Science.gov

Sample records for damage evolution law

  1. Glen's Law++: Transition to a Rate-Weakening Flow Law As a New Framework for Damage Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borstad, C. P.; Morlighem, M.; Khazendar, A.; Scheuchl, B.; Larour, E. Y.; Rignot, E. J.

    2014-12-01

    Continuum damage mechanics is gaining increasing acceptance as a framework for modeling flow enhancement caused by fractures in glaciers and ice shelves. To date, the temporal evolution of viscous damage has been handled using a transport equation with some kind of source term for damage. A number of empirical formulations for such a source term have been adopted, though no clear physical foundation exists for treating damage using flux terms. Furthermore, it remains to be demonstrated that the parameters of such a source term can be determined from observations. Here, we introduce a new framework for damage evolution that does not require specifying a damage source term and that results in a more intuitive physical interpretation of the coupled evolution of stress and damage. By postulating an explicit rate-weakening flow law above a threshold stress, damage can be calculated analytically from the results of a stress balance computation. A transport equation is still applied to advect damage, but the evolution of damage is explicitly linked to the evolving stress balance. This new damage formulation requires only two new parameters, both of which have clear physical interpretations and can be inferred from observations. Using the Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM), we determine values for both parameters by inverting for damage for the remnant Larsen B ice shelf using a time series of InSAR velocity data covering the years 2000-2010. The inferred patterns of damage and strain rate, in both space and time, are used to quantify the rate-weakening constitutive parameters using nonlinear regression. The resulting damage evolution framework is then applied in perturbation experiments to determine the conditions and timescales under which the remnant Larsen B ice shelf may collapse. We conclude by discussing advantages of this approach to damage evolution and applications to problems in iceberg calving, ice shelf stability, and buttressing at the grounding line.

  2. Evolution of the Second Law of Thermodynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raman, V. V.

    1970-01-01

    Presents the history surrounding the evolution of the second law of thermodynamics. Discusses Sadi Carnot's contributions, but also refers to those by Clapeyron, Thomson, Joule, Clausius, and Boltzman among others. (RR)

  3. Stochastic damage evolution in textile laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dzenis, Yuris A.; Bogdanovich, Alexander E.; Pastore, Christopher M.

    1993-01-01

    A probabilistic model utilizing random material characteristics to predict damage evolution in textile laminates is presented. Model is based on a division of each ply into two sublaminas consisting of cells. The probability of cell failure is calculated using stochastic function theory and maximal strain failure criterion. Three modes of failure, i.e. fiber breakage, matrix failure in transverse direction, as well as matrix or interface shear cracking, are taken into account. Computed failure probabilities are utilized in reducing cell stiffness based on the mesovolume concept. A numerical algorithm is developed predicting the damage evolution and deformation history of textile laminates. Effect of scatter of fiber orientation on cell properties is discussed. Weave influence on damage accumulation is illustrated with the help of an example of a Kevlar/epoxy laminate.

  4. Brittleness Effect on Rock Fatigue Damage Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nejati, Hamid Reza; Ghazvinian, Abdolhadi

    2014-09-01

    The damage evolution mechanism of rocks is one of the most important aspects in studying of rock fatigue behavior. Fatigue damage evolution of three rock types (onyx marble, sandstone and soft limestone) with different brittleness were considered in the present study. Intensive experimental tests were conducted on the chosen rock samples and acoustic emission (AE) sensors were used in some of them to monitor the fracturing process. Experimental tests indicated that brittleness strongly influences damage evolution of rocks in the course of static and dynamic loading. AE monitoring revealed that micro-crack density induced by the applied loads during different stages of the failure processes increases as rock brittleness increases. Also, results of fatigue tests on the three rock types indicated that the rock with the most induced micro-cracks during loading cycles has the least fatigue life. Furthermore, the condition of failure surfaces of the studied rocks samples, subjected to dynamic and static loading, were evaluated and it was concluded that the roughness of failure surfaces is influenced by loading types and rock brittleness. Dynamic failure surfaces were rougher than static ones and low brittle rock demonstrate a smoother failure surface compared to high brittle rock.

  5. A continuum theory of grain size evolution and damage and D. Bercovici2

    E-print Network

    A continuum theory of grain size evolution and damage Y. Ricard1 and D. Bercovici2 Received 8 averaged grained continuum. The grain-scale element of the theory describes both the evolution of the grain (``healing'') laws employed by these models are derived from normal grain growth or coarsening theory, which

  6. 26 CFR 1.162-22 - Treble damage payments under the antitrust laws.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...Treble damage payments under the antitrust laws. 1.162-22 Section 1...Treble damage payments under the antitrust laws. (a) In general. In...of a violation of the Federal antitrust laws or enters a plea of guilty...

  7. 26 CFR 1.162-22 - Treble damage payments under the antitrust laws.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...Treble damage payments under the antitrust laws. 1.162-22 Section 1...Treble damage payments under the antitrust laws. (a) In general. In...of a violation of the Federal antitrust laws or enters a plea of guilty...

  8. 26 CFR 1.162-22 - Treble damage payments under the antitrust laws.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...Treble damage payments under the antitrust laws. 1.162-22 Section 1...Treble damage payments under the antitrust laws. (a) In general. In...of a violation of the Federal antitrust laws or enters a plea of guilty...

  9. 26 CFR 1.162-22 - Treble damage payments under the antitrust laws.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...Treble damage payments under the antitrust laws. 1.162-22 Section 1...Treble damage payments under the antitrust laws. (a) In general. In...of a violation of the Federal antitrust laws or enters a plea of guilty...

  10. 26 CFR 1.162-22 - Treble damage payments under the antitrust laws.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...Treble damage payments under the antitrust laws. 1.162-22 Section 1...Treble damage payments under the antitrust laws. (a) In general. In...of a violation of the Federal antitrust laws or enters a plea of guilty...

  11. Simplest potential conservation laws of linear evolution equations

    E-print Network

    Vyacheslav M. Boyko; Roman O. Popovych

    2010-12-29

    Every simplest potential conservation law of any (1+1)-dimensional linear evolution equation of even order proves induced by a local conservation law of the same equation. This claim is true also for linear simplest potential conservation laws of (1+1)-dimensional linear evolution equations of odd order, which are related to linear potential systems. We also derive an effective criterion for checking whether a quadratic conservation law of a simplest linear potential system is a purely potential conservation law of a (1+1)-dimensional linear evolution equation of odd order.

  12. Entropy evolution law in a laser process

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jun-hua Fan, Hong-yi

    2013-07-15

    For the first time, we obtain the entropy variation law in a laser process after finding the Kraus operator of the master equation describing the laser process with the use of the entangled state representation. The behavior of entropy is determined by the competition of the gain and damping in the laser process. The evolution formula for the number of photons is also obtained. -- Highlights: •We apply the thermo-field dynamics method to the master equation of a laser. •We find the operator-sum (Kraus) representation for the density operator. •We find both the normally ordered and compact forms of ?(t) for ?{sub 0}=|z??z|. •We find the exact expression of the laser’s entropy. •Our results reveal quantitatively how a laser beam can be generated in a laser.

  13. ALTERNATING EVOLUTION (AE) SCHEMES FOR HYPERBOLIC CONSERVATION LAWS

    E-print Network

    Alexander, Roger K.

    ALTERNATING EVOLUTION (AE) SCHEMES FOR HYPERBOLIC CONSERVATION LAWS HASEENA AHMED AND HAILIANG LIU), serves as a refined description of systems of hyperbolic conservation laws t + xf() = 0, (x, 0) = 0(x). The solution of conservation laws is precisely captured when two components take the same initial value as 0

  14. Conservation laws and normal forms of evolution equations

    E-print Network

    Roman O. Popovych; Artur Sergyeyev

    2010-03-08

    We study local conservation laws for evolution equations in two independent variables. In particular, we present normal forms for the equations admitting one or two low-order conservation laws. Examples include Harry Dym equation, Korteweg-de-Vries-type equations, and Schwarzian KdV equation. It is also shown that for linear evolution equations all their conservation laws are (modulo trivial conserved vectors) at most quadratic in the dependent variable and its derivatives.

  15. Local conservation laws of second-order evolution equations

    E-print Network

    Roman O. Popovych; Anatoly M. Samoilenko

    2008-08-06

    Generalizing results by Bryant and Griffiths [Duke Math. J., 1995, V.78, 531-676], we completely describe local conservation laws of second-order (1+1)-dimensional evolution equations up to contact equivalence. The possible dimensions of spaces of conservation laws prove to be 0, 1, 2 and infinity. The canonical forms of equations with respect to contact equivalence are found for all nonzero dimensions of spaces of conservation laws.

  16. Permeability of WIPP Salt During Damage Evolution and Healing

    SciTech Connect

    BODNER,SOL R.; CHAN,KWAI S.; MUNSON,DARRELL E.

    1999-12-03

    The presence of damage in the form of microcracks can increase the permeability of salt. In this paper, an analytical formulation of the permeability of damaged rock salt is presented for both initially intact and porous conditions. The analysis shows that permeability is related to the connected (i.e., gas accessible) volumetric strain and porosity according to two different power-laws, which may be summed to give the overall behavior of a porous salt with damage. This relationship was incorporated into a constitutive model, known as the Multimechanism Deformation Coupled Fracture (MDCF) model, which has been formulated to describe the inelastic flow behavior of rock salt due to coupled creep, damage, and healing. The extended model was used to calculate the permeability of rock salt from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site under conditions where damage evolved with stress over a time period. Permeability changes resulting from both damage development under deviatoric stresses and damage healing under hydrostatic pressures were considered. The calculated results were compared against experimental data from the literature, which indicated that permeability in damaged intact WIPP salt depends on the magnitude of the gas accessible volumetric strain and not on the total volumetric strain. Consequently, the permeability of WIPP salt is significantly affected by the kinetics of crack closure, but shows little dependence on the kinetics of crack removal by sintering.

  17. Evolution equations: Frobenius integrability, conservation laws and travelling waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prince, Geoff; Tehseen, Naghmana

    2015-10-01

    We give new results concerning the Frobenius integrability and solution of evolution equations admitting travelling wave solutions. In particular, we give a powerful result which explains the extraordinary integrability of some of these equations. We also discuss ‘local’ conservations laws for evolution equations in general and demonstrate all the results for the Korteweg-de Vries equation.

  18. Damage evolution and clustering in shock loaded tantalum

    SciTech Connect

    Thissell, W.R.; Zurek, A.K.; Rivas, J.M.; Tonks, D.L.; Hixson, R.S.

    1998-12-31

    Two grades of tantalum were shock loaded by plate impact and recovered. The loading conditions were varied to study the damage evolution in te materials from incipient to full spallation. The authors performed quantitative image analysis and optical profilometry on the recovered specimens. Statistical analyses are shown of the void sizes, void clustering, and void linking in the two material grades.

  19. Conservation laws for self-adjoint ?rst order evolution equations

    E-print Network

    Igor Leite Freire

    2011-04-26

    In this work we consider the problem on group classification and conservation laws of the general first order evolution equations. We obtain the subclasses of these general equations which are quasi-self-adjoint and self-adjoint. By using the recent Ibragimov's Theorem on conservation laws, we establish the conservation laws of the equations admiting self-adjoint equations. We illustrate our results applying them to the inviscid Burgers' equation. In particular an infinite number of new symmetries of these equations are found and their corresponding conservation laws are established.

  20. Early-state damage detection, characterization, and evolution using high-resolution computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grandin, Robert John

    Safely using materials in high performance applications requires adequately understanding the mechanisms which control the nucleation and evolution of damage. Most of a material's operational life is spent in a state with noncritical damage, and, for example in metals only a small portion of its life falls within the classical Paris Law regime of crack growth. Developing proper structural health and prognosis models requires understanding the behavior of damage in these early stages within the material's life, and this early-stage damage occurs on length scales at which the material may be considered "granular'' in the sense that the discrete regions which comprise the whole are large enough to require special consideration. Material performance depends upon the characteristics of the granules themselves as well as the interfaces between granules. As a result, properly studying early-stage damage in complex, granular materials requires a means to characterize changes in the granules and interfaces. The granular-scale can range from tenths of microns in ceramics, to single microns in fiber-reinforced composites, to tens of millimeters in concrete. The difficulty of direct-study is often overcome by exhaustive testing of macro-scale damage caused by gross material loads and abuse. Such testing, for example optical or electron microscopy, destructive and further, is costly when used to study the evolution of damage within a material and often limits the study to a few snapshots. New developments in high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) provide the necessary spatial resolution to directly image the granule length-scale of many materials. Successful application of HRCT with fiber-reinforced composites, however, requires extending the HRCT performance beyond current limits. This dissertation will discuss improvements made in the field of CT reconstruction which enable resolutions to be pushed to the point of being able to image the fiber-scale damage structures and the application of this new capability to the study of early-stage damage.

  1. The evolution of the power law k-essence cosmology

    E-print Network

    Rong-Jia Yang; Bohai Chen; Jun Li; Jingzhao Qi

    2015-03-22

    We investigate the evolution of the power law k-essence field in FRWL spacetime. The autonomous dynamical system and critical points are obtained. The corresponding cosmological parameters, such as $\\Omega _{\\phi }$ and $w_{\\phi }$, are calculated at these critical points. We find it is possible to achieve an equation of state crossing through $-1$ for k-essence field. The results we obtained indicate that the power law k-essence dark energy model can be compatible with observations.

  2. The Ultimate Law of Social Evolution

    E-print Network

    Overlander, Jacob Alphaeus

    1901-05-23

    are s a t i s f i e d , nan, then, casts about for other means by which to guard h imse l f against improvidence -*nd absolute want. 3y contact wi th h i s fe l lows a co rse i ousr f f r i s developed i n which the one be ing recognises the other as o... new and d i f f e r e n t b e i n r onlv to be retrans^ormed bv the ever changing proces : . Adaptation, then, i s the great lev/ which prepares humanity to conform to the exigencies of the s o c i a l mind. I t i s that law ?/hioh a r e - supposes...

  3. 26 CFR 1.162-22 - Treble damage payments under the antitrust laws.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Treble damage payments under the antitrust laws. 1.162-22 Section 1.162-22 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Itemized Deductions for Individuals and Corporations § 1.162-22 Treble damage payments...

  4. 26 CFR 1.162-22 - Treble damage payments under the antitrust laws.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Treble damage payments under the antitrust laws. 1.162-22 Section 1.162-22 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Itemized Deductions for Individuals and Corporations § 1.162-22 Treble damage payments...

  5. Stochastic damage evolution modeling in laminates. Ph.D. Thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Dzenis, Y.A.

    1994-01-01

    A stochastic mesomechanics model has been developed for damage accumulation analysis in advanced laminated composites. The model is based on a theory of excursions of random process beyond the limiting bounds. Stochastic strains in the laminate subjected to random Gaussian in-plane loading are calculated using lamination theory and random functions theory. Probabilistic variation of stiffness and strength characteristics of plies are used in the analysis. A stochastic version of maximum strain failure criterion is applied for damage probability calculation. A mesovolume concept is utilized in modeling stiffness degradation. The model is verified experimentally based on the available data. Capabilities of the model are illustrated by predictions of damage accumulation and failure in a Kevlar/epoxy (0/ +/- 30/90){sub s} laminate under quasistationary, long-term stationary, and cyclic loading. Effects of loading rate, deviation, stationary level and cyclic amplitude on damage evolution are discussed. High-cycle fatigue behavior of laminate is calculated utilizing the observed stages in failure accumulation under the cyclic loading. Percolation type analysis of damage morphology is performed for the inhomogeneous anisotropic media. The model and computer codes developed can be incorporated into structural analysis software and used in design of laminated structures.

  6. The constructal law of design and evolution in nature.

    PubMed

    Bejan, Adrian; Lorente, Sylvie

    2010-05-12

    Constructal theory is the view that (i) the generation of images of design (pattern, rhythm) in nature is a phenomenon of physics and (ii) this phenomenon is covered by a principle (the constructal law): 'for a finite-size flow system to persist in time (to live) it must evolve such that it provides greater and greater access to the currents that flow through it'. This law is about the necessity of design to occur, and about the time direction of the phenomenon: the tape of the design evolution 'movie' runs such that existing configurations are replaced by globally easier flowing configurations. The constructal law has two useful sides: the prediction of natural phenomena and the strategic engineering of novel architectures, based on the constructal law, i.e. not by mimicking nature. We show that the emergence of scaling laws in inanimate (geophysical) flow systems is the same phenomenon as the emergence of allometric laws in animate (biological) flow systems. Examples are lung design, animal locomotion, vegetation, river basins, turbulent flow structure, self-lubrication and natural multi-scale porous media. This article outlines the place of the constructal law as a self-standing law in physics, which covers all the ad hoc (and contradictory) statements of optimality such as minimum entropy generation, maximum entropy generation, minimum flow resistance, maximum flow resistance, minimum time, minimum weight, uniform maximum stresses and characteristic organ sizes. Nature is configured to flow and move as a conglomerate of 'engine and brake' designs. PMID:20368252

  7. The constructal law of design and evolution in nature

    PubMed Central

    Bejan, Adrian; Lorente, Sylvie

    2010-01-01

    Constructal theory is the view that (i) the generation of images of design (pattern, rhythm) in nature is a phenomenon of physics and (ii) this phenomenon is covered by a principle (the constructal law): ‘for a finite-size flow system to persist in time (to live) it must evolve such that it provides greater and greater access to the currents that flow through it’. This law is about the necessity of design to occur, and about the time direction of the phenomenon: the tape of the design evolution ‘movie’ runs such that existing configurations are replaced by globally easier flowing configurations. The constructal law has two useful sides: the prediction of natural phenomena and the strategic engineering of novel architectures, based on the constructal law, i.e. not by mimicking nature. We show that the emergence of scaling laws in inanimate (geophysical) flow systems is the same phenomenon as the emergence of allometric laws in animate (biological) flow systems. Examples are lung design, animal locomotion, vegetation, river basins, turbulent flow structure, self-lubrication and natural multi-scale porous media. This article outlines the place of the constructal law as a self-standing law in physics, which covers all the ad hoc (and contradictory) statements of optimality such as minimum entropy generation, maximum entropy generation, minimum flow resistance, maximum flow resistance, minimum time, minimum weight, uniform maximum stresses and characteristic organ sizes. Nature is configured to flow and move as a conglomerate of ‘engine and brake’ designs. PMID:20368252

  8. The constructal law and the evolution of design in nature.

    PubMed

    Bejan, Adrian; Lorente, Sylvie

    2011-10-01

    The constructal law accounts for the universal phenomenon of generation and evolution of design (configuration, shape, structure, pattern, rhythm). This phenomenon is observed across the board, in animate, inanimate and human systems. The constructal law states the time direction of the evolutionary design phenomenon. It defines the concept of design evolution in physics. Along with the first and second law, the constructal law elevates thermodynamics to a science of systems with configuration. In this article we review the more recent work of our group, with emphasis on the advances made with the constructal law in the natural sciences. Highlighted are the oneness of animate and inanimate designs, the origin of finite-size organs on animals and vehicles, the flow of stresses as the generator of design in solid structures (skeletons, vegetation), the universality and rigidity of hierarchy in all flow systems, and the global design of human flows. Noteworthy is the tapestry of distributed energy systems, which balances nodes of production with networks of distribution on the landscape, and serves as key to energy sustainability and empowerment. At the global level, the constructal law accounts for the geography and design of human movement, wealth and communications. PMID:21683663

  9. The constructal law and the evolution of design in nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bejan, Adrian; Lorente, Sylvie

    2011-10-01

    The constructal law accounts for the universal phenomenon of generation and evolution of design (configuration, shape, structure, pattern, rhythm). This phenomenon is observed across the board, in animate, inanimate and human systems. The constructal law states the time direction of the evolutionary design phenomenon. It defines the concept of design evolution in physics. Along with the first and second law, the constructal law elevates thermodynamics to a science of systems with configuration. In this article we review the more recent work of our group, with emphasis on the advances made with the constructal law in the natural sciences. Highlighted are the oneness of animate and inanimate designs, the origin of finite-size organs on animals and vehicles, the flow of stresses as the generator of design in solid structures (skeletons, vegetation), the universality and rigidity of hierarchy in all flow systems, and the global design of human flows. Noteworthy is the tapestry of distributed energy systems, which balances nodes of production with networks of distribution on the landscape, and serves as key to energy sustainability and empowerment. At the global level, the constructal law accounts for the geography and design of human movement, wealth and communications.

  10. Time evolution of damage due to environmentally assisted aging in a fiber bundle model.

    PubMed

    Lennartz-Sassinek, S; Main, I G; Danku, Z; Kun, F

    2013-09-01

    Damage growth in composite materials is a complex process which is of interest in many fields of science and engineering. We consider this problem in a fiber bundle model where fibers undergo an aging process due to the accumulation of damage driven by the locally acting stress in a chemically active environment. By subjecting the bundle to a constant external load, fibers fail either when the load on them exceeds their individual intrinsic strength or when the accumulated internal damage exceeds a random threshold. We analyze the time evolution of the breaking process under low external loads where aging of fibers dominates. In the mean field limit, we show analytically that the aging system continuously accelerates in a way which can be characterized by an inverse power law of the event rate with a singularity that defines a failure time. The exponent is not universal; it depends on the details of the aging process. For localized load sharing, a more complex damage process emerges which is dominated by distinct spatial regions of the system with different degrees of stress concentration. Analytical calculations revealed that the final acceleration to global failure is preceded by a stationary accumulation of damage. When the disorder is strong, the accelerating phase has the same functional behavior as in the mean field limit. The analytical results are verified by computer simulations. PMID:24125307

  11. Cohesive Laws and Progressive Damage Analysis of Composite Bonded Joints, a Combined Numerical/Experimental Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Girolamo, Donato; Davila, Carlos G.; Leone, Frank A.; Lin, Shih-Yung

    2015-01-01

    The results of an experimental/numerical campaign aimed to develop progressive damage analysis (PDA) tools for predicting the strength of a composite bonded joint under tensile loads are presented. The PDA is based on continuum damage mechanics (CDM) to account for intralaminar damage, and cohesive laws to account for interlaminar and adhesive damage. The adhesive response is characterized using standard fracture specimens and digital image correlation (DIC). The displacement fields measured by DIC are used to calculate the J-integrals, from which the associated cohesive laws of the structural adhesive can be derived. A finite element model of a sandwich conventional splice joint (CSJ) under tensile loads was developed. The simulations, in agreement with experimental tests, indicate that the model is capable of predicting the interactions of damage modes that lead to the failure of the joint.

  12. Simulation of Damage Evolution in Discontinously Reinforced Metal Matrix Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Biner, S.B.; Hu, Shenyang Y.

    2009-08-01

    First, a phase-field model for elastic-plastic solids obeying von Mises yield criterion will be described. Then, this phase-field model will be extended to simulate the damage evolution due to nucleation and growth of voids in ductile matrix for discontinuously reinforced composites. The role of reinforcement morphology and the modulus effects leading to final failure all included in the simulations in an effort to make a parametric investigation. The advantages and disadvantages of such phase-field modeling approach in comparison to well established other continuum methods will be elucidated.

  13. Chromosome damage evolution after low and high LET irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, Sergey; Eidelman, Yuri

    Ionizing radiation induces DNA and chromatin lesions which are converted to chromosome lesions detected in the first post-irradiation mitosis by classic cytogenetic techniques as chromosomal aberrations (CAs). These techniques allow to monitor also delayed aberrations observed after many cell generations post-irradiation - the manifestation of chromosomal instability phenotype (CIN). The problem discussed is how to predict time evolution from initial to delayed DNA/chromosome damage. To address this question, in the present work a mechanistic model of CIN is elaborated which integrates pathways of (*) DNA damage induction and its conversion to chromosome lesions (aberrations), (**) lesion transmission and generation through cell cycles. Delayed aberrations in subsequent cycles are formed in the model owing to two pathways, DNA damage generation de novo as well as CA transmission from previous cycles. DNA damage generation rate is assumed to consist of bystander and non-bystander components. Bystander signals impact all cells roughly equally, whereas non-bystander DSB generation rate differs for the descendants of unirradiated and irradiated cells. Monte Carlo simulation of processes underlying CIN allows to predict the time evolution of initial radiation-induced damage - kinetics curve for delayed unstable aberrations (dicentrics) together with dose response and RBE as a function of time after high vs low LET irradiation. The experimental data for radiation-induced CIN in TK6 lymphoblastoid cells and human lymphocytes irradiated with low (gamma) and high (Fe, C) LET radiation are analyzed on the basis of the proposed model. One of the conclusions is that without bystander signaling, just taking into account the initial DNA damage and non-bystander DSB generation, it is impossible to describe the available experimental data for high-LET-induced CIN. The exact contribution of bystander effects for high vs low LET remains unknown, but the relative contribution may be assessed at large times after initial acute irradiation. RBE for delayed aberrations depends on LET, time and cell line, which probably reflects a genetic background for bystander component. The proposed modeling approach creates a basis for integration of complex network of bystander/inflammatory signaling in systems-level platform for quantification of radiation induced CIN.

  14. Defect and damage evolution quantification in dynamically-deformed metals using orientation-imaging microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, George T., III; Livescu, Veronica; Cerreta, Ellen K

    2010-03-18

    Orientation-imaging microscopy offers unique capabilities to quantify the defects and damage evolution occurring in metals following dynamic and shock loading. Examples of the quantification of the types of deformation twins activated, volume fraction of twinning, and damage evolution as a function of shock loading in Ta are presented. Electron back-scatter diffraction (EBSD) examination of the damage evolution in sweeping-detonation-wave shock loading to study spallation in Cu is also presented.

  15. Damage law identification from full field displacement measurement: Application to four-point bending test for

    E-print Network

    of the bending stiffness is described through a damage law. A specific procedure for the identification it is observed that the skin (paper) contributes to an increase of up to 40 % in estimated flexural strength on mechanical properties of gypsum sheathing found that the bending strength of gypsum sheathing depends

  16. On-site inspections of pavement damages evolution using GPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosti, Fabio; D'Amico, Fabrizio; Calvi, Alessandro; Benedetto, Andrea

    2014-05-01

    Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) is being increasingly used for pavements maintenance due to the wide range of applications spanning from physical to geometrical inspections, thereby allowing for a reliable diagnosis of the main causes of road structural damages. In this work, an off-ground GPR system was used to investigate a large-scale rural road network. Two sets of surveys were carried out in different time periods, with the main goals to i) localize the most critical sections; ii) monitor the evolution of previous damages and localize newborn deep faults, although not revealed at the pavement surface level; iii) analyze the causes of both evolution and emergence of faults by considering environmental and human factors. A 1-GHz GPR air-launched antenna was linked to an instrumented van for collecting data at traffic speed. Other support techniques (e.g. GPS data logger, odometer, HD video camera) were used for cross-checking,. Such centre frequency of investigation along with a 25-ns time window allow for a signal penetration of 900 mm, consistent with the deepest layer interfaces. The bottom of the array was 400 mm over the surface, with a minimum distance of 1200 mm from the van body. Scan length of maximum 10 km were provided for avoiding heavy computational loads. The rural road network was located in the District of Rieti, 100 km north from Rome, Italy, and mostly develops in a hilly and mountainous landscape. In most of the investigated roads, the carriageway consists in two lanes of 3.75 meters wide and two shoulders of 0.50 meters wide. A typical road section includes a HMA layer (65 mm average thickness), a base layer (100 mm average thickness), and a subbase layer (300 mm average thickness), as described by pavement design charts. The first set of surveys was carried out in two days at the beginning of spring in moderately dry conditions. Overall, 320-km-long inspections were performed in both travel directions, thereby showing a productivity of approximately 160 km/day at 40 km/h speed, on the average. After processing and first-checking, GPR profiles were divided into homogeneous sections according to the combination of different parameters (e.g. route analyzed, long distance conditions of regularity/irregularity in layers arrangement). In such context, a high consistency between surface damages, mismatches from the GPR scans, and boundary environmental conditions was demonstrated. In addition, deep mismatches were detected even for early-stage or unrevealed faults. The second set of surveys was carried out in autumn in high humidity conditions, due to recent rainfalls. 160 km of relevant routes from the same road network were investigated. Results showed a high consistency with those collected during the first-stage of surveys. Minor changes were found in those sections with low traffic loads (e.g. farther away from the biggest town of Rieti), whereas major mismatches were detected in wetlands (e.g. close to rivers), work zones, and nearby those sections already deeply damaged in the past. This work benefited from networking activities carried out within the EU funded COST Action TU1208 'Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar'.

  17. A biophysical model of cell evolution after cytotoxic treatments: Damage, repair and cell response.

    PubMed

    Tomezak, M; Abbadie, C; Lartigau, E; Cleri, F

    2016-01-21

    We present a theoretical agent-based model of cell evolution under the action of cytotoxic treatments, such as radiotherapy or chemotherapy. The major features of cell cycle and proliferation, cell damage and repair, and chemical diffusion are included. Cell evolution is based on a discrete Markov chain, with cells stepping along a sequence of discrete internal states from 'normal' to 'inactive'. Probabilistic laws are introduced for each type of event a cell can undergo during its life: duplication, arrest, senescence, damage, reparation, or death. We adjust the model parameters on a series of cell irradiation experiments, carried out in a clinical LINAC, in which the damage and repair kinetics of single- and double-strand breaks are followed. Two showcase applications of the model are then presented. In the first one, we reconstruct the cell survival curves from a number of published low- and high-dose irradiation experiments. We reobtain a very good description of the data without assuming the well-known linear-quadratic model, but instead including a variable DSB repair probability. The repair capability of the model spontaneously saturates to an exponential decay at increasingly high doses. As a second test, we attempt to simulate the two extreme possibilities of the so-called 'bystander' effect in radiotherapy: the 'local' effect versus a 'global' effect, respectively activated by the short-range or long-range diffusion of some factor, presumably secreted by the irradiated cells. Even with an oversimplified simulation, we could demonstrate a sizeable difference in the proliferation rate of non-irradiated cells, the proliferation acceleration being much larger for the global than the local effect, for relatively small fractions of irradiated cells in the colony. PMID:26549470

  18. A biophysical model of cell evolution after cytotoxic treatments: damage, repair and cell response

    E-print Network

    Maxime Tomezak; Corinne Abbadie; Eric Lartigau; Fabrizio Cleri

    2015-09-21

    We present a theoretical agent-based model of cell evolution under the action of cytotoxic treatments, such as radioteraphy or chemoteraphy. The major features of cell cycle and proliferation, cell damage and repair, and chemical diffusion are included. Cell evolution is based on a discrete Markov chain, with cells stepping along a sequence of discrete internal states from 'normal' to 'inactive'. Probabilistic laws are introduced for each type of event a cell can undergo during its life cycle: duplication, arrest, apoptosis, senescence, damage, healing. We adjust the model parameters on a series of cell irradiation experiments, carried out in a clinical LINAC at 20 MV, in which the damage and repair kinetics of single- and double-strand breaks are followed. Two showcase applications of the model are then presented. In the first one, we reconstruct the cell survival curves from a number of published low- and high-dose irradiation experiments. We reobtain a very good description of the data without assuming the well-known linear-quadratic model, but instead including a variable DSB repair probability, which is found to spontaneously saturate with an exponential decay at increasingly high doses. As a second test, we attempt to simulate the two extreme possibilities of the so-called 'bystander' effect in radiotherapy: the 'local' effect versus a 'global' effect, respectively activated by the short-range or long-range diffusion of some factor, presumably secreted by the irradiated cells. Even with an oversimplified simulation, we could demonstrate a sizeable difference in the proliferation rate of non-irradiated cells, the proliferation acceleration being much larger for the global than the local effect, for relatively small fractions of irradiated cells in the colony.

  19. Numerical Simulation of Rock Mass Damage Evolution During Deep-Buried Tunnel Excavation by Drill and Blast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jianhua; Lu, Wenbo; Hu, Yingguo; Chen, Ming; Yan, Peng

    2015-09-01

    Presence of an excavation damage zone (EDZ) around a tunnel perimeter is of significant concern with regard to safety, stability, costs and overall performance of the tunnel. For deep-buried tunnel excavation by drill and blast, it is generally accepted that a combination of effects of stress redistribution and blasting is mainly responsible for development of the EDZ. However, few open literatures can be found to use numerical methods to investigate the behavior of rock damage induced by the combined effects, and it is still far from full understanding how, when and to what degree the blasting affects the behavior of the EDZ during excavation. By implementing a statistical damage evolution law based on stress criterion into the commercial software LS-DYNA through its user-subroutines, this paper presents a 3D numerical simulation of the rock damage evolution of a deep-buried tunnel excavation, with a special emphasis on the combined effects of the stress redistribution of surrounding rock masses and the blasting-induced damage. Influence of repeated blast loadings on the damage extension for practical millisecond delay blasting is investigated in the present analysis. Accompanying explosive detonation and secession of rock fragments from their initial locations, in situ stress in the immediate vicinity of the excavation face is suddenly released. The transient characteristics of the in situ stress release and induced dynamic responses in the surrounding rock masses are also highlighted. From the simulation results, some instructive conclusions are drawn with respect to the rock damage mechanism and evolution during deep-buried tunnel excavation by drill and blast.

  20. A computational approach to the investigation of impact damage evolution in discontinuously reinforced fiber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H. K.

    A micromechanical damage constitutive model for discontinuous fiber-reinforced composites is developed to perform impact simulation. Progressive interfacial fiber debonding and a crack-weakened model are considered in accordance with a statistical function to describe the varying probability of damage. Emanating from a constitutive damage model for aligned fiber-reinforced composites, a micromechanical damage constitutive model for randomly oriented, discontinuous fiber-reinforced composites is developed. The constitutive damage model is then implemented into a finite element program DYNA3D to simulate the dynamic behavior and the progressive damage of composites. Finally, numerical simulations for a biaxial loading test and a four-point bend impact test of composite specimens are performed to validate the computational model and investigate impact damage evolution in discontinuous fiber-reinforced composite structures. Furthermore, in order to address the influence of Weibull parameter So on the damage evolution in composites, parametric analysis is carried out.

  1. Finite volume evolution Galerkin method for hyperbolic conservation laws with spatially varying

    E-print Network

    present a generalization of the finite volume evolution Galerkin scheme [17, 18] for hyperbolic systems Galerkin scheme, finite volume methods, bicharacteristics, wave equation, heterogeneous media, acousticFinite volume evolution Galerkin method for hyperbolic conservation laws with spatially varying

  2. Scaling laws for convection with temperature-dependent viscosity and grain-damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, Bradford J.; Bercovici, David

    2014-10-01

    Numerical experiments of convection with grain-damage are used to develop scaling laws for convective heat flow, mantle velocity and plate velocity across the stagnant lid and plate-tectonic regimes. Three main cases are presented in order of increasing complexity: a simple case wherein viscosity is only dependent on grain size, a case where viscosity depends on temperature and grain size, and finally a case where viscosity is temperature and grain size sensitive, and the grain-growth (or healing) is also temperature sensitive. In all cases, convection with grain-damage scales differently than Newtonian convection; whereas the Nusselt number (Nu), typically scales with the reference Rayleigh number, Ra0, to the 1/3 power, for grain-damage this exponent is larger because increasing Ra0 also enhances damage. In addition, Nu, mantle velocity, and plate velocity are also functions of the damage to healing ratio, (D/H); increasing D/H increases Nu because more damage leads to more vigorous convection. For the fully realistic case, numerical results show stagnant lid convection, fully mobilized convection that resembles the temperature-independent viscosity case, and partially mobile or transitional convection, depending on D/H, Ra0, and the activation energies for viscosity and healing. Applying our scaling laws for the fully realistic case to Earth and Venus we demonstrate that increasing surface temperature dramatically decreases plate speed and heat flow, essentially shutting down plate tectonics, due to increased healing in lithospheric shear zones, as proposed previously. Contrary to many previous studies, the transitional regime between the stagnant lid and fully mobilized regimes is large, and the transition from stagnant lid to mobile convection is gradual and continuous. Thus planets could exhibit a full range of surface mobility, as opposed to the bimodal distribution of fully mobile lid planets and stagnant lid planets that is typically assumed.

  3. 3-D KINEMATICAL CONSERVATION LAWS (KCL): EQUATIONS OF EVOLUTION OF A SURFACE

    E-print Network

    3-D KINEMATICAL CONSERVATION LAWS (KCL): EQUATIONS OF EVOLUTION OF A SURFACE K. R. ARUN AND P and propagation, we need the governing equations in the form a system of physically realistic conservation laws. In this paper we derive and analyze such conservation laws in a specially defined ray coordinate system

  4. A multiscale model for predicting damage evolution in heterogeneous viscoelastic media 

    E-print Network

    Searcy, Chad Randall

    2004-11-15

    A multiple scale theory is developed for the prediction of damage evolution in heterogeneous viscoelastic media. Asymptotic expansions of the field variables are used to derive a global scale viscoelastic constitutive equation that includes...

  5. Collateral damage: Evolution with displacement of fracture distribution and secondary fault strands in fault

    E-print Network

    Savage, Heather M.

    Collateral damage: Evolution with displacement of fracture distribution and secondary fault strands in fault damage zones Heather M. Savage1,2 and Emily E. Brodsky1 Received 22 April 2010; revised 10 faults is governed by the same process. Based on our own field work combined with data from

  6. Tensile properties and damage evolution in vascular 3D woven glass/epoxy composites

    E-print Network

    Sottos, Nancy R.

    Tensile properties and damage evolution in vascular 3D woven glass/epoxy composites Anthony M of vascular channels on the in-plane tensile properties and damage progression of three minimal effect on tensile behavior when fiber alignment is unaltered, while reductions in strength

  7. The Evolution of Health Care Advance Planning Law and Policy

    PubMed Central

    Sabatino, Charles P

    2010-01-01

    Context: The legal tools of health care advance planning have substantially changed since their emergence in the mid-1970s. Thirty years of policy development, primarily at the state legislative level addressing surrogate decision making and advance directives, have resulted in a disjointed policy landscape, yet with important points of convergence evolving over time. An understanding of the evolution of advance care planning policy has important implications for policy at both the state and federal levels. Methods: This article is a longitudinal statutory and literature review of health care advance planning from its origins to the present. Findings: While considerable variability across the states still remains, changes in law and policy over time suggest a gradual paradigm shift from what is described as a “legal transactional approach” to a “communications approach,” the most recent extension of which is the emergence of Physician Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment, or POLST. The communications approach helps translate patients’ goals into visible and portable medical orders. Conclusions: States are likely to continue gradually moving away from a legal transactional mode of advance planning toward a communications model, albeit with challenges to authentic and reliable communication that accurately translates patients’ wishes into the care they receive. In the meantime, the states and their health care institutions will continue to serve as the primary laboratory for advance care planning policy and practice. PMID:20579283

  8. The Coffin-Manson law as a consequence of the statistical nature of the LCF surface damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brechet, Y.; Magnin, T.; Sornette, D.

    1992-09-01

    The transition between the Coffin-Manson law in low cycle fatigue and the Basquin law in high cycle fatigue is shown to be closely related to the microstructural aspects of damage accumulation in the two different fatigue domains. In LCF, the surface extension of microcracks is predominant whereas their bulk propagation is dominating in HCF. Along these lines, the Coffin-Manson law is derived using standard methods of statistical physics of disordered systems. The university of the Coffin-Manson exponent for single-phased materials is shown to be a direct consequence of the statistical nature of damage accumulation due to the growth and the interaction of surface microcracks.

  9. Computational modeling of damage evolution in unidirectional fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites

    E-print Network

    Ortiz, Michael

    mechanical re- sponse of a ceramic matrix composite is simulated by a numerical model for a ®ber-matrix unitComputational modeling of damage evolution in unidirectional fiber reinforced ceramic matrix evolution in brittle matrix composites was developed. This modeling is based on an axisymmetric unit cell

  10. Scale Invariance in Landscape Evolution Models Using Stream Power Laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwang, J. S.; Parker, G.

    2014-12-01

    Landscape evolution models (LEM) commonly utilize stream power laws to simulate river incision with formulations such as E = KAmSn, where E is a vertical incision rate [L/T], K is an erodibility constant [L1-2m/T], A is an upstream drainage area [L2], S is a local channel gradient [-], and m and n are positive exponents that describe the basin hydrology. In our reduced complexity model, the landscape approached equilibrium by balancing an incision rate with a constant, uniform, vertical rock uplift rate at every location in the landscape. From our simulations, for a combination of m and n, the landscape exhibited scale invariance. That is, regardless of the size and scale of the basin, the relief and vertical structure of the landscape remained constant. Therefore, the relief and elevation profile of the landscape at equilibrium were only dependent on the coefficients for erodibility and uplift and an equation that described how upstream area, A, increased as the length of a stream increased. In our analytical 1D models, we utilized two equations that described upslope area, (a) A = Bl, where B is the profile width [L], and l is the stream length from the ridge [L] and (b) A = Clh, Hack's Law, where C is a constant [L2-h] and h is a positive exponent. With these equations, (a) m = n and (b) hm = n resulted in scale invariance. In our numerical 2D models, the relationship between A and l was inherent in the actual structure of the drainage network. From our numerical 2D results, scale invariance occurred when 2m = n. Additionally, using reasonable values from the literature for exponents, n, m and h, resulted in singularities at the ridges in the landscape, which caused truncation error. In consequence, the elevation of the ridge increased as the number of grid cells in the domain increased in the numerical model, and the model was unable to converge. These singularities at the ridges appeared when (a) m ? n and (b) hm ? n in the analytical model and 2m ? n in the numerical model. Here we present (1) 1D analytical solutions and (2) 2D numerical solutions that demonstrate scale invariance in LEMs and (3) the consequences of the singularity in 2D LEM numerical simulations. These results will help provide insight about the structure and dynamics of landscapes and drainage networks and shed light on geomorphological empirical relationships.

  11. The Second Law as a Cause of the Evolution

    E-print Network

    Kafri, Oded

    2007-01-01

    It is a common belief that in any environment where life is possible, life will be generated. Here it is suggested that the cause for a spontaneous generation of complex systems is probability driven processes. Based on equilibrium thermodynamics, it is argued that in low occupation number statistical systems, the second law of thermodynamics yields an increase of thermal entropy and a canonic energy distribution. However, in high occupation number statistical systems, the same law for the same reasons yields an increase of information and a Benford's law/power-law energy distribution. It is therefore, plausible, that eventually the heat death is not necessarily the end of the universe.

  12. Constructal law of design and evolution: Physics, biology, technology, and society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bejan, Adrian; Lorente, Sylvie

    2013-04-01

    This is a review of the theoretical and applied progress made based on the Constructal law of design and evolution in nature, with emphasis on the last decade. The Constructal law is the law of physics that accounts for the natural tendency of all flow systems (animate and inanimate) to change into configurations that offer progressively greater flow access over time. The progress made with the Constructal law covers the broadest range of science, from heat and fluid flow and geophysics, to animal design, technology evolution, and social organization (economics, government). This review presents the state of this fast growing field, and draws attention to newly opened directions for original research. The Constructal law places the concepts of life, design, and evolution in physics.

  13. Evolution of damage during deformation in porous granular materials (Louis Néel Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Main, Ian

    2014-05-01

    'Crackling noise' occurs in a wide variety of systems that respond to external forcing in an intermittent way, leading to sudden bursts of energy release similar to those heard when crunching up a piece of paper or listening to a fire. In mineral magnetism ('Barkhausen') crackling noise occurs due to sudden changes in the size and orientation of microscopic ferromagnetic domains when the external magnetic field is changed. In rock physics sudden changes in internal stress associated with microscopically brittle failure events lead to acoustic emissions that can be recorded on the sample boundary, and used to infer the state of internal damage. Crackling noise is inherently stochastic, but the population of events often exhibits remarkably robust scaling properties, in terms of the source area, duration, energy, and in the waiting time between events. Here I describe how these scaling properties emerge and evolve spontaneously in a fully-dynamic discrete element model of sedimentary rocks subject to uniaxial compression at a constant strain rate. The discrete elements have structural disorder similar to that of a real rock, and this is the only source of heterogeneity. Despite the stationary loading and the lack of any time-dependent weakening processes, the results are all characterized by emergent power law distributions over a broad range of scales, in agreement with experimental observation. As deformation evolves, the scaling exponents change systematically in a way that is similar to the evolution of damage in experiments on real sedimentary rocks. The potential for real-time failure forecasting is examined by using synthetic and real data from laboratory tests and prior to volcanic eruptions. The combination of non-linearity and an irreducible stochastic component leads to significant variations in the precision and accuracy of the forecast failure time, leading to a significant proportion of 'false alarms' (forecast too early) and 'missed events' (forecast too late), as well as an over-optimistic assessments of forecasting power and quality when the failure time is known (the 'benefit of hindsight'). The evolution becomes progressively more complex, and the forecasting power diminishes, in going from ideal synthetics to controlled laboratory tests to open natural systems at larger scales in space and time.

  14. Law, evolution and the brain: applications and open questions.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Owen D

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses several issues at the intersection of law and brain science. It focuses principally on ways in which an improved understanding of how evolutionary processes affect brain function and human behaviour may improve law's ability to regulate behaviour. It explores sample uses of such 'evolutionary analysis in law' and also raises questions about how that analysis might be improved in the future. Among the discussed uses are: (i) clarifying cost-benefit analyses; (ii) providing theoretical foundation and potential predictive power; (iii) assessing comparative effectiveness of legal strategies; and (iv) revealing deep patterns in legal architecture. Throughout, the paper emphasizes the extent to which effective law requires: (i) building effective behavioural models; (ii) integrating life-science perspectives with social-science perspectives; (iii) considering the effects of brain biology on behaviours that law seeks to regulate; and (iv) examining the effects of evolutionary processes on brain design. PMID:15590611

  15. Fatigue Damage Evolution in Silicon Films for Micromechanical Applications

    E-print Network

    Suo, Zhigang

    of stable crack growth by stress corrosion cracking prior to the onset of unstable crack growth in the SiO2 the importance of stress corrosion cracking phenomena (in the topical SiO2 layer on Si) as the key process topography evolution and crack growth/fracture dur- ing the cyclic actuation of polysilicon

  16. Studying the laws of software evolution in a long-lived FLOSS project

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Barahona, Jesus M; Robles, Gregorio; Herraiz, Israel; Ortega, Felipe

    2014-01-01

    Some free, open-source software projects have been around for quite a long time, the longest living ones dating from the early 1980s. For some of them, detailed information about their evolution is available in source code management systems tracking all their code changes for periods of more than 15?years. This paper examines in detail the evolution of one of such projects, glibc, with the main aim of understanding how it evolved and how it matched Lehman's laws of software evolution. As a result, we have developed a methodology for studying the evolution of such long-lived projects based on the information in their source code management repository, described in detail several aspects of the history of glibc, including some activity and size metrics, and found how some of the laws of software evolution may not hold in this case. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Software: Evolution and Process published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:25893093

  17. General introduction to microstructural evolution under cascade damage conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedersich, H.

    1993-06-01

    A short overview of the processes that affect the evolution of the microstructure during irradiation is given. The processes include defect production with an emphasis on the effects of the dynamic cascade events, defect clustering, irradiation-enhanced diffusion, radiation-induced segregation, phase decompositions and phase transformations. A simple model for the description of the development of the defect microstructure in a pure metal during cascade producing irradiation is also outlined which can provide, in principle, defect fluxes required for the description of the microstructural processes such as phase decomposition and irradiation-induced precipitation.

  18. Damage evolution in Au-implanted Ho2Ti2O7 titanate pyrochlore

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yanwen; Jagielski, Jacek; Bae, In-Tae; Xiang, Xia; Thome, Lionel; Balakrishnan, G.; Paul, D. M.; Weber, William J.

    2010-10-01

    Damage evolution at room temperature in Ho2Ti2O7 single crystals is studied under 1 MeV Au2+ ion irradiation by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy along the <001> direction. For a better determination of ion-induced disorder profile, an iterative procedure and a Monte Carlo code (McChasy) were used to analyze ion channeling spectra. A disorder accumulation model, with contributions from the amorphous fraction and the crystalline disorder, is fit to the Ho damage accumulation data. The damage evolution behavior indicates that the relative disorder on the Ho sublattice follows a nonlinear dependence on dose and that defect-stimulated amorphization is the primary amorphization mechanism. Similar irradiation behavior previously was observed in Sm2Ti2O7. A slower damage accumulation rate for Ho2Ti2O7, as compared with damage evolution in Sm2Ti2O7, is mainly attributed to a lower effective cross section for defect-simulated amorphization.

  19. Microstructure: Property correlation. [multiaxial fatigue damage evolution in waspaloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jayaraman, N.

    1990-01-01

    Strain controlled torsional and biaxial (tension-torsion) low cycle fatigue behavior of Waspaloy was studied at room temperature as a function of heat treatment. Biaxial tests were conducted under proportional (when the axial and torsional strain cycles are in-phase) and non-proportional (when the axial and torsional strain cycles are 90 deg out-of-phase) cyclic conditions. The deformation behavior under these different cyclic conditions were evaluated by slip trace analysis. For this, a Schmidt-type factor was defined for multiaxial loading conditions and it was shown that when the slip deformation is predominant, non-proportional cycles are more damaging than proportional or pure axial or torsional cycles. This was attributed to the fact that under non-proportional cyclic conditions, deformation was through multiple slip as opposed single slip for other loading conditions, which gave rise to increased hardening. The total life for a given test condition was found to be independent of heat treatment. This was interpreted as being due to the differences in the cycles to initiation and propagation of cracks.

  20. Fault Wear by Damage Evolution During Steady-State Slip VLADIMIR LYAKHOVSKY,1

    E-print Network

    Lyakhovsky, Vladimir

    Fault Wear by Damage Evolution During Steady-State Slip VLADIMIR LYAKHOVSKY,1 AMIR SAGY,1 YUVAL BONEH,2 and ZE'EV RECHES 3 Abstract--Slip along faults generates wear products such as gouge layers of these zones appar- ently control fault strength and slip stability. Here we present a new model of wear

  1. The Effects of Flash-Weakening and Damage on the Evolution of Fault Strength and Temperature

    E-print Network

    Rempel, Alan W.

    263 The Effects of Flash-Weakening and Damage on the Evolution of Fault Strength and Temperature A the effects of flash-weakening at highly stressed asperity contacts by extending the model of Rice [1999; 2006]. In addition to Earthquakes: Radiated Energy and the Physics of Faulting Geophysical Monograph Series 170

  2. The evolution of damage control orthopedics: current evidence and practical applications of early appropriate care.

    PubMed

    D'Alleyrand, Jean-Claude G; O'Toole, Robert V

    2013-10-01

    This article summarizes the evolution of literature and practice related to fracture care in polytrauma patients. Particular emphasis is given to the management of femoral shaft fractures and the concept of damage control in these complex patients. The application of these guidelines in common clinical practice is also discussed. PMID:24095066

  3. Experimental and Analytical Evaluation of Stressing-Rate State Evolution in Rate-State Friction Laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, P.; Rubin, A. M.; Bayart, E.; Savage, H. M.; Marone, C.; Beeler, N. M.

    2013-12-01

    Standard rate and state friction laws fail to explain the full range of observations from laboratory friction experiments. A new state evolution law has been proposed by Nagata et al. (2012) that adds a linear stressing-rate-dependent term to the Dieterich (aging) law, which may provide a remedy. They introduce a parameter c that controls the contribution of the stressing rate to state evolution. We show through analytical approximations that the new law can transition between the responses of the traditional Dieterich (aging) and Ruina (slip) laws in velocity step up/down experiments when the value of c is tuned properly. In particular, for c = 0 the response is pure aging while for finite, non-zero c one observes slip law like behavior for small velocity jumps but aging law like response for larger jumps. The magnitude of the velocity jump required to see this transition between aging and slip behaviour increases as c increases. In the limit of c >> 1 the response to velocity steps becomes purely slip law like. In this limit, numerical simulations show that this law loses its appealing time dependent healing property. An approach using Markov Chain Monte Carlo parameter search on data for large magnitude velocity step tests reveals that it is only possible to determine a lower bound on c using datasets that are well explained by the slip law. For a dataset with velocity steps of two orders of magnitude on simulated fault gouge we find this lower bound to be c ? 10.0. This is significantly larger than c ? 2.0 used by Nagata et al. (2012) to fit their data (mainly bare rock experiments with smaller excursions from steady state than our dataset). Similar parameter estimation exercises on slide hold slide data reveal that none of the state evolution laws considered - Dieterich, Ruina, Kato-Tullis and Nagata - match the relevant features of the data. In particular, even the aging law predicts only the correct rate of healing for long hold times but not the correct amount of healing. For c = 10.0, the Nagata law shows significant slip dependence in healing rate for long hold times which is at odds with the lab data and similar to the slip law response. If one accepts frictional healing observed in the laboratory as a ';proper' analog for fault strengthening over the interseismic period, we conclude that none of the investigated state evolution laws provides a comprehensive and correct constitutive relation.

  4. Fatigue-damage evolution and damage-induced reduction of critical current of a Nb3Al superconducting composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochiai, S.; Sekino, F.; Sawada, T.; Ohno, H.; Hojo, M.; Tanaka, M.; Okuda, H.; Koganeya, M.; Hayashi, K.; Yamada, Y.; Ayai, N.; Watanabe, K.

    2003-09-01

    We have studied the fatigue-damage mechanism of a Nb3Al superconducting composite at room temperature, and the influences of the fatigue damages introduced at room temperature on the critical current at 4.2 K and the residual strength at room temperature. The main (largest) fatigue crack arose first in the clad copper and then extended into the inner core with an increasing number of stress cycles. The cracking of the Nb3Al filaments in the core region occurred at a late stage (around 60-90% of the fatigue life). Once the fracture of the core occurred, it extended very quickly, resulting in a quick reduction in critical current and the residual strength with increasing stress cycles. Such a behaviour was accounted for by the crack growth calculated from the S-N curves (the relation of the maximum stress to the number of stress cycles at failure) combined with the Paris law. The size and distribution of the subcracks along the specimen length, and therefore the reduction in critical current of the region apart from the main crack, were dependent on the maximum stress level. The large subcracks causing fracture of the Nb3Al filaments were formed when the maximum stress was around 300-460 MPa, resulting in large reduction in critical current, but not when the maximum stress was outside such a stress range.

  5. Microscopic elasticity and rate and state friction evolution laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleep, Norman H.

    2012-12-01

    Rate and state friction formalism represents the dependence of macroscopic shear traction ?M on sliding velocity V and the history of the sliding surface. In macroscopic terms, ?M = PN[?0 + a ln(V/Vref) + b ln(?/?norm)], where PN is normal traction, ?0 is the coefficient of friction, a ? b ? 0.01 are small dimensionless parameters, Vref is a reference velocity, ? is the state variable that depends on history, and ?norm represents the effect of changes in normal traction. This representation does not consider microscopic elasticity and is inadequate over very small times. The apparent value of a just after a small decrease in shear traction is a factor of a few larger than its traditional value of ˜0.01. Changes of microscopic elastic strain energy may cause this effect. Microscopic elasticity affects friction after changes in normal traction. Shear traction does not change instantly after a sudden change in normal traction because time is required for real contact area to change. A hybrid of the aging law (where ?increases linearly with time during holds) and the slip law behavior (where the state variable does not change in the limit of zero sliding velocity) is necessary. Slip-law behavior dominates near steady state and also applies to sudden initial sliding where the state variable and porosity are far from steady state. Porosity increases from its initial value toward the steady state value over slip scaling with the critical displacementDc. The ratio of dilatant to shear strain in low porosity material is a modest fraction of 1 and related to the construct of dilatancy angle in engineering.

  6. The evolution of Zipf's law indicative of city development

    E-print Network

    Chen, Yanguang

    2015-01-01

    Zipf's law of city-size distributions can be expressed by three types of mathematical models: one-parameter form, two-parameter form, and three-parameter form. The one-parameter and one of the two-parameter models are familiar to urban scientists. However, the three-parameter model and another type of two-parameter model have not attracted attention. This paper is devoted to exploring the conditions and scopes of application of this Zipf models. By mathematical reasoning and empirical analysis, new discoveries are made as follows. First, if the size distribution of cities in a geographical region cannot be described with the one- or two-parameter model, maybe it can be characterized by the three-parameter model with a scaling factor and a scale-translational factor. Second, all these Zipf models can be unified by hierarchical scaling laws based on cascade structure. Third, the patterns of city-size distributions seems to evolve from three-parameter mode to two-parameter mode, and then to one-parameter mode. F...

  7. Cumulative creep-fatigue damage evolution in an austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgaw, Michael A.

    1992-01-01

    A model of cumulative creep-fatigue damage has been developed which is based on the use of damage curve equations to describe the evolution of creep-fatigue damage for four basic creep-fatigue cycle types. These cycle types correspond to the four fundamental cycles of the Strain Range Partitioning Life Prediction approach of Manson, Halford, and Hirschberg. A concept referred to as Damage Coupling is introduced to analytically account for the differences in the nature of the damage introduced by each cycle type. For application of this model, the cumulative creep-fatigue damage behavior of type 316 stainless steel at 816 C has been experimentally established for the two-level loading cases involving fatigue and creep-fatigue, in various permutations. The tests were conducted such that the lower life (high strain) cycling was applied first, for a controlled number of cycles, and the higher life (lower strain) cycling was conducted at the second level, to failure. The proposed model correlated the majority of the observed cumulative creep-fatigue data.

  8. Worldtube conservation laws for the null-timelike evolution problem

    E-print Network

    Jeffrey Winicour

    2011-05-17

    I treat the worldtube constraints which arise in the null-timelike initial-boundary value problem for the Bondi-Sachs formulation of Einstein's equations. Boundary data on a worldtube and initial data on an outgoing null hypersurface determine the exterior spacetime by integration along the outgoing null geodsics. The worldtube constraints are a set of conservation laws which impose conditions on the integration constants. I show how these constraints lead to a well-posed initial value problem governing the extrinsic curvature of the worldtube, whose components are related to the integration constants. Possible applications to gravitational waveform extraction and to the well-posedness of the null-timelike initial-boundary value problem are discussed.

  9. The Influence of Grain Boundary Type upon Damage Evolution at Grain Boundary Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Bergquist, Alejandro G; Brandl, Christian; Escobedo, Juan P; Trujillo, Carl P; Cerreta, Ellen K; Gray III, George T; Germann, Timothy C

    2012-07-09

    In a prior work, it was found that grain boundary structure strongly influences damage evolution at grain boundaries in copper samples subjected to either shock compression or incipient spall. Here, several grain boundaries with different grain boundary structures, including a {Sigma}3 (10-1) boundary, are interrogated via conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) to investigate the effects of atomic-scale structural differences on grain boundary strength and mobility. Boundaries are studied both before and after shock compression at a peak shock stress of 10 GPa. Results of the TEM and HRTEM work are used in conjunction with MD modeling to propose a model for shock-induced damage evolution at grain boundary interfaces that is dependent upon coincidence.

  10. Quantification of damage evolution for a micromechanical model of ductile fracture in spallation of copper

    SciTech Connect

    Thissell, W.R.; Zurek, A.K.; Tonks, D.L.; Hixson, R.

    1997-09-01

    Detailed quantitative measurements of damage evolution in an incipiently spalled and recovered 10100 OFHC copper sample of 30 {micro}m grain size are described. The free surface velocity is shown. The total porosity of the sample as a function of distance from the spall plane is reported. The observed and true volumetric size distribution of voids and the observed size distribution of clusters of voids are also calculated and presented.

  11. Evolution of damage surfaces and the plastic potential in a limestone

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, D.J.

    1991-01-01

    Acoustic emissions and conventional strain measurements were used to follow the evolution of the damage surface and the plastic potential in a limestone under conditions of triaxial compressions. Confining pressures were chosen such that macroscopically, the limestone exhibited both brittle and ductile behavior. The parameters thus derived are useful for modeling the deformation of a pressure-dependent material and for computing when localization would occur. 10 refs., 8 figs.

  12. Materials Science and Engineering A 443 (2007) 115 Damage evolution in Ti6Al4VAl3Ti metal-intermetallic

    E-print Network

    Meyers, Marc A.

    2007-01-01

    behavior; Damage evolution; Crack density 1. Introduction Intermetallics are phases or compounds formedMaterials Science and Engineering A 443 (2007) 1­15 Damage evolution in Ti6Al4V­Al3Ti metal-intermetallic May 2006; accepted 5 May 2006 Abstract The crack propagation and damage evolution in metal (Ti6Al4V)-intermetallic

  13. The Morning after the Year of Darwin. Book review. The Laws of Evolution and the Derived

    E-print Network

    Badyaev, Alex

    a century prior to Charles Darwin's Origin (Darwin 1859). In fact some of the major concepts that laidPr:374 The Morning after the Year of Darwin. Book review. The Laws of Evolution £69.95. ­ As much of the western scientific community reflects on the Year of Darwin festivities

  14. A universal scaling law for the evolution of granular gases

    E-print Network

    Mathias Hummel; James P. D. Clewett; Marco G. Mazza

    2015-10-21

    Dry, freely evolving granular materials in a dilute gaseous state coalesce into dense clusters only due to dissipative interactions. This clustering transition is important for a number of problems ranging from geophysics to cosmology. Here we show that the evolution of a dilute, freely cooling granular gas is determined in a universal way by the ratio of inertial flow and thermal velocities, that is, the Mach number. Theoretical calculations and direct numerical simulations of the granular Navier--Stokes equations show that irrespective of the coefficient of restitution, density or initial velocity distribution, the density fluctuations follow a universal quadratic dependence on the system's Mach number. We find that the clustering exhibits a scale-free dynamics but the clustered state becomes observable when the Mach number is approximately of $\\mathcal{O}(1)$. Our results provide a method to determine the age of a granular gas and predict the macroscopic appearance of clusters.

  15. Scaling laws in laser-induced potassium dihydrogen phosphate crystal damage by nanosecond pulses at 3{omega}

    SciTech Connect

    Dyan, A.; Enguehard, F.; Lallich, S.; Piombini, H.; Duchateau, G.

    2008-06-15

    A model for the description of laser-induced damage in bulk potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) by nanosecond laser pulses is addressed. It is based on the heating of nanometric plasma balls whose absorption efficiency is described through the Mie theory. The plasma optical indices are then evaluated within the Drude model framework. This modeling provides an evaluation of the scaling law exponent x linking the damage threshold laser pulse energy density F{sub c} to the pulse duration {tau} as F{sub c}={alpha}{tau}{sup x}, where {alpha} is a constant. The inverse problem for which the knowledge of experimental data allows one to determine physical parameters of the model is considered. The results suggest that the critical plasma density is reached in a time much shorter than the pulse duration. Information about the nature of defects responsible for the damage initiation is also provided.

  16. von Baer's law for the ages: lost and found principles of developmental evolution.

    PubMed

    Abzhanov, Arhat

    2013-12-01

    In 1828, Karl Ernst von Baer formulated a series of empirically defined rules, which became widely known as the 'Law of Development' or 'von Baer's law of embryology'. This was one the most significant attempts to define the principles that connected morphological complexity and embryonic development. Understanding this relation is central to both evolutionary biology and developmental genetics. Von Baer's ideas have been both a source of inspiration to generations of biologists and a target of continuous criticism over many years. With advances in multiple fields, including paleontology, cladistics, phylogenetics, genomics, and cell and developmental biology, it is now possible to examine carefully the significance of von Baer's law and its predictions. In this review, I argue that, 185 years after von Baer's law was first formulated, its main concepts after proper refurbishing remain surprisingly relevant in revealing the fundamentals of the evolution-development connection, and suggest that their explanation should become the focus of renewed research. PMID:24120296

  17. A Numerical Method for Simulating the Microscopic Damage Evolution in Composites Under Uniaxial Transverse Tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhi, Jie; Zhao, Libin; Zhang, Jianyu; Liu, Zhanli

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, a new numerical method that combines a surface-based cohesive model and extended finite element method (XFEM) without predefining the crack paths is presented to simulate the microscopic damage evolution in composites under uniaxial transverse tension. The proposed method is verified to accurately capture the crack kinking into the matrix after fiber/matrix debonding. A statistical representative volume element (SRVE) under periodic boundary conditions is used to approximate the microstructure of the composites. The interface parameters of the cohesive models are investigated, in which the initial interface stiffness has a great effect on the predictions of the fiber/matrix debonding. The detailed debonding states of SRVE with strong and weak interfaces are compared based on the surface-based and element-based cohesive models. The mechanism of damage in composites under transverse tension is described as the appearance of the interface cracks and their induced matrix micro-cracking, both of which coalesce into transversal macro-cracks. Good agreement is found between the predictions of the model and the in situ experimental observations, demonstrating the efficiency of the presented model for simulating the microscopic damage evolution in composites.

  18. Measuring Compensation from Credit Reporting Damage: A Comparison of Islamic, Saudi, and American Law in Light of Credit Information Reporting Acts

    E-print Network

    Alhaidary, Mansour

    2012-05-31

    with reference to both Shariah and Saudi Arabia law. Consequently, legal and Shariah solutions should be provided. This dissertation is a comprehensive study of credit reporting damage and remedies. It tackles issues related to definitions, history...

  19. Process-induced damage evolution and management in resin transfer molding of composite panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuan, Yean-Der

    2000-10-01

    Woven fiber composites made by resin transfer molding process are currently used as the primary and secondary load bearing structures in automotive and aircraft industries. A variety of defects could be evolved during the injection stage and the curing stage of the process. Improper injection conditions or unsound tool design would result in process induced damage in the form of dry spots, incomplete filling, or displacement of the fiber. In the curing stage, the process parameters of heating and cooling rates, and the temperature level at each element of the curing cycle have direct effects on the development of internal residual stresses, and shape distortion due to warpage. The work in this dissertation aims at developing numerical models to predict, characterize, and minimize process-induced damage during both the injection stage and curing stage in RTM process for woven-fiber composites. A control volume technique based on the finite difference method is used to characterize the flow behavior in resin transfer molding (RTM) of composite structures. Resin flow through fiber mats is modeled as a two-phase flow through porous media. Experimental results on flow behavior of EPON 826 epoxy resin into irregular mold cavity with fiberglass mats agree well with the present numerical simulation. Parametric analysis of several case studies using developed model illustrates the effectiveness of the flow model in investigating the flow pattern, mold filling time, dry spots formulation, and pressure distribution inside the mold. A numerical model describing the evolution of process-induced damage during curing in molded composite panels was developed. The effects of thermo-mechanical and thermo-chemical responses of the material on the evolution of damage during resin transfer molding of the panels are quantified. The developed numerical model in conjunction with an optimization module based on Simulated Annealing (SA) scheme form a useful tool for conducting a parametric design analysis for characterization and management of process-induced damage in composite panels. Experimental investigation of resin transfer molding of composite panels made of epoxy resin (EPON 826) and eight-harness graphite fiber mats, indicates that low cure temperature, moderate heating rate and high rate of cooling after cure would minimize damage during curing. Furthermore the experimental measurements are in agreement with the degree of damage predicted by the numerical models and hence verifying the effectiveness of these models. The models and methods developed in the present work are of broader applicability to process design and optimization of resin transfer molding of composite structures.

  20. Effect of Temperature on Damage Evolution of Cr25Ni35Nb Alloy Subjected to Combined Mechanical and Environmental Degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Limin; Liu, Huansheng; Gong, Jianming; Geng, Luyang

    2015-07-01

    Due to combined mechanical and environmental degradation, i.e. coupled creep and carburization, Cr25Ni35Nb alloy often fails prior to the expected design life. In the present paper, based on the continuum damage mechanics, the constitutive model of coupled multi-damage factors for computing the damage evolution of Cr25Ni35Nb alloy was proposed. The damage prediction was carried out by using finite element method based on ABAQUS code. And then damage evolution processes at different operating temperatures (950 °C and 1050 °C) were simulated and the effect of service temperature on the damage evolution was discussed. The results showed that the rate of damage increased obviously with operating temperature increasing. The location with maximum damage is along the inner surface of tube, which implies that fracture begins along the inner surface of tube under the action of coupled creep and carburization damage and this is coincident with the actual observation of the failure of furnace tube.

  1. Detection of structural damage in multiwire cables by monitoring the entropy evolution of wavelet coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibáñez, Flor; Baltazar, Arturo; Mijarez, Rito; Aranda, Jorge

    2015-03-01

    Multiwire cables are widely used in important civil structures. Since they are exposed to several dynamic and static loads, their structural health can be compromised. The cables can also be submitted to mechanical contact, tension and energy propagation in addition to changes in size and material within their wires. Due to the critical role played by multiwire cables, it is necessary to develop a non-destructive health monitoring method to maintain their structure and proper performance. Ultrasonic inspection using guided waves is a promising non-destructive damage monitoring technique for rods, single wires and multiwire cables. The propagated guided waves are composed by an infinite number of vibrational modes making their analysis difficult. In this work, an entropy-based method to identify small changes in non-stationary signals is proposed. A system to capture and post-process acoustic signals is implemented. The Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT) is computed in order to obtain the reconstructed wavelet coefficients of the signals and to analyze the energy at different scales. The feasibility of using the concept of entropy evolution of non-stationary signals to detect damage in multiwire cables is evaluated. The results show that there is a high correlation between the entropy value and damage level of the cable. The proposed method has low sensitivity to noise and reduces the computational complexity found in a typical time-frequency analysis.

  2. Detection of damage in multiwire cables based on wavelet entropy evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibáñez, Flor; Baltazar, Arturo; Mijarez, Rito

    2015-08-01

    Multiwire cables are widely used in important engineering structures. Since they are exposed to several dynamic and static loads as well as detrimental environmental conditions, their structural health can be compromised. Due to the critical role played by multiwire cables, it is necessary to develop a non-destructive health monitoring method to maintain their structure and proper performance. Ultrasonic inspection using guided waves is a promising non-destructive damage monitoring technique for rods, single and multiwire cables. However, the propagated guided waves are composed of an infinite number of dispersive vibrational modes making their analysis difficult. In this work, an entropy-based method to identify small changes in non-stationary signals is proposed. An experimental system to capture and post-process acoustic signals is implemented. The discrete wavelet transform is computed in order to obtain the reconstructed wavelet coefficients of the signals and to analyze the energy at different scales. The use of the concept of entropy evolution of non-stationary signals to detect damage in multiwire cables is evaluated. The results show that there is a correlation between the entropy value and level of damage of the cable including breaking of single wires and change in the mechanical contact conditions among the wires. It is found that the studied method has low sensitivity to signal noise and can reduce the computational complexity encountered in a typical time-frequency analysis.

  3. An incremental-iterative method for modeling damage evolution in voxel-based microstructure models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qi-Zhi; Yvonnet, Julien

    2015-02-01

    Numerical methods motivated by rapid advances in image processing techniques have been intensively developed during recent years and increasingly applied to simulate heterogeneous materials with complex microstructure. The present work aims at elaborating an incremental-iterative numerical method for voxel-based modeling of damage evolution in quasi-brittle microstructures. The iterative scheme based on the Lippmann-Schwinger equation in the real space domain (Yvonnet, in Int J Numer Methods Eng 92:178-205, 2012) is first cast into an incremental form so as to implement nonlinear material models efficiently. In the proposed scheme, local strain increments at material grid points are computed iteratively by a mapping operation through a transformation array, while local stresses are determined using a constitutive model that accounts for material degradation by damage. For validation, benchmark studies and numerical simulations using microtomographic data of concrete are performed. For each test, numerical predictions by the incremental-iterative scheme and the finite element method, respectively, are presented and compared for both global responses and local damage distributions. It is emphasized that the proposed incremental-iterative formulation can be straightforwardly applied in the framework of other Lippmann-Schwinger equation-based schemes, like the fast Fourier transform method.

  4. Moving on from bland: the evolution of the law and minimally conscious patients.

    PubMed

    Heywood, Rob

    2014-01-01

    The decision in Bland centred on the withdrawal of artificial nutrition and hydration from a patient in a persistent vegetative state (PVS). Since then, a new medical condition has emerged, known as a minimally conscious state (MCS). In W v M, the Court of Protection was asked to authorise the withdrawal of artificial nutrition and hydration from a patient in a MCS. Baker J refused to grant the declaration. More recently, however, the courts were also asked to rule on the lawfulness of withholding treatment in a similar, albeit factually different, case. In the Court of Appeal decision in Aintree University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust v David James and Others, Sir Alan Ward, with the agreement of Arden LJ and Laws LJ, granted a declaration that it would be lawful to withhold treatment. The Supreme Court then upheld this ruling, Lady Hale stating that the Court of Appeal reached the right result but for the wrong reasons. This article seeks to critically appraise the evolution of the law in regard to withdrawing treatment from MCS patients. The piece begins by explaining the differences between the two conditions of PVS and MCS and defines the law from the starting point of Bland. From here, the discussion progresses to focus on the challenges that the law has had to face in trying to keep pace with the advancing nature of medical understanding of conditions of the brain and explains how it has responded to these. The narrative then critiques the legal mechanism of best interests as it has been employed in the case law concerning MCS patients to date by analysing the various judicial perspectives on the concept. After addressing both the narrow and wide viewpoints, a conclusion is ventured as to how the balancing of best interests should be approached in respect of future MCS cases. PMID:24618294

  5. Critical evaluation of state evolution laws in rate and state friction: Fitting large velocity steps in simulated fault gouge with time-, slip-, and stress-dependent constitutive laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Pathikrit; Rubin, Allan M.; Bayart, Elsa; Savage, Heather M.; Marone, Chris

    2015-09-01

    The variations in the response of different state evolution laws to large velocity increases can dramatically alter the style of earthquake nucleation in numerical simulations. But most velocity step friction experiments do not drive the sliding surface far enough above steady state to probe this relevant portion of the parameter space. We try to address this by fitting 1-3 orders of magnitude velocity step data on simulated gouge using the most widely used state evolution laws. We consider the Dieterich (Aging) and Ruina (Slip) formulations along with a stress-dependent state evolution law recently proposed by Nagata et al. (2012). Our inversions confirm the results from smaller velocity step tests that the Aging law cannot explain the observed response and that the Slip law produces much better fits to the data. The stress-dependent Nagata law can produce fits identical to, and sometimes slightly better than, those produced by the Slip law using a sufficiently large value of an additional free parameter c that controls the stress dependence of state evolution. A Monte Carlo search of the parameter space confirms analytical results that velocity step data that are well represented by the Slip law can only impose a lower bound on acceptable values of c and that this lower bound increases with the size of the velocity step being fit. We find that our 1-3 orders of magnitude velocity steps on synthetic gouge impose this lower bound on c to be 10-100, significantly larger than the value of 2 obtained by Nagata et al. (2012) based on experiments on initially bare rock surfaces with generally smaller departures from steady state.

  6. Proposed damage evolution model for large-scale finite element modeling of the dual coolant US-ITER TBM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharafat, S.; El-Awady, J.; Liu, S.; Diegele, E.; Ghoniem, N. M.

    2007-08-01

    Large-scale finite element modeling (FEM) of the US Dual Coolant Lead Lithium ITER Test Blanket Module including damage evolution is under development. A comprehensive rate-theory based radiation damage creep deformation code was integrated with the ABACUS FEM code. The advantage of this approach is that time-dependent in-reactor deformations and radiation damage can now be directly coupled with 'material properties' of FEM analyses. The coupled FEM-Creep damage model successfully simulated the simultaneous microstructure and stress evolution in small tensile test-bar structures. Applying the integrated Creep/FEM code to large structures is still computationally prohibitive. Instead, for thermo-structural analysis of the DCLL TBM structure the integrated FEM-creep damage model was used to develop true stress-strain behavior of F82H ferritic steel. Based on this integrated damage evolution-FEM approach it is proposed to use large-scale FEM analysis to identify and isolate critical stress areas for follow up analysis using detailed and fully integrated creep-FEM approach.

  7. The second law of thermodynamics under unitary evolution and external operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Tatsuhiko N.; Sakumichi, Naoyuki; Polkovnikov, Anatoli; Ueda, Masahito

    2015-03-01

    The von Neumann entropy cannot represent the thermodynamic entropy of equilibrium pure states in isolated quantum systems. The diagonal entropy, which is the Shannon entropy in the energy eigenbasis at each instant of time, is a natural generalization of the von Neumann entropy and applicable to equilibrium pure states. We show that the diagonal entropy is consistent with the second law of thermodynamics upon arbitrary external unitary operations. In terms of the diagonal entropy, thermodynamic irreversibility follows from the facts that quantum trajectories under unitary evolution are restricted by the Hamiltonian dynamics and that the external operation is performed without reference to the microscopic state of the system.

  8. Regional Distribution and Evolution of Gray Matter Damage in Different Populations of Multiple Sclerosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Calabrese, Massimiliano; Reynolds, Richard; Magliozzi, Roberta; Castellaro, Marco; Morra, Aldo; Scalfari, Antonio; Farina, Gabriele; Romualdi, Chiara; Gajofatto, Alberto; Pitteri, Marco; Benedetti, Maria Donata; Monaco, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    Background Both gray-matter (GM) atrophy and lesions occur from the earliest stages of Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and are one of the major determinants of long-term clinical outcomes. Nevertheless, the relationship between focal and diffuse GM damage has not been clarified yet. Here we investigate the regional distribution and temporal evolution of cortical thinning and how it is influenced by the local appearance of new GM lesions at different stages of the disease in different populations of MS patients. Methods We studied twenty MS patients with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS), 27 with early relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS, disease duration <5 years), 29 with late RRMS (disease duration ? 5 years) and 20 with secondary-progressive MS (SPMS). The distribution and evolution of regional cortical thickness and GM lesions were assessed during 5-year follow-up. Results The results showed that new lesions appeared more frequently in hippocampus and parahippocampal gyri (9.1%), insula (8.9%), cingulate cortex (8.3%), superior frontal gyrus (8.1%), and cerebellum (6.5%). The aforementioned regions showed the greatest reduction in thickness/volume, although (several) differences were observed across subgroups. The correlation between the appearance of new cortical lesions and cortical thinning was stronger in CIS (r2 = 50.0, p<0.001) and in early RRMS (r2 = 52.3, p<0.001), compared to late RRMS (r2 = 25.5, p<0.001) and SPMS (r2 = 6.3, p = 0.133). Conclusions We conclude that GM atrophy and lesions appear to be different signatures of cortical disease in MS having in common overlapping spatio-temporal distribution patterns. However, the correlation between focal and diffuse damage is only moderate and more evident in the early phase of the disease. PMID:26267665

  9. Relating damage evolution of concrete cooled to cryogenic temperatures to permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogbara, Reginald B.; Iyengar, Srinath R.; Grasley, Zachary C.; Rahman, Syeda; Masad, Eyad A.; Zollinger, Dan G.

    2014-11-01

    Typically, 9% Ni steel is used for primary containment of liquefied natural gas (LNG). Utilization of concrete in place of 9% Ni steel for primary containment would lead to significant cost savings. Hence, this study investigates changes in the microstructure of concrete due to cryogenic freezing that would affect its relevant engineering properties for containment. The study also evaluates the effect of aggregate type on the damage potential of concrete subjected to cryogenic freezing. The aim is to investigate design methodologies to produce damage-resistant cryogenic concrete. The study employed four concrete mixture designs involving river sand as fine aggregate, and coarse aggregates with different coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) values. Specifically, the coarse aggregates were limestone, sandstone, trap rock and lightweight aggregate. Concrete cubes were cured under water for at least 28 days and thereafter frozen from ambient (20 °C) to cryogenic temperature (-165 °C). Acoustic emission (AE) sensors were placed on the concrete cubes during freezing. X-ray computed tomography (XRCT) was employed to study the microstructure of concrete cores, before and after cryogenic freezing. The impact of the microstructural evolution thus obtained from AE and XRCT on relevant engineering properties was determined via water and chloride permeability tests. Microcrack propagation determined from AE correlated with changes in permeability. There were no observable cracks in majority of the concrete mixtures after freezing. This implies that microcracks detected via AE and increased permeability was very well distributed and smaller than the XRCT's resolution. Damage (microcracking) resistance of the concrete with different aggregates was in the order limestone ? trap rock ? lightweight aggregate ? sandstone.

  10. Characterization and damaging law of CFC for high heat flux actively cooled plasma facing components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevet, G.; Martin, E.; Boscary, J.; Camus, G.; Herb, V.; Schlosser, J.; Escourbiac, F.; Missirlian, M.

    2011-10-01

    The carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite (CFC) Sepcarb N11 has been used in the Tore Supra (TS) tokamak (Cadarache, France) as armour material for the plasma facing components. For the fabrication of the Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) divertor (Greifswald, Germany), the NB31 material was chosen. For the fabrication of the ITER divertor, two potential CFC candidates are the NB31 and NB41 materials. In the case of Tore Supra, defects such as microcracks or debonding were found at the interface between CFC tile and copper heat sink. A mechanical characterization of the behaviour of N11 and NB31 was undertaken, allowing the identification of a damage model and finite element calculations both for flat tiles (TS and W7-X) and monoblock (ITER) armours. The mechanical responses of these CFC materials were found almost linear under on-axis tensile tests but highly nonlinear under shear tests or off-axis tensile tests. As a consequence, damage develops within the high shear-stress zones.

  11. Damage evolution of a SiC/Ti-15-3 metal matrix composite with different heat treatments 

    E-print Network

    Miller, David Arthur

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to study the effects of heat treatments on the deformation mechanisms of a SiCi MMC. The damage evolution for a four ply unidirectional SiC sigma fiber/Ti 15-3 MMC was studied for a uniaxial tensile loading. Both 90...

  12. The chemical evolution of a Milky Way-like galaxy: the importance of a cosmologically motivated infall law

    E-print Network

    Edoardo Colavitti; Francesca Matteucci; Giuseppe Murante

    2008-02-13

    We aim at finding a cosmologically motivated infall law to understand if the LambdaCDM cosmology can reproduce the main chemical characteristics of a Milky Way-like spiral galaxy. In this work we test several different gas infall laws, starting from that suggested in the two-infall model for the chemical evolution of the Milky Way by Chiappini et al., but focusing on laws derived from cosmological simulations which follows a concordance LambdaCDM cosmology. By means of a detailed chemical evolution model for the solar vicinity, we study the effects of the different gas infall laws on the abundance patterns and the G-dwarf metallicity distribution. The cosmological gas infall law predicts two main gas accretion episodes. By means of this cosmologically motivated infall law, we study the star formation rate, the SNIa and SNII rate, the total amount of gas and stars in the solar neighbourhood and the behaviour of several chemical abundances. We find that the results of the two-infall model are fully compatible with the evolution of the Milky Way with cosmological accretion laws. A gas assembly history derived from a DM halo, compatible with the formation of a late-type galaxy from the morphological point of view, can produce chemical properties in agreement with the available observations.

  13. Self-consistent evolution of tissue damage under stress wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauss, Moshe; Kaufman, Yitzhak; Sapir, Micha; Amendt, Peter A.; London, Richard A.; Glinsky, Michael E.

    1999-06-01

    Laser-initiated stress waves are reflected from tissue boundaries, thereby inducing tensile stresses, which are responsible for tissue damage. A self-consistent model of tissue failure evolution induced by stress wave propagation is considered. The failed tissue is represented by an ensemble of spherical voids and includes the effect of nucleation, growth and coalescence of voids under stress wave tension. Voids nucleate around impurities and grow according to an extended Rayleigh model that includes the effects of surface tension, viscosity and acoustic emission at void collapse. The damage model is coupled self-consistently to a one-dimensional planar hydrodynamic model of stress waves generated by a short pulse laser. We considered the problem of a bipolar wave generated by a short pulse laser absorbed on a free boundary of an aqueous system. The propagating wave includes a tensile component, which interacts with the impurities of exponential distribution in dimension, and an ensemble of voids is generated. For moderate impurity density (approximately 108 cm-3) void growth reduces the tensile wave component and causes the pressure to oscillate between tension and compression. For low impurity density (approximately 106 cm-3) the bubbles grown on a long time scale (5 - 10 microseconds) relative to the wave interaction time (approximately 100 nsec). At later times the growing bubbles interact with each other causing pressure oscillations between tension and compression, with an average compression pressure below 1 bar. This effect increases considerably the bubble lifetime consistent with experiments. At the collapse stage small bubbles collapse earlier and induce pressures, which reduce the collapse time of the larger bubbles.

  14. Evolution of the law of the sea: developments in law-making in the wake of the 1982 Law of the Sea Convention 

    E-print Network

    Harrison, James

    2008-01-01

    It is no exaggeration to say that the Third United Nations Conference on the Law of the Sea was one of the most important law-making events of the twentieth century. It heralded the beginning of a revolution in international ...

  15. Spatiotemporal evolution of blood brain barrier damage and tissue infarction within the first 3h after ischemia onset.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xinchun; Liu, Jie; Yang, Yi; Liu, Ke J; Yang, Yirong; Liu, Wenlan

    2012-12-01

    Blood brain barrier (BBB) damage that occurs within the thrombolytic time window is increasingly appreciated to negatively impact the safety and efficacy profiles of thrombolytic therapy for ischemic stroke. However, the spatiotemporal evolution of BBB damage in this early stroke stage and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we investigated the topographical distribution of BBB damage and its association with tissue injury within the first 3 h after ischemia onset and the roles of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2/9 in this process. Rats were subjected to 1, 2, or 3 h of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) followed by 10 min reperfusion with fluorescence-labeled dextran as BBB permeability marker. Acute tissue infarction was evidenced by staining defect with triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC). Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured by magnetic resonance imaging. MMP-2/9 were assessed by gel and in situ zymography. After 2-h MCAO, dextran leakage was seen in the ischemic ventromedial striatum and the preoptic area which showed ~70% CBF reduction, and expanded to other MCA regions including the cortex after 3-h MCAO. Interestingly, high (2000 kDa) and low (70 kDa) molecular weight dextrans displayed almost identical leakage patterns. Different from BBB damage, tissue infarction was first seen in the ischemic dorsal striatum and the parietal/insular cortex which experienced ~90% CBF reduction. Increased gelatinolytic activity colocalized with dextran leakage, and MMP-2 was found to be the major enzymatic source on gelatin zymograms. Pretreatment with MMP inhibitor GM6001 significantly reduced dextran leakage induced by 2-h and 3-h MCAO. Taken together, our findings reveal substantial differences in the topographic distribution of BBB damage and tissue infarction within the first 3 h after MCAO onset. Unlike ischemic neuronal damage, BBB damage appears to develop faster in brain regions with moderately severe ischemia, and MMP-2 contributes to this early ischemic BBB damage. PMID:22813865

  16. Effect of ageing in fibre bundle models on the evolution of acoustic and silent damage in time-dependent failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lennartz, S.; Main, I. G.; Zaiser, M.; Kun, F.

    2012-04-01

    The spatio-temporal evolution of damage in brittle materials is often modelled by fibre bundle models. In real fibre bundles (such as suspension bridge ropes), and in other composite materials such as rocks and ceramics, the evolution of damage as a function of stress and time can be recorded using acoustic emissions (AE), and used to asses the integrity of the sample and its lifetime. Such monitoring however tells only part of the story, since time-dependent, effectively 'silent' damage also occurs without AE, and small AE events may not be recorded below some recording threshold set by the background noise. The proportion of seismic to aseismic deformation is important for a number of applications, for example providing a strong constraint on plate boundary dynamics and estimates of earthquake hazard. Accordingly we have modified the usual fibre bundle model by introducing some additional ageing, which results in silent damage below a nominal threshold for more dynamic deformation. This enables us to model the effect of the model parameters on the ratio of acoustic to total damage, and how it evolves in time under a given stress history. We found that the silent damage dominates the process and that for a constant applied stress the ratio between acoustic and silent emissions is approximately constant over a wide range of time. The proportionality factor depends strongly on the applied stress and only weakly on the ageing parameter, while it is the other way around for the failure time which depends more on the ageing parameter than on the applied stress.

  17. Off-fault damage and acoustic emission distributions during the evolution of structurally complex faults over series of stick-slip events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goebel, T. H. W.; Becker, T. W.; Sammis, C. G.; Dresen, G.; Schorlemmer, D.

    2014-06-01

    Variations in fault structure, for example, surface roughness and deformation zone width, influence the location and dynamics of large earthquakes as well as the distribution of small seismic events. In nature, changes in fault roughness and seismicity characteristics can rarely be studied simultaneously, so that little is known about their interaction and evolution. Here, we investigate the connection between fault structure and near-fault distributions of seismic events over series of stick-slip cycles in the laboratory. We conducted a set of experiments on rough faults that developed from incipient fracture surfaces. We monitored stress and seismic activity which occurred in the form of acoustic emissions (AEs). We determined AE density distributions as a function of fault normal distance based on high-accuracy hypocentre locations during subsequent interslip periods. The characteristics of these distributions were closely connected to different structural units of the faults, that is, the fault core, off-fault and background damage zone. The core deformation zone was characterized by consistently high seismic activity, whereas the off-fault damage zone displayed a power-law decay of seismic activity with increasing distance from the fault core. The exponents of the power-law-distributed off-fault activity increased with successive stick-slip events so that later interslip periods showed a more rapid spatial decay of seismic activity from the fault. The increase in exponents was strongest during the first one to three interslip periods and reached approximately constant values thereafter. The relatively rapid spatial decay of AE events during later interslip periods is likely an expression of decreasing fault zone complexity and roughness. Our results indicate a close relationship between fault structure, stress and seismic off-fault activity. A more extensive mapping of seismic off-fault activity-decay has the potential to significantly advance the understanding of fault zone properties including variations in fault roughness and stress.

  18. Study of the damage evolution function of tin silver copper in cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qasaimeh, Awni

    The present research focused on the assessment of solder joint fatigue life in microelectronics assemblies. A general concern of any reliability engineer is whether accelerated tests are relevant to field conditions. The risk of this was minimized by developing an approach to reduce the duration of an accelerated thermal cycling test, thus allowing for the use of less accelerated test conditions. For this purpose the conventional dye and pry technique was improved and used together with artificial neural networks to measure and characterize very early stages of crack growth. The same work also demonstrated a quantitative link between thermal cycling induced recrystallization and a strong acceleration of the subsequent fatigue crack growth and failure. A new study was conducted in which different combinations of annealing and isothermal cycling provided a systematic characterization of the effects of a range of individual parameters on the recrystallization. Experiments showed the ongoing coarsening of secondary precipitates to have a clear effect on recrystallization. The rate of recrystallization was also shown not to scale with the inelastic energy deposition. This means that the most popular current thermal cycling model cannot apply to SnAgCu solder joints. Recrystallization of the Sn grains is usually not the rate limiting mechanism in isothermal cycling. The crack initiation stage often takes up a much greater fraction of the overall life, and the eventual failure of BGA joints tends to involve transgranular crack growth instead. Cycling of individual solder joints allowed for monitoring of the evolution of the solder properties and the rate of inelastic energy deposition. Both the number of cycles to crack initiation and the subsequent number of cycles to failure were shown to be determined by the inelastic energy deposition. This provides for a simple model for the extrapolation of accelerated test results to the much milder cycling amplitudes characteristic of long term service conditions based on conventional Finite Element Modeling. It also offers a critical basis for the ongoing development of a practical model to account for the often dramatic break-down of Miner's rule of linear damage accumulation under variable cycling amplitudes as expected in realistic applications.

  19. A computational model for predicting damage evolution in laminated composite plates 

    E-print Network

    Phillips, Mark Lane

    1999-01-01

    The feasibility of producing a model capable of predicting the evolution of interface degradation, matrix cracking, and delimitation at multiple sites in laminated continuous fiber composite plates subjected to monotonic ...

  20. Stochastic Damage Evolution under Static and Fatigue Loading in Composites with Manufacturing Defects 

    E-print Network

    Huang, Yongxin

    2012-07-16

    for the stochastic matrix cracking evolution on the macro-scale is developed. Simulations based on the statistical model yield accurate predictions for both static and fatigue loading compared to the experimental data. The Weibull distribution of the static strength...

  1. The protein folds as platonic forms: new support for the pre-Darwinian conception of evolution by natural law.

    PubMed

    Denton, Michael J; Marshall, Craig J; Legge, Michael

    2002-12-01

    Before the Darwinian revolution many biologists considered organic forms to be determined by natural law like atoms or crystals and therefore necessary, intrinsic and immutable features of the world order, which will occur throughout the cosmos wherever there is life. The search for the natural determinants of organic form-the celebrated "Laws of Form"-was seen as one of the major tasks of biology. After Darwin, this Platonic conception of form was abandoned and natural selection, not natural law, was increasingly seen to be the main, if not the exclusive, determinant of organic form. However, in the case of one class of very important organic forms-the basic protein folds-advances in protein chemistry since the early 1970s have revealed that they represent a finite set of natural forms, determined by a number of generative constructional rules, like those which govern the formation of atoms or crystals, in which functional adaptations are clearly secondary modifications of primary "givens of physics." The folds are evidently determined by natural law, not natural selection, and are "lawful forms" in the Platonic and pre-Darwinian sense of the word, which are bound to occur everywhere in the universe where the same 20 amino acids are used for their construction. We argue that this is a major discovery which has many important implications regarding the origin of proteins, the origin of life and the fundamental nature of organic form. We speculate that it is unlikely that the folds will prove to be the only case in nature where a set of complex organic forms is determined by natural law, and suggest that natural law may have played a far greater role in the origin and evolution of life than is currently assumed. PMID:12419661

  2. Permeability of natural rock salt from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) during damage evolution and healing

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeifle, T.W.

    1998-06-01

    The US Department of Energy has developed the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in the bedded salt of southeastern New Mexico to demonstrate the safe disposal of radioactive transuranic wastes. Four vertical shafts provide access to the underground workings located at a depth of about 660 meters. These shafts connect the underground facility to the surface and potentially provide communication between lithologic units, so they will be sealed to limit both the release of hazardous waste from and fluid flow into the repository. The seal design must consider the potential for fluid flow through a disturbed rock zone (DRZ) that develops in the salt near the shafts. The DRZ, which forms initially during excavation and then evolves with time, is expected to have higher permeability than the native salt. The closure of the shaft openings (i.e., through salt creep) will compress the seals, thereby inducing a compressive back-stress on the DRZ. This back-stress is expected to arrest the evolution of the DRZ, and with time will promote healing of damage. This paper presents laboratory data from tertiary creep and hydrostatic compression tests designed to characterize damage evolution and healing in WIPP salt. Healing is quantified in terms of permanent reduction in permeability, and the data are used to estimate healing times based on considerations of first-order kinetics.

  3. The Effect of Interfacial Properties on Damage Evolution in Model Composites

    E-print Network

    Sottos, Nancy R.

    the operative dam- age mechanism. This study conclusively demonstrates that the damage mechanism in composites: fiber failure and pullout, matrix cracking, interface debonding, and shear band devel- opment [1 of a single matrix crack accompanied by fiber fracture and pullout (Class I); (ii) The formation of multiple

  4. Evolution of blood-brain barrier damage associated with changes in brain metabolites following acute ischemia.

    PubMed

    Yan, Gen; Xuan, Yinghua; Dai, Zhuozhi; Zhang, Guishan; Xu, Haiyun; Mikulis, David; Wu, Renhua

    2015-11-11

    Stroke is a serious medical condition that requires emergency care. In the case of ischemic stroke, ischemia may lead to damage to the blood-brain barrier (BBB); the damage in turn may exacerbate the condition. Therefore, noninvasive detection of BBB damage represents a challenge for experimental and clinical researchers. In this study, we assessed the onset of BBB disruption by means of T1-weighted images with administration of the contrast enhancement agent gadolinium-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) and related BBB breakdown to brain metabolite changes in proton magnetic resonance spectrum (H-MRS) in the infarcted site following middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in rats. It was shown that MCAO for 30?min and 1.5?h caused no Gd-DTPA signal change in the T1-weighted images, whereas MCAO for 1?h significantly altered some of H-MRS brain metabolites, suggesting that brain metabolite changes occurred earlier than BBB damage after ischemic stroke. MCAO for 2?h caused BBB breakdown, which was related to changes in the levels of some brain metabolites detected by H-MRS. Between the second and the third hour after MCAO, brain metabolite changes continued as the result of BBB breakdown and the concurrent overperfusion to the infarcted site, which may ameliorate the metabolite changes, thus compensating for the functional failures of the brain after stroke. PMID:26366833

  5. Damage evolution during freezethaw cycling of cement mortar, studied by electrical resistivity measurement

    E-print Network

    Chung, Deborah D.L.

    at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14260-4400, USA Received 29 August 2001; accepted 6 May 2002 Abstract Damage of the water in the concrete upon cooling, and the thawing upon subsequent heating. The phase transition-8846(02)00856-6 * Corresponding author. Tel.: +1-716-645-2593; fax: +1-716-645- 3875. E-mail address: ddlchung@acsu.buffalo.edu (D

  6. Influence of weak electric field on spatial-temporal dynamics of damage evolution during granite deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panteleev, Ivan; Mubassarova, Virginia; Damaskinskaya, Ekaterina; Naimark, Oleg; Bogomolov, Leonid

    2015-10-01

    The influence of the weak electric field on a process of damage accumulation and main crack formation is investigated on a base of the acoustic emission data obtained during a uniaxial quasistatic compression of granite samples. It is shown that continuous external impact leads to a change in deformation and fracture processes. This, in turn, leads to a change of acoustic emission parameters and stages of acoustic emission.

  7. Dictyostelium discoideum, a lower eukaryote model for the study of DNA repair: Implications for the role of DNA-damaging chemicals in the evolution of repair proficient cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deering, R. A.

    1994-10-01

    The evolution of the ability of living cells to cope with stress is crucial for the maintenance of their genetic integrity. Yet low levels of mutation must remain to allow adaptation to environmental changes. The cellular slime mold D. discoideum is a good system for studying molecular aspects of the repair of lethal and mutagenic damage to DNA by radiation and chemicals. The wild-type strains of this soil microorganism are extremely resistant to DNA damaging agents. In nature the amoeboid cells in their replicative stage feed on soil bacteria and are exposed to numerous DNA-damaging chemicals produced by various soil microorganisms. It is probable that the evolution of repair systems in this organism and perhaps in others is a consequence of the necessity to cope with chemical damage which also confers resistance to radiation.

  8. Microstructure-Property Relation and Evolution for the Design of Advanced Hierarchical Materials Cohesive law

    E-print Network

    Chen, Wei

    n Fiber Cohesive law Viscoplastic behavior Enable material design based on the microstructure conformation and properties. Two materials were evaluated: composites and metal alloys RESEARCH OBJECTIVE Polymer Matrix Composites: Design made possible through performance prediction for different mechanical

  9. The effects of shockwave profile shape and shock obliquity on spallation in Cu and Ta: kinetic and stress-state effects on damage evolution(u)

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, George T

    2010-12-14

    Widespread research over the past five decades has provided a wealth of experimental data and insight concerning shock hardening and the spallation response of materials subjected to square-topped shock-wave loading profiles. Less quantitative data have been gathered on the effect of direct, in-contact, high explosive (HE)-driven Taylor wave (or triangular-wave) loading profile shock loading on the shock hardening, damage evolution, or spallation response of materials. Explosive loading induces an impulse dubbed a 'Taylor Wave'. This is a significantly different loading history than that achieved by a square-topped impulse in terms of both the pulse duration at a fixed peak pressure, and a different unloading strain rate from the peak Hugoniot state achieved. The goal of this research is to quantify the influence of shockwave obliquity on the spallation response of copper and tantalum by subjecting plates of each material to HE-driven sweeping detonation-wave loading and quantify both the wave propagation and the post-mortem damage evolution. This talk will summarize our current understanding of damage evolution during sweeping detonation-wave spallation loading in Cu and Ta and show comparisons to modeling simulations. The spallation responses of Cu and Ta are both shown to be critically dependent on the shockwave profile and the stress-state of the shock. Based on variations in the specifics of the shock drive (pulse shape, peak stress, shock obliquity) and sample geometry in Cu and Ta, 'spall strength' varies by over a factor of two and the details of the mechanisms of the damage evolution is seen to vary. Simplistic models of spallation, such as P{sub min} based on 1-D square-top shock data lack the physics to capture the influence of kinetics on damage evolution such as that operative during sweeping detonation loading. Such considerations are important for the development of predictive models of damage evolution and spallation in metals and alloys.

  10. Teaching about Controversial Issues: Resolving Conflict between Creationism and Evolution through Law-Related Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morishita, Ford

    1991-01-01

    Presents a unit on evolution and creation theories in which students explore the legal issues surrounding the teaching of evolution and creation in biology. Students write preliminary essays, study conflict resolution techniques, and conduct a moot trial of the Scopes case of 1925. A course outline is provided. (MDH)

  11. Evolution of a hairpin vortex in a shear-thinning fluid governed by a power-law model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhen, Ni; Handler, Robert A.; Zhang, Qi; Oeth, Cassandra

    2013-10-01

    The effect of a shear-thinning fluid governed by a power-law model on the evolution of a hairpin vortex in a wall-bounded flow was studied by means of direct numerical simulation. With a fixed Reynolds number and hairpin vortex strength, the effect of shear-thinning on vortex evolution could be isolated. The primary observation is that very early in time shear-thinning has the effect of reducing the production of vortex kinetic energy and dramatically increasing viscous dissipation. This leads to a delay in the transition of the flow to a turbulent state. Three-dimensional flow visualizations reveal that the increased dissipation is associated with an instability in which the hairpin vortex is broken down into small-scale structures. It is suggested that the finite amplitude of the hairpin creates a lowering of viscosity near the hairpin vortex core which leads to this instability.

  12. Slip, Crystal Orientation, and Damage Evolution During Thermal Cycling in High-Strain Wafer-Level Chip-Scale Packages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Bite; Zhou, Quan; Bieler, Thomas R.; Lee, Tae-kyu

    2015-03-01

    Wafer-level chip-scale package samples with pre-cross-sectioned edge rows were thermally cycled to study microstructure evolution and damage development. Electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) and high-energy x-ray diffraction were used to obtain Sn grain orientations and the average coefficient of thermal expansion normal to the board in every joint of the package for samples in the as-fabricated and thermally cycled conditions. The results indicated a near-random distribution of joint orientation. Optical, scanning electron microscopy, and EBSD methods were used to characterize microstructure changes in pre-cross-sectioned samples due to thermal cycling. Slip trace analysis and Orientation Imaging Microscopy™ (OIM) show that slip systems with high Schmid factors (estimated global shear stress based on the package neutral point) are responsible for the observed microstructure evolution during thermal cycling, which provides information about slip systems that are more easily activated. Two joints were analyzed in detail to evaluate slip activity at different stages of their thermal history. The first case showed that a solidification twin grain boundary misorientation deviated from the twin relationship due to slip activity during thermal cycling, which can influence damage development and the path of crack propagation. The second case showed a new grain orientation developing due to gradual lattice rotation about the Sn [110] axis by a continuous recrystallization mechanism. This rotation was correlated with the operation of slip system . Small tin whiskers emerged from the initially polished chip interface and grew with increasing thermal cycles until a crack developed in the solder that relieved the stress. As the local stresses are not known experimentally, this analysis provides observations that can be compared with a crystal plasticity model simulation.

  13. Creep in Thermally Cracked Granite: Physical, Mechanical and Damage Properties Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Schubnel, A. J.; Fortin, J.; Gueguen, Y.; Ge, H.

    2011-12-01

    We investigate the effects of pervasive crack damage on the rupture processes of a fine-grained granite, under triaxial stress, in wet (H20) and dry (argon gas) saturated conditions, at room temperature. Eight samples of La Peyratte granite (a granodiorite with an average grain size of 200 microns) were cored with an initial porosity of <1%. Damage was introduced by heating four samples up to 700°C. These were then compared to the intact granite specimens. 4 samples were deformed at a constant strain rate of 2x10-6/s until brittle failure occurred. 4 other samples were deformed in creep conditions. During these 8 experiments, at each step, we recorded strains, elastic wave velocities and Acoustic Emissions (AE). Our main results are: 1. The brittle strength of the sample remained unchanged (approx. 500MPa deviatoric stress at 30MPa effective pressure), whether the sample was heat-treated or not. We did not observe any significant water weakening as well. However, the onset of dilatancy was observed at lower deviatoric stress in the heat-treated specimen than for the intact ones. 2. Acoustic emissions revealed useful in order to image the rupture processes. Indeed, AE locations and Focal mechanism were in good agreement with the post mortem analysis of sample. In intact specimen, failure occurred after a larger premonitory AE activity, while heat-treated specimen had a longer aftershocks activity. In creep conditions, we show that extreme damage localization is already initiated during the primary and secondary creep phases. 3. However, in all our experiments, we observed the development of an elastic fabric well before the onset of rupture. To be more precise, measuring the P wave velocities along two different horizontal travel paths - one perpendicular and one parallel to the eventual rupture plane, away from the nucleation zone - we showed that that both started to diverge as early as at 70% of the final rupture strength. This shows that quite early on during the experiment, the strain localization processes have started and the final fault orientation has already been selected.

  14. An explicit finite element formulation for dynamic strain localization and damage evolution in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Mourad, Hashem M; Bronkhorst, Curt A; Addessio, Francis L

    2010-12-16

    An explicit finite element formulation, used to study the behavior and failure mechanisms of metallic materials under high strain rate loading, is presented. The formulation is based on the assumed-strain approach of Fish and Belytschko [1988], which allows localization bands to be embedded within an element, thereby alleviating mesh sensitivity and reducing the required computational effort. The behavior of the material outside localization bands (and of the virgin material prior to the onset of strain localization) is represented using a Gurson-type coupled plasticity-damage model based on the work of Johnson and Addessio [1988]. Assuming adiabatic conditions, the response of the localization band material is represented by a set of constitutive equations for large elasticviscoplastic deformations in metals at high strain rates and high homologous temperatures (see Brown et al. [1989]). Computational results are compared to experimental data for different metallic alloys to illustrate the advantages of the proposed modeling strategy.

  15. Limitations on the Evolution of Quantum Coherences: Towards Fully Quantum Second Laws of Thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    ?wikli?ski, Piotr; Studzi?ski, Micha?; Horodecki, Micha?; Oppenheim, Jonathan

    2015-11-20

    The second law of thermodynamics places a limitation into which states a system can evolve into. For systems in contact with a heat bath, it can be combined with the law of energy conservation, and it says that a system can only evolve into another if the free energy goes down. Recently, it's been shown that there are actually many second laws, and that it is only for large macroscopic systems that they all become equivalent to the ordinary one. These additional second laws also hold for quantum systems, and are, in fact, often more relevant in this regime. They place a restriction on how the probabilities of energy levels can evolve. Here, we consider additional restrictions on how the coherences between energy levels can evolve. Coherences can only go down, and we provide a set of restrictions which limit the extent to which they can be maintained. We find that coherences over energy levels must decay at rates that are suitably adapted to the transition rates between energy levels. We show that the limitations are matched in the case of a single qubit, in which case we obtain the full characterization of state-to-state transformations. For higher dimensions, we conjecture that more severe constraints exist. We also introduce a new class of thermodynamical operations which allow for greater manipulation of coherences and study its power with respect to a class of operations known as thermal operations. PMID:26636834

  16. Limitations on the Evolution of Quantum Coherences: Towards Fully Quantum Second Laws of Thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ?wikli?ski, Piotr; Studzi?ski, Micha?; Horodecki, Micha?; Oppenheim, Jonathan

    2015-11-01

    The second law of thermodynamics places a limitation into which states a system can evolve into. For systems in contact with a heat bath, it can be combined with the law of energy conservation, and it says that a system can only evolve into another if the free energy goes down. Recently, it's been shown that there are actually many second laws, and that it is only for large macroscopic systems that they all become equivalent to the ordinary one. These additional second laws also hold for quantum systems, and are, in fact, often more relevant in this regime. They place a restriction on how the probabilities of energy levels can evolve. Here, we consider additional restrictions on how the coherences between energy levels can evolve. Coherences can only go down, and we provide a set of restrictions which limit the extent to which they can be maintained. We find that coherences over energy levels must decay at rates that are suitably adapted to the transition rates between energy levels. We show that the limitations are matched in the case of a single qubit, in which case we obtain the full characterization of state-to-state transformations. For higher dimensions, we conjecture that more severe constraints exist. We also introduce a new class of thermodynamical operations which allow for greater manipulation of coherences and study its power with respect to a class of operations known as thermal operations.

  17. Menzerath-Altmann law in mammalian exons reflects the dynamics of gene structure evolution.

    PubMed

    Nikolaou, Christoforos

    2014-12-01

    Genomic sequences exhibit self-organization properties at various hierarchical levels. One such is the gene structure of higher eukaryotes with its complex exon/intron arrangement. Exon sizes and exon numbers in genes have been shown to conform to a law derived from statistical linguistics and formulated by Menzerath and Altmann, according to which the mean size of the constituents of an entity is inversely related to the number of these constituents. We herein perform a detailed analysis of this property in the complete exon set of the mouse genome in correlation to the sequence conservation of each exon and the transcriptional complexity of each gene locus. We show that extensive linear fits, representative of accordance to Menzerath-Altmann law are restricted to a particular subset of genes that are formed by exons under low or intermediate sequence constraints and have a small number of alternative transcripts. Based on this observation we propose a hypothesis for the law of Menzerath-Altmann in mammalian genes being predominantly due to genes that are more versatile in function and thus, more prone to undergo changes in their structure. To this end we demonstrate one test case where gene categories of different functionality also show differences in the extent of conformity to Menzerath-Altmann law. PMID:25155263

  18. Damage-induced nonassociated inelastic flow in rock salt

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, K.S.; Bodner, S.R.; Brodsky, N.S.; Fossum, A.F.

    1993-06-01

    The multi-mechanism deformation coupled fracture model recently developed by CHAN, et al. (1992), for describing time-dependent, pressure-sensitive inelastic flow and damage evolution in crystalline solids was evaluated against triaxial creep experiments on rock salt. Guided by experimental observations, the kinetic equation and the flow law for damage-induced inelastic flow in the model were modified to account for the development of damage and inelastic dilatation in the transient creep regime. The revised model was then utilized to obtain the creep response and damage evolution in rock salt as a function of confining pressure and stress difference. Comparison between model calculation and experiment revealed that damage-induced inelastic flow is nonassociated, dilatational, and contributes significantly to the macroscopic strain rate observed in rock salt deformed at low confining pressures. The inelastic strain rate and volumetric strain due to damage decrease with increasing confining pressures, and all are suppressed at sufficiently high confining pressures.

  19. THEORETICAL INVESTIGATION OF MICROSTRUCTURE EVOLUTION AND DEFORMATION OF ZIRCONIUM UNDER CASCADE DAMAGE CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Barashev, Alexander V; Golubov, Stanislav I; Stoller, Roger E

    2012-06-01

    This work is based on our reaction-diffusion model of radiation growth of Zr-based materials proposed recently in [1]. In [1], the equations for the strain rates in unloaded pure crystal under cascade damage conditions of, e.g., neutron or heavy-ion irradiation were derived as functions of dislocation densities, which include contributions from dislocation loops, and spatial distribution of their Burgers vectors. The model takes into account the intra-cascade clustering of self-interstitial atoms and their one-dimensional diffusion; explains the growth stages, including the break-away growth of pre-annealed samples; and accounts for some striking observations, such as of negative strain in prismatic direction, and co-existence of vacancy- and interstitial-type prismatic loops. In this report, the change of dislocation densities due to accumulation of sessile dislocation loops is taken into account explicitly to investigate the dose dependence of radiation growth. The dose dependence of climb rates of dislocations is calculated, which is important for the climb-induced glide model of radiation creep. The results of fitting the model to available experimental data and some numerical calculations of the strain behavior of Zr for different initial dislocation structures are presented and discussed. The computer code RIMD-ZR.V1 (Radiation Induced Microstructure and Deformation of Zr) developed is described and attached to this report.

  20. Topographic signatures and a general transport law for deep-seated landslides in a landscape evolution model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, Adam M.; Roering, Josh J.; Rempel, Alan W.

    2013-06-01

    A fundamental goal of studying earth surface processes is to disentangle the complex web of interactions among baselevel, tectonics, climate, and rock properties that generate characteristic landforms. Mechanistic geomorphic transport laws can quantitatively address this goal, but no widely accepted law for landslides exists. Here we propose a transport law for deep-seated landslides in weathered bedrock and demonstrate its utility using a two-dimensional numerical landscape evolution model informed by study areas in the Waipaoa catchment, New Zealand, and the Eel River catchment, California. We define a non-dimensional landslide number, which is the ratio of the horizontal landslide flux to the vertical tectonic flux, that characterizes three distinct landscape types. One is dominated by stochastic landsliding, whereby discrete landslide events episodically erode material at rates exceeding the long-term uplift rate. Another is characterized by steady landsliding, in which the landslide flux at any location remains constant through time and is greatest at the steepest locations in the catchment. The third is not significantly affected by landsliding. In both the "stochastic landsliding" and "steady landsliding" regimes, increases in the non-dimensional landslide number systematically reduce catchment relief and widen valley spacing, producing long, low angle hillslopes despite high uplift rates. The stochastic landsliding regime captures the frequent observation that deep-seated landslides produce large sediment fluxes from small areal extents while being active only a fraction of the time. We suggest that this model is adaptable to a wide range of geologic settings and is useful for interpreting climate-driven changes in landslide behavior.

  1. From Migmatites to Plutons: Power Law Relationships in the Evolution of Magmatic Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soesoo, Alvar; Bons, Paul D.

    2015-07-01

    Magma is generated by partial melting from micrometre-scale droplets at the source and may accumulate to form >100 km-scale plutons. Magma accumulation thus spans well over ten orders of magnitude in scale. Here we provide measurements of migmatitic leucosomes and granitic veins in drill cores from the Estonian Proterozoic basement and outcrops at Masku in SW Finland and Montemor-o-Novo, central Portugal. Despite the differences in size and number of measured leucosomes and magmatic veins, differences in host rock types and metamorphic grades, the cumulative width distribution of the studied magmatic leucosomes/veins follows a power law with exponents usually between 0.7 and 1.8. Published maps of the SE Australian Lachlan Fold Belt were used to investigate the distribution of granitoid pluton sizes. The granites occupy ca. 22 % of the 2.6 × 105 km2 area. The cumulative pluton area distributions show good power law distributions with exponents between 0.6 and 0.8 depending on pluton area group. Using the self-affine nature of pluton shapes, it is possible to estimate the total volume of magma that was expelled from the source in the 2.6 × 105 km2 map area, giving an estimated 0.8 km3 of magma per km2. It has been suggested in the literature that magma batches in the source merge to form ever-bigger batches in a self-organized way. This leads to a power law for the cumulative distribution of magma volumes, with an exponent m V between 1 for inefficient melt extraction, and 2/3 for maximum accumulation efficiency as most of the volume resides in the largest batches that can escape from the source. If m V ? 1, the mass of the magma is dominated by small batches; in case m = 2/3, about 50 % of all magma in the system is placed in a single largest batch. Our observations support the model that the crust develops a self-organized critical state during magma generation. In this state, magma batches accumulate in a non-continuous, step-wise manner to form ever-larger accumulations. There is no characteristic length or time scale in the partial melting process or its products. Smallest melt segregations and >km-scale plotuns form the end members of a continuous chain of mergers of magma batches.

  2. Dynamical evolution of planetary systems and the significance of Bode's law.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conway, B. A.; Elsner, T. J.

    1988-01-01

    The authors examine the question of whether an arbitrary configuration of planets in orbit about the sun could evolve by point gravitational interaction to become a very regular system such as the actual solar system. The evolution of a number of sample planetary systems with varying original distributions has been examined to determine the degree of "arbitrariness" allowed to the initial conditions which will yet yield the regularities presently observed in the solar system. This study suggests that only a geometric (or Bode-type) initial distribution of planetary semimajor axes is likely to yield the present (geometric) spacing of the planets of the solar system.

  3. An investigation of the effects of history dependent damage in time dependent fracture mechanics: nano-scale studies of damage evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Brust, F.W. Jr; Mohan, R.; Yang, Y.P.; Oh, J.; Katsube, N.

    2002-12-01

    High-temperature operation of technical engineering systems is critical for system efficiency, and will be a key driver in the future US DOE energy policy. Developing an understanding of high-temperature creep and creep-fatigue failure processes is a key driver for the research work described here. The focus is on understanding the high-temperature deformation and damage development on the nano-scale (50 to 500 nm) level. The high-temperature damage development process, especially with regard to low and high cyclic loading, which has received little attention to date, is studied. Damage development under cyclic loading develops in a fashion quite different from the constant load situation. The development of analytical methodologies so that high-temperature management of new systems can be realized is the key goal of this work.

  4. Conservation Laws and the Multiplicity Evolution of Spectra at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    E-print Network

    Zbigniew Chaj?cki; Mike Lisa

    2009-01-09

    Transverse momentum distributions in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions carry considerable information about the dynamics of the hot system produced. Direct comparison with the same spectra from $p+p$ collisions has proven invaluable to identify novel features associated with the larger system, in particular, the "jet quenching" at high momentum and apparently much stronger collective flow dominating the spectral shape at low momentum. We point out possible hazards of ignoring conservation laws in the comparison of high- and low-multiplicity final states. We argue that the effects of energy and momentum conservation actually dominate many of the observed systematics, and that $p+p$ collisions may be much more similar to heavy ion collisions than generally thought.

  5. Propagation of continuum damage in a viscoelastic ice bar

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, J.G. . Dept. of Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering); Karr, D.G. . Dept. of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering)

    1994-05-01

    An initial value problem of a semi-infinite nonlinear viscoelastic bar is solved with continuum damage evolution. The evolution law of the continuum damage for a viscoelastic material is used in order to explore the propagation of two crushing mechanisms: grain boundary cracking and transgranular cracking. Using the method of characteristics, the speed of propagation is found to be dependent on the continuum damage. On the wave front, the delayed elastic strain is zero, and only the continuum damage due to the transgranular cracking evolves. A finite difference method is developed to solve the governing equations on the obtained characteristic lines, and gives a stable solution for the propagation of the stress, strain, and damage. Numerical results are obtained and discussed using the material properties of polycrystalline ice.

  6. Equilibrium configurations and stability of a damaged body under uniaxial tractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzoni, Luca; Tarantino, Angelo Marcello

    2015-02-01

    This paper deals with the equilibrium problem in nonlinear dissipative inelasticity of damaged bodies subject to uniaxial loading. To model the damage effects, a damage function, affecting the stored energy function, is defined. In the framework of the continuum thermodynamics theory, the constitutive law for damaged hyperelastic materials and an inequality for the energy release rate are derived. By means of an energy-based damage criterion, the irreversible evolution law for the damage function is obtained. After formulating the equilibrium boundary value problem, explicit expressions governing the global development of the equilibrium paths are written. Successively, the stability of the equilibrium solutions are assessed through the energy criterion. For a damaged body under uniaxial loading, seven inequalities are derived. These conditions, if fulfilled, ensure the stability of the solutions under each type of small perturbation. Finally, a number of applications for compressible neo-Hookean and Mooney-Rivlin materials are performed.

  7. The spatial-temporal evolution of coherent structures in log law region of turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xiao-Bo; Jiang, Nan

    2015-02-01

    The spatial-temporal evolution of coherent structures (CS) is significant for turbulence control and drag reduction. Among the CS, low and high speed streak structures show typical burst phenomena. The analysis was based on a time series of three-dimensional and three-component (3D-3C) velocity fields of the flat plate turbulent boundary layer (TBL) measured by a Tomographic and Time-resolved PIV (Tomo TRPIV) system. Using multi-resolution wavelet transform and conditional sampling method, we extracted the intrinsic topologies and found that the streak structures appear in bar-like patterns. Furthermore, we seized locations and velocity information of transient CS, and then calculated the propagation velocity of CS based on spatial-temporal cross-correlation scanning. This laid a foundation for further studies on relevant dynamics properties.

  8. Deformation Failure Characteristics of Coal Body and Mining Induced Stress Evolution Law

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Zhijie; Wen, Jinhao; Shi, Yongkui; Jia, Chuanyang

    2014-01-01

    The results of the interaction between coal failure and mining pressure field evolution during mining are presented. Not only the mechanical model of stope and its relative structure division, but also the failure and behavior characteristic of coal body under different mining stages are built and demonstrated. Namely, the breaking arch and stress arch which influence the mining area are quantified calculated. A systematic method of stress field distribution is worked out. All this indicates that the pore distribution of coal body with different compressed volume has fractal character; it appears to be the linear relationship between propagation range of internal stress field and compressed volume of coal body and nonlinear relationship between the range of outburst coal mass and the number of pores which is influenced by mining pressure. The results provide theory reference for the research on the range of mining-induced stress and broken coal wall. PMID:24967438

  9. The effects of shockwave profile shape and shock obliquity on spallation : studies of kinetics and stress state effects on damage evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, George T., III; Hull, Larry M; Faulkner, J R; Briggs, M E; Cerreta, E K; Addessio, F L; Bourne, N K

    2009-06-22

    Shock-loading of a material in contact with a high explosive (HE) experiences a 'Taylor wave' (triangular wave) loading profile in contrast to the square-wave loading profile imparted via the impact of a flyer plate. Detailed metallographic and mlcrotextural analysis of the damage evolution in spalled Cu samples as a function of square/triangle and sweeping detonation-wave loading is presented.

  10. Ankle skeletal injury predictions using anisotropic inelastic constitutive model of cortical bone taking into account damage evolution.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Masami; Miki, Kazuo; Tanaka, Eiichi

    2005-11-01

    The most severe ankle skeletal injury called pilon fractures can cause long term disability and impairment. Based on previous experimental studies, the pilon fractures are regarded as caused by a high-energy compressive force in the ankle joint and affected by a muscular tension force generated by emergency braking. However, quantitative injury criteria for the pilon fractures are still unknown. More accurate prediction of bone fractures in the distal tibia using a FE model of human lower leg can help us know the quantitative injury criteria. Therefore we newly proposed an anisotropic inelastic constitutive model of cortical bone including damage evolution and then implemented it to a FE code, LS-DYNA. The proposed model successfully reproduced most of anisotropy, strain rate dependency, and asymmetry of tension and compression on material and failure properties of human femoral cortical bone. However, the simplified model using an isotropic elasto-viscoplastic material, which has been used in previous studies, did not reproduce the characteristic features of the cortical bone. Two series of validation on axial impact cadaver tests for the foot and ankle indicate that the proposed model predicts the pilon fractures more accurately than the simplified model. Parametric studies on footwell impacts and pedal impacts for the foot using the proposed model show that the severity of the pilon fractures increases when the foot sustains normal and heel impacts with the impact velocity of 5 m/s and the pedal hits the forefoot with the impact velocity of 3 m/s regardless of the muscular tension force. PMID:17096272

  11. Negative Power Law Scaling of Rockfalls along the Yorkshire Coast: Implications for Long Term Landscape Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlow, John; Rosser, Nick; Lime, Michael; Petley, David; Brain, Matthew; Sapsford, Melanie; Norman, Emma

    2010-05-01

    An increasing body of evidence suggests that rockfalls follow a negative power law scaling in their magnitude-frequency distribution of the form F = aM-b. Where F is the normalized frequency density, M is the event magnitude, and a / b are dimensionless scaling coefficients. Investigation using Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) has produced an extremely high resolution inventory of rockfall magnitudes along the sea cliffs near Staithes, UK. Such data is ideal for erosion modelling. Once the scaling parameters have been estimated, the volume of eroded rock for events of magnitude x (Vx) is derived as Vx = ax-b+1. Therefore, the total volume (V t) of eroded rock between a minimum and maximum magnitude can be calculated by taking by integrating the above. An examination of monthly fluctuations in the scaling coefficients indicates greater variation within the winter months in response to higher deliveries of wave energy during these months. Initial results using geophone data indicate a relationship between the magnitude of the scaling coefficients and the amount of wave energy delivered to the cliff. Such linkages suggest the possibility of a predictive model for erosion based on wave climate, providing a predictive capability for the implications of environmental change. Model testing is to be accomplished using an innovative cliff recession model derived using cosmogenic isotope concentrations and paleoenvironmental data. Our cosmogenic dating model considers marine variables (tidal range, wave climate and inundation duration); Holocene relative sea level change; lateral cliff retreat, and the consequent changes in geometrical and marine shielding to establish the rate of retreat based on a continuum of Be10 concentrations.

  12. Influence of sweeping detonation-wave loading on damage evolution during spallation loading of tantalum in both a planar and curved geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, George Thompson III; Hull, Lawrence Mark; Livescu, Veronica; Faulkner, James; Briggs, Matthew E.; Meyer, Ross Keith; Andrews, Heather Lynn; Hare, Steven John; Jakulewicz, Micah Shawn; Shinas, Michael A.

    2015-03-30

    Widespread research over the past five decades has provided a wealth of experimental data and insight concerning the shock hardening, damage evolution, and the spallation response of materials subjected to square-topped shock-wave loading profiles. However, fewer quantitative studies have been conducted on the effect of direct, in-contact, high explosive (HE)-driven Taylor wave (unsupported shocks) loading on the shock hardening, damage evolution, or spallation response of materials. Systematic studies quantifying the effect of sweeping-detonation wave loading are yet sparser. In this study, the damage evolution and spallation response of Ta is shown to be critically dependent on the peak shock stress, the geometry of the sample (flat or curved plate geometry), and the shock obliquity during sweeping-detonation-wave shock loading. Sweepingwave loading in the flat-plate geometry is observed to: a) yield a lower spall strength than previously documented for 1-D supported-shock-wave loading, b) exhibit increased shock hardening as a function of increasing obliquity, and c) lead to an increased incidence of deformation twin formation with increasing shock obliquity. Sweeping-wave loading of a 10 cm radius curved Ta plate is observed to: a) lead to an increase in the shear stress as a function of increasing obliquity, b) display a more developed level of damage evolution, extensive voids and coalescence, and lower spall strength with obliquity in the curved plate than seen in the flat-plate sweeping-detonation wave loading for an equivalent HE loading, and c) no increased propensity for deformation twin formation with increasing obliquity as seen in the flat-plate geometry. The overall observations comparing and contrasting the flat versus curved sweeping-wave spall experiments with 1D loaded spallation behavior suggests a coupled influence of obliquity and geometry on dynamic shock-induced damage evolution and spall strength. Coupled experimental and modeling research to quantify the combined effects of sweeping-wave loading with increasingly complex sample geometries on the shockwave response of materials is clearly crucial to providing the basis for developing and thereafter validation of predictive modeling capability.

  13. Evolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayr, Ernst

    1978-01-01

    Traces the history of evolution theory from Lamarck and Darwin to the present. Discusses natural selection in detail. Suggests that, besides biological evolution, there is also a cultural evolution which is more rapid than the former. (MA)

  14. Postbuckling Investigations of Piezoelectric Microdevices Considering Damage Effects

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhigang; Wang, Xianqiao

    2014-01-01

    Piezoelectric material has been emerging as a popular building block in MEMS devices owing to its unique mechanical and electrical material properties. However, the reliability of MEMS devices under buckling deformation environments remains elusive and needs to be further explored. Based on the Talreja's tensor valued internal state damage variables as well as the Helmhotlz free energy of piezoelectric material, a constitutive model of piezoelectric materials with damage is presented. The Kachanvo damage evolution law under in-plane compressive loads is employed. The model is applied to the specific case of the postbuckling analysis of the piezoelectric plate with damage. Then, adopting von Karman's plate theory, the nonlinear governing equations of the piezoelectric plates with initial geometric deflection including damage effects under in-plane compressive loads are established. By using the finite difference method and the Newmark scheme, the damage evolution for damage accumulation is developed and the finite difference procedure for postbuckling equilibrium path is simultaneously employed. Numerical results show the postbuckling behaviors of initial flat and deflected piezoelectric plates with damage or no damage under different sets of electrical loading conditions. The effects of applied voltage, aspect ratio of plate, thick-span ratio of plate, damage as well as initial geometric deflections on the postbuckling behaviors of the piezoelectric plate are discussed. PMID:24618774

  15. Indirect identification of damage functions from damage records

    E-print Network

    Steinhäuser, J Micha; Kropp, Jürgen P

    2015-01-01

    In order to assess future damage caused by natural disasters, it is desirable to estimate the damage caused by single events. So called damage functions provide -- for a natural disaster of certain magnitude -- a specific damage value. However, in general, the functional form of such damage functions is unknown. We study the distributions of recorded flood damages on extended scales and deduce which damage functions lead to such distributions when the floods obey Generalized Extreme Value statistics and follow Generalized Pareto distributions. Based on the finding of broad damage distributions we investigate two possible functional forms to characterize the data. In the case of Gumbel distributed extreme events, (i) a power-law distribution density with an exponent close to 2 (Zipf's law) implies an exponential damage function; (ii) stretched exponential distribution densities imply power-law damage functions. In the case of Weibull (Frechet) distributed extreme events we find correspondingly steeper (less st...

  16. Damage characterization for particles filled semi-crystalline polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauro, Franck; Balieu, Romain; Bennani, Bruno; Haugou, Gregory; Bourel, Benjamin; Chaari, Fahmi; Matsumoto, Tsukatada; Mottola, Ernesto

    2015-09-01

    Damage evolution and characterization in semi-crystalline polymer filled with particles under various loadings is still a challenge. A specific damage characterization method using Digital Image Correlation is proposed for a wide range of strain rates considering tensile tests with hydraulic jacks as well as Hopkinson's bars. This damage measurement is obtained by using and adapting the SEE method [1] which was developed to characterize the behaviour laws at constant strain rates of polymeric materials in dynamic. To validate the characterization process, various damage measurement techniques are used under quasi-static conditions before to apply the procedure in dynamic. So, the well-known damage characterization by loss of stiffness technique under quasi-static loading is applied to a polypropylene. In addition, an in-situ tensile test, carried out in a microtomograph, is used to observe the cavitation phenomenon in real time. A good correlation is obtained between all these techniques and consequently the proposed technique is supposed suitable for measuring the ductile damage observed in semi-crystalline polymers under dynamic loading. By applying it to the semi-crystalline polymer at moderate and high speed loadings, the damage evolution is measured and it is observed that the damage evolution is not strain rate dependent but the failure strain on the contrary is strain rate dependent.

  17. Comparison of Tensile Damage Evolution in Ti6A14V Joints Between Laser Beam Welding and Gas Tungsten Arc Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiao-Long; Zhang, Lin-Jie; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Jian-Xun

    2014-09-01

    The present paper studied the evolution of tensile damage in joints welded using laser beam welding (LBW) and gas tungsten arc welding (TIG) under a uniaxial tensile load. The damage evolution in the LBW joints and TIG-welded joints was studied by using digital image correlation (DIC) technology and monitoring changes in Young's modulus during tensile testing. To study the mechanism of void nucleation and growth in the LBW joints and TIG-welded joints, test specimens with various amounts of plastic deformation were analyzed using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Compared with TIG-welded joints, LBW-welded joints have a finer microstructure and higher microhardness in the fusion zone. The SEM analysis and DIC test results indicated that the critical strain of void nucleation was greater in the LBW-welded joints than in the TIG-welded joints, while the growth rate of voids was lower in the LBW-welded joints than in the TIG-welded joints. Thus, the damage ratio in the LBW joints was lower than that in the TIG-welded joints during tensile testing. This can be due to the coarser martensitic ?' and the application of TC-1 welding rods in the TIG-welded joint.

  18. Comparison of Tensile Damage Evolution in Ti6A14V Joints Between Laser Beam Welding and Gas Tungsten Arc Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiao-Long; Zhang, Lin-Jie; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Jian-Xun

    2014-12-01

    The present paper studied the evolution of tensile damage in joints welded using laser beam welding (LBW) and gas tungsten arc welding (TIG) under a uniaxial tensile load. The damage evolution in the LBW joints and TIG-welded joints was studied by using digital image correlation (DIC) technology and monitoring changes in Young's modulus during tensile testing. To study the mechanism of void nucleation and growth in the LBW joints and TIG-welded joints, test specimens with various amounts of plastic deformation were analyzed using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Compared with TIG-welded joints, LBW-welded joints have a finer microstructure and higher microhardness in the fusion zone. The SEM analysis and DIC test results indicated that the critical strain of void nucleation was greater in the LBW-welded joints than in the TIG-welded joints, while the growth rate of voids was lower in the LBW-welded joints than in the TIG-welded joints. Thus, the damage ratio in the LBW joints was lower than that in the TIG-welded joints during tensile testing. This can be due to the coarser martensitic ?' and the application of TC-1 welding rods in the TIG-welded joint.

  19. Application of Phase Space Warping on Damage Tracking for Bearing Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Bin; Hu, Niaoqing; Hu, Lei; Gu, Fengshou

    2012-05-01

    Nowadays, the significance of keeping equipment function properly each time is obvious. If equipment fails during its use, it may have disastrous consequences. Estimating remaining useful life (RUL) of equipment is a key to prevent such calamities, improve its reliability, provide security and reduce unnecessary maintenance and operational cost. The evolution and tracking of damage is the foundation of RUL predicting, and also is one of the most important content of mechanical fault diagnosis. Slow-time variable process of mechanical damage would lead the phase space reconstructed by fast-time variable vibrate signals warping. Search the dynamics characteristic law of damage evolution analysis in the phase space, and build the relationship between fast-time variable signals and slow-time variable damage, and then damage evolution tracking is possible. To validate the theory, simulation model of bearing damage evolution is built, the outer-race fault evolution signals is obtained, and the trend of evolution of degradation of bearing fault is described with Phase Space Warping (PSW) theory and Smooth Orthogonal Decomposition (SOD). The results proved the feasibility of the methodology of PSW in damage evolution tracking.

  20. Does the universe obey the energy conservation law by a constant mass or an increasing mass with radius during its evolution?

    E-print Network

    Akinbo Ojo

    2008-10-09

    How the energy conservation law is obeyed by the universe during its evolution is an important but not yet unanimously resolved question. Does the universe have a constant mass during its evolution or has its mass been increasing with its radius? Here, we evaluate the two contending propositions within the context of the Friedmann equations and the standard big bang theory. We find that though both propositions appeal to the Friedmann equations for validity, an increasing mass with increasing radius is more in harmony with the thermal history of the big bang model. In addition, temperature and flatness problems that plague the constant mass proposal are mitigated by the increasing mass with radius proposal. We conclude that the universe has been increasing in mass and radius in obedience to the energy conservation law.

  1. Modeling Fatigue Damage in Long-Fiber Thermoplastics

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Kunc, Vlastimil; Bapanapalli, Satish K.

    2009-10-30

    This paper applies a fatigue damage model recently developed for injection-molded long-fiber thermoplastics (LFTs) to predict the modulus reduction and fatigue lifetime of glass/polyamide 6,6 (PA6,6) specimens. The fatigue model uses a multiscale mechanistic approach to describe fatigue damage accumulation in these materials subjected to cyclic loading. Micromechanical modeling using a modified Eshelby-Mori-Tanaka approach combined with averaging techniques for fiber length and orientation distributions is performed to establish the stiffness reduction relation for the composite as a function of the microcrack volume fraction. Next, continuum damage mechanics and a thermodynamic formulation are used to derive the constitutive relations and the damage evolution law. The fatigue damage model has been implemented in the ABAQUS finite element code and has been applied to analyze fatigue of the studied glass/PA6,6 specimens. The predictions agree well with the experimental results.

  2. Modeling KDP Bulk Damage Curves for Prediction of Large-Area Damage Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Runkel, M.; Sharp, R.

    1999-12-16

    Over the past two years extensive experimentation has been carded out to determine the nature of bulk damage in KDP. Automated damage testing with small beams has made it possible to rapidly investigate damage statistics and its connection to growth parameter Variation. Over this time we have built up an encyclopedia of many damage curves but only relatively few samples have been tested with large beams. The scarcity of data makes it difficult to estimate how future crystals will perform on the NIF, and the campaign nature of large beam testing is not suitable for efficient testing of many samples with rapid turn-around, it is therefore desirable to have analytical tools in place that could make reliable predictions of large-beam performance based on small-beam damage probability measurements. To that end, we discuss the application of exponential and power law damage evolution within the framework of Poisson statistics in this memo. We describe the results of fitting these models to various damage probability curves on KDP including the heavily investigated KDP214 samples. We find that both models are capable of fitting the damage probability S-curves quite well but there are multiple parameter sets for each model that produce comparable {chi}{sup 2} values. In addition, the fit parameters from the exponential model do not agree well with the measured evolution from large-beam OSL experiments where pinpoint density was shown to evolve according to n(F)=n{sub 0}exp(bF). The largest discrepancy is in determination of the b values. For the O'Connell formalism the power law case developed here, we find that the best-fit powers have approximately the same magnitude as the Weibull exponent of Feit's formalism, but it is difficult to extract information about the defect concentration using the O'Connell approach. In addition, we found that the power law case provides slightly better {chi}{sup 2} values in roughly half of the cases. We discuss these results in terms of fluence measurement precision and the observed fluctuation of damage density observed on OSL testing. We conclude that these two formalisms are not yet well-enough developed to provide reliable parameters for predicting large-scale damage performance of KDP. In outlining possible steps for refining the models, we also call for any future small-spot damage model to include the effects of laser conditioning.

  3. Selective neuronal vulnerability of human hippocampal CA1 neurons: lesion evolution, temporal course, and pattern of hippocampal damage in diffusion-weighted MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Bartsch, Thorsten; Döhring, Juliane; Reuter, Sigrid; Finke, Carsten; Rohr, Axel; Brauer, Henriette; Deuschl, Günther; Jansen, Olav

    2015-11-01

    The CA1 (cornu ammonis) region of hippocampus is selectively vulnerable to a variety of metabolic and cytotoxic insults, which is mirrored in a delayed neuronal death of CA1 neurons. The basis and mechanisms of this regional susceptibility of CA1 neurons are poorly understood, and the correlates in human diseases affecting the hippocampus are not clear. Adopting a translational approach, the lesion evolution, temporal course, pattern of diffusion changes, and damage in hippocampal CA1 in acute neurologic disorders were studied using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging. In patients with hippocampal ischemia (n=50), limbic encephalitis (n=30), after status epilepticus (n=17), and transient global amnesia (n=53), the CA1 region was selectively affected compared with other CA regions of the hippocampus. CA1 neurons exhibited a maximum decrease of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) 48 to 72?hours after the insult, irrespective of the nature of the insult. Hypoxic-ischemic insults led to a significant lower ADC suggesting that the ischemic insult results in a stronger impairment of cellular metabolism. The evolution of diffusion changes show that CA1 diffusion lesions mirror the delayed time course of the pathophysiologic cascade typically observed in animal models. Studying the imaging correlates of hippocampal damage in humans provides valuable insight into the pathophysiology and neurobiology of the hippocampus. PMID:26082014

  4. Proposed damage evolution model for large-scale finite element modeling of the dual coolant US-ITER TBM

    E-print Network

    Ghoniem, Nasr M.

    -ITER TBM S. Sharafat a,*, J. El-Awady a , S. Liu a , E. Diegele b , N.M. Ghoniem a a University-structural analysis of the DCLL TBM structure the integrated FEM­creep damage model was used to develop true stress. Introduction The US Dual Coolant Lead Lithium (DCLL) ITER Test Blanket Module (TBM) structure will be subject

  5. Investigation of a Novel NDE Method for Monitoring Thermomechanical Damage and Microstructure Evolution in Ferritic-Martensitic Steels for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, Peter

    2013-09-30

    The main goal of the proposed project is the development of validated nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques for in situ monitoring of ferritic-martensitic steels like Grade 91 9Cr-1Mo, which are candidate materials for Generation IV nuclear energy structural components operating at temperatures up to ~650{degree}C and for steam-generator tubing for sodium-cooled fast reactors. Full assessment of thermomechanical damage requires a clear separation between thermally activated microstructural evolution and creep damage caused by simultaneous mechanical stress. Creep damage can be classified as "negligible" creep without significant plastic strain and "ordinary" creep of the primary, secondary, and tertiary kind that is accompanied by significant plastic deformation and/or cavity nucleation and growth. Under negligible creep conditions of interest in this project, minimal or no plastic strain occurs, and the accumulation of creep damage does not significantly reduce the fatigue life of a structural component so that low-temperature design rules, such as the ASME Section III, Subsection NB, can be applied with confidence. The proposed research project will utilize a multifaceted approach in which the feasibility of electrical conductivity and thermo-electric monitoring methods is researched and coupled with detailed post-thermal/creep exposure characterization of microstructural changes and damage processes using state-of-the-art electron microscopy techniques, with the aim of establishing the most effective nondestructive materials evaluation technique for particular degradation modes in high-temperature alloys that are candidates for use in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) as well as providing the necessary mechanism-based underpinnings for relating the two. Only techniques suitable for practical application in situ will be considered. As the project evolves and results accumulate, we will also study the use of this technique for monitoring other GEN IV materials. Through the results obtained from this integrated materials behavior and NDE study, new insight will be gained into the best nondestructive creep and microstructure monitoring methods for the particular mechanisms identified in these materials. The proposed project includes collaboration with a national laboratory partner and the results will also serve as a foundation to guide the efforts of scientists in the DOE laboratory, university, and industrial communities concerned with the technological challenges of monitoring creep and microstructural evolution in materials planned to be used in Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems.

  6. A Dynamic Damage Mechanics Source Model for Explosions in Crystalline Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihaly, J. M.; Bhat, H. S.; Sammis, C. G.; Rosakis, A.

    2011-12-01

    The micromechanical damage mechanics formulated by Ashby and Sammis [PAGEOPH, 1990] and generalized by Deshpande and Evans [J. Mech. Phys. Solids, 2008] has been extended to allow for a more generalized stress state and to incorporate an experimentally motivated crack growth (damage evolution) law that is valid over a wide range of loading rates. This law is sensitive to both the crack tip stress field and its time derivative, and thus produces strain-rate sensitivity in the constitutive response. The model is experimentally verified by predicting the failure strength of Dionysus-Pentelicon marble over strain rates ranging from to . This rate-dependent damage mechanics has been implemented in the ABAQUS dynamic finite element code and used to explore the effects of burn rate (loading rate) and lithostatic stress on the spatial extent of fracture damage and S waves generated by explosions in crystalline rock. Slower rise times and longer pressure pulses produce more damage and stronger S waves.

  7. Temperature activated absorption during laser-induced damage: The evolution of laser-supported solid-state absorption fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, C W; Bude, J D; Shen, N; Demange, P

    2010-10-26

    Previously we have shown that the size of laser induced damage sites in both KDP and SiO{sub 2} is largely governed by the duration of the laser pulse which creates them. Here we present a model based on experiment and simulation that accounts for this behavior. Specifically, we show that solid-state laser-supported absorption fronts are generated during a damage event and that these fronts propagate at constant velocities for laser intensities up to 4 GW/cm{sup 2}. It is the constant absorption front velocity that leads to the dependence of laser damage site size on pulse duration. We show that these absorption fronts are driven principally by the temperature-activated deep sub band-gap optical absorptivity, free electron transport, and thermal diffusion in defect-free silica for temperatures up to 15,000K and pressures < 15GPa. In addition to the practical application of selecting an optimal laser for pre-initiation of large aperture optics, this work serves as a platform for understanding general laser-matter interactions in dielectrics under a variety of conditions.

  8. Pyrolytic carbon free-radical evolution and irradiation damage of polyimide under low-energy proton irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Chengyue; Wu Yiyong; Xiao Jingdong; Li Ruifeng; Yang Dezhuang; He Shiyu

    2011-12-15

    Ionization and displacement effects are basic phenomena in damage processes of materials under space-particle irradiation. In this paper, the damage behaviors were investigated on the polyimide under proton irradiation using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra analysis and optical absorbance valuation. The results indicate that the proton irradiation induces the formation of pyrolytic carbon free-radical with a g value of 2.0025, and the population of free radicals increases with the irradiation fluence. The most important finding is that the irradiation-induced free-radical population increases linearly with the displacement damage dose, as does the optical degradation, whereas the ionization effect alone, during the irradiation, cannot induce the formation of pyrolytic carbon free radical. Furthermore, during the post storage, after irradiation, the free-radical population decreases following a sum of an exponential and a linear mode with the storage time. It is interesting that, during the post storage, the recovery of the degraded optical absorbance of the polyimide follows a similar mode to that of free radicals, and the characteristic time constant changes with the wavelength of the optical spectra.

  9. Evolution of the Governing Law for Loan Agreements of the World Bank and Other Multilateral Development Banks

    E-print Network

    Head, John W.

    1996-01-01

    What is the governing law for loan agreements entered into by the World Bank and other multilateral development banks (MDBs) in carrying out their public sector lending? That question was first definitively addressed about thirty-five years ago...

  10. 32 CFR 537.5 - Applicable law.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...of the tort. However, as to what law of damages is applicable, Maryland or Virginia depecage (choice of law) theory may apply. For example, if the flight...destination was Virginia, the conflict law of both Maryland and Virginia...

  11. 32 CFR 537.5 - Applicable law.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...of the tort. However, as to what law of damages is applicable, Maryland or Virginia depecage (choice of law) theory may apply. For example, if the flight...destination was Virginia, the conflict law of both Maryland and Virginia...

  12. An X-ray Radiography Study of the Effect of Thermal Cycling on Damage Evolution in Large-Area Sn-3.5Ag Solder Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Kurumaddali, Kanth; Kercher, Andrew K.; Walker, Larry; Leslie, Scott G.

    2013-02-01

    There is a need for next-generation, high-performance power electronic packages and systems utilizing wide-band-gap devices to operate at high temperatures in automotive and electricity transmission applications. Sn-3.5Ag solder is a candidate for use in such packages with potential maximum operating temperatures of about 200°C. However, there is a need to understand the thermal cycling reliability of Sn-3.5Ag solders subject to such high-temperature operating conditions. The results of a study on the damage evolution occurring in large-area Sn-3.5Ag solder joints between silicon dies and direct bonded copper substrates with Au/Ni-P metallization subject to thermal cycling between 200°C and 5°C are presented in this paper. Interface structure evolution and damage accumulation were followed using high-resolution X-ray radiography, cross-sectional optical and scanning electron microscopies, and X-ray microanalysis in these joints for up to 3000 thermal cycles. Optical and scanning electron microscopy results showed that the stresses introduced by the thermal cycling result in cracking and delamination at the copper-intermetallic compound interface. X-ray microanalysis showed that stresses due to thermal cycling resulted in physical cracking and breakdown of the Ni-P barrier layer, facilitating Cu-Sn interdiffusion. This interdiffusion resulted in the formation of Cu-Sn intermetallic compounds underneath the Ni-P layer, subsequently leading to delamination between the Ni-rich layer and Cu-Sn intermetallic compounds.

  13. Farmers, Ranchers, and the Railroad: The Evolution of Fence Law in the Great Plains, 1865-1900

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kawashima, Yasuhide

    2010-01-01

    This article is divided into three parts. The first examines specific fencing policies in Kansas, Nebraska, and other Plains states, highlighting the transformation from the "fence-out" to "fence-in" (herd laws) policies. The second part discusses the coming of the railroads to the Great Plains and the farmers and the ranchers as beneficiaries who…

  14. Prediction Of Formability In Sheet Metal Forming Processes Using A Local Damage Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, P.; Santos, Abel; César Sá, J.; Andrade Pires, F.; Barata da Rocha, A.

    2007-05-01

    The formability in sheet metal forming processes is mainly conditioned by ductile fracture resulting from geometric instabilities due to necking and strain localization. The macroscopic collapse associated with ductile failure is a result of internal degradation described throughout metallographic observations by the nucleation, growth and coalescence of voids and micro-cracks. Damage influences and is influenced by plastic deformation and therefore these two dissipative phenomena should be coupled at the constitutive level. In this contribution, Lemaitre's ductile damage model is coupled with Hill's orthotropic plasticity criterion. The coupling between damaging and material behavior is accounted for within the framework of Continuum Damage Mechanics (CDM). The resulting constitutive equations are implemented in the Abaqus/Explicit code, for the prediction of fracture onset in sheet metal forming processes. The damage evolution law takes into account the important effect of micro-crack closure, which dramatically decreases the rate of damage growth under compressive paths.

  15. Prediction Of Formability In Sheet Metal Forming Processes Using A Local Damage Model

    SciTech Connect

    Teixeira, P.; Santos, Abel; Cesar Sa, J.; Andrade Pires, F.; Barata da Rocha, A.

    2007-05-17

    The formability in sheet metal forming processes is mainly conditioned by ductile fracture resulting from geometric instabilities due to necking and strain localization. The macroscopic collapse associated with ductile failure is a result of internal degradation described throughout metallographic observations by the nucleation, growth and coalescence of voids and micro-cracks. Damage influences and is influenced by plastic deformation and therefore these two dissipative phenomena should be coupled at the constitutive level. In this contribution, Lemaitre's ductile damage model is coupled with Hill's orthotropic plasticity criterion. The coupling between damaging and material behavior is accounted for within the framework of Continuum Damage Mechanics (CDM). The resulting constitutive equations are implemented in the Abaqus/Explicit code, for the prediction of fracture onset in sheet metal forming processes. The damage evolution law takes into account the important effect of micro-crack closure, which dramatically decreases the rate of damage growth under compressive paths.

  16. Conservation laws and multiplicity evolution of spectra at energies available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Chajecki, Zbigniew; Lisa, Mike

    2009-03-15

    Transverse momentum distributions in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions carry considerable information about the dynamics of the hot system produced. Direct comparison with the same spectra from p+p collisions has proved invaluable in identifying novel features associated with the larger system, in particular, the 'jet quenching' at high momentum and the apparently much stronger collective flow dominating the spectral shape at low momentum. We point out possible hazards of ignoring conservation laws in the comparison of high- and low-multiplicity final states. We argue that the effects of energy and momentum conservation actually dominate many of the observed systematics, and that p+p collisions may be much more similar to heavy ion collisions than generally thought.

  17. Prediction of Damage in A Randomly Oriented Short-Fiber Composite Plate Containing A Central Hole

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Bathe, K.-J.

    2003-01-01

    A micro-macro approach to matrix cracking in randomly oriented short-fiber composites is used in this paper for the damage and failure analysis of a random glass/epoxy plate containing a central hole under tensile loading. At the micro-scale, the virgin and reduced elastic properties of the composite are computed using micromechanical models and are then averaged over all possible orientations and weighted by an orientation distribution function. Next, the macroscopic response is performed by means of a continuum damage mechanics formulation in which the damage evolution law is obtained using a damage threshold function and the concepts of thermodynamic of continuous media. Damage accumulations leading to initiation and propagation of a macroscopic crack are modeled using a vanishing element technique.

  18. Do p+p Collisions Flow at RHIC? Understanding One-Particle Distributions, Multiplicity Evolution, and Conservation Laws

    E-print Network

    Zbigniew Chaj?cki; Mike Lisa

    2009-09-29

    Collective, explosive flow in central heavy ion collisions manifests itself in the mass dependence of $p_T$ distributions and femtoscopic length scales, measured in the soft sector ($p_T\\lesssim 1$ GeV/c). Measured $p_T$ distributions from proton-proton collisions differ significantly from those from heavy ion collisions. This has been taken as evidence that p+p collisions generate little collective flow, a conclusion in line with naive expectations. We point out possible hazards of ignoring phase-space restrictions due to conservation laws when comparing high- and low-multiplicity final states. Already in two-particle correlation functions, we see clear signals of such phase-space restrictions in low-multiplicity collisions at RHIC. We discuss how these same effects, then, {\\it must} appear in the single particle spectra. We argue that the effects of energy and momentum conservation actually dominate the observed systematics, and that $p+p$ collisions may be much more similar to heavy ion collisions than generally thought.

  19. Evolution of different dual-use concepts in international and national law and its implications on research ethics and governance.

    PubMed

    Rath, Johannes; Ischi, Monique; Perkins, Dana

    2014-09-01

    This paper provides an overview of the various dual-use concepts applied in national and international non-proliferation and anti-terrorism legislation, such as the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention, the Chemical Weapons Convention and United Nations Security Council Resolution 1540, and national export control legislation and in relevant codes of conduct. While there is a vast literature covering dual-use concepts in particular with regard to life sciences, this is the first paper that incorporates into such discussion the United Nations Security Council Resolution 1540. In addition, recent developments such as the extension of dual-use export control legislation in the area of human rights protection are also identified and reviewed. The discussion of dual-use concepts is hereby undertaken in the context of human- and/or national-security-based approaches to security. This paper discusses four main concepts of dual use as applied today in international and national law: civilian versus military, peaceful versus non-peaceful, legitimate versus illegitimate and benevolent versus malevolent. In addition, the usage of the term to describe positive technology spin-offs between civilian and military applications is also briefly addressed. Attention is also given to the roles civil society and research ethics may play in the governance of dual-use sciences and technologies. PMID:24497004

  20. Temporal Variation of Aerosol Properties at a Rural Continental Site and Study of Aerosol Evolution through Growth Law Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Jian; Collins, Don; Covert, David; Elleman, Robert; Ferrare, Richard A.; Gasparini, Roberto; Jonsson, Haflidi; Ogren, John; Sheridan, Patrick; Tsay, Si-Chee

    2006-01-01

    Aerosol size distributions were measured by a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) onboard the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft during 16 flights at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in northern central Oklahoma as part of the Aerosol Intensive Operation period in May, 2003. During the same period a second SMPS was deployed at a surface station and provided continuous measurements. Combined with trace gas measurements at the SGP site and back-trajectory analysis, the aerosol size distributions provided insights into the sources of aerosols observed at the SGP site. High particle concentrations, observed mostly during daytime, were well correlated with the sulfur dioxide (SO2) mixing ratios, suggesting nucleation involving sulfuric acid is likely the main source of newly formed particles at the SGP. Aerosols within plumes originating from wildfires in Central America were measured at the surface site. Vertically compact aerosol layers, which can be traced back to forest fires in East Asia, were intercepted at altitudes over 3000 meters. Analyses of size dependent particle growth rates for four periods during which high cloud coverage was observed indicate growth dominated by volume controlled reactions. Sulfate accounts for 50% to 72% of the increase in aerosol volume concentration; the rest of the volume concentration increase was likely due to secondary organic species. The growth law analyses and meteorological conditions indicate that the sulfate was produced mainly through aqueous oxidation of SO2 in clouds droplets and hydrated aerosol particles.

  1. Law without Law

    E-print Network

    B. G. Sidharth

    2007-10-21

    We consider a model for spacetime in which there is an ubiquitous background Dark Energy which is the Zero Point Field. This is further modeled in terms of a Weiner process that leads to a Random or Brownian characterization. Nevertheless we are able to recover meaningful physics, very much in the spirit of Wheeler's Law without Law, that is laws emerging from an underpinning of lawlessness.

  2. A Note on Conservation Laws Stanly Steinberg

    E-print Network

    Steinberg, Stanly

    that minimizes the energy E , then this motion will satisfy Newton's law for the force determined of these forms, for example Newton's law is a force balance law, but many laws that describe the time evolution's momentum is p(t) = m v(t) where v(t) = x 0 (t) is the velocity of the particle. Newton's law says

  3. A model for high temperature creep of single crystal superalloys based on nonlocal damage and viscoplastic material behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinh, B. T.; Hackl, K.

    2014-07-01

    A model for high temperature creep of single crystal superalloys is developed, which includes constitutive laws for nonlocal damage and viscoplasticity. It is based on a variational formulation, employing potentials for free energy, and dissipation originating from plasticity and damage. Evolution equations for plastic strain and damage variables are derived from the well-established minimum principle for the dissipation potential. The model is capable of describing the different stages of creep in a unified way. Plastic deformation in superalloys incorporates the evolution of dislocation densities of the different phases present. It results in a time dependence of the creep rate in primary and secondary creep. Tertiary creep is taken into account by introducing local and nonlocal damage. Herein, the nonlocal one is included in order to model strain localization as well as to remove mesh dependence of finite element calculations. Numerical results and comparisons with experimental data of the single crystal superalloy LEK94 are shown.

  4. [The return of the Red Queen, or the law of the growth in the mean duration of the existence of genera during evolution].

    PubMed

    Markov, A V

    2000-01-01

    Phanerozoic marine genera apparently do not become less extinction-prone with age. Higher extinction probability in "young" cohorts of genera is better explained by initially different levels of extinction-tolerance of genera in the cohort. This fact agrees with one of the two basic statements of the "Red Queen" hypothesis (Van Valen, 1973). In the second statement (the idea that the increase in fitness lowers extinction probability) the term "fitness" should be changed to "adaptability". The increase of extinction-tolerance, that can be interpreted as the increase of adaptability to unpredictable changes of environment, is found in succession of "generations" of genera that replace one another through time. This increase reveals itself, firstly, in the growth of mean duration of genera, as well as in the decrease of extinction/origination rates, gradual accumulation of long-lived genera and origination of genera with higher duration. The increase of adaptability may be caused by selective extinction of stenotopic, ecologically specialized forms; Cope's law; evolution of ecosystems that involves development of more effective mechanisms of sustaining homeostasis which may stimulate the recovery of a genus after partial extinction. PMID:10999002

  5. Evolution and Ethics Introduction to Evolution

    E-print Network

    Mittal, Aditya

    "), but the underlying premise is not in question. #12;www.carlwozniak.com Does evolution go against the lawEvolution and Ethics · Introduction to Evolution · Concept of Gene Pools: Man-made (Domestication) versus Natural selection · Some evidences · Specific examples of evolution of pathogenic organisms

  6. Irreversible entropy model for damage diagnosis in resistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuadras, Angel; Crisóstomo, Javier; Ovejas, Victoria J.; Quilez, Marcos

    2015-10-01

    We propose a method to characterize electrical resistor damage based on entropy measurements. Irreversible entropy and the rate at which it is generated are more convenient parameters than resistance for describing damage because they are essentially positive in virtue of the second law of thermodynamics, whereas resistance may increase or decrease depending on the degradation mechanism. Commercial resistors were tested in order to characterize the damage induced by power surges. Resistors were biased with constant and pulsed voltage signals, leading to power dissipation in the range of 4-8 W, which is well above the 0.25 W nominal power to initiate failure. Entropy was inferred from the added power and temperature evolution. A model is proposed to understand the relationship among resistance, entropy, and damage. The power surge dissipates into heat (Joule effect) and damages the resistor. The results show a correlation between entropy generation rate and resistor failure. We conclude that damage can be conveniently assessed from irreversible entropy generation. Our results for resistors can be easily extrapolated to other systems or machines that can be modeled based on their resistance.

  7. Interacting damage models mapped onto ising and percolation models

    SciTech Connect

    Toussaint, Renaud; Pride, Steven R.

    2004-03-23

    The authors introduce a class of damage models on regular lattices with isotropic interactions between the broken cells of the lattice. Quasistatic fiber bundles are an example. The interactions are assumed to be weak, in the sense that the stress perturbation from a broken cell is much smaller than the mean stress in the system. The system starts intact with a surface-energy threshold required to break any cell sampled from an uncorrelated quenched-disorder distribution. The evolution of this heterogeneous system is ruled by Griffith's principle which states that a cell breaks when the release in potential (elastic) energy in the system exceeds the surface-energy barrier necessary to break the cell. By direct integration over all possible realizations of the quenched disorder, they obtain the probability distribution of each damage configuration at any level of the imposed external deformation. They demonstrate an isomorphism between the distributions so obtained and standard generalized Ising models, in which the coupling constants and effective temperature in the Ising model are functions of the nature of the quenched-disorder distribution and the extent of accumulated damage. In particular, they show that damage models with global load sharing are isomorphic to standard percolation theory, that damage models with local load sharing rule are isomorphic to the standard ising model, and draw consequences thereof for the universality class and behavior of the autocorrelation length of the breakdown transitions corresponding to these models. they also treat damage models having more general power-law interactions, and classify the breakdown process as a function of the power-law interaction exponent. Last, they also show that the probability distribution over configurations is a maximum of Shannon's entropy under some specific constraints related to the energetic balance of the fracture process, which firmly relates this type of quenched-disorder based damage model to standard statistical mechanics.

  8. EFFECT OF CREVICE FORMER ON CORROSION DAMAGE PROPAGATION

    SciTech Connect

    J.H. Payer; U. Landau; X. Shan; A.S. Agarwal

    2006-03-01

    The objectives of this report are: (1) To determine the effect of the crevice former on the localized corrosion damage propagation; (2) FOCUS on post initiation stage, crevice propagation and arrest processes; (3) Determine the evolution of damage--severity, shape, location/distribution, damage profile; and (4) Model of crevice corrosion propagation, i.e. the evolution of the crevice corrosion damage profile.

  9. Water, law, science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narasimhan, T. N.

    2008-01-01

    SummaryIn a world with water resources severely impacted by technology, science must actively contribute to water law. To this end, this paper is an earth scientist's attempt to comprehend essential elements of water law, and to examine their connections to science. Science and law share a common logical framework of starting with a priori prescribed tenets, and drawing consistent inferences. In science, observationally established physical laws constitute the tenets, while in law, they stem from social values. The foundations of modern water law in Europe and the New World were formulated nearly two thousand years ago by Roman jurists who were inspired by Greek philosophy of reason. Recognizing that vital natural elements such as water, air, and the sea were governed by immutable natural laws, they reasoned that these elements belonged to all humans, and therefore cannot be owned as private property. Legally, such public property was to be governed by jus gentium, the law of all people or the law of all nations. In contrast, jus civile or civil law governed private property. Remarkably, jus gentium continues to be relevant in our contemporary society in which science plays a pivotal role in exploiting vital resources common to all. This paper examines the historical roots of modern water law, follows their evolution through the centuries, and examines how the spirit of science inherent in jus gentium is profoundly influencing evolving water and environmental laws in Europe, the United States and elsewhere. In a technological world, scientific knowledge has to lie at the core of water law. Yet, science cannot formulate law. It is hoped that a philosophical understanding of the relationships between science and law will contribute to their constructively coming together in the service of society.

  10. Progressive Damage Analysis of Laminated Composite (PDALC)-A Computational Model Implemented in the NASA COMET Finite Element Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, David C.; Coats, Timothy W.; Harris, Charles E.; Allen, David H.

    1996-01-01

    A method for analysis of progressive failure in the Computational Structural Mechanics Testbed is presented in this report. The relationship employed in this analysis describes the matrix crack damage and fiber fracture via kinematics-based volume-averaged variables. Damage accumulation during monotonic and cyclic loads is predicted by damage evolution laws for tensile load conditions. The implementation of this damage model required the development of two testbed processors. While this report concentrates on the theory and usage of these processors, a complete list of all testbed processors and inputs that are required for this analysis are included. Sample calculations for laminates subjected to monotonic and cyclic loads were performed to illustrate the damage accumulation, stress redistribution, and changes to the global response that occur during the load history. Residual strength predictions made with this information compared favorably with experimental measurements.

  11. Progressive Damage Analysis of Laminated Composite (PDALC) (A Computational Model Implemented in the NASA COMET Finite Element Code). 2.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coats, Timothy W.; Harris, Charles E.; Lo, David C.; Allen, David H.

    1998-01-01

    A method for analysis of progressive failure in the Computational Structural Mechanics Testbed is presented in this report. The relationship employed in this analysis describes the matrix crack damage and fiber fracture via kinematics-based volume-averaged damage variables. Damage accumulation during monotonic and cyclic loads is predicted by damage evolution laws for tensile load conditions. The implementation of this damage model required the development of two testbed processors. While this report concentrates on the theory and usage of these processors, a complete listing of all testbed processors and inputs that are required for this analysis are included. Sample calculations for laminates subjected to monotonic and cyclic loads were performed to illustrate the damage accumulation, stress redistribution, and changes to the global response that occurs during the loading history. Residual strength predictions made with this information compared favorably with experimental measurements.

  12. Water, law, science

    SciTech Connect

    Narasimhan, T.N.

    2007-10-17

    In a world with water resources severely impacted bytechnology, science must actively contribute to water law. To this end,this paper is an earth scientist s attempt to comprehend essentialelements of water law, and to examine their connections to science.Science and law share a common logical framework of starting with apriori prescribed tenets, and drawing consistent inferences. In science,observationally established physical laws constitute the tenets, while inlaw, they stem from social values. The foundations of modern water law inEurope and the New World were formulated nearly two thousand years ago byRoman jurists who were inspired by Greek philosophy of reason.Recognizing that vital natural elements such as water, air, and the seawere governed by immutable natural laws, they reasoned that theseelements belonged to all humans, and therefore cannot be owned as privateproperty. Legally, such public property was to be governed by jusgentium, the law of all people or the law of all nations. In contrast,jus civile or civil law governed private property. Remarkably, jusgentium continues to be relevant in our contemporary society in whichscience plays a pivotal role in exploiting vital resources common to all.This paper examines the historical roots of modern water law, followstheir evolution through the centuries, and examines how the spirit ofscience inherent in jus gentium is profoundly influencing evolving waterand environmental laws in Europe, the United States and elsewhere. In atechnological world, scientific knowledge has to lie at the core of waterlaw. Yet, science cannot formulate law. It is hoped that a philosophicalunderstanding of the relationships between science and law willcontribute to their constructively coming together in the service ofsociety.

  13. Full-scale prestress loss monitoring of damaged RC structures using distributed optical fiber sensing technology.

    PubMed

    Lan, Chunguang; Zhou, Zhi; Ou, Jinping

    2012-01-01

    For the safety of prestressed structures, prestress loss is a critical issue that will increase with structural damage, so it is necessary to investigate prestress loss of prestressed structures under different damage scenarios. Unfortunately, to date, no qualified techniques are available due to difficulty for sensors to survive in harsh construction environments of long service life and large span. In this paper, a novel smart steel strand based on the Brillouin optical time domain analysis (BOTDA) sensing technique was designed and manufactured, and then series of tests were used to characterize properties of the smart steel strands. Based on prestress loss principle analysis of damaged structures, laboratory tests of two similar beams with different damages were used to verify the concept of full-scale prestress loss monitoring of damaged reinforced concrete (RC) beams by using the smart steel strands. The prestress losses obtained from the Brillouin sensors are compared with that from conventional sensors, which provided the evolution law of prestress losses of damaged RC beams. The monitoring results from the proposed smart strand can reveal both spatial distribution and time history of prestress losses of damaged RC beams. PMID:22778590

  14. Elastic-Plastic Constitutive Equation of WC-Co Cemented Carbides with Anisotropic Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Hayakawa, Kunio; Nakamura, Tamotsu; Tanaka, Shigekazu

    2007-05-17

    Elastic-plastic constitutive equation of WC-Co cemented carbides with anisotropic damage is proposed to predict a precise service life of cold forging tools. A 2nd rank symmetric tensor damage tensor is introduced in order to express the stress unilaterality; a salient difference in uniaxial behavior between tension and compression. The conventional framework of irreversible thermodynamics is used to derive the constitutive equation. The Gibbs potential is formulated as a function of stress, damage tensor, isotropic hardening variable and kinematic hardening variable. The elastic-damage constitutive equation, conjugate forces of damage, isotropic hardening and kinematic hardening variable is derived from the potential. For the kinematic hardening variable, the superposition of three kinematic hardening laws is employed in order to improve the cyclic behavior of the material. For the evolution equation of the damage tensor, the damage is assumed to progress by fracture of the Co matrix - WC particle interface and by the mechanism of fatigue, i.e. the accumulation of microscopic plastic strain in matrix and particles. By using the constitutive equations, calculation of uniaxial tensile and compressive test is performed and the results are compared with the experimental ones in the literature. Furthermore, finite element analysis on cold forward extrusion was carried out, in which the proposed constitutive equation was employed as die insert material.

  15. Full-Scale Prestress Loss Monitoring of Damaged RC Structures Using Distributed Optical Fiber Sensing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Chunguang; Zhou, Zhi; Ou, Jinping

    2012-01-01

    For the safety of prestressed structures, prestress loss is a critical issue that will increase with structural damage, so it is necessary to investigate prestress loss of prestressed structures under different damage scenarios. Unfortunately, to date, no qualified techniques are available due to difficulty for sensors to survive in harsh construction environments of long service life and large span. In this paper, a novel smart steel strand based on the Brillouin optical time domain analysis (BOTDA) sensing technique was designed and manufactured, and then series of tests were used to characterize properties of the smart steel strands. Based on prestress loss principle analysis of damaged structures, laboratory tests of two similar beams with different damages were used to verify the concept of full-scale prestress loss monitoring of damaged reinforced concrete (RC) beams by using the smart steel strands. The prestress losses obtained from the Brillouin sensors are compared with that from conventional sensors, which provided the evolution law of prestress losses of damaged RC beams. The monitoring results from the proposed smart strand can reveal both spatial distribution and time history of prestress losses of damaged RC beams. PMID:22778590

  16. Damage mechanics in 2-D and 3-D microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, Keith J.; Ostoja-Starzewski, Martin

    1993-02-01

    The evolution of damage and strategies for assessing damage when it has occurred in structural materials is the primary focus of this research program. The research effort is a collaborative one on mesomechanics called 'Damage in 2D and 3D Microstructures.' What distinguishes this effort from others is the attempt to perform incisive model experiments to assist in evaluating stochastic models for constitutive laws (elasticity and conductivity), mechanical response plasticity, and hardness and associated damage processes. The theoretical models are designed to be elegant and efficient in the use of computing resources as opposed to brute force procedures which handle systems with different scales by scaling up the size of the computer. The essence of this work is to explore sample size microstructure relationships via stochastic models which reflect the same types of variability present in the response of real materials. This leads directly to concerns with effective properties of materials. Thus, research integrates the effects of microstructure and preferred orientation on the effective tensorial properties of polycrystalline materials.

  17. Property Evaluation and Damage Evolution of Environmental Barrier Coatings and Environmental Barrier Coated SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composite Sub-Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Halbig, Michael; Jaskowiak, Martha; Hurst, Janet; Bhatt, Ram; Fox, Dennis S.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes recent development of environmental barrier coatings on SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites. The creep and fatigue behavior at aggressive long-term high temperature conditions have been evaluated and highlighted. Thermal conductivity and high thermal gradient cyclic durability of environmental barrier coatings have been evaluated. The damage accumulation and complex stress-strain behavior environmental barrier coatings on SiCSiC ceramic matrix composite turbine airfoil subelements during the thermal cyclic and fatigue testing of have been also reported.

  18. The Role of Elastic and Plastic Anisotropy of Sn in Recrystallization and Damage Evolution During Thermal Cycling in SAC305 Solder Joints

    SciTech Connect

    Bieler, Thomas R.; Zhou, Bite; Blair, Lauren; Zamiri, Amir; Darbandi, Payam; Pourboghrat, Farhang; Lee, Tae-Kyu; Liu, Kuo-Chuan

    2013-04-08

    Because failures in lead-free solder joints occur at locations other than the most highly shear-strained regions, reliability prediction is challenging. To gain physical understanding of this phenomenon, physically based understanding of how elastic and plastic deformation anisotropy affect microstructural evolution during thermomechanical cycling is necessary. Upon solidification, SAC305 (Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu) solder joints are usually single or tricrystals. The evolution of microstructures and properties is characterized statistically using optical and orientation imaging microscopy. In situ synchrotron x-ray measurements during thermal cycling are used to examine how crystal orientation and thermal cycling history change strain history. Extensive characterization of a low-stress plastic ball grid array (PBGA) package design at different stages of cycling history is compared with preliminary experiments using higher-stress package designs. With time and thermal history, microstructural evolution occurs mostly from continuous recrystallization and particle coarsening that is unique to each joint, because of the specific interaction between local thermal and displacement boundary conditions and the strong anisotropic elastic, plastic, expansion, and diffusional properties of Sn crystals. The rate of development of recrystallized microstructures is a strong function of strain and aging. Cracks form at recrystallized (random) boundaries, and then percolate through recrystallized regions. Complications arising from electromigration and corrosion are also considered.

  19. The Role of Elastic and Plastic Anisotropy of Sn in Recrystallization and Damage Evolution During Thermal Cycling in SAC305 Solder Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieler, Thomas R.; Zhou, Bite; Blair, Lauren; Zamiri, Amir; Darbandi, Payam; Pourboghrat, Farhang; Lee, Tae-Kyu; Liu, Kuo-Chuan

    2012-02-01

    Because failures in lead-free solder joints occur at locations other than the most highly shear-strained regions, reliability prediction is challenging. To gain physical understanding of this phenomenon, physically based understanding of how elastic and plastic deformation anisotropy affect microstructural evolution during thermomechanical cycling is necessary. Upon solidification, SAC305 (Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu) solder joints are usually single or tricrystals. The evolution of microstructures and properties is characterized statistically using optical and orientation imaging microscopy. In situ synchrotron x-ray measurements during thermal cycling are used to examine how crystal orientation and thermal cycling history change strain history. Extensive characterization of a low-stress plastic ball grid array (PBGA) package design at different stages of cycling history is compared with preliminary experiments using higher-stress package designs. With time and thermal history, microstructural evolution occurs mostly from continuous recrystallization and particle coarsening that is unique to each joint, because of the specific interaction between local thermal and displacement boundary conditions and the strong anisotropic elastic, plastic, expansion, and diffusional properties of Sn crystals. The rate of development of recrystallized microstructures is a strong function of strain and aging. Cracks form at recrystallized (random) boundaries, and then percolate through recrystallized regions. Complications arising from electromigration and corrosion are also considered.

  20. MULTI-WAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF THE SPATIO-TEMPORAL EVOLUTION OF SOLAR FLARES WITH AIA/SDO. II. HYDRODYNAMIC SCALING LAWS AND THERMAL ENERGIES

    SciTech Connect

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Shimizu, Toshifumi E-mail: shimizu.toshifumi@isas.jaxa.jp

    2013-10-20

    In this study we measure physical parameters of the same set of 155 M- and X-class solar flares observed with AIA/SDO as analyzed in Paper I, by performing a differential emission measure analysis to determine the flare peak emission measure EM{sub p} , peak temperature T{sub p} , electron density n{sub p} , and thermal energy E{sub th}, in addition to the spatial scales L, areas A, and volumes V measured in Paper I. The parameter ranges for M- and X-class flares are log (EM{sub p}) = 47.0-50.5, T{sub p} = 5.0-17.8 MK, n{sub p} = 4 × 10{sup 9}-9 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup –3}, and thermal energies of E{sub th} = 1.6 × 10{sup 28}-1.1 × 10{sup 32} erg. We find that these parameters obey the Rosner-Tucker-Vaiana (RTV) scaling law T{sub p}{sup 2}?n{sub p} L and H?T {sup 7/2} L {sup –2} during the peak time t{sub p} of the flare density n{sub p} , when energy balance between the heating rate H and the conductive and radiative loss rates is achieved for a short instant and thus enables the applicability of the RTV scaling law. The application of the RTV scaling law predicts power-law distributions for all physical parameters, which we demonstrate with numerical Monte Carlo simulations as well as with analytical calculations. A consequence of the RTV law is also that we can retrieve the size distribution of heating rates, for which we find N(H)?H {sup –1.8}, which is consistent with the magnetic flux distribution N(?)??{sup –1.85} observed by Parnell et al. and the heating flux scaling law F{sub H} ?HL?B/L of Schrijver et al.. The fractal-diffusive self-organized criticality model in conjunction with the RTV scaling law reproduces the observed power-law distributions and their slopes for all geometrical and physical parameters and can be used to predict the size distributions for other flare data sets, instruments, and detection algorithms.

  1. Consequences of the Thermal Transient on the Evolution of the Damaged Zone Around a Repository for Heat-Emitting High-Level Radioactive Waste in a Clay Formation: a Performance Assessment Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Li; Weetjens, Eef; Sillen, Xavier; Vietor, Tim; Li, Xiangling; Delage, Pierre; Labiouse, Vincent; Charlier, Robert

    2014-01-01

    A proper evaluation of the perturbations of the host rock induced by the excavation and the emplacement of exothermic wastes is essential for the assessment of the long-term safety of high-level radioactive waste disposals in clay formations. The impact of the thermal transient on the evolution of the damaged zone (DZ) has been explored in the European Commission project TIMODAZ (thermal impact on the damaged zone around a radioactive waste disposal in clay host rocks, 2006-2010). This paper integrates the scientific results of the TIMODAZ project from a performance assessment (PA) point of view, showing how these results support and justify key PA assumptions and the values of PA model parameters. This paper also contextualises the significance of the thermal impact on the DZ from a safety case perspective, highlighting how the project outcomes result into an improved understanding of the thermo-hydro-mechanical behaviour of the clay host rocks. The results obtained in the TIMODAZ project strengthen the assessment basis of the safety evaluation of the current repository designs. There was no evidence throughout the TIMODAZ experimental observations of a temperature-induced additional opening of fractures nor of a significant permeability increase of the DZ. Instead, thermally induced plasticity, swelling and creep seem to be beneficial to the sealing of fractures and to the recovery of a very low permeability in the DZ, close to that of an undisturbed clay host rock. Results from the TIMODAZ project indicate that the favourable properties of the clay host rock, which guarantee the effectiveness of the safety functions of the repository system, are expected to be maintained after the heating-cooling cycle. Hence, the basic assumptions usually made in PA calculations so far are expected to remain valid, and the performance of the system should not be affected in a negative way by the thermal evolution of the DZ around a radioactive waste repository in clay host rock.

  2. Humans are still evolving, scientists find Darwinian survival-of-the-fittest laws continue to shape human evolution in the modern age, research has shown.

    E-print Network

    Lummaa, Virpi

    Humans are still evolving, scientists find Darwinian survival-of-the-fittest laws continue to shape. SubscribeRegisterLog in Page 1 of 2Humans are still evolving, scientists find - Telegraph 12/05/2012http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/science-news/9236924/Humans-are-still-evolving... #12;Although the specific pressures, the factors making some

  3. Partition coefficients for REE between garnets and liquids - Implications of non-Henry's Law behaviour for models of basalt origin and evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, W. J.

    1981-01-01

    An experimental investigation of Ce, Sm and Tm rare earth element (REE) partition coefficients between coexisting garnets (both natural and synthetic) and hydrous liquids shows that Henry's Law may not be obeyed over a range of REE concentrations of geological relevance. Systematic differences between the three REE and the two garnet compositions may be explained in terms of the differences between REE ionic radii and those of the dodecahedral site into which they substitute, substantiating the Harrison and Wood (1980) model of altervalent substitution. Model calculations demonstrate that significant variation can occur in the rare earth contents of melts produced from a garnet lherzolite, if Henry's Law partition coefficients do not apply for the garnet phase.

  4. Limits of imagination: the 150th Anniversary of Mendel's Laws, and why Mendel failed to see the importance of his discovery for Darwin's theory of evolution.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rama S

    2015-09-01

    Mendel is credited for discovering Laws of Heredity, but his work has come under criticism on three grounds: for possible falsification of data to fit his expectations, for getting undue credit for the laws of heredity without having ideas of segregation and independent assortment, and for being interested in the development of hybrids rather than in the laws of heredity. I present a brief review of these criticisms and conclude that Mendel deserved to be called the father of genetics even if he may not, and most likely did not, have clear ideas of segregation and particulate determiners as we know them now. I argue that neither Mendel understood the evolutionary significance of his findings for the problem of genetic variation, nor would Darwin have understood their significance had he read Mendel's paper. I argue that the limits to imagination, in both cases, came from their mental framework being shaped by existing paradigms-blending inheritance in the case of Darwin, hybrid development in the case of Mendel. Like Einstein, Darwin's natural selection was deterministic; like Niels Bohr, Mendel's Laws were probabilistic-based on random segregation of trait-determining "factors". Unlike Einstein who understood quantum mechanics, Darwin would have been at a loss with Mendel's paper with no guide to turn to. Geniuses in their imaginations are like heat-seeking missiles locked-in with their targets of deep interests and they generally see things in one dimension only. Imagination has limits; unaided imagination is like a bird without wings - it goes nowhere. PMID:26372894

  5. Defect interactions with stepped CeO{sub 2}/SrTiO{sub 3} interfaces: Implications for radiation damage evolution and fast ion conduction

    SciTech Connect

    Dholabhai, Pratik P. Aguiar, Jeffery A.; Uberuaga, Blas P.; Misra, Amit

    2014-05-21

    Due to reduced dimensions and increased interfacial content, nanocomposite oxides offer improved functionalities in a wide variety of advanced technological applications, including their potential use as radiation tolerant materials. To better understand the role of interface structures in influencing the radiation damage tolerance of oxides, we have conducted atomistic calculations to elucidate the behavior of radiation-induced point defects (vacancies and interstitials) at interface steps in a model CeO{sub 2}/SrTiO{sub 3} system. We find that atomic-scale steps at the interface have substantial influence on the defect behavior, which ultimately dictate the material performance in hostile irradiation environments. Distinctive steps react dissimilarly to cation and anion defects, effectively becoming biased sinks for different types of defects. Steps also attract cation interstitials, leaving behind an excess of immobile vacancies. Further, defects introduce significant structural and chemical distortions primarily at the steps. These two factors are plausible origins for the enhanced amorphization at steps seen in our recent experiments. The present work indicates that comprehensive examination of the interaction of radiation-induced point defects with the atomic-scale topology and defect structure of heterointerfaces is essential to evaluate the radiation tolerance of nanocomposites. Finally, our results have implications for other applications, such as fast ion conduction.

  6. Defect interactions with stepped CeO2/SrTiO3 interfaces: Implications for radiation damage evolution and fast ion conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dholabhai, Pratik P.; Aguiar, Jeffery A.; Misra, Amit; Uberuaga, Blas P.

    2014-05-01

    Due to reduced dimensions and increased interfacial content, nanocomposite oxides offer improved functionalities in a wide variety of advanced technological applications, including their potential use as radiation tolerant materials. To better understand the role of interface structures in influencing the radiation damage tolerance of oxides, we have conducted atomistic calculations to elucidate the behavior of radiation-induced point defects (vacancies and interstitials) at interface steps in a model CeO2/SrTiO3 system. We find that atomic-scale steps at the interface have substantial influence on the defect behavior, which ultimately dictate the material performance in hostile irradiation environments. Distinctive steps react dissimilarly to cation and anion defects, effectively becoming biased sinks for different types of defects. Steps also attract cation interstitials, leaving behind an excess of immobile vacancies. Further, defects introduce significant structural and chemical distortions primarily at the steps. These two factors are plausible origins for the enhanced amorphization at steps seen in our recent experiments. The present work indicates that comprehensive examination of the interaction of radiation-induced point defects with the atomic-scale topology and defect structure of heterointerfaces is essential to evaluate the radiation tolerance of nanocomposites. Finally, our results have implications for other applications, such as fast ion conduction.

  7. A continuum damage model of fatigue-induced damage in laminated composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Charles E.; Allen, David H.

    1988-01-01

    A model is presented which predicts the stress-strain behavior of continuous fiber reinforced laminated composites in the presence of microstructural damage. The model is based on the concept of continuum damage mechanics and uses internal state variables to characterize the various damage modes. The associated internal state variable growth laws are mathematical models of the loading history induced development of microstructural damage. The model is demonstrated by using it to predict the response of damaged AS-4/3502 graphite/epoxy laminate panels.

  8. Water law

    SciTech Connect

    Goldfarb, W.

    1988-01-01

    The author pays particular attention to recent amendments to the Clean Water Act, Safe Drinking Water Act, and hazardous waste statutes. Concludes with a new chapter on regional land-use controls to safeguard water quality. This book is revised to explain the nature of law and the relationships among water law, science, water uses, water rights, and water resources management.

  9. Patenting Human Evolution

    E-print Network

    Torrance, Andrew W.

    2008-06-01

    to thorough analysis and debate prior to the imminent arrival of human genetic enhancement technologies. Otherwise, patent law may drive human evolution in directions either unplanned - or worse - undesired....

  10. The Therapeutic Turn in International Humanitarian Law: War Crimes Tribunals as Sites of "Healing"?

    E-print Network

    Anders, Diana Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    M. Cherif. Crimes Against Humanity: Historical Evolution andBassiouni. Crimes Against Humanity: Historical Evolution andevolution of sexual violence in international law, see: Kelly Askin, War Crimes against

  11. MULTI-WAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF THE SPATIO-TEMPORAL EVOLUTION OF SOLAR FLARES WITH AIA/SDO. I. UNIVERSAL SCALING LAWS OF SPACE AND TIME PARAMETERS

    SciTech Connect

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Kai E-mail: jzhang7@gmu.edu

    2013-09-20

    We extend a previous statistical solar flare study of 155 GOES M- and X-class flares observed with AIA/SDO to all seven coronal wavelengths (94, 131, 171, 193, 211, 304, and 335 Å) to test the wavelength dependence of scaling laws and statistical distributions. Except for the 171 and 193 Å wavelengths, which are affected by EUV dimming caused by coronal mass ejections (CMEs), we find near-identical size distributions of geometric (lengths L, flare areas A, volumes V, and fractal dimension D{sub 2}), temporal (flare durations T), and spatio-temporal parameters (diffusion coefficient ?, spreading exponent ?, and maximum expansion velocities v{sub max}) in different wavelengths, which are consistent with the universal predictions of the fractal-diffusive avalanche model of a slowly driven, self-organized criticality (FD-SOC) system, i.e., N(L)?L {sup –3}, N(A)?A {sup –2}, N(V)?V {sup –5/3}, N(T)?T {sup –2}, and D{sub 2} = 3/2, for a Euclidean dimension d = 3. Empirically, we find also a new strong correlation ??L {sup 0.94±0.01} and the three-parameter scaling law L?? T {sup 0.1}, which is more consistent with the logistic-growth model than with classical diffusion. The findings suggest long-range correlation lengths in the FD-SOC system that operate in the vicinity of a critical state, which could be used for predictions of individual extreme events. We find also that eruptive flares (with accompanying CMEs) have larger volumes V, longer flare durations T, higher EUV and soft X-ray fluxes, and somewhat larger diffusion coefficients ? than confined flares (without CMEs)

  12. Multi-wavelength Observations of the Spatio-temporal Evolution of Solar Flares with AIA/SDO. I. Universal Scaling Laws of Space and Time Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Kai

    2013-09-01

    We extend a previous statistical solar flare study of 155 GOES M- and X-class flares observed with AIA/SDO to all seven coronal wavelengths (94, 131, 171, 193, 211, 304, and 335 Å) to test the wavelength dependence of scaling laws and statistical distributions. Except for the 171 and 193 Å wavelengths, which are affected by EUV dimming caused by coronal mass ejections (CMEs), we find near-identical size distributions of geometric (lengths L, flare areas A, volumes V, and fractal dimension D 2), temporal (flare durations T), and spatio-temporal parameters (diffusion coefficient ?, spreading exponent ?, and maximum expansion velocities v max) in different wavelengths, which are consistent with the universal predictions of the fractal-diffusive avalanche model of a slowly driven, self-organized criticality (FD-SOC) system, i.e., N(L)vpropL -3, N(A)vpropA -2, N(V)vpropV -5/3, N(T)vpropT -2, and D 2 = 3/2, for a Euclidean dimension d = 3. Empirically, we find also a new strong correlation ?vpropL 0.94 ± 0.01 and the three-parameter scaling law Lvprop? T 0.1, which is more consistent with the logistic-growth model than with classical diffusion. The findings suggest long-range correlation lengths in the FD-SOC system that operate in the vicinity of a critical state, which could be used for predictions of individual extreme events. We find also that eruptive flares (with accompanying CMEs) have larger volumes V, longer flare durations T, higher EUV and soft X-ray fluxes, and somewhat larger diffusion coefficients ? than confined flares (without CMEs).

  13. TRANSBOUNDARY GROUNDWATER AND INTERNATIONAL LAW: PAST PRACTICES AND CURRENT IMPLICATIONS

    E-print Network

    Wolf, Aaron

    TRANSBOUNDARY GROUNDWATER AND INTERNATIONAL LAW: PAST PRACTICES AND CURRENT IMPLICATIONS By Kyoko........................................................................................................................................ 1 2. The Notion of Transboundary Groundwater................................................................................... 3 3. Evolution of International Groundwater Management in Environmental Law

  14. Penn Law Classes, Certificate

    E-print Network

    Bushman, Frederic

    Litigation · Introduction to General Business Law · Regulation of Health Insurance Markets · Navigating to Health Law and Policy · Public Health Law & Policy · Mental Health Law · Intellectual Property and Patent

  15. Scaling of fracture length and distributed damage Vladimir Lyakhovsky

    E-print Network

    Lyakhovsky, Vladimir

    Scaling of fracture length and distributed damage Vladimir Lyakhovsky The Institute of Earth fracture. The macroscopic effects of distributed cracking and other types of damage require treatment of loading, and (2) a kinetic aspect, that is, damage evolution (degradation/recovery of elasticity

  16. Multi-Wavelength Observations of the Spatio-Temporal Evolution of Solar Flares with AIA/SDO: I. Universal Scaling Laws of Space and Time Parameters

    E-print Network

    Aschwanden, Markus J; Liu, Kai

    2013-01-01

    We extend a previous statistical solar flare study of 155 GOES M- and X-class flares observed with AIA/SDO (Aschwanden 2012) to all 7 coronal wavelengths (94, 131, 171, 193, 211, 304, 335 \\ang) to test the wavelength-dependence of scaling laws and statistical distributions. Except for the 171 and 193 \\ang\\ wavelengths, which are affected by EUV dimming caused by coronal mass ejections (CMEs), we find near-identical size distributions of geometric (lengths $L$, flare areas $A$, volumes $V$, fractal dimension $D_2$), temporal (flare durations $T$), and spatio-temporal parameters (diffusion coefficient $\\kappa$, spreading exponent $\\beta$, and maximum expansion velocities $v_{max}$) in different wavelengths, which are consistent with the universal predictions of the fractal-diffusive avalanche model of a slowly-driven self-organized criticality (FD-SOC) system, i.e., $N(L) \\propto L^{-3}$, $N(A) \\propto A^{-2}$, $N(V) \\propto V^{-5/3}$, $N(T) \\propto T^{-2}$, $D_2=3/2$, for a Euclidean dimension $d=3$. Empirical...

  17. Undermining Evolution: Where State Standards Go Wrong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Educator, 2012

    2012-01-01

    While many states are handling evolution better today than in the past, anti-evolution pressures continue to threaten state science standards. In April 2012, for example, Tennessee passed a law that enables teachers to bring anti-evolution materials into the classroom without being challenged by administrators. This law is similar to the Science…

  18. On Common Ground: Jost's (1897) Law of Forgetting and Ribot's (1881) Law of Retrograde Amnesia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wixted, John T.

    2004-01-01

    T. Ribot's (1881) law of retrograde amnesia states that brain damage impairs recently formed memories to a greater extent than older memories, which is generally taken to imply that memories need time to consolidate. A. Jost's (1897) law of forgetting states that if 2 memories are of the same strength but different ages, the older will decay more…

  19. Law in Wyoming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyoming Law-Related Education Advisory Council, Cheyenne.

    This document is intended to give students an overview of laws in Wyoming. Subjects covered include civil and criminal law; courts in Wyoming; juvenile law, juvenile court procedure; rights of children; family law; employment law; automobile-related law; laws affecting the schools; and citizenship rights and responsibilities. The laws and courts…

  20. Incorporating Micro-Mechanics Based Damage Models into Earthquake Rupture Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, H.; Rosakis, A.; Sammis, C. G.

    2012-12-01

    The micromechanical damage mechanics formulated by Ashby and Sammis, 1990 and generalized by Deshpande and Evans 2008 has been extended to allow for a more generalized stress state and to incorporate an experimentally motivated new crack growth (damage evolution) law that is valid over a wide range of loading rates. This law is sensitive to both the crack tip stress field and its time derivative. Incorporating this feature produces additional strain-rate sensitivity in the constitutive response. The model is also experimentally verified by predicting the failure strength of Dionysus-Pentelicon marble over a wide range of strain rates. Model parameters determined from quasi-static experiments were used to predict the failure strength at higher loading rates. Agreement with experimental results was excellent. After this verification step the constitutive law was incorporated into a Finite Element Code focused on simulating dynamic earthquake ruptures with specific focus on the ends of the fault (fault tip process zone) and the resulting strong ground motion radiation was studied.

  1. School Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Splitt, David A.

    1986-01-01

    Reviews four recent court decisions affecting school law. A Circuit Court of Appeals ruling upheld Norfolk Schools' decision to abolish busing and reinstate neighborhood schools. The United States Supreme Court dismissed appeals to lower court decisions involving a minimum grade prerequisite, a teacher's privacy rights, and an "adult" movie…

  2. School Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Splitt, David A.

    1982-01-01

    Summarizes three current issues in school law, including school district suits over potentially carcinogenic asbestos insulation, a California judge's finding that captionless educational television discriminates against hearing-impaired students, and the federal government's attempt to keep the Fairfax (Virginia) school system from charging…

  3. A damage model based on singular elastic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leguillon, Dominique

    2008-03-01

    At re-entrant corners in elastic structures, the stress field is known to increase to infinity following a power law. From the material viewpoint it is paradoxical that it can locally sustain such an overburden. To avoid this paradox we propose a damage model where the Young's modulus of the material decreases (damage) also following a power law and such that the resulting stress field remains bounded. To cite this article: D. Leguillon, C. R. Mecanique 336 (2008).

  4. Gauss' Law (Review) Gauss' law form of

    E-print Network

    Bertulani, Carlos A. - Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A&M University

    Gauss' Law (Review) Gauss' law ­ form of Coulomb's law qenc is the total charge enclosed is to A so = 0 Outer endcap = EA #12;Conductors Using Gauss' law and = EA If is charge per unit area If + charge on conductor, E directed away 0 =E #12;Gauss' Law Infinitely long insulating rod with linear

  5. Bode's Law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    A numerical sequence which is roughly in proportion to the distances of the major planets from the Sun. It is named after Johann Bode, who announced it in 1772; it is more properly referred to as the Titius-Bode law, as it was first put forward by Johann Titius six years previously. The sequence is formed by taking 0 and 3, doubling 3 to give 6, doubling 6 to give 12, and so on, then adding 4 to ...

  6. Appendix L Patent Laws CONSOLIDATED PATENT LAWS

    E-print Network

    Luryi, Serge

    Appendix L Patent Laws __________________________________________________________________ CONSOLIDATED PATENT LAWS United States Code Title 35 - Patents Editor's Note (January 2007): The Patent Laws repro duced below supersede those reproduced in the last revision of the Manual of Patent Examining

  7. Numerical simulation of multiscale damage-failure transition and shock wave propagation in metals and ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayandin, Yu V.; Saveleva, N. V.; Savinykh, A. S.; Naimark, O. B.

    2014-05-01

    Statistical theory of evolution of typical mesoscopic defects revealed specific type of criticality - structural-scaling transitions and allowed the development of phenomenology of damage and plastic flow in materials under intensive loading, which established characteristic multiscale collective modes of defects responsible for formation of plastic waves and damage-failure transition. Original approach based on wide range constitutive equations was developed for simulation of multiscale damage-failure transition mechanisms and shock wave propagation in metals and ceramics in range of strain rate 103 - 108 s-1. It was shown that mechanisms of a plastic relaxation and damage-failure transitions are linked to multiscale kinetics of mesodefects collective modes with the nature of solitary waves and blow-up dissipative structures consequently. Numerical simulation of original plate impact tests showed that the model describes shock wave loading for metals and ceramics, and allowed us to explain the effect of power law phenomena of plastic wave fronts formation, its self-similar features under reloading and unloading. Analysis of shock wave profiles in ceramics for different thicknesses of specimens in terms of self-similar variables supports the universality of shock wave fronts.

  8. Numerical simulation of multiscale damage-failure transition and shock wave propagation in metals and ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayandin, Yuriy; Savelieva, Natalia; Savinykh, Andrey; Naimark, Oleg

    2013-06-01

    Statistical theory of evolution of typical mesoscopic defects revealed specific type of criticality-structural-scaling transitions and allowed the development of phenomenology of damage and plastic flow in materials under intensive loading, which established characteristic multiscale collective modes of defects responsible for formation of plastic waves and damage-failure transition. Original approach based on wide range constitutive equations was developed for simulation of multiscale damage-failure transition mechanisms and shock wave propagation in metals and ceramics in range of strain rate 103 -108 s-1 . It was shown that mechanisms of a plastic relaxation and damage-failure transitions are linked to multiscale kinetics of mesodefects collective modes with the nature of solitary waves and blow-up dissipative structures consequently. Numerical simulation of original plate impact tests showed that the model describes shock wave loading for metals and ceramics, and allowed us to explain the effect of power law phenomena of plastic wave fronts formation, its self-similar features under reloading and unloading. Analysis of shock wave profiles in ceramics for different thicknesses of specimens in terms of self-similar variables supports the universality of shock wave fronts. Research was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (projects N 11-01-00712, N 13-01-96034) and the program of fundamental research of Ural Branch of RAS (project N 12-P-1-1021).

  9. A two-scale damage model with material length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dascalu, Cristian

    2009-09-01

    The Note presents the formulation of a class of two-scale damage models involving a micro-structural length. A homogenization method based on asymptotic developments is employed to deduce the macroscopic damage equations. The damage model completely results from energy-based micro-crack propagation laws, without supplementary phenomenological assumptions. We show that the resulting two-scale model has the property of capturing micro-structural lengths. When damage evolves, the micro-structural length is given by the ratio of the surface density of energy dissipated during the micro-crack growth and the macroscopic damage energy release rate per unit volume of the material. The use of fracture criteria based on resistance curves or power laws for sub-critical growth of micro-cracks leads to quasi-brittle and, respectively, time-dependent damage models. To cite this article: C. Dascalu, C. R. Mecanique 337 (2009).

  10. Error of law and flawed administrative acts

    E-print Network

    Feldman, David

    2014-07-17

    otherwise requires, “decision” includes “rule”) inappropriate or deprive it of social and political legitimacy. The damage caused by refusing all legal effect to it might then be out of all proportion to the seriousness of the error. However, the three... that these principles provide a basis for a realistic, predictable and principled understanding of administrative law. B. “Error of law” and “jurisdiction” 1. Decisions Until the 1960s, judges had at their disposal a number of techniques for identifying those...

  11. Property law in Jersey 

    E-print Network

    MacLeod, Rebecca Frances

    2012-06-26

    Jersey law, and within it Jersey property law, has received little academic attention. This thesis seeks to examine, and provide a systematic account of, the Jersey law of property. Specific aspects of substantive law ...

  12. Plant evolution The Evolution

    E-print Network

    Rieseberg, Loren

    Plant evolution The Evolution of Plants by Kathy J. Willis and Jenny C. McElwain. Oxford University Press, 2002. $40.00/£22.99 pbk (378 pages) ISBN 0 19 850065 3 Developmental Genetics and Plant Evolution is observed for treatments of evolution and development. Titles of major monographs on the subject imply

  13. Prolegomenon to patterns in evolution.

    PubMed

    Kauffman, Stuart A

    2014-09-01

    Despite Darwin, we remain children of Newton and dream of a grand theory that is epistemologically complete and would allow prediction of the evolution of the biosphere. The main purpose of this article is to show that this dream is false, and bears on studying patterns of evolution. To do so, I must justify the use of the word "function" in biology, when physics has only happenings. The concept of "function" lifts biology irreducibly above physics, for as we shall see, we cannot prestate the ever new biological functions that arise and constitute the very phase space of evolution. Hence, we cannot mathematize the detailed becoming of the biosphere, nor write differential equations for functional variables we do not know ahead of time, nor integrate those equations, so no laws "entail" evolution. The dream of a grand theory fails. In place of entailing laws, I propose a post-entailing law explanatory framework in which Actuals arise in evolution that constitute new boundary conditions that are enabling constraints that create new, typically unprestatable, adjacent possible opportunities for further evolution, in which new Actuals arise, in a persistent becoming. Evolution flows into a typically unprestatable succession of adjacent possibles. Given the concept of function, the concept of functional closure of an organism making a living in its world becomes central. Implications for patterns in evolution include historical reconstruction, and statistical laws such as the distribution of extinction events, or species per genus, and the use of formal cause, not efficient cause, laws. PMID:24704211

  14. Queen's Law Celebrating Queen's Law at 50

    E-print Network

    Fletcher, Robin

    REPORTS Queen's Law Celebrating Queen's Law at 50 ISSUE 2006 #12;This summer marks the completion of my first year as Dean of the Faculty of Law at Queen's. It has been an exciting and exhilarating time Strategic Framework 2005-2010. We articulated ambitious mission and vision statements for Queen's Law

  15. Administrative Law: The Hidden Comparative Law Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strauss, Peter L.

    1996-01-01

    Argues that the main contribution of the Administrative Law course to law students is that it presents problems which contrast with those of the standard court-centered curriculum and can illuminate other areas of law, repeatedly confronting students with doctrinal differences. Offers several examples from civil procedure, constitutional law, and…

  16. Evolution, Fundamentalism, and American Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyle, James J.

    1988-01-01

    Describes four court cases involving confrontation between the theory of evolution and the theory of creation: the Scopes trial, the Seagraves trial, Arkansas Act 590, and the Louisiana law. Provides 64 references on the issue. (YP)

  17. Entropic Corrections to Coulomb's Law

    E-print Network

    S. H. Hendi; A. Sheykhi

    2011-10-17

    Two well-known quantum corrections to the area law have been introduced in the literatures, namely, logarithmic and power-law corrections. Logarithmic corrections, arises from loop quantum gravity due to thermal equilibrium fluctuations and quantum fluctuations, while, power-law correction appears in dealing with the entanglement of quantum fields in and out the horizon. Inspired by Verlinde's argument on the entropic force, and assuming the quantum corrected relation for the entropy, we propose the entropic origin for the Coulomb's law in this note. Also we investigate the Uehling potential as a radiative correction to Coulomb potential in 1-loop order and show that for some value of distance the entropic corrections of the Coulomb's law is compatible with the vacuum-polarization correction in QED. So, we derive modified Coulomb's law as well as the entropy corrected Poisson's equation which governing the evolution of the scalar potential $\\phi$. Our study further supports the unification of gravity and electromagnetic interactions based on the holographic principle.

  18. Damage accumulation in quasibrittle fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzato, Claudio; Alava, Mikko J.; Zapperi, Stefano

    2014-07-01

    The strength of quasibrittle materials depends on the ensemble of defects inside the sample and on the way damage accumulates before failure. Using large-scale numerical simulations of the random fuse model, we investigate the evolution of the microcrack distribution as the applied load approaches the fracture point. We find that the distribution broadens mostly due to a tendency of cracks to coalesce in a way that increases with system size. We study how the observed behavior depends on the disorder present in the sample and relate the results with fracture size effects.

  19. Adhesive Characterization and Progressive Damage Analysis of Bonded Composite Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Girolamo, Donato; Davila, Carlos G.; Leone, Frank A.; Lin, Shih-Yung

    2014-01-01

    The results of an experimental/numerical campaign aimed to develop progressive damage analysis (PDA) tools for predicting the strength of a composite bonded joint under tensile loads are presented. The PDA is based on continuum damage mechanics (CDM) to account for intralaminar damage, and cohesive laws to account for interlaminar and adhesive damage. The adhesive response is characterized using standard fracture specimens and digital image correlation (DIC). The displacement fields measured by DIC are used to calculate the J-integrals, from which the associated cohesive laws of the structural adhesive can be derived. A finite element model of a sandwich conventional splice joint (CSJ) under tensile loads was developed. The simulations indicate that the model is capable of predicting the interactions of damage modes that lead to the failure of the joint.

  20. Past and Futur Parallelism Challenges to Encompass Sequential Processor Evolution

    E-print Network

    Vialle, Stéphane

    This paper deals with parallelism evolution compared to sequential processor evolution following Moore's law: Moore's law, temporal advance of paral­ lelism, speed up models, portability, parallelism challenges. 1 computer performance doubles every 1.5 years, according to Moore's law[10]. So, most people pre­ fer

  1. Plate tectonics, damage and inheritance.

    PubMed

    Bercovici, David; Ricard, Yanick

    2014-04-24

    The initiation of plate tectonics on Earth is a critical event in our planet's history. The time lag between the first proto-subduction (about 4?billion years ago) and global tectonics (approximately 3?billion years ago) suggests that plates and plate boundaries became widespread over a period of 1?billion years. The reason for this time lag is unknown but fundamental to understanding the origin of plate tectonics. Here we suggest that when sufficient lithospheric damage (which promotes shear localization and long-lived weak zones) combines with transient mantle flow and migrating proto-subduction, it leads to the accumulation of weak plate boundaries and eventually to fully formed tectonic plates driven by subduction alone. We simulate this process using a grain evolution and damage mechanism with a composite rheology (which is compatible with field and laboratory observations of polycrystalline rocks), coupled to an idealized model of pressure-driven lithospheric flow in which a low-pressure zone is equivalent to the suction of convective downwellings. In the simplest case, for Earth-like conditions, a few successive rotations of the driving pressure field yield relic damaged weak zones that are inherited by the lithospheric flow to form a nearly perfect plate, with passive spreading and strike-slip margins that persist and localize further, even though flow is driven only by subduction. But for hotter surface conditions, such as those on Venus, accumulation and inheritance of damage is negligible; hence only subduction zones survive and plate tectonics does not spread, which corresponds to observations. After plates have developed, continued changes in driving forces, combined with inherited damage and weak zones, promote increased tectonic complexity, such as oblique subduction, strike-slip boundaries that are subparallel to plate motion, and spalling of minor plates. PMID:24717430

  2. Right Hemisphere Brain Damage

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and traumatic brain injury (TBI). How are cognitive-communication problems following right hemisphere brain damage diagnosed? A ... examined. The nature and severity of the cognitive-communication problem will depend on the extent of damage ...

  3. [A Handling Qualities Metric for Damaged Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cogan, Bruce; Hayes, Peggy

    2009-01-01

    In recent flight tests of F-15 Intelligent Flight Control System (IFCS), software simulated aircraft control surface failures were inserted to evaluate the IFCS adaptive systems. The failure commanded the left stabilator to a fixed position. The adaptive system uses a neural network that is designed to change control law gains, in the event of damage (real or simulated), that allows the aircraft to fly as it had before the damage. The performance of the adaptive system was assessed in terms of its ability to re-establish good onboard model tracking and its ability to decouple roll and pitch response.

  4. School of Law Undergraduate

    E-print Network

    Hickman, Mark

    Law School of Law 12 Undergraduate Handbook #12;Many good reasons Real work experienceTripp summer clerk, you'll be joining a team with a history of success ­ achieved through the quality to the School of Law 3 Law degrees at UC 4 Double degrees at UC 5 Planning your degree 9 Law School staff 11

  5. Demonstrating the Gas Laws.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holko, David A.

    1982-01-01

    Presents a complete computer program demonstrating the relationship between volume/pressure for Boyle's Law, volume/temperature for Charles' Law, and volume/moles of gas for Avagadro's Law. The programing reinforces students' application of gas laws and equates a simulated moving piston to theoretical values derived using the ideal gas law.…

  6. The Distinction between Civil and Criminal Law: A Lesson Plan for High School Law-Related Educators To Support "Understanding the Federal Courts."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Administrative Office of the United States Courts, Washington, DC.

    The O. J. Simpson trials taught much of the United States a basic lesson in the difference between criminal law and civil law. Many students learn in their government classes that a person cannot be tried twice for the same crime. A person found innocent in a criminal trial, however, can be sued under civil law procedures for damages. It is…

  7. Power-law relaxation in a complex system: Omori law after a financial market crash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillo, F.; Mantegna, R.

    2003-07-01

    We study the relaxation dynamics of a financial market just after the occurrence of a crash by investigating the number of times the absolute value of an index return is exceeding a given threshold value. We show that the empirical observation of a power law evolution of the number of events exceeding the selected threshold (a behavior known as the Omori law in geophysics) is consistent with the simultaneous occurrence of (i) a return probability density function characterized by a power law asymptotic behavior and (ii) a power-law relaxation decay of its typical scale. Our empirical observation cannot be explained within the framework of simple and widespread stochastic volatility models.

  8. Evolution and Friendship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mena-Werth, Jose

    2005-01-01

    In 1925, Williams Jennings Bryan, a former congressman from Nebraska and a former Secretary of State under Woodrow Wilson, spent two agonizing weeks defending his religious faith that cost him his life a month after. Bryan was a prosecutor of high school teacher John Scopes, who had violated Tennessee state law by teaching the theory of evolution.…

  9. Evolution towards Symmetry Ferdinand Verhulst and Richard Huveneers

    E-print Network

    Verhulst, Ferdinand

    Evolution towards Symmetry Ferdinand Verhulst and Richard Huveneers Mathematisch Instituut those of today and will the laws of tomorrow still be the same? Henri Poincar´e in `The evolution of the laws', Derni`eres Pens´ees. Abstract The dynamics of time-dependent evolution towards symmetry

  10. Teaching Global Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wojtan, Linda S.

    1980-01-01

    Addresses problem of American students' limited knowledge of international issues and laws. Provides articles for secondary school students on law around the world, South Africa, Russia, folk law, and alternatives to the adversary system and suggests relevant resources. (KC)

  11. Composite blade damaging under impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menouillard, T.; Réthoré, J.; Bung, H.; Suffis, A.

    2006-08-01

    Composites materials are now being used in primary aircraft structures, and other domains because of numerous advantages. A part of a continuous in-flight operating costs, gas turbine engine manufacturers are always looking for ways to decrease engine weight. This is the case of compressor blades which have to satisfy, for example, the standard bird strike or debris in order to measure the crashworthiness. Bird strike impacts are actually among the most challenging loads that composite blades must accommodate. Thus for the further development of composite structures, it becomes important to have available predictive tools for simulating the response of composite structures under crash or impact loads, which will allow to evaluate damage state in the structure in function of time. A composites damage model, without mesh dependency, is presented, and allows to obtain agreement with impact experiment. Examples of finite element simulations for the impact response of blade based on this materials model are developped. These numerical results correspond to a bird strike on an equivalent composites blade, and insists on damage evolution in structure.

  12. Research Report faculty of law

    E-print Network

    Tobar, Michael

    strength include natural resources law, environmental law, international law, medical law, public law, environmental and natural resources law, medical law and public law. It also demonstrates the diverse rangeResearch Report 2011 faculty of law #12;Contents Dean's message | 01 Associate Dean's message | 03

  13. Stochastic modeling of p53-regulated apoptosis upon radiation damage

    E-print Network

    Bhatt, Divesh; Bahar, Ivet

    2011-01-01

    We develop and study the evolution of a model of radiation induced apoptosis in cells using stochastic simulations, and identified key protein targets for effective mitigation of radiation damage. We identified several key proteins associated with cellular apoptosis using an extensive literature survey. In particular, we focus on the p53 transcription dependent and p53 transcription independent pathways for mitochondrial apoptosis. Our model reproduces known p53 oscillations following radiation damage. The key, experimentally testable hypotheses that we generate are - inhibition of PUMA is an effective strategy for mitigation of radiation damage if the treatment is administered immediately, at later stages following radiation damage, inhibition of tBid is more effective.

  14. Innovations in Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martz, Carlton

    2000-01-01

    This issue of "Bill of Rights in Action" looks at historical and recent innovations in law. The first article examines the code of laws developed by the ancient Hebrews which influenced Roman law, English law, and the U.S. Declaration of Independence and Constitution. The second article explores Thomas Jefferson's writing of the Declaration of…

  15. School of Law Scholarships

    E-print Network

    Almor, Amit

    School of Law Scholarships Complete Scholarship Name Application Deadline Date Contact Name Contact Scholarship Endowment Fund The scholarship(s) will be awarded by the University of South Carolina School of Law Scholarship Committee to deserving law students. Preference will be given to law students who

  16. Maryland Law and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dubel, Robert Y.

    This document analyzes the major elements of Maryland school and college law pertaining to governance. While recognizing differences between school and college law in Maryland, this study shows that there are many elements in common between the two. This study will be primarily concerned with civil law rather than criminal law. School personnel or…

  17. Damage Tolerance of Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, Andy

    2007-01-01

    Fracture control requirements have been developed to address damage tolerance of composites for manned space flight hardware. The requirements provide the framework for critical and noncritical hardware assessment and testing. The need for damage threat assessments, impact damage protection plans, and nondestructive evaluation are also addressed. Hardware intended to be damage tolerant have extensive coupon, sub-element, and full-scale testing requirements in-line with the Building Block Approach concept from the MIL-HDBK-17, Department of Defense Composite Materials Handbook.

  18. A mixed damage model for unsaturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arson, Chloé; Gatmiri, Behrouz

    2009-02-01

    The aim of this study is to present a framework for the modeling of damage in continuous unsaturated porous geomaterials. The damage variable is a second-order tensor. The model is formulated in net stress and suction independent state variables. Correspondingly, the strain tensor is split into two independent thermodynamic strain components. The proposed framework mixes micro-mechanical and phenomenological approaches. On the one hand, the effective stress concept of Continuum Damage Mechanics is used in order to compute the damaged rigidities. On the other hand, the concept of equivalent mechanical state is introduced in order to get a simple phenomenological formulation of the behavior laws. Cracking effects are also taken into account in the fluid transfer laws. To cite this article: C. Arson, B. Gatmiri, C. R. Mecanique 337 (2009).

  19. A high accuracy femto-/picosecond laser damage test facility dedicated to the study of optical thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangote, B.; Gallais, L.; Zerrad, M.; Lemarchand, F.; Gao, L. H.; Commandré, M.; Lequime, M.

    2012-01-01

    A laser damage test facility delivering pulses from 100 fs to 3 ps and designed to operate at 1030 nm is presented. The different details of its implementation and performances are given. The originality of this system relies the online damage detection system based on Nomarski microscopy and the use of a non-conventional energy detection method based on the utilization of a cooled CCD that offers the possibility to obtain the laser induced damage threshold (LIDT) with high accuracy. Applications of this instrument to study thin films under laser irradiation are presented. Particularly the deterministic behavior of the sub-picosecond damage is investigated in the case of fused silica and oxide films. It is demonstrated that the transition of 0-1 damage probability is very sharp and the LIDT is perfectly deterministic at few hundreds of femtoseconds. The damage process in dielectric materials being the results of electronic processes, specific information such as the material bandgap is needed for the interpretation of results and applications of scaling laws. A review of the different approaches for the estimation of the absorption gap of optical dielectric coatings is conducted and the results given by the different methods are compared and discussed. The LIDT and gap of several oxide materials are then measured with the presented instrument: Al2O3, Nb2O5, HfO2, SiO2, Ta2O5, and ZrO2. The obtained relation between the LIDT and gap at 1030 nm confirms the linear evolution of the threshold with the bandgap that exists at 800 nm, and our work expands the number of tested materials.

  20. Natural resources policy and law: Trends and directions

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonnell, L.J.; Bates, S.F.

    1993-11-01

    The book explores past, present, and future directions in natural resource environmental law and policy, with a special emphasis on new laws and important legal cases of the past decade and their implications for the future. Its ten chapters, each written by a leading expert in the field, consider both specific concerns and broad themes, including topics such as history and evolution of natural resources law and policy, laws governing mining and minerals, oil and gas, and public lands, and relationship between environmentalism and environmental law, and future directions of the field.

  1. Omori law for eruption foreshocks and aftershocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, A.; Grasso, J.-R.

    2012-07-01

    Using the 1973-2009 worldwide catalogs for M ? 4.8 seismicity and VEI ? 0 volcano eruptions, we compare the properties of seismic damage patterns contemporary with eruption with the properties of foreshocks and aftershocks of classic tectonic earthquakes. Using superposed epoch analysis, we demonstrated that the seismicity rate after eruption decreases as a power law similar to the Omori law of earthquake aftershocks. We further show that a complete mapping of Omori law of earthquake aftershocks onto eruption aftershocks does exist as Rerup(t) = (K0.10?(VEI))/[(t+c)p], volcanic explosivity index (VEI), being an empirical measure that exponentially scales with eruption size. ? close to 0.4 is the value reported for M = 5-6.5 earthquakes from the same catalog. The p values are in the 0.7 range, i.e., robustly smaller than the 0.9-1.0 range for earthquake aftershocks we estimated in the volcanic area. K value for eruptions is 2-10 times smaller than for earthquakes, and it scales with VEI values. All those parameters characterize a slower damage relaxation after eruptions than after earthquakes. When earthquakes' foreshock rates are proposed to be independent of the main shock magnitude, we resolved a strong increase in foreshock rates including an increase of the p' value of the inverse Omori law prior eruptions with eruption size. These patterns, all emerging from mean field analysis, are evidence of the volcanic eruptions being contemporary with a stochastic brittle damage in the Earth crust. These results suggest a generic damage relaxation within the Earth crust as power law distributed after or before events. The loading and relaxation exponents and the damage rate emerge as being controlled by the loading rate, as reported during lab-scale experiments. The more impulsive the loading, i.e., km/s for the slip velocity during earthquakes against km/h for dyke propagation, the faster the relaxation (0.9-1.0 p values for earthquakes' aftershocks against 0.7 for eruptions' aftershocks). Before eruptions, the larger the impending events, the higher the p values. All the observations converge toward the amplitude and frequency of the stress step to drive the Omori law parameters as qualitatively reproduced by the rate and state friction law response of brittle crust faults to loading.

  2. Evolutionary Psychology, Moral Heuristics, and the Law

    E-print Network

    Cosmides, Leda

    9 Evolutionary Psychology, Moral Heuristics, and the Law Leda Cosmides and John Tooby Center. To negotiate that intimate social world, evolution equipped our minds with moral heuristics: decision rules situation-types, because alternative framings trigger different evolved moral heuristics. Once triggered

  3. Anti-Corn-Law agitations in Scotland, with particular reference to the Anti-Corn-Law League 

    E-print Network

    Cameron, Kenneth John

    1971-01-01

    The Corn Laws and the movement for their repeal were both indigenous products of Scotland, although even in the eighteenth century, less intrinsically Scottish than the polemics of the debate would suggest. The evolution of aim, attitude...

  4. Faculty of Law Faculty of Law

    E-print Network

    to Islamic Jurisprudence 0410171 04101713Personal Status" Marriage & Divorce" 0410272 04101713Personal StatusCommercial Papers & Banking Transactions 0410333 04102143Real Rights0410317 04103143Private International Law

  5. Table of Contents Law ....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 2

    E-print Network

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    Table of Contents Law .......................................................................................................................................................................... 36 Law Library Guide ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 53 #12;2 Law Law WVU law students have a passion for justice, an interest in how our legal system

  6. A damage mechanics based approach to structural deterioration and reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattcharya, B.; Ellingwood, B.

    1998-02-01

    Structural deterioration often occurs without perceptible manifestation. Continuum damage mechanics defines structural damage in terms of the material microstructure, and relates the damage variable to the macroscopic strength or stiffness of the structure. This enables one to predict the state of damage prior to the initiation of a macroscopic flaw, and allows one to estimate residual strength/service life of an existing structure. The accumulation of damage is a dissipative process that is governed by the laws of thermodynamics. Partial differential equations for damage growth in terms of the Helmholtz free energy are derived from fundamental thermodynamical conditions. Closed-form solutions to the equations are obtained under uniaxial loading for ductile deformation damage as a function of plastic strain, for creep damage as a function of time, and for fatigue damage as function of number of cycles. The proposed damage growth model is extended into the stochastic domain by considering fluctuations in the free energy, and closed-form solutions of the resulting stochastic differential equation are obtained in each of the three cases mentioned above. A reliability analysis of a ring-stiffened cylindrical steel shell subjected to corrosion, accidental pressure, and temperature is performed.

  7. Guest Editorial: Laser Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Vitaly Gruzdev, Michelle D. Shinn

    2012-12-01

    Laser damage of optical materials, first reported in 1964, continues to limit the output energy and power of pulsed and continuous-wave laser systems. In spite of some 48 years of research in this area, interest from the international laser community to laser damage issues remains at a very high level and does not show any sign of decreasing. Moreover, it grows with the development of novel laser systems, for example, ultrafast and short-wavelength lasers that involve new damage effects and specific mechanisms not studied before. This interest is evident from the high level of attendance and presentations at the annual SPIE Laser Damage Symposium (aka, Boulder Damage Symposium) that has been held in Boulder, Colorado, since 1969. This special section of Optical Engineering is the first one devoted to the entire field of laser damage rather than to a specific part. It is prepared in response to growing interest from the international laser-damage community. Some papers in this special section were presented at the Laser Damage Symposium; others were submitted in response to the general call for papers for this special section. The 18 papers compiled into this special section represent many sides of the broad field of laser-damage research. They consider theoretical studies of the fundamental mechanisms of laser damage including laser-driven electron dynamics in solids (O. Brenk and B. Rethfeld; A. Nikiforov, A. Epifanov, and S. Garnov; T. Apostolova et al.), modeling of propagation effects for ultrashort high-intensity laser pulses (J. Gulley), an overview of mechanisms of inclusion-induced damage (M. Koldunov and A. Manenkov), the formation of specific periodic ripples on a metal surface by femtosecond laser pulses (M. Ahsan and M. Lee), and the laser-plasma effects on damage in glass (Y. Li et al). Material characterization is represented by the papers devoted to accurate and reliable measurements of absorption with special emphasis on thin films (C. Mühlig and S. Bublitz; B. Cho, E. Danielewicz, and J. Rudisill; W. Palm et al; and J. Lu et al.). Statistical treatment of measurements of the laser-damage threshold (J. Arenberg) and the relationship to damage mechanisms (F. Wagner et al.) represent the large subfield of laser-damage measurements. Various aspects of multilayer coating and thin-film characterization are considered in papers by B. Cho, J. Rudisill, and E. Danielewicz (spectral shift in multilayer mirrors) and R. Weber et al. (novel approach to damage studies based on third-harmonic generation microscopy). Of special interest for readers is the paper by C. Stolz that summarizes the results of four “thin-film damage competitions” organized as a part of the Laser Damage Symposium. Another paper is devoted to thermal annealing of damage precursors (N. Shen et al.). Finally, the influence of nano-size contamination on initiation of laser damage by ultrashort pulses is considered in paper of V. Komolov et al.

  8. PARALLEL ADAPTIVE NUMERICAL SCHEMES FOR HYPERBOLIC SYSTEMS OF CONSERVATION LAWS*

    E-print Network

    Lucier, Bradley J.

    in adaptive or moving grid methods applied to evolution equations, and specifically to conservation laws by the Applied Mathematical Sciences subprogram of the Office of Energy Research, U.S. Department of EnergyPARALLEL ADAPTIVE NUMERICAL SCHEMES FOR HYPERBOLIC SYSTEMS OF CONSERVATION LAWS* BRADLEY J. LUCIER

  9. Does Your Collective Bargaining Agreement Violate Antitrust Law?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigoness, William J.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    To familiarize managers with the conditions under which collective bargaining agreements may violate antitrust law, the historical evolution of antitrust law concerning labor-management relations is traced; the managerial implications of the United States Supreme Court's decisions are discussed; and likely future trends are suggested. (Author/MLF)

  10. Constitutive modeling of viscoplastic damage in solder material

    SciTech Connect

    WEI,YONG; CHOW,C.L.; NEILSEN,MICHAEL K.; FANG,HUEI ELIOT

    2000-04-17

    This paper presents a constitutive modeling of viscoplastic damage in 63Sn-37Pb solder material taking into account the effects of microstructural change in grain coarsening. Based on the theory of damage mechanics, a two-scalar damage model is developed by introducing the damage variables and the free energy equivalence principle. An inelastic potential function based on the concept of inelastic damage energy release rate is proposed and used to derive an inelastic damage evolution equation. The validation of the model is carried out for the viscoplastic material by predicting monotonic tensile behavior and tensile creep curves at different temperatures. The softening behavior of the material under monotonic tension loading can be characterized with the model. The results demonstrate adequately the validity of the proposed viscoplastic constitutive modeling for the solder material.

  11. War Damage Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    During and after the Persian Gulf war, hundreds of "oil lakes" were created in Kuwait by oil released from damaged wells. The lakes are a hazard to the Kuwait atmosphere, soil and ground water and must be carefully monitored. Boston University Center for Remote Sensing, assisted by other organizations, has accurately mapped the lakes using Landsat and Spot imagery. The war damage included the formation of over 300 oil lakes, oil pollution and sand dune movement. Total damage area is over 5,400 square kilometers - 30 percent of Kuwait's total surface area.

  12. Dynamics and Adaptive Control for Stability Recovery of Damaged Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Krishnakumar, Kalmanje; Kaneshige, John; Nespeca, Pascal

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a recent study of a damaged generic transport model as part of a NASA research project to investigate adaptive control methods for stability recovery of damaged aircraft operating in off-nominal flight conditions under damage and or failures. Aerodynamic modeling of damage effects is performed using an aerodynamic code to assess changes in the stability and control derivatives of a generic transport aircraft. Certain types of damage such as damage to one of the wings or horizontal stabilizers can cause the aircraft to become asymmetric, thus resulting in a coupling between the longitudinal and lateral motions. Flight dynamics for a general asymmetric aircraft is derived to account for changes in the center of gravity that can compromise the stability of the damaged aircraft. An iterative trim analysis for the translational motion is developed to refine the trim procedure by accounting for the effects of the control surface deflection. A hybrid direct-indirect neural network, adaptive flight control is proposed as an adaptive law for stabilizing the rotational motion of the damaged aircraft. The indirect adaptation is designed to estimate the plant dynamics of the damaged aircraft in conjunction with the direct adaptation that computes the control augmentation. Two approaches are presented 1) an adaptive law derived from the Lyapunov stability theory to ensure that the signals are bounded, and 2) a recursive least-square method for parameter identification. A hardware-in-the-loop simulation is conducted and demonstrates the effectiveness of the direct neural network adaptive flight control in the stability recovery of the damaged aircraft. A preliminary simulation of the hybrid adaptive flight control has been performed and initial data have shown the effectiveness of the proposed hybrid approach. Future work will include further investigations and high-fidelity simulations of the proposed hybrid adaptive Bight control approach.

  13. The evolution of airplanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bejan, A.; Charles, J. D.; Lorente, S.

    2014-07-01

    The prevailing view is that we cannot witness biological evolution because it occurred on a time scale immensely greater than our lifetime. Here, we show that we can witness evolution in our lifetime by watching the evolution of the flying human-and-machine species: the airplane. We document this evolution, and we also predict it based on a physics principle: the constructal law. We show that the airplanes must obey theoretical allometric rules that unite them with the birds and other animals. For example, the larger airplanes are faster, more efficient as vehicles, and have greater range. The engine mass is proportional to the body size: this scaling is analogous to animal design, where the mass of the motive organs (muscle, heart, lung) is proportional to the body size. Large or small, airplanes exhibit a proportionality between wing span and fuselage length, and between fuel load and body size. The animal-design counterparts of these features are evident. The view that emerges is that the evolution phenomenon is broader than biological evolution. The evolution of technology, river basins, and animal design is one phenomenon, and it belongs in physics.

  14. Nonlinear damage analysis: Postulate and evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leis, B. N.; Forte, T. P.

    1983-01-01

    The objective of this program is to assess the viability of a damage postulate which asserts that the fatigue resistance curve of a metal is history dependent due to inelastic action. The study focusses on OFE copper because this simple model material accentuates the inelastic action central to the damage postulate. Data relevant to damage evolution and crack initiation are developed via a study of surface topography. The effects of surface layer residual stresses are explored via comparative testing as were the effects in initial prestraining. The results of the study very clearly show the deformation history dependence of the fatigue resistance of OFE copper. Furthermore the concept of deformation history dependence is shown to qualitatively explain the fatigue resistance of all histories considered. Likewise quantitative predictions for block cycle histories are found to accurately track the observed results. In this respect the assertion that damage per cycle for a given level of the damage parameter is deformation history dependent appears to be physically justified.

  15. LSD and Genetic Damage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dishotsky, Norman I.; And Others

    1971-01-01

    Reviews studies of the effects of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) on man and other organisms. Concludes that pure LSD injected in moderate doses does not cause chromosome or detectable genetic damage and is not a teratogen or carcinogen. (JM)

  16. Controlling Armadillo Damage 

    E-print Network

    Texas Wildlife Services

    2007-03-13

    Armadillos are beneficial because they eat insects and other invertebrates, but they can damage lawns, gardens and structural foundations. They also are believed to transmit leprosy to humans. This leaflet focuses on control methods such as trapping...

  17. Controlling Pocket Gopher Damage 

    E-print Network

    Texas Wildlife Services

    2007-03-13

    Pocket gophers can seriously damage cultivated farming areas, rangelands, orchards, tree farms and lawns. Mechanical control by probing and chemical control by hand baiting and using fumigants are explained....

  18. Northridge, CA Earthquake Damage

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    The person in this image was a USGS employee at the time this was taken. Collection of USGS still images taken after the January 17, 1994 Northridge earthquake highlighting the damage to buildings and infrastructure....

  19. Composites Damage Tolerance Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, Wayne

    2006-01-01

    The Composite Damage Tolerance Workshop included participants from NASA, academia, and private industry. The objectives of the workshop were to begin dialogue in order to establish a working group within the Agency, create awareness of damage tolerance requirements for Constellation, and discuss potential composite hardware for the Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV) Upper Stage (US) and Crew Module. It was proposed that a composites damage tolerance working group be created that acts within the framework of the existing NASA Fracture Control Methodology Panel. The working group charter would be to identify damage tolerance gaps and obstacles for implementation of composite structures into manned space flight systems and to develop strategies and recommendations to overcome these obstacles.

  20. Teaching Disability Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothstein, Laura F.

    1998-01-01

    Reviews the history of teaching disability law and traces the development of disability law courses, tracking the emergence of disability discrimination law as a more comprehensive set of legal requirements. The extent to which schools are offering these courses and the approaches being used are examined; additional approaches are also suggested.…

  1. On Teaching Natural Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forte, David F.

    1978-01-01

    A brief look at Columbia, Harvard, and Notre Dame law schools shows that the American tradition in teaching natural law has not been strong. The value of teaching natural law is discussed, a separate course or seminar is seen as the most effective option, and a selection of available sources for such a course is appended. (JMD)

  2. Zipf's law in multifragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Campi, X.; Krivine, H.

    2005-11-01

    We discuss the meaning of Zipf's law in nuclear multifragmentation. We remark that Zipf's law is a consequence of a power-law fragment size distribution with exponent {tau}{approx_equal}2. We also recall why the presence of such a distribution is not a reliable signal of a liquid-gas phase transition.

  3. Benford's Law Strikes Back

    E-print Network

    Berger, Arno

    Benford's Law Strikes Back: No Simple Explanation in Sight for Mathematical Gem ARNO BERGER* AND THEODORE P. HILL TT he widely known phenomenon called Benford's Law continues to defy attempts at an easy''. As the reader as well will see, this is all too true for Benford's Law, also known as the First-Digit Phenomenon

  4. SECOND LAW OF THERMODYNAMICS

    E-print Network

    Kostic, Milivoje M.

    SECOND LAW OF THERMODYNAMICS: STATUS AND CHALLENGES San Diego, California, USA 14 ­ 15 June 2011 The First Law of energy conservation was even known (Joule 1843) and long before Thermodynamic concepts were, including this one. The Laws of Thermodynamics have much wider, including philosophical significance

  5. Law of Empires.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martz, Carlton

    2001-01-01

    This issue of "Bill of Rights in Action" explores issues raised by empires and imperial law. The first article, "Clash of Empires: The Fight for North America," looks at the clash of empires and the fight for North America during the 18th century. The second article, "When Roman Law Ruled the Western World," examines Roman Law, which helped hold…

  6. Topology optimization in damage governed low cycle fatigue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desmorat, Boris; Desmorat, Rodrigue

    2008-05-01

    Topology optimization is applied here to discuss an optimization problem of fatigue resistance. Fatigue lifetime is maximized by optimizing the shape of a structure in cyclic plasticity combined with Lemaitre damage law. The topology optimization algorithm is detailed. A 3D numerical example is given. To cite this article: B. Desmorat, R. Desmorat, C. R. Mecanique 336 (2008).

  7. 43 CFR 9239.0-8 - Measure of damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...resources, coal, oil, and other trespass in accordance with the decision of the Supreme Court of the United States in the case of Mason et al. v. United States (260 U.S. 545, 67 L. ed. 396), will be the measure of damages prescribed by the laws...

  8. 43 CFR 9239.0-8 - Measure of damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...resources, coal, oil, and other trespass in accordance with the decision of the Supreme Court of the United States in the case of Mason et al. v. United States (260 U.S. 545, 67 L. ed. 396), will be the measure of damages prescribed by the laws...

  9. 43 CFR 9239.0-8 - Measure of damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...resources, coal, oil, and other trespass in accordance with the decision of the Supreme Court of the United States in the case of Mason et al. v. United States (260 U.S. 545, 67 L. ed. 396), will be the measure of damages prescribed by the laws...

  10. 43 CFR 9239.0-8 - Measure of damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...resources, coal, oil, and other trespass in accordance with the decision of the Supreme Court of the United States in the case of Mason et al. v. United States (260 U.S. 545, 67 L. ed. 396), will be the measure of damages prescribed by the laws...

  11. Acid mine drainage: Common law, SMCRA, and the Clean Water Act

    SciTech Connect

    Henrich, C.

    1995-12-31

    Acid mine drainage is a major problem related to coal mining which, if unabated, can severely damage the aquatic environment. Damage resulting from acid mine drainage was first addressed by common law and riparian principles. As societal laws changed, common law principles alone could not effectively control this problem. Preventing and controlling pollution including acid mine drainage are important goals of the Surface Mining Control Reclamation Act (SMCRA) and the Clean Water Act (CWA). This article examines how common law, SMCRA, and the CWA address the acid mine drainage issue independently, and how improvements in the control of acid mine drainage can be achieved.

  12. Assessing Tropical Cyclone Damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Done, J.; Czajkowski, J.

    2012-12-01

    Landfalling tropical cyclones impact large coastal and inland areas causing direct damage due to winds, storm-surge flooding, tornadoes, and precipitation; as well as causing substantial indirect damage such as electrical outages and business interruption. The likely climate change impact of increased tropical cyclone intensity, combined with increases in exposure, bring the possibility of increased damage in the future. A considerable amount of research has focused on modeling economic damage due to tropical cyclones, and a series of indices have been developed to assess damages under climate change. We highlight a number of ways this research can be improved through a series of case study analyses. First, historical loss estimates are revisited to properly account for; time, impacted regions, the source of damage by type, and whether the damage was direct/indirect and insured/uninsured. Second, the drivers of loss from both the socio-economic and physical side are examined. A case is made to move beyond the use of maximum wind speed to more stable metrics and the use of other characteristics of the wind field such as direction, degree of gustiness, and duration is explored. A novel approach presented here is the potential to model losses directly as a function of climate variables such as sea surface temperature, greenhouse gases, and aerosols. This work is the first stage in the development of a tropical cyclone loss model to enable projections of losses under scenarios of both socio-economic change (such as population migration or altered policy) and physical change (such as shifts in tropical cyclone activity one from basin to another or within the same basin).

  13. Symbolic computation of conservation laws for nonlinear partial differential equations in multiple space dimensions

    E-print Network

    Hereman, Willy A.M.

    1 Symbolic computation of conservation laws for nonlinear partial differential equations been implemented in Mathematica. The software package, ConservationLawsMD.m, can be used evolution equations. The code ConservationLawsMD.m has been applied to multi-dimensional versions

  14. Are the laws of nature Markovian?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Robert

    2012-02-01

    The present laws of physics are Markovian. The state of the world at the current time step, t, depends only on the state of the world at the previous time step, t-1. (If there happen to exist closed timelike curves in our world then general relativity suggests that this may not be true even in physics.) But other sciences may propose laws which are nonMarkovian. Biology (evolution) has the memories stored in DNA, cognitive science has long term and short term memories, economics may exhibit behavior (cooperation) that depends on a memory of past events, etc.

  15. Time-dependent corona models - Scaling laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korevaar, P.; Martens, P. C. H.

    1989-01-01

    Scaling laws are derived for the one-dimensional time-dependent Euler equations that describe the evolution of a spherically symmetric stellar atmosphere. With these scaling laws the results of the time-dependent calculations by Korevaar (1989) obtained for one star are applicable over the whole Hertzsprung-Russell diagram and even to elliptic galaxies. The scaling is exact for stars with the same M/R-ratio and a good approximation for stars with a different M/R-ratio. The global relaxation oscillation found by Korevaar (1989) is scaled to main sequence stars, a solar coronal hole, cool giants and elliptic galaxies.

  16. A Guide to F-Scale Damage Assessment U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

    E-print Network

    Doswell III, Charles A.

    .............................................................................................................iii I. The Fujita scale of tornado intensityA Guide to F-Scale Damage Assessment U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric of the copyright holders. Federal Law provides copyright protection of these images. #12;A Guide to F-Scale Damage

  17. Conservation law of operator current in open quantum systems

    E-print Network

    J. Salmilehto; P. Solinas; M. Möttönen

    2012-03-08

    We derive a fundamental conservation law of operator current for master equations describing reduced quantum systems. If this law is broken, the temporal integral of the current operator of an arbitrary system observable does not yield in general the change of that observable in the evolution. We study Lindblad-type master equations as examples and prove that the application of the secular approximation during their derivation results in a violation of the conservation law. We show that generally any violation of the law leads to artificial corrections to the complete quantum dynamics, thus questioning the accuracy of the particular master equation.

  18. Philadelphia University Faculty of law

    E-print Network

    Philadelphia University Faculty of law Department of -------------- ---------- semester, 2007/2008 Course Syllabus Course code: 410331 Course Title: International Trade Law Course prerequisite (s) and trade law Prerequisite: Introduction to commercial law Module number: 410331 Module number: 330270

  19. Grain evolution during hot forging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Quanlin

    2013-05-01

    A review on grain evolution during hot forging is presented in this paper. The discussion focus is on the experimental law, the microscopic mechanism, the physical model and the evolution equations of grain refinement and growth. This is because the grain evolution is the most important microstructure evolution effecting on the part mechanical behaviors, and to establish reasonable grain evolution is a very important and difficult work for macro microscopic coupling constitutive equation. The following contents about constitutive equation and grain evolution are discussed. 1) The experimental phenomena and evolution laws of grain growth and grain refinement under differential working conditions (deformation, heating, cooling) in order to adapt to the needs of numerical simulation of whole forging process. 2) The advantages and disadvantages of the traditional empirical equations on grain growth, grain refinement and recrystallization process are analyzed. 3) The recent advances in physic models for dynamic recrystallizaton and dynamic grain growth are introduced in detail. Comparing to the empirical equations, these models are closer to the actual physical process. The models not only describe the details of grain changes, but also reveal the relationship between the accumulated dislocations energy and grain size evolution. In addition, the assumptions used in the models and their influences on prediction function are also discussed in order to improve the models.

  20. Power-law entropic corrections to Newton's law and Friedmann equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheykhi, A.; Hendi, S. H.

    2011-08-01

    A possible source of black hole entropy could be the entanglement of quantum fields inside and outside the horizon. The entanglement entropy of the ground state obeys the area law. However, a correction term proportional to a fractional power of area results when the field is in a superposition of ground and excited states. Inspired by the power-law corrections to entropy and adopting the viewpoint that gravity emerges as an entropic force, we derive modified Newton’s law of gravitation as well as the corrections to Friedmann equations. In a different approach, we obtained power-law-corrected Friedmann equation by starting from the first law of thermodynamics at the apparent horizon of a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe, and assuming that the associated entropy with apparent horizon has a power-law-corrected relation. Our study shows a consistency between the obtained results of these two approaches. We also examine the time evolution of the total entropy including the power-law-corrected entropy associated with the apparent horizon together with the matter field entropy inside the apparent horizon and show that the generalized second law of thermodynamics is fulfilled in a region enclosed by the apparent horizon.

  1. Power-Law Entropic Corrections to Newton's Law and Friedmann Equations

    E-print Network

    Ahmad Sheykhi; Seyed Hossein Hendi

    2011-08-07

    A possible source of black hole entropy could be the entanglement of quantum fields in and out the horizon. The entanglement entropy of the ground state obeys the area law. However, a correction term proportional to a fractional power of area results when the field is in a superposition of ground and excited states. Inspired by the power-law corrections to entropy and adopting the viewpoint that gravity emerges as an entropic force, we derive modified Newton's law of gravitation as well as the corrections to Friedmann equations. In a different approach, we obtained power-law corrected Friedmann equation by starting from the first law of thermodynamics at apparent horizon of a FRW universe, and assuming that the associated entropy with apparent horizon has a power-law corrected relation. Our study shows a consistency between the obtained results of these two approaches. We also examine the time evolution of the total entropy including the power-law corrected entropy associated with the apparent horizon together with the matter field entropy inside the apparent horizon and show that the generalized second law of thermodynamics is fulfilled in a region enclosed by the apparent horizon.

  2. A method of damage mechanics analysis for solder material

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, H.E.; Chow, C.L.; Yang, Fan

    1997-06-01

    This paper presents as a method of damage mechanics analysis for solder joint material stressed to extensive plastic deformation. The material chosen for the current work is the 60Sn-40Pb eutectic alloy due to its wide use. The analysis is based on the thermodynamic theory of irreversible processes. With the introduction of a set of internal state variables, known as damage variables, and a damage effect tensor, a damage dissipative potential function is proposed to enable the formulation of the constitutive equations of elasticity and plasticity coupled with damage. The equations of damage evolution are also derived to monitor damage initiation and growth. Before a damage analysis can be performed with a finite element analysis, the mechanical properties of the chosen solder joint material and its damage variables must first be determined. A method of experimental analysis was developed and used to successfully measure the highly strain sensitive 60Sn-40Pb solder material. The measured properties are presented and various characteristics of the solder material are examined and discussed. 7 refs., 8 figs.

  3. Damage Tolerance Assessment Branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James L.

    2013-01-01

    The Damage Tolerance Assessment Branch evaluates the ability of a structure to perform reliably throughout its service life in the presence of a defect, crack, or other form of damage. Such assessment is fundamental to the use of structural materials and requires an integral blend of materials engineering, fracture testing and analysis, and nondestructive evaluation. The vision of the Branch is to increase the safety of manned space flight by improving the fracture control and the associated nondestructive evaluation processes through development and application of standards, guidelines, advanced test and analytical methods. The Branch also strives to assist and solve non-aerospace related NDE and damage tolerance problems, providing consultation, prototyping and inspection services.

  4. Phenylbutazone and chromosomal damage.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, S; Price Evans, A; Benn, P A; Littler, T R; Halliday, L D

    1975-01-01

    Investigation of 44 paired test and control patients, all suffering from rheumatoid arthritis, following exposure to phenylbutazone (PBZ) and/or oxyphenbutazone (OPB), suggests that there is no significant increase in the level of chromosomal damage in lymphocytes. The control subjects comprised two series, one previously exposed to PBZ and/or OPB, but not for at least 1-5 years, and the other never exposed to PBZ or OPB. No significant difference in the level of chromosome damage was found between patients never exposed, previously exposed, or now receiving PBZ and/or OPB. PMID:769706

  5. Statistical laws in linguistics

    E-print Network

    Altmann, Eduardo G

    2015-01-01

    Zipf's law is just one out of many universal laws proposed to describe statistical regularities in language. Here we review and critically discuss how these laws can be statistically interpreted, fitted, and tested (falsified). The modern availability of large databases of written text allows for tests with an unprecedent statistical accuracy and also a characterization of the fluctuations around the typical behavior. We find that fluctuations are usually much larger than expected based on simplifying statistical assumptions (e.g., independence and lack of correlations between observations).These simplifications appear also in usual statistical tests so that the large fluctuations can be erroneously interpreted as a falsification of the law. Instead, here we argue that linguistic laws are only meaningful (falsifiable) if accompanied by a model for which the fluctuations can be computed (e.g., a generative model of the text). The large fluctuations we report show that the constraints imposed by linguistic laws...

  6. Zipf's law, power laws and maximum entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, Matt

    2013-04-01

    Zipf's law, and power laws in general, have attracted and continue to attract considerable attention in a wide variety of disciplines—from astronomy to demographics to software structure to economics to linguistics to zoology, and even warfare. A recent model of random group formation (RGF) attempts a general explanation of such phenomena based on Jaynes' notion of maximum entropy applied to a particular choice of cost function. In the present paper I argue that the specific cost function used in the RGF model is in fact unnecessarily complicated, and that power laws can be obtained in a much simpler way by applying maximum entropy ideas directly to the Shannon entropy subject only to a single constraint: that the average of the logarithm of the observable quantity is specified.

  7. Bullying Policies and Laws

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Policies & Laws | Español Search Stopbullying.gov WHAT IS BULLYING Definition The Roles Kids Play Related Topics CYBER BULLYING What is Cyberbullying? Prevent Cyberbullying Report Cyberbullying WHO ...

  8. Observation and Modeling of Fault Damage Zones at Reservoir Depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johri, M.; Zoback, M. D.; Dunham, E. M.; Hennings, P.

    2011-12-01

    We report a study of sub-surface fault damage zones adjacent to the San Andreas Fault in central California and series of first- and second-order faults in a gas field in Southeast Asia. We compare the observations with theoretically-predicted damage zones from dynamic rupture propagation modeling. The importance of characterizing damage zones arises from the important role that damage zones and natural fractures play in governing fluid flow in low permeability rocks. While there are many published studies of exposed damage zones, there is an absence of studies utilizing subsurface data that characterizes damage zones at depth. Damage zones associated with second-order faults adjacent to the San Andreas Fault are studied in well-cemented arkosic sandstones immediately southwest of the fault at the SAFOD site using electrical image logs and physical property measurements. The peak fracture intensity is between three and six fractures per meter in thee damage zones which persist about 50-80 meters from the second-order faults. Fracture intensity in these damage zones in both the regions of study decreases according to a power law where the rate of decrease is approximately -0.8 . The gas reservoir in Southeast Asia is associated with a large, basement master fault and twenty-seven seismically resolvable second-order faults. Four to seven fractures per meter are observed in electrical image logs from five wells in the 50-80m wide damage zones of the second-order faults. The second part of this work involves predicting damage zone widths utilizing two-dimensional plane-strain dynamic rupture models with strong rate-weakening fault friction and off-fault Drucker-Prager plasticity. The number of induced third-order faults and fractures are calculated by assuming that the dilatational plastic strain is manifested in the form of discrete fault planes. The theoretical results suggest that the damage zones are approximately 60-100 meters wide and the fracture intensity decreases with distance from the fault according to a power law with the rate of decrease approximately -0.8, both predictions in very good agreement with our observations. However, the damage zone width and the rate of decrease of fracture intensity are not constant all along the fault and depend on fault geometry (roughness), depth and the distance from points of nucleation. We hypothesize that the superposition of numerous earthquakes on the faults in situ may tend to smooth out such variations.

  9. Accepting Evolution or Discarding Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharpes, Donald K.; Peramas, Mary M.

    2006-01-01

    Challenging basic principles of constitutional law, advocates of intelligent design are undermining educators' ability to teach evolution in their science classrooms. Because US Supreme Court rulings now prohibit creationist accounts of the origin of life in schools, arguments favoring divine intervention, known as intelligent design, have emerged…

  10. Damage mechanisms of random fibrous networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sozumert, E.; Farukh, F.; Demirci, E.; Acar, M.; Pourdeyhimi, B.; Silberschmidt, V. V.

    2015-07-01

    Fibrous networks are ubiquitous: they can be found in various engineering applications as well as in biological tissues. Due to complexity of their random microstructure, anisotropic properties and large deformation, their modelling is challenging. Though, there are numerous studies in literature focusing either on numerical simulations of fibrous networks or explaining their damage mechanisms at micro or meso-scale, the respective models usually do not include actual random microstructure and failure mechanisms. The microstructure of fibrous networks, together with highly non-linear mechanical behaviourof their fibres, is a key to initiation of damage, its spatial localization and ultimate failure [1]. Numerical models available in literature are not capable of elucidating actual microstructure of the material and, hence, its influence on damage processes in fibrous networks. To emulate a real-life microstructure in a developed finite-element model, an orientation distribution function for fibresobtained from X-ray micro computed-tomography images was considered to provide actual alignment of fibres. To validate the suggested model, notched and unnotched rectangular specimens were experimentally tested. A good correlation between the experimental data and simulation results was observed. This study revealed a significant effect of a notch on damage evolution.

  11. Progressive Damage Analysis of Bonded Composite Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leone, Frank A., Jr.; Girolamo, Donato; Davila, Carlos G.

    2012-01-01

    The present work is related to the development and application of progressive damage modeling techniques to bonded joint technology. The joint designs studied in this work include a conventional composite splice joint and a NASA-patented durable redundant joint. Both designs involve honeycomb sandwich structures with carbon/epoxy facesheets joined using adhesively bonded doublers.Progressive damage modeling allows for the prediction of the initiation and evolution of damage within a structure. For structures that include multiple material systems, such as the joint designs under consideration, the number of potential failure mechanisms that must be accounted for drastically increases the complexity of the analyses. Potential failure mechanisms include fiber fracture, intraply matrix cracking, delamination, core crushing, adhesive failure, and their interactions. The bonded joints were modeled using highly parametric, explicitly solved finite element models, with damage modeling implemented via custom user-written subroutines. Each ply was discretely meshed using three-dimensional solid elements. Layers of cohesive elements were included between each ply to account for the possibility of delaminations and were used to model the adhesive layers forming the joint. Good correlation with experimental results was achieved both in terms of load-displacement history and the predicted failure mechanism(s).

  12. Continuum damage model for bioresorbable magnesium alloy devices - Application to coronary stents.

    PubMed

    Gastaldi, D; Sassi, V; Petrini, L; Vedani, M; Trasatti, S; Migliavacca, F

    2011-04-01

    The main drawback of a conventional stenting procedure is the high risk of restenosis. The idea of a stent that "disappears" after having fulfilled its mission is very intriguing and fascinating, since it can be expected that the stent mass decreases in time to allow the gradual transmission of the mechanical load to the surrounding tissues owing to controlled dissolution by corrosion. Magnesium and its alloys are appealing materials for designing biodegradable stents. The objective of this work is to develop, in a finite element framework, a model of magnesium degradation that is able to predict the corrosion rate, thus providing a valuable tool for the design of bioresorbable stents. Continuum damage mechanics is suitable for modeling several damage mechanisms, including different types of corrosion. In this study, the damage is assumed to be the superposition of stress corrosion and uniform microgalvanic corrosion processes. The former describes the stress-mediated localization of the corrosion attack through a stress-dependent evolution law, while the latter affects the free surface of the material exposed to an aggressive environment. Comparisons with experimental tests show that the developed model can reproduce the behavior of different magnesium alloys subjected to static corrosion tests. The study shows that parameter identification for a correct calibration of the model response on the results of uniform and stress corrosion experimental tests is reachable. Moreover, three-dimensional stenting procedures accounting for interaction with the arterial vessel are simulated, and it is shown how the proposed modeling approach gives the possibility of accounting for the combined effects of an aggressive environment and mechanical loading. PMID:21316623

  13. Sinkhole Activity Damages Home.

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Cracking along exterior walls is a sign of subsidence activity. Such severe structural damage from sinkholes can destroy homes and other structures. More than 110 sinkholes formed in the Dover area of Florida during a freeze event in January 2010. Ground water levels dropped to record-sett...

  14. Loss and damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huq, Saleemul; Roberts, Erin; Fenton, Adrian

    2013-11-01

    Loss and damage is a relative newcomer to the climate change agenda. It has the potential to reinvigorate existing mitigation and adaptation efforts, but this will ultimately require leadership from developed countries and enhanced understanding of several key issues, such as limits to adaptation.

  15. Coping with brain damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waring, W.

    1974-01-01

    Two neurological disorders, cerebral palsy, and traumatic brain damage as from an accident, are considered. The discussion covers the incidence of disabilities, their characteristics, and what is now being done to deal with them, particularly in reference to areas in which the capabilities of the engineer can be effectively applied.

  16. Damaged Hospital Wing

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    This two story hospital wing in Cauquenes, Chile suffered severe damage to the wall of the first floor as a result of the M 8.8 earthquake on Feb. 27, 2010. This building must be torn down. All patients were successfully evacuated at 3:34 AM after the earthquake shaking started....

  17. EOS Laser Atmosphere Wind Sounder (LAWS) investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    In this final report, the set of tasks that evolved from the Laser Atmosphere Wind Sounder (LAWS) Science Team are reviewed, the major accomplishments are summarized, and a complete set of resulting references provided. The tasks included preparation of a plan for the LAWS Algorithm Development and Evolution Laboratory (LADEL); participation in the preparation of a joint CNES/NASA proposal to build a space-based DWL; involvement in the Global Backscatter Experiments (GLOBE); evaluation of several DWL concepts including 'Quick-LAWS', SPNDL and several direct detection technologies; and an extensive series of system trade studies and Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSE's). In this report, some of the key accomplishments are briefly summarized with reference to interim reports, special reports, conference/workshop presentations, and publications.

  18. Displacement Cascade Damage Production in Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Stoller, Roger E; Malerba, Lorenzo; Nordlund, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced changes in microstructure and mechanical properties in structural materials are the result of a complex set of physical processes initiated by the collision between an energetic particle (neutron or ion) and an atom in the lattice. This primary damage event is called an atomic displacement cascade. The simplest description of a displacement cascade is to view it as a series of many billiard-ball-like elastic collisions among the atoms in the material. This chapter describes the formation and evolution of this primary radiation damage mechanism to provide an overview of how stable defects are formed by displacement cascades, as well as the nature and morphology of the defects themselves. The impact of the relevant variables such as cascade energy and irradiation temperature is discussed, and defect formation in different materials is compared.

  19. 43 CFR 8365.1-7 - State and local laws.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false State and local laws. 8365.1-7 Section 8365.1-7 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND..., or destruction or damage to property; (e) Air and water pollution; (f) Littering; (g) Sanitation;...

  20. 43 CFR 8365.1-7 - State and local laws.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false State and local laws. 8365.1-7 Section 8365.1-7 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND..., or destruction or damage to property; (e) Air and water pollution; (f) Littering; (g) Sanitation;...

  1. 43 CFR 8365.1-7 - State and local laws.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false State and local laws. 8365.1-7 Section 8365.1-7 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND..., or destruction or damage to property; (e) Air and water pollution; (f) Littering; (g) Sanitation;...

  2. 43 CFR 8365.1-7 - State and local laws.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false State and local laws. 8365.1-7 Section 8365.1-7 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND..., or destruction or damage to property; (e) Air and water pollution; (f) Littering; (g) Sanitation;...

  3. A Data Analysis for the Inverse Square Law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downie, Russell

    2007-04-01

    When first encountered, inverse square laws can damage the confidence of beginning physics students whose maths skills are uncertain. Engaging in practical exercises that help them work with the idea can be a great help. We have used the following apparatus for a number of years and our students understand and enjoy the exercise.

  4. Microstructural evolution during dynamic deformation of cubic metals: copper

    SciTech Connect

    Cerreta, Ellen K; Koller, Darcie D; Bronkhorst, Curt A; Excobedo, Juan P; Hansen, Benjamin L; Patterson, Brian M; Lebensohn, Ricardo A; Livescu, Veronica; Tonks, Davis; Mourad, Hashem M; Germann, Timothy C; Perez - Bergquist, Alex; Gray Ill, George T

    2010-12-22

    Shockwave shape can influence dynamic damage evolution. Features such as rise time, pulse duration, peak shock pressure, pull back, and release rate are influenced as wave shape changes. However, their individual influence on dynamic damage evolution is not well understood. Specifically, changing from a square to triangular or Taylor wave loading profile can alter the release kinetics from peak shock pressure and the volume of material sampled during release. This creates a spatial influence. In high purity metals, because damage is often linked to boundaries within the microstructure (grain or twin), changing the volume of material sampled during release, can have a drastic influence on dynamic damage evolution as the number of boundaries or defects sampled is altered. In this study, model-driven dynamic experiments have been conducted on eu with four different grain sizes to examine, for a given shockwave shape, how the spatial effect of boundary distribution influences dynamic damage evolution. Both two and three dimensional damage characterization techniques have been utilized. This study shows the critical influence of spatial effects, in this case boundary density, on dynamic damage evolution. As the boundary density decreases, the damage evolution transitions from nucleation controlled to growth controlled. It also shows that specific boundaries, those with high Schmid factor orientations on either side, maybe a necessary condition for void formation.

  5. School Law Update...Preventive School Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Thomas N., Ed.; Semler, Darel P., Ed.

    A wide variety of contemporary legal issues are addressed in the 15 separate papers that make up this volume. The introductory chapter by William C. Bednar, Jr. provides a broad-based rationale for "Preventive School Law." Chapters 2 and 3, both by Gerald A. Caplan, review "Current Issues in Reduction-in-Force" and "First Amendment Claims by…

  6. College of Law LLM in Oil and Gas Law

    E-print Network

    Harman, Neal.A.

    remains one of the most fundamental aspects of global commerce and natural resources law in the modern eraCollege of Law LLM in Oil and Gas Law New LLM in Oil and Gas Law launched to complement our other Law. The new LLM Degree in this field is a very exciting development at Swansea and I am sure

  7. Centre for Business Law and Practice School of Law

    E-print Network

    Haase, Markus

    1 Centre for Business Law and Practice School of Law University of Leeds ANNUAL REPORT 2012 ­ 2013 AND THE CITY 1.1 THE CENTRE The Centre for Business Law and Practice (the `Centre') is located in the School of Law (part of the Faculty of Social Sciences, Education and Law) at the University of Leeds. The School

  8. Micro-mechanical modeling of perforating shock damage

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, R.P.; Krogh, K.E.; Behrmann, L.A.; Halleck, P.M.

    1997-11-17

    Shaped charge jet induced formation damage from perforation treatments hinders productivity. Manifestation of this damage is in the form of grain fragmentation resulting in fines that plug up pore throats along with the breakdown of inter-grain cementation. The authors use the Smooth Particle Hydrodynamic (SPH) computational method as a way to explicitly model, on a grain pore scale, the dynamic interactions of grains and grain/pores to calculate the damage resulting from perforation type stress wave loading. The SPH method is a continuum Lagrangian, meshless approach that features particles. Clusters of particles are used for each grain to provide representation of a grain pore structure that is similar to x-ray synchrotron microtomography images. Numerous damage models are available to portray fracture and fragmentation. In this paper the authors present the results of well defined impact loading on a grain pore structure that illustrate how the heterogeneity affects stress wave behavior and damage evolution. The SPH approach easily accommodates the coupling of multi-materials. Calculations for multi-material conditions with the pore space treated as a void, fluid filled, and/or clay filled show diverse effects on the stress wave propagation behavior and damage. SPH comparisons made with observed damage from recovered impacted sandstone samples in gas gun experiments show qualitatively the influence of stress intensity. The modeling approach presented here offers a unique way in concert with experiments to define a better understanding of formation damage resulting from perforation completion treatments.

  9. Science and the Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Donald; Merrill, Richard A.

    2000-01-01

    Explaines the role of the Carnegie Commission which was formed to explore the relationship between the disciplines of science, technology, and the law. Discusses concerns about the individual right of privacy in projects such as the Human Genome Project. Focuses on the panel on Science, Technology, and Law which was established in 1999. (YDS)

  10. Social Studies: Law Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curriculum Review, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Reviews 11 series, texts, supplements, kits, and professional references for law instruction, including civil and criminal law, the Bill of Rights, and controversial legal issues: arson, gun control, capital punishment, and euthanasia. While all grade levels are covered, the emphasis is on secondary-level materials. (SJL)

  11. Law and Marine Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bockrath, Joseph

    1976-01-01

    The University of Delaware Marine Studies has implemented courses in coastal zone law and policy and maritime law. The courses attempt to integrate the scientist's or engineer's work with public policy formation. The program emphasizes historical and current issues and the economic, cultural, and political forces operating in decision-making…

  12. Women in Law Enforcement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Regina

    1991-01-01

    The lack of roles for African-American female police officers has not stopped black women from gaining momentum in law enforcement. Women still comprise less than 10 percent of all police officers, but growing numbers of black women are finding meaningful work in law enforcement. (SLD)

  13. The Law of Elasticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cocco, Alberto; Masin, Sergio Cesare

    2010-01-01

    Participants estimated the imagined elongation of a spring while they were imagining that a load was stretching the spring. This elongation turned out to be a multiplicative function of spring length and load weight--a cognitive law analogous to Hooke's law of elasticity. Participants also estimated the total imagined elongation of springs joined…

  14. Teaching Information Technology Law

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, M. J.; Jones, R. P.; Haggerty, J.; Gresty, D.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we discuss an approach to the teaching of information technology law to higher education computing students that attempts to prepare them for professional computing practice. As information technology has become ubiquitous its interactions with the law have become more numerous. Information technology practitioners, and in particular…

  15. Law Related Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maslow, R., Ed.; Kirchgaessner, R., Ed.

    1989-01-01

    This journal edition focuses upon the many resources for teachers to draw upon in order to infuse law-related education (LRE) into their classrooms. Isidore Starr explains the reasons behind the LRE movement, while Mabel McKinney-Browning describes the existing American Bar Association's programs in LRE. Judith Zimmer covers the Street Law

  16. INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LAW

    E-print Network

    Al Faruque, Mohammad Abdullah

    of matters, including copyright, patent and privacy law. Interdisciplinary Research. IP faculty at UCI Law and Creative Processes, in A Companion to Media Authorship (Jonathan Gray & Derek Johnson eds., 2013 Professor Burk is an internationally prominent authority on legal and social issues related to high

  17. Pop Goes the Law

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harper, Steven J.

    2013-01-01

    The Law School Admission Council recently reported that applications were heading toward a 30-year low, reflecting, as a "New York Times" article put it, "increased concern over soaring tuition, crushing student debt, and diminishing prospects of lucrative employment upon graduation." Since 2004 the number of law-school applicants has dropped from…

  18. Laws for Young Mountaineers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanawha County Board of Education, Charleston, WV.

    This booklet introduces secondary grade students to the criminal laws of West Virginia. It can easily be adapted and used by educators in other states. The authors believe that young people must recognize and understand these laws and the mechanisms which society uses to implement and enforce them if they are to function as an integral, important,…

  19. School Law Update, 1986.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Thomas N., Ed.; Semler, Darel P., Ed.

    A wide variety of contemporary legal issues, involving all levels of public and private education, are addressed in the 20 separate chapters comprising this volume. The titles and authors of the chapters are as follows: (1) Due Process of Law: Loudermill v. Cleveland Board of Education (Hooker); (2) Schools, Technology and the Law (Helm); (3)…

  20. A Quantitative Examination Whether Education Mitigates Stress Levels among Law Enforcement Officers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metts, Gary A.

    2012-01-01

    Stress is damaging if it is continual, overwhelming. and prolonged. Law enforcement officers face stressful events daily. A relationship exists between stress levels and the physical and psychological effects to the human body. Although there is a general understanding of the damage stress can do physically and psychologically, many elements that…

  1. Reliability-based framework for fatigue damage prognosis of bonded structural elements in aerospace composite structures

    E-print Network

    Gobbato, Maurizio

    2011-01-01

    ? 0 presented earlier. dam The crack propagation analysis atdam NDE technique detection capability and measurement accuracy Underlying (true) crackcrack length, a a 0 , and damage evolution model , at time N 0 = 0 cycles parameters, ? dam

  2. On Newton's Third Law

    E-print Network

    Pinheiro, Mario J

    2009-01-01

    The law of action-reaction is thoroughly used in textbooks to derive the conservation laws of linear and angular momentum, and it was considered by Ernst Mach the the cornerstone of physics. We give here a background survey of several questions raised by the action-reaction law, and in particular, the role of the physical vacuum is shown to provide an appropriate framework to clarify the occurrence of possible violations of the action-reaction law. It is also obtained an expression for the general linear momentum of a body-particle in the context of statistical mechanics. It is shown that Newton's third law is not verified in systems out of equilibrium due to an additional entropic gradient term present in the particle's momentum.

  3. [Compulsory admission to hospital in Tunisia: a necessary evolution].

    PubMed

    Ellouze, Faten; Lahmar, Aymen; Beji, Rami; Dridi, Anis; Fadhel M'rad, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of the legislation governing compulsory admission to hospital in Tunisia is interesting for two reasons. The country's 2011 revolution notably brought about major changes to the legislative framework, from constitutional through to ordinary laws. At the same time, the current trend for globalisation is also affecting legislation: international laws, treaties and UN charters are imposed on the laws of individual countries. This article looks at how Tunisian law governing compulsory admission to hospital has had to evolve. PMID:26143219

  4. 43 CFR 11.17 - Compliance with applicable laws and standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Compliance with applicable laws and standards. 11.17 Section 11.17 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Introduction § 11.17 Compliance with applicable laws and standards. (a)...

  5. 43 CFR 11.17 - Compliance with applicable laws and standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Compliance with applicable laws and standards. 11.17 Section 11.17 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Introduction § 11.17 Compliance with applicable laws and standards. (a)...

  6. 43 CFR 11.17 - Compliance with applicable laws and standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Compliance with applicable laws and standards. 11.17 Section 11.17 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Introduction § 11.17 Compliance with applicable laws and standards. (a)...

  7. 43 CFR 11.17 - Compliance with applicable laws and standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Compliance with applicable laws and standards. 11.17 Section 11.17 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Introduction § 11.17 Compliance with applicable laws and standards. (a)...

  8. 43 CFR 11.17 - Compliance with applicable laws and standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compliance with applicable laws and standards. 11.17 Section 11.17 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Introduction § 11.17 Compliance with applicable laws and standards. (a)...

  9. The Evolution and Development of the Universe

    E-print Network

    Clement Vidal; Charles Auffray; Alex H. Blin; Jean Chaline; Louis Crane; Thomas Durt; Borje Ekstig; Horace Fairlamb; Jan Greben; Rob Hengeveld; Francis Heylighen; Gerard Jagers op Akkerhuis; Giuseppe Longo; Nicolas F. Lori; Denis Noble; Laurent Nottale; Franc Rottiers; Stanley Salthe; John Stewart; Ruediger Vaas; Gertrudis Van de Vijver; Nico M. van Straalen

    2010-01-04

    This document is the Special Issue of the First International Conference on the Evolution and Development of the Universe (EDU 2008). Please refer to the preface and introduction for more details on the contributions. Keywords: acceleration, artificial cosmogenesis, artificial life, Big Bang, Big History, biological evolution, biological universe, biology, causality, classical vacuum energy, complex systems, complexity, computational universe, conscious evolution, cosmological artificial selection, cosmological natural selection, cosmology, critique, cultural evolution, dark energy, dark matter, development of the universe, development, emergence, evolution of the universe evolution, exobiology, extinction, fine-tuning, fractal space-time, fractal, information, initial conditions, intentional evolution, linear expansion of the universe, log-periodic laws, macroevolution, materialism, meduso-anthropic principle, multiple worlds, natural sciences, Nature, ontology, order, origin of the universe, particle hierarchy, philosophy, physical constants, quantum darwinism, reduction, role of intelligent life, scale relativity, scientific evolution, self-organization, speciation, specification hierarchy, thermodynamics, time, universe, vagueness.

  10. Chemical Laws, Idealization and Approximation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tobin, Emma

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the notion of laws in chemistry. Vihalemm ("Found Chem" 5(1):7-22, 2003) argues that the laws of chemistry are fundamentally the same as the laws of physics they are all "ceteris paribus" laws which are true "in ideal conditions". In contrast, Scerri (2000) contends that the laws of chemistry are…

  11. Philadelphia University Faculty of law

    E-print Network

    Philadelphia University Faculty of law Department of -------------- ---------- semester, 2007/or corequisite (s): public international law 1 Course Level: Second year Credit hours: 3 Credit HoursLecture Time Humanitarian Law Module name: Humanitarian international law Prerequisite: Public international law (1) Module

  12. Rock Weathering and Damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoke, G. D.; Turcotte, D. L.

    2001-12-01

    Weathering of rock surfaces is often associated with a surface dissolution process. Chemical interactions occur on grain boundaries where diffusion is the controlling process. A dissolution boundary layer (rind) develops adjacent to the weathering surface. We quantify the extent of dissolution by introducing a damage variable f; f = 0 for pristine rock and when f = f0, the rock disintegrates. We assume that the variations of the damage variable are given by the diffusion equation. We solve two problems. The first is for the structure of the transient dissolution boundary layer prior to surface disintegration. We find an incubation time ti before active weathering (disintegration) begins. The second is the solution for steady-state weathering with a constant weathering velocity vw. Our results are entirely consistent with weathering studies on Carrera marble gravestones in the United Kingdom.

  13. Weathering and damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoke, Gregory D.; Turcotte, Donald L.

    2002-10-01

    Weathering of rock surfaces is often associated with a surface dissolution process. Chemical interactions occur on grain boundaries and diffusion is the controlling process. A dissolution boundary layer (rind) develops adjacent to the weathering surface. We quantify the extent of dissolution by introducing a damage variable f, f = 0 for pristine rock, and when f = f0 the rock disintegrates. We assume that the variations of the damage variable are given by the diffusion equation. We solve two problems. The first is for the structure of the transient dissolution boundary layer prior to surface disintegration. We find an incubation time ti before active weathering (disintegration) begins. The second is the solution for steady state weathering with a constant weathering velocity vw. Our results are entirely consistent with weathering studies on Carrera marble gravestones in the United Kingdom.

  14. Teaching American Law to French Law Students--in English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sultan, Allen

    1978-01-01

    Described is the history and academic activity of the program, offered in English, to French law students, at the Center for the Study of English and American Law. The program includes instruction in law, along with English language instruction. (JMD)

  15. Tornado damage risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhold, T.A.; Ellingwood, B.

    1982-09-01

    Several proposed models were evaluated for predicting tornado wind speed probabilities at nuclear plant sites as part of a program to develop statistical data on tornadoes needed for probability-based load combination analysis. A unified model was developed which synthesized the desired aspects of tornado occurrence and damage potential. The sensitivity of wind speed probability estimates to various tornado modeling assumptions are examined, and the probability distributions of tornado wind speed that are needed for load combination studies are presented.

  16. Earthquake damage to schools

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCullough, Heather

    1994-01-01

    These unusual slides show earthquake damage to school and university buildings around the world. They graphically illustrate the potential danger to our schools, and to the welfare of our children, that results from major earthquakes. The slides range from Algeria, where a collapsed school roof is held up only by students' desks; to Anchorage, Alaska, where an elementary school structure has split in half; to California and other areas, where school buildings have sustained damage to walls, roofs, and chimneys. Interestingly, all the United States earthquakes depicted in this set of slides occurred either on a holiday or before or after school hours, except the 1935 tremor in Helena, Montana, which occurred at 11:35 am. It undoubtedly would have caused casualties had the schools not been closed days earlier by Helena city officials because of a damaging foreshock. Students in Algeria, the People's Republic of China, Armenia, and other stricken countries were not so fortunate. This set of slides represents 17 destructive earthquakes that occurred in 9 countries, and covers more than a century--from 1886 to 1988. Two of the tremors, both of which occurred in the United States, were magnitude 8+ on the Richter Scale, and four were magnitude 7-7.9. The events represented by the slides (see table below) claimed more than a quarter of a million lives.

  17. Prediction of Damage in Randomly Oriented Short-Fibre Composites by means of A Mechanistic Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2004-05-01

    A micro-macro mechanistic approach to damage in short-fiber composites is developed in this paper. At the micro-scale, the damage mechanisms such as matrix cracking, fiber/matrix debonding are analyzed to define the associated damage variables. The stiffness reduction law dependent on these variables is then established using micromechanical models and average orientation distributions of fibers and microcracks. The macroscopic response is obtained by means of thermodynamics of continuous media, continuum damage mechanics and a finite element formulation.

  18. Prediction of Damage in Randomly Oriented Short-Fibre Composites by means of A Mechanistic Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba NGHIEP; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2004-03-01

    A micro-macro mechanistic approach to damage in short-fiber composites is developed in this paper. At the micro-scale, the damage mechanisms such as matrix cracking, fiber/matrix debonding are analyzed to define the associated damage variables. The stiffness reduction law dependent on these variables is then established using micromechanical models and average orientation distributions of fibers and microcracks. The macroscopic response is obtained by means of thermodynamics of continuous media, continuum damage mechanics and a finite element formulation.

  19. Lenz's Law Magic Trick

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Michael J.

    2006-02-01

    The demonstration of Lenz's law by dropping a powerful magnet down a nonmagnetic metal pipe has become a classic lecture-hall demonstration.1,2 An inexpensive version is packaged as a professional magic trick3 called "Newton's Nightmare." Combining sleight-of-hand with a demonstration of Lenz's law is a surefire way to heighten student interest. The subsequent student discussion motivated by a desire to understand the magic trick can lead to a memorable physics lesson. This paper will discuss Lenz's law magic and review literature that reveals the subtlety of the physics.

  20. Anomalous law of cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapas, Luciano C.; Ferreira, Rogelma M. S.; Rubí, J. Miguel; Oliveira, Fernando A.

    2015-03-01

    We analyze the temperature relaxation phenomena of systems in contact with a thermal reservoir that undergoes a non-Markovian diffusion process. From a generalized Langevin equation, we show that the temperature is governed by a law of cooling of the Newton's law type in which the relaxation time depends on the velocity autocorrelation and is then characterized by the memory function. The analysis of the temperature decay reveals the existence of an anomalous cooling in which the temperature may oscillate. Despite this anomalous behavior, we show that the variation of entropy remains always positive in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics.

  1. Benford's Law in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Leontsinis, Stefanos

    2014-12-01

    Benford's law predicts the occurrence of the n-th digit of numbers in datasets originating from various sources all over the world, ranging from financial data to atomic spectra. It is intriguing that although many features of Benford's law have been proven, it is still not fully understood mathematically. In this paper we investigate the distances of galaxies and stars by comparing the first, second and third significant digit probabilities with Benford's predictions. It is found that the distances of galaxies follow the first digit law reasonable well, and that the star distances agree very well with the first, second and third significant digit.

  2. Anomalous law of cooling.

    PubMed

    Lapas, Luciano C; Ferreira, Rogelma M S; Rubí, J Miguel; Oliveira, Fernando A

    2015-03-14

    We analyze the temperature relaxation phenomena of systems in contact with a thermal reservoir that undergoes a non-Markovian diffusion process. From a generalized Langevin equation, we show that the temperature is governed by a law of cooling of the Newton's law type in which the relaxation time depends on the velocity autocorrelation and is then characterized by the memory function. The analysis of the temperature decay reveals the existence of an anomalous cooling in which the temperature may oscillate. Despite this anomalous behavior, we show that the variation of entropy remains always positive in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics. PMID:25770525

  3. Damage mechanics characterization on fatigue behavior of a solder joint material

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, C.L.; Yang, F.; Fang, H.E.

    1998-08-01

    This paper presents the first part of a comprehensive mechanics approach capable of predicting the integrity and reliability of solder joint material under fatigue loading without viscoplastic damage considerations. A separate report will be made to present a comprehensive damage model describing life prediction of the solder material under thermomechanical fatigue loading. The method is based on a theory of damage mechanics which makes possible a macroscopic description of the successive material deterioration caused by the presence of microcracks/voids in engineering materials. A damage mechanics model based on the thermodynamic theory of irreversible processes with internal state variables is proposed and used to provide a unified approach in characterizing the cyclic behavior of a typical solder material. With the introduction of a damage effect tensor, the constitutive equations are derived to enable the formulation of a fatigue damage dissipative potential function and a fatigue damage criterion. The fatigue evolution is subsequently developed based on the hypothesis that the overall damage is induced by the accumulation of fatigue and plastic damage. This damage mechanics approach offers a systematic and versatile means that is effective in modeling the entire process of material failure ranging from damage initiation and propagation leading eventually to macro-crack initiation and growth. As the model takes into account the load history effect and the interaction between plasticity damage and fatigue damage, with the aid of a modified general purpose finite element program, the method can readily be applied to estimate the fatigue life of solder joints under different loading conditions.

  4. What's Inside: Child Labor Laws

    E-print Network

    What's Inside: · Child Labor Laws · Attachments to Online Job Announcements · Hiring Officials child labor laws that apply. Below is a brief overview. 14 and 15 year olds: Departments must keep-year age groupmayworkatanytimeforunlimitedhoursinany non-hazardousposition. CHILD LABOR LAWS

  5. QUEUES IN LAW Ronen Perry*

    E-print Network

    Wintner, Shuly

    QUEUES IN LAW Ronen Perry* & Tal Z. Zarsky** INTRODUCTION the Allocator to Expand the Resource .......................39 F. Broader Social Benefits...............................................................................................57 * Professor, Faculty of Law, University of Haifa. ** Associate Professor, Faculty of Law

  6. Philadelphia University Faculty of law

    E-print Network

    Philadelphia University Faculty of law Department of -------------- ---------- semester, 2007/2008 Course Syllabus Course code: 410417 Course Title: Private International Law Course prerequisite (s) and Professor Dr. Sabri Thyabat Course module description: Module name: Private international law Prerequisite

  7. A Tow-Level Progressive Damage for Simulating Carbon-Fiber Textile Composites: Interim Report

    SciTech Connect

    Zywicz, E.

    2000-07-01

    A numerical approach to model the elasto-plastic and tensile damage response of tri-axially braided carbon-fiber polymeric-matrix composites is developed. It is micromechanically based and consists of a simplified unit cell geometry, a plane-stress tow-level constitutive relationship, a one-dimensional undulation constitutive law, and a non-traditional shell element integration rule. The braided composite lamina is idealized as periodic in the plane, and a simplified three-layer representative volume (RV) is assembled from axial and braider tows and pure resin regions. The constituents in each layer are homogenized with an iso-strain assumption in the fiber-direction and an iso-stress condition in the other directions. In the upper and lower layers, the fiber-direction strain is additively decomposed into an undulation and a tow portion. A finite-deformation tow model predicts the plane-stress tow response and is coupled to the undulation constitutive relationship. The overall braid model is implemented in DYNA3D and works with traditional shell elements. The finite-deformation tow constitutive relationship is derived from the fiber elasticity and the isotropic elasto-plastic power-law hardening matrix response using a thermodynamic framework and simple homogenization assumptions. The model replicates tensile damage evolution, in a smeared sense, parallel and perpendicular to the fiber axis and is regularized to yield mesh independent results. The tow-level model demonstrates reasonable agreement, prior to damage, with detailed three-dimensional FE (finite element) elasto-plastic simulations of aligned, periodically arranged, uni-directional composites. The 3-layer braid model response is compared with predictions obtained from detailed micromechanical simulations of the braid's unit cell in uni-axial extension, shear, and flexure for three braid angles. The elastic properties show good agreement as does the non-linear response for loadings dominated by the axial tows. In loadings dominated by the braider tow response, the absence of a non-linear undulation model deteriorates the agreement. Nonetheless, the present approach is applicable to a broad range of tri-axially braided composites as well as for unidirectional composites, but presently lacks any compressive failure mechanisms and an adequate non-linear undulation model.

  8. Modeling of damage in unidirectional ceramic matrix composites and multi-scale experimental validation on third generation SiC/SiC minicomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chateau, C.; Gélébart, L.; Bornert, M.; Crépin, J.; Caldemaison, D.; Sauder, C.

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this paper is to experimentally validate a 1D probabilistic model of damage evolution in unidirectional SiC/SiC composites. The key point of this approach lies in the identification and validation at both local and macroscopic scales. Thus, in addition to macroscopic tensile tests, the evolution of microscopic damage mechanisms - in the form of matrix cracks and fiber breaks - is experimentally analyzed and quantified through in-situ scanning electron microscope and computed tomography tensile tests. A complete model, including both matrix cracking and fiber breaking, is proposed on the basis of existing modeling tools separately addressing these mechanisms. It is based on matrix and fiber failure probability laws and a stress redistribution assumption in the vicinity of matrix cracks or fiber breaks. The identification of interfacial parameters is conducted to fit the experimental characterization, and shows that conventional assumptions of 1D probabilistic models can adequately describe matrix cracking at both macro- and microscopic scales. However, it is necessary to enrich them to get a proper prediction of ultimate failure and fiber break density for Hi-Nicalon type S fiber-reinforced SiC/SiC minicomposites.

  9. Causal Newton Gravity Law

    E-print Network

    Zinoviev, Yury M

    2012-01-01

    The equations of the relativistic causal Newton gravity law for the planets of the solar system are studied in the approximation when the Sun rests at the coordinates origin and the planets do not iteract between each other.

  10. The "Natural Law Tradition."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finnis, John

    1986-01-01

    A discussion of natural law outlines some of the theory and tradition surrounding it and examines its relationship to the social science and legal curriculum and to the teaching of jurisprudence. (MSE)

  11. What Is Benford's Law?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Jonathan R.; Farnsworth, David L.

    2009-01-01

    The surprising property of many data sets that their first significant digits follow Benford's Law provides examples that can pique and hold students' interest. Several ideas for student activities are presented.

  12. Potential Conservation Laws

    E-print Network

    Michael Kunzinger; Roman O. Popovych

    2008-04-15

    We prove that potential conservation laws have characteristics depending only on local variables if and only if they are induced by local conservation laws. Therefore, characteristics of pure potential conservation laws have to essentially depend on potential variables. This statement provides a significant generalization of results of the recent paper by Bluman, Cheviakov and Ivanova [J. Math. Phys., 2006, V.47, 113505]. Moreover, we present extensions to gauged potential systems, Abelian and general coverings and general foliated systems of differential equations. An example illustrating possible applications of proved statements is considered. A special version of the Hadamard lemma for fiber bundles and the notions of weighted jet spaces are proposed as new tools for the investigation of potential conservation laws.

  13. Potential conservation laws

    SciTech Connect

    Kunzinger, Michael; Popovych, Roman O.

    2008-10-15

    We prove that potential conservation laws have characteristics depending only on local variables if and only if they are induced by local conservation laws. Therefore, characteristics of pure potential conservation laws have to essentially depend on potential variables. This statement provides a significant generalization of results of the recent paper by Bluman et al. [J. Math. Phys. 47, 113505 (2006)]. Moreover, we present extensions to gauged potential systems, Abelian and general coverings, and general foliated systems of differential equations. An example illustrating possible applications of these results is given. A special version of the Hadamard lemma for fiber bundles and the notions of weighted jet spaces are proposed as new tools for the investigation of potential conservation laws.

  14. Fraud in Scots law 

    E-print Network

    Reid, Dot

    2013-11-26

    This thesis seeks to provide a deeper understanding of the Scots law of fraud. Adopting a method that is both historical and doctrinal, it provides a critical analysis of the current understanding of fraud and argues for ...

  15. Causal Newton Gravity Law

    E-print Network

    Yury M. Zinoviev

    2012-01-17

    The equations of the relativistic causal Newton gravity law for the planets of the solar system are studied in the approximation when the Sun rests at the coordinates origin and the planets do not iteract between each other.

  16. Drunk Driving Laws

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Offense Limited Driving Privileges During Susp. Ignition Interlocks Vehicle and License Plate Sanctions Open Container Laws* Repeat ... days After 30 days Mandatory for all convictions Vehicle impoundment Yes Ariz. .15 90 days After 30 ...

  17. Teaching Criminal Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, Sandy

    1989-01-01

    Presents learning activities and resources for teaching senior level criminal law courses. Topics covered include arrest, search and seizure, bail, trial procedures, sentencing, and prisons. Objective is to encourage students to address societal issues. (LS)

  18. Damage tolerance for commuter aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lincoln, John W.

    1992-01-01

    The damage tolerance experience in the United States Air Force with military aircraft and in the commercial world with large transport category aircraft indicates that a similar success could be achieved in commuter aircraft. The damage tolerance process is described for the purpose of defining the approach that could be used for these aircraft to ensure structural integrity. Results of some of the damage tolerance assessments for this class of aircraft are examined to illustrate the benefits derived from this approach. Recommendations are given for future damage tolerance assessment of existing commuter aircraft and on the incorporation of damage tolerance capability in new designs.

  19. Philadelphia University Faculty of Law

    E-print Network

    Contracts · 410315 Labor Law · 410323 Commercial Papers & Banking Transactions · 410391 Law of Civil · 410233 Introduction to Islamic Jurisprudence · 410334 Personal Statutes" Marriage & Divorce" · 410339

  20. SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY College of Law

    E-print Network

    McConnell, Terry

    SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY College of Law Academic Handbook Academic Rules for J.D. Students Academic ......................................................................................................................... - 20 - (c) Successful Completion Defined. ....................................- 21 - (d) Constitutional Law II

  1. Power-laws and Non-Power-laws in Dark Matter Halos

    E-print Network

    R. N. Henriksen

    2006-09-05

    Simulated dark matter profiles are often modelled as a `NFW' density profile rather than a single power law. Recently, attention has turned to the rather rigorous power-law behaviour exhibited by the `pseudo phase-space density' of the dark matter halo, which is defined dimensionally in terms of the local density and velocity dispersion of the dark matter particles. The non-power-law behaviour of the density profile is generally taken to exclude simple scale-free, in-fall models; however the power-law behaviour of the `pseudo-density' is a counter indication. We argue in this paper that both behaviours may be at least qualitatively understood in terms of a dynamically evolving self-similarity, rather than the form for self-similar infall that is fixed by cosmological initial conditions. The evolution is likely due to collective relaxation such as that provided by the radial-orbit instability on large scales. We deduce, from a distribution function given by first order coarse-graining, both the NFW-type density profile and the power-law pseudo-density profile. The results are not greatly sensitive to variation about 3 in the power of the velocity dispersion used in the definition of the phase space pseudo-density. We suggest that the power 2 may create the more physical quantity, whose deviations from a power-law are a diagnostic of incomplete relaxation.

  2. Law Panel in action.

    PubMed

    Odulana, J

    In September 1976 the Africa Regional Council (ARC) of IPPF created a Law Panel to 1) advise the ARC on the emphasis of laws and parenthood programs in the region, 2) investigate legal obstacles to family planning and ways of removing them, 3) institute a monitoring service on laws and court decisions affecting planned parenthood, and 4) prepare a list of lawyers and legal reformers by country. The panel has 1) recommended adoption of an IPPF Central Medical Committee and Central Law Panel statement on sterilization, adolescent fertility control, and the use of medical and auxiliary personnel in family planning services with guidelines for Africa; 2) appointed National Legal Correspondents to carry on the monitoring service mentioned above in 18 countries; and 3) discussed solutions to problems in delivering family planning services with family planning associations in Tanzania, Zambia, Mauritius, Madagascar, and Kenya. Laws governing family planning education and services, marriage, divorce, and maternity benefits in these countries are summarized. In 1978 the panel will hold 2 workshops on law and the status of women. PMID:12260478

  3. Controlling Ground Squirrel Damage 

    E-print Network

    Texas Wildlife Services

    2007-03-13

    stream_source_info pdf_272.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 5616 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name pdf_272.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 G round squirrels are small... and vegetables in gardens, and their burrows can be a nuisance. In rural areas, ground squirrels can do extensive damage to cropland or pastures. They may dig up newly planted seeds, eat sprouting plants and weaken L-1909 3-07 earthen dikes with their burrows...

  4. The law of the leading digits and the world religions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mir, T. A.

    2012-02-01

    Benford's law states that the occurrence of significant digits in many data sets is not uniform but tends to follow a logarithmic distribution such that the smaller digits appear as first significant digits more frequently than the larger ones. We investigate here numerical data on the country-wise adherent distribution of seven major world religions i.e. Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism, Sikhism, Judaism and Baha'ism to see if the proportion of the leading digits occurring in the distribution conforms to Benford's law. We find that the adherent data of all the religions, except Christianity, excellently does conform to Benford's law. Furthermore, unlike the adherent data on Christianity, the significant digit distribution of the three major Christian denominations i.e. Catholicism, Protestantism and Orthodoxy obeys the law. Thus in spite of their complexity general laws can be established for the evolution of religious groups.

  5. Time-dependent damage in predictions of fatigue behaviour of normal and healing ligaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornton, Gail M.; Bailey, Soraya J.; Schwab, Timothy D.

    2015-08-01

    Ligaments are dense fibrous tissues that connect bones across a joint and are exposed daily to creep and fatigue loading. Ligaments are tensile load-bearing tissues; therefore, fatigue loading will have a component of time-dependent damage from the non-zero mean stress and cycle-dependent damage from the oscillating stress. If time-dependent damage is not sufficient to completely predict the fatigue response, then cycle-dependent damage could be an important contributor. Using data from normal ligaments (current study and Thornton et al., Clin. Biomech. 22:932-940, 2007a) and healing ligaments (Thornton and Bailey, J. Biomech. Eng. 135:091004-1-091004-6, 2013), creep data was used to predict the fatigue response considering time-dependent damage. Relationships between creep lifetime and test stress or initial strain were modelled using exponential or power-law regression. In order to predict fatigue lifetimes, constant rates of damage were assumed and time-varying stresses were introduced into the expressions for time-dependent damage from creep. Then, the predictions of fatigue lifetime were compared with curvefits to the fatigue data where exponential or power-law regressions were used to determine the relationship between fatigue lifetime and test stress or initial strain. The fatigue prediction based on time-dependent damage alone greatly overestimated fatigue lifetime suggesting that time-dependent damage alone cannot account for all of the damage accumulated during fatigue and that cycle-dependent damage has an important role. At lower stress and strain, time-dependent damage was a greater relative contributor for normal ligaments than healing ligaments; however, cycle-dependent damage was a greater relative contributor with incremental increases in stress or strain for normal ligaments than healing ligaments.

  6. Rediscovering Kepler's laws using Newton's gravitation law and NASA data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springsteen, Paul; Keith, Jason

    2010-03-01

    Kepler's three laws of planetary motion were originally discovered by using data acquired from Tycho Brache's naked eye observations of the planets. We show how Kepler's third law can be reproduced using planetary data from NASA. We will also be using Newton's Gravitational law to explain why Kepler's three laws exist as they do.

  7. Centre for Business Law and Practice School of Law

    E-print Network

    Haase, Markus

    Law LLM International Banking and Finance Law LLM International Trade Law LLM European such as the International Monetary Fund. Research has been undertaken in many areas of business law including banking institutions, foreign investment, insolvency, intellectual property, international trade, the regulation

  8. Labour Law and Transnational Law The Fates of Legal Fields &

    E-print Network

    Applebaum, David

    Labour Law and Transnational Law The Fates of Legal Fields & The Trajectory of Legal Scholarship's Building, Strand Campus ABOUT THE LECTURE As the short, unhappy life of Labour Law suggests, legal fields and political conditions. The trajectory of Labour Law may therefore represent a cautionary tale for proponents

  9. Centre for Business Law and Practice School of Law

    E-print Network

    Haase, Markus

    1 1 Centre for Business Law and Practice School of Law University of Leeds ANNUAL REPORT 2010 of the Centre Appendix 2: Officers of the Centre #12;3 3 1. ABOUT THE CENTRE FOR BUSINESS LAW AND PRACTICE, THE UNIVERSITY AND THE CITY OF LEEDS 1.1 THE CENTRE The Centre for Business Law and Practice is located

  10. Centre for Business Law and Practice School of Law

    E-print Network

    Haase, Markus

    1 1 Centre for Business Law and Practice School of Law University of Leeds ANNUAL REPORT 2011. Publications 7. Editorial Work 8. Working Paper #12;3 3 1. ABOUT THE CENTRE FOR BUSINESS LAW AND PRACTICE, THE UNIVERSITY AND THE CITY OF LEEDS 1.1 THE CENTRE The Centre for Business Law and Practice is located

  11. Scherr & Redish Newton's Zeroth Law Newton's Zeroth Law

    E-print Network

    Maryland at College Park, University of

    Scherr & Redish Newton's Zeroth Law Newton's Zeroth Law: Learning from listening to our students "Newton's Zeroth Law" articulates important (but usually tacit) ideas underlying them. In this paper we explain our use of Newton's Zeroth Law in the introductory algebra-based course at the University

  12. Law School Preparation ABA statement on preparing for law school--

    E-print Network

    that will prepare you for a legal education. Students who are successful in law school, and who become accomplished1 Law School Preparation ABA statement on preparing for law school-- "There is no single path or recommended for law school. Students are advised to take courses that will develop strong skills in writing

  13. SWANSEA LAW ALUMNI OCTOBER 2012 SWANSEA LAW TAKING YOU PLACES

    E-print Network

    Harman, Neal.A.

    successfully completed the New York Bar and became a defence attorney. In 2009 she established her own lawSWANSEA LAW ALUMNI OCTOBER 2012 SWANSEA LAW TAKING YOU PLACES AUSTRALIA Barrister Matthew Lewis's Defamation Law Committee and his recent clients include Facebook Inc, Australia Broadcasting Corpo- ration

  14. A New Damage Constitutive Model for Thermal Deformation of AA6111 Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Wenyu; Wang, Baoyu; Bian, Jianhua; Tang, Xuefeng; Yang, Lei; Huo, Yuanming

    2015-06-01

    Hot tensile tests were conducted using a Gleeble 1500, at the temperature range of 623 K to 823 K (350 °C to 550 °C) and strain rate range of 0.1 to 10 s-1. Flow stress is significantly affected by temperature and strain rate. As strain increases; the flow stress first rapidly increases, subsequently maintains a steady state, and finally drops sharply because of damage evolution. The features and mechanism of the damage were studied utilizing a scanning electron microscope. Micro-void nucleation, growth, and coalescence result in the failure of the hot-formed specimen. A damage equation based on continuum damage mechanics and damage mechanism in hot metal forming was proposed. A unified viscoplastic damage model coupled with strain, strain rate, temperature, dislocation, hardening, damage, damage rate, and so on was developed and calibrated for AA6111 using Genetic Algorism Tool in three steps. This model can be used to describe viscoplastic flow behavior and damage evolution at various temperatures and strain rates. The model was implemented into the finite element (FE) model in ABAQUS platform via the variable user material subroutine. Thus, the FE model could be employed to study the damage distribution and the effects of blank holder force (BHF) and forming velocity on hot cylindrical deep drawing. It is revealed that lower BHF and higher velocity are beneficial for drawability. A good agreement between simulated and experimental results has been achieved.

  15. Optimisation of Quantum Evolution Algorithms

    E-print Network

    Apoorva Patel

    2015-03-04

    Given a quantum Hamiltonian and its evolution time, the corresponding unitary evolution operator can be constructed in many different ways, corresponding to different trajectories between the desired end-points. A choice among these trajectories can then be made to obtain the best computational complexity and control over errors. As an explicit example, Grover's quantum search algorithm is described as a Hamiltonian evolution problem. It is shown that the computational complexity has a power-law dependence on error when a straightforward Lie-Trotter discretisation formula is used, and it becomes logarithmic in error when reflection operators are used. The exponential change in error control is striking, and can be used to improve many importance sampling methods. The key concept is to make the evolution steps as large as possible while obeying the constraints of the problem. In particular, we can understand why overrelaxation algorithms are superior to small step size algorithms.

  16. The Evolution of Complex Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billingham, John

    1989-01-01

    In considering the probabilities that intelligent life might exist elsewhere in the Universe, it is important to ask questions about the factors governing the emergence of complex living organisms in the context of evolutionary biology, planetary environments and events in space. Two important problems arise. First, what can be learned about the general laws governing the evolution of complex life anywhere in space by studying its history on the Earth? Second, how is the evolution of complex life affected by events in space? To address these problems, a series of Science Workshops on the Evolution of Complex Life was held at the Ames Research Center. Included in this paper are highlights of those workshops, with particular emphasis on the first question, namely the evolution of complex extraterrestrial life.

  17. The Evolution and Development of the Universe

    E-print Network

    Vidal, Clément; Blin, Alex H; Chaline, Jean; Crane, Louis; Durt, Thomas; Ekstig, Borje; Fairlamb, Horace; Greben, Jan; Hengeveld, Rob; Heylighen, Francis; Akkerhuis, Gerard Jagers op; Longo, Giuseppe; Lori, Nicolas F; Noble, Denis; Nottale, Laurent; Salthe, Stanley; Stewart, John; Vaas, Ruediger; Van de Vijver, Gertrudis; van Straalen, Nico M

    2009-01-01

    This document is the Special Issue of the First International Conference on the Evolution and Development (EDU 2008). Please refer to the preface and introduction for more details on the contributions. Keywords: acceleration, artificial cosmogenesis, artificial life, Big Bang, Big History, biological evolution, biological universe, biology, causality, classical vacuum energy, complex systems, complexity, computational universe, conscious evolution, cosmological artificial selection, cosmological natural selection, cosmology, critique, cultural evolution, dark energy, dark matter, development of the universe, development, emergence, evolution of the universe evolution, exobiology, extinction, fine-tuning, fractal space-time, fractal, information, initial conditions, intentional evolution, linear expansion of the universe, log-periodic laws, macroevolution, materialism, meduso-anthropic principle, multiple worlds, natural sciences, Nature, ontology, order, origin of the universe, particle hierarchy, philosophy,...

  18. [Cloning and law in Hungary].

    PubMed

    Julesz, Máté

    2015-03-01

    Reproductive human cloning is prohibited in Hungary, as in many other countries. Therapeutic human cloning is not prohibited, just like in many other countries. Stem cell therapy is also allowed. Article III, paragraph (3) of the Hungarian basic law (constitution) strictly forbids total human cloning. Article 1 of the Additional Protocol to the Oviedo Convention, on the Prohibition of Cloning Human Beings (1998) stipulates that any intervention seeking to create a human being genetically identical to another human being, whether living or dead, is prohibited. In Hungary, according to Article 174 of the Criminal Code, total human cloning constitutes a crime. Article 180, paragraph (3) of the Hungarian Act on Health declares that embryos shall not be brought about for research purposes; research shall be conducted only on embryos brought about for reproductive purposes when this is authorized by the persons entitled to decide upon its disposal, or when the embryo is damaged. Article 180, paragraph (5) of the Hungarian Act on Health stipulates that multiple individuals who genetically conform to one another shall not be brought about. According to Article 181, paragraph (1) of the Hungarian Act on Health, an embryo used for research shall be kept alive for not longer than 14 days, not counting the time it was frozen for storage and the time period of research. PMID:25749537

  19. A Simplified Algorithm for Statistical Investigation of Damage Spreading

    SciTech Connect

    Gecow, Andrzej

    2009-04-16

    On the way to simulating adaptive evolution of complex system describing a living object or human developed project, a fitness should be defined on node states or network external outputs. Feedbacks lead to circular attractors of these states or outputs which make it difficult to define a fitness. The main statistical effects of adaptive condition are the result of small change tendency and to appear, they only need a statistically correct size of damage initiated by evolutionary change of system. This observation allows to cut loops of feedbacks and in effect to obtain a particular statistically correct state instead of a long circular attractor which in the quenched model is expected for chaotic network with feedback. Defining fitness on such states is simple. We calculate only damaged nodes and only once. Such an algorithm is optimal for investigation of damage spreading i.e. statistical connections of structural parameters of initial change with the size of effected damage. It is a reversed-annealed method--function and states (signals) may be randomly substituted but connections are important and are preserved. The small damages important for adaptive evolution are correctly depicted in comparison to Derrida annealed approximation which expects equilibrium levels for large networks. The algorithm indicates these levels correctly. The relevant program in Pascal, which executes the algorithm for a wide range of parameters, can be obtained from the author.

  20. 7 CFR 1945.25 - Relationship between FmHA or its successor agency under Public Law 103-354 and FEMA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... under Public Law 103-354 and FEMA. 1945.25 Section 1945.25 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of... Public Law 103-354 and FEMA. (a) General. When a major disaster or emergency declaration is made by the... FmHA or its successor agency under Public Law 103-354 on losses and damages caused by an unusual...

  1. 7 CFR 1945.25 - Relationship between FmHA or its successor agency under Public Law 103-354 and FEMA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... under Public Law 103-354 and FEMA. 1945.25 Section 1945.25 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of... Public Law 103-354 and FEMA. (a) General. When a major disaster or emergency declaration is made by the... FmHA or its successor agency under Public Law 103-354 on losses and damages caused by an unusual...

  2. 7 CFR 1945.25 - Relationship between FmHA or its successor agency under Public Law 103-354 and FEMA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... under Public Law 103-354 and FEMA. 1945.25 Section 1945.25 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of... Public Law 103-354 and FEMA. (a) General. When a major disaster or emergency declaration is made by the... FmHA or its successor agency under Public Law 103-354 on losses and damages caused by an unusual...

  3. Research Report faculty of law

    E-print Network

    Tobar, Michael

    and expanding its areas of research strength. Our foci includes natural resources law, law and medicine, public entities: the Centre for Mining, Energy and Natural Resources Law, the Consumer Research Unit and the CrimeResearch Report 2012 faculty of law #12;Contents Dean's message | 01 Associate Dean's message | 03

  4. Law GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING

    E-print Network

    Fletcher, Robin

    combination of academic excellence and student engagement. The school is located in a beautiful residential spring the law school offers programs in Public International Law and International Business Law students with a wide range of experiential "hands- on" learning experiences, including our Business Law

  5. Philadelphia University Faculty of law

    E-print Network

    Philadelphia University Faculty of law Department of -------------- ---------- semester, 2007) and/or corequisite (s): Introduction to Law Course Level: Second year Credit hours: 3 Credit Hours : Introduction to Law ) Module name: English legal texts Prerequisite: Introduction to law Module number: 410232

  6. Philadelphia University Faculty of law

    E-print Network

    Philadelphia University Faculty of law Department of -------------- ---------- semester, 2007/2008 Course Syllabus Course code: 410111Course Title: Introduction to Law Course prerequisite (s) and/or corequisite (s): Sources of obligation, intro to commercial law, administration (1), Criminal law (general

  7. Philadelphia University Faculty of Law

    E-print Network

    1 Philadelphia University Faculty of Law 2004-2005 1. Awarding Institution /Body Philadelphia University 2. Teaching Institution Philadelphia University 3. University Department/Center Faculty of Law 4 Association) 5. Title of Final Award BA in Law 6. Programme Title Law 7. Modes of Attendance offered Credit

  8. INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LAW Intellectual Property

    E-print Network

    Loudon, Catherine

    faculty at UCI Law have written treatises, monographs, casebooks and articles that are regularlyINTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LAW #12;Intellectual Property Scholarship at UCI Law Consistently recognized to UC Irvine's No. 6 ranking among U.S. law school faculties for scholarly impact in 20151 -- the IP

  9. Damage evolution in particulate composite materials Karel Matouss *

    E-print Network

    Matous, Karel

    group of materials used in a variety of applications, such as automobile tires and/or solid rocket in heterogeneous solids is modeled using transformation field analysis and imperfect interface model. Stress propellant. The mechanical behavior of these materials depends upon properties of constituents and any

  10. Diffusion Processes Satisfying a Conservation Law Constraint

    SciTech Connect

    Bakosi, J.; Ristorcelli, J. R.

    2014-03-04

    We investigate coupled stochastic differential equations governing N non-negative continuous random variables that satisfy a conservation principle. In various fields a conservation law requires that a set of fluctuating variables be non-negative and (if appropriately normalized) sum to one. As a result, any stochastic differential equation model to be realizable must not produce events outside of the allowed sample space. We develop a set of constraints on the drift and diffusion terms of such stochastic models to ensure that both the non-negativity and the unit-sum conservation law constraint are satisfied as the variables evolve in time. We investigate the consequences of the developed constraints on the Fokker-Planck equation, the associated system of stochastic differential equations, and the evolution equations of the first four moments of the probability density function. We show that random variables, satisfying a conservation law constraint, represented by stochastic diffusion processes, must have diffusion terms that are coupled and nonlinear. The set of constraints developed enables the development of statistical representations of fluctuating variables satisfying a conservation law. We exemplify the results with the bivariate beta process and the multivariate Wright-Fisher, Dirichlet, and Lochner’s generalized Dirichlet processes.

  11. Diffusion Processes Satisfying a Conservation Law Constraint

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bakosi, J.; Ristorcelli, J. R.

    2014-03-04

    We investigate coupled stochastic differential equations governing N non-negative continuous random variables that satisfy a conservation principle. In various fields a conservation law requires that a set of fluctuating variables be non-negative and (if appropriately normalized) sum to one. As a result, any stochastic differential equation model to be realizable must not produce events outside of the allowed sample space. We develop a set of constraints on the drift and diffusion terms of such stochastic models to ensure that both the non-negativity and the unit-sum conservation law constraint are satisfied as the variables evolve in time. We investigate the consequencesmore »of the developed constraints on the Fokker-Planck equation, the associated system of stochastic differential equations, and the evolution equations of the first four moments of the probability density function. We show that random variables, satisfying a conservation law constraint, represented by stochastic diffusion processes, must have diffusion terms that are coupled and nonlinear. The set of constraints developed enables the development of statistical representations of fluctuating variables satisfying a conservation law. We exemplify the results with the bivariate beta process and the multivariate Wright-Fisher, Dirichlet, and Lochner’s generalized Dirichlet processes.« less

  12. Oxidative damage and carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wiczkowski, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    Oxygen is an essential element to conduct life processes but some of the metabolic byproducts e.g. reactive oxygen species (ROS), are toxic for living organisms. Endogenous ROS are produced e.g. reduction of dioxygen; some exogenous sources of radicals also exist, including nicotine and ionizing radiation. Reactive oxygen species include superoxide anion, hydroxyl radical, singlet oxygen, hydrogen peroxide and hypochlorous acid. Carcinogenesis is a multistep process. The exact reasons for the development of cancer are still unknown. Many factors contribute to the development of carcinogenesis, one of which is oxidative stress. Oxidative stress is defined as an imbalance between oxidizing agents (pro-oxidants) and antioxidants, agents that protect biomolecules against injury by pro-oxidants. When reactive oxygen species are overproduced it can damage nucleic acids, proteins and lipids. ROS are considered as a significant class of carcinogens participating in cancer initiation, promotion and progression. PMID:23788885

  13. Nowcasting Disaster Damage

    E-print Network

    Kryvasheyeu, Yury; Obradovich, Nick; Moro, Esteban; Van Hentenryck, Pascal; Fowler, James; Cebrian, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Could social media data aid in disaster response and damage assessment? Countries face both an increasing frequency and intensity of natural disasters due to climate change. And during such events, citizens are turning to social media platforms for disaster-related communication and information. Social media improves situational awareness, facilitates dissemination of emergency information, enables early warning systems, and helps coordinate relief efforts. Additionally, spatiotemporal distribution of disaster-related messages helps with real-time monitoring and assessment of the disaster itself. Here we present a multiscale analysis of Twitter activity before, during, and after Hurricane Sandy. We examine the online response of 50 metropolitan areas of the United States and find a strong relationship between proximity to Sandy's path and hurricane-related social media activity. We show that real and perceived threats -- together with the physical disaster effects -- are directly observable through the intens...

  14. Nonstrictly hyperbolic conservation laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keyfitz, Barbara Lee

    1989-11-01

    This project has centered on formulating and solving mathematical problems that arise in the study of systems of conservation laws that are not of the classical, strictly hyperbolic type. Potential applications for these results are found in models for three-phases flow in porous media, for compressible two-phase flow, and for flow in elastic and elastoplastic materials (including continuum models for granular flow). Modeling of many different flow processes has led to systems of conservation laws in which the classical assumptions breakdown in a way which leads to distrust of the models. Research in this and allied projects is directed at extending the mathematical theory of conservation laws. The practical goal of this research is to discover which models are well-posed, and, hence, to enable applied scientists to discover which are correct descriptions of various observed instabilities.

  15. Physical Laws for Mechanobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Alan D.

    2007-01-01

    Higher-level physical laws applicable to biological tissues are presented that will permit the modeling of metabolic activity at the cellular level, including variations in the mass of a tissue. Here the tissue is represented as a fluid/solid mixture, wherein molecular solutes transport within the fluid, and cells can migrate throughout the porous solid. Variations in mass can arise via exchanges in mass between the constituent phases within a control volume such that mass is conserved in the tissue overall. The governing balance laws for mass, momentum, energy, and entropy are a special case of those describing a chemically reacting mixture with diffusion. Thermodynamic constraints on the constitutive structure are addressed. Biophysics; Biomechanics; Brownian motion; Cell migration; Mixture theory; Thermodynamic laws; Tissue mechanics

  16. Primary and secondary damage to biological tissue induced by laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Laufer, G.

    1983-03-01

    A simply analytic model describing the evolution of the thermal injury during and after exposure of biological tissue to pulses of intense laser radiation is presented. Estimates for the upper and lower bounds of the extent of the thermal injury associated with protein and enzyme denaturization (secondary damage) relative to the extent of burned tissue (primary damage) are presented. The energy necessary for burn threshold and the energy required to induce both types of thermal injury increase with laser pulse duration. An optimal duration of laser pulse exists at which the extent of the secondary damage relative to the primary damage is the smallest.

  17. FTS evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Provost, David E.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on flight telerobotic servicer evolution are presented. Topics covered include: paths for FTS evolution; frequently performed actions; primary task states; EPS radiator panel installation; generic task definitions; path planning; non-contact alignment; contact planning and control; and human operator interface.

  18. Teaching Evolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryner, Jeanna

    2005-01-01

    Eighty years after the famous 1925 Scopes "monkey trial," which tested a teacher's right to discuss the theory of evolution in the classroom, evolution--and its most recent counterview, called "intelligent design"--are in the headlines again, and just about everyone seems to have an opinion. This past July, President Bush weighed in, telling…

  19. Rapid Disaster Damage Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, T. T.

    2012-07-01

    The experiences from recent disaster events showed that detailed information derived from high-resolution satellite images could accommodate the requirements from damage analysts and disaster management practitioners. Richer information contained in such high-resolution images, however, increases the complexity of image analysis. As a result, few image analysis solutions can be practically used under time pressure in the context of post-disaster and emergency responses. To fill the gap in employment of remote sensing in disaster response, this research develops a rapid high-resolution satellite mapping solution built upon a dual-scale contextual framework to support damage estimation after a catastrophe. The target objects are building (or building blocks) and their condition. On the coarse processing level, statistical region merging deployed to group pixels into a number of coarse clusters. Based on majority rule of vegetation index, water and shadow index, it is possible to eliminate the irrelevant clusters. The remaining clusters likely consist of building structures and others. On the fine processing level details, within each considering clusters, smaller objects are formed using morphological analysis. Numerous indicators including spectral, textural and shape indices are computed to be used in a rule-based object classification. Computation time of raster-based analysis highly depends on the image size or number of processed pixels in order words. Breaking into 2 level processing helps to reduce the processed number of pixels and the redundancy of processing irrelevant information. In addition, it allows a data- and tasks- based parallel implementation. The performance is demonstrated with QuickBird images captured a disaster-affected area of Phanga, Thailand by the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami are used for demonstration of the performance. The developed solution will be implemented in different platforms as well as a web processing service for operational uses.

  20. The trespasses of property law.

    PubMed

    Wall, Jesse

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to identify a limit to the appropriate application of property law to the use and storage of bodily material. I argue here that property law ought to be limited to protecting 'contingent rights' and that recent cases where property rights have been recognised in semen represent the application of property law beyond this limit. I also suggest how the law ought to develop in order to avoid the overextensive use of property law. PMID:23842078

  1. Symmetry properties of conservation laws

    E-print Network

    Stephen C. Anco

    2015-12-06

    Symmetry properties of conservation laws of partial differential equations are developed by using the general method of conservation law multipliers. As main results, simple conditions are given for characterizing when a conservation law and its associated conserved quantity are invariant (and, more generally, homogeneous) under the action of a symmetry. These results are used to show that a recent conservation law formula (due to Ibragimov) is equivalent to a standard formula for the action of an infinitesimal symmetry on a conservation law multiplier.

  2. Thermodynamics and evolution.

    PubMed

    Demetrius, L

    2000-09-01

    The science of thermodynamics is concerned with understanding the properties of inanimate matter in so far as they are determined by changes in temperature. The Second Law asserts that in irreversible processes there is a uni-directional increase in thermodynamic entropy, a measure of the degree of uncertainty in the thermal energy state of a randomly chosen particle in the aggregate. The science of evolution is concerned with understanding the properties of populations of living matter in so far as they are regulated by changes in generation time. Directionality theory, a mathematical model of the evolutionary process, establishes that in populations subject to bounded growth constraints, there is a uni-directional increase in evolutionary entropy, a measure of the degree of uncertainty in the age of the immediate ancestor of a randomly chosen newborn. This article reviews the mathematical basis of directionality theory and analyses the relation between directionality theory and statistical thermodynamics. We exploit an analytic relation between temperature, and generation time, to show that the directionality principle for evolutionary entropy is a non-equilibrium extension of the principle of a uni-directional increase of thermodynamic entropy. The analytic relation between these directionality principles is consistent with the hypothesis of the equivalence of fundamental laws as one moves up the hierarchy, from a molecular ensemble where the thermodynamic laws apply, to a population of replicating entities (molecules, cells, higher organisms), where evolutionary principles prevail. PMID:10968933

  3. Undergraduate Courses in School of Law

    E-print Network

    Banaji,. Murad

    Undergraduate Courses in School of Law Law #12;Contents 4 Start Your Journey Here 5 Why Choose Law at Leicester? 6 Degree Programmes 8 LLB Law 10 LLB Law and Criminology 11 LLB Law with Politics 12 Graduate Entry Law ("LLB Senior Status") 13 LLB Law with a Modern Language 14 LLB / Maîtrise in English

  4. What Is This Thing Called the Schmidt Law?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madore, B. F.

    2011-06-01

    The Schmidt Law has become synonymous with the parameterized rate of star formation in galaxies. We present an overview of the evolution of this idea from its origin in studies of the Milky Way to its application to spatially resolved galaxies, and then its apparent transformation to a global relation. We also look at its evolution from being a fitting formula into a predictive equation, and finally how it has been interpreted and recast in a theoretical context and then also in a computational setting for galaxy evolution modeling.

  5. Modelling long term damage in rock slopes and impact of deglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amitrano, D.; Lacroix, P.

    2014-12-01

    Long-term observations of large active rockslides show accelerating deformation over many thousands of years since the last deglaciation. The effect of deglaciation on slope stability is however poorly understood due to (1) limited long-term observations and (2) a complex interaction between glacier retreat and hydrogeological, mechanical, and morphological processes. To assess the sensitivity of rockslide dynamics to these different processes, a model of progressive damage through intact rock mass is developed in this study, based on the finite element method. This model uses time-to-failure laws based on rock laboratory creep experiments. It is able to reproduce progressive damage localization along shear bands associated with strain rate acceleration as observed during tertiary creep. The model reproduces the different phases of deformation associated with morphologies typical of large rockslides. This model is thus suitable for simulating the dynamics of large rockslides and the transition from initiation to rapid sliding. The sensitivity of rockslide kinematics and morphology to different mechanical properties is analyzed. This analysis shows that the time evolution of the rockslide can be inferred with the knowledge of only one time parameter, independent of the knowledge of the mechanical properties of the rock mass. This parameter is here chosen as the time when the summit slope displacement has reached 10 m, a parameter that can be estimated with cosmogenic dating. The model is then used to study the effects of deglaciation on the valley flank stability and the formation of large rockslides. This study shows that the deglaciation velocity can affect the morphology of the rockslide, with the shear band of the rockslide emerging at higher elevation as the velocity decreases.We also show that the response to the deglaciation can last several thousands of years after the glacier retreat.

  6. Time evolution of negative binomial optical field in diffusion channel

    E-print Network

    Liu Tang-Kun; Wu Pan-Pan; Shan Chuan-Jia; Liu Ji-Bing; Fan Hong-Yi

    2015-04-17

    We find time evolution law of negative binomial optical field in diffusion channel. We reveal that by adjusting the diffusion parameter, photon number can controlled. Therefore, the diffusion process can be considered a quantum controlling scheme through photon addition.

  7. Thresholded Power law Size Distributions of Instabilities in Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.

    2015-11-01

    Power-law-like size distributions are ubiquitous in astrophysical instabilities. There are at least four natural effects that cause deviations from ideal power law size distributions, which we model here in a generalized way: (1) a physical threshold of an instability; (2) incomplete sampling of the smallest events below a threshold x0; (3) contamination by an event-unrelated background xb; and (4) truncation effects at the largest events due to a finite system size. These effects can be modeled in the simplest terms with a “thresholded power law” distribution function (also called generalized Pareto [type II] or Lomax distribution), N(x){dx}\\propto {(x+{x}0)}-a{dx}, where x0 > 0 is positive for a threshold effect, while x0 < 0 is negative for background contamination. We analytically derive the functional shape of this thresholded power law distribution function from an exponential growth evolution model, which produces avalanches only when a disturbance exceeds a critical threshold x0. We apply the thresholded power law distribution function to terrestrial, solar (HXRBS, BATSE, RHESSI), and stellar flare (Kepler) data sets. We find that the thresholded power law model provides an adequate fit to most of the observed data. Major advantages of this model are the automated choice of the power law fitting range, diagnostics of background contamination, physical instability thresholds, instrumental detection thresholds, and finite system size limits. When testing self-organized criticality models that predict ideal power laws, we suggest including these natural truncation effects.

  8. Survey of four damage models for concrete.

    SciTech Connect

    Leelavanichkul, Seubpong; Brannon, Rebecca Moss

    2009-08-01

    Four conventional damage plasticity models for concrete, the Karagozian and Case model (K&C), the Riedel-Hiermaier-Thoma model (RHT), the Brannon-Fossum model (BF1), and the Continuous Surface Cap Model (CSCM) are compared. The K&C and RHT models have been used in commercial finite element programs many years, whereas the BF1 and CSCM models are relatively new. All four models are essentially isotropic plasticity models for which 'plasticity' is regarded as any form of inelasticity. All of the models support nonlinear elasticity, but with different formulations. All four models employ three shear strength surfaces. The 'yield surface' bounds an evolving set of elastically obtainable stress states. The 'limit surface' bounds stress states that can be reached by any means (elastic or plastic). To model softening, it is recognized that some stress states might be reached once, but, because of irreversible damage, might not be achievable again. In other words, softening is the process of collapse of the limit surface, ultimately down to a final 'residual surface' for fully failed material. The four models being compared differ in their softening evolution equations, as well as in their equations used to degrade the elastic stiffness. For all four models, the strength surfaces are cast in stress space. For all four models, it is recognized that scale effects are important for softening, but the models differ significantly in their approaches. The K&C documentation, for example, mentions that a particular material parameter affecting the damage evolution rate must be set by the user according to the mesh size to preserve energy to failure. Similarly, the BF1 model presumes that all material parameters are set to values appropriate to the scale of the element, and automated assignment of scale-appropriate values is available only through an enhanced implementation of BF1 (called BFS) that regards scale effects to be coupled to statistical variability of material properties. The RHT model appears to similarly support optional uncertainty and automated settings for scale-dependent material parameters. The K&C, RHT, and CSCM models support rate dependence by allowing the strength to be a function of strain rate, whereas the BF1 model uses Duvaut-Lion viscoplasticity theory to give a smoother prediction of transient effects. During softening, all four models require a certain amount of strain to develop before allowing significant damage accumulation. For the K&C, RHT, and CSCM models, the strain-to-failure is tied to fracture energy release, whereas a similar effect is achieved indirectly in the BF1 model by a time-based criterion that is tied to crack propagation speed.

  9. Adaptive Finite Element Methods for Continuum Damage Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Tworzydlo, W. W.; Xiques, K. E.

    1995-01-01

    The paper presents an application of adaptive finite element methods to the modeling of low-cycle continuum damage and life prediction of high-temperature components. The major objective is to provide automated and accurate modeling of damaged zones through adaptive mesh refinement and adaptive time-stepping methods. The damage modeling methodology is implemented in an usual way by embedding damage evolution in the transient nonlinear solution of elasto-viscoplastic deformation problems. This nonlinear boundary-value problem is discretized by adaptive finite element methods. The automated h-adaptive mesh refinements are driven by error indicators, based on selected principal variables in the problem (stresses, non-elastic strains, damage, etc.). In the time domain, adaptive time-stepping is used, combined with a predictor-corrector time marching algorithm. The time selection is controlled by required time accuracy. In order to take into account strong temperature dependency of material parameters, the nonlinear structural solution a coupled with thermal analyses (one-way coupling). Several test examples illustrate the importance and benefits of adaptive mesh refinements in accurate prediction of damage levels and failure time.

  10. Analysis of nonlinear deformations and damage in CFRP textile laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah, H.; Harland, A. R.; Lucas, T.; Price, D.; Silberschmidt, V. V.

    2011-07-01

    Carbon fibre-reinforced polymer (CFRP) textile composites are widely used in aerospace, automotive and construction components and structures thanks to their relatively low production costs, higher delamination and impact strength. They can also be used in various products in sports industry. These products are usually exposed to different in-service conditions such as large bending deformation and multiple impacts. Composite materials usually demonstrate multiple modes of damage and fracture due to their heterogeneity and microstructure, in contrast to more traditional homogeneous structural materials like metals and alloys. Damage evolution affects both their in-service properties and performance that can deteriorate with time. These damage modes need adequate means of analysis and investigation, the major approaches being experimental characterisation, numerical simulations and microtomography analysis. This research deals with a deformation behaviour and damage in composite laminates linked to their quasi-static bending. Experimental tests are carried out to characterise the behaviour of woven CFRP material under large-deflection bending. Two-dimensional finite element (FE) models are implemented in the commercial code Abaqus/Explicit to study the deformation behaviour and damage in woven CFRP laminates. Multiple layers of bilinear cohesive-zone elements are employed to model the onset and progression of inter-ply delamination process. X-ray Micro-Computed Tomography (MicroCT) analysis is carried out to investigate internal damage mechanisms such as cracking and delaminations. The obtained results of simulations are in agreement with experimental data and MicroCT scans.

  11. Damage in woven CFRP laminates subjected to low velocity impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah, H.; Abdel-Wahab, A. A.; Harland, A. R.; Silberschmidt, V. V.

    2012-08-01

    Carbon fabric-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites used in sports products can be exposed to different in-service conditions such as large dynamic bending deformations caused by impact loading. Composite materials subjected to such loads demonstrate various damage modes such as matrix cracking, delamination and, ultimately, fabric fracture. Damage evolution in these materials affects both their in-service properties and performance that can deteriorate with time. These processes need adequate means of analysis and investigation, the major approaches being experimental characterisation and non-destructive examination of internal damage in composite laminates. This research deals with a deformation behaviour and damage in woven composite laminates due to low-velocity dynamic out-of-plane bending. Experimental tests are carried out to characterise the behaviour of such laminates under large-deflection dynamic bending in un-notched specimens in Izod tests using a Resil Impactor. A series of low-velocity impact tests is carried out at various levels of impact energy to assess the energy absorbed and force-time response of CFRP laminates. X-ray micro computed tomography (micro-CT) is used to investigate material damage modes in the impacted specimens. X-ray tomographs revealed that through-thickness matrix cracking, inter-ply delamination and intra-ply delamination, such as tow debonding and fabric fracture, were the prominent damage modes.

  12. Treatment of anisotropic damage development within a scalar damage formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, K.S.; Bodner, S.R.; Munson, D.E.

    1996-11-01

    This paper is concerned with describing a damage mechanics formulation which provides for non-isotropic effects using a scalar damage variable. An investigation has been in progress for establishing the constitutive behavior of rock salt at long times and low to moderate confining pressures in relation to the possible use of excavated rooms in rock salt formations as repositories for nuclear waste. An important consideration is the effect of damage manifested principally by the formation of shear induced wing cracks which have a stress dependent orientation. The analytical formulation utilizes a scalar damage parameter, but is capable of indicating the non- isotropic dependence of inelastic straining on the stress state and the confining pressure. Also, the equations indicate the possibility of volumetric expansions leading to the onset of tertiary creep and eventually rupture if the damage variable reaches a critical value.

  13. Rate Sensitive Continuum Damage Models and Mesh Dependence in Finite Element Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Fagerström, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The experiences from orthogonal machining simulations show that the Johnson-Cook (JC) dynamic failure model exhibits significant element size dependence. Such mesh dependence is a direct consequence of the utilization of local damage models. The current contribution is an investigation of the extent of the possible pathological mesh dependence. A comparison of the resulting JC model behavior combined with two types of damage evolution is considered. The first damage model is the JC dynamic failure model, where the development of the “damage” does not affect the response until the critical state is reached. The second one is a continuum damage model, where the damage variable is affecting the material response continuously during the deformation. Both the plasticity and the damage models are rate dependent, and the damage evolutions for both models are defined as a postprocessing of the effective stress response. The investigation is conducted for a series of 2D shear tests utilizing different FE representations of the plane strain plate with pearlite material properties. The results show for both damage models, using realistic pearlite material parameters, that similar extent of the mesh dependence is obtained and that the possible viscous regularization effects are absent in the current investigation. PMID:25530994

  14. Whale evolution 1 Whale evolution

    E-print Network

    Gingerich, Philip D.

    6 Miocene­Recent Lipotidae Chinese river dolphins 2 Miocene­Recent Kogiidae Pygmy sperm whales 5 Miocene­Recent Acrodelphinidae Acrodelphinids 5 Miocene Physeteridae Sperm whales 17 OligoceneWhale evolution 1 Whale evolution Cetaceans, or whales (a group which includes the an- imals

  15. Shock Initiation of Damaged Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Chidester, S K; Vandersall, K S; Tarver, C M

    2009-10-22

    Explosive and propellant charges are subjected to various mechanical and thermal insults that can increase their sensitivity over the course of their lifetimes. To quantify this effect, shock initiation experiments were performed on mechanically and thermally damaged LX-04 (85% HMX, 15% Viton by weight) and PBX 9502 (95% TATB, 5% Kel-F by weight) to obtain in-situ manganin pressure gauge data and run distances to detonation at various shock pressures. We report the behavior of the HMX-based explosive LX-04 that was damaged mechanically by applying a compressive load of 600 psi for 20,000 cycles, thus creating many small narrow cracks, or by cutting wedge shaped parts that were then loosely reassembled, thus creating a few large cracks. The thermally damaged LX-04 charges were heated to 190 C for long enough for the beta to delta solid - solid phase transition to occur, and then cooled to ambient temperature. Mechanically damaged LX-04 exhibited only slightly increased shock sensitivity, while thermally damaged LX-04 was much more shock sensitive. Similarly, the insensitive explosive PBX 9502 was mechanically damaged using the same two techniques. Since PBX 9502 does not undergo a solid - solid phase transition but does undergo irreversible or 'rachet' growth when thermally cycled, thermal damage to PBX 9502 was induced by this procedure. As for LX-04, the thermally damaged PBX 9502 demonstrated a greater shock sensitivity than mechanically damaged PBX 9502. The Ignition and Growth reactive flow model calculated the increased sensitivities by igniting more damaged LX-04 and PBX 9502 near the shock front based on the measured densities (porosities) of the damaged charges.

  16. The Gas Laws

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raman, V. V.

    1973-01-01

    Inquires into the individual names and dates which are associated with the various perfect gas laws on the basis of published and historically researched works. Indicates the presence of eight features in giving a scientist credit for a scientific discovery. (CC)

  17. ADHD and School Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregg, Soleil

    A review of the research and legal literature summarizes the status of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) under school law. Following a brief introduction, discussion of ADHD as a disability notes the impact of ADHD on overall functioning and provides a table of diagnostic criteria for subtypes of ADHD. The following section focuses…

  18. Team Teaching School Law

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanko, John G.; Rogina, Raymond P.

    2005-01-01

    Graduate students preparing themselves for a career in school administration are typically apprehensive about the legal issues they will face in their first administrative position. After teaching school law for the first time, the author believed that there had to be a more effective way to reach these students rather than the traditional methods…

  19. Law and Ecomanagement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayda, Jaro

    1986-01-01

    This article argues that environmental awareness has a substantial impact on law, both as a technical discipline and as a policy process. It further develops the concept of ecomanagement and reviews the role of environmental impact assessments in policy development. (JDH)

  20. Discipline and the Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkel, Perry A.

    1996-01-01

    Some superintendents'"zero-tolerance" stance on guns, drugs, and disruptive student behavior conflicts with federal laws (Individuals with Disabilities Act and Americans with Disabilities Act), which apply a "zero-reject" policy to many categories of students with disabilities. Superintendents should revamp policies and practices and think twice…

  1. Environmental Law II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Continuing Legal Education in Colorado, Inc., Denver.

    Presented are papers delivered at a 1976 Colorado environmental law conference. Included in the publication are the conference schedule, the text of nine papers, background information on authors, and bibliography listings for each paper. Titles and topics of the papers are the following: (1) Water Resources Development and the Environment…

  2. The Law School Announcements

    E-print Network

    He, Chuan

    2011-2012 12 Lifetime Members 12 Terms Expiring in 2011­2012 13 Terms Expiring in 2012-2013 13 Terms expiring in 2013­2014 15 The Law School 15 History 16 Educational Mission 17 Programs of Instruction 17

  3. Preventive Law Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Martha V.; Gullatt, David E.; Hardin, Dawn T.; Jannik, Catherine; Tollett, John R.

    This curriculum guide presents a context for preservice education and/or professional development in education law for teachers. Section 1, "Teacher Liability," discusses "Duty to Supervise,""Providing Reasonable Care,""Duty,""Preventing Student-to-Student Sexual Harassment,""Reporting Child Abuse,""Issuing Permission Slips,""Defense for…

  4. Gauging Newton's Law

    E-print Network

    James T. Wheeler

    2003-05-01

    We derive both Lagrangian and Hamiltonian mechanics as gauge theories of Newtonian mechanics. Systematic development of the distinct symmetries of dynamics and measurement suggest that gauge theory may be motivated as a reconciliation of dynamics with measurement. Applying this principle to Newton's law with the simplest measurement theory leads to Lagrangian mechanics, while use of conformal measurement theory leads to Hamilton's equations.

  5. Demonstrating Newton's Second Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fricker, H. S.

    1994-01-01

    Describes an apparatus for demonstrating the second law of motion. Provides sample data and discusses the merits of this method over traditional methods of supplying a constant force. The method produces empirical best-fit lines which convincingly demonstrate that for a fixed mass, acceleration is proportional to force. (DDR)

  6. Athletics and the Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appenzeller, Herb

    This book answers questions concerning athletics and the law. The chapters include trends in litigation, disruptive behavior, the changing attitude of the court toward married athletes, training rules, and good conduct codes. They include the problem of athletic travel, the changing role of state athletic associations with their diverse rules,…

  7. Frictional response of a thick gouge sample: 2. Friction law and implications for faults

    E-print Network

    Schmittbuhl, Jean

    not involve any characteristic length scale. The decrease of the gouge friction coefficient m with imposed of the friction law is to prescribe the evolution of the fault effective coefficient of friction as a function-weakening laws prescribe that the coefficient of friction essentially depends on slip displacement [e.g., Palmer

  8. Eye for an Eye, A Survey History of Law, Social Studies: 6448.06.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Jerry W.

    This guide is one of a series in the Quinmester Program to aid high school teachers in planning instructional programs concerning the origins and evolution of our system of law. The purpose of this course of study is to help students understand the rights and responsibilities of citizens under the law; to motivate them to make judgments upon the…

  9. Characteristics of shear damage for 60Sn-40Pb solder material

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, H.E.; Chow, C.L.; Wei, Y.

    1997-12-31

    This paper presents an investigation of the development of a continuum damage model capable of accurately analyzing shear damage in 60Sn-40Pb solder material. Based on the theory of damage mechanics, an internal state variable known as the damage variable is introduced to characterize material degradation caused by the change of material microstructures under load. A damage surface in stress space is proposed to quantify damage initiation and its successive expanding surfaces to represent damage hardening. With the aid of irreversible thermodynamics, the damage-coupled constitutive equations and the damage evolution equations are established. A failure criterion is proposed based on the accumulation of overall damage in the material. The damage model is implemented in a general purpose finite element program ABAQUS through its user-defined material subroutine UMAT. The program is applied to predict shear deformation in a notched specimen. The predicted failure mode and maximum load agree well with those measured experimentally. The effect of finite element meshing on the numerical results is also examined and discussed.

  10. Benzophenone photosensitized DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Cuquerella, M Consuelo; Lhiaubet-Vallet, Virginie; Cadet, Jean; Miranda, Miguel A

    2012-09-18

    Although the carcinogenic potential of ultraviolet radiation is well-known, UV light may interact with DNA by direct absorption or through photosensitization by endogenous or exogenous chromophores. These chromophores can extend the "active" fraction of the solar spectrum to the UVA region and beyond, which means that photosensitizers increase the probability of developing skin cancer upon exposure to sunlight. Therefore researchers would like to understand the mechanisms involved in photosensitized DNA damage both to anticipate possible photobiological risks and to design tailor-made photoprotection strategies. In this context, photosensitized DNA damage can occur through a variety of processes including electron transfer, hydrogen abstraction, triplet-triplet energy transfer, or generation of reactive oxygen species. In this Account, we have chosen benzophenone (BP) as a classical and paradigmatic chromophore to illustrate the different lesions that photosensitization may prompt in nucleosides, in oligonucleotides, or in DNA. Thus, we discuss in detail the accumulated mechanistic evidence of the BP-photosensitized reactions of DNA or its building blocks obtained by our group and others. We also include ketoprofen (KP), a BP-derivative that possesses a chiral center, to highlight the stereodifferentiation in the key photochemical events, revealed through the dynamics of the reactive triplet excited state ((3)KP*). Our results show that irradiation of the BP chromophore in the presence of DNA or its components leads to nucleobase oxidations, cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer formation, single strand breaks, DNA-protein cross-links, or abasic sites. We attribute the manifold photoreactivity of BP to its well established photophysical properties: (i) it absorbs UV light, up to 360 nm; (ii) its intersystem crossing quantum yield (?(ISC)) is almost 1; (iii) the energy of its n?* lowest triplet excited state (E(T)) is ca. 290 kJ mol(-1); (iv) it produces singlet oxygen ((1)O(2)) with a quantum yield (?(?)) of ca. 0.3. For electron transfer and singlet oxygen reactions, we focused on guanine, the nucleobase with the lowest oxidation potential. Among the possible oxidative processes, electron transfer predominates. Conversely, triplet-triplet energy transfer occurs mainly from (3)BP* to thymine, the base with the lowest lying triplet state in DNA. This process results in the formation of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers, but it also competes with the Paternò-Büchi reaction in nucleobases or nucleosides, giving rise to oxetanes as a result of crossed cycloadditions. Interestingly, we have found significant stereodifferentiation in the quenching of the KP triplet excited state by both 2'-deoxyguanosine and thymidine. Based on these results, this chromophore shows potential as a (chiral) probe for the investigation of electron and triplet energy transport in DNA. PMID:22698517

  11. Stellar evolution.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, H.-Y. (editor); Muriel, A.

    1972-01-01

    Aspects of normal stellar evolution are discussed together with evolution near the main sequence, stellar evolution from main sequence to white dwarf or carbon ignition, the structure of massive main-sequence stars, and problems of stellar stability and stellar pulsation. Other subjects considered include variable stars, white dwarfs, close binaries, novae, early supernova luminosity, neutron stars, the photometry of field horizontal-branch stars, and stellar opacity. Transport mechanisms in stars are examined together with thermonuclear reactions and nucleosynthesis, the instability problem in nuclear burning shells, stellar coalescence, and intense magnetic fields in astrophysics. Individual items are announced in this issue.

  12. Damage characterization by vibration test

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, J.L.; Pazhouh, J.; Lin, S.B.; Burton, T.D. . Dept. of Mechanical and Materials Engineering)

    1994-04-01

    For load-bearing structural materials, damage is a generic term for the deterioration process that weakens the strength and integrity of materials. It may refer to macrocracks or to the deterioration process that precedes the formation of a dominant macrocrack, such as void nucleation and growth during creep, and plastic deformation or microcrack formation during fatigue and straining of brittle solids. Compared to a macrocrack, the latter is usually a microscopic deterioration which is somewhat distributed in nature. In damage mechanics, quite often the term damage'' only refers to the latter deterioration process, probably due to the fact that once a dominant crack is formed, structures are usually imminent to fracture. Some studies on the damage assessment of structures based on vibration test have been done. Their objective was, in general, to use the vibration test as a nondestructive evaluation tool to locate and determine the size of a cross-sectional edge or center macrocrack. The objective of the current work is to study the feasibility of using the vibration test as a tool for evaluating the overall damaged state of a solid. Experiments were first performed to study the dynamic behavior of a damaged cantilever beam under the flexural vibration mode. The experimental data were then interpreted in terms of the concept of the effective stiffness. Finally, use of a vibration test to distinguish distributed damage from localized damage is also discussed.

  13. Road Damage Following Earthquake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Ground shaking triggered liquefaction in a subsurface layer of water-saturated sand, producing differential lateral and vertical movement in a overlying carapace of unliquified sand and slit, which moved from right to left towards the Pajaro River. This mode of ground failure, termed lateral spreading, is a principal cause of liquefaction-related earthquake damage caused by the Oct. 17, 1989, Loma Prieta earthquake. Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditons that carnot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. Credit: S.D. Ellen, U.S. Geological Survey

  14. Validating Theories for Brittle Damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brannon, Rebecca M.; Wells, Joseph M.; Erik Strack, O.

    2007-12-01

    Validating simulated predictions of internal damage within armor ceramics is preferable to simply assessing a model’s ability to predict penetration depth, especially if one hopes to perform subsequent “second strike” analyses. We present the results of a study in which crack networks are seeded by using a statistically perturbed strength, the median of which is inherited from a deterministic “smeared damage” model, with adjustments to reflect experimentally established size effects. This minor alteration of an otherwise conventional damage model noticeably mitigates mesh dependencies and, at virtually no computational cost, produces far more realistic cracking patterns that are well suited for validation against X-ray computed tomography (XCT) images of internal damage patterns. For Brazilian, spall, and indentation tests, simulations share qualitative features with externally visible damage. However, the need for more stringent quantitative validation, software quality testing, and subsurface XCT validation, is emphasized.

  15. Centre for Business Law & Practice School of Law

    E-print Network

    Haase, Markus

    in many areas of business law including banking and financial services, business confidentiality, financial institutions, foreign investment, insolvency, intellectual property, international trade postgraduate taught programmes in International and European Business Law. In addition, the Centre offers

  16. Centre for Business Law and Practice School of Law

    E-print Network

    Haase, Markus

    of business law including banking and financial services, business confidentiality, corporate (general core, consumer, employment, financial institutions, foreign investment, insolvency, intellectual property and to manage postgraduate taught several programmes in International and European Business Law. In addition

  17. Monitoring asphalt pavement damages using remote sensing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mettas, Christodoulos; Themistocleous, Kyriacos; Neocleous, Kyriacos; Christofe, Andreas; Pilakoutas, Kypros; Hadjimitsis, Diofantos

    2015-06-01

    One of the main issues in the maintenance plans of road agencies or governmental organizations is the early detection of damaged asphalt pavements. The development of a smart and non-destructive systematic technique for monitoring damaged asphalt pavements is considered a main priority to fill this gap. During the 1970's, remote sensing was used to map road surface distress, while during the last decade, remote sensing became more advanced, thereby assisting in the evolution of the identification and mapping of roads. Various techniques were used in order to explore condition, age, weaknesses and imperfections of asphalted pavements. These methods were fairly successful in the classification of asphalted surfaces and in the detection of some of their characteristics. This paper explores the state of the art of using remote sensing techniques for monitoring damaged pavements and some typical spectral profiles of various asphalt pavements in Cyprus area acquired using the SVC1024 field spectroradiometer.

  18. Nondestructive Damage Evaluation in Ceramic Matrix Composites for Aerospace Applications

    PubMed Central

    Dassios, Konstantinos G.; Kordatos, Evangelos Z.; Aggelis, Dimitrios G.; Matikas, Theodore E.

    2013-01-01

    Infrared thermography (IRT) and acoustic emission (AE) are the two major nondestructive methodologies for evaluating damage in ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) for aerospace applications. The two techniques are applied herein to assess and monitor damage formation and evolution in a SiC-fiber reinforced CMC loaded under cyclic and fatigue loading. The paper explains how IRT and AE can be used for the assessment of the material's performance under fatigue. IRT and AE parameters are specifically used for the characterization of the complex damage mechanisms that occur during CMC fracture, and they enable the identification of the micromechanical processes that control material failure, mainly crack formation and propagation. Additionally, these nondestructive parameters help in early prediction of the residual life of the material and in establishing the fatigue limit of materials rapidly and accurately. PMID:23935428

  19. Nondestructive damage evaluation in ceramic matrix composites for aerospace applications.

    PubMed

    Dassios, Konstantinos G; Kordatos, Evangelos Z; Aggelis, Dimitrios G; Matikas, Theodore E

    2013-01-01

    Infrared thermography (IRT) and acoustic emission (AE) are the two major nondestructive methodologies for evaluating damage in ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) for aerospace applications. The two techniques are applied herein to assess and monitor damage formation and evolution in a SiC-fiber reinforced CMC loaded under cyclic and fatigue loading. The paper explains how IRT and AE can be used for the assessment of the material's performance under fatigue. IRT and AE parameters are specifically used for the characterization of the complex damage mechanisms that occur during CMC fracture, and they enable the identification of the micromechanical processes that control material failure, mainly crack formation and propagation. Additionally, these nondestructive parameters help in early prediction of the residual life of the material and in establishing the fatigue limit of materials rapidly and accurately. PMID:23935428

  20. Simulating Evolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stebbins, Robert C.; Allen, Brockenbrough

    1975-01-01

    Described are simulations that can be used to illustrate evolution by natural selection. Suggestions for simulating phenomena such as adaptive radiation, color match to background and vision of predators are offered. (BR)

  1. Simple model of self-organized biological evolution

    SciTech Connect

    de Boer, J.; Derrida, B.; Flyvbjerg, H.; Jackson, A.D.; Wettig, T. The Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences, 20 Clarkson Road, Cambridge, CB4 0EH Laboratoire de Physique Statistique, Ecole Normale Superieure, 24 rue Lhomond, F-75005 Paris Service de Physique Theorique, Centre de Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, F-91191, Gif-Sur-Yvette CONNECT, The Niels Bohr Institute, Blegdamsvej 17, DK-2100 Copenhagen )

    1994-08-08

    We give an exact solution of a recently proposed self-organized critical model of biological evolution. We show that the model has a power law distribution of durations of coevolutionary avalanches'' with a mean field exponent 3/2. We also calculate analytically the finite size effects which cut off this power law at times of the order of the system size.

  2. Centre for Business Law and Practice School of Law

    E-print Network

    Haase, Markus

    , intellectual property, international trade, the regulation of corporate lawyers, and corporate and economic and Finance Law LLM International Trade Law LLM European and International Business Law All postgraduate bodies and international bodies such as the International Monetary Fund. Research has been undertaken

  3. Law Behind Second Law of Thermodynamics --Unification with Cosmology--

    E-print Network

    Holger B. Nielsen; Masao Ninomiya

    2006-02-02

    In an abstract setting of a general classical mechanical system as a model for the universe we set up a general formalism for a law behind the second law of thermodynamics, i.e. really for "initial conditions". We propose a unification with the other laws by requiring similar symmetry and locality properties.

  4. LPO Law Enforcement Grow Your Law Enforcement Career With Us!

    E-print Network

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    LPO ­ Law Enforcement Grow Your Law Enforcement Career With Us! Overwaitea Food Group, who operates Loss Prevention Officers through a training program that sets each new employee up for success! If you the confidence to grow your career in Law Enforcement, join Overwaitea Food Group as a Loss Prevention Officer

  5. A metallography and x-ray tomography study of spall damage in ultrapure Al

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, M. L.; Bie, B. X.; Zhao, F. P.; Fan, D.; Luo, S. N.; Hu, C. M.; Ran, X. X.; Xiao, X. H.; Yang, W. G.; Li, P.

    2014-07-15

    We characterize spall damage in shock-recovered ultrapure Al with metallography and x-ray tomography. The measured damage profiles in ultrapure Al induced by planar impact at different shock strengths, can be described with a Gaussian function, and showed dependence on shock strengths. Optical metallography is reasonably accurate for damage profile measurements, and agrees within 10–25% with x-ray tomography. Full tomography analysis showed that void size distributions followed a power law with an exponent of ? = 1.5 ± 2.0, which is likely due to void nucleation and growth, and the exponent is considerably smaller than the predictions from percolation models.

  6. Types and Consequences of DNA Damage

    EPA Science Inventory

    This review provides a concise overview of the types of DNA damage and the molecular mechanisms by which a cell senses DNA damage, repairs the damage, converts the damage into a mutation, or dies as a consequence of unrepaired DNA damage. Such information is important in consid...

  7. Clinical light damage to the eye

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains four sections: The Nature of Light and of Light Damage to Biological Tissues; Light Damage to the Eye; Protecting the Eye from Light Damage; and Overview of Light Damage to the Eye. Some of the paper titles are: Ultraviolet-Absorbing Intraocular Lens Implants; Phototoxic Changes in the Retina; Light Damage to the Lens; and Radiation, Light, and Sight.

  8. Henry's Law and Noisy Knuckles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimbrough, Doris R.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses Henry's Law which describes the relationship between the pressure of gas and the concentration of that gas in a solution. Presents an application of Henry's Law to the cracking of knuckles. (CCM)

  9. Turning around Newton's Second Law

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goff, John Eric

    2004-01-01

    Conceptual and quantitative difficulties surrounding Newton's second law often arise among introductory physics students. Simply turning around how one expresses Newton's second law may assist students in their understanding of a deceptively simple-looking equation.

  10. The oxidative damage initiation hypothesis for meiosis.

    PubMed

    Hörandl, Elvira; Hadacek, Franz

    2013-12-01

    The maintenance of sexual reproduction in eukaryotes is still a major enigma in evolutionary biology. Meiosis represents the only common feature of sex in all eukaryotic kingdoms, and thus, we regard it a key issue for discussing its function. Almost all asexuality modes maintain meiosis either in a modified form or as an alternative pathway, and facultatively apomictic plants increase frequencies of sexuality relative to apomixis after abiotic stress. On the physiological level, abiotic stress causes oxidative stress. We hypothesize that repair of oxidative damage on nuclear DNA could be a major driving force in the evolution of meiosis. We present a hypothetical model for the possible redox chemistry that underlies the binding of the meiosis-specific protein Spo11 to DNA. During prophase of meiosis I, oxidized sites at the DNA molecule are being targeted by the catalytic tyrosine moieties of Spo11 protein, which acts like an antioxidant reducing the oxidized target. The oxidized tyrosine residues, tyrosyl radicals, attack the phosphodiester bonds of the DNA backbone causing DNA double strand breaks that can be repaired by various mechanisms. Polyploidy in apomictic plants could mitigate oxidative DNA damage and decrease Spo11 activation. Our hypothesis may contribute to explaining various enigmatic phenomena: first, DSB formation outnumbers crossovers and, thus, effective recombination events by far because the target of meiosis may be the removal of oxidative lesions; second, it offers an argument for why expression of sexuality is responsive to stress in many eukaryotes; and third, repair of oxidative DNA damage turns meiosis into an essential characteristic of eukaryotic reproduction. PMID:23995700

  11. Logic, Laws, and Life

    E-print Network

    Horner, Jack K.

    two classic issues relevant to this question: (a) whether, because of the complexity of biological phenomena, biological laws can hope to look like physical ones, and (b) whether teleological claims can be re-expressed in non-teleological form... and physical sciences must be truly distinct; but if the genetics looks like a physical theory, then at least some 207 sophistication will have been introduced into the old "reductionist" controversies. In an essay of somewhat narrower scope, "Teleology...

  12. The Quantum Newton's Law

    E-print Network

    A. Bouda; T. Djama

    2001-06-29

    Using the quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation within the framework of the equivalence postulate, we construct a Lagrangian of a quantum system in one dimension and derive a third order equation of motion representing a first integral of the quantum Newton's law. We then integrate this equation in the free particle case and compare our results to those of Floydian trajectories. Finally, we propose a quantum version of Jacobi's theorem.

  13. Ethics and Law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilacoba Ramos, Andrés

    2007-04-01

    Ethics are the set of moral rules that govern human conduct. Hegel, for his part, asserted that ethicity implied the full realization of freedom, as well as the suppression of it as arbitrariness. In this paper, we point out that, through the relation between Law and Ethics, we can discover how high are the Ethics of a society, as well as the adherence of its members to it.

  14. Laws of form draft September 8 1 Jerry Fodor and Massimo Piattelli-Palmarini

    E-print Network

    Laws of form draft September 8 1 Jerry Fodor and Massimo Piattelli-Palmarini "What Darwin Got Wrong on adaptation to the evolution of whole ontogenies, from discontinuous switches of polarity in the expression of master genes to genetic epistasis and epigenetics, just to name a few) makes the picture of evolution

  15. Equivalent damage: A critical assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laflen, J. R.; Cook, T. S.

    1982-01-01

    Concepts in equivalent damage were evaluated to determine their applicability to the life prediction of hot path components of aircraft gas turbine engines. Equivalent damage was defined as being those effects which influence the crack initiation life-time beyond the damage that is measured in uniaxial, fully-reversed sinusoidal and isothermal experiments at low homologous temperatures. Three areas of equivalent damage were examined: mean stress, cumulative damage, and multiaxiality. For each area, a literature survey was conducted to aid in selecting the most appropriate theories. Where possible, data correlations were also used in the evaluation process. A set of criteria was developed for ranking the theories in each equivalent damage regime. These criteria considered aspects of engine utilization as well as the theoretical basis and correlative ability of each theory. In addition, consideration was given to the complex nature of the loading cycle at fatigue critical locations of hot path components; this loading includes non-proportional multiaxial stressing, combined temperature and strain fluctuations, and general creep-fatigue interactions. Through applications of selected equivalent damage theories to some suitable data sets it was found that there is insufficient data to allow specific recommendations of preferred theories for general applications. A series of experiments and areas of further investigations were identified.

  16. Evolution and longevity-assurance processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, R. W.; Turturro, A.

    1981-11-01

    The role of the development of information fidelity systems in evolution is explored, with evidence that the loss in the ability to maintain the integrity of homeostasis in organisms over time, aging, is correlated with the loss in the ability to maintain integrity at the molecular biological level. Evolutionary-comparative analysis places an upper limit on the number of these systems important to the evolution of longevity in the primates, and suggests the importance of insuring the stability of information bearing macromolecules in evolution and the role of modulators of damage to these moieties in the expression of the senescent state

  17. Enforcing pollution control laws

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, C.S.; Harrington, W.; Vaughan, W.J.

    1986-01-01

    The heightened environmental consciousness of the 1970s prompted passage of a multitude of ambitious and unprecedented laws designed to clean up the environment and protect it for future generations. But beyond the mere passing of laws lay the difficult tasks of implementing, monitoring, and enforcing them. The authors of this book describe the current state of air and water pollution monitoring and enforcement activity a decade later, within the context of relevant legal, technological, and statistical developments. They mediate between the concerns of the theoretical literature-where it is generally assumed that violations are discovered and punished-and the real world-where violations are rarely discovered and almost never punished. Monitoring and enforcement procedures to date have been aimed at achieving initial rather than continuing compliance with regulations. The authors contend that it is time for a new approach focusing on the enduring problems of compliance. Economic models are used to show the extent of the difficulties involved in monitoring and enforcing pollution control laws on a continuous basis.

  18. Sexuality and the law.

    PubMed

    Portelli, C J

    1998-01-01

    Federal, state, and local laws in the US now govern almost every aspect of sexuality. This includes sexuality at the workplace, sexuality education, adolescent sexuality, access to sexuality information and sexually explicit materials, sexual orientation, and sexually transmitted disease(STD)/HIV transmission. Almost 33% of the US Supreme Court's docket this past term concerned sexuality issues. In contrast to 50 years ago, when sexuality law was confined to the criminal arena, contemporary "sex crimes" primarily relate to nonconsensual and exploitative behaviors. It is time for lawmakers, judges, lawyers, policy analysts, lobbyists, and advocates to realize they cannot legislate or litigate how, when, or why people fall in love. Rather, the role of the law should be to create and preserve models of justice and equality that seek to preserve one's individual rights to privacy and freedom to choose in matters related to one's sexuality. This includes free access to age-appropriate sexuality information, the right to marriage and children regardless of sexual orientation, comprehensive sexuality education that encompasses information about avoiding unwanted pregnancies and HIV/STDs, access to contraception and abortion, protection from sexually abusive or exploitative relationships, and access to sexual health care. PMID:12295182

  19. Requirements Evolution Empirical Analyses

    E-print Network

    Felici, Massimo

    Requirements Evolution Empirical Analyses Massimo Felici 18 July 2001, ITC-IRST/ARS, Trento, Italy Massimo Felici Requirements Evolution ITC-IRST/ARS #12;Requirements Evolution 1 Overview · Why Requirements Evolution? · Empirical Requirements Evolution: Two Industrial Case Studies · Discussion

  20. Estimating bird damage from damage incidence in wine grape vineyards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeHaven, R.W.; Hothem, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    Bird damage was measured during 1977 and 1978 at 32 wine grape vineyards in the San Joaquin Valley and North Coastal Region of California. Both the percentage bird loss (PBL) and the percentage of bunches damaged (BDI = bird damage incidence) were determined during 55 total-damage assessments, and the resulting data pairs were used to develop a regression of PBL on BDI. The final prediction equation was loge (PBL + 1) = 0.0385 BDI, for which the SE = 9.6297 10-4, and it accounted for 97% of the observed variation. We conclude that by using that equation, reasonably accurate predictions of PBL can be obtained from relatively quick and inexpensive estimates of BDI. Guidelines for the use of the prediction method and the accuracy of some PBL predictions are discussed.

  1. Hubble's Law Implies Benford's Law for Distances to Stars

    E-print Network

    Fox, Ronald F

    2014-01-01

    A recent article by Alexopoulos and Leontsinis presented empirical evidence that the distances to stars listed in the 2011 HYG database "follow well the probabilities predicted by Benford's law", the well known logarithmic statistical distribution of significant digits. The purpose of the present article is to give a theoretical explanation, based on Hubble's law and mathematical properties of Benford's law, why star distances might be expected to follow Benford's law. Conversely, with the logical derivation given here, the empirical observations may be viewed as new independent evidence of the validity of Hubble's law.

  2. Kinetics of wealth and the Pareto law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boghosian, Bruce M.

    2014-04-01

    An important class of economic models involve agents whose wealth changes due to transactions with other agents. Several authors have pointed out an analogy with kinetic theory, which describes molecules whose momentum and energy change due to interactions with other molecules. We pursue this analogy and derive a Boltzmann equation for the time evolution of the wealth distribution of a population of agents for the so-called Yard-Sale Model of wealth exchange. We examine the solutions to this equation by a combination of analytical and numerical methods and investigate its long-time limit. We study an important limit of this equation for small transaction sizes and derive a partial integrodifferential equation governing the evolution of the wealth distribution in a closed economy. We then describe how this model can be extended to include features such as inflation, production, and taxation. In particular, we show that the model with taxation exhibits the basic features of the Pareto law, namely, a lower cutoff to the wealth density at small values of wealth, and approximate power-law behavior at large values of wealth.

  3. Kinetics of wealth and the Pareto law.

    PubMed

    Boghosian, Bruce M

    2014-04-01

    An important class of economic models involve agents whose wealth changes due to transactions with other agents. Several authors have pointed out an analogy with kinetic theory, which describes molecules whose momentum and energy change due to interactions with other molecules. We pursue this analogy and derive a Boltzmann equation for the time evolution of the wealth distribution of a population of agents for the so-called Yard-Sale Model of wealth exchange. We examine the solutions to this equation by a combination of analytical and numerical methods and investigate its long-time limit. We study an important limit of this equation for small transaction sizes and derive a partial integrodifferential equation governing the evolution of the wealth distribution in a closed economy. We then describe how this model can be extended to include features such as inflation, production, and taxation. In particular, we show that the model with taxation exhibits the basic features of the Pareto law, namely, a lower cutoff to the wealth density at small values of wealth, and approximate power-law behavior at large values of wealth. PMID:24827290

  4. On Bode's law

    E-print Network

    R. Bass; A. Del Popolo

    2004-07-23

    In a planetary or satellite system, idealized as n small bodies in initially coplanar, concentric orbits around a large central body, obeying Newtonian point-particle mechanics, resonant perturbations will cause dynamical evolution of the orbital radii except under highly specific mutual relationships, here derived analytically.

  5. Higher Education and the Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Harry T.; Nordin, Virginia Davis

    The proliferation of laws, regulations, and judicial opinions affecting higher education and the nature of the impact of these laws on the academic community are examined. Designed for use by both students and practitioners, the book employs the "case method" design based on the belief that law cases furnish the best sources for study and review…

  6. School of Law Reykjavk University

    E-print Network

    Karlsson, Brynjar

    in antitrust matters. The ECHR perspective. Panel talk at St. Gallen International Competition Law Forum ICF1 School of Law Reykjavík University SUMMARY - ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORTS 2012 Arnar Þór Jónsson LL Boundary Agreements. International & Comparative Law Quarterly (accepted). Bjarni Mar Magnusson. Judgement

  7. Whats Inside: Child Labor Laws

    E-print Network

    Whats Inside: Child Labor Laws Annual Performance Review BDS Reminders All International Part- Time are under the age of eighteen (18). The Oklahoma Department of Labor has specific child labor laws work up to eight hours a day, 40 hours in any one week, and only between the hours of CHILD LABOR LAWS

  8. Whats Inside: Child Labor Laws

    E-print Network

    Whats Inside: · Child Labor Laws · Computer Training Update · Annual Performance Review · Meet the age of eighteen (18). The Oklahoma Department of Labor has specific child labor laws that apply. Below) 744-5373. CHILD LABOR LAWS ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REVIEW Policy and Procedures 3-0741, Performance

  9. Chemical Laws Academic Resource Center

    E-print Network

    Heller, Barbara

    Chemical Laws Academic Resource Center #12;Chemical Law · Chemical reactions are governed and volume of a gas, if the temperature is kept constant within a closed system · The mathematical equation by the equation below: p1v1 = p2v2 #12;Boyle's Law (Cont.) · It is important to remember that the temperature

  10. Philadelphia University Faculty of law

    E-print Network

    Philadelphia University Faculty of law Department of -------------- ---------- semester, 2007/2008 Course Syllabus Course code: 410237Course Title: History of Law Course prerequisite (s) and/or corequisite (s): Introduction to Law Course Level: Second year Credit hours: 3 Credit HoursLecture Time

  11. Philadelphia University Faculty of law

    E-print Network

    Philadelphia University Faculty of law Department of -------------- ---------- semester, 2007/or corequisite (s): Law of Civil Procedures Course Level: Fourth year Credit hours: 3 Credit HoursLecture Time applications Prerequisite: Civil law of procedure Module number: 410494 Module number: 410391 This course

  12. Philadelphia University Faculty of Law

    E-print Network

    1 Philadelphia University Faculty of Law PROGRAM HANDBOOK 2004-2005 Philadelphia University Mission Faculty of Law Mission Programme Aims and Objectives Admissions' Criteria Programme Policy Programme, and the Association of Islamic Universities. Faculty of Law Mission The Faculty's most basic and vital aim

  13. Philadelphia University Faculty of law

    E-print Network

    Philadelphia University Faculty of law Department of -------------- ---------- semester, 2007/2008 Course Syllabus Course code: 420242 Course Title: Public International Law 2 Course prerequisite (s) and/or corequisite (s): public international law 1 Course Level: Second year Credit hours: 3 Credit HoursLecture Time

  14. Philadelphia University Faculty of law

    E-print Network

    Philadelphia University Faculty of law Department of -------------- ---------- semester, 2007/2008 Course Syllabus Course code: 410424Course Title: Maritime Law Course prerequisite (s) and/or corequisite (s): : Introduction to Commercial Law Course Level: Third Year Credit hours: 3 Credit Hours

  15. Philadelphia University Faculty of law

    E-print Network

    Philadelphia University Faculty of law Department of -------------- ---------- semester, 2007/2008 Course Syllabus Course code: Course Title: Administrative Law 2: Course prerequisite (s) and/or corequisite (s): Administrative Law 1 Course Level: Third Year Credit hours: 3 Credit HoursLecture Time

  16. Philadelphia University Faculty of law

    E-print Network

    Philadelphia University Faculty of law Department of -------------- ---------- semester, 2007 to commercial law Module number: 330270 This course deals with both commercial and industrial property as two branches of intellectual property within the scope of private law, which is characterized by its non

  17. Philadelphia University Faculty of law

    E-print Network

    Philadelphia University Faculty of law Department of -------------- ---------- semester, 2007/2008 Course Syllabus Course code: 420493 Course Title: : Law of criminal procedures Course prerequisite (s.dayyat@philadelphia.edu.jo312 Assistant Professor Dr. Sameerah Dayyat Course module description: Module name: Criminal law

  18. Philadelphia University Faculty of law-

    E-print Network

    Philadelphia University Faculty of law- Department of -------------- ---------- semester, 2007/2008 Course Syllabus Course code: 420161Course Title: Administrative Law 1 Course prerequisite (s) and/or corequisite (s): Introduction to Law Course Level: Second Year Credit hours: 3 Credit HoursLecture Time

  19. PHILADELPHIA UNIVERSITY Faculty of Law

    E-print Network

    PHILADELPHIA UNIVERSITY Faculty of Law QUALITY MANAGEMENT HANDBOOK #12;Philadelphia-University Faculty of Law 2004-2005 Quality Management Handbook For the Academic Year 2004-2005 #12;CONTENTS Preface Mission of the University Mission of the Faculty of Law Curriculum Design, Content, and Organization

  20. Law GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING

    E-print Network

    Fletcher, Robin

    FACULTY OF Law· GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE · EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING · INTERDISCIPLINARY OPPORTUNITIES 2015; WELCOME TO QUEEN'S LAW For students seeking an engaging and transformational learning experience, Queen's Faculty of Law is the school of choice. Our residential setting in Kingston allows our students to live

  1. Freedom under Law. Revised edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denver Public Schools, CO.

    This pamphlet identifies and explains Colorado laws as they apply to juveniles and adults. The handbook was specifically developed to help teenagers know how the laws protect them and how they are expected to comply with them. Two short sections discuss the necessity of having laws and give definitions of 12 legal terms such as felony and petty…

  2. Immigration Law & the American Dream.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrini, Michelle, Ed.; Parins, Claire, Ed.; Kittlaus, Jennifer, Ed.; Bliss, Pam, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    This magazine is designed to help high school teachers of civics, government, history, law, and law-related education program developers educate students about legal issues. This issue focuses on immigration law and the American Dream. It includes 11 articles: (1) "U.S. Immigration Policy and Globalization" (P. Martin; S. Martin) explains how the…

  3. FINANCIAL AID FOR LAW SCHOOL

    E-print Network

    FINANCIAL AID FOR LAW SCHOOL: A PRELIMINARY GUIDE LSAC.org #12;INTRODUCTION Legal education education is the financial aid office (or the website) of any LSAC-member law school. LSAC.org provides links to many law schools as well as several good sources of financial aid information. The cost

  4. Bragg's Law & By Nathan Brummel

    E-print Network

    Budker, Dmitry

    & William Henry Bragg came up with Bragg's Law Nobel Prize in physics in 1914 Bragg's Law is simple & Elegant Confirmed the existence of real particles at the atomic scale Sir William Bragg William Henry Diffraction · Diffractometer · The Electron Microscope #12;Bragg's Law #12;In 1913 William Lawrence Bragg

  5. Estimation in the Power Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Hoben

    1981-01-01

    Psychophysicists neglect to consider how error should be characterized in applications of the power law. Failures of the power law to agree with certain theoretical predictions are examined. A power law with lognormal product structure is proposed and approximately unbiased parameter estimates given for several common estimation situations.…

  6. On Proebsting's Law Kevin Scott

    E-print Network

    Huang, Wei

    that the capacity of semiconductor ICs doubled every 18 to 24 months. This trend, now known as Moore's Law, has held to Moore's Law, a program executed on a 25-year-old computer would run almost 80,000 times more slowly thanOn Proebsting's Law Kevin Scott Department of Computer Science Technical Report CS-2001

  7. COLLEGE OF LAW UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES

    E-print Network

    Harman, Neal.A.

    Student Survey 2013 94% SATISFACTION SWANSEA LAW I LLB PROGRAMMES 2 #12;SWANSEA LAW I LLB PROGRAMMES 4 www that law schools serve an essential function in the promotion of justice. I encourage you to consider they were satisfied with the course. This ranks us among the top twenty for student satisfaction

  8. Simulation of Anisotropic Rock Damage for Geologic Fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busetti, S.; Xu, H.; Arson, C. F.

    2014-12-01

    A continuum damage model for differential stress-induced anisotropic crack formation and stiffness degradation is used to study geologic fracturing in rocks. The finite element-based model solves for deformation in the quasi-linear elastic domain and determines the six component damage tensor at each deformation increment. The model permits an isotropic or anisotropic intact or pre-damaged reference state, and the elasticity tensor evolves depending on the stress path. The damage variable, similar to Oda's fabric tensor, grows when the surface energy dissipated by three-dimensional opened cracks exceeds a threshold defined at the appropriate scale of the representative elementary volume (REV). At the laboratory or wellbore scale (<1m) brittle continuum damage reflects microcracking, grain boundary separation, grain crushing, or fine delamination, such as in shale. At outcrop (1m-100m), seismic (10m-1000m), and tectonic (>1000m) scales the damaged REV reflects early natural fracturing (background or tectonic fracturing) or shear strain localization (fault process zone, fault-tip damage, etc.). The numerical model was recently benchmarked against triaxial stress-strain data from laboratory rock mechanics tests. However, the utility of the model to predict geologic fabric such as natural fracturing in hydrocarbon reservoirs was not fully explored. To test the ability of the model to predict geological fracturing, finite element simulations (Abaqus) of common geologic scenarios with known fracture patterns (borehole pressurization, folding, faulting) are simulated and the modeled damage tensor is compared against physical fracture observations. Simulated damage anisotropy is similar to that derived using fractured rock-mass upscaling techniques for pre-determined fracture patterns. This suggests that if model parameters are constrained with local data (e.g., lab, wellbore, or reservoir domain), forward modeling could be used to predict mechanical fabric at the relevant REV scale. This reference fabric also can be used as the starting material property to pre-condition subsequent deformation or fluid flow. Continuing efforts are to expand the present damage model to couple damage evolution with plasticity and with permeability for more geologically realistic simulation.

  9. Earthquake damage to transportation systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCullough, Heather

    1994-01-01

    Earthquakes represent one of the most destructive natural hazards known to man. A large magnitude earthquake near a populated area can affect residents over thousands of square kilometers and cause billions of dollars in property damage. Such an event can kill or injure thousands of residents and disrupt the socioeconomic environment for months, sometimes years. A serious result of a large-magnitude earthquake is the disruption of transportation systems, which limits post-disaster emergency response. Movement of emergency vehicles, such as police cars, fire trucks and ambulances, is often severely restricted. Damage to transportation systems is categorized below by cause including: ground failure, faulting, vibration damage, and tsunamis.

  10. [Damage control in vascular trauma].

    PubMed

    Henzan, Eisei

    2002-07-01

    During the era of frequent occurrence of motor vehicle accidents and criminal injuries with lethal weapons, trauma surgeons have accumulated much experience in managing severely injured victims. Very often, efforts to proceed with definitive repair at initial surgery led to patient death despite the control of anatomic bleeding. Damage control methods were thus developed to save patients who otherwise would hove died. Damage control treatment for vascular trauma patients is still in its infancy in Japan. This paper presents an overview of the relevant reports form international journals dealing with the present status of damage control methods in vascular trauma patients. PMID:12143290

  11. Micromechanics-Based Damage Analysis of Fracture in Ti5553 Alloy with Application to Bolted Sectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettaieb, Mohamed Ben; Van Hoof, Thibaut; Minnebo, Hans; Pardoen, Thomas; Dufour, Philippe; Jacques, Pascal J.; Habraken, Anne Marie

    2015-03-01

    A physics-based, uncoupled damage model is calibrated using cylindrical notched round tensile specimens made of Ti5553 and Ti-6Al-4V alloys. The fracture strain of Ti5553 is lower than for Ti-6Al-4V in the full range of stress triaxiality. This lower ductility originates from a higher volume fraction of damage sites. By proper heat treatment, the fracture strain of Ti5553 increases by almost a factor of two, as a result of a larger damage nucleation stress. This result proves the potential for further optimization of the damage resistance of the Ti5553 alloy. The damage model is combined with an elastoviscoplastic law in order to predict failure in a wide range of loading conditions. In particular, a specific application involving bolted sectors is addressed in order to determine the potential of replacing the Ti-6Al-4V by the Ti5553 alloy.

  12. Scaling in a Model of Material Damage with Healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gran, J. D.

    2009-12-01

    A variety of studies have modeled the physics of material deformation and damage as examples of generalized phase transitions, involving either critical phenomena or spinodal nucleation. Here we study a model for frictional sliding with interactions R>>1 and recurrent damage that is parameterized by a process of damage and partial healing during sliding. We define a mapping to a percolation transition, and show that the scaling exponents are, within measurement error, the same as for mean field percolation and spinodal nucleation. We also examine finite size effects, and show that the values of the scaling exponents correctly approach the values for spinodal nucleation as lattice size L is increased for fixed R. The probability of gridsize events vs the weakening parameter adjusted by the critical weakening value. The plot is on a logarithmic scale emphasizing the power-law dependence of P(h-hc) with a scaling exponent ? = 1. The second region of increasing P(h-hc) is fit to an exponential curve. The inter-event intervals for the simulation with weakening parameter h = 0.074. An inter-event interval is defined as the number of micro-events occurring between two events whose area's are greater than a minimum cutoff size. The cutoff event size here is 15 sites. The plot shows the frequency of inter-event intervals has a power-law dependence on the size of the interval with a scaling exponent near 2.

  13. Children's Law Certificate Program Graduation Checklist

    E-print Network

    Almor, Amit

    Children's Law Certificate Program Graduation Checklist Name: _________________________ VIP ID: _________________ Children's Law Certificate required courses (minimum of 4): · Students must complete at least four courses from the Children's Law

  14. A coupled mechanical and chemical damage model for concrete affected by alkali–silica reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Pignatelli, Rossella; Lombardi Ingegneria S.r.l., Via Giotto 36, 20145 Milano ; Comi, Claudia; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.

    2013-11-15

    To model the complex degradation phenomena occurring in concrete affected by alkali–silica reaction (ASR), we formulate a poro-mechanical model with two isotropic internal variables: the chemical and the mechanical damage. The chemical damage, related to the evolution of the reaction, is caused by the pressure generated by the expanding ASR gel on the solid concrete skeleton. The mechanical damage describes the strength and stiffness degradation induced by the external loads. As suggested by experimental results, degradation due to ASR is considered to be localized around reactive sites. The effect of the degree of saturation and of the temperature on the reaction development is also modeled. The chemical damage evolution is calibrated using the value of the gel pressure estimated by applying the electrical diffuse double-layer theory to experimental values of the surface charge density in ASR gel specimens reported in the literature. The chemo-damage model is first validated by simulating expansion tests on reactive specimens and beams; the coupled chemo-mechanical damage model is then employed to simulate compression and flexure tests results also taken from the literature. -- Highlights: •Concrete degradation due to ASR in variable environmental conditions is modeled. •Two isotropic internal variables – chemical and mechanical damage – are introduced. •The value of the swelling pressure is estimated by the diffuse double layer theory. •A simplified scheme is proposed to relate macro- and microscopic properties. •The chemo-mechanical damage model is validated by simulating tests in literature.

  15. The Bayesian Second Law of Thermodynamics

    E-print Network

    Bartolotta, Anthony; Leichenauer, Stefan; Pollack, Jason

    2015-01-01

    We derive a generalization of the Second Law of Thermodynamics that uses Bayesian updates to explicitly incorporate the effects of a measurement of a system at some point in its evolution. By allowing an experimenter's knowledge to be updated by the measurement process, this formulation resolves a tension between the fact that the entropy of a statistical system can sometimes fluctuate downward and the information-theoretic idea that knowledge of a stochastically-evolving system degrades over time. The Bayesian Second Law can be written as $\\Delta H(\\rho_m, \\rho) + \\langle \\mathcal{Q}\\rangle_{F|m}\\geq 0$, where $\\Delta H(\\rho_m, \\rho)$ is the change in the cross entropy between the original phase-space probability distribution $\\rho$ and the measurement-updated distribution $\\rho_m$, and $\\langle \\mathcal{Q}\\rangle_{F|m}$ is the expectation value of a generalized heat flow out of the system. We also derive refined versions of the Second Law that bound the entropy increase from below by a non-negative number, ...

  16. The Bayesian Second Law of Thermodynamics

    E-print Network

    Anthony Bartolotta; Sean M. Carroll; Stefan Leichenauer; Jason Pollack

    2015-11-18

    We derive a generalization of the Second Law of Thermodynamics that uses Bayesian updates to explicitly incorporate the effects of a measurement of a system at some point in its evolution. By allowing an experimenter's knowledge to be updated by the measurement process, this formulation resolves a tension between the fact that the entropy of a statistical system can sometimes fluctuate downward and the information-theoretic idea that knowledge of a stochastically-evolving system degrades over time. The Bayesian Second Law can be written as $\\Delta H(\\rho_m, \\rho) + \\langle \\mathcal{Q}\\rangle_{F|m}\\geq 0$, where $\\Delta H(\\rho_m, \\rho)$ is the change in the cross entropy between the original phase-space probability distribution $\\rho$ and the measurement-updated distribution $\\rho_m$, and $\\langle \\mathcal{Q}\\rangle_{F|m}$ is the expectation value of a generalized heat flow out of the system. We also derive refined versions of the Second Law that bound the entropy increase from below by a non-negative number, as well as Bayesian versions of the Jarzynski equality. We demonstrate the formalism using simple analytical and numerical examples.

  17. Chemical Laws, Idealization and Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, Emma

    2013-07-01

    This paper examines the notion of laws in chemistry. Vihalemm ( Found Chem 5(1):7-22, 2003) argues that the laws of chemistry are fundamentally the same as the laws of physics they are all ceteris paribus laws which are true "in ideal conditions". In contrast, Scerri (2000) contends that the laws of chemistry are fundamentally different to the laws of physics, because they involve approximations. Christie ( Stud Hist Philos Sci 25:613-629, 1994) and Christie and Christie ( Of minds and molecules. Oxford University Press, New York, pp. 34-50, 2000) agree that the laws of chemistry are operationally different to the laws of physics, but claim that the distinction between exact and approximate laws is too simplistic to taxonomise them. Approximations in chemistry involve diverse kinds of activity and often what counts as a scientific law in chemistry is dictated by the context of its use in scientific practice. This paper addresses the question of what makes chemical laws distinctive independently of the separate question as to how they are related to the laws of physics. From an analysis of some candidate ceteris paribus laws in chemistry, this paper argues that there are two distinct kinds of ceteris paribus laws in chemistry; idealized and approximate chemical laws. Thus, while Christie ( Stud Hist Philos Sci 25:613-629, 1994) and Christie and Christie ( Of minds and molecules. Oxford University Press, New York, pp. 34--50, 2000) are correct to point out that the candidate generalisations in chemistry are diverse and heterogeneous, a distinction between idealizations and approximations can nevertheless be used to successfully taxonomise them.

  18. Freezing Spring Temperatures Damage Knobcone Pine

    E-print Network

    Freezing Spring Temperatures Damage Knobcone Pine Stanley L. Krugman U. S. FOREST SERVICE RESEARCH, Stanley L. 1966. Freezing spring temperatures damage knobcone pine conelets. Berkeley, Calif.. Pacific pine, conelets, freezing temperature) Krugman, Stanley L. 1966. Freezing spring temperatures damage

  19. An integrated physiology model to study regional lung damage effects and the physiologic response

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This work expands upon a previously developed exercise dynamic physiology model (DPM) with the addition of an anatomic pulmonary system in order to quantify the impact of lung damage on oxygen transport and physical performance decrement. Methods A pulmonary model is derived with an anatomic structure based on morphometric measurements, accounting for heterogeneous ventilation and perfusion observed experimentally. The model is incorporated into an existing exercise physiology model; the combined system is validated using human exercise data. Pulmonary damage from blast, blunt trauma, and chemical injury is quantified in the model based on lung fluid infiltration (edema) which reduces oxygen delivery to the blood. The pulmonary damage component is derived and calibrated based on published animal experiments; scaling laws are used to predict the human response to lung injury in terms of physical performance decrement. Results The augmented dynamic physiology model (DPM) accurately predicted the human response to hypoxia, altitude, and exercise observed experimentally. The pulmonary damage parameters (shunt and diffusing capacity reduction) were fit to experimental animal data obtained in blast, blunt trauma, and chemical damage studies which link lung damage to lung weight change; the model is able to predict the reduced oxygen delivery in damage conditions. The model accurately estimates physical performance reduction with pulmonary damage. Conclusions We have developed a physiologically-based mathematical model to predict performance decrement endpoints in the presence of thoracic damage; simulations can be extended to estimate human performance and escape in extreme situations. PMID:25044032

  20. Behind the Evolution/Creation Controversy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Franklin

    This paper discusses the historical background of the creationist movement, presents Federal Judge Overton's analysis of why and how the Creationists got the equal time evolution/creation teaching law passed in Arkansas, and examines how scientists and educators are reacting to the controversy. Creationists were set back when Overton declared…