Number 26 are: "The Effect of Instrument Type, Stimulus Timbre, and Stimulus Octave Placement on Tuning Accuracy" (Jane W. Cassidy); "The Relationship of Music Opportunity at the Common School Level and…

  16. Missouri Adult Education and Literacy State Plan, 2000-2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education's revised State Plan extension, which is effective until June 30, 2011. The eligible agency assures that this plan, which serves as an agreement between State and Federal Governments under the Adult Education and Family Literacy Act, will be administered in…

  17. Missouri Agricultural Energy Saving Team-A Revolutionary Opportunity (MAESTRO)

    SciTech Connect

    McIntosh, Jane; Schumacher, Leon

    2014-10-23

    The Missouri Agricultural Energy Saving Team-A Revolutionary Opportunity (MAESTRO) program brought together a team of representatives from government, academia, and private industry to enhance the availability of energy efficiency services for small livestock producers in the State of Missouri. The Missouri Department of Agriculture (MDA) managed the project via a subcontract with the University of Missouri (MU), College of Agriculture Food and Natural Resources, MU Extension, the MU College of Human Environmental Sciences, the MU College of Engineering, and the Missouri Agricultural and Small Business Development Authority (MASBDA). MU teamed with EnSave, Inc, a nationally-recognized expert in agricultural energy efficiency to assist with marketing, outreach, provision of farm energy audits and customer service. MU also teamed with independent home contractors to facilitate energy audits of the farm buildings and homes of these livestock producers. The goals of the project were to: (1) improve the environment by reducing fossil fuel emissions and reducing the total energy used on small animal farms; (2) stimulate the economy of local and regional communities by creating or retaining jobs; and (3) improve the profitability of Missouri livestock producers by reducing their energy expenditures. Historically, Missouri scientists/engineers conducted programs on energy use in agriculture, such as in equipment, grain handling and tillage practices. The MAESTRO program was the first to focus strictly on energy efficiency associated with livestock production systems in Missouri and to investigate the applicability and potential of addressing energy efficiency in animal production from a building efficiency perspective. A. Project Objectives The goal of the MAESTRO program was to strengthen the financial viability and environmental soundness of Missouri's small animal farms by helping them implement energy efficient technologies for the production facility, farm buildings, and the homes on these farms. The expected measurable outcomes of the project were to improve the environment and stimulate the economy by: • Reducing annual fossil fuel emissions by 1,942 metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent, reducing the total annual energy use on at least 323 small animal farms and 100 farm homes by at least 8,000 kWh and 2,343 therms per farm. • Stimulating the economy by creating or retaining at least 69 jobs, and saving small animal farmers an average of $2,071 per farm in annual energy expenditures. B. Project Scope The MAESTRO team chose the target population of small farms because while all agriculture is traditionally underserved in energy efficiency programs, small farms were particularly underserved because they lack the financial resources and access to energy efficiency technologies that larger farms deploy. The MAESTRO team reasoned that energy conservation, financial and educational programs developed while serving the agricultural community could serve as a national model for other states and their agricultural sectors. The target population was approximately 2,365 small animal farm operations in Missouri, specifically those farms that were not by definition a confined animal feeding operation (CAFO). The program was designed to create jobs by training Missouri contractors and Missouri University Extension staff how to conduct farm audits. The local economy would be stimulated by an increase in construction activity and an increasing demand for energy efficient farm equipment. Additionally, the energy savings were deemed critical in keeping Missouri farms in business. This project leveraged funds using a combination of funds from the Missouri Department of Natural Resources’ Missouri Energy Center and its Soil and Water Conservation Program, from the state's Linked Deposits, MASBDA's agricultural loan guarantee programs, and through the in-kind contribution of faculty and staff time to the project from these agencies and MU. Several hundred Missouri livestock producers were contacted during the MAESTRO project. Of the livestock producers, 254 invited the team to conduct a farm energy assessment which complied with ASABE 612. A total of 147 livestock farm upgrades were implemented, representing 57.5 percent of the farms for which a farm energy assessment was completed. This represented a statewide average annual savings of 1,088,324 kWh and 75,516 therms. The team also reviewed the condition of the livestock producer’s home(s). A total of 106 home energy assessments were completed and 48 individual homes implemented their recommended upgrades, representing 45 percent of the farm homes for which an energy assessment was completed. This represented a statewide average annual savings of 323,029 kWh, and 769.4 therms. More of these farmers likely would have updated their homes but the funding to incentivize them fell short. In spite of the shortfall in incentive funds, some farmers still updated their homes as they saw the value in making these changes to their home.

  18. 76 FR 34121 - Missouri Disaster Number MO-00049

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-10

    ... ADMINISTRATION Missouri Disaster Number MO-00049 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1.... ADDRESSES: Submit completed loan applications to: U.S. Small Business Administration, Processing And..., Office of Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409 3rd Street, SW., Suite...

  19. 76 FR 31388 - Missouri Disaster Number MO-00048

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-31

    ... ADMINISTRATION Missouri Disaster Number MO-00048 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1... applications to: U.S. Small Business Administration, Processing and Disbursement Center, 14925 Kingsport Road, Fort Worth, TX 76155. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance,...

  20. The Missouri Southern Story: From the Provincial to the International

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Kay

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the international program at Missouri Southern, which began 10 years ago and has expanded in both the number of students and faculty participating, and in the places to go for foreign study. The program affects students two ways, according to university president Julio Leon. While some students do foreign study as part of…

  1. 2011 Census of Technology: Missouri Schools K-12

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The Census of Technology (COT) is designed to assess Missouri's continuing investment in K-12 education technologies. The COT provides important data for the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE) to share with state and national decision-makers to help advance public policy and increase public awareness and support for education…

  2. Missouri Journal of Research in Music Education, 1995-2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hylton, John B., Ed.; Bergee, Martin J., Ed.; Robinson, Charles R., Ed.; Fredrickson, William E., Ed.

    2000-01-01

    This journal is devoted to the needs and interests of the school and college music teachers of Missouri and the United States. Articles in Number 32 are: "Developing Writing-Across-the-Curriculum Projects in Eighth Grade Band: An Observational Case Study" (Martin J. Bergee; Judith L. Crawford); "Student Teaching Programs in Music Education at…

  3. Building Teacher Quality in the Kansas City, Missouri School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corso, Aileen; Franck, Valerie; Kelliher, Kate; McCorry, Betsy

    2011-01-01

    This study looks at the policies and practices shaping teacher quality in the Kansas City, Missouri School District (KCMSD). It is part of a series of analyses by the National Council on Teacher Quality (NCTQ) in school districts across the nation. Framing this analysis are five policy goals for improving teacher quality: (1) Staffing. Teacher…

  4. Missouri Responses to the Advanced Practice Nurse Role.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armer, Jane M.

    1997-01-01

    A randomly drawn statewide sample of 891 Missouri consumers revealed overall support for the advance practice nurse role to be greater than 75%. Seeking health care consumers' reactions to proposed alternatives is a crucial step in planning and implementing a program of health care reform that will meet current and future health needs. (Author)

  5. Remote Wetland Assessment for Missouri Coteau Prairie Glacial Basins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Missouri Coteau prairie glacial wetlands are subject to numerous anthropogenic disturbances, such as cultivation, construction, and chemical inputs from upland land-use practices. High wetland density and temporal variability among these ecosystems necessitate synoptic tools for watershed-scale wetl...

  6. National Environmental/Energy Workforce Assessment for Missouri.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Field Research Center Inc., Iowa City, IA.

    This report presents existing workforce levels, training programs and career potentials and develops staffing level projections (1976-1982) based on available information for the State of Missouri. The study concerns itself with the environmental pollution control areas of air, noise, potable water, pesticides, radiation, solid waste, wastewater,…

  7. Frequency and Correlates of Campus Crime: Missouri Public Postsecondary Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Seunghee

    2012-01-01

    Data from 34 public postsecondary institutions in Missouri showed liquor- and drug-related offenses and burglary as the most frequent campus crimes. Four-year institutions, institutions with a greater number of students, full-time students, younger students, out-of-state students, and a larger percentage of program completion were positively…

  8. The Missouri Southern Story: From the Provincial to the International

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Kay

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the international program at Missouri Southern, which began 10 years ago and has expanded in both the number of students and faculty participating, and in the places to go for foreign study. The program affects students two ways, according to university president Julio Leon. While some students do foreign study as part of

  9. An Analysis of Community Use Policies in Missouri School Districts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eyler, Amy A.; Swaller, Erin M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Joint use or community use policies are state-, district-, or school-level policies that allow for shared use of space or facilities between a school and a city or private organization. For this study, we (1) created an inventory of community use policies within Missouri school districts; (2) analyzed the policies for content, and (3)…

  10. Bigotry and Violence on Missouri's College Campuses. A Summary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri State Advisory Committee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights.

    This publication reports on the bigotry and violence on Missouri's college campuses based on the perspectives of 15 persons at a community forum held March 22, 1989. Participants included representatives of federal and state government agencies, human rights organizations, law enforcement agencies, and faculty, staff, students, and administrators…

  11. Missouri River Flooding in Pierre, S.D.

    Runoff due to recent wide-scale rainfall in South Dakota has led to very high streamflows for local Missouri River tributaries, according to several U.S. Geological Survey streamflow gages. In this photo of Pierre, S.D., the State Capitol can be seen in the background, a sign for

  12. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. Missouri

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Missouri's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  13. 75 FR 60719 - Missouri River Resource Advisory Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-01

    ...: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Helena National Forest's Missouri River Resource Advisory Committee (RAC) will meet on Tuesday, November 9, 2010 from 6 p.m. until 9 p.m., in Helena, Montana. The purpose of the.... ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the USDA-Helena National Forest office located at 2880 Skyway...

  14. Ventilation of Welding Fumes in Vocational Agriculture Laboratories in Missouri.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Brenda; And Others

    1982-01-01

    This study was intended to measure the effectiveness of ventilation systems in removing airborne contaminants produced by arc welding in vocational agriculture laboratories in Missouri. It was found that most schools did not meet the minimum Occupational Safety and Health Administration standards. (SK)

  15. Trail Camera Installation to Monitor Erosion along Missouri River

    A South Dakota School of Mines and Technology student working for the USGS South Dakota Water Science Center installed a trail camera in the fall of 2013 on a pole at the Playground site to take time-lapse images of shoreline erosion along the Missouri River near the town of Lower Brule on...

  16. Trail Camera Installation to Monitor Erosion along Missouri River

    A South Dakota School of Mines and Technology student working for the USGS South Dakota Water Science Center installed a trail camera at the Lodge site in the fall of 2013 to take time-lapse images of shoreline erosion along the Missouri River near the town of Lower Brule on the Lower Brule Res...

  17. Missouri Journal of Research in Music Education, 1962-1966.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilton, Lewis B., Ed.

    1966-01-01

    The research projects reported in this bulletin represent the scope of thinking being done by those in the music teaching field, by college students, and by students in Missouri's secondary schools. Articles in Volume 1, Number 1 are: "Toward the Development of a Music Curriculum Based on the Maturation of the Child" (A. Kitto); "Musical Values…

  18. Administrative Handbook for Cooperative Industrial Education Programs in Missouri.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Clifton L.

    This handbook is a complete guide for developing and administering cooperative industrial education programs in Missouri. The 11 sections of the handbook provide information in the following areas: (1) overview of the cooperative industrial education program; (2) role of the teacher-coordinator; (3) program development; (4) the instructional

  19. Administrative Handbook for Cooperative Occupational Education Programs in Missouri.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Clifton L.

    This handbook is a complete guide for developing and administering cooperative vocational education programs in Missouri. The 11 sections of the handbook provide information in the following areas: (1) overview of the cooperative education program; (2) role of the teacher-coordinator; (3) program development; (4) the instructional program; (5)

  20. Missouri Journal of Research in Music Education, 1982-1988.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephenson, Jack R., Ed.; Koch, Franklin W., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    This journal is devoted to the needs and interests of the school and college music teachers of Missouri and the United States. Articles in Volume 5, Number 1 are: "O. Anderson Fuller, The First Black Doctor of Philosophy in Music in America, and his Development of the Music Education Curriculum at Lincoln University" (S. Houser); "A Study…

  1. Numerical simulation of a plume of brackish water in the Biscayne Aquifer originating from a flowing artesian well, Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Merritt, Michael L.

    1996-01-01

    A computer model that simulates a plume of brackish water in the Biscayne Aquifer has been developed. Simulations showed the remnant plume moving generally south-southeastward after 1985 and gradually dissipating. The plume of brackish water (originating from a well drilled in 1944) will be completely dispersed between 1994 and 2003. New well fields drilled would not cause the remnant plume to reverse direction nor would the brackish water reach the well fields.

  2. The Nation's Report Card Science 2009 Trial Urban District Snapshot Report. Miami-Dade County Public Schools. Grade 8, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Guided by a new framework, the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) science assessment was updated in 2009 to keep the content current with key developments in science, curriculum standards, assessments, and research. The 2009 framework organizes science content into three broad content areas. Physical science includes concepts…

  3. The Nation's Report Card Science 2009 Trial Urban District Snapshot Report. Miami-Dade County Public Schools. Grade 4, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Guided by a new framework, the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) science assessment was updated in 2009 to keep the content current with key developments in science, curriculum standards, assessments, and research. The 2009 framework organizes science content into three broad content areas. Physical science includes concepts…

  4. Relations between well-field pumping and induced canal leakage in east-central Miami-Dade County, Florida, 2010-2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nemec, Katherine; Antolino, Dominick; Turtora, Michael; Adam Foster

    2015-01-01

    Results from the groundwater model and the stable isotope data analysis indicate the importance of considering geologic heterogeneity when investigating the relations between pumping and canal leakage, not only at this site, but also at other sites with similar heterogeneous geology. The model results were consistently sensitive to the hydrogeologic framework and changes in hydraulic conductivities. The model and the isotope data indicate that the majority of the groundwater/surface-water interactions occurred within the shallow flow zone. A relatively lower-permeability geologic layer occurring between the shallowest and deep preferential flow zones lessens the interactions between the production wells and the canal.

  5. Time to English Proficiency for English Language Learners in New York City and Miami-Dade County. IESP Policy Brief No. 01-12

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conger, Dylan; Hatch, Megan; McKinney, Jessica; Atwell, Meghan Salas; Lamb, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Since the 2002 No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) was signed into law, schools have been allowed to administer grade-level content reading exams in the native language of English Language Learner (ELL) students for up to three years after they enter the school system. From that point, the students are expected to take the state assessments in…

  6. U.S. News & World Report's Best High Schools: Methodology and Miami-Dade County Public Schools Rankings. Information Capsule. Volume 1106

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blazer, Christie

    2012-01-01

    In December 2009, "U.S. News & World Report" published its list of the nation's top 100 high schools. The magazine awarded an additional 1,687 high schools it judged to be deserving of special recognition with silver medals, bronze medals, and honorable mentions. High schools receiving awards demonstrated an ability to provide all students,…

  7. Characterization of Possible Carbonatites in Southeast Missouri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shavers, E. J.; Wulamu, A.; Encarnacion, J. P.; Luetkemeyer, P. B.

    2014-12-01

    Carbonatite is an igneous rock containing greater than 50% carbonate minerals. These rocks are the most common host of REE mineralization and may contain other economic deposits such as uranium, fluorine and niobium. Several researchers have mentioned the presence of a carbonatite phase interspersed among the olivine melilitite-alnöite dikes and diatremes of southeast Missouri, yet a comprehensive validation of this occurrence has, so far, remained elusive. Here we present petrographic, cathodoluminescence, stable isotope and Vis-NIR analysis which support the presence of a carbonatite magma. We identify apparently single generation calcite groundmass surrounding country rock xenoliths and olivine-cored mafic spheroids altered to carbonate and opaque minerals. We present stable isotope data for twenty samples of intrusive and country rock from across the study area. δ18O values for all rock types exhibit little variation with values between 21.9 ‰ and 28.1 ‰ (VSMOW), possibly the result of outgassing during emplacement. Measured δ13C values of (1) carbonate country rocks are between -0.1 ‰ and -2.9 ‰ (VPDB), (2) ultramafic and carbonate-rich mafic rocks range from -3.0 ‰ to -4.6 ‰ (VPDB) and (3) carbonate-rich rocks with volcanic textures, as well as carbonate veins within mafic rocks, fall between -5.4 ‰ to -8.2 ‰ (VPDB). We suggest that this data and initial petrographic observations indicate (1) limited fluid-rock interaction as the host rock clasts have retained their original isotopic signature, (2) an initial ultramafic phase enriched in 13C by a small amount of sedimentary rock due to low initial C content, (3) mantle sourced carbonate fluids entraining fragments of the ultramafic phase and xenoliths. However, future electron microprobe studies may allow us to further constrain the causes for the observed isotopic shifts. We compare laboratory reflectance measurements of a dolomitic intrusive and adjacent dolomite country rock. Absorption bands in the 0.42-1.35 and 2.2-2.4 μm regions indicate unique Si, Fe, Mg, Al and possibly Cr mineralization in the intrusive rock. These features may indicate higher chemical content in addition to, or alternately, intrusive specific mineralogy. This data may allow for future carbonatite identification using remote imaging spectroscopy.

  8. 40 CFR 81.116 - Northern Missouri Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... municipalities (as defined in section 302(f) of the Clean Air Act, 42 U.S.C. 1857h(f)) geographically located..., Gentry County, Grundy County, Harrison County, Holt County, Howard County, Knox County, Lewis...

  9. 40 CFR 81.116 - Northern Missouri Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... municipalities (as defined in section 302(f) of the Clean Air Act, 42 U.S.C. 1857h(f)) geographically located..., Gentry County, Grundy County, Harrison County, Holt County, Howard County, Knox County, Lewis...

  10. 40 CFR 81.116 - Northern Missouri Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... municipalities (as defined in section 302(f) of the Clean Air Act, 42 U.S.C. 1857h(f)) geographically located..., Gentry County, Grundy County, Harrison County, Holt County, Howard County, Knox County, Lewis...

  11. 40 CFR 81.116 - Northern Missouri Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... municipalities (as defined in section 302(f) of the Clean Air Act, 42 U.S.C. 1857h(f)) geographically located..., Gentry County, Grundy County, Harrison County, Holt County, Howard County, Knox County, Lewis...

  12. Microbiologic Evaluation of Patients from Missouri with Erythema Migrans

    PubMed Central

    Wormser, Gary P.; Masters, Edwin; Liveris, Dionysios; Nowakowski, John; Nadelman, Robert B.; Holmgren, Diane; Bittker, Susan; Cooper, Denise; Wang, Guiqing; Schwartz, Ira

    2009-01-01

    Background Borrelia lonestari infects Amblyomma americanum, the tick species that is the most common cause of tick bites in southeast and south-central United States, and this spirochete has been detected in an erythema migrans (EM)like skin rash in 1 patient. Therefore, B. lonestari is considered to be a leading candidate for the etiologic agent of EM in this region. Methods Skin biopsy specimens obtained from patients from the Cape Girardeau area of Missouri who had EM-like lesions were cultured in Barbour-Stoenner-Kelly medium and evaluated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting multiple genes. Serum specimens were tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for antibodies against sonicated whole-cell Borrelia burgdorferi. Results were compared with those obtained over the same period for patients from New York State who had EM. Results B. lonestari was not detected by PCR in any of 31 skin biopsy specimens collected from 30 Missouri patients. None of 19 cultures of Missouri skin samples that were suitable for evaluation were positive for B. burgdorferi, compared with 89 (63%) of 142 cultures of samples collected from New York State patients (P < .001). None of the 25 evaluable Missouri patients were seropositive for antibodies against B. burgdorferi, compared with 107 (75%) of 143 New York State patients (P < .001). Conclusions Neither B. lonestari nor B. burgdorferi is likely to be the cause of EM-like skin lesions in patients from the Cape Girardeau area of Missouri. The etiology of this condition remains unknown. PMID:15668867

  13. Evaluation of multiband, multitemporal, and transformed LANDSAT MSS data for land cover area estimation. [North Central Missouri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoner, E. R.; May, G. A.; Kalcic, M. T. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    Sample segments of ground-verified land cover data collected in conjunction with the USDA/ESS June Enumerative Survey were merged with LANDSAT data and served as a focus for unsupervised spectral class development and accuracy assessment. Multitemporal data sets were created from single-date LANDSAT MSS acquisitions from a nominal scene covering an eleven-county area in north central Missouri. Classification accuracies for the four land cover types predominant in the test site showed significant improvement in going from unitemporal to multitemporal data sets. Transformed LANDSAT data sets did not significantly improve classification accuracies. Regression estimators yielded mixed results for different land covers. Misregistration of two LANDSAT data sets by as much and one half pixels did not significantly alter overall classification accuracies. Existing algorithms for scene-to scene overlay proved adequate for multitemporal data analysis as long as statistical class development and accuracy assessment were restricted to field interior pixels.

  14. Brick and Click Libraries: Proceedings of a Regional Academic Library Symposium (Missouri State University, Maryville, Missouri, October 10, 2003)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ury, Connie Jo, Ed.; Baudino, Frank, Ed.

    2003-01-01

    The 2003 Brick and Click is a one-day conference that focuses on providing library resources and services for students who are either on-campus learners or off-campus learners. The conference theme was "The Shape of Tomorrow". It is sponsored by the Northwest Missouri State University in order to offer academic librarians a forum for sharing…

  15. ECOREGIONALIZATION OF MISSOURI AND DEVELOPMENT OF MAP/POSTER OF LEVEL III AND IV ECOREGIONS IN MISSOURI AND IOWA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Level III ecoregions were refined and subdivided for Iowa and Missouri in a manner consistent with ecoregion work that has been completed or is on-going in 37 of the conterminous United States. The project was collaborative, involving scientists and resource managers from the Nat...

  16. DRAFT LANDSAT DATA MOSAIC: MONTGOMERY COUNTY, TEXAS; HARRIS COUNTY, TEXAS; FORT BEND COUNTY, TEXAS; BRAZORIA COUNTY, TEXAS; GALVESTON COUNTY, TEXAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a draft Landsat Data Mosaic, which contains remote sensing information for Montgomery County, Texas Harris County, Texas Fort Bend County, Texas Brazoria County, Texas Galveston County, and Texas Imagery dates on the following dates: October 6, 1999 and September 29, 200...

  17. A Roadmap to School Improvement: A Strategic Plan for Educational Technology in Missouri. The Report of the Missouri Technology Task Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri School Boards Association, Columbia.

    The strategic plan for educational technology was developed by the Missouri Technology Task Force to assist state and local authorities in the creative application and appropriate integration of all technologies to achieve the broad educational goals for elementary and secondary Missouri schools. The specific goals and objectives of the plan…

  18. County by County in Ohio Genealogy. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khouw, Petta; And Others

    The State Library of Ohio's genealogy collection of over 8,000 items is listed by county. Within each county listing the sources are designated as atlases, cemetery and death records, census records (the majority from the 1800's), family-church-Bible records, marriage records, or county and township histories. Vital records consist of material…

  19. Rural County Report. County Level Data Base.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, J. Dennis

    This report represents a county-level Pennsylvania data base focused on variables of significance to rural communities. The data includes computations of per capita rates for counties in rural, urban influence, and urban clusters. This report is intended for comparing rural counties to other areas of the state. Three categories are used to present…

  20. Responsiveness summary for the remedial investigation/feasibility study for management of the bulk wastes at the Weldon Spring quarry, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, J.M.; MacDonell, M.M.

    1990-08-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for conducting remedial actions at the Weldon Spring site in St. Charles County, Missouri, under its Surplus Facilities Management Program. The site consists of a quarry and a chemical plant area located about 6.4 km (4 mi) northeast of the quarry. The quarry is surrounded by the Weldon Spring Wildfire Area and is near an alluvial well field that constitutes a major source of potable water for St. Charles County; the nearest supply well is located about 0.8 km (0.5 mi) southeast of the quarry. From 1942 to 1969, the quarry was used for the disposal of various radioactively and chemically contaminated materials. Bulk wastes in the quarry consist of contaminated soils and sediments, rubble, metal debris, and equipment. As part of overall site remediation, DOE is proposing to conduct an interim remedial action at the quarry to manage the radioactively and chemically contaminated bulk wastes contained therein. Potential remedial action alternatives for managing the quarry bulk wastes have been evaluated consistent with US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) guidance for conducting remedial actions under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended. The contents of these documents were developed in consultation with EPA Region VII and the state of Missouri and reflect the focused scope defined for this interim remedial action. 9 refs.

  1. First Isolation and Cultivation of Borrelia burgdorferi Sensu Lato from Missouri

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, J. H.; Kollars, T. M.; Chandler, F. W.; James, A. M.; Masters, E. J.; Lane, R. S.; Huey, L. O.

    1998-01-01

    Five Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato isolates from Missouri are described. This represents the first report and characterization of such isolates from that state. The isolates were obtained from either Ixodes dentatus or Amblyomma americanum ticks that had been feeding on cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus floridanus) from a farm in Bollinger County, Mo., where a human case of Lyme disease had been reported. All isolates were screened immunologically by indirect immunofluorescence by using monoclonal antibodies to B. burgdorferi-specific outer surface protein A (OspA) (antibodies H3TS and H5332), B. burgdorferi-specific OspB (antibody H6831), Borrelia (genus)-specific antiflagellin (antibody H9724), and Borrelia hermsii-specific antibody (antibody H9826). Analysis of the isolates also involved a comparison of their protein profiles by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Finally, the isolates were analyzed by PCR with six pairs of primers known to amplify selected DNA target sequences specifically found in the reference strain B. burgdorferi B-31. Although some genetic variability was detected among the five isolates as well as between them and the B-31 strain, enough similarities were found to classify them as B. burgdorferi sensu lato. PMID:9431909

  2. Tracking legacy radionuclides in St. Louis, Missouri, via unsupported (210)Pb.

    PubMed

    Kaltofen, Marco P J; Alvarez, Robert; Hixson, Lucas

    2016-03-01

    Analysis of 287 soil, sediment and house dust samples collected in a 200 km(2)-zone in northern St. Louis County, Missouri, establish that offsite migration of radiological contaminants from Manhattan Project-era uranium processing wastes has occurred in this populated area. Specifically, 48% of samples (111 of a subset of 229 soils and sediments tested) had (210)Pb concentrations above the risk-based soil cleanup limits for residential farming established by the US Department of Energy at the Fernald, OH, uranium plant, which handled and stored the same concentrated Manhattan Project-era wastes; the geographical distribution of the exceedances are consistent with water and radon gas releases from a landfill and related sites used to store and dispose of legacy uranium wastes; and offsite soil and house dust samples proximal to the landfill showed distinctive secular disequilibrium among uranium and its progeny indicative of uranium ore processing wastes. The secular disequilibrium of uranium progeny in the environment provides an important method for distinguishing natural uranium from industrial uranium wastes. In this study, the detection of unsupported (210)Pb beyond expected atmospheric deposition rates is examined as a possible indicator of excessive radon emissions from buried uranium and radium-containing wastes. PMID:26741397

  3. Hydrology and model study of the proposed Prosperity Reservoir, Center Creek Basin, southwestern Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harvey, Edward Joseph; Emmett, Leo F.

    1980-01-01

    A reservoir has been proposed on Center Creek, Jasper County, southwestern Missouri. Ground-water levels in the limestone uplands adjacent to the reservoir will rise when the impoundment is completed. The site is a few miles upstream from the Oronogo-Duenweg belt in the Tri-State zinc district. Grove Creek joins Center Creek downstream from the reservoir separating it from the mining belt. A model study indicates water-level rises varying from about 20 feet near the reservoir to 0.5 to 1.0 foot in the southern part of the Grove Creek drainage basin. A significant rise in the water table adjacent to the reservoir could increase mine-water discharge if Grove Creek is not an effective drain. However, it is probable that Grove Creek is an effective drain, and the higher ground-water levels in the reservoir area will increase ground-water discharge to Grove Creek, and in turn, Center Creek. The increase in ground-water discharge to Grove Creek will have the beneficial effect of diluting mine-water discharge from the Oronogo-Duenweg belt during periods of low flow. (USGS)

  4. Hazelwood Interim Storage Site environmental report for calendar year 1992, 9200 Latty Avenue, Hazelwood, Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    This report describes the environmental surveillance program at the Hazelwood Interim storage Site (HISS) and surrounding area, provides the results for 1992, and discusses applicable environmental standards and requirements with which the results were compared. HISS is located in eastern Missouri in the City of Hazelwood (St. Louis County) and occupies approximately 2.2 ha (5.5 acres). Environmental monitoring of HISS began in 1984 when the site was assigned to the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of the decontamination research and development project authorized by Congress under the 1984 Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act. DOE placed responsibility for HISS under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), which was established to identify and decontaminate or otherwise control sites where residual radioactive materials remain from the early years of the nation`s atomic energy program or from commercial operations causing conditions that Congress has authorized DOE to remedy. In 1992 there were no environmental occurrences or unplanned contaminant releases as defined in DOE requirements and in the Superfund Amendment and Reauthorization Act (SARA) Title III of CERCLA.

  5. St. Louis Airport site environmental report for calendar year 1989, St. Louis, Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1990-05-01

    The environmental monitoring program, which began in 1984, continued during 1989 at the St. Louis Airport Site (SLAPS) in St. Louis County, Missouri. SLAPS and its vicinity properties, including ditches north and south of the site, were designated for cleanup as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), a United States Department of Energy (DOE) program to identify and decontaminate or otherwise control sites where residual radioactive material remains from the early years of the nation's atomic energy program. The monitoring program at SLAPS measures radon concentrations in air; external gamma dose rates; and uranium, thorium, and radium concentrations in surface water, groundwater, and sediment. Additionally, several nonradiological parameters are measured in groundwater. To assess the potential effect of SLAPS on public health, the potential radiation dose was estimated for a hypothetical maximally exposed individual. This report presents the findings of the environmental monitoring program conducted at the St. Louis Airport Site (SLAPS) during calendar year 1989. 19 refs., 13 figs., 14 tabs.

  6. Ten-Ecosystem Study. [Grand and Weld Counties, Colorado; Warren County, Pennsylvania; St. Louis County, Minnesota; Sandoval County, New Mexico; Kershaw County, South Carolina; Fort Yukon, Alaska; Grays Harbor County, Washington; and Washington County, Missouri.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazade, A. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    Remote sensing methodology developed for the Nationwide Forestry Applications Program utilize computer data processing procedures for performing inventories from satellite imagery. The Ten-Ecosystem Study (TES) was developed to test the processing procedures in an intermediate-sized application study. The results of TES indicate that LANDSAT multispectral imagery and associated automatic data processing techniques can be used to distinguish softwood, hardwood, grassland, and water and make inventory of these classes with an accuracy of 70 percent or better. The technical problems encountered during the TES and the solutions and insights to these problems are discussed. The TES experience is useful in planning subsequent inventories utilizing remote sensing technology.

  7. Quality of Surface Water in Missouri, Water Year 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Otero-Benitez, William; Davis, Jerri V.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Missouri Department of Natural Resources, designed and operates a series of monitoring stations on streams throughout Missouri known as the Ambient Water-Quality Monitoring Network. During the 2007 water year (October 1, 2006 through September 30, 2007), data were collected at 67 stations including two U.S. Geological Survey National Stream Quality Accounting Network stations and one spring sampled in cooperation with the U.S. Forest Service. Dissolved oxygen, specific conductance, water temperature, suspended solids, suspended sediment, fecal coliform bacteria, dissolved nitrite plus nitrte, total phosphorus, dissolved and total recoverable lead and zinc, and selected pesticide data summaries are presented for 64 of these stations, which primarily have been classified in groups corresponding to the physiography of the State, main land use, or unique station types. In addition, a summary of hydrologic conditions in the State during water year 2007 is presented.

  8. Structural lineament and pattern analysis of Missouri, using LANDSAT imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, J. A.; Kisvarsanyi, G. (Principal Investigator)

    1977-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Major linear, circular, and arcuate traces were observed on LANDSAT imagery of Missouri. Lineaments plotted within the state boundaries range from 20 to nearly 500 km in length. Several extend into adjoining states. Lineaments plots indicate a distinct pattern and in general reflect structural features of the Precambrian basement of the platform. Coincidence of lineaments traced from the imagery and known structural features in Missouri is high, thus supporting a causative relation between them. The lineament pattern apparently reveals a fundamental style of the deformation of the intracontinental craton. Dozens of heretofore unknown linear features related to epirogenic movements and deformation of this segment of the continental crust were delineated. Lineaments and mineralization are interrelated in a geometrically classifiable pattern.

  9. Application of the Hydroecological Integrity Assessment Process for Missouri Streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kennen, Jonathan G.; Henriksen, James A.; Heasley, John; Cade, Brian S.; Terrell, James W.

    2009-01-01

    Natural flow regime concepts and theories have established the justification for maintaining or restoring the range of natural hydrologic variability so that physiochemical processes, native biodiversity, and the evolutionary potential of aquatic and riparian assemblages can be sustained. A synthesis of recent research advances in hydroecology, coupled with stream classification using hydroecologically relevant indices, has produced the Hydroecological Integrity Assessment Process (HIP). HIP consists of (1) a regional classification of streams into hydrologic stream types based on flow data from long-term gaging-station records for relatively unmodified streams, (2) an identification of stream-type specific indices that address 11 subcomponents of the flow regime, (3) an ability to establish environmental flow standards, (4) an evaluation of hydrologic alteration, and (5) a capacity to conduct alternative analyses. The process starts with the identification of a hydrologic baseline (reference condition) for selected locations, uses flow data from a stream-gage network, and proceeds to classify streams into hydrologic stream types. Concurrently, the analysis identifies a set of non-redundant and ecologically relevant hydrologic indices for 11 subcomponents of flow for each stream type. Furthermore, regional hydrologic models for synthesizing flow conditions across a region and the development of flow-ecology response relations for each stream type can be added to further enhance the process. The application of HIP to Missouri streams identified five stream types ((1) intermittent, (2) perennial runoff-flashy, (3) perennial runoff-moderate baseflow, (4) perennial groundwater-stable, and (5) perennial groundwater-super stable). Two Missouri-specific computer software programs were developed: (1) a Missouri Hydrologic Assessment Tool (MOHAT) which is used to establish a hydrologic baseline, provide options for setting environmental flow standards, and compare past and proposed hydrologic alterations; and (2) a Missouri Stream Classification Tool (MOSCT) designed for placing previously unclassified streams into one of the five pre-defined stream types.

  10. Parelaphostrongyliasis in white-tailed deer in Missouri.

    PubMed

    Banks, S M; Ashley, D C

    2000-07-01

    The heads of 137 white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) were collected on the opening day of the 1996 Missouri (USA) fire-arms deer season and surveyed for the presence of meningeal worm (Parelaphostrongylus tenuis). Eighteen percent of the deer examined were infected. Mean intensity of infection was 2.0 (range 1-7). There were no significant differences of infection or mean intensity when deer were classified and compared according to sex or age class. PMID:10941746

  11. The Colorado/Missouri 1989 cirrus mini IFO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymsfield, Andrew J.; Hagen, Donald

    1990-01-01

    A series of experiments with aircraft were planned for Nov. and Dec. 1989 to study cirrus ice crystal nucleation mechanisms and to test new aircraft instrumentation. The measurements were conducted using the NCAR Sabreliner and King Air. Sampling was conducted near Boulder, Colorado, in lenticular (mountain wave) clouds, and over Missouri in cirrus generating cells. Field samples of aerosol and ice crystal replicas and melt water from these cirrus clouds were collected and studied. Aircraft instrumentation and sampling techniques are discussed.

  12. New emission controls for Missouri batch-type charcoal kilns

    SciTech Connect

    Yronwode, P.; Graf, W.J.

    1999-07-01

    Charcoal kilns have been exempted from air emission regulation in the state of Missouri. Today, 80% of US charcoal production takes place in Missouri. As a result of a petition filed by people in the area around an installation in southern Missouri, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) set up air monitors and measured ambient air levels at that charcoal manufacturing installation. These monitors yielded the highest particulate matter less than 10 micron (PM{sub 10}) levels ever recorded in the state. Earlier stack testing at another charcoal manufacturing installation indicated that toxics and carcinogens are present in charcoal kiln air emissions. A Charcoal Kiln Workgroup was formed to determine the Best Available Control Technology (BACT) for charcoal kilns and to draft a charcoal kiln rule that requires BACT. The BACT report determined that afterburners were suitable for controlling emissions from batch-type charcoal kilns. In addition, the charcoal industry supported incorporating the BACT limits and requirements into an enforceable state rule and submitting this rule to the EPA for federal approval. A consent agreement between the EPA and three major charcoal companies was signed with provisions to install, operate, and maintain emission control devices on charcoal kilns. This agreement was to settle complaints alleging that the three major charcoal producers had failed to report toxic air emissions to federal and state regulators. The agreement provided that industry would install control devices on a set schedule with some charcoal kilns being shut down.

  13. Mineral resource potential map of the Rock Pile Mountain Wilderness Study area, Madison County, Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pratt, Walden P.; Erickson, Ralph L.; Ellis, Clarence

    1982-01-01

    Neither the Precambrlan volcanic rocks nor the Cambrlan sedimentary rocks contain any detectable evidence of economic mineralization. The area has no potential for coal resources, an unfavorable potential for oil and gas, and no known potential for geothermal energy. The volcanic rocks might be suitable for use as crushed stone, but similar rocks occur abundantly in more favorable locations elsewhere.

  14. INTENSIVE WATER QUALITY MONITORING IN TWO KARST WATERSHEDS OF BOONE COUNTY, MISSOURI

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Karst watersheds with significant losing streams represent a particularly vulnerable setting for ground water contamination because of the direct connection to surface water. Management challenges in this type of karst setting are similar to surface watersheds with regard to implementation of best m...

  15. Master Facilities Inventory: A Study of Health Manpower Training Resources. Jackson and Clay Counties, Missouri--1967.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmerman, T. F.; Crnic, Carol A.

    The objective of this inventory was to provide basic data concerning the effectiveness of new health manpower training programs for comparison with future studies and documented information, for planning purposes. It was necessary to define the components of the health manpower training network and to identify individuals responsible for its…

  16. Cooking Matters at the Store: A Case Study of Three Missouri Counties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bess, Melissa M.

    2015-01-01

    Cooking Matters at the Store is a grocery store tour where participants learned about healthy eating and tips for saving money on food purchases. Participants learned how to read food labels, compare unit prices, find whole grains, and three ways to purchase produce. Evaluations revealed that participants planned to use the information they…

  17. Bathymetric surveys at highway bridges crossing the Missouri River in Kansas City, Missouri, using a multibeam echo sounder, 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huizinga, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    Bathymetric surveys were conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Missouri Department of Transportation, on the Missouri River in the vicinity of nine bridges at seven highway crossings in Kansas City, Missouri, in March 2010. A multibeam echo sounder mapping system was used to obtain channel-bed elevations for river reaches that ranged from 1,640 to 1,800 feet long and extending from bank to bank in the main channel of the Missouri River. These bathymetric scans will be used by the Missouri Department of Transportation to assess the condition of the bridges for stability and integrity with respect to bridge scour. Bathymetric data were collected around every pier that was in water, except those at the edge of the water or in extremely shallow water, and one pier that was surrounded by a large debris raft. A scour hole was present at every pier for which bathymetric data could be obtained. The scour hole at a given pier varied in depth relative to the upstream channel bed, depending on the presence and proximity of other piers or structures upstream from the pier in question. The surveyed channel bed at the bottom of the scour hole was between 5 and 50 feet above bedrock. At bridges with drilled shaft foundations, generally there was exposure of the upstream end of the seal course and the seal course often was undermined to some extent. At one site, the minimum elevation of the scour hole at the main channel pier was about 10 feet below the bottom of the seal course, and the sides of the drilled shafts were evident in a point cloud visualization of the data at that pier. However, drilled shafts generally penetrated 20 feet into bedrock. Undermining of the seal course was evident as a sonic 'shadow' in the point cloud visualization of several of the piers. Large dune features were present in the channel at nearly all of the surveyed sites, as were numerous smaller dunes and many ripples. Several of the sites are on or near bends in the river, resulting in a deep channel thalweg on the outside of the bend at these sites. At structure A5817 on State Highway 269, bedrock exposure was evident in the channel thalweg. The surveyed channel bed at a given site from this study generally was lower than the channel bed obtained during Level II scour assessments in 2002. At piers with well-defined scour holes, the frontal slopes of the holes were somewhat less than recommended values in the literature, and the shape of the holes appeared to be affected by the movement of dune features into and around the holes. The channel bed at all of the surveyed sites was lower than the channel bed at the time of construction, and an analysis of measurement data from the U.S. Geological Survey continuous streamflow-gaging station on the Missouri River at Kansas City, Missouri (station number 06893000), confirmed a lowering trend of the channel-bed elevations with time at the gaging station. The size of the scour holes observed at the surveyed sites likely was affected by the moderate flood conditions on the Missouri River at the time of the surveys. The scour holes likely would be substantially smaller during conditions of low flow.

  18. PRECISION AGRICULTURE MASTERS PROGRAM - EDUCATING MISSOURI CROP PRODUCERS ABOUT THE BENEFITS OF PRECISION AGRICULTURE MANAGEMENT THROUGH ON-FARM RESEARCH

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Precision Agriculture Masters (PAM) Program was initiated to enhance the transfer of technology related to precision agriculture to Missouri's crop producers. The PAM program consists of three parts: the precision agriculture knowledge network available through the Missouri Precision Agricultur...

  19. Temperature-Dependent Models for Predicting European Corn Borer Early Feeding on Corn in Missouri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magai, Robert Nthipe

    The European corn borer (Ostrinia nubilalis) is one of the most damaging insect pests to corn. Current yield losses attributed to the European corn borer are in the region of 400 million annually. Even though the European corn borer (ECB) has been extensively studied, few models exist that attempt to accurately predict its early infestation on corn. The basic problem encountered in formulating a first generation infestation prediction model is when to start calculating the temperature index. The exact conditions required to terminate diapause and the resumption of normal development are not well established. One of the old methods used in Missouri to predict the earliest date of ECB infestation involves the use of growing degree days, and by convention the heat units are arbitrarily calculated from January 1. This study was conducted to formulate prediction, and simulation-decision models for corn and first generation ECB infestation. The effects of variable maximum and minimum temperatures on the growth and development of the ECB were studied both in the laboratory and field designed experiments. Archival biological data from the IPM programs in three Missouri counties and weather data from weather stations were also used in corn phenology studies and to determine the dates of earliest ECB infestation on corn, for the period covering 1984 through 1989. Results from laboratory experiments suggest that the total growth and development period of ECB reared at variable temperatures is a constant value. However, the phenological development of the ECB stages does not follow a linear trend as earlier assumed during the introduction of the growing degree day model, but assumes a cubic curve. The starting point for the calculation of the temperature index in early spring occurs under conditions of longer than 13.0 hours of day length and a daily mean temperature of 60^ circF and above for at least five consecutive days. Three prediction models were developed. These are, the temperature departure model (R^2 = 0.36), and two time sequence models (R^2 = 0.68 and 0.90, respectively) using mean weekly temperatures for weeks 4, 5, and 6, coded from April 1. A single corn phenology model developed in this study can universally be applied to corn planted at any time during the growing season (R^2 = 0.79). Damage to corn by ECB can only occur when the first instar of the corn borer larvae coincides with the sixth stage of corn or greater.

  20. The evolution of the lower Missouri River: Stratigraphy, geomorphology, and habitat dynamics at Lisbon Bottom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spooner, Jeffrey David

    2002-01-01

    A study of Lisbon Bottom, a confined meander bend of the Missouri River near Glasgow in central Missouri, as well as an overview of the Missouri River between Kansas City and St. Louis concludes that (1) with three minor exceptions, the southern limit of Pleistocene glaciation coincides very closely with the present position of the Missouri River valley, (2) 200 years of river management, flood plain development and farming has had a profound effect on the lower Missouri River and, (3) confined meander eddy accretion deposits have played a significant role in creating wetlands on Lisbon Bottom and along the entire lower Missouri River. At three locations along the present Missouri River, there is strong evidence that the Missouri River was diverted to the south of its present course by Pleistocene glacial lobes. With the exception of these three locations, the southern extent of Pleistocene glaciation coincides closely with the present lower Missouri River valley. Since 1800, the lower Missouri River has been modified significantly by farming, flood plain development, and the construction of flood control and bank stabilization structures by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. These modifications to the river and its flood plain have suppressed or obscured natural processes, making them difficult to identify and interpret. Nevertheless, the geometry of the main channel where it impinges on the valley wall at the lower end of Lisbon Bottom and the location of wetlands adjacent to the impingement point and along the valley wall is consistent with the process by which eddy accretion deposits develop and migrate. Further, the specific location of wetlands at 30 of 31 additional sites along the lower Missouri River where the main channel impinges on the valley wall strongly suggests that confined meander eddy accretion deposits are probably common along the entire lower river, that they underlie the downstream, nearbank areas of many bottoms, and that they ate very important to the formation of wetlands.