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Sample records for damage mechanics formulation

  1. Treatment of anisotropic damage development within a scalar damage formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, K. S.; Bodner, S. R.; Munson, D. E.

    This paper is concerned with describing a damage mechanics formulation which provides for non-isotropic effects using a scalar damage variable. An investigation has been in progress for establishing the constitutive behavior of rock salt at long times and low to moderate confining pressures in relation to the possible use of excavated rooms in rock salt formations as repositories for nuclear waste. An important consideration is the effect of damage manifested principally by the formation of shear induced wing cracks which have a stress dependent orientation. The analytical formulation utilizes a scalar damage parameter, but is capable of indicating the non-isotropic dependence of inelastic straining on the stress state and the confining pressure. Also, the equations indicate the possibility of volumetric expansions leading to the onset of tertiary creep and eventually rupture if the damage variable reaches a critical value.

  2. Operator Formulation of Classical Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohn, Jack

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the construction of an operator formulation of classical mechanics which is directly concerned with wave packets in configuration space and is more similar to that of convential quantum theory than other extant operator formulations of classical mechanics. (Author/HM)

  3. Damage mechanics in engineering materials

    SciTech Connect

    Voyiadjis, G.Z.; Woody Ju, J.W.; Chaboche, J.L.

    1998-12-31

    This book contains thirty peer-reviewed papers that are based on the presentations made at the symposium on Damage Mechanics in Engineering Materials on the occasion of the Joint ASME/ASCE/SES Mechanics Conference (McNU97), held in Evanston, Illinois, June 28--July 2, 1997. The key area of discussion was on the constitutive modeling of damage mechanics in engineering materials encompassing the following topics: macromechanics/micromechanical constitutive modeling, experimental procedures, numerical modeling, inelastic behavior, interfaces, damage, fracture, failure, computational methods. The book is divided into six parts: study of damage mechanics; localization and damage; damage in brittle materials; damage in metals and metal matrix composites; computational aspects of damage models; damage in polymers and elastomers.

  4. Finite strain formulation of viscoelastic damage model for simulation of fabric reinforced polymers under dynamic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treutenaere, S.; Lauro, F.; Bennani, B.; Matsumoto, T.; Mottola, E.

    2015-09-01

    The use of fabric reinforced polymers in the automotive industry is growing significantly. The high specific stiffness and strength, the ease of shaping as well as the great impact performance of these materials widely encourage their diffusion. The present model increases the predictability of explicit finite element analysis and push the boundaries of the ongoing phenomenological model. Carbon fibre composites made up various preforms were tested by applying different mechanical load up to dynamic loading. This experimental campaign highlighted the physical mechanisms affecting the initial mechanical properties, namely intra- and interlaminar matrix damage, viscoelasticty and fibre failure. The intralaminar behaviour model is based on the explicit formulation of the matrix damage model developed by the ONERA as the given damage formulation correlates with the experimental observation. Coupling with a Maxwell-Wiechert model, the viscoelasticity is included without losing the direct explicit formulation. Additionally, the model is formulated under a total Lagrangian scheme in order to maintain consistency for finite strain. Thus, the material frame-indifference as well as anisotropy are ensured. This allows reorientation of fibres to be taken into account particularly for in-plane shear loading. Moreover, fall within the framework of the total Lagrangian scheme greatly makes the parameter identification easier, as based on the initial configuration. This intralaminar model thus relies upon a physical description of the behaviour of fabric composites and the numerical simulations show a good correlation with the experimental results.

  5. Hamiltonian formulations and symmetries in rod mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Dichmann, D.J.; Li, Yiwei; Maddocks, J.H.

    1996-12-31

    This article provides a survey of contemporary rod mechanics, including both dynamic and static theories. Much of what we discuss is regarded as classic material within the mechanics community, but the objective here is to provide a self-contained account accessible to workers interested in modelling DNA. We also describe a number of recent results and computations involving rod mechanics that have been obtained by our group at the University of Maryland. This work was largely motivated by applications to modelling DNA, but our approach reflects a background of research in continuum mechanics. In particular, we emphasize the role that Hamiltonian formulations and symmetries play in the effective computation of special solutions, conservation laws of dynamics and integrals of statics. 41 refs., 10 figs.

  6. Theories of elastoplasticity coupled with continuum damage mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, N. R.

    1993-01-01

    Inelastic material constitutive relations for elastoplasticity coupled with continuum damage mechanics are investigated. For elastoplasticity, continuum damage mechanics, and the coupled formulations, rigorous thermodynamic frameworks are derived. The elastoplasticity framework is shown to be sufficiently general to encompass J(sub 2) plasticity theories including general isotropic and kinematic hardening relations. The concepts of an intermediate undamaged configuration and a fictitious deformation gradient are used to develop a damage representation theory. An empirically-based, damage evolution theory is proposed to overcome some observed deficiencies. Damage deactivation, which is the negation of the effects of damage under certain loading conditions, is investigated. An improved deactivation algorithm is developed for both damaged elasticity and coupled elastoplasticity formulations. The applicability of coupled formulations is validated by comparing theoretical predictions to experimental data for a spectrum of materials and loads paths. The pressure-dependent brittle-to-ductile transitional behavior of concrete is replicated. The deactivation algorithm is validated using tensile and compression data for concrete. For a ductile material, the behavior of an aluminum alloy is simulated including the temperature-dependent ductile-to-brittle behavior features. The direct application of a coupled model to fatigue is introduced. In addition, the deactivation algorithm in conjunction with an assumed initial damage and strain is introduced as a novel method of simulating the densification phenomenon in cellular solids.

  7. Immunoglobulin: production, mechanisms of action and formulations

    PubMed Central

    Novaretti, Marcia Cristina Zago; Dinardo, Carla Luana

    2011-01-01

    Human immunoglobulin (Ig) began to be applied in the clinical practice with the treatment of primary immunodeficiencies. Quickly, applications of Ig increased, as its anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory functions were elucidated. Currently, Ig is the most commonly used blood product. Ig is obtained by processing plasma; methods, in particular, techniques to reduce plasma viral loads have been evolving over the years and include: pasteurization, solvent/ detergent treatment, caprylic acid treatment and nanofiltration. These methods contribute to increased safety and quality of blood products. The mechanisms of action of Ig not only involve the blockade of Fc receptors of phagocytes, but also control complement pathways, idiotype-anti-idiotype dimer formation, blockage of superantigen binding to T cells, inhibition of dendritic cells and stimulation of regulatory T cells (Tregs). There are several formulations of Ig available, each one with its own peculiar characteristics. In Brazil, there is stringent legislation regulating the quality of Ig. Only Ig products that completely fulfill the quality control criteria are released for use. These standards involve different tests from visual inspection to determination of anti-complementary activity. This paper will further review the history and current status of Ig, including its production and mechanisms of action. The formulations available in Brazil and also the criteria of quality control currently applied will be presented. PMID:23049343

  8. Recent Advances in Composite Damage Mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reifsnider, Ken; Case, Scott; Iyengar, Nirmal

    1996-01-01

    The state of the art and recent developments in the field of composite material damage mechanics are reviewed, with emphasis on damage accumulation. The kinetics of damage accumulation are considered with emphasis on the general accumulation of discrete local damage events such as single or multiple fiber fractures or microcrack formation. The issues addressed include: how to define strength in the presence of widely distributed damage, and how to combine mechanical representations in order to predict the damage tolerance and life of engineering components. It is shown that a damage mechanics approach can be related to the thermodynamics of the damage accumulation processes in composite laminates subjected to mechanical loading and environmental conditions over long periods of time.

  9. On the formulation, parameter identification and numerical integration of the EMMI model :plasticity and isotropic damage.

    SciTech Connect

    Bammann, Douglas J.; Johnson, G. C. (University of California, Berkeley, CA); Marin, Esteban B.; Regueiro, Richard A.

    2006-01-01

    In this report we present the formulation of the physically-based Evolving Microstructural Model of Inelasticity (EMMI) . The specific version of the model treated here describes the plasticity and isotropic damage of metals as being currently applied to model the ductile failure process in structural components of the W80 program . The formulation of the EMMI constitutive equations is framed in the context of the large deformation kinematics of solids and the thermodynamics of internal state variables . This formulation is focused first on developing the plasticity equations in both the relaxed (unloaded) and current configurations. The equations in the current configuration, expressed in non-dimensional form, are used to devise the identification procedure for the plasticity parameters. The model is then extended to include a porosity-based isotropic damage state variable to describe the progressive deterioration of the strength and mechanical properties of metals induced by deformation . The numerical treatment of these coupled plasticity-damage constitutive equations is explained in detail. A number of examples are solved to validate the numerical implementation of the model.

  10. A comparative review of four formulations of noncommutative quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouba, Laure

    2016-07-01

    Four formulations of quantum mechanics on noncommutative Moyal phase spaces are reviewed. These are the canonical, path-integral, Weyl-Wigner and systematic formulations. Although all these formulations represent quantum mechanics on a phase space with the same deformed Heisenberg algebra, there are mathematical and conceptual differences which we discuss.

  11. MATERIAL SHAPE OPTIMIZATION FOR FIBER REINFORCED COMPOSITES APPLYING A DAMAGE FORMULATION

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Junji; Ramm, Ekkehard; Terada, Kenjiro; Kyoya, Takashi

    The present contribution deals with an optimization strategy of fiber reinforced composites. Although the methodical concept is very general we concentrate on Fiber Reinforced Concrete with a complex failure mechanism resulting from material brittleness of both constituents matrix and fibers. The purpose of the present paper is to improve the structural ductility of the fiber reinforced composites applying an optimization method with respect to the geometrical layout of continuous long textile fibers. The method proposed is achieved by applying a so-called embedded reinforcement formulation. This methodology is extended to a damage formulation in order to represent a realistic structural behavior. For the optimization problem a gradient-based optimization scheme is assumed. An optimality criteria method is applied because of its numerically high efficiency and robustness. The performance of the method is demonstrated by a series of numerical examples; it is verified that the ductility can be substantially improved.

  12. An explicit finite element formulation for dynamic strain localization and damage evolution in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Mourad, Hashem M; Bronkhorst, Curt A; Addessio, Francis L

    2010-12-16

    An explicit finite element formulation, used to study the behavior and failure mechanisms of metallic materials under high strain rate loading, is presented. The formulation is based on the assumed-strain approach of Fish and Belytschko [1988], which allows localization bands to be embedded within an element, thereby alleviating mesh sensitivity and reducing the required computational effort. The behavior of the material outside localization bands (and of the virgin material prior to the onset of strain localization) is represented using a Gurson-type coupled plasticity-damage model based on the work of Johnson and Addessio [1988]. Assuming adiabatic conditions, the response of the localization band material is represented by a set of constitutive equations for large elasticviscoplastic deformations in metals at high strain rates and high homologous temperatures (see Brown et al. [1989]). Computational results are compared to experimental data for different metallic alloys to illustrate the advantages of the proposed modeling strategy.

  13. Damaging HMX/HTPB formulations: In-situ compression imaging using X-ray micro computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, Brian M.; Cordes, Nikolaus Lynn; Tappan, Bryce C.; Thompson, Darla Graff; Manner, Virginia Warren

    2015-04-17

    HMX (octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine) is a powerful high explosive that is routinely used in formulations such as PBX 9501. Much remains to be learned about the performance and mechanical properties of HMX formulations such as these, particularly after dynamic damage has occurred. We have prepared formulations with HMX using hydroxyl terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) binder in order to form an explosive that is relatively insensitive to mild stimuli, analogous to PBXB-110 (different only is substitution of dioctyladipate (DO) for isodecyl pelargonate).

  14. Majorization formulation of uncertainty in quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Partovi, M. Hossein

    2011-11-15

    Heisenberg's uncertainty principle is formulated for a set of generalized measurements within the framework of majorization theory, resulting in a partial uncertainty order on probability vectors that is stronger than those based on quasientropic measures. The theorem that emerges from this formulation guarantees that the uncertainty of the results of a set of generalized measurements without a common eigenstate has an inviolable lower bound which depends on the measurement set but not the state. A corollary to this theorem yields a parallel formulation of the uncertainty principle for generalized measurements corresponding to the entire class of quasientropic measures. Optimal majorization bounds for two and three mutually unbiased bases in two dimensions are calculated. Similarly, the leading term of the majorization bound for position and momentum measurements is calculated which provides a strong statement of Heisenberg's uncertainty principle in direct operational terms. Another theorem provides a majorization condition for the least-uncertain generalized measurement of a given state with interesting physical implications.

  15. New Formulation of Statistical Mechanics Using Thermal Pure Quantum States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiura, Sho; Shimizu, Akira

    2014-03-01

    We formulate statistical mechanics based on a pure quantum state, which we call a "thermal pure quantum (TPQ) state". A single TPQ state gives not only equilibrium values of mechanical variables, such as magnetization and correlation functions, but also those of genuine thermodynamic variables and thermodynamic functions, such as entropy and free energy. Among many possible TPQ states, we discuss the canonical TPQ state, the TPQ state whose temperature is specified. In the TPQ formulation of statistical mechanics, thermal fluctuations are completely included in quantum-mechanical fluctuations. As a consequence, TPQ states have much larger quantum entanglement than the equilibrium density operators of the ensemble formulation. We also show that the TPQ formulation is very useful in practical computations, by applying the formulation to a frustrated two-dimensional quantum spin system.

  16. Retinal Light Damage: Mechanisms and Protection

    PubMed Central

    Organisciak, Daniel T.; Vaughan, Dana K.

    2009-01-01

    By its action on rhodopsin, light triggers the well-known visual transduction cascade, but can also induce cell damage and death through phototoxic mechanisms -- a comprehensive understanding of which is still elusive despite more than 40 years of research. Herein, we integrate recent experimental findings to address several hypotheses of retinal light damage, premised in part on the close anatomical and metabolic relationships between the photoreceptors and the retinal pigment epithelium. We begin by reviewing the salient features of light damage, recently joined by evidence for retinal remodeling which has implications for the prognosis of recovery of function in retinal degenerations. We then consider select factors that influence the progression of the damage process and the extent of visual cell loss. Traditional, genetically-modified, and emerging animal models are discussed, with particular emphasis on cone visual cells. Exogenous and endogenous retinal protective factors are explored, with implications for light damage mechanisms and some suggested avenues for future research. Synergies are known to exist between our long term light environment and photoreceptor cell death in retinal disease. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of light damage in a variety of animal models can provide valuable insights into the effects of light in clinical disorders and may form the basis of future therapies to prevent or delay visual cell loss. PMID:19951742

  17. An axiomatic formulation of the Montevideo interpretation of quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambini, Rodolfo; García-Pintos, Luis Pedro; Pullin, Jorge

    We make a first attempt to axiomatically formulate the Montevideo interpretation of quantum mechanics. In this interpretation environmental decoherence is supplemented with loss of coherence due to the use of realistic clocks to measure time to solve the measurement problem. The resulting formulation is framed entirely in terms of quantum objects. Unlike in ordinary quantum mechanics, classical time only plays the role of an unobservable parameter. The formulation eliminates any privileged role of the measurement process giving an objective definition of when an event occurs in a system.

  18. Mechanisms of Diabetes-Induced Liver Damage

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Jamaludin; Nazratun Nafizah, A. H.; Zariyantey, A. H.; Budin, S. B.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a non-communicable disease that occurs in both developed and developing countries. This metabolic disease affects all systems in the body, including the liver. Hyperglycaemia, mainly caused by insulin resistance, affects the metabolism of lipids, carbohydrates and proteins and can lead to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, which can further progress to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, cirrhosis and, finally, hepatocellular carcinomas. The underlying mechanism of diabetes that contributes to liver damage is the combination of increased oxidative stress and an aberrant inflammatory response; this activates the transcription of pro-apoptotic genes and damages hepatocytes. Significant involvement of pro-inflammatory cytokines—including interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor-α—exacerbates the accumulation of oxidative damage products in the liver, such as malondialdehyde, fluorescent pigments and conjugated dienes. This review summarises the biochemical, histological and macromolecular changes that contribute to oxidative liver damage among diabetic individuals. PMID:27226903

  19. Volatile Emission of Mechanically Damaged Almonds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mature almonds from the Monterey variety were evaluated for their volatile composition after mechanical damage and compared to the volatile composition of the corresponding undamaged almonds. Volatiles were collected on Tenax, desorbed with diethyl ether, and identified via GC-MS analyses. Volatile ...

  20. Significance of Strain in Formulation in Theory of Solid Mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, Surya N.; Coroneos, Rula M.; Hopkins, Dale A.

    2003-01-01

    The basic theory of solid mechanics was deemed complete circa 1860 when St. Venant provided the strain formulation or the field compatibility condition. The strain formulation was incomplete. The missing portion has been formulated and identified as the boundary compatibility condition (BCC). The BCC, derived through a variational formulation, has been verified through integral theorem and solution of problems. The BCC, unlike the field counterpart, do not trivialize when expressed in displacements. Navier s method and the stiffness formulation have to account for the extra conditions especially at the inter-element boundaries in a finite element model. Completion of the strain formulation has led to the revival of the direct force calculation methods: the Integrated Force Method (IFM) and its dual (IFMD) for finite element analysis, and the completed Beltrami-Michell formulation (CBMF) in elasticity. The benefits from the new methods in elasticity, in finite element analysis, and in design optimization are discussed. Existing solutions and computer codes may have to be adjusted for the compliance of the new conditions. Complacency because the discipline is over a century old and computer codes have been developed for half a century can lead to stagnation of the discipline.

  1. Nucleation in models of damage mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gran, J. D.; Rundle, J. B.; Klein, W.; Turcotte, D. L.

    2010-12-01

    A variety of studies have modeled the physics of material deformation and damage as examples of generalized phase transitions, involving either critical phenomena or spinodal nucleation. Here we study two cellular automaton models of damage mechanics which. The first model is a modified slider-block model with failure threshold weakening. A block is considered partially damaged after its first slip, and any subsequent failure of that block will occur at reduced failure threshold. Damage here is defined as the fraction of blocks that have a reduced failure threshold. The threshold weakening parameter is viewed as a scaling field similar to the occupation probability in site percolation. The second model is time-dependent fiber-bundle model, where the time to failure for each element is specified from a Poissonian distribution and the hazard rate is assumed to have a power-law dependence on stress. Damage here is defined to be the fraction of blocks or fibers that have failed. Because there is no healing, catastrophic failure occurs. The transient behavior prior to rupture propagation is studied and scaling laws are obtained. We compare both models to mean-field percolation which has been shown to be representative of spinodal nucleation and to laboratory experiments that display power-law behavior.

  2. A damage mechanics based general purpose interface/contact element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Chengyong

    Most of the microelectronics packaging structures consist of layered substrates connected with bonding materials, such as solder or epoxy. Predicting the thermomechanical behavior of these multilayered structures is a challenging task in electronic packaging engineering. In a layered structure the most complex part is always the interfaces between the strates. Simulating the thermo-mechanical behavior of such interfaces, is the main theme of this dissertation. The most commonly used solder material, Pb-Sn alloy, has a very low melting temperature 180sp°C, so that the material demonstrates a highly viscous behavior. And, creep usually dominates the failure mechanism. Hence, the theory of viscoplasticity is adapted to describe the constitutive behavior. In a multilayered assembly each layer has a different coefficient of thermal expansion. Under thermal cycling, due to heat dissipated from circuits, interfaces and interconnects experience low cycle fatigue. Presently, the state-of-the art damage mechanics model used for fatigue life predictions is based on Kachanov (1986) continuum damage model. This model uses plastic strain as a damage criterion. Since plastic strain is a stress path dependent value, the criterion does not yield unique damage values for the same state of stress. In this dissertation a new damage evolution equation based on the second law of thermodynamic is proposed. The new criterion is based on the entropy of the system and it yields unique damage values for all stress paths to the final state of stress. In the electronics industry, there is a strong desire to develop fatigue free interconnections. The proposed interface/contact element can also simulate the behavior of the fatigue free Z-direction thin film interconnections as well as traditional layered interconnects. The proposed interface element can simulate behavior of a bonded interface or unbonded sliding interface, also called contact element. The proposed element was verified against

  3. Scattering in the Euclidean formulation of relativistic quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyzou, Wayne

    2013-10-01

    Euclidean relativistic quantum mechanics is a formulation of relativistic quantum mechanics based on the Osterwalder-Schrader reconstruction theorem that exploits the logical independence of locality from the rest of the axioms of Euclidean field theory. I discuss the properties of Euclidean Green functions necessary for the existence of Møller wave operators and the construction of these wave operators in this formalism. Supported by the US Department of Energy, Grant - DE-AC02-81ER40038.

  4. Damage Control Mechanisms in Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Martin, James A; Scherb, MB; Lembke, Lois A; Buckwalter, Joseph

    2000-01-01

    Articular chondrocytes maintain cartilage throughout life by replacing lost or damaged matrix with freshly synthesized material. Synthesis activity is regulated, rapidly increasing to well above basal levels in response to cartilage injury. Such responses suggest that synthesis activity is linked to the rate of matrix loss by endogenous "damage control" mechanisms. As a major stimulator of matrix synthesis in cartilage, insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) is likely to play a role in such mechanisms. Although IGF-I is nearly ubiquitous, its bioavailability in cartilage is controlled by IGF-I binding proteins (IGFBPs) secreted by chondrocytes. IGFBPs are part of a complex system, termed the IGF-I axis, that tightly regulates IGF-I activities. For the most part, IGFBPs block IGF-I activity by sequestering IGF-I from its cell surface receptor. We recently found that the expression of one binding protein, IGFBP-3, increases with chondrocyte age, paralleling an age-related decline in synthesis activity. In addition, IGFBP-3 is overexpressed in osteoarthritic cartilage, leading to metabolic disturbances that contribute to cartilage degeneration. These observations indicate that IGFBP-3 plays a crucial role in regulating matrix synthesis in cartilage, and suggest that cartilage damage control mechanisms may fail due to age-related changes in IGFBP-3 expression or distribution. Our investigation of this hypothesis began with immunolocalization studies to determine the tissue distribution of IGFBP-3 in human cartilage. We found that IGFBP-3 accumulated around chondrocytes in the pericellular/territorial matrix, where it co-localized with fibronectin, but not with the other matrix proteins tenascin-C and type VI collagen. This result suggested that the IGFBP-3 distribution is determined by binding to fibronectin. Binding studies using purified proteins demonstrated that IGFBP-3 does in fact bind to fibronectin, but not to tenascin-C or type VI collagen. Finally, we

  5. Continuum theory of fibrous tissue damage mechanics using bond kinetics: application to cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Nims, Robert J; Durney, Krista M; Cigan, Alexander D; Dusséaux, Antoine; Hung, Clark T; Ateshian, Gerard A

    2016-02-01

    This study presents a damage mechanics framework that employs observable state variables to describe damage in isotropic or anisotropic fibrous tissues. In this mixture theory framework, damage is tracked by the mass fraction of bonds that have broken. Anisotropic damage is subsumed in the assumption that multiple bond species may coexist in a material, each having its own damage behaviour. This approach recovers the classical damage mechanics formulation for isotropic materials, but does not appeal to a tensorial damage measure for anisotropic materials. In contrast with the classical approach, the use of observable state variables for damage allows direct comparison of model predictions to experimental damage measures, such as biochemical assays or Raman spectroscopy. Investigations of damage in discrete fibre distributions demonstrate that the resilience to damage increases with the number of fibre bundles; idealizing fibrous tissues using continuous fibre distribution models precludes the modelling of damage. This damage framework was used to test and validate the hypothesis that growth of cartilage constructs can lead to damage of the synthesized collagen matrix due to excessive swelling caused by synthesized glycosaminoglycans. Therefore, alternative strategies must be implemented in tissue engineering studies to prevent collagen damage during the growth process. PMID:26855751

  6. Thermomechanical formulation of ductile damage coupled to nonlinear isotropic hardening and multiplicative viscoplasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soyarslan, C.; Bargmann, S.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we present a thermomechanical framework which makes use of the internal variable theory of thermodynamics for damage-coupled finite viscoplasticity with nonlinear isotropic hardening. Damage evolution, being an irreversible process, generates heat. In addition to its direct effect on material's strength and stiffness, it causes deterioration of the heat conduction. The formulation, following the footsteps of Simó and Miehe (1992), introduces inelastic entropy as an additional state variable. Given a temperature dependent damage dissipation potential, we show that the evolution of inelastic entropy assumes a split form relating to plastic and damage parts, respectively. The solution of the thermomechanical problem is based on the so-called isothermal split. This allows the use of the model in 2D and 3D example problems involving geometrical imperfection triggered necking in an axisymmetric bar and thermally triggered necking of a 3D rectangular bar.

  7. An Equilibrium Constitutive Model of Anisotropic Cartilage Damage to Elucidate Mechanisms of Damage Initiation and Progression.

    PubMed

    Stender, Michael E; Regueiro, Richard A; Klisch, Stephen M; Ferguson, Virginia L

    2015-08-01

    Traumatic injuries and gradual wear-and-tear of articular cartilage (AC) that can lead to osteoarthritis (OA) have been hypothesized to result from tissue damage to AC. In this study, a previous equilibrium constitutive model of AC was extended to a constitutive damage articular cartilage (CDAC) model. In particular, anisotropic collagen (COL) fibril damage and isotropic glycosaminoglycan (GAG) damage were considered in a 3D formulation. In the CDAC model, time-dependent effects, such as viscoelasticity and poroelasticity, were neglected, and thus all results represent the equilibrium response after all time-dependent effects have dissipated. The resulting CDAC model was implemented in two different finite-element models. The first simulated uniaxial tensile loading to failure, while the second simulated spherical indentation with a rigid indenter displaced into a bilayer AC sample. Uniaxial tension to failure simulations were performed for three COL fibril Lagrangian failure strain (i.e., the maximum elastic COL fibril strain) values of 15%, 30%, and 45%, while spherical indentation simulations were performed with a COL fibril Lagrangian failure strain of 15%. GAG damage parameters were held constant for all simulations. Our results indicated that the equilibrium postyield tensile response of AC and the macroscopic tissue failure strain are highly dependent on COL fibril Lagrangian failure strain. The uniaxial tensile response consisted of an initial nonlinear ramp region due to the recruitment of intact fibrils followed by a rapid decrease in tissue stress at initial COL fibril failure, as a result of COL fibril damage which continued until ultimate tissue failure. In the spherical indentation simulation, damage to both the COL fibril and GAG constituents was located only in the superficial zone (SZ) and near the articular surface with tissue thickening following unloading. Spherical indentation simulation results are in agreement with published experimental

  8. Damage mechanisms in shock wave lithotripsy (SWL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokhandwalla, Murtuza

    Shock wave lithotripsy is a 'non-invasive' therapy for treating kidney stones. Focused shock waves fragment stones to a size that can be passed naturally. There is, however, considerable tissue injury, and the mechanisms of stone fragmentation and tissue injury are not well understood. This work investigates potential tissue damage mechanisms, with an aim towards enhancing stone fragmentation and minimizing tissue damage. Lysis of red blood cells (RBC's) due to in vitro exposure to shock waves was investigated. Fluid flow-fields induced by a non-uniform shock wave, as well as radial expansion/implosion of a bubble was hypothesized to cause cell lysis. Both the above flow-fields constitute an unsteady extensional flow, exerting inertial as well as viscous forces on the RBC membrane. The resultant membrane tension and the membrane areal strain due to the above flow-fields were estimated. Both were found to exert a significantly higher inertial force (50--100 mN/m) than the critical membrane tension (10 mN/m). Bubble-induced flow-field was estimated to last for a longer duration (˜1 microsec) compared to the shock-induced flow (˜1 ns) and hence, was predicted to be lytically more effective, in typical in vitro experimental conditions. However, in vivo conditions severely constrain bubble growth, and cell lysis due to shock-induced shear could be dominant. Hemolysis due to shock-induced shear, in absence of cavitation, was experimentally investigated. The lithotripter-generated shock wave was refocused by a parabolic reflector. This refocused wave-field had a tighter focus (smaller beam-width and a higher amplitude) than the lithotripter wave-field. Cavitation was eliminated by applying overpressure to the fluid. Acoustic emissions due to bubble activity were monitored by a novel passive cavitation detector (HP-PCD). Aluminum foils were also used to differentiate cavitational from non-cavitational mode of damage. RBC's were exposed to the reflected wave-field from

  9. Damage mechanisms in nanolayered metallic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, A.; Kung, H.; Hammon, D. L.; Hoagland R. G.; Nastasi, Michael Anthony,

    2002-01-01

    The strengths of metallic multilayers, composed of alternating layers o f soft metals such as Cu and Nb, approach the theoretical limit of material strengih when the bilayer periods are on the order of a few nanometers. We have investigated the damage mechanisms in these ultra-high strength nanolayered composite inaterials subjected to monotonic deformation. Large strain plastic deformation such as rooin temperature rolling does not lead to any dislocation cell structure formation within the layers indicating that the deformation and dislocation storage mechanisms in nanostructured materials are completely different from the bulk. In bulk metals, dislocation pile-ups lead to heterogeneous slip, but in nano-materials, deformation by single disloqations on closely spaced glide planes results in more homogeneously distributed slip. The implications of the high tensile strengths and hoinogencous slip on the fatigue properties of nanolayered materials are also discussed.

  10. Protective effect of Xingnaojia formulation on rats with brain and liver damage caused by chronic alcoholism

    PubMed Central

    LI, SHUANG; WANG, SU; GUO, ZHI-GANG; HUANG, NING; ZHAO, FAN-RONG; ZHU, MO-LI; MA, LI-JUAN; LIANG, JIN-YING; ZHANG, YU-LIN; HUANG, ZHONG-LIN; WAN, GUANG-RUI

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to observe the effect of a formulation of traditional Chinese medicine extracts known as Xingnaojia (XNJ) on the liver function, learning ability and memory of rats with chronic alcoholism and to verify the mechanism by which it protects the brain and liver. A rat model of chronic alcoholism was used in the study. The spatial learning ability and memory of the rats were tested. The rats were then sacrificed and their brains and hepatic tissues were isolated. The activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and levels of glutamate (Glu), N-methyl D-aspartate receptor subtype 2B (NR2B), cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) and cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) in the hippocampus were analyzed. The ultrastructure of the hepatic tissue was observed by electron microscopy. In addition, the activities of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) in serum were tested and the levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), triglycerides (TG) and total cholesterol (TCHOL) were analyzed. XNJ enhanced the learning and memory of rats with chronic alcoholism. Treatment with XNJ increased the activity of SOD, and decreased the expression levels of NR2B mRNA and NR2B, CB1 and CDK5 proteins in the brain tissues compared with those in the model rats. It also increased the activity of ALDH in the serum and liver, decreased the serum levels of LDL, TG and TCHOL and increased the serum level of HDL. These results indicate that XNJ exhibited a protective effect against brain and liver damage in rats with chronic alcoholism. PMID:26640531

  11. Mechanism of frost damage to concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhenhua

    We studied several topics that are important to explain the mechanisms of frost damage to concrete, including the volume change of concrete during freezing, the role of air voids in protecting concrete from frost damage, the pore structure of concrete, and the nucleation and propagation of ice in concrete. By combining calorimetric measurements with dilatometry, we were able to calculate the contributions of thermal expansion, pore pressure, and crystallization pressure of ice to the strain observed in a mortar during freezing/thawing cycles. Air-entrained mortars contract upon freezing due to the cryo-suction effect, while non-air-entrained mortars expand primarily due to hydraulic pressure. Based on the theory originally proposed by Powers and Helmuth, we show that the poromechanical calculations account quantitatively for the contraction of samples with air entrainment, which is shown to quantitatively account for a reduction of salt scaling damage based on the glue-spall theory. The method of thermoporometry (TPM) that we used to study the pore structure of concrete is also discussed. In a study of ice propagation inside concrete, we re-examined experiments by Helmuth [Proc. 4th Int. Cong. Chem. Cement, NBS Monog. 43, Vol. II (National Bureau of Standards, Washington, D.C., 1962) pp. 855--869] from which he concluded that ice grows in the pores of cement paste under heat-flow control, and that the internal temperature rises to the melting point given by the Gibbs-Thomson equation. Using experimental and computational methods, we find that his conclusions are correct, but the growth rates he reports are misleading. Our experiment reveals the true growth rate, which is about three times smaller than found by Helmuth. The dendritic morphology explains how fast constant growth rates can occur when the interior temperature of the sample is very near the melting point: the temperature at the tip of the dendrite is a few degrees below the melting point, but the liquid

  12. Relativistic wave and particle mechanics formulated without classical mass

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, J.L.; Musielak, Z.E.; Chang, Trei-wen

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > Formal derivation of the Klein-Gordon equation with an invariant frequency. > Formal derivation of the relativistic version of Newton's equation. > The classical mass is replaced by the invariant frequency. > The invariant frequencies for selected elementary particles are deduced. > The choice of natural units resulting from the developed theories is discussed. - Abstract: The fact that the concept of classical mass plays an important role in formulating relativistic theories of waves and particles is well-known. However, recent studies show that Galilean invariant theories of waves and particles can be formulated with the so-called 'wave mass', which replaces the classical mass and allows attaining higher accuracy of performing calculations [J.L. Fry and Z.E. Musielak, Ann. Phys. 325 (2010) 1194]. The main purpose of this paper is to generalize these results and formulate fundamental (Poincare invariant) relativistic theories of waves and particles without the classical mass. In the presented approach, the classical mass is replaced by an invariant frequency that only involves units of time. The invariant frequencies for various elementary particles are deduced from experiments and their relationship to the corresponding classical and wave mass for each particle is described. It is shown that relativistic wave mechanics with the invariant frequency is independent of the Planck constant, and that such theory can attain higher accuracy of performing calculations. The choice of natural units resulting from the developed theories of waves and particles is also discussed.

  13. Formulation and Mechanical Properties of LLM-105 PBXs

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D M; Lorenz, K T; Cunningham, B; Gagliardi, F

    2008-04-03

    Eight different polymer binders were formulated with bimodal distributions of 2,6-diamino-3,5-dinitropyrazine-1-oxide (LLM-105) in 5/95 weight ratio of polymer to explosive at the 25 gram level. The polymers evaluated included: Kel-F 800, Viton A, Oxy 461, Cytop A, Hyflon AD 60, Hytemp 5545, Technoflon PFR 91 and Technoflon P 459. LLM-105 had an average particle size of 35.6 {+-} 0.6 {micro}m. This material was ground in a ball mill for 24 h to achieve a particle size of 0.72 {+-} 0.02 {micro}m. Small angle light scattering measurements were used to obtain particle size distributions on both ground and unground LLM-105. Optical microscopy was used to characterize the morphology of the crystals. Bimodal mixes of approximately 75/25% coarse to fine LLM-105 were used in all formulations. Cylinders 1.27 cm diameter by 2.54 cm long were compression molded using 3 three-minute cycles at 105 C, except in the case of Cytop and Hyflon formulations which were molded at {approx}130 C. Densities varied between 94-98% of theoretical maximum. Stress strain measurements were made in compression at -30, ambient and 74 C at a strain rate of 0.0001 sec{sup -1}. As expected, the mechanical strength scaled with temperature depending on the glass transition temperature of the polymer.

  14. Damage and fracture mechanics of composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdussalam, Saleh Ramadan

    The design of structural systems in the aerospace industry has been characterized by a continuing search for strong, yet lightweight, materials to achieve maximum payload capability for minimum weight. In recent years, this search has led to a wide use of fiber reinforced composites, such as carbon, glass and kevelar based composites. Comparison of these new materials with the traditional ones (metals) according to the basic properties, such as density, elastic modulus and also long-time and short-time strength, shows their superiority over traditional materials, when weight is a major design factor, like in the aerospace industry. Most composite materials of interest to aerospace applications have been adequately characterized under static loading conditions. Related work to study their fracture behaviour has been limited. Since most failure mechanisms involve crack growth and/or delamination, design of such components requires knowledge and understanding of their fracture properties. This thesis includes an experimental and analytical investigation of fracture characteristics of composite materials. The post-peak response of notched specimens subjected to uniaxial cyclic loading is established to evaluate the fracture energy associated with progressive matrix damage and subsequent crack growth. A total of 75 uniaxial tension specimens were tested. The experimental work consisted of first testing several un-notched specimens with different thickness (number of layers) to determine the initial and secondary elastic modulus as well as the tensile strength. The investigation studied the effect of the various fracture parameters, including thickness, fiber orientation, and crack width ratio (a/w) on the behaviour of crack propagation, peak load, and post-peak response. The specimens used in this research were prepared using the vacuum bagging technique, with a chosen number of fiber glass cloth layers and fiber orientation. The experimental results provided

  15. A Dynamic Damage Mechanics Source Model for Explosions in Crystalline Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihaly, J. M.; Bhat, H. S.; Sammis, C. G.; Rosakis, A.

    2011-12-01

    The micromechanical damage mechanics formulated by Ashby and Sammis [PAGEOPH, 1990] and generalized by Deshpande and Evans [J. Mech. Phys. Solids, 2008] has been extended to allow for a more generalized stress state and to incorporate an experimentally motivated crack growth (damage evolution) law that is valid over a wide range of loading rates. This law is sensitive to both the crack tip stress field and its time derivative, and thus produces strain-rate sensitivity in the constitutive response. The model is experimentally verified by predicting the failure strength of Dionysus-Pentelicon marble over strain rates ranging from to . This rate-dependent damage mechanics has been implemented in the ABAQUS dynamic finite element code and used to explore the effects of burn rate (loading rate) and lithostatic stress on the spatial extent of fracture damage and S waves generated by explosions in crystalline rock. Slower rise times and longer pressure pulses produce more damage and stronger S waves.

  16. One damage law for different mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaitre, J.; Sermage, J. P.

    1997-07-01

    We consider here a general three-dimensional kinetic damage law. It uses the thermodynamic of irreversible processes formalism and the phenomenological aspects of isotropic damage. It gives the damage rate as a function of its associated variable, the strain energy density release rate and the accumulated plastic strain rate. Associated with different plastic constitutive equations, this damage law takes into account brittle damage, ductile damage, low and high cycle fatigue and creep damage. In this paper we mainly focus on creep-fatigue interaction and high cycle fatigue. Associated to a viscoplastic constitutive equation having kinematic hardening, the damage law gives the non linear creep-fatigue interaction. The agreement with experiments is good. Associated to plastic constitutive equations also having kinematic hardening but introduced in a micromechanical two scale model based on the self-consistent scheme, it models the non linear accumulation of damage induced by a succession of sequences of different amplitudes as well as the effect of the mean stress and the influence of non proportional loading.

  17. Mechanical Properties of Shock-Damaged Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Hongliang; Ahrens, T. J.

    1994-01-01

    Stress-strain tests were performed both on shock-damaged gabbro and limestone. The effective Young's modulus decreases with increasing initial damage parameter value, and an apparent work-softening process occurs prior to failure. To further characterize shock-induced microcracks, the longitudinal elastic wave velocity behavior of shock-damaged gabbro in the direction of compression up to failure was measured using an acoustic transmission technique under uniaxial loading. A dramatic increase in velocity was observed for the static compressive stress range of 0-50 MPa. Above that stress range, the velocity behavior of lightly damaged (D(sub 0) less than 0.1) gabbro is almost equal to unshocked gabbro. The failure strength of heavily-damaged (D(sub 0) greater than 0.1) gabbro is approx. 100-150 MPa, much lower than that of lightly damaged and unshocked gabbros (approx. 230-260 MPa). Following Nur's theory, the crack shape distribution was analyzed. The shock-induced cracks in gabbro appear to be largely thin penny-shaped cracks with c/a values below 5 x 10(exp -4). Moreover, the applicability of Ashby and Sammis's theory relating failure strength and damage parameter of shock-damaged rocks was examined and was found to yield a good estimate of the relation of shock-induced deficit in elastic modulus with the deficit in compressive strength.

  18. Damage mechanisms in components for fiber lasers and amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Adrian; Samson, Bryce N.; Tankala, Kanishka; Machewirth, David P.; Khitrov, Victor; Manyam, Upendra H.; Gonthier, Francois; Seguin, Francois

    2005-02-01

    In this paper we review the damage mechanisms that need to be considered when building high power fibre lasers. More specifically we look at thermal issues, optically induced coating damage, bulk and surface damage thresholds of the host glass. We also discuss the reliability of tapered fibre bundles and Bragg gratings at these power densities.

  19. A signed particle formulation of non-relativistic quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Sellier, Jean Michel

    2015-09-15

    A formulation of non-relativistic quantum mechanics in terms of Newtonian particles is presented in the shape of a set of three postulates. In this new theory, quantum systems are described by ensembles of signed particles which behave as field-less classical objects which carry a negative or positive sign and interact with an external potential by means of creation and annihilation events only. This approach is shown to be a generalization of the signed particle Wigner Monte Carlo method which reconstructs the time-dependent Wigner quasi-distribution function of a system and, therefore, the corresponding Schrödinger time-dependent wave-function. Its classical limit is discussed and a physical interpretation, based on experimental evidences coming from quantum tomography, is suggested. Moreover, in order to show the advantages brought by this novel formulation, a straightforward extension to relativistic effects is discussed. To conclude, quantum tunnelling numerical experiments are performed to show the validity of the suggested approach.

  20. Formulation and process strategies to minimize coat damage for compaction of coated pellets in a rotary tablet press: A mechanistic view.

    PubMed

    Xu, Min; Heng, Paul Wan Sia; Liew, Celine Valeria

    2016-02-29

    Compaction of multiple-unit pellet system (MUPS) tablets has been extensively studied in the past few decades but with marginal success. This study aims to investigate the formulation and process strategies for minimizing pellet coat damage caused by compaction and elucidate the mechanism of damage sustained during the preparation of MUPS tablets in a rotary tablet press. Blends containing ethylcellulose-coated pellets and cushioning agent (spray dried aggregates of micronized lactose and mannitol), were compacted into MUPS tablets in a rotary tablet press. The effects of compaction pressure and dwell time on the physicomechanical properties of resultant MUPS tablets and extent of pellet coat damage were systematically examined. The coated pellets from various locations at the axial and radial peripheral surfaces and core of the MUPS tablets were excavated and assessed for their coat damage individually. Interestingly, for a MUPS tablet formulation which consolidates by plastic deformation, the tablet mechanical strength could be enhanced without exacerbating pellet coat damage by extending the dwell time in the compaction cycle during rotary tableting. However, the increase in compaction pressure led to faster drug release rate. The location of the coated pellets in the MUPS tablet also contributed to the extent of their coat damage, possibly due to uneven force distribution within the compact. To ensure viability of pellet coat integrity, the formation of a continuous percolating network of cushioning agent is critical and the applied compaction pressure should be less than the pellet crushing strength. PMID:26748363

  1. Noncommutative spaces and covariant formulation of statistical mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinzadeh, V.; Gorji, M. A.; Nozari, K.; Vakili, B.

    2015-07-01

    We study the statistical mechanics of a general Hamiltonian system in the context of symplectic structure of the corresponding phase space. This covariant formalism reveals some interesting correspondences between properties of the phase space and the associated statistical physics. While topology, as a global property, turns out to be related to the total number of microstates, the invariant measure which assigns a priori probability distribution over the microstates is determined by the local form of the symplectic structure. As an example of a model for which the phase space has a nontrivial topology, we apply our formulation on the Snyder noncommutative space-time with de Sitter four-momentum space and analyze the results. Finally, in the framework of such a setup, we examine our formalism by studying the thermodynamical properties of a harmonic oscillator system.

  2. 3D Progressive Damage Modeling for Laminated Composite Based on Crack Band Theory and Continuum Damage Mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, John T.; Pineda, Evan J.; Ranatunga, Vipul; Smeltzer, Stanley S.

    2015-01-01

    A simple continuum damage mechanics (CDM) based 3D progressive damage analysis (PDA) tool for laminated composites was developed and implemented as a user defined material subroutine to link with a commercially available explicit finite element code. This PDA tool uses linear lamina properties from standard tests, predicts damage initiation with an easy-to-implement Hashin-Rotem failure criteria, and in the damage evolution phase, evaluates the degradation of material properties based on the crack band theory and traction-separation cohesive laws. It follows Matzenmiller et al.'s formulation to incorporate the degrading material properties into the damaged stiffness matrix. Since nonlinear shear and matrix stress-strain relations are not implemented, correction factors are used for slowing the reduction of the damaged shear stiffness terms to reflect the effect of these nonlinearities on the laminate strength predictions. This CDM based PDA tool is implemented as a user defined material (VUMAT) to link with the Abaqus/Explicit code. Strength predictions obtained, using this VUMAT, are correlated with test data for a set of notched specimens under tension and compression loads.

  3. Mechanisms for mechanical damage in the intervertebral disc annulus fibrosus.

    PubMed

    Iatridis, J C James C; ap Gwynn, Iolo

    2004-08-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration results in disorganization of the laminate structure of the annulus that may arise from mechanical microfailure. Failure mechanisms in the annulus were investigated using composite lamination theory and other analyses to calculate stresses in annulus layers, interlaminar shear stress, and the region of stress concentration around a fiber break. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to evaluate failure patterns in the annulus and evaluate novel structural features of the disc tissue. Stress concentrations in the annulus due to an isolated fiber break were localized to approximately 5 microm away from the break, and only considered a likely cause of annulus fibrosus failure (i.e., radial tears in the annulus) under extreme loading conditions or when collagen damage occurs over a relatively large region. Interlaminar shear stresses were calculated to be relatively large, to increase with layer thickness (as reported with degeneration), and were considered to be associated with propagation of circumferential tears in the annulus. SEM analysis of intervertebral disc annulus fibrosus tissue demonstrated a clear laminate structure, delamination, matrix cracking, and fiber failure. Novel structural features noted with SEM also included the presence of small tubules that appear to run along the length of collagen fibers in the annulus and a distinct collagenous structure representative of a pericellular matrix in the nucleus region. PMID:15212921

  4. Phenomenological approach to mechanical damage growth analysis.

    PubMed

    Pugno, Nicola; Bosia, Federico; Gliozzi, Antonio S; Delsanto, Pier Paolo; Carpinteri, Alberto

    2008-10-01

    The problem of characterizing damage evolution in a generic material is addressed with the aim of tracing it back to existing growth models in other fields of research. Based on energetic considerations, a system evolution equation is derived for a generic damage indicator describing a material system subjected to an increasing external stress. The latter is found to fit into the framework of a recently developed phenomenological universality (PUN) approach and, more specifically, the so-called U2 class. Analytical results are confirmed by numerical simulations based on a fiber-bundle model and statistically assigned local strengths at the microscale. The fits with numerical data prove, with an excellent degree of reliability, that the typical evolution of the damage indicator belongs to the aforementioned PUN class. Applications of this result are briefly discussed and suggested. PMID:18999489

  5. A nonlocal continuum damage mechanics approach to simulation of creep fracture in ice sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duddu, Ravindra; Waisman, Haim

    2013-06-01

    We present a Lagrangian finite element formulation aimed at modeling creep fracture in ice-sheets using nonlocal continuum damage mechanics. The proposed formulation is based on a thermo-viscoelastic constitutive model and a creep damage model for polycrystalline ice with different behavior in tension and compression. In this paper, mainly, we detail the nonlocal numerical implementation of the constitutive damage model into commercial finite element codes (e.g. Abaqus), wherein a procedure to handle the abrupt failure (rupture) of ice under tension is proposed. Then, we present numerical examples of creep fracture under four-point bending, uniaxial tension, and biaxial tension in order to illustrate the viability of the current approach. Finally, we present simulations of creep crack propagation in idealized rectangular ice slabs so as to estimate calving rates at low deformation rates. The examples presented demonstrate the mesh size and mesh directionality independence of the proposed nonlocal implementation.

  6. Formulation and computational aspects of plasticity and damage models with application to quasi-brittle materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Z.; Schreyer, H.L.

    1995-09-01

    The response of underground structures and transportation facilities under various external loadings and environments is critical for human safety as well as environmental protection. Since quasi-brittle materials such as concrete and rock are commonly used for underground construction, the constitutive modeling of these engineering materials, including post-limit behaviors, is one of the most important aspects in safety assessment. From experimental, theoretical, and computational points of view, this report considers the constitutive modeling of quasi-brittle materials in general and concentrates on concrete in particular. Based on the internal variable theory of thermodynamics, the general formulations of plasticity and damage models are given to simulate two distinct modes of microstructural changes, inelastic flow and degradation of material strength and stiffness, that identify the phenomenological nonlinear behaviors of quasi-brittle materials. The computational aspects of plasticity and damage models are explored with respect to their effects on structural analyses. Specific constitutive models are then developed in a systematic manner according to the degree of completeness. A comprehensive literature survey is made to provide the up-to-date information on prediction of structural failures, which can serve as a reference for future research.

  7. A coupled mechanical and chemical damage model for concrete affected by alkali–silica reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Pignatelli, Rossella; Comi, Claudia; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.

    2013-11-15

    To model the complex degradation phenomena occurring in concrete affected by alkali–silica reaction (ASR), we formulate a poro-mechanical model with two isotropic internal variables: the chemical and the mechanical damage. The chemical damage, related to the evolution of the reaction, is caused by the pressure generated by the expanding ASR gel on the solid concrete skeleton. The mechanical damage describes the strength and stiffness degradation induced by the external loads. As suggested by experimental results, degradation due to ASR is considered to be localized around reactive sites. The effect of the degree of saturation and of the temperature on the reaction development is also modeled. The chemical damage evolution is calibrated using the value of the gel pressure estimated by applying the electrical diffuse double-layer theory to experimental values of the surface charge density in ASR gel specimens reported in the literature. The chemo-damage model is first validated by simulating expansion tests on reactive specimens and beams; the coupled chemo-mechanical damage model is then employed to simulate compression and flexure tests results also taken from the literature. -- Highlights: •Concrete degradation due to ASR in variable environmental conditions is modeled. •Two isotropic internal variables – chemical and mechanical damage – are introduced. •The value of the swelling pressure is estimated by the diffuse double layer theory. •A simplified scheme is proposed to relate macro- and microscopic properties. •The chemo-mechanical damage model is validated by simulating tests in literature.

  8. Damage progression in mechanically fastened composite structural joints

    SciTech Connect

    Minnetyan, L.; Chamis, C.C.; Murthy, P.L.N.

    1994-12-31

    Progressive damage and fracture of a bolted graphite/epoxy composite laminate is evaluated via computational simulation. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate a new methodology that scales up constituent material properties, stress and strain limits to the structure level to evaluate the overall damage and fracture propagation for mechanically fastened composite structures. An integrated computer code is used for the simulation of structural degradation under loading. Damage initiation, growth, accumulation, and propagation to fracture are included in the simulation. Results show the damage progression sequence and structural fracture resistance during different degradation stages. The effect of fastener spacing is investigated with regard to the structural durability of a bolted joint.

  9. Laser damage mechanisms in conductive widegap semiconductor films.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jae-Hyuck; Menor, Marlon G; Adams, John J; Raman, Rajesh N; Lee, Jonathan R I; Olson, Tammy Y; Shen, Nan; Suh, Joonki; Demos, Stavros G; Bude, Jeff; Elhadj, Selim

    2016-08-01

    Laser damage mechanisms of two conductive wide-bandgap semiconductor films - indium tin oxide (ITO) and silicon doped GaN (Si:GaN) were studied via microscopy, spectroscopy, photoluminescence (PL), and elemental analysis. Nanosecond laser pulse exposures with a laser photon energy (1.03 eV, 1064 nm) smaller than the conductive films bandgaps were applied and radically different film damage morphologies were produced. The laser damaged ITO film exhibited deterministic features of thermal degradation. In contrast, laser damage in the Si:GaN film resulted in highly localized eruptions originating at interfaces. For ITO, thermally driven damage was related to free carrier absorption and, for GaN, carbon complexes were proposed as potential damage precursors or markers. PMID:27505731

  10. A damage mechanics based approach to structural deterioration and reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattcharya, B.; Ellingwood, B.

    1998-02-01

    Structural deterioration often occurs without perceptible manifestation. Continuum damage mechanics defines structural damage in terms of the material microstructure, and relates the damage variable to the macroscopic strength or stiffness of the structure. This enables one to predict the state of damage prior to the initiation of a macroscopic flaw, and allows one to estimate residual strength/service life of an existing structure. The accumulation of damage is a dissipative process that is governed by the laws of thermodynamics. Partial differential equations for damage growth in terms of the Helmholtz free energy are derived from fundamental thermodynamical conditions. Closed-form solutions to the equations are obtained under uniaxial loading for ductile deformation damage as a function of plastic strain, for creep damage as a function of time, and for fatigue damage as function of number of cycles. The proposed damage growth model is extended into the stochastic domain by considering fluctuations in the free energy, and closed-form solutions of the resulting stochastic differential equation are obtained in each of the three cases mentioned above. A reliability analysis of a ring-stiffened cylindrical steel shell subjected to corrosion, accidental pressure, and temperature is performed.

  11. Ontogenetic contingency of tolerance mechanisms in response to apical damage

    PubMed Central

    Gruntman, Michal; Novoplansky, Ariel

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims Plants are able to tolerate tissue loss through vigorous branching which is often triggered by release from apical dominance and activation of lateral meristems. However, damage-induced branching might not be a mere physiological outcome of released apical dominance, but an adaptive response to environmental signals, such as damage timing and intensity. Here, branching responses to both factors were examined in the annual plant Medicago truncatula. Methods Branching patterns and allocation to reproductive traits were examined in response to variable clipping intensities and timings in M. truncatula plants from two populations that vary in the onset of reproduction. Phenotypic selection analysis was used to evaluate the strength and direction of selection on branching under the damage treatments. Key Results Plants of both populations exhibited an ontogenetic shift in tolerance mechanisms: while early damage induced greater meristem activation, late damage elicited investment in late-determined traits, including mean pod and seed biomass, and supported greater germination rates. Severe damage mostly elicited simultaneous development of multiple-order lateral branches, but this response was limited to early damage. Selection analyses revealed positive directional selection on branching in plants under early- compared with late- or no-damage treatments. Conclusions The results demonstrate that damage-induced meristem activation is an adaptive response that could be modified according to the plant's developmental stage, severity of tissue loss and their interaction, stressing the importance of considering these effects when studying plastic responses to apical damage. PMID:21873259

  12. Continuous damage parameter calculation under thermo-mechanical random loading

    PubMed Central

    Nagode, Marko

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents a method on how the mean stress effect on fatigue damage can be taken into account under an arbitrary low cycle thermo-mechanical loading. From known stress, elastoplastic strain and temperature histories the cycle amplitudes and cycle mean values are extracted and the damage parameter is computed. In contrast to the existing methods the proposed method enables continuous damage parameter computation without the need of waiting for the cycles to close. The limitations of the standardized damage parameters are thus surpassed. The damage parameters derived initially for closed and isothermal cycles assuming that the elastoplastic stress–strain response follows the Masing and memory rules can now be used to take the mean stress effect into account under an arbitrary low cycle thermo-mechanical loading. The method includes:•stress and elastoplastic strain history transformation into the corresponding amplitude and mean values;•stress and elastoplastic strain amplitude and mean value transformation into the damage parameter amplitude history;•damage parameter amplitude history transformation into the damage parameter history. PMID:26150939

  13. Micromechanical Modeling of Impact Damage Mechanisms in Unidirectional Composite Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qinghua; Wang, Zhenqing

    2016-05-01

    Composite laminates are susceptible to the transverse impact loads resulting in significant damage such as matrix cracking, fiber breakage and delamination. In this paper, a micromechanical model is developed to predict the impact damage of composite laminates based on microstructure and various failure models of laminates. The fiber and matrix are represented by the isotropic and elastic-plastic solid, and their impact failure behaviors are modeled based on shear damage model. The delaminaton failure is modeling by the interface element controlled by cohesive damage model. Impact damage mechanisms of laminate are analyzed by using the micromechanical model proposed. In addition, the effects of impact energy and laminated type on impact damage behavior of laminates are investigated. Due to the damage of the surrounding matrix near the impact point caused by the fiber deformation, the surface damage area of laminate is larger than the area of ​​impact projectile. The shape of the damage area is roughly rectangle or elliptical with the major axis extending parallel to the fiber direction in the surface layer of laminate. The alternating laminated type with two fiber directions is more propitious to improve the impact resistance of laminates.

  14. Modeling of glass fracture damage using continuum damage mechanics - Static spherical indentation

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2004-07-01

    Continuum damage mechanics based constitutive model is used to study the stone-impact resistance of automotive windshields. An axisymmetric finite element model is created to simulate the transient dynamic response and impact induced damge tensors for laminated glass layers subject to stone-impact loading. The windshield glass consists of two glass outer layers laminated by a thin poly-vinyl butyral (PVB) layer. The constitutive behavior of the glass layers is simulated suing continuum damage mechanics model with linear damage evolution. The PVB layer is modeled with linear viscoelastic solid. The model is used to predict and examine damage patterns on different glass surfaces for different windshield designs including variations in ply thickness and curvatures.

  15. Biconvex intraocular lenses and Nd:YAG capsulotomy: Experimental comparison of surface damage with different poly(methyl methacrylate) formulations

    SciTech Connect

    Downing, J.E.; Alberhasky, M.T. )

    1990-11-01

    Biconvex posterior chamber lenses have optical advantages and decrease the risk of capsular opacification, but they are more likely to be pitted during ND:YAG capsulotomy because of apposition of the lens to the capsule. This study reports the likelihood of surface damage to different formulations of poly(methyl methacrylate) at the energy levels required to open posterior capsules. Molded lenses are more easily damaged than higher molecular weight lathe-cut materials (P less than .01), as expected. However, by keeping energy output low, even injection-molded lenses showed minimal damage, with mean pit size 39 +/- 39 microns at 1 mJ. By using a converging contact lens, low power, and keeping the focus behind the capsule, damage to all materials tested should be clinically insignificant.

  16. Are DNA-damaging effects induced by herbicide formulations (Roundup® and Garlon®) in fish transient and reversible upon cessation of exposure?

    PubMed

    Guilherme, S; Santos, M A; Gaivão, I; Pacheco, M

    2014-10-01

    Owing to the seasonality of crop cultivation and subsequent periodic/seasonal application of herbicides, their input to the aquatic systems is typically intermittent. Consequently, exposure of fish to this type of contaminants can be short and followed by a period of permanence in non-contaminated areas. Thus, the assessment of genotoxic endpoints in fish after removal of the contamination source appears as a crucial step to improve the knowledge on the dynamics of herbicide genotoxicity, as well as to determine the actual magnitude of risk posed by these agrochemicals. Therefore, the present study intended to shed light on the ability of fish to recover from the DNA damage induced by short-term exposures to the herbicide formulations Roundup(®) (glyphosate-based) and Garlon(®) (triclopyr-based) upon the exposure cessation. European eel (Anguilla anguilla) was exposed to the above commercial formulations for 3 days, and allowed to recover for 1, 7 and 14 days (post-exposure period). The comet assay was used to identify the DNA damage in blood cells during both exposure and post-exposure periods. As an attempt to clarify the DNA damaging mechanisms involved, an extra-step including the incubation of the nucleotides with DNA lesion-specific repair enzyme was added to the standard comet. The genotoxic potential of both herbicides was confirmed, concerning the exposure period. In addition, the involvement of oxidative DNA damage on the action of Roundup(®) (pointed out as pyrimidine bases oxidation) was demonstrated, while for Garlon(®) this damaging mechanism was less evident. Fish exposed to Garlon(®), though presenting some evidence towards a tendency of recovery, did not achieve a complete restoration of DNA integrity. In what concerns to Roundup(®), a recovery was evident when considering non-specific DNA damage on day 14 post-exposure. In addition, this herbicide was able to induce a late oxidative DNA damage (day 14). Blood cells of A. anguilla exposed to

  17. Phototoxicity mechanisms: chlorpromazine photosensitized damage to DNA and cell membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Kochevar, K.E.

    1981-07-01

    Photosensitized damage to biological molecules is the initial process in phototoxic responses. It is now recognized that many phototoxic compounds can photosensitize damage to more than one type of biological substrate. The in vitro light-initiated reactions of phototoxic compounds with DNA, soluble proteins and membrane components can be classified by their molecular mechanisms: (1) those in which an excited state of the phototoxic compound (or an unstable species derived from it) reacts directly with the biological substrate and (2) those in which a molecule derived from the phototoxic compound (a photoproduct or an activated oxygen species) reacts with the biological substrate. This paper describes the mechanisms by which chlorpromazine photosensitizes damage to membranes, protein and DNA and compares them to the mechanisms of photosensitization by psoralens, porphyrins, dyes, and other molecules.

  18. Electrical self-healing of mechanically damaged zinc oxide nanobelts.

    PubMed

    Zang, Jianfeng; Xu, Zhi-Hui; Webb, Richard A; Li, Xiaodong

    2011-01-12

    We report the observation of remarkable electrical self-healing in mechanically damaged ZnO nanobelts. Nanoindentation into intrinsically defect-free ZnO nanobelts induces deformation and crack damage, causing a dramatic electrical signal decrease. Two self-healing regimes in the nanoindented ZnO nanobelts are revealed. The physical mechanism for the observed phenomena is analyzed in terms of the nanoindentation-induced dislocations, the short-range atomic diffusion in nanostructures, and the local heating of the dislocation zone in the electrical measurement. PMID:21121680

  19. High-Temperature Oxide Regrowth on Mechanically-Damaged Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, Peter Julian; Lowe, Tracie M

    2008-01-01

    Here we report the effects of mechanical damage from a sharp stylus on the regrowth of oxide layers on a Ni-based superalloy known as Pyromet 80A . It was found that the oxide that reformed on the damaged portion of a pre-oxidized surface differed from that which formed on undamaged areas after the equal exposures to elevated temperature in air. These findings have broad implications for modeling the processes of material degradation in applications such as exhaust valves in internal combustion engines because they imply that static oxidation data for candidate materials may not adequately reflect their reaction to operating environments that involve both mechanical contact and oxidation.

  20. Mechanical Data for Use in Damage Tolerance Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forth, Scott C.; James, Mark A.; Newman, John A.; Everett, Richard A., Jr.; Johnston, William M., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    This report describes the results of a research program to determine the damage tolerance properties of metallic propeller materials. Three alloys were selected for investigation: 2025-T6 Aluminum, D6AC Steel and 4340 Steel. Mechanical response, fatigue (S-N) and fatigue crack growth rate data are presented for all of the alloys. The main conclusions that can be drawn from this study are as follows. The damage tolerant design of a propeller system will require a complete understanding of the fatigue crack growth threshold. There exists no experimental procedure to reliably develop the fatigue crack growth threshold data that is needed for damage tolerant design methods. Significant research will be required to fully understand the fatigue crack growth threshold. The development of alternative precracking methods, evaluating the effect of specimen configuration and attempting to identify micromechanical issues are simply the first steps to understanding the mechanics of the threshold.

  1. Damage mechanisms in uniaxial compression of single enamel rods.

    PubMed

    An, Bingbing; Wang, Raorao; Arola, Dwayne; Zhang, Dongsheng

    2015-02-01

    Enamel possesses a complex hierarchical structure, which bestows this tissue with unique mechanical properties. In this study, the mechanical behavior of single enamel rods was investigated under uniaxial compression. Numerical simulations were also performed using micromechanics models for individual enamel rods to identify the damage mechanisms contributing to the constitutive behavior. Experimental results showed that the single rods exhibited an elastic modulus ranging from 10~31 GPa, and that they undergo post-yield strain-hardening. The primary damage mode consisted of delamination within the assembly of mineral crystals. Results from numerical simulations suggest that strain localization within individual rods is responsible for the observed delamination, which is believed to arise from the non-uniform arrangement of mineral crystals. This mechanism was independent of mineral morphology and properties. The non-uniform crystal arrangement results in friction between crystals with different inclination angles and is believed to be responsible for the post-yield strain hardening behavior. PMID:25460920

  2. Protein formulation and lyophilization cycle design: prevention of damage due to freeze-concentration induced phase separation.

    PubMed

    Heller, M C; Carpenter, J F; Randolph, T W

    1999-04-20

    Hemoglobin has been previously shown to unfold during freeze drying when lyophilized from formulations that undergo freeze-concentration induced phase separation (Heller et al. 1997. Biotechnol Prog 13:590-596). In this report, we show that such damage may be avoided using kinetic strategies to arrest the phase separation. By rapidly cooling samples during liquid nitrogen spray-freeze drying, the time that the formulation spends in temperature regimes (ca. -3 to -23 degrees C) in which phase separation is both thermodynamically favorable and kinetically realizable is minimized. Increased protein damage with decreasing cooling rates and/or longer annealing periods at -7 degrees C is observed by FTIR spectroscopy. Phase separation and concomitant protein damage may also be avoided by addition of mannitol at concentrations sufficient to cause crystallization. Mannitol crystals segregate the freeze concentrated solution into microscopic domains that block propagation and nucleation of phase separating events. Addition of noncrystallizing sugars, such as sucrose and trehalose, or nonionic surfactants, such as Tween 80 and Triton X-100, has little protective effect against phase separation induced damage during freezing drying. PMID:10099593

  3. Mechanisms for microvascular damage induced by ultrasound-activated microbubbles

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Hong; Brayman, Andrew A.; Evan, Andrew P.; Matula, Thomas J.

    2012-10-03

    To provide insight into the mechanisms of microvascular damage induced by ultrasound-activated microbubbles, experimental studies were performed to correlate microvascular damage to the dynamics of bubble-vessel interactions. High-speed photomicrography was used to record single microbubbles interacting with microvessels in ex vivo tissue, under the exposure of short ultrasound pulses with a center frequency of 1 MHz and peak negative pressures (PNP) ranging from 0.8-4 MPa. Vascular damage associated with observed bubble-vessel interactions was either indicated directly by microbubble extravasation or examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses. As observed previously, the high-speed images revealed that ultrasound-activated microbubbles could cause distention and invagination of adjacent vessel walls, and could form liquid jets in microvessels. Vessel distention, invagination, and liquid jets were associated with the damage of microvessels whose diameters were smaller than those of maximally expanded microbubbles. However, vessel invagination appeared to be the dominant mechanism for the damage of relative large microvessels.

  4. Mechanisms for microvascular damage induced by ultrasound-activated microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hong; Brayman, Andrew A.; Evan, Andrew P.; Matula, Thomas J.

    2012-10-01

    To provide insight into the mechanisms of microvascular damage induced by ultrasound-activated microbubbles, experimental studies were performed to correlate microvascular damage to the dynamics of bubble-vessel interactions. High-speed photomicrography was used to record single microbubbles interacting with microvessels in ex vivo tissue, under the exposure of short ultrasound pulses with a center frequency of 1 MHz and peak negative pressures (PNP) ranging from 0.8-4 MPa. Vascular damage associated with observed bubble-vessel interactions was either indicated directly by microbubble extravasation or examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses. As observed previously, the high-speed images revealed that ultrasound-activated microbubbles could cause distention and invagination of adjacent vessel walls, and could form liquid jets in microvessels. Vessel distention, invagination, and liquid jets were associated with the damage of microvessels whose diameters were smaller than those of maximally expanded microbubbles. However, vessel invagination appeared to be the dominant mechanism for the damage of relative large microvessels.

  5. Lightning Strike Induced Damage Mechanisms of Carbon Fiber Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakami, Hirohide

    Composite materials have a wide application in aerospace, automotive, and other transportation industries, because of the superior structural and weight performances. Since carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites possess a much lower electrical conductivity as compared to traditional metallic materials utilized for aircraft structures, serious concern about damage resistance/tolerance against lightning has been rising. Main task of this study is to clarify the lightning damage mechanism of carbon fiber reinforced epoxy polymer composites to help further development of lightning strike protection. The research on lightning damage to carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites is quite challenging, and there has been little study available until now. In order to tackle this issue, building block approach was employed. The research was started with the development of supporting technologies such as a current impulse generator to simulate a lightning strike in a laboratory. Then, fundamental electrical properties and fracture behavior of CFRPs exposed to high and low level current impulse were investigated using simple coupon specimens, followed by extensive parametric investigations in terms of different prepreg materials frequently used in aerospace industry, various stacking sequences, different lightning intensity, and lightning current waveforms. It revealed that the thermal resistance capability of polymer matrix was one of the most influential parameters on lightning damage resistance of CFRPs. Based on the experimental findings, the semi-empirical analysis model for predicting the extent of lightning damage was established. The model was fitted through experimental data to determine empirical parameters and, then, showed a good capability to provide reliable predictions for other test conditions and materials. Finally, structural element level lightning tests were performed to explore more practical situations. Specifically, filled-hole CFRP plates and patch

  6. Herbal Formulation C168 Attenuates Proliferation and Induces Apoptosis in HCT 116 Human Colorectal Carcinoma Cells: Role of Oxidative Stress and DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Lek Mun; Chan, Kok Meng; Hamid, Asmah; Latip, Jalifah; Rajab, Nor Fadilah

    2016-01-01

    The use of herbal formulations has gained scientific interest, particularly in cancer treatment. In this study, the herbal formulation of interest, denoted as C168, is a mixture of eight genera of plants. This study aims to investigate the antiproliferative effect of C168 methanol extract (CME) on various cancer cells and its underlying mechanism of action on the most responsive cell line, namely, HCT 116 cells. CME exerted antiproliferative activities on HCT 116 colorectal carcinoma cells and HepG2 hepatocellular carcinoma cells but not on CCD-841-CoN normal colon epithelial cells, Jurkat E6.1 lymphoblastic leukemic cells, and V79-4 Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts. Further investigation on HCT 116 cells showed that CME induced G2/M cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis. Treatment of CME induced oxidative stress in HCT 116 cells by increasing the superoxide anion level and decreasing the intracellular glutathione. CME also increased tail moment value and H2AX phosphorylation in HCT 116 cells, suggesting DNA damage as an early signal of CME induced apoptosis. Loss of mitochondrial membrane potential in CME-treated cells also indicated the involvement of mitochondria in CME induced apoptosis. This study indicated the selectivity of CME toward colon cancer cells with the involvement of oxidative damage as its possible mechanism of action. PMID:26884792

  7. Fatigue and Mechanical Damage Propagation in Automotive PEM Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banan, Roshanak

    Polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells are generally exposed to high magnitude road-induced vibrations and impact loads, frequent humidity-temperature loading cycles, and freeze/thaw stresses when employed in automotive applications. The resultant mechanical stresses can play a significant role in the evolution of mechanical defects in the membrane electrode assembly (MEA). The focus of this research is to investigate fatigue challenges due to humidity-temperature (hygrothermal) cycles and vibrations and their effects on damage evolution in PEM fuel cells. To achieve this goal, this thesis is divided into three parts that provide insight into damage propagation in the MEA under i) hygrothermal cycles, ii) external applied vibrations, and iii) a combination of both to simulate realistic automotive conditions. A finite element damage model based on cohesive zone theory was developed to simulate the propagation of micro-scale defects (cracks and delaminations) in the MEA under fuel cell operating conditions. It was found that the micro-defects can propagate to critical states under start-up and shut-down cycles, prior to reaching the desired lifespan of the fuel cell. The simultaneous presence of hygrothermal cycles and vibrations severely intensified damage propagation and resulted in considerably large defects within 75% of the fuel cell life expectancy. However, the order of generated damage was found to be larger under hygrothermal cycles than vibrations. Under hygrothermal cycles, membrane crack propagation was more severe compared to delamination propagation. Conversely, the degrading influence of vibrations was more significant on delaminations. The presence of an anode/cathode channel offset under the combined loadings lead to a 2.5-fold increase in the delamination length compared to the aligned-channel case. The developed model can be used to investigate the damage behaviour of current materials employed in fuel cells as well as to evaluate the

  8. Differential continuum damage mechanics models for creep and fatigue of unidirectional metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, S. M.; Kruch, S.

    1991-01-01

    Three multiaxial isothermal continuum damage mechanics models for creep, fatigue, and creep/fatigue interaction of a unidirectional metal matrix composite volume element are presented, only one of which will be discussed in depth. Each model is phenomenological and stress based, with varying degrees of complexity to accurately predict the initiation and propagation of intergranular and transgranular defects over a wide range of loading conditions. The development of these models is founded on the definition of an initially transversely isotropic fatigue limit surface, static fracture surface, normalized stress amplitude function and isochronous creep damage failure surface, from which both fatigue and creep damage evolutionary laws can be obtained. The anisotropy of each model is defined through physically meaningful invariants reflecting the local stress and material orientation. All three transversely isotropic models have been shown, when taken to their isotropic limit, to directly simplify to previously developed and validated creep and fatigue continuum damage theories. Results of a nondimensional parametric study illustrate (1) the flexibility of the present formulation when attempting to characterize a large class of composite materials, and (2) its ability to predict anticipated qualitative trends in the fatigue behavior of unidirectional metal matrix composites. Additionally, the potential for the inclusion of various micromechanical effects (e.g., fiber/matrix bond strength, fiber volume fraction, etc.), into the phenomenological anisotropic parameters is noted, as well as a detailed discussion regarding the necessary exploratory and characterization experiments needed to utilize the featured damage theories.

  9. Metric space formulation of quantum mechanical conservation laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, P. M.; D'Amico, I.

    2014-03-01

    We show that conservation laws in quantum mechanics naturally lead to metric spaces for the set of related physical quantities. All such metric spaces have an "onion-shell" geometry. We demonstrate the power of this approach by considering many-body systems immersed in a magnetic field, with a finite ground state current. In the associated metric spaces we find regions of allowed and forbidden distances, a "band structure" in metric space directly arising from the conservation of the z component of the angular momentum.

  10. Origin and magma pathways for intraplate volcanism: a new damage mechanics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regenauer-Lieb, K.; Rosenbaum, G.; Weinberg, R. F.; Lyakhovsky, V.; Segev, A.; Weinstein, Y.

    2013-12-01

    We address the question of melting at the base of the lithosphere and the opening of pathways capable of transferring melt to the surface in an intraplate setting of an extending continental lithosphere. We study the initial stage of melting and the onset of the melting instability. The aim of this study thus is to understand: (i) the ubiquitous appearance of alkali-basaltic volcanic provinces that appear without identifiable heat source in intraplate settings; (ii) the apparent relation between melting and localization of deformation under such extremely low intraplate strain rates; (iii) the challenge of generating efficient pathways for the propagation of melt to the surface; (iv) the generation of melt at the base of a lithosphere with low regional heat flow in a thermodynamically consistent model; (iv) as a minor aspect, we also investigate the effect of a pre-existing structure at the surface of the lithosphere. We use a novel method for calculating the effect of melt on lithosphere deformation, which includes damage mechanics and feedback effects between melt generation and rock deformation. We show that it is possible to nucleate melt damage shear bands at the bottom of initially cold lithosphere in slow extensional setting. We conducted numerical models for common continental lithosphere with 50mW/m2 heat flow and a slow asymmetric extension velocity of 1 mm/y, and allowed three different damage mechanisms: (1) classical brittle damage with a Drucker-Prager type rheology; (2) creep damage with a crustal fluid assisted diffusional/dislocation mechanism; and (3) melt damage with a melt-supported diffusional/ dislocation mechanism. The melt conditions were calculated with a Gibbs energy minimization method (Melts; http://melts.ofm-research.org/), and the energy equation solved self-consistently for latent heat and shear heating effects. Our results show that within a short timeframe (~2 Ma), melt damage can propagate from the bottom of the lithosphere upwards

  11. Coating formulation and method for refinishing the surface of surface-damaged graphite articles

    DOEpatents

    Ardary, Zane L.; Benton, Samuel T.

    1988-01-01

    The described development is directed to a coating formulation for filling surface irregularities in graphite articles such as molds, crucibles, and matched die sets used in high-temperature metallurgical operations. The coating formulation of the present invention is formed of carbon black flour, thermosetting resin and a solvent for the resin. In affixing the coating to the article, the solvent is evaporated, the resin cured to bond the coating to the surface of the article and then pyrolyzed to convert the resin to carbon. Upon completion of the pyrolysis step, the coating is shaped and polished to provide the article with a surface restoration that is essentially similar to the original or desired surface finish without the irregularity.

  12. Coating formulation and method for refinishing the surface of surface-damaged graphite articles

    DOEpatents

    Ardary, Z.L.; Benton, S.T.

    1987-07-08

    The described development is directed to a coating formulation for filling surface irregularities in graphite articles such as molds, crucibles, and matched die sets used in high-temperature metallurgical operations. The coating formulation of the present invention is formed of carbon black flour, thermosetting resin and a solvent for the resin. In affixing the coating to the article, the solvent is evaporated, the resin cured to bond the coating to the surface of the article and then pyrolyzed to convert the resin to carbon. Upon completion of the pyrolysis step, the coating is shaped and polished to provide the article with a surface restoration that is essentially similar to the original or desired surface finish without the irregularity.

  13. Coating formulation and method for refinishing the surface of surface-damaged graphite articles

    DOEpatents

    Ardary, Z.L.; Benton, S.T.

    1988-11-22

    The described development is directed to a coating formulation for filling surface irregularities in graphite articles such as molds, crucibles, and matched die sets used in high-temperature metallurgical operations. The coating formulation of the present invention is formed of carbon black flour, thermosetting resin and a solvent for the resin. In affixing the coating to the article, the solvent is evaporated, the resin cured to bond the coating to the surface of the article and then pyrolyzed to convert the resin to carbon. Upon completion of the pyrolysis step, the coating is shaped and polished to provide the article with a surface restoration that is essentially similar to the original or desired surface finish without the irregularity.

  14. Mechanism study of goldenseal-associated DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Chen, Si; Wan, Liqing; Couch, Letha; Lin, Haixia; Li, Yan; Dobrovolsky, Vasily N; Mei, Nan; Guo, Lei

    2013-07-31

    Goldenseal has been used for the treatment of a wide variety of ailments including gastrointestinal disturbances, urinary tract disorders, and inflammation. The five major alkaloid constituents in goldenseal are berberine, palmatine, hydrastine, hydrastinine, and canadine. When goldenseal was evaluated by the National Toxicology Program (NTP) in the standard 2-year bioassay, goldenseal induced an increase in liver tumors in rats and mice; however, the mechanism of goldenseal-associated liver carcinogenicity remains unknown. In this study, the toxicity of the five goldenseal alkaloid constituents was characterized, and their toxic potencies were compared. As measured by the Comet assay and the expression of γ-H2A.X, berberine, followed by palmatine, appeared to be the most potent DNA damage inducer in human hepatoma HepG2 cells. Berberine and palmatine suppressed the activities of both topoisomerase (Topo) I and II. In berberine-treated cells, DNA damage was shown to be directly associated with the inhibitory effect of Topo II, but not Topo I by silencing gene of Topo I or Topo II. In addition, DNA damage was also observed when cells were treated with commercially available goldenseal extracts and the extent of DNA damage was positively correlated to the berberine content. Our findings suggest that the Topo II inhibitory effect may contribute to berberine- and goldenseal-induced genotoxicity and tumorigenicity. PMID:23747414

  15. Mechanisms of vessel damage in photodynamic therapy (Invited Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fingar, Victor H.; Wieman, Thomas J.

    1992-06-01

    Vessel constriction and platelet aggregation are observed within the first minutes of light exposure to photosensitized tissues and lead to blood flow stasis, tissue hypoxia, and nutrient depravation. The mechanism for these vessel changes remains unknown, although the release of eicosanoids is implicated. We propose the following hypothesis: Photodynamic therapy results in specific perturbations of endothelial cells which results in a combination of membrane damage, mitochondrial damage, and rearrangement of cytoskeletal proteins. This results in cellular stress which leads to interruption of tight junctions along the endothelium and cell rounding. Cell rounding exposes the basement membrane proteins causing activation of platelets and leukocytes. Activated platelets and leukocytes release thromboxane and other eicosanoids. These eicosanoids induce vasoconstriction, platelet aggregation, increases in vessel permeability, and blood flow stasis.

  16. A new mechanism for radiation damage processes in alkali halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubinko, V. I.; Turkin, A. A.; Vainshtein, D. I.; den Hartog, H. W.

    1999-12-01

    We present a theory of radiation damage formation in alkali halides based on a new mechanism of dislocation climb, which involves the production of VF centers (self-trapped hole neighboring a cation vacancy) as a result of the absorption of H centers of dislocation lines. We consider the evolution of all experimentally observed extended defects: metal colloids, gas bubbles, and vacancy voids. Voids are shown to arise and grow large due to the reaction between F and VF centers at the surface of halogen bubbles. Voids can ignite a back reaction between the radiolytic products resulting in decomposition of the irradiated material.

  17. Hygrothermal damage mechanisms in graphite-epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crossman, F. W.; Mauri, R. E.; Warren, W. J.

    1979-01-01

    T300/5209 and T300/5208 graphite epoxy laminates were studied experimentally and analytically in order to: (1) determine the coupling between applied stress, internal residual stress, and moisture sorption kinetics; (2) examine the microscopic damage mechanisms due to hygrothermal cycling; (3) evaluate the effect of absorbed moisture and hygrothermal cycling on inplane shear response; (4) determine the permanent loss of interfacial bond strength after moisture absorption and drying; and (5) evaluate the three dimensional stress state in laminates under a combination of hygroscopic, thermal, and mechanical loads. Specimens were conditioned to equilibrium moisture content under steady exposure to 55% or 95% RH at 70 C or 93 C. Some specimens were tested subsequent to moisture conditioning and 100 cycles between -54 C and either 70 C or 93 C.

  18. Fisetin Protects DNA Against Oxidative Damage and Its Possible Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tingting; Lin, Huajuan; Tu, Qian; Liu, Jingjing; Li, Xican

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The paper tries to assess the protective effect of fisetin against •OH-induced DNA damage, then to investigate the possible mechanism. Methods: The protective effect was evaluated based on the content of malondialdehyde (MDA). The possible mechanism was analyzed using various antioxidant methods in vitro, including •OH scavenging (deoxyribose degradation), •O2- scavenging (pyrogallol autoxidation), DPPH• scavenging, ABTS•+ scavenging, and Cu2+-reducing power assays. Results: Fisetin increased dose-dependently its protective percentages against •OH-induced DNA damage (IC50 value =1535.00±29.60 µM). It also increased its radical-scavenging percentages in a dose-dependent manner in various antioxidants assays. Its IC50 values in •OH scavenging, •O2- scavenging, DPPH• scavenging, ABTS•+ scavenging, and Cu2+-reducing power assays, were 47.41±4.50 µM, 34.05±0.87 µM, 9.69±0.53 µM, 2.43±0.14 µM, and 1.49±0.16 µM, respectively. Conclusion: Fisetin can effectively protect DNA against •OH-induced oxidative damage possibly via reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging approach, which is assumed to be hydrogen atom (H•) and/or single electron (e) donation (HAT/SET) pathways. In the HAT pathway, the 3’,4’-dihydroxyl moiety in B ring of fisetin is thought to play an important role, because it can be ultimately oxidized to a stable ortho-benzoquinone form. PMID:27478791

  19. Damage detection technique by measuring laser-based mechanical impedance

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyeonseok; Sohn, Hoon

    2014-02-18

    This study proposes a method for measurement of mechanical impedance using noncontact laser ultrasound. The measurement of mechanical impedance has been of great interest in nondestructive testing (NDT) or structural health monitoring (SHM) since mechanical impedance is sensitive even to small-sized structural defects. Conventional impedance measurements, however, have been based on electromechanical impedance (EMI) using contact-type piezoelectric transducers, which show deteriorated performances induced by the effects of a) Curie temperature limitations, b) electromagnetic interference (EMI), c) bonding layers and etc. This study aims to tackle the limitations of conventional EMI measurement by utilizing laser-based mechanical impedance (LMI) measurement. The LMI response, which is equivalent to a steady-state ultrasound response, is generated by shooting the pulse laser beam to the target structure, and is acquired by measuring the out-of-plane velocity using a laser vibrometer. The formation of the LMI response is observed through the thermo-mechanical finite element analysis. The feasibility of applying the LMI technique for damage detection is experimentally verified using a pipe specimen under high temperature environment.

  20. Damage detection technique by measuring laser-based mechanical impedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyeonseok; Sohn, Hoon

    2014-02-01

    This study proposes a method for measurement of mechanical impedance using noncontact laser ultrasound. The measurement of mechanical impedance has been of great interest in nondestructive testing (NDT) or structural health monitoring (SHM) since mechanical impedance is sensitive even to small-sized structural defects. Conventional impedance measurements, however, have been based on electromechanical impedance (EMI) using contact-type piezoelectric transducers, which show deteriorated performances induced by the effects of a) Curie temperature limitations, b) electromagnetic interference (EMI), c) bonding layers and etc. This study aims to tackle the limitations of conventional EMI measurement by utilizing laser-based mechanical impedance (LMI) measurement. The LMI response, which is equivalent to a steady-state ultrasound response, is generated by shooting the pulse laser beam to the target structure, and is acquired by measuring the out-of-plane velocity using a laser vibrometer. The formation of the LMI response is observed through the thermo-mechanical finite element analysis. The feasibility of applying the LMI technique for damage detection is experimentally verified using a pipe specimen under high temperature environment.

  1. Characteristics and mechanisms of acrylate polymer damage to maize seedlings.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xian; Mao, Xiaoyun; Lu, Qin; Liao, Zongwen; He, Zhenli

    2016-07-01

    Superabsorbent acrylate polymers (SAPs) have been widely used to maintain soil moisture in agricultural management, but they may cause damage to plants, and the mechanisms are not well understood. In this study, seed germination, soil pot culture, hydroponic experiments, and SAPs degradation were conducted to investigate damage characteristics and mechanisms associated with SAPs application. The Results showed that SAPs inhibited maize growth and altered root morphology (irregular and loose arrangement of cells and breakage of cortex parenchyma), and the inhibitory effects were enhanced at higher SAPs rates. After 1h SAP hydrogels treatment, root malondialdehyde (MDA) content was significantly increased, while superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) content were significantly decreased. Hydroponics experiment indicated that root and shoot growth was inhibited at 2.5mgL(-1) acrylic acid (AA), and the inhibition was enhanced with increasing AA rates. This effect was exacerbated by the presence of Na(+) at a high concentration in the hydrogels. Release and degradation of AA were enhanced at higher soil moisture levels. A complete degradation of AA occurred between 15 and 20 days after incubation (DAI), but it took longer for Na(+) concentration to decrease to a safe level. These results indicate that high concentration of both AA and Na(+) present in the SAPs inhibits plant growth. The finding of this study may provide a guideline for appropriate application of SAPs in agriculture. PMID:27057990

  2. Oxidant conditioning protects cartilage from mechanically induced damage.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Prem; Hecht, Benjamin A; Pedersen, Douglas R; Lavery, Matthew R; Maynard, Jerry; Buckwalter, Joseph A; Martin, James A

    2010-07-01

    Articular cartilage degeneration in osteoarthritis has been linked to abnormal mechanical stresses that are known to cause chondrocyte apoptosis and metabolic derangement in in vitro models. Evidence implicating oxidative damage as the immediate cause of these harmful effects suggests that the antioxidant defenses of chondrocytes might influence their tolerance for mechanical injury. Based on evidence that antioxidant defenses in many cell types are stimulated by moderate oxidant exposure, we hypothesized that oxidant preconditioning would reduce acute chondrocyte death and proteoglycan depletion in cartilage explants after exposure to abnormal mechanical stresses. Porcine cartilage explants were treated every 48 h with tert-butyl hydrogen peroxide (tBHP) at nonlethal concentrations (25, 100, 250, and 500 microM) for a varying number of times (one, two, or four) prior to a bout of unconfined axial compression (5 MPa, 1 Hz, 1800 cycles). When compared with untreated controls, tBHP had significant positive effects on post-compression viability, lactate production, and proteoglycan losses. Overall, the most effective regime was 100 microM tBHP applied four times. RNA analysis revealed significant effects of 100 microM tBHP on gene expression. Catalase, hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha), and glyceraldehyde 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) were significantly increased relative to untreated controls in explants treated four times with 100 microM tBHP, a regime that also resulted in a significant decrease in matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) expression. These findings demonstrate that repeated exposure of cartilage to sublethal concentrations of peroxide can moderate the acute effects of mechanical stress, a conclusion supported by evidence of peroxide-induced changes in gene expression that could render chondrocytes more resistant to oxidative damage. PMID:20058262

  3. A displacement-based finite element formulation for incompressible and nearly-incompressible cardiac mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Hadjicharalambous, Myrianthi; Lee, Jack; Smith, Nicolas P.; Nordsletten, David A.

    2014-01-01

    The Lagrange Multiplier (LM) and penalty methods are commonly used to enforce incompressibility and compressibility in models of cardiac mechanics. In this paper we show how both formulations may be equivalently thought of as a weakly penalized system derived from the statically condensed Perturbed Lagrangian formulation, which may be directly discretized maintaining the simplicity of penalty formulations with the convergence characteristics of LM techniques. A modified Shamanskii–Newton–Raphson scheme is introduced to enhance the nonlinear convergence of the weakly penalized system and, exploiting its equivalence, modifications are developed for the penalty form. Focusing on accuracy, we proceed to study the convergence behavior of these approaches using different interpolation schemes for both a simple test problem and more complex models of cardiac mechanics. Our results illustrate the well-known influence of locking phenomena on the penalty approach (particularly for lower order schemes) and its effect on accuracy for whole-cycle mechanics. Additionally, we verify that direct discretization of the weakly penalized form produces similar convergence behavior to mixed formulations while avoiding the use of an additional variable. Combining a simple structure which allows the solution of computationally challenging problems with good convergence characteristics, the weakly penalized form provides an accurate and efficient alternative to incompressibility and compressibility in cardiac mechanics. PMID:25187672

  4. Damage mechanisms in PBT-GF30 under thermo-mechanical cyclic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Schaaf, A. De Monte, M. Hoffmann, C.; Vormwald, M.; Quaresimin, M.

    2014-05-15

    The scope of this paper is the investigation of damage mechanisms at microscopic scale on a short glass fiber reinforced polybutylene terephthalate (PBT-GF30) under thermo-mechanical cyclic loading. In addition the principal mechanisms are verified through micro mechanical FE models. In order to investigate the fatigue behavior of the material both isothermal strain controlled fatigue (ISCF) tests at three different temperatures and thermo-mechanical fatigue (TMF) tests were conducted on plain and notched specimens, manufactured by injection molding. The goal of the work is to determine the damage mechanisms occurring under TMF conditions and to compare them with the mechanisms occurring under ISCF. For this reason fracture surfaces of TMF and ISCF samples loaded at different temperature levels were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. Furthermore, specimens that failed under TMF were examined on microsections revealing insight into both crack initiation and crack propagation. The findings of this investigation give valuable information about the main damage mechanisms of PBT-GF30 under TMF loading and serve as basis for the development of a TMF life estimation methodology.

  5. Molecular mechanisms involved in initiation of the DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Barnum, Kevin J; O’Connell, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    DNA is subject to a wide variety of damage. In order to maintain genomic integrity, cells must respond to this damage by activating repair and cell cycle checkpoint pathways. The initiating events in the DNA damage response entail recognition of the lesion and the assembly of DNA damage response complexes at the DNA. Here, we review what is known about these processes for various DNA damage pathways. PMID:27308403

  6. UNDERSTANDING DAMAGE MECHANISMS IN FERRITIC/MARTENSITIC STEELS

    SciTech Connect

    Swindeman, R.W.; Maziasz, P.J.; Swindeman, M.J.

    2003-04-22

    Advanced ferritic/martensitic steels are being used extensively in fossil energy applications. New steels such as 2 1/4Cr-W-V (T23, T24), 3Cr-W-V, 9Cr-Mo-V (T91), 7Cr-W-V, 9Cr-W-V (T92 and T911), and 12Cr-W-V (T122, SAVE 12, and NF12) are examples of tubing being used in boilers and heat recovery steam generators (1). Other products for these new steels include piping, plates, and forgings. There is concern about the high-temperature performance of the advanced steels for several reasons. First, they exhibit a higher sensitivity to temperature than the 300 series stainless steels that they often replace. Second, they tend to be metallurgically unstable and undergo significant degradation at service temperatures in the creep range. Third, the experience base is limited in regard to duration. Fourth, they will be used for thick-section, high-pressure components that require high levels of integrity. To better understand the potential limitations of these steels, damage models are being developed that consider metallurgical factors as well as mechanical performance factors. Grade 91 steel was chosen as representative of these steels for evaluation of cumulative damage models since laboratory and service exposures of grade 91 exceed 100,000 hours.

  7. Review: Wind impacts on plant growth, mechanics and damage.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Barry; Berry, Peter; Moulia, Bruno

    2016-04-01

    Land plants have adapted to survive under a range of wind climates and this involve changes in chemical composition, physical structure and morphology at all scales from the cell to the whole plant. Under strong winds plants can re-orientate themselves, reconfigure their canopies, or shed needles, leaves and branches in order to reduce the drag. If the wind is too strong the plants oscillate until the roots or stem fail. The mechanisms of root and stem failure are very similar in different plants although the exact details of the failure may be different. Cereals and other herbaceous crops can often recover after wind damage and even woody plants can partially recovery if there is sufficient access to water and nutrients. Wind damage can have major economic impacts on crops, forests and urban trees. This can be reduced by management that is sensitive to the local site and climatic conditions and accounts for the ability of plants to acclimate to their local wind climate. Wind is also a major disturbance in many plant ecosystems and can play a crucial role in plant regeneration and the change of successional stage. PMID:26940495

  8. Enhanced protective activity of nano formulated andrographolide against arsenic induced liver damage.

    PubMed

    Das, Sujata; Pradhan, Goutam Kumar; Das, Subhadip; Nath, Debjani; Das Saha, Krishna

    2015-12-01

    Chronic exposure to arsenic over a period of time induces toxicity, primarily in liver but gradually in all systems of the body. Andrographolide (AG), a major diterpene lactone of Andrographis paniculata, shows a wide array of physiological functions including hepatoprotection. Therapeutic applications of AG are however seriously constrained because of its insolubility, poor bioavailability, and short plasma half-life. Nanoparticulation of AG is a possible solution to these problems. In the present study we investigated the effectiveness of polylactide co-glycolide (PLGA) nanocapsulated andrographolide (NA) against arsenic induced liver damage in mice. NA of average diameter 65.8 nm and encapsulation efficiency of 64% were prepared. Sodium arsenite at a dose of 40 mg/L supplied via drinking water in mice significantly raised the serum level of liver function markers such as AST, ALT, and ALP, and caused arsenic deposition in liver and ROS generation, though it did not show any lethality up to 30 days of exposure. However, even liver toxicity was not observed when mice were given AG and NA orally at doses up to 100 mg/kg bwt and 20 mg/kg bwt respectively on alternate days for one month. Treatment of non-toxic doses of AG or NA on alternate days along with arsenic significantly decreased the arsenic induced elevation of the serum level of ALT, AST and ALP, and arsenic deposition in liver. AG and NA increased the level of hepatic antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT), and the level of reduced glutathione (GSH). Also, the ROS level was lowered in mice exposed to arsenic but treated with AG or NA. Protective efficiency of NA is about five times more than that of AG. Administration of NA to arsenic-treated mice caused signs of improvement in liver tissue architecture. In conclusion, the results of this study suggest that NA could be beneficial against arsenic-induced liver toxicity. PMID:26485141

  9. DEVELOPMENT OF NONLINEAR HARMONIC SENSORS FOR DETECTION OF MECHANICAL DAMAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Alfred E. Crouch; Alan Dean; Carl Torres; Jeff Aron

    2004-03-01

    In a joint effort with Tuboscope Pipeline Services of Houston, Texas, Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) adapted its nonlinear harmonic (NLH) sensing technology for use on a new in-line inspection system (smart pig). Nonlinear harmonics, an AC magnetic method for detecting local anomalies of stress and plastic deformation, shows promise of improved characterization of mechanical damage defects such as gouged dents, even though the dents may have re-rounded. The SwRI-Tuboscope project produced a sensor design, electronic design, and sensor suspension design that are directly adaptable to a multitechnology ILI system. This report describes the NLH method, the sensor, circuit, and suspension designs, and shows results from the supporting laboratory work.

  10. Damage and failure mechanisms associated with photoablation of biological tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Antoun, T.; Seaman, L.; Curran, D.; Glinsky, M.

    1996-05-01

    This paper aims to examine the processes associated with failure of the cornea and other collagenous tissues during photoablation. Two different constitutive models are applied to simulate a series of laser deposition experiments into porcine reticular dermis (1), a biological tissue similar to the cornea in composition and photoablation characteristics. The first of our constitutive models, DFRACT, is a physically motivated, micromechanical model based on the nucleation and growth of spherical voids (2). The second is a relatively simple model that allows the material to vaporize and thermally soften. The simulation results reproduce the prominent features observed experimentally thereby shedding a new light on the operative mechanisms during photoablation. The good qualitative agreement between the simulated stress histories and the stress histories measured during the experiments also demonstrates the effectiveness of micromechanical damage and failure modeling as a viable tool for optimizing existing laser surgery procedures and designing new ones. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Mechanical damage to Escherichia coli cells in a model of amino-acid crystal fermentation.

    PubMed

    Okutani, Satoshi; Iwai, Takayoshi; Iwatani, Shintaro; Kondo, Kazuya; Osumi, Tsuyoshi; Tsujimoto, Nobuharu; Matsuno, Kiyoshi

    2012-04-01

    We investigated the mechanical damage to the Escherichia coli cell caused by polyvinyl chloride particles as a model of amino-acid crystal fermentation. Our results indicated that the glucose-consumption rate and the intracellular ATP concentration temporarily increased by the mechanical damage, and decreased after considerable damage had occurred on cell membrane. PMID:22153714

  12. Skin Damage Mechanisms Related to Airborne Particulate Matter Exposure.

    PubMed

    Magnani, Natalia D; Muresan, Ximena M; Belmonte, Giuseppe; Cervellati, Franco; Sticozzi, Claudia; Pecorelli, Alessandra; Miracco, Clelia; Marchini, Timoteo; Evelson, Pablo; Valacchi, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest a correlation between increased airborne particulate matter (PM) and adverse health effects. The mechanisms of PM-health effects are believed to involve oxidative stress and inflammation. To evaluate the ability of PM promoting skin tissue damage, one of the main organs exposed to outdoor pollutants, we analyzed the effect of concentrated ambient particles (CAPs) in a reconstructed human epidermis (RHE) model. RHE tissues were exposed to 25 or 100 µg/ml CAPs for 24 or 48 h. Data showed that RHE seems to be more susceptible to CAPs-induced toxicity after 48 h exposure than after 24 h. We found a local reactive O(2) species (ROS) production increase generated from metals present on the particle, which contributes to lipids oxidation. Furthermore, as a consequence of altered redox status, NFkB nucleus translocation was increase upon CAPs exposure, as well as cyclooxygenase 2 and cytochrome P450 levels, which may be involved in the inflammatory response initiated by PM. CAPs also triggered an apoptotic process in skin. Surprisingly, by transition electron microscopy analysis we showed that CAPs were able to penetrate skin tissues. These findings contribute to the understanding of the cutaneous pathophysiological mechanisms initiated by CAPs exposure, where oxidative stress and inflammation may play predominant roles. PMID:26507108

  13. A Look Behind the Salt Curve: An Examination of Thickening Mechanisms in Shampoo Formulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penfield, Kevin

    2008-07-01

    Dynamic oscillatory rheological measurements are used to examine two mechanisms for thickening simple shampoo formulations. The salt curve, in which viscosity of a surfactant solution is maximized at intermediate levels of salt, is shown to be due to the variation in relaxation time; this is found to correlate with variation in the degree of entanglement per micelle. This is contrasted with the effect of PEG-150 distearate, which alters viscosity through a change in modulus.

  14. Damage in total knee replacements from mechanical overload.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, William F; Miller, Mark A; Cleary, Richard J; Izant, Timothy H; Mann, Kenneth A

    2016-07-01

    The mechanical loads acting across the knee joint following total knee replacements (TKR) during activities of daily living have recently been measured using instrumented TKRs. Using a series of postmortem retrieved TKR constructs we investigated whether these mechanical loads could result in damage to the implant bone interface or supporting bone in the tibia. Eighteen cemented en bloc tibial components (0 to 22 years in service) were loaded under axial compression in increments from 1 to 10 times body weight and digital image correlation was used to measure bone strain and interface micromotion during loading and unloading. Failure was considered to occur when micromotion exceeded 150µm or compressive bone strain exceeded 7300με. The results show that all retrieved specimens had sufficient bone strength to support most activities of daily living, but ~40% would be at risk under larger physiologic loads that might occur secondary to a higher impacts such as jogging or a stumble. The tray-bone micromotion (regression model R(2)=0.48, p=0.025) was greater for donors with lower age at implantation (p=0.0092). Proximal bone strain (model R(2)=0.46, p=0.03) was greater for donors with longer time in service (p=0.021). Distal bone strain (model R(2)=0.58, p=0.005) was greater for donors with more time in service (p=0.0054) and lower peri-implant BMD (p=0.049). High mechanical overload of a single or repetitive nature may be an initiating factor in aseptic loosening of total joint arthroplasties and should be avoided in order to prolong the life of the implant. PMID:27237382

  15. DNA Damage Response and Immune Defense: Links and Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Nakad, Rania; Schumacher, Björn

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage plays a causal role in numerous human pathologies including cancer, premature aging, and chronic inflammatory conditions. In response to genotoxic insults, the DNA damage response (DDR) orchestrates DNA damage checkpoint activation and facilitates the removal of DNA lesions. The DDR can also arouse the immune system by for example inducing the expression of antimicrobial peptides as well as ligands for receptors found on immune cells. The activation of immune signaling is triggered by different components of the DDR including DNA damage sensors, transducer kinases, and effectors. In this review, we describe recent advances on the understanding of the role of DDR in activating immune signaling. We highlight evidence gained into (i) which molecular and cellular pathways of DDR activate immune signaling, (ii) how DNA damage drives chronic inflammation, and (iii) how chronic inflammation causes DNA damage and pathology in humans. PMID:27555866

  16. Incorporating Micro-Mechanics Based Damage Models into Earthquake Rupture Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, H.; Rosakis, A.; Sammis, C. G.

    2012-12-01

    The micromechanical damage mechanics formulated by Ashby and Sammis, 1990 and generalized by Deshpande and Evans 2008 has been extended to allow for a more generalized stress state and to incorporate an experimentally motivated new crack growth (damage evolution) law that is valid over a wide range of loading rates. This law is sensitive to both the crack tip stress field and its time derivative. Incorporating this feature produces additional strain-rate sensitivity in the constitutive response. The model is also experimentally verified by predicting the failure strength of Dionysus-Pentelicon marble over a wide range of strain rates. Model parameters determined from quasi-static experiments were used to predict the failure strength at higher loading rates. Agreement with experimental results was excellent. After this verification step the constitutive law was incorporated into a Finite Element Code focused on simulating dynamic earthquake ruptures with specific focus on the ends of the fault (fault tip process zone) and the resulting strong ground motion radiation was studied.

  17. Diving bradycardia: a mechanism of defence against hypoxic damage.

    PubMed

    Alboni, Paolo; Alboni, Marco; Gianfranchi, Lorella

    2011-06-01

    A feature of all air-breathing vertebrates, diving bradycardia is triggered by apnoea and accentuated by immersion of the face or whole body in cold water. Very little is known about the afferents of diving bradycardia, whereas the efferent part of the reflex circuit is constituted by the cardiac vagal fibres. Diving bradycardia is associated with vasoconstriction of selected vascular beds and a reduction in cardiac output. The diving response appears to be more pronounced in mammals than in birds. In humans, the bradycardic response to diving varies greatly from person to person; the reduction in heart rate generally ranges from 15 to 40%, but a small proportion of healthy individuals can develop bradycardia below 20 beats/min. During prolonged dives, bradycardia becomes more pronounced because of activation of the peripheral chemoreceptors by a reduction in the arterial partial pressure of oxygen (O2), responsible for slowing of heart rate. The vasoconstriction is associated with a redistribution of the blood flow, which saves O2 for the O2-sensitive organs, such as the heart and brain. The results of several investigations carried out both in animals and in humans show that the diving response has an O2-conserving effect, both during exercise and at rest, thus lengthening the time to the onset of serious hypoxic damage. The diving response can therefore be regarded as an important defence mechanism for the organism. PMID:21330930

  18. The anisotropic mechanical behaviour of electro-spun biodegradable polymer scaffolds: Experimental characterisation and constitutive formulation.

    PubMed

    Limbert, Georges; Omar, Rodaina; Krynauw, Hugo; Bezuidenhout, Deon; Franz, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Electro-spun biodegradable polymer fibrous structures exhibit anisotropic mechanical properties dependent on the degree of fibre alignment. Degradation and mechanical anisotropy need to be captured in a constitutive formulation when computational modelling is used in the development and design optimisation of such scaffolds. Biodegradable polyester-urethane scaffolds were electro-spun and underwent uniaxial tensile testing in and transverse to the direction of predominant fibre alignment before and after in vitro degradation of up to 28 days. A microstructurally-based transversely isotropic hyperelastic continuum constitutive formulation was developed and its parameters were identified from the experimental stress-strain data of the scaffolds at various stages of degradation. During scaffold degradation, maximum stress and strain in circumferential direction decreased from 1.02 ± 0.23 MPa to 0.38 ± 0.004 MPa and from 46 ± 11 % to 12 ± 2 %, respectively. In longitudinal direction, maximum stress and strain decreased from 0.071 ± 0.016 MPa to 0.010 ± 0.007 MPa and from 69 ± 24 % to 8 ± 2 %, respectively. The constitutive parameters were identified for both directions of the non-degraded and degraded scaffold for strain range varying between 0% and 16% with coefficients of determination r(2)>0.871. The six-parameter constitutive formulation proved versatile enough to capture the varying non-linear transversely isotropic behaviour of the fibrous scaffold throughout various stages of degradation. PMID:26301317

  19. A Mechanical Drag Coefficient Formulation and Urban Canopy Parameter Assimilation Technique for Complex Urban Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, E.; Martilli, A.; Santiago, J. L.; González, J. E.

    2015-11-01

    A mechanical drag coefficient formulation was implemented into the Building Effect Parameterization + Building Energy Model system coupled with the mesoscale Weather Research Forecasting model to improve the representation of the wind speed in complex urban environments. Previously, this formulation had been assessed only against spatially-averaged results from computational fluid dynamical simulations in idealized urban configurations. The main objective is to evaluate its performance over a real city. The introduction of a drag coefficient that varies with the building plan-area fraction increases the accuracy of the mesoscale model in predicting surface wind speed in complex urban environments (i.e. New York City) particularly in areas with tall buildings. Additionally, a methodology to implement local building information and a new land-cover land-use distribution is proposed that improves the representation of the urban morphology.

  20. Micro-mechanical modeling of perforating shock damage

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, R.P.; Krogh, K.E.; Behrmann, L.A.; Halleck, P.M.

    1997-11-17

    Shaped charge jet induced formation damage from perforation treatments hinders productivity. Manifestation of this damage is in the form of grain fragmentation resulting in fines that plug up pore throats along with the breakdown of inter-grain cementation. The authors use the Smooth Particle Hydrodynamic (SPH) computational method as a way to explicitly model, on a grain pore scale, the dynamic interactions of grains and grain/pores to calculate the damage resulting from perforation type stress wave loading. The SPH method is a continuum Lagrangian, meshless approach that features particles. Clusters of particles are used for each grain to provide representation of a grain pore structure that is similar to x-ray synchrotron microtomography images. Numerous damage models are available to portray fracture and fragmentation. In this paper the authors present the results of well defined impact loading on a grain pore structure that illustrate how the heterogeneity affects stress wave behavior and damage evolution. The SPH approach easily accommodates the coupling of multi-materials. Calculations for multi-material conditions with the pore space treated as a void, fluid filled, and/or clay filled show diverse effects on the stress wave propagation behavior and damage. SPH comparisons made with observed damage from recovered impacted sandstone samples in gas gun experiments show qualitatively the influence of stress intensity. The modeling approach presented here offers a unique way in concert with experiments to define a better understanding of formation damage resulting from perforation completion treatments.

  1. Damage detection in mechanical structures using extreme value statistic.

    SciTech Connect

    Worden, K.; Allen, D. W.; Sohn, H.; Farrar, C. R.

    2002-01-01

    The first and most important objective of any damage identification algorithms is to ascertain with confidence if damage is present or not. Many methods have been proposed for damage detection based on ideas of novelty detection founded in pattern recognition and multivariate statistics. The philosophy of novelty detection is simple. Features are first extracted from a baseline system to be monitored, and subsequent data are then compared to see if the new features are outliers, which significantly depart from the rest of population. In damage diagnosis problems, the assumption is that outliers are generated from a damaged condition of the monitored system. This damage classification necessitates the establishment of a decision boundary. Choosing this threshold value is often based on the assumption that the parent distribution of data is Gaussian in nature. While the problem of novelty detection focuses attention on the outlier or extreme values of the data i.e. those points in the tails of the distribution, the threshold selection using the normality assumption weighs the central population of data. Therefore, this normality assumption might impose potentially misleading behavior on damage classification, and is likely to lead the damage diagnosis astray. In this paper, extreme value statistics is integrated with the novelty detection to specifically model the tails of the distribution of interest. Finally, the proposed technique is demonstrated on simulated numerical data and time series data measured from an eight degree-of-freedom spring-mass system.

  2. A damage mechanics approach for quantifying stress changes due to brittle failure of porous rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquey, Antoine B.; Cacace, Mauro; Blöcher, Guido; Milsch, Harald; Scheck-Wenderoth, Magdalena

    2016-04-01

    Natural fault zones or man-made injection or production of fluid impact the regional stress distribution in Earth's crust and can be responsible for localized stress discontinuities. Understanding the processes controlling fracturing of the porous rocks and mechanical behaviour of fault zones is therefore of interest for several applications including geothermal energy production. In this contribution, we will present a thermodynamically consistent visco-poroelastic damage model which can deal with the multi-scale and multi-physics nature of the physical processes controlling the deformation of porous rocks during and after brittle failure. Deformation of a porous medium is crucially influenced by the changes in the effective stress. Considering a strain-formulated yield cap and the compaction-dilation transition, three different regimes can be identified: quasi-elastic deformation, cataclastic compaction with microcracking (damage accumulation) and macroscopic brittle failure with dilation. The governing equations for deformation, damage accumulation/healing and fluid flow have been implemented in a fully-coupled finite-element-method based framework (MOOSE). The MOOSE framework provides a powerful and flexible platform to solve multiphysics problems implicitly and in a tightly coupled manner on unstructured meshes which is of interest for such non-linear context. To illustrate the model, simulation of a compaction experiment of a sandstone leading to shear failure will be presented which allows to quantify the stress drop accompanying the failure. Finally, we will demonstrate that this approach can also be used at the field scale to simulate hydraulic fracturing and assess the resulting changes in the stress field.

  3. Mechanisms of fatigue damage in boron/aluminum composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.

    1980-01-01

    Tensile fatigue tests were conducted on several laminates of boron/aluminum (6061-0). In laminates with 0 deg fibers on the outside, an analysis that identifies "shakedown" conditions predicted the stress amplitude below which no fatigue damage accumulated. A fatigue damage accumulation model which relates matrix fatigue cracking and the overall laminate properties is described. A model for the saturation damage stage development is presented, that identical laminates, tested in directions 90 deg apart (such that one layup has 90 deg outer plies and the other 0 deg), have different fatigue behaviors due to the stacking sequence. The 90 deg plies on the surface develop cracks earlier than predicted by shakedown. An attempt was made to explain this stacking sequence effect. Variable load history effects on the fatigue damage response were investigated. Tests reveal that for a given stress ratio the specimen seeks the saturation damage state for the largest stress range to which it is subjected. It was also found that little damage is generated by shifting a given stress range down, whereas significant damage may be created by shifting it upward. The laminate stresses were always tensile.

  4. Mechanisms of Mitochondrial Damage in Keratinocytes by Pemphigus Vulgaris Antibodies*

    PubMed Central

    Kalantari-Dehaghi, Mina; Chen, Yumay; Deng, Wu; Chernyavsky, Alex; Marchenko, Steve; Wang, Ping H.; Grando, Sergei A.

    2013-01-01

    The development of nonhormonal treatment of pemphigus vulgaris (PV) has been hampered by a lack of clear understanding of the mechanisms leading to keratinocyte (KC) detachment and death in pemphigus. In this study, we sought to identify changes in the vital mitochondrial functions in KCs treated with the sera from PV patients and healthy donors. PV sera significantly increased proton leakage from KCs, suggesting that PV IgGs increase production of reactive oxygen species. Indeed, measurement of intracellular reactive oxygen species production showed a drastic increase of cell staining in response to treatment by PV sera, which was confirmed by FACS analysis. Exposure of KCs to PV sera also caused dramatic changes in the mitochondrial membrane potential detected with the JC-1 dye. These changes can trigger the mitochondria-mediated intrinsic apoptosis. Although sera from different PV patients elicited unique patterns of mitochondrial damage, the mitochondria-protecting drugs nicotinamide (also called niacinamide), minocycline, and cyclosporine A exhibited a uniform protective effect. Their therapeutic activity was validated in the passive transfer model of PV in neonatal BALB/c mice. The highest efficacy of mitochondrial protection of the combination of these drugs found in mitochondrial assay was consistent with the ability of the same drug combination to abolish acantholysis in mouse skin. These findings provide a theoretical background for clinical reports of the efficacy of mitochondria-protecting drugs in PV patients. Pharmacological protection of mitochondria and/or compensation of an altered mitochondrial function may therefore become a novel approach to development of personalized nonhormonal therapies of patients with this potentially lethal autoimmune blistering disease. PMID:23599429

  5. Fractal mechanism for characterizing singularity of mode shape for damage detection

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, M. S.; Ostachowicz, W.; Bai, R. B.; Radzieński, M.

    2013-11-25

    Damage is an ordinary physical phenomenon jeopardizing structural safety; damage detection is an ongoing interdisciplinary issue. Waveform fractal theory has provided a promising resource for detecting damage in plates while presenting a concomitant problem: susceptibility to false features of damage. This study proposes a fractal dimension method based on affine transformation to address this problem. Physical experiments using laser measurement demonstrate that this method can substantially eliminate false features of damage and accurately identify complex cracks in plates, providing a fundamental mechanism that brings the merits of waveform fractal theory into full play in structural damage detection applications.

  6. Mechanisms controlling fatigue damage development in continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.

    1989-01-01

    Damage in continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composite materials can be quite complex since there are a number of different constituents (fiber, matrix, and the fiber/matrix interface) that can fail. Multidirectional lay-ups have an even greater number of possible damage orientations and mechanisms. Based on the simplifying assumption of equivalent constituent strain states in the absence of damage, a strain based failure criteria may be applied to determine when and where initial damage will occur. Based on the relative strain to fatigue failure of the fiber and matrix, the possible damage mechanisms of an MMC can be grouped into three categories: (1) matrix dominated, (2) fiber dominated, and (3) self-similar damage growth. A fourth type of damage development, fiber/matrix interface failure, is dependent on the relative strength of the fiber/matrix interface and the matrix yield strength. These four types of damage are discussed and illustrated by examples.

  7. Mechanisms and impact of damage resulting from hydraulic fracturing. Topical report, May 1995-July 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Penny, G.S.; Conway, M.W.; Almond, S.W.; Himes, R.; Nick, K.E.

    1996-08-01

    This topical report documents the mechanisms of formation damage following hydraulic fracturing and their impact upon gas well productivity. The categories of damage reviewed include absolute or matrix permeability damage, relative permeability alterations, the damage of natural fracture permeability mechanisms and proppant conductivity impairment. Case studies are reviewed in which attempts are made to mitigate each of the damage types. Industry surveys have been conducted to determine the perceptions of the industry on the topic of formation damage following hydraulic fracturing and to identify key formations in which formation damage is a problem. From this information, technical hurdles and new technology needs are identified and estimates are made of the benefits of developing and applying minimum formation damage technology.

  8. Chemo-mechanics of salt damage in stone.

    PubMed

    Flatt, Robert J; Caruso, Francesco; Sanchez, Asel Maria Aguilar; Scherer, George W

    2014-01-01

    Many porous materials are damaged by pressure exerted by salt crystals growing in their pores. This is a serious issue in conservation science, geomorphology, geotechnical engineering and concrete materials science. In all cases, a central question is whether crystallization pressure will cause damage. Here we present an experiment in which the crystallization pressure and the pore saturation are varied in a controlled way. We demonstrate that a strain energy failure criterion can be used to predict when damage will occur. The experiment considered is the most widely used means to study the susceptibility to salt crystallization, so quantification of this test has far-reaching implications. PMID:25208600

  9. An adhesive contact mechanics formulation based on atomistically induced surface traction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Houfu; Ren, Bo; Li, Shaofan

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we have developed a novel multiscale computational contact formulation based on the generalized Derjuguin approximation for continua that are characterized by atomistically enriched constitutive relations in order to study macroscopic interaction between arbitrarily shaped deformable continua. The proposed adhesive contact formulation makes use of the microscopic interaction forces between individual particles in the interacting bodies. In particular, the double-layer volume integral describing the contact interaction (energy, force vector, matrix) is converted into a double-layer surface integral through a mathematically consistent approach that employs the divergence theorem and a special partitioning technique. The proposed contact model is formulated in the nonlinear continuum mechanics framework and implemented using the standard finite element method. With no large penalty constant, the stiffness matrix of the system will in general be well-conditioned, which is of great significance for quasi-static analysis. Three numerical examples are presented to illustrate the capability of the proposed method. Results indicate that with the same mesh configuration, the finite element computation based on the surface integral approach is faster and more accurate than the volume integral based approach. In addition, the proposed approach is energy preserving even in a very long dynamic simulation.

  10. Mechanical relaxation of localized residual stresses associatedwith foreign object damage

    SciTech Connect

    Boyce, B.L.; Chen, X.; Peters, J.O.; Hutchinson, J.H.; Ritchie,R.O.

    2002-05-01

    Foreign-object damage associated with the ingestion ofdebris into aircraft turbine engines can lead to a marked degradation inthe high-cycle fatigue life of turbine components. This degradation isgenerally considered to be associated with the premature initiation offatigue cracks at or near the damage sites; this is suspected to be dueto, at least in part, the impact-induced residual stress state, which canbe strongly tensile in these locations.

  11. Discrete fracture modeling of hydro-mechanical damage processes in geological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K.; Rutqvist, J.; Houseworth, J. E.; Birkholzer, J. T.

    2014-12-01

    This study presents a modeling approach for investigating coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical (THM) behavior, including fracture development, within geomaterials and structures. In the model, the coupling procedure consists of an effective linkage between two codes: TOUGH2, a simulator of subsurface multiphase flow and mass transport based on the finite volume approach; and an implementation of the rigid-body-spring network (RBSN) method, a discrete (lattice) modeling approach to represent geomechanical behavior. One main advantage of linking these two codes is that they share the same geometrical mesh structure based on the Voronoi discretization, so that a straightforward representation of discrete fracture networks (DFN) is available for fluid flow processes. The capabilities of the TOUGH-RBSN model are demonstrated through simulations of hydraulic fracturing, where fluid pressure-induced fracturing and damage-assisted flow are well represented. The TOUGH-RBSN modeling methodology has been extended to enable treatment of geomaterials exhibiting anisotropic characteristics. In the RBSN approach, elastic spring coefficients and strength parameters are systematically formulated based on the principal bedding direction, which facilitate a straightforward representation of anisotropy. Uniaxial compression tests are simulated for a transversely isotropic material to validate the new modeling scheme. The model is also used to simulate excavation fracture damage for the HG-A microtunnel in the Opalinus Clay rock, located at the Mont Terri underground research laboratory (URL) near Saint-Ursanne, Switzerland. The Opalinus Clay has transversely isotropic material properties caused by natural features such as bedding, foliation, and flow structures. Preferential fracturing and tunnel breakouts were observed following excavation, which are believed to be strongly influenced by the mechanical anisotropy of the rock material. The simulation results are qualitatively

  12. Fatigue Damage Mechanisms in Advanced Hybrid Titanium Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. Steven; Rhymer, Donald W.; St.Clair, Terry L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Hybrid Titanium Composite Laminates (HTCL) are a type of hybrid composite laminate with promise for high-speed aerospace applications, specifically designed for improved damage tolerance and strength at high-temperature (350 F, 177 C). However, in previous testing, HTCL demonstrated a propensity to excessive delamination at the titanium/PMC interface following titanium cracking. An advanced HTCL has been constructed with an emphasis on strengthening this interface, combining a PETI-5/IM7 PMC with Ti-15-3 foils prepared with an alkaline-perborate surface treatment. This paper discusses how the fatigue capabilities of the "advanced" HTCL compare to the first generation HTCL which was not modified for interface optimization, in both tension-tension (R = 0.1) and tension-compression (R=-0.2). The advanced HTCL under did not demonstrate a significant improvement in fatigue life, in either tension-tension or tension-compression loading. However, the advanced HTCL proved much more damage tolerant. The R = 0.1 tests revealed the advanced HTCL to increase the fatigue life following initial titanium ply damage up to 10X that of the initial HTCL at certain stress levels. The damage progression following the initial ply damage demonstrated the effect of the strengthened PMC/titanium interface. Acetate film replication of the advanced HTCL edges showed a propensity for some fibers in the adjacent PMC layers to fail at the point of titanium crack formation, suppressing delamination at the Ti/PMC interface. The inspection of failure surfaces validated these findings, revealing PMC fibers bonded to the majority of the titanium surfaces. Tension compression fatigue (R = -0.2) demonstrated the same trends in cycles between initial damage and failure, damage progression, and failure surfaces. Moreover, in possessing a higher resistance to delamination, the advanced HTCL did not exhibit buckling following initial titanium ply cracking under compression unlike the initial HTCL.

  13. Damage mechanisms avoided or managed for NIF large optics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Manes, K. R.; Spaeth, M. L.; Adams, J. J.; Bowers, M. W.; Bude, J. D.; Carr, C. W.; Conder, A. D.; DiNicola, J. M. G.; Dixit, S. N.; Feigenbaum, E.; et al

    2016-02-09

    After every other failure mode has been considered, in the end, the high-performance limit of all lasers is set by optical damage. The demands of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) pushed lasers designed as ICF drivers into this limit from their very earliest days. The first ICF lasers were small, and their pulses were short. Their goal was to provide as much power to the target as possible. Typically, they faced damage due to high intensity on their optics. As requests for higher laser energy, longer pulse lengths, and better symmetry appeared, new kinds of damage also emerged, some of themmore » anticipated and others unexpected. This paper will discuss the various types of damage to large optics that had to be considered, avoided to the extent possible, or otherwise managed as the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser was designed, fabricated, and brought into operation. Furthermore, it has been possible for NIF to meet its requirements because of the experience gained in previous ICF systems and because NIF designers have continued to be able to avoid or manage new damage situations as they have appeared.« less

  14. Mechanical and microstructural changes in tungsten due to irradiation damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uytdenhouwen, I.; Schwarz-Selinger, T.; Coenen, J. W.; Wirtz, M.

    2016-02-01

    Stress-relieved pure tungsten received three damage levels (0.10, 0.25 and 0.50 dpa) by self-tungsten ion beam irradiation at room temperature. Positron annihilation spectroscopy showed the formation of mono-vacancies and vacancy clusters after ion beam exposure. In the first irradiation step (0-0.10 dpa) some splitting up of large vacancy clusters occurred which became more numerous. For increasing dose to 0.25 dpa, growth of the vacancy clusters was seen. At 0.50 dpa a change in the defect formation seems to occur leading to a saturation in the lifetime signal obtained from the positrons. Nano-indentation on the cross-sections showed a flat damage depth distribution profile. The nano-indentation hardness increased for increasing damage dose without any saturation up to 0.50 dpa. This means that other defects such as dislocation loops and large sized voids seem to contribute.

  15. Fatigue damage mechanisms in boron-aluminium composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dvorak, G. J.; Johnson, W. S.

    1980-01-01

    The relationship between fatigue and shakedown in metal matrix composites is investigated theoretically and experimentally for unidirectional and laminated 6061 Al-B materials. It is shown that no fatigue damage takes place if the applied stress range is such that the material remains elastic, or shakes down, i.e., resumes elastic cyclic straining after a small number of plastic strain cycles. Fatigue damage occurs only in specimens subjected to stress ranges which cause sustained cyclic plastic straining in the aluminum matrix. If the applied stress range is smaller than that required for fatigue failure, after about 10 to the 6th cycles a saturation damage state is reached which remains essentially unchanged with increasing number of cycles.

  16. Quality control mechanisms in cellular and systemic DNA damage responses

    PubMed Central

    Ermolaeva, Maria A.; Dakhovnik, Alexander; Schumacher, Björn

    2016-01-01

    The maintenance of the genome is of pivotal importance for the functional integrity of cells and tissues. The gradual accumulation of DNA damage is thought to contribute to the functional decline of tissues and organs with ageing. Defects in multiple genome maintenance systems cause human disorders characterized by cancer susceptibility, developmental failure, and premature ageing. The complex pathological consequences of genome instability are insufficiently explained by cell-autonomous DNA damage responses (DDR) alone. Quality control pathways play an important role in DNA repair and cellular DDR pathways. Recent years have revealed non-cell autonomous effects of DNA damage that impact the physiological adaptations during ageing. We will discuss the role of quality assurance pathways in cell-autonomous and systemic responses to genome instability. PMID:25560147

  17. A boundary element method for detection of damages and self-diagnosis of transducers using electro-mechanical impedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Fangxin; Aliabadi, M. H.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, for the first time, a boundary element method (BEM) for modelling the electro-mechanical responses of three-dimensional structures is reported. Within an electro-mechanically coupled system, the host structure is formulated using the 3D dual boundary element method in order to be able to take into account the possible existence of cracks, and the piezoelectric transducers, which are the key to measuring electro-mechanical impedance (EMI), are modelled using a semi-analytical finite element approach. The analyses of the coupled system are performed in the frequency domain. The EMI signatures computed by the BEM developed in this work show excellent agreement with those obtained using the finite element method and from experiments. Using parametric studies, the potential of using EMI signatures for the detection of damages in structures and for the self-diagnosis of transducers is assessed.

  18. Mechanisms of cell damage in agitated microcarrier tissue culture reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cherry, Robert S.; Papoutsakis, E. Terry

    1986-01-01

    Cells growing on microcarriers may be damaged by collisions of the microcarrier against another microcarrier or the reactor agitator. Bead-bead collisions are caused by small-scale turbulence, which can also cause high local shear stress on the cells. The cells are also exposed to 10-20 Hz cyclic shear stress by bead rotation.

  19. A damage mechanics based approach for developing a quantitative understanding of ductile fracture.

    SciTech Connect

    Thissell, W. R.; Tonks, D. L.; Schwartz, D. S.

    2004-01-01

    A self-consistent damage mechanics approach for describing ductile fracture is introduced. This approach consists of damage quantification of incipiently failed specimens resulting from well-controlled and diagnosed experiments that span a wide parameter space of stress triaxiality, strain rate, and equivalent plastic strain. Numerical simulations are performed of these experiments using damage constitutive models and the simulation predictions are compared with the experimental measurements and post-mortem damage quantification, with the goal of developing, validating, and calibrating the damage constitutive models. New developments are described, such as the coupling between void and deformation bands.

  20. Effect of attract and kill formulations and application rates on trap catches of European pine shoot moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) and shoot damage in Scots pine saplings.

    PubMed

    Sukovata, Lidia; Kolk, Andrzej; Cieślak, Marek

    2004-10-01

    Attract and kill technology was tested for management of European pine shoot moth, Rhyacionia buoliana (Denis & Schiffermüller), in 4-6-yr-old Scots pine, Pinus sylvestris L., plantations managed by Jablonna and Pultusk Forest Districts, Poland. In 2001, two formulations based on ricinoleic acid and hydrocarbon fraction (petroleum jelly) in combination with (E)-9-dodecenyl acetate, the sex pheromone of the pine shoot moth; permethrin as a contact insecticide; and Tinuvin UV absorber were used. In 2002, different formulations and application rates of the attracticide based on petroleum jelly were tested. Significantly reduced trap catches occurred in plots treated with three attracticide formulations [Rhykil-1 (with Tinuvin UV absorber), Rhykil-2 (with a new UV absorber, 3,3'-dihydroxy-2,2'-bipyridyl), and Rhykil-3 (without the insecticide)] at 3,000 droplets per hectare in comparison with those in control plots, suggesting that all formulations were highly effective. Significantly lower catches than in control plots also were observed when Rhykil-1 was applied at 1000, 2,000, and 3,000 droplets per hectare. However, only slight reduction of shoot damage in treated plots was observed in both experiments. The formulation without the insecticide had similar efficacy to that of the formulation combined with the insecticide. In 2003, the Rhykil-2 attracticide was tested at 250, 500, and 1000 droplets per hectare. Although there were no significant differences in trap catches between treated and control plots, shoot damage level was reduced substantially in all treated plots. These results suggest that attract and kill technology may be used at rates lower than 1000 droplets per hectare for management of R. buoliana; however, its "kill" effect should be confirmed in further studies. PMID:15568351

  1. EFFECT OF FORMULATION AND PROCESS VARIABLES ON THE RELEASE, MECHANICAL AND MUCOADHESIVE PROPERTIES OF IBUPROFEN TABLET FORMULATIONS.

    PubMed

    Adetunji, Oladapo A; Odeniyi, Michael A; Itiola, Oludele A

    2015-01-01

    A 2(4) full factorial analysis was used to study the individual and interactive effects of binder type, X1; binder concentration, X2; relative density, X3 and tabletting technique, X4, on disintegration time (DT), brittle fracture index (BFI), tensile strength (TS) and mucoadhesion time (MT) of ibuprofen tablets formulated by direct compression (DC) and wet granulation (WG), and containing Entandophragnia angolense gum (ENTA) as binder, in comparison with hydroxypropylcellulose. The result of the FTIR and UV peaks suggests the absence of any interaction between ENTA and ibuprofen. Interactions between the polymers and ibuprofen were determined using FTIR and UV determinations. The ranking of the individual effects on DT and BFI was X2 > X3 > X1 > X4, on TS; X3 > X2> X1 > X4 and on MT; X2> X > X4 > X3. The effects of changing the binder from hydroxypropylcellulose to ENTA led to an increase in DT and decrease in TS, BFI and MT. Changing X2 and X3 to higher values increased the DT and TS. The interaction between X1 and X2 had the highest influence on BEI and MT, while interaction between "X3 and X4", and "X2 and X3" had the highest influence on DT and TS, respectively. Ibuprofen tablets prepared by wet granulation method and containing Entandophragma angolense gum showed lower capping/lamination tendencies and better mucoadhesive drug release profiles. PMID:26642687

  2. Application of damage mechanism-specific NDE methods in support of risk-informed inspections

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, S.M.; Ammirato, F.V.

    1996-12-01

    Risk-informed inservice inspection (RISI) programs effectively concentrate limited and costly examination resources on systems and locations most relevant to plant safety. The thought process used in the selection of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods and procedures in a RISI program is expected to change toward integrating NDE into integrity management, with a concentration on understanding failure mechanisms. Identifying which damage mechanisms may be operative in specific locations and applying appropriate NDE methods to detect the presence of these damage mechanisms is fundamental to effective RISI application. Considerable information is already available on inspection for damage mechanisms such as intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC), thermal fatigue, and erosion-corrosion. Similar procedures are under development for other damage mechanisms that may occur individually or in combination with other mechanisms. Guidance is provided on application of NDE procedures in an RISI framework to facilitate implementation by utility staff (Gosselin, 1996).

  3. Mechanisms of Hg species induced toxicity in cultured human astrocytes: genotoxicity and DNA-damage response.

    PubMed

    Pieper, Imke; Wehe, Christoph A; Bornhorst, Julia; Ebert, Franziska; Leffers, Larissa; Holtkamp, Michael; Höseler, Pia; Weber, Till; Mangerich, Aswin; Bürkle, Alexander; Karst, Uwe; Schwerdtle, Tanja

    2014-03-01

    The toxicologically most relevant mercury (Hg) species for human exposure is methylmercury (MeHg). Thiomersal is a common preservative used in some vaccine formulations. The aim of this study is to get further mechanistic insight into the yet not fully understood neurotoxic modes of action of organic Hg species. Mercury species investigated include MeHgCl and thiomersal. Additionally HgCl2 was studied, since in the brain mercuric Hg can be formed by dealkylation of the organic species. As a cellular system astrocytes were used. In vivo astrocytes provide the environment necessary for neuronal function. In the present study, cytotoxic effects of the respective mercuricals increased with rising alkylation level and correlated with their cellular bioavailability. Further experiments revealed for all species at subcytotoxic concentrations no induction of DNA strand breaks, whereas all species massively increased H2O2-induced DNA strand breaks. This co-genotoxic effect is likely due to a disturbance of the cellular DNA damage response. Thus, at nanomolar, sub-cytotoxic concentrations, all three mercury species strongly disturbed poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation, a signalling reaction induced by DNA strand breaks. Interestingly, the molecular mechanism behind this inhibition seems to be different for the species. Since chronic PARP-1 inhibition is also discussed to sacrifice neurogenesis and learning abilities, further experiments on neurons and in vivo studies could be helpful to clarify whether the inhibition of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation contributes to organic Hg induced neurotoxicity. PMID:24549367

  4. Barium cardiotoxicity: Relationship between ultrastructural damage and mechanical effects.

    PubMed

    Delfino, G; Amerini, S; Mugelli, A

    1988-01-01

    The ultrastructural damage in guinea-pig ventricular strips caused by barium was analysed. At a concentration of 1 mmol/litre, barium chloride caused a dramatic increase in the developed tension associated with the onset of automaticity. The ultrastructural analysis demonstrated that barium caused notable and consistent alterations which affected most myocyte components. Various degenerative aspects were observed in mitochondria and in the contractile apparatus. Glycogen deposits were completely depleted. Preparations driven at 4 Hz (i.e. the rate of spontaneous firing of barium-treated preparations) showed moderate ultrastructural alterations, thus demonstrating that the increase in the rate of beating is not the only determinant of the observed damage. These results suggest that the myocardial toxicity of barium is due not only to the well-known modifications in membrane permeability, but possibly also to alterations in cell function. PMID:20702358

  5. Mechanical loading up-regulates early remodeling signals from osteocytes subjected to physical damage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Wu, Michael; You, Lidan

    2015-12-16

    In the mineralized bone matrix, mechanical loading causes micrometer-sized cracks. These cracks trigger targeted remodeling along the micro-crack. Physical damage to osteocytes was shown to be involved in the initiation of this remodeling process. However, the role of subsequent mechanical loading osteocyte response to physical damage is unclear. In this study, we have designed and developed an in vitro cell model to study the impact of mechanical loading on osteocytes with physical damage. Specifically, a system was developed to create sub-cellular physical damage on MLO-Y4 osteocytes in vitro. This model re-created the spatial distribution of non-viable cells and VEGF expression around microdamage as reported in vivo. Using this system, the short term (24h) effects of fluid shear stress in regulation of osteocyte response to physical damage were investigated. We have observed that the mechanical stimuli had an additive effect in terms of COX-2, VEGF mRNA expressions, as well as PGE2, VEGF concentrations in the media. Interestingly, other inflammatory signals such as IL-6 and TNF-α did not change with these stimuli, at this time point. Moreover, fluid shear also had a modulating effect in regulation of osteoclast differentiation by osteocyte with physical damage. These results show that (1) subcellular physical damage upregulates remodeling signals in osteocytes at early time point, (2) mechanical loading substantially upregulates these signals for remodeling in osteocytes with physical damage. PMID:26596719

  6. Formulation of thermo-hydro-mechanical coupling behavior of unsaturated soils based on hybrid mixture theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Guo-Qing; Zhao, Cheng-Gang; Sheng, Dai-Chao; Zhou, An-Nan

    2014-08-01

    Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical (THM) coupling processes in unsaturated soils are very important in both theoretical researches and engineering applications. A coupled formulation based on hybrid mixture theory is derived to model the THM coupling behavior of unsaturated soils. The free-energy and dissipative functions for different phases are derived from Taylor's series expansions. Constitutive relations for THM coupled behaviors of unsaturated soils, which include deformation, entropy change, fluid flow, heat conduction, and dynamic compatibility conditions on the interfaces, are then established. The number of field equations is shown to be equal to the number of unknown variables; thus, a closure of this coupling problem is established. In addition to modifications of the physical conservation equations with coupling effect terms, the constitutive equations, which consider the coupling between elastoplastic deformation of the soil skeleton, fluid flow, and heat transfer, are also derived.

  7. Failure of the Volume Function in Granular Statistical Mechanics and an Alternative Formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumenfeld, Raphael; Amitai, Shahar; Jordan, Joe F.; Hihinashvili, Rebecca

    2016-04-01

    We first show that the currently accepted statistical mechanics for granular matter is flawed. The reason is that it is based on the volume function, which depends only on a minute fraction of all the structural degrees of freedom and is unaffected by most of the configurational microstates. Consequently, the commonly used partition function underestimates the entropy severely. We then propose a new formulation, replacing the volume function with a connectivity function that depends on all the structural degrees of freedom and accounts correctly for the entire entropy. We discuss the advantages of the new formalism and derive explicit results for two- and three-dimensional systems. We test the formalism by calculating the entropy of an experimental two-dimensional system, as a function of system size, and showing that it is an extensive variable.

  8. Cytogenetic effects of commercial formulation of cypermethrin in root meristem cells of Allium sativum: spectroscopic basis of chromosome damage.

    PubMed

    Saxena, P N; Chauhan, L K S; Gupta, S K

    2005-12-15

    To validate the use of Allium sativum as a sensitive test model for genotoxicity, the cytogenetic effects of a commercial formulation of the pyrethroid insecticide, cypermethrin, were evaluated in the root meristem cells of A. sativum. Ultraviolet (UV) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectral measurements were also carried out to understand the interaction of cypermethrin with DNA. In a preliminary toxicity assay, the EC50 for Allium root growth was estimated to be 8 ppm. For the cytogenetic assay, root meristem cells were exposed to 1, 2, 4, 8 and 16 ppm of the test compound for 24 h, and either processed immediately for analysis or incubated in water for 24 h of recovery and then processed. Cells analyzed immediately after the exposure had a significant, dose-dependent inhibition of mitotic index (MI) and induction of mitotic and chromosomal aberrations (MAs and CAs). The 24 h recovery period reduced the effect of the test compound on the MI and percent aberrations; however, cells exposed to 8 and 16 ppm showed a significant frequency of aberrations despite the recovery period. One part per million cypermethrin was consistently negative in the assay. The data indicate that higher doses of cypermethrin produce toxicity, CAs and MAs in A. sativum. The present study indicates that A. sativum is a sensitive and reliable test system. A bathochromic shift observed in UV absorption spectra reveals that cypermethrin binds with DNA. Role of vibrational modes of the active site in the recognition and reaction of cypermethrin with DNA has been discussed. Based on spectroscopic data and structural properties, a possible mechanism has been proposed for the interaction of cypermethrin with DNA resulting in chromosomal aberrations. PMID:16168554

  9. Identification and Elimination of Mechanisms Leading to UV Damage of DKDP

    SciTech Connect

    Burnham, A; Runkel, M; Chase, L; Demos, S; Staggs, M; Siekhaus, W

    2001-03-06

    This LDRD project addressed both bulk and surface damage induced by UV-laser exposure. The primary objectives were (1) to complete our understanding of the factors leading to bulk damage, including growth conditions and orientational direction, and (2) to identify mechanisms of surface damage initiation and growth leading to mitigation methods. Due to the more advanced state of knowledge in bulk damage, a greater portion of that work was completed during the one-year term of this project. Three papers were presented at the 32nd Boulder Damage Symposium on Laser-Induced Damage in Optical Materials, and the three resulting manuscripts submitted to the Proceeding are attached: An important result from this work is that it established a dependence of obscuration from bulk damage on fluence and pulse length, which is shown.

  10. Effects of hydromechanical loading history and antecedent soil mechanical damage on shallow landslide triggering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Linfeng; Lehmann, Peter; Or, Dani

    2015-10-01

    Evidence suggests that the sudden triggering of rainfall-induced shallow landslides is preceded by accumulation of local internal failures in the soil mantle before their abrupt coalescence into a landslide failure plane. The mechanical status of a hillslope at any given time reflects competition between local damage accumulated during antecedent rainfall events and rates of mechanical healing (e.g., rebonding of microcracks and root regrowth). This dynamic interplay between damage accumulation and healing rates determines the initial mechanical state for landslide modeling. We evaluated the roles of these dynamic processes on landslide characteristics and patterns using a hydromechanical landslide-triggering model for a sequence of rainfall scenarios. The progressive nature of soil failure was represented by the fiber bundle model formalism that considers threshold strength of mechanical bonds linking adjacent soil columns and bedrock. The antecedent damage induced by prior rainfall events was expressed by the fraction of broken fibers that gradually regain strength or mechanically heal at rates specific to soil and roots. Results indicate that antecedent damage accelerates landslide initiation relative to pristine (undamaged) hillslopes. The volumes of first triggered landslides increase with increasing antecedent damage; however, for heavily damaged hillslopes, landslide volumes tend to decrease. Elapsed time between rainfall events allows mechanical healing that reduces the effects of antecedent damage. This study proposed a quantitative framework for systematically incorporating hydromechanical loading history and information on precursor events (e.g., such as recorded by acoustic emissions) into shallow landslide hazard assessment.

  11. Initiation and progression of mechanical damage in the intervertebral disc under cyclic loading using continuum damage mechanics methodology: A finite element study

    PubMed Central

    Qasim, Muhammad; Natarajan, Raghu N.; An, Howard S.; Andersson, Gunnar B.J.

    2013-01-01

    It is difficult to study the breakdown of disc tissue over several years of exposure to bending and lifting by experimental methods. There is also no finite element model that elucidates the failure mechanism due to repetitive loading of the lumbar motion segment. The aim of this study was to refine an already validated poro-elastic finite element model of lumbar motion segment to investigate the initiation and progression of mechanical damage in the disc under simple and complex cyclic loading conditions. Continuum damage mechanics methodology was incorporated into the finite element model to track the damage accumulation in the annulus in response to the repetitive loading. The analyses showed that the damage initiated at the posterior inner annulus adjacent to the endplates and propagated outwards towards its periphery under all loading conditions simulated. The damage accumulated preferentially in the posterior region of the annulus. The analyses also showed that the disc failure is unlikely to happen with repetitive bending in the absence of compressive load. Compressive cyclic loading with low peak load magnitude also did not create the failure of the disc. The finite element model results were consistent with the experimental and clinical observations in terms of the region of failure, magnitude of applied loads and the number of load cycles survived. PMID:22682891

  12. Initiation and progression of mechanical damage in the intervertebral disc under cyclic loading using continuum damage mechanics methodology: A finite element study.

    PubMed

    Qasim, Muhammad; Natarajan, Raghu N; An, Howard S; Andersson, Gunnar B J

    2012-07-26

    It is difficult to study the breakdown of disc tissue over several years of exposure to bending and lifting by experimental methods. There is also no finite element model that elucidates the failure mechanism due to repetitive loading of the lumbar motion segment. The aim of this study was to refine an already validated poro-elastic finite element model of lumbar motion segment to investigate the initiation and progression of mechanical damage in the disc under simple and complex cyclic loading conditions. Continuum damage mechanics methodology was incorporated into the finite element model to track the damage accumulation in the annulus in response to the repetitive loading. The analyses showed that the damage initiated at the posterior inner annulus adjacent to the endplates and propagated outwards towards its periphery under all loading conditions simulated. The damage accumulated preferentially in the posterior region of the annulus. The analyses also showed that the disc failure is unlikely to happen with repetitive bending in the absence of compressive load. Compressive cyclic loading with low peak load magnitude also did not create the failure of the disc. The finite element model results were consistent with the experimental and clinical observations in terms of the region of failure, magnitude of applied loads and the number of load cycles survived. PMID:22682891

  13. A physically-based continuum damage mechanics model for numerical prediction of damage growth in laminated composite plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Kevin Vaughan

    Rapid growth in use of composite materials in structural applications drives the need for a more detailed understanding of damage tolerant and damage resistant design. Current analytical techniques provide sufficient understanding and predictive capabilities for application in preliminary design, but current numerical models applicable to composites are few and far between and their development into well tested, rigorous material models is currently one of the most challenging fields in composite materials. The present work focuses on the development, implementation, and verification of a plane-stress continuum damage mechanics based model for composite materials. A physical treatment of damage growth based on the extensive body of experimental literature on the subject is combined with the mathematical rigour of a continuum damage mechanics description to form the foundation of the model. The model has been implemented in the LS-DYNA3D commercial finite element hydrocode and the results of the application of the model are shown to be physically meaningful and accurate. Furthermore it is demonstrated that the material characterization parameters can be extracted from the results of standard test methodologies for which a large body of published data already exists for many materials. Two case studies are undertaken to verify the model by comparison with measured experimental data. The first series of analyses demonstrate the ability of the model to predict the extent and growth of damage in T800/3900-2 carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP) plates subjected to normal impacts over a range of impact energy levels. The predicted force-time and force-displacement response of the panels compare well with experimental measurements. The damage growth and stiffness reduction properties of the T800/3900-2 CFRP are derived using published data from a variety of sources without the need for parametric studies. To further demonstrate the physical nature of the model, a IM6

  14. [Continuous damage mechanics: Critical states: Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Krajcinovic, D.

    1992-06-01

    Failure can occur in many distinctly different ways depending on the material, stress and strain fields, temperature field, environmental effects, strain rate, etc. The proposed research program will focus on a single well defined class of failure modes common to many structures and machine elements. This class of problems is characterized by a gradually evolving microscale process which at a certain point triggers a discontinuous or singular (qualitative) change of macroscale response. Consideration of critical states of cooperative processes requires radical departure from the well traveled paths. Recently developing methods of statistical physics seem to be applicable to the class of problems under consideration. These models are generally formulated as discrete enabling consideration of spatial-temporal complexities as they raise from the microstructural disorder. However, in many cases these models in the limit do not converge to the traditional continuum theories.

  15. (Continuous damage mechanics: Critical states: Technical progress report)

    SciTech Connect

    Krajcinovic, D.

    1992-01-01

    Failure can occur in many distinctly different ways depending on the material, stress and strain fields, temperature field, environmental effects, strain rate, etc. The proposed research program will focus on a single well defined class of failure modes common to many structures and machine elements. This class of problems is characterized by a gradually evolving microscale process which at a certain point triggers a discontinuous or singular (qualitative) change of macroscale response. Consideration of critical states of cooperative processes requires radical departure from the well traveled paths. Recently developing methods of statistical physics seem to be applicable to the class of problems under consideration. These models are generally formulated as discrete enabling consideration of spatial-temporal complexities as they raise from the microstructural disorder. However, in many cases these models in the limit do not converge to the traditional continuum theories.

  16. Derivation of the Schrodinger Equation from the Hamilton-Jacobi Equation in Feynman's Path Integral Formulation of Quantum Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, J. H.

    2011-01-01

    It is shown how the time-dependent Schrodinger equation may be simply derived from the dynamical postulate of Feynman's path integral formulation of quantum mechanics and the Hamilton-Jacobi equation of classical mechanics. Schrodinger's own published derivations of quantum wave equations, the first of which was also based on the Hamilton-Jacobi…

  17. Characterization of the anisotropic mechanical behaviour of colonic tissues: experimental activity and constitutive formulation.

    PubMed

    Carniel, E L; Gramigna, V; Fontanella, C G; Frigo, A; Stefanini, C; Rubini, A; Natali, A N

    2014-05-01

    The aim was to investigate the biomechanical behaviour of colonic tissues by a coupled experimental and numerical approach. The wall of the colon is composed of different tissue layers. Within each layer, different fibre families are distributed according to specific spatial orientations, which lead to a strongly anisotropic configuration. Accounting for the complex histology of the tissues, mechanical tests must be planned and designed to evaluate the behaviour of the colonic wall in different directions. Uni-axial tensile tests were performed on tissue specimens from 15 fresh pig colons, accounting for six different loading directions (five specimens for each loading direction). The next step of the investigation was to define an appropriate constitutive framework and develop a procedure for identification of the constitutive parameters. A specific hyperelastic formulation was developed that accounted for the multilayered conformation of the colonic wall and the fibre-reinforced configuration of the tissues. The parameters were identified by inverse analyses of the mechanical tests. The comparison of model results with experimental data, together with the evaluation of satisfaction of material thermomechanics principles, confirmed the reliability of the analysis developed. This work forms the basis for more comprehensive activities that aim to provide computational tools for the interpretation of surgical procedures that involve the gastrointestinal tract, considering the specific biomedical devices adopted. PMID:24486449

  18. Monosodium glutamate-induced oxidative kidney damage and possible mechanisms: a mini-review.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Amod

    2015-01-01

    Animal studies suggest that chronic monosodium glutamate (MSG) intake induces kidney damage by oxidative stress. However, the underlying mechanisms are still unclear, despite the growing evidence and consensus that α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, glutamate receptors and cystine-glutamate antiporter play an important role in up-regulation of oxidative stress in MSG-induced renal toxicity. This review summaries evidence from studies into MSG-induced renal oxidative damage, possible mechanisms and their importance from a toxicological viewpoint. PMID:26493866

  19. True porosity measurement of hair: a new way to study hair damage mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hessefort, Yin; Holland, Brian T; Cloud, Richard W

    2008-01-01

    This study employs a novel method, gas sorption (1), to quantify the porosity characteristics of hair by determining total pore volume, adsorption pore-size distribution, and the surface area of damaged hair. Damage mechanisms were studied by comparing the different pore volume and surface area resulting from two different types of damage: chemical and UV. Hair color measurement and tensile strength, both reflecting the changes in hair cortex, were also employed in this study. The results suggest that hair damage caused by oxidative bleach and UV oxidation follows different pathways. Chemical damage (oxidative bleach) nearly triples the hair surface area in the first minute of bleaching due to the increase in the number of pores, followed by a sudden drop after 10 min of bleaching from smaller pores breaking down into larger ones. In contrast, UV damage shows an immediate loss in surface area in the first 200 hr of exposure and a gradual increase as exposure time continues. PMID:18818850

  20. DNA damage by reactive species: Mechanisms, mutation and repair.

    PubMed

    Jena, N R

    2012-07-01

    DNA is continuously attacked by reactive species that can affect its structure and function severely. Structural modifications to DNA mainly arise from modifications in its bases that primarily occur due to their exposure to different reactive species. Apart from this, DNA strand break, inter- and intra-strand crosslinks and DNA-protein crosslinks can also affect the structure of DNA significantly. These structural modifications are involved in mutation, cancer and many other diseases. As it has the least oxidation potential among all the DNA bases, guanine is frequently attacked by reactive species, producing a plethora of lethal lesions. Fortunately, living cells are evolved with intelligent enzymes that continuously protect DNA from such damages. This review provides an overview of different guanine lesions formed due to reactions of guanine with different reactive species. Involvement of these lesions in inter- and intra-strand crosslinks, DNA-protein crosslinks and mutagenesis are discussed. How certain enzymes recognize and repair different guanine lesions in DNA are also presented. PMID:22750987

  1. Site damage from mechanized thinning in southeast Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Sidle, R.C.; Laurent, T.H.

    1986-01-01

    Soil disturbance and damage to remaining trees were studied in a 0.724 acre, 45 year old second growth western hemlock/Sitka spruce stand on Prince of Wales Island, Alaska, thinned with a Menzi-Muck walking backhoe equipped with hydraulic shears for use as a feller-buncher. The stand was thinned to b.a. 111 square ft/acre and 205 stems/acre. Almost half the roads, which occupied 30% of the total thinned area, received some soil disturbance, though the disturbance was largely within the organic horizon and mineral soil was exposed on only 1.8% of the roaded area. Slight and heavy soil compaction occurred on 23 and 2% of the roads, respectively. Based on the entire thinning unit, 85% of the site was undisturbed and only 0.5% had exposed mineral soil, while 7% was slightly compacted and 0.5% was heavily compacted. Approximately 90% of the remaining trees had some stem or root abrasion. Split or severed roots occurred on 10% of the trees. Only 5% of stem and root scars were greater than 1 square foot, and these were all superficial. 17 references.

  2. Pre- and post-annealing of mechanical damage in silicon wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwottke, G. H.

    1982-01-01

    Basic properties of mechanical damage in silicon consisting of cracks and abrasion were studied using transmission electron microscopy. The crystallographic structure of mechanical damage was determined before and after high temperature annealing. The main findings include that stresses in silicon around crack tips are not plastically relieved at room temperature and that abrasion at room temperature introduces shear loops into the silicon. It was also found that cracks of micron size can be annealed out, specifically, if cleavage occurs on 111 planes. The healing products of such cracks are 60 deg and 90 deg dislocations. Submicron cracks transform into stacking faults during annealing. Likewise high concentrations of shear loops due abrasion were found to anneal into stacking faults. A one to one correlation between surface areas containing small cracks and stacking faults was made. Measurements of damage removal on silicon surfaces through chemical-mechanical etching techniques are presented. It is shown that silicon dioxide repolishes damaged silicon surfaces most effectively.

  3. Experimental Study on the Thermal Damage Characteristics of Limestone and Underlying Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weiqiang; Sun, Qiang; Hao, Shuqing; Wang, Bo

    2016-08-01

    This work discusses an experimental investigation on the thermal damage characteristics of limestone and underlying mechanism. Cylindrical rock samples were heated to a specific temperature level of 25, 100, 200, 300, 400, 500, 600, 700, 800, and 900 °C. Then the thermal damage evolution equation was established based on the experimental results and the characteristics of thermal damage were analyzed. Last, possible mechanisms for the observed thermo-physical and mechanical response are discussed. The results show that with the increase of temperature in the tested range of temperature, the P-wave velocity, peak compressive strength and elastic modulus decrease, but the peak strain increases; the damage factors increase faster in 200-600 °C; the development of high-temperature-induced cracks conforms to the dislocation theory; the decomposition of magnesium carbonate and dolomite is the main reaction in the tested temperature range.

  4. Multivariate optimization of formulation and process variables influencing physico-mechanical characteristics of site-specific release isoniazid pellets.

    PubMed

    Pund, Swati; Joshi, Amita; Vasu, Kamala; Nivsarkar, Manish; Shishoo, Chamanlal

    2010-03-30

    In the present study, isoniazid was formulated as site-specific release pellets with high drug loading (65%, w/w) using extrusion-spheronization followed by aqueous coating of Sureteric (35% weight gain). A statistical experimental strategy was developed to optimize simultaneously the effect of the two formulation variables and one process variable on the critical physico-mechanical properties of the core pellets of isoniazid. Amount of granulating fluid and amount of binder were selected as formulation variables and spheronization speed as a process variable. A 2(3) full factorial experimental design was employed for the present study. Pellets were characterized for physico-mechanical properties viz. usable yield, pellet size, pellips, porosity, abrasion resistance, mechanical crushing force, residual moisture and dissolution efficiency. Graphical and mathematical analysis of the results allowed the identification and quantification of the formulation and process variables active on the selected responses. A polynomial equation fitted to the data was used to predict the responses in the optimal region. The optimum formulation and process parameters were found to be 44.24% (w/w) of granulating fluid, 2.13% (w/w) of binder and spheronization speed of 1000rpm. Optimized formulation showed usable yield 84.95%, particle size 1021.32microm, pellips 0.945, porosity 46.11%, and abrasion resistance 0.485%. However, mechanical crushing force, residual moisture and dissolution efficiency were not significantly affected by the selected independent variables. These results demonstrate the importance of, amount of water, binder and spheronization speed, on physico-mechanical characteristics of the isoniazid core pellets with high drug loading. PMID:20035851

  5. Experimental investigation on mechanical damage characteristics of sandstone under triaxial cyclic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sheng-Qi; Ranjith, P. G.; Huang, Yan-Hua; Yin, Peng-Fei; Jing, Hong-Wen; Gui, Yi-Lin; Yu, Qing-Lei

    2015-05-01

    The mechanical damage characteristics of sandstone subjected to cyclic loading is very significant to evaluate the stability and safety of deep excavation damage zones. However to date, there are very few triaxial experimental studies of sandstone under cyclic loading. Moreover, few X-ray micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) observations have been adopted to reveal the damage mechanism of sandstone under triaxial cyclic loading. Therefore, in this research, a series of triaxial cyclic loading tests and X-ray micro-CT observations were conducted to analyse the mechanical damage characteristics of sandstone with respect to different confining pressures. The results indicated that at lower confining pressures, the triaxial strength of sandstone specimens under cyclic loading is higher than that under monotonic loading; whereas at confining pressures above 20 MPa, the triaxial strength of sandstone under cyclic loading is approximately equal to that under monotonic loading. With the increase of cycle number, the crack damage threshold of sandstone first increases, and then significantly decreases and finally remains constant. Based on the damage evolution of irreversible deformation, it appears that the axial damage value of sandstone is all higher than the radial damage value before the peak strength; whereas the radial damage value is higher than the axial damage value after the peak strength. The evolution of Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio of sandstone can be characterized as having four stages: (i) Stage I: material strengthening; (ii) Stage II: material degradation; (iii) Stage III: material failure and (iv) Stage IV: structure slippage. X-ray micro-CT observations demonstrated that the CT scanning surface images of sandstone specimens are consistent with actual surface crack photographs. The analysis of the cross-sections of sandstone supports that the system of crack planes under triaxial cyclic loading is much more complicated than that under triaxial

  6. Suppression of nano-absorbing precursors and damage mechanism in optical coatings for 3ω mirrors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hu; Qi, Hongji; Zhang, Weili; Sun, Jian; Chai, Yingjie; Tu, Feifei; Zhao, Jiaoling; Yu, Zhen; Wang, Bin; Zhu, Meiping; Yi, Kui; Shao, Jianda

    2016-03-15

    Damage precursors in the 3ω (351 nm) mirror for a high-power laser system are investigated as well as the relevant damage mechanisms. The precursors are classified into two ensembles according to the different laser resistance and damage features. The former is nano-absorbing precursors, which are sensitive to the standing wave electric field and vulnerable to the laser irradiation. The latter is submicrometer nodular defects, which have higher laser resistance and are sensitive to the adhesion strength between the fluoride coatings and oxide coatings. The damage due to nano-absorbing precursors is efficiently suppressed with the double stack design that screens the electric field in the oxides. Currently, the nodular seed is major originating from the Al2O3/SiO2 stack. Even for the same defect type and mirror, the final damage features are dependent on the local mechanical properties at the irradiation location. The investigations of the damage mechanisms provide a direction to further improve the laser-induced damage threshold of the 3ω mirror. PMID:26977671

  7. Bioreducible Liposomes for Gene Delivery: From the Formulation to the Mechanism of Action

    PubMed Central

    Candiani, Gabriele; Pezzoli, Daniele; Ciani, Laura; Chiesa, Roberto; Ristori, Sandra

    2010-01-01

    Background A promising strategy to create stimuli-responsive gene delivery systems is to exploit the redox gradient between the oxidizing extracellular milieu and the reducing cytoplasm in order to disassemble DNA/cationic lipid complexes (lipoplexes). On these premises, we previously described the synthesis of SS14 redox-sensitive gemini surfactant for gene delivery. Although others have attributed the beneficial effects of intracellular reducing environment to reduced glutathione (GSH), these observations cannot rule out the possible implication of the redox milieu in its whole on transfection efficiency of bioreducible transfectants leaving the determinants of DNA release largely undefined. Methodology/Principal Findings With the aim of addressing this issue, SS14 was here formulated into binary and ternary 100 nm-extruded liposomes and the effects of the helper lipid composition and of the SS14/helper lipids molar ratio on chemical-physical and structural parameters defining transfection effectiveness were investigated. Among all formulations tested, DOPC/DOPE/SS14 at 25∶50∶25 molar ratio was the most effective in transfection studies owing to the presence of dioleoyl chains and phosphatidylethanolamine head groups in co-lipids. The increase in SS14 content up to 50% along DOPC/DOPE/SS14 liposome series yielded enhanced transfection, up to 2.7-fold higher than that of the benchmark Lipofectamine 2000, without altering cytotoxicity of the corresponding lipoplexes at charge ratio 5. Secondly, we specifically investigated the redox-dependent mechanisms of gene delivery into cells through tailored protocols of transfection in GSH-depleted and repleted vs. increased oxidative stress conditions. Importantly, GSH specifically induced DNA release in batch and in vitro. Conclusions/Significance The presence of helper lipids carrying unsaturated dioleoyl chains and phosphatidylethanolamine head groups significantly improved transfection efficiencies of DOPC/DOPE/SS14

  8. Structural and Mechanical Repair of Diffuse Damage in Cortical Bone in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Seref-Ferlengez, Zeynep; Basta-Pljakic, Jelena; Kennedy, Oran D.; Philemon, Claudy J.; Schaffler, Mitchell B.

    2014-01-01

    Physiological wear and tear causes bone microdamage at several hierarchical levels, and these have different biological consequences. Bone remodeling is widely held to be the mechanism by which bone microdamage is repaired. However, recent studies showed that unlike typical linear microcracks, small crack damage, the clusters of submicron-sized matrix cracks also known as diffuse damage (Dif.Dx), does not activate remodeling. Thus, the fate of diffuse damage in vivo is not known. To examine this, we induced selectively Dif.Dx in rat ulnae in vivo by using end-load ulnar bending creep model. Changes in damage content were assessed by histomorphometry and mechanical testing immediately after loading (i.e., acute loaded) or at 14 days after damage induction (i.e., survival ulnae). Dif.Dx area was markedly reduced over the 14-day survival period after loading (p<0.02). We did not observe any intracortical resorption and there was no increase in cortical bone area in survival ulnae. The reduction in whole bone stiffness in acute loaded ulnae was restored to baseline levels in survival ulnae (p>0.6). Microindentation studies showed that Dif.Dx caused a highly localized reduction in elastic modulus in diffuse damage regions of the ulnar cortex. Moduli in these previously damaged bone areas were restored to control values by 14 days after loading. Our current findings indicate that small crack damage in bone can be repaired without bone remodeling, and suggest that alternative repair mechanisms exist in bone to deal with submicron-sized matrix cracks. Those mechanisms are currently unknown and further investigations are needed to elucidate the mechanisms by which this direct repair occurs. PMID:25042459

  9. Structural and mechanical repair of diffuse damage in cortical bone in vivo.

    PubMed

    Seref-Ferlengez, Zeynep; Basta-Pljakic, Jelena; Kennedy, Oran D; Philemon, Claudy J; Schaffler, Mitchell B

    2014-12-01

    Physiological wear and tear causes bone microdamage at several hierarchical levels, and these have different biological consequences. Bone remodeling is widely held to be the mechanism by which bone microdamage is repaired. However, recent studies showed that unlike typical linear microcracks, small crack damage, the clusters of submicron-sized matrix cracks also known as diffuse damage (Dif.Dx), does not activate remodeling. Thus, the fate of diffuse damage in vivo is not known. To examine this, we induced selectively Dif.Dx in rat ulnae in vivo by using end-load ulnar bending creep model. Changes in damage content were assessed by histomorphometry and mechanical testing immediately after loading (ie, acute loaded) or at 14 days after damage induction (ie, survival ulnae). Dif.Dx area was markedly reduced over the 14-day survival period after loading (p < 0.02). We did not observe any intracortical resorption, and there was no increase in cortical bone area in survival ulnae. The reduction in whole bone stiffness in acute loaded ulnae was restored to baseline levels in survival ulnae (p > 0.6). Microindentation studies showed that Dif.Dx caused a highly localized reduction in elastic modulus in diffuse damage regions of the ulnar cortex. Moduli in these previously damaged bone areas were restored to control values by 14 days after loading. Our current findings indicate that small crack damage in bone can be repaired without bone remodeling, and they suggest that alternative repair mechanisms exist in bone to deal with submicron-sized matrix cracks. Those mechanisms are currently unknown and further investigations are needed to elucidate the mechanisms by which this direct repair occurs. PMID:25042459

  10. Conditioning polymers in today's shampoo formulations - efficacy, mechanism and test methods.

    PubMed

    Hössel, P; Dieing, R; Nörenberg, R; Pfau, A; Sander, R

    2000-02-01

    Today's shampoo formulations are beyond the stage of pure cleansing of the hair. Additional benefits are expected, e.g. conditioning, smoothing of the hair surface, improvement of combability and lather creaminess. Cationic polymers play an important role in providing many of those features. Therefore, within the last few years their use in shampoos has increased greatly. In the only last two decades, shampoo designation has gradually changed from '2-in-1' to '3-in-1' and then to 'multifunctional', as at present. The consumer demands products which live up to their promises. Modern shampoos contain a wide variety of ingredients such as co-surfactants, vitamins and pro-vitamins, protein derivatives, silicones, natural-based plant extracts and other 'active ingredients', but there is still a need for conditioning polymers. The specific objective of this study is to assess the conditioning efficacy of cationic polymers and to investigate their mechanisms in a shampoo system. The investigations were carried out on formulations that contained sodium lauryl ether sulphate and different cationic polymers, e.g. Polyquaternium 7, 10, 11, cationic guar gum and Luviquat Care (Polyquaternium 44), a new branched copolymer of vinylpyrrolidone (VP) and quaternized vinylimidazolium salts (QVI). We used test methods relevant to the applications in question, such as combing force measurements, the feel of the hair and the creaminess of the lather, to assess the efficacy. Atomic force microscopy and electrokinetics (streaming potential) were used to detect polymer residues on treated hair. All the polymers under investigation improved the overall performance of the shampoo formulations. This was demonstrated by means of combing force measurements, sensorial tests and analytical methods, namely zeta potential measurement and atomic force microscopy. Polyquaternium 44 exhibited the best conditioning properties on wet hair without sacrificing removability or absence of build-up. The

  11. Neural network based system for damage identification and location in structural and mechanical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, C.R.; Doebling, S.W.; Prime, M.B.; Cornwell, P.; Kam, M.; Straser, E.G.; Hoerst, B.C.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Recent advances in wireless, remotely monitored data acquisition systems coupled with the development of vibration-based damage detection algorithms make the possibility of self- or remotely-monitored structures and mechanical systems appear to be within the capabilities of current technology. However, before such a system can be relied upon to perform this monitoring, the variability of the vibration properties that are the basis for the damage detection algorithm must be understood and quantified. This understanding is necessary so that the artificial intelligence/expert system that is employed to discriminate when changes in modal properties are indicative of damage will not yield false indications of damage. To this end, this project has focused on developing statistical methods for quantifying variability in identified vibration proper ties of structural and mechanical systems.

  12. Mechanisms of sensorineural cell damage, death and survival in the cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Ann C. Y.; Ryan, Allen F.

    2015-01-01

    The majority of acquired hearing loss, including presbycusis, is caused by irreversible damage to the sensorineural tissues of the cochlea. This article reviews the intracellular mechanisms that contribute to sensorineural damage in the cochlea, as well as the survival signaling pathways that can provide endogenous protection and tissue rescue. These data have primarily been generated in hearing loss not directly related to age. However, there is evidence that similar mechanisms operate in presbycusis. Moreover, accumulation of damage from other causes can contribute to age-related hearing loss (ARHL). Potential therapeutic interventions to balance opposing but interconnected cell damage and survival pathways, such as antioxidants, anti-apoptotics, and pro-inflammatory cytokine inhibitors, are also discussed. PMID:25954196

  13. Mechanical damage assessment by means of thermo-electrical lock-in thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordatos, E. Z.; Exarchos, D. A.; Matikas, T. E.

    2016-04-01

    The present work deals with the nondestructive assessment of the metallic materials' mechanical damage. An innovative Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) methodology based on two thermographic approaches was developed in order the state of fatigue damage to be assessed. The first approach allows the detection of heat waves generated by the thermomechanical coupling during the fatigue loading (online method). Specifically, both the thermo-elastic and intrinsic dissipated energy was correlated with the mechanical degradation and the remaining fatigue life. The second approach involves the monitoring of the materials' thermal behavior using a Peltier device for accurate thermal excitation (offline method). The correlation of the thermal behavior and the state of damage was achieved by the determination of the material's thermal response. The combination of these two approaches enables the rapid and accurate assessment of the cumulative damage.

  14. Effects of Thermal Damage and Confining Pressure on the Mechanical Properties of Coarse Marble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Mengdi; Rong, Guan; Zhou, Chuangbing; Peng, Jun

    2016-06-01

    Heating treatment generally causes thermal damage inside rocks, and the influence of thermal damage on mechanical properties of rocks is an important topic in rock mechanics. The coarse marble specimens drilled out from a rock block were first heated to a specific temperature level of 200, 400 and 600 °C except the control group left at 20 °C. A series of triaxial compression tests subjected to the confining pressure of 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35 and 40 MPa were conducted. Coupling effects of thermal damage and confining pressure on the mechanical properties of marbles including post-peak behaviors and failure modes, strength and deformation parameters, characteristic stresses in the progressive failure process had been investigated. Meanwhile, accompanied tests of physical properties were carried out to study the effect of thermal damage on microstructure, porosity and P-wave velocity. Finally, the degradation parameter was defined and a strength-degradation model to describe the peak strength was proposed. Physical investigations show that porosity increases slowly and P-wave velocity reduces dramatically, which could be re-demonstrated by the microscopy results. As for the post-peak behaviors and the failure modes, there is a brittle to ductile transition trend with increasing confining pressure and thermal effect reinforces the ductility to some degree. The comparative study on strength and deformation parameters concludes that heating causes damage and confining pressure inhibits the damage to develop. Furthermore, crack damage stress and crack initiation stress increase, while the ratios of crack damage stress to peak strength and crack initiation stress to peak strength show a decreasing trend with the increase of confining pressure; the magnitude of crack damage stress or crack initiation stress shows a tendency of decrease with the increasing heating temperature and the tendency vanishes subjected to high confinement.

  15. Forming Prediction of Magnesium Alloy Sheets using a Continuum Damage Mechanics Multistep Inverse Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Bapanapalli, Satish K.; Nguyen, Ba Nghiep

    2008-06-30

    This paper applies multistep inverse approach using a new method to generate the intermediate configurations to analyze the press forming of magnesium alloys. The developed approach considers a final configuration to be formed from a flat blank sheet. It accounts for a series of intermediate configurations that are estimated based on the initial and final configurations as well as tooling conditions using optimization techniques. The approach is based on the concept of minimization of the surface area of the sheet metal subject to the constraints that the punch and die surfaces are not penetrated. Due to the limited formability of magnesium alloys, it is important to realistically estimate the intermediate configurations so that a damage mechanics approach can be explored to predict damage accumulations that can cause rupture of the sheet during forming. Elastic-plastic constitutive laws are used with the modified Hill’s criterion and deformation theory of plasticity to describe the behavior of AZ31 magnesium alloys. Damage is captured by a damage variable that governs the equivalent stress. A damage-plasticity coupled approach is employed for the integration of the constitutive equations. The computed strain increment from two consecutive intermediate configurations is used to predict the resulting damage accumulations during forming. The continuum damage mechanics multistep inverse approach is applied to predict forming of AZ31 magnesium alloys.

  16. Anisotropic constitutive model incorporating multiple damage mechanisms for multiscale simulation of dental enamel.

    PubMed

    Ma, Songyun; Scheider, Ingo; Bargmann, Swantje

    2016-09-01

    An anisotropic constitutive model is proposed in the framework of finite deformation to capture several damage mechanisms occurring in the microstructure of dental enamel, a hierarchical bio-composite. It provides the basis for a homogenization approach for an efficient multiscale (in this case: multiple hierarchy levels) investigation of the deformation and damage behavior. The influence of tension-compression asymmetry and fiber-matrix interaction on the nonlinear deformation behavior of dental enamel is studied by 3D micromechanical simulations under different loading conditions and fiber lengths. The complex deformation behavior and the characteristics and interaction of three damage mechanisms in the damage process of enamel are well captured. The proposed constitutive model incorporating anisotropic damage is applied to the first hierarchical level of dental enamel and validated by experimental results. The effect of the fiber orientation on the damage behavior and compressive strength is studied by comparing micro-pillar experiments of dental enamel at the first hierarchical level in multiple directions of fiber orientation. A very good agreement between computational and experimental results is found for the damage evolution process of dental enamel. PMID:27294283

  17. Mechanisms of damage to corals exposed to sedimentation.

    PubMed

    Weber, Miriam; de Beer, Dirk; Lott, Christian; Polerecky, Lubos; Kohls, Katharina; Abed, Raeid M M; Ferdelman, Timothy G; Fabricius, Katharina E

    2012-06-12

    We investigated the mechanisms leading to rapid death of corals when exposed to runoff and resuspended sediments, postulating that the killing was microbially mediated. Microsensor measurements were conducted in mesocosm experiments and in naturally accumulated sediment on corals. In organic-rich, but not in organic-poor sediment, pH and oxygen started to decrease as soon as the sediment accumulated on the coral. Organic-rich sediments caused tissue degradation within 1 d, whereas organic-poor sediments had no effect after 6 d. In the harmful organic-rich sediment, hydrogen sulfide concentrations were low initially but increased progressively because of the degradation of coral mucus and dead tissue. Dark incubations of corals showed that separate exposures to darkness, anoxia, and low pH did not cause mortality within 4 d. However, the combination of anoxia and low pH led to colony death within 24 h. When hydrogen sulfide was added after 12 h of anoxia and low pH, colonies died after an additional 3 h. We suggest that sedimentation kills corals through microbial processes triggered by the organic matter in the sediments, namely respiration and presumably fermentation and desulfurylation of products from tissue degradation. First, increased microbial respiration results in reduced O(2) and pH, initiating tissue degradation. Subsequently, the hydrogen sulfide formed by bacterial decomposition of coral tissue and mucus diffuses to the neighboring tissues, accelerating the spread of colony mortality. Our data suggest that the organic enrichment of coastal sediments is a key process in the degradation of coral reefs exposed to terrestrial runoff. PMID:22615403

  18. Fault damage zones in mechanically layered rocks: The effects of planar anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Santanu; Ellis, Susan; Mandal, Nibir

    2015-08-01

    This study shows how inherited strength anisotropy influences damage localization at both the tip and wall regions of a fault or fracture. We performed analogue and numerical compression experiments on transversely isotropic models with single and multiple cuts of finite length, simulating the propagation of preexisting faults and cracks in layered rock. The stress-strain curves from the analogue experiments show a change in bulk yield behavior with fault inclination and anisotropy orientation with respect to the stress direction. Earlier isotropic models demonstrated a brittle (wing fracturing) to ductile (shear-zone formation) transition as the fault angle (α) to the principal compression direction increased. The experiments with anisotropic models show patterns of damage localization change dramatically with the orientation of transversely isotropic planes (θ, measured with respect to principal extension direction). Under layer-normal (θ = 0°) and layer-parallel compression (θ = 90°), preexisting faults undergo significant reactivation when 0 < α < 90°, and fault slip eventually leads to mechanical instabilities within the anisotropic layering, causing damage zones in the tip regions. For layer-normal (θ = 0°) compression, the damage processes involve intense extensional shear localization, whereas for layer-parallel compression, contractional shear localization and tensile opening result in characteristic internal shear-band structures. In contrast, for 0 < θ < 90°, the faults undergo little or no reactivation, irrespective of α. In this case, bulk compression leads to an interlayer slip-mediated global deformation. Obliquely anisotropic models thus produce weak or no fault damage zones. We also show that the fault-parallel principal damage localized at the tips can be coupled with transversely oriented, antithetic secondary damage in the wall regions. However, secondary damage develops predominantly when θ = 90°. Field examples of fault damage

  19. Experimental verification of a progressive damage model for composite laminates based on continuum damage mechanics. M.S. Thesis Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coats, Timothy William

    1994-01-01

    Progressive failure is a crucial concern when using laminated composites in structural design. Therefore the ability to model damage and predict the life of laminated composites is vital. The purpose of this research was to experimentally verify the application of the continuum damage model, a progressive failure theory utilizing continuum damage mechanics, to a toughened material system. Damage due to tension-tension fatigue was documented for the IM7/5260 composite laminates. Crack density and delamination surface area were used to calculate matrix cracking and delamination internal state variables, respectively, to predict stiffness loss. A damage dependent finite element code qualitatively predicted trends in transverse matrix cracking, axial splits and local stress-strain distributions for notched quasi-isotropic laminates. The predictions were similar to the experimental data and it was concluded that the continuum damage model provided a good prediction of stiffness loss while qualitatively predicting damage growth in notched laminates.

  20. Multiscale Approach to the Physics of Ion-Beam Therapy:. Thermo-Mechanical Damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solov'yov, A. V.; Yakubovich, A. V.; Surdutovich, E.

    2012-01-01

    We present a brief overview of the multiscale approach towards the understanding of processes responsible for the radiation damage caused by energetic ions. This knowledge is important because it can be utilized in the ion-beam cancer therapy, which is one of the most advanced modern techniques to cure certain types of cancer. The central element of the multiscale approach is the theoretical evaluation and quantification of DNA damage within cell environment. We consider different pathways of DNA damage and focus on the the illustration of the thermo-mechanical effects caused by the propagation of ions through the biological environment and in particular on the possibility of the creation of the shock waves in the vicinity of the ion tracks. We demonstrate that at the initial stages after ion's passage the shock wave is so strong that it can contribute to the DNA damage due to large pressure gradients developed at the distances of a few nanometers from the ionic tracks. This novel mechanism of the DNA damage provides an important contribution to the cumulative bio-damage caused by low-energy secondary electrons, holes and free radicals.

  1. Effects of formulation design on niacin therapeutics: mechanism of action, metabolism, and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Dustin L; Murrell, Derek E; Roane, David S; Harirforoosh, Sam

    2015-07-25

    Niacin is a highly effective, lipid regulating drug associated with a number of metabolically induced side effects such as prostaglandin (PG) mediated flushing and hepatic toxicity. In an attempt to reduce the development of these adverse effects, scientists have investigated differing methods of niacin delivery designed to control drug release and alter metabolism. However, despite successful formulation of various orally based capsule and tablet delivery systems, patient adherence to niacin therapy is still compromised by adverse events such as PG-induced flushing. While the primary advantage of orally dosed formulations is ease of use, alternative delivery options such as transdermal delivery or polymeric micro/nanoparticle encapsulation for oral administration have shown promise in niacin reformulation. However, the effectiveness of these alternative delivery options in reducing inimical effects of niacin and maintaining drug efficacy is still largely unknown and requires more in-depth investigation. In this paper, we present an overview of niacin applications, its metabolic pathways, and current drug delivery formulations. Focus is placed on oral immediate, sustained, and extended release niacin delivery as well as combined statin and/or prostaglandin antagonist niacin formulation. We also examine and discuss current findings involving transdermal niacin formulations and polymeric micro/nanoparticle encapsulated niacin delivery. PMID:25987211

  2. Computational Simulation of Damage Progression of Composite Thin Shells Subjected to Mechanical Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotsis, P. K.; Chamis, C. C.; Minnetyan, L.

    1996-01-01

    Defect-free and defected composite thin shells with ply orientation (90/0/+/-75) made of graphite/epoxy are simulated for damage progression and fracture due to internal pressure and axial loading. The thin shells have a cylindrical geometry with one end fixed and the other free. The applied load consists of an internal pressure in conjunction with an axial load at the free end, the cure temperature was 177 C (350 F) and the operational temperature was 21 C (70 F). The residual stresses due to the processing are taken into account. Shells with defect and without defects were examined by using CODSTRAN an integrated computer code that couples composite mechanics, finite element and account for all possible failure modes inherent in composites. CODSTRAN traces damage initiation, growth, accumulation, damage propagation and the final fracture of the structure. The results show that damage initiation started with matrix failure while damage/fracture progression occurred due to additional matrix failure and fiber fracture. The burst pressure of the (90/0/+/- 75) defected shell was 0.092% of that of the free defect. Finally the results of the damage progression of the (90/0/+/- 75), defective composite shell was compared with the (90/0/+/- theta, where theta = 45 and 60, layup configurations. It was shown that the examined laminate (90/0/+/- 75) has the least damage tolerant of the two compared defective shells with the (90/0/+/- theta), theta = 45 and 60 laminates.

  3. Earthquake Induced Damage Mechanism of Long Period Structures Using Energy Response

    SciTech Connect

    Du Yongfeng; Li Hui

    2008-07-08

    This paper presents a method of expounding the damage of RC long period frame structure using energy analysis method. Since the damage of structures usually occurs under major earthquakes, the structure is assumed to be in elasto-plastic state, and degraded Bouc-Wen model is used to describe the hysteretic component of the restoring force. A double index damage criterion defined by the maximum drift and energy absorption is used as the damage criterion. The energy transferring relation in a structure is derived, and both momentary and cumulative energy response is used to reflect the delay of the collapse of a long period structure. The mechanism of collapse delay of the long period structure is suggested through a numerical example combing the energy response and time history response.

  4. A fracture mechanics analysis of impact damage in a thick composite laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poe, C. C., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Graphite/epoxy filament-wound cases (FWC) for the solid rocket motors of the space shuttle are being made by NASA. The FWC cases are wound with AS4W graphite fiber impregnated with an epoxy resin and are about 1.4 inches or more thick. Graphite-epoxy composite laminates, unlike metals, can be damaged easily by low velocity impacts of objects like dropped tools. The residual tension strength of the FWC laminate, after impact, is being studied at Langley Research Center. The conditions that give minimum visual evidence of damage are being emphasized. A fracture mechanics analysis was developed to predict the residual strength, after impact, using radiographs to measure the size of the damage and an equivalent surface crack to represent the damage.

  5. Mechanisms of Diabetes-Induced Liver Damage: The role of oxidative stress and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Jamaludin; Nazratun Nafizah, A H; Zariyantey, A H; Budin, S B

    2016-05-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a non-communicable disease that occurs in both developed and developing countries. This metabolic disease affects all systems in the body, including the liver. Hyperglycaemia, mainly caused by insulin resistance, affects the metabolism of lipids, carbohydrates and proteins and can lead to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, which can further progress to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, cirrhosis and, finally, hepatocellular carcinomas. The underlying mechanism of diabetes that contributes to liver damage is the combination of increased oxidative stress and an aberrant inflammatory response; this activates the transcription of pro-apoptotic genes and damages hepatocytes. Significant involvement of pro-inflammatory cytokines-including interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor-α-exacerbates the accumulation of oxidative damage products in the liver, such as malondialdehyde, fluorescent pigments and conjugated dienes. This review summarises the biochemical, histological and macromolecular changes that contribute to oxidative liver damage among diabetic individuals. PMID:27226903

  6. Theory of inception mechanism and growth of defect-induced damage in polyethylene cable insulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serra, S.; Montanari, G. C.; Mazzanti, G.

    2005-08-01

    We have investigated theoretically the inception mechanism and growth of the damage inside the insulation system of a polymeric cable under working conditions. We focused, in particular, our attention on damage originating from microscopic defects such as voids. In order to clarify the implications of these defects for cable failure, we have developed a theoretical model based on the theory of electrical avalanche solving numerically its basic equations. Calculations of the ionization rates of atmospheric gas filling the voids are done as a function of the applied electric stress and void dimensions. Estimates of the energy release and local damage in polyethylene produced by the resulting hot-electron discharge are given. The developed physical model of damage growth compares reasonably well with known experimental data.

  7. Modeling of combined high-temperature creep and cyclic plasticity in components using continuum damage mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunne, F. P. E.; Hayhurst, D. R.

    1992-06-01

    A computer-based finite-element viscoplastic damage solver is presented to analyze structural components subject to combined cyclic thermal and mechanical loading. The solver is capable of predicting the combined evolution of creep and cyclic plasticity damage by solution of the combined boundary-initial value problem. The solver has been used to predict the high-temperature behavior of a slag tap component subjected to cyclic thermal loading generated by infrared heaters and water cooling ducts. It is found that the initiation of damage and microcracking occur early in the lifetime at about 3000 cycles adjacent to the cooling duct. The propagation of failure zones stabilizes at 60,000 cycles after which no further damage evolution occurs.

  8. Prediction of Size Effects in Notched Laminates Using Continuum Damage Mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camanho, D. P.; Maimi, P.; Davila, C. G.

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the use of a continuum damage model to predict strength and size effects in notched carbon-epoxy laminates. The effects of size and the development of a fracture process zone before final failure are identified in an experimental program. The continuum damage model is described and the resulting predictions of size effects are compared with alternative approaches: the point stress and the inherent flaw models, the Linear-Elastic Fracture Mechanics approach, and the strength of materials approach. The results indicate that the continuum damage model is the most accurate technique to predict size effects in composites. Furthermore, the continuum damage model does not require any calibration and it is applicable to general geometries and boundary conditions.

  9. Microstructural coarsening effects on redox instability and mechanical damage in solid oxide fuel cell anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdeljawad, F.; Haataja, M.

    2013-11-01

    In state-of-the-art high temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), a porous composite of nickel and yttria stabilized zirconia (Ni/YSZ) is employed as the anode. The rapid oxidation of Ni into NiO is regarded as the main cause of the so-called reduction-oxidation (redox) instability in Ni/YSZ anodes, due to the presence of extensive bulk volume changes associated with this reaction. As a consequence, the development of internal stresses can lead to performance degradation and/or structural failure. In this study, we employ a recently developed continuum formalism to quantify the mechanical deformation behavior and evolution of internal stresses in Ni/YSZ porous anodes due to re-oxidation. In our approach, a local failure criterion is coupled to the continuum framework in order to account for the heterogeneous damage accumulation in the YSZ phase. The hallmark of our approach is the ability to track the spatial evolution of mechanical damage and capture the interaction of YSZ damaged regions with the local microstructure. Simulation results highlight the importance of the microstructure characterized by Ni to YSZ particle size ratio on the redox behavior and damage accumulation in as-synthesized SOFC anode systems. Moreover, a redox-strain-to-failure criterion is developed to quantify the degree by which coarsened anode microstructures become more susceptible to mechanical damage during re-oxidation.

  10. Model-Based Fatigue Prognosis of Fiber-Reinforced Laminates Exhibiting Concurrent Damage Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corbetta, M.; Sbarufatti, C.; Saxena, A.; Giglio, M.; Goebel, K.

    2016-01-01

    Prognostics of large composite structures is a topic of increasing interest in the field of structural health monitoring for aerospace, civil, and mechanical systems. Along with recent advancements in real-time structural health data acquisition and processing for damage detection and characterization, model-based stochastic methods for life prediction are showing promising results in the literature. Among various model-based approaches, particle-filtering algorithms are particularly capable in coping with uncertainties associated with the process. These include uncertainties about information on the damage extent and the inherent uncertainties of the damage propagation process. Some efforts have shown successful applications of particle filtering-based frameworks for predicting the matrix crack evolution and structural stiffness degradation caused by repetitive fatigue loads. Effects of other damage modes such as delamination, however, are not incorporated in these works. It is well established that delamination and matrix cracks not only co-exist in most laminate structures during the fatigue degradation process but also affect each other's progression. Furthermore, delamination significantly alters the stress-state in the laminates and accelerates the material degradation leading to catastrophic failure. Therefore, the work presented herein proposes a particle filtering-based framework for predicting a structure's remaining useful life with consideration of multiple co-existing damage-mechanisms. The framework uses an energy-based model from the composite modeling literature. The multiple damage-mode model has been shown to suitably estimate the energy release rate of cross-ply laminates as affected by matrix cracks and delamination modes. The model is also able to estimate the reduction in stiffness of the damaged laminate. This information is then used in the algorithms for life prediction capabilities. First, a brief summary of the energy-based damage model

  11. Deformation and damage mechanisms of zinc coatings on hot-dip galvanized steel sheets: Part II. Damage modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parisot, Rodolphe; Forest, Samuel; Pineau, André; Grillon, François; Demonet, Xavier; Mataigne, Jean-Michel

    2004-03-01

    Zinc-based coatings are widely used for protection against corrosion of steel-sheet products in the automotive industry. The objective of the present article is to investigate the damage modes at work in three different microstructures of a zinc coating on an interstitial-free steel substrate under tension, planestrain tension, and expansion loading. Plastic-deformation mechanisms are addressed in the companion article. Two main fracture mechanisms, namely, intergranular cracking and transgranular cleavage fracture, were identified in an untempered cold-rolled coating, a tempered cold-rolled coating, and a recrystallized coating. No fracture at the interface between the steel and zinc coating was observed that could lead to spalling, in the studied zinc alloy. A complex network of cleavage cracks and their interaction with deformation twinning is shown to develop in the material. An extensive quantitative analysis based on systematic image analysis provides the number and cumulative length of cleavage cracks at different strain levels for the three investigated microstructures and three loading conditions. Grain refinement by recrystallization is shown to lead to an improved cracking resistance of the coating. A model for crystallographic cleavage combining the stress component normal to the basal plane and the amount of plastic slip on the basal slip systems is proposed and identified from equibiaxial tension tests and electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) analysis of the cracked grains. This analysis requires the computation of the nonlinear stress-strain response of each grain using a crystal-plasticity constitutive model. The model is then applied successfully to other loading conditions and is shown to account for the preferred orientations of damaged grains observed in the case of plane-strain tension.

  12. Changes of color coordinates of biological tissue with superficial skin damage due to mechanical trauma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pteruk, Vail; Mokanyuk, Olexander; Kvaternuk, Olena; Yakenina, Lesya; Kotyra, Andrzej; Romaniuk, Ryszard S.; Dussembayeva, Shynar

    2015-12-01

    Change of color coordinates of normal and pathological biological tissues is based on calculated spectral diffuse reflection. The proposed color coordinates of normal and pathological biological tissues of skin provided using standard light sources, allowing accurately diagnose skin damage due to mechanical trauma with a blunt object for forensic problems.

  13. DNA DAMAGE REPAIR AND CELL CYCLE CONTROL: A NATURAL BIO-DEFENSE MECHANISM

    EPA Science Inventory

    DNA DAMAGE REPAIR AND CELL CYCLE CONTROL: A natural bio-defense mechanism
    Anuradha Mudipalli.

    Maintenance of genetic information, including the correct sequence of nucleotides in DNA, is essential for replication, gene expression, and protein synthesis. DNA lesions onto...

  14. Coordination of DNA damage tolerance mechanisms with cell cycle progression in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Callegari, A. John; Kelly, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT DNA damage tolerance (DDT) mechanisms allow cells to synthesize a new DNA strand when the template is damaged. Many mutations resulting from DNA damage in eukaryotes are generated during DDT when cells use the mutagenic translesion polymerases, Rev1 and Polζ, rather than mechanisms with higher fidelity. The coordination among DDT mechanisms is not well understood. We used live-cell imaging to study the function of DDT mechanisms throughout the cell cycle of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We report that checkpoint-dependent mitotic delay provides a cellular mechanism to ensure the completion of high fidelity DDT, largely by homology-directed repair (HDR). DDT by mutagenic polymerases is suppressed during the checkpoint delay by a mechanism dependent on Rad51 recombinase. When cells pass the G2/M checkpoint and can no longer delay mitosis, they completely lose the capacity for HDR and simultaneously exhibit a requirement for Rev1 and Polζ. Thus, DDT is coordinated with the checkpoint response so that the activity of mutagenic polymerases is confined to a vulnerable period of the cell cycle when checkpoint delay and HDR are not possible. PMID:26652183

  15. Phagocytosis-dependent and independent mechanisms underlie the microglial cell damage caused by carbon nanotube agglomerates.

    PubMed

    Shigemoto-Mogami, Yukari; Hoshikawa, Kazue; Hirose, Akihiko; Sato, Kaoru

    2016-01-01

    Although carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are used in many fields, including energy, healthcare, environmental technology, materials, and electronics, the adverse effects of CNTs in the brain are poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the effects of CNTs on cultured microglia, as microglia are the first responders to foreign materials. We compared the effects of sonicated suspensions of 5 kinds of CNTs and their flow-through filtered with a 0.22 µm membrane filter on microglial viability. We found that sonicated suspensions caused microglial cell damage, but their flow-through did not. The number of microglial aggregates was well correlated with the extent of the damage. We also determined that the CNT agglomerates consisted of two groups: one was phagocytosed by microglia and caused microglial cell damage, and the other caused cell damage without phagocytosis. These results suggest that phagocytosis-dependent and independent mechanisms underlie the microglial cell damage caused by CNT agglomerates and it is important to conduct studies about the relationships between physical properties of nanomaterial-agglomerates and cell damage. PMID:27432236

  16. Imperfect asymmetry: The mechanism governing asymmetric partitioning of damaged cellular components during mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Pattabiraman, Sundararaghavan; Kaganovich, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Aging is universally associated with organism-wide dysfunction and a decline in cellular fitness. From early development onwards, the efficiency of self-repair, energy production, and homeostasis all decrease. Due to the multiplicity of systems that undergo agingrelated decline, the mechanistic basis of organismal aging has been difficult to pinpoint. At the cellular level, however, recent work has provided important insight. Cellular aging is associated with the accumulation of several types of damage, in particular damage to the proteome and organelles. Groundbreaking studies have shown that replicative aging is the result of a rejuvenation mechanism that prevents the inheritance of damaged components during division, thereby confining the effects of aging to specific cells, while removing damage from others. Asymmetric inheritance of misfolded and aggregated proteins, as well as reduced mitochondria, has been shown in yeast. Until recently, however, it was not clear whether a similar mechanism operates in mammalian cells, which were thought to mostly divide symmetrically. Our group has recently shown that vimentin establishes mitotic polarity in immortalized mammalian cells, and mediates asymmetric partitioning of multiple factors through direct interaction. These findings prompt a provocative hypothesis: that intermediate filaments serve as asymmetric partitioning modules or “sponges” that, when expressed prior to mitosis, can “clean” emerging cells of the damage they have accumulated. PMID:25941938

  17. Dissecting the molecular mechanism of ionizing radiation-induced tissue damage in the feather follicle.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Liao, Chunyan; Chu, Qiqi; Zhou, Guixuan; Lin, Xiang; Li, Xiaobo; Lu, Haijie; Xu, Benhua; Yue, Zhicao

    2014-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) is a common therapeutic agent in cancer therapy. It damages normal tissue and causes side effects including dermatitis and mucositis. Here we use the feather follicle as a model to investigate the mechanism of IR-induced tissue damage, because any perturbation of feather growth will be clearly recorded in its regular yet complex morphology. We find that IR induces defects in feather formation in a dose-dependent manner. No abnormality was observed at 5 Gy. A transient, reversible perturbation of feather growth was induced at 10 Gy, leading to defects in the feather structure. This perturbation became irreversible at 20 Gy. Molecular and cellular analysis revealed P53 activation, DNA damage and repair, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in the pathobiology. IR also induces patterning defects in feather formation, with disrupted branching morphogenesis. This perturbation is mediated by cytokine production and Stat1 activation, as manipulation of cytokine levels or ectopic Stat1 over-expression also led to irregular feather branching. Furthermore, AG-490, a chemical inhibitor of Stat1 signaling, can partially rescue IR-induced tissue damage. Our results suggest that the feather follicle could serve as a useful model to address the in vivo impact of the many mechanisms of IR-induced tissue damage. PMID:24586618

  18. Mechanical behavior, damage tolerance and durability of fiber metal laminates for aircraft structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Guocai

    This study systematically explores the mechanical behavior, damage tolerance and durability of fiber metal laminates, a promising candidate materials system for next generation aerospace structures. The experimental results indicated that GLARE laminates exhibited a bilinear deformation behavior under static in-plane loading. Both an analytical constitutive model based on a modified classical lamination theory which incorporates the elasto-plastic behavior of aluminum alloy and a numerical simulation based on finite element modeling are used to predict the nonlinear stress-strain response and deformation behavior of GLARE laminates. The blunt notched strength of GLARE laminates increased with decreasing specimen width and decreasing hole diameter. The notched strength of GLARE laminates was evaluated based on a modified point stress criterion. A computer simulation based on finite element method was performed to study stress concentration and distribution around the notch and verify the analytical and experimental results of notched strength. Good agreement is obtained between the model predictions and experimental results. Experimental results also indicate that GLARE laminates exhibited superior impact properties to those of monolithic 2024-T3 aluminum alloy at low velocity impact loading. The GLARE 5-2/1 laminate with 0°/90°/90°/0° fiber configuration exhibits a better impact resistance than the GLARE 4-3/2 laminate with 0°/90°/0° fiber orientation. The characteristic impact energies, the damage area, and the permanent deflection of laminates are used to evaluate the impact damage resistance. The post-impact residual tensile strength under various damage states ranging from the plastic dent, barely visible impact damage (BVID), clearly visible impact damage (CVID) up to the complete perforation was also measured and compared. The post-impact fatigue behavior under various stress levels and impact damage states was extensively explored. The damage

  19. Modeling of thermo-mechanical fatigue and damage in shape memory alloy axial actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Robert W.; Hartl, Darren J.; Chemisky, Yves; Lagoudas, Dimitris C.

    2015-04-01

    The aerospace, automotive, and energy industries have seen the potential benefits of using shape memory alloys (SMAs) as solid state actuators. Thus far, however, these actuators are generally limited to non-critical components or over-designed due to a lack of understanding regarding how SMAs undergo thermomechanical or actuation fatigue and the inability to accurately predict failure in an actuator during use. The purpose of this study was to characterize the actuation fatigue response of Nickel-Titanium-Hafnium (NiTiHf) axial actuators and, in turn, use this characterization to predict failure and monitor damage in dogbone actuators undergoing various thermomechanical loading paths. Calibration data was collected from constant load, full cycle tests ranging from 200-600MPa. Subsequently, actuator lifetimes were predicted for four additional loading paths. These loading paths consisted of linearly varying load with full transformation (300-500MPa) and step loads which transition from zero stress to 300-400MPa at various martensitic volume fractions. Thermal cycling was achieved via resistive heating and convective cooling and was controlled via a state machine developed in LabVIEW. A previously developed fatigue damage model, which is formulated such that the damage accumulation rate is general in terms of its dependence on current and local stress and actuation strain states, was utilized. This form allows the model to be utilized for specimens undergoing complex loading paths. Agreement between experiments and simulations is discussed.

  20. Cationic liposomes formulated with DMPC and a gemini surfactant traverse the cell membrane without causing a significant bio-damage.

    PubMed

    Stefanutti, E; Papacci, F; Sennato, S; Bombelli, C; Viola, I; Bonincontro, A; Bordi, F; Mancini, G; Gigli, G; Risuleo, G

    2014-10-01

    Cationic liposomes have been intensively studied both in basic and applied research because of their promising potential as non-viral molecular vehicles. This work was aimed to gain more information on the interactions between the plasmamembrane and liposomes formed by a natural phospholipid and a cationic surfactant of the gemini family. The present work was conducted with the synergistic use of diverse experimental approaches: electro-rotation measurements, atomic force microscopy, ζ-potential measurements, laser scanning confocal microscopy and biomolecular/cellular techniques. Electro-rotation measurements pointed out that the interaction of cationic liposomes with the cell membrane alters significantly its dielectric and geometric parameters. This alteration, being accompanied by significant changes of the membrane surface roughness as measured by atomic force microscopy, suggests that the interaction with the liposomes causes locally substantial modifications to the structure and morphology of the cell membrane. However, the results of electrophoretic mobility (ζ-potential) experiments show that upon the interaction the electric charge exposed on the cell surface does not vary significantly, pointing out that the simple adhesion on the cell surface of the cationic liposomes or their fusion with the membrane is to be ruled out. As a matter of fact, confocal microscopy images directly demonstrated the penetration of the liposomes inside the cell and their diffusion within the cytoplasm. Electro-rotation experiments performed in the presence of endocytosis inhibitors suggest that the internalization is mediated by, at least, one specific pathway. Noteworthy, the liposome uptake by the cell does not cause a significant biological damage. PMID:25017801

  1. [Structural mechanisms and mathematical modeling of the bone tissue damage caused by hyper-speed impact].

    PubMed

    Ishchenko, A N; Belov, N N; Gaĭdash, A A; Iugov, N T; Bashirov, R S; Afanas'eva, S A; Sinitsa, L N

    2011-03-01

    Method of computer modeling of behavior of cylindrical and lamellar bones under the hypervelocity impact is suggested. This method allows in the frame of mechanics of continuous medium to calculate the stress strain behavior and damage in bone tissues under the shock wave impact. The processes of shock correlation of steel fragments of different shape with diaphysis of cylindrical bones and flat bone of calvaria under the impact 500 m/s are studied. The given method can be used for the evaluation of damage area of bone tissue of shock wave osteoporosis under the gunshot wound. PMID:21770310

  2. Identification of Fracture Toughness for Discrete Damage Mechanics Analysis of Glass-Epoxy Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbero, E. J.; Cosso, F. A.; Martinez, X.

    2014-08-01

    A methodology for determination of the intralaminar fracture toughness is presented, based on fitting discrete damage mechanics (DDM) model predictions to available experimental data. DDM is constitutive model that, when incorporated into commercial finite element software via user material subroutines, is able to predict intralaminar transverse and shear damage initiation and evolution in terms of the fracture toughness of the composite. The applicability of the DDM model is studied by comparison to available experimental data for Glass-Epoxy laminates. Sensitivity of the DDM model to h- and p-refinement is studied. Also, the effect of in-situ correction of strength is highlighted.

  3. Mechanisms of MDMA (ecstasy)-induced oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and organ damage.

    PubMed

    Song, Byoung-Joon; Moon, Kwan-Hoon; Upreti, Vijay V; Eddington, Natalie D; Lee, Insong J

    2010-08-01

    Despite numerous reports about the acute and sub-chronic toxicities caused by MDMA (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, ecstasy), the underlying mechanism of organ damage is poorly understood. The aim of this review is to present an update of the mechanistic studies on MDMA-mediated organ damage partly caused by increased oxidative/nitrosative stress. Because of the extensive reviews on MDMA-mediated oxidative stress and tissue damage, we specifically focus on the mechanisms and consequences of oxidative-modifications of mitochondrial proteins, leading to mitochondrial dysfunction. We briefly describe a method to systematically identify oxidatively-modified mitochondrial proteins in control and MDMA-exposed rats by using biotin-N-maleimide (biotin-NM) as a sensitive probe for oxidized proteins. We also describe various applications and advantages of this Cys-targeted proteomics method and alternative approaches to overcome potential limitations of this method in studying oxidized proteins from MDMA-exposed tissues. Finally we discuss the mechanism of synergistic drug-interaction between MDMA and other abused substances including alcohol (ethanol) as well as application of this redox-based proteomics method in translational studies for developing effective preventive and therapeutic agents against MDMA-induced organ damage. PMID:20420575

  4. The rodent endovascular puncture model of subarachnoid hemorrhage: mechanisms of brain damage and therapeutic strategies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) represents a considerable health problem. To date, limited therapeutic options are available. In order to develop effective therapeutic strategies for SAH, the mechanisms involved in SAH brain damage should be fully explored. Here we review the mechanisms of SAH brain damage induced by the experimental endovascular puncture model. We have included a description of similarities and distinctions between experimental SAH in animals and human SAH pathology. Moreover, several novel treatment options to diminish SAH brain damage are discussed. SAH is accompanied by cerebral inflammation as demonstrated by an influx of inflammatory cells into the cerebral parenchyma, upregulation of inflammatory transcriptional pathways and increased expression of cytokines and chemokines. Additionally, various cell death pathways including cerebral apoptosis, necrosis, necroptosis and autophagy are involved in neuronal damage caused by SAH. Treatment strategies aiming at inhibition of inflammatory or cell death pathways demonstrate the importance of these mechanisms for survival after experimental SAH. Moreover, neuroregenerative therapies using stem cells are discussed as a possible strategy to repair the brain after SAH since this therapy may extend the window of treatment considerably. We propose the endovascular puncture model as a suitable animal model which resembles the human pathology of SAH and which could be applied to investigate novel therapeutic therapies to combat this debilitating insult. PMID:24386932

  5. Inelastic Deformation of Metal Matrix Composites. Part 1; Plasticity and Damage Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, B. S.; Newaz, G. M.

    1992-01-01

    The deformation mechanisms of a Ti 15-3/SCS6 (SiC fiber) metal matrix composite (MMC) were investigated using a combination of mechanical measurements and microstructural analysis. The objectives were to evaluate the contributions of plasticity and damage to the overall inelastic response, and to confirm the mechanisms by rigorous microstructural evaluations. The results of room temperature experiments performed on 0 degree and 90 degree systems primarily are reported in this report. Results of experiments performed on other laminate systems and at high temperatures will be provided in a forthcoming report. Inelastic deformation of the 0 degree MMC (fibers parallel to load direction) was dominated by the plasticity of the matrix. In contrast, inelastic deformations of the 90 degree composite (fibers perpendicular to loading direction) occurred by both damage and plasticity. The predictions of a continuum elastic plastic model were compared with experimental data. The model was adequate for predicting the 0 degree response; however, it was inadequate for predicting the 90 degree response largely because it neglected damage. The importance of validating constitutive models using a combination of mechanical measurements and microstructural analysis is pointed out. The deformation mechanisms, and the likely sequence of events associated with the inelastic deformation of MMCs, are indicated in this paper.

  6. Deterministic and Probabilistic Creep and Creep Rupture Enhancement to CARES/Creep: Multiaxial Creep Life Prediction of Ceramic Structures Using Continuum Damage Mechanics and the Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jadaan, Osama M.; Powers, Lynn M.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1998-01-01

    High temperature and long duration applications of monolithic ceramics can place their failure mode in the creep rupture regime. A previous model advanced by the authors described a methodology by which the creep rupture life of a loaded component can be predicted. That model was based on the life fraction damage accumulation rule in association with the modified Monkman-Grant creep ripture criterion However, that model did not take into account the deteriorating state of the material due to creep damage (e.g., cavitation) as time elapsed. In addition, the material creep parameters used in that life prediction methodology, were based on uniaxial creep curves displaying primary and secondary creep behavior, with no tertiary regime. The objective of this paper is to present a creep life prediction methodology based on a modified form of the Kachanov-Rabotnov continuum damage mechanics (CDM) theory. In this theory, the uniaxial creep rate is described in terms of stress, temperature, time, and the current state of material damage. This scalar damage state parameter is basically an abstract measure of the current state of material damage due to creep deformation. The damage rate is assumed to vary with stress, temperature, time, and the current state of damage itself. Multiaxial creep and creep rupture formulations of the CDM approach are presented in this paper. Parameter estimation methodologies based on nonlinear regression analysis are also described for both, isothermal constant stress states and anisothermal variable stress conditions This creep life prediction methodology was preliminarily added to the integrated design code CARES/Creep (Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures/Creep), which is a postprocessor program to commercially available finite element analysis (FEA) packages. Two examples, showing comparisons between experimental and predicted creep lives of ceramic specimens, are used to demonstrate the viability of this methodology and

  7. Chemical Mechanical Polishing with Nanocolloidal Ceria Slurry for Low-Damage Planarization of Dielectric Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryuzaki, Daisuke; Hoshi, Yosuke; Machii, Yoichi; Koyama, Naoyuki; Sakurai, Haruaki; Ashizawa, Toranosuke

    2012-03-01

    New chemical mechanical polishing processes using nanocolloidal ceria slurry are proposed for high-precision and low-damage planarization of silicon-dioxide-based dielectric films. In the polishing process of a shallow trench isolation structure, a hard pad and a cationic polymer additive are used in combination with the slurry. The new process is effective in improving the planarity and reducing the microscratch count in comparison with a conventional polishing process with calcined ceria slurry and a standard pad. In the polishing process of an interconnect structure with ultralow-k interlayer dielectrics (ULK-ILDs), the standard pad should be used since the ULK-ILDs are easily damaged. By employing a spin-on-type ULK-ILD having a self-planarizing effect, a high planarity is obtained when using the nanocolloidal ceria slurry with the standard pad. The electrical measurement of the interconnect structure indicates that dielectric damage due to the process is successfully suppressed.

  8. Endogenous recovery after brain damage: molecular mechanisms that balance neuronal life/death fate.

    PubMed

    Tovar-y-Romo, Luis B; Penagos-Puig, Andrés; Ramírez-Jarquín, Josué O

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal survival depends on multiple factors that comprise a well-fueled energy metabolism, trophic input, clearance of toxic substances, appropriate redox environment, integrity of blood-brain barrier, suppression of programmed cell death pathways and cell cycle arrest. Disturbances of brain homeostasis lead to acute or chronic alterations that might ultimately cause neuronal death with consequent impairment of neurological function. Although we understand most of these processes well when they occur independently from one another, we still lack a clear grasp of the concerted cellular and molecular mechanisms activated upon neuronal damage that intervene in protecting damaged neurons from death. In this review, we summarize a handful of endogenously activated mechanisms that balance molecular cues so as to determine whether neurons recover from injury or die. We center our discussion on mechanisms that have been identified to participate in stroke, although we consider different scenarios of chronic neurodegeneration as well. We discuss two central processes that are involved in endogenous repair and that, when not regulated, could lead to tissue damage, namely, trophic support and neuroinflammation. We emphasize the need to construct integrated models of neuronal degeneration and survival that, in the end, converge in neuronal fate after injury. Under neurodegenerative conditions, endogenously activated mechanisms balance out molecular cues that determine whether neurons contend toxicity or die. Many processes involved in endogenous repair may as well lead to tissue damage depending on the strength of stimuli. Signaling mediated by trophic factors and neuroinflammation are examples of these processes as they regulate different mechanisms that mediate neuronal demise including necrosis, apoptosis, necroptosis, pyroptosis and autophagy. In this review, we discuss recent findings on balanced regulation and their involvement in neuronal death. PMID:26376102

  9. Protecting the heritable genome: DNA damage response mechanisms in spermatogonial stem cells.

    PubMed

    Rübe, Claudia E; Zhang, Sheng; Miebach, Nadine; Fricke, Andreas; Rübe, Christian

    2011-02-01

    Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) must maintain the integrity of their genome to prevent reproduction failure and limit the hereditary risk associated with transmission to the progeny. SSCs must therefore have robust response mechanisms to counteract the potentially deleterious effects of DNA damage, with DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) representing the greatest threat to genomic integrity. Through in vivo analysis of the DNA damage response of SSCs within their physiological tissue context, we aimed to gain insights into the mechanisms by which SSCs preserve genome integrity. After whole-body irradiation of repair-proficient and repair-deficient (DNA-PK- and ATM-deficient) mice, the formation and rejoining of DSBs was analyzed in SSCs of testis compared with somatic cells of other tissues by enumerating γH2AX-, MDC1-, and 53BP1-foci. Caspase-3 and PARP-1 were used as markers for apoptotic cell death. Our results show that DNA damage response mechanisms in SSCs characterized by unique chromatin compositions are markedly different from those of somatic cells. In SSCs lacking compact heterochromatin, histone-associated signaling components of the DNA repair machinery are completely absent and radiation-induced DSBs are rejoined predominantly by DNA-PK-independent pathways, suggesting the existence of alternative repair mechanisms. As a complimentary mechanism characterized by low thresholds for ATM-dependent checkpoint activation, the differentiating progeny, but not the SSCs themselves, promote apoptosis in response to low levels of DNA damage. By evaluating SSCs within their stem cell niche, we show that DNA repair, cell-cycle checkpoints, and apoptosis function together to maintain the integrity of the heritable genome. PMID:21123119

  10. Application of the damage mechanics to the description of multiple cracks development in shales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izvekov, Oleg

    2014-05-01

    Oil and gas shales are one of the most perspective sources of hydrocarbons. Damage processes are in the focus of any technology of oil shales development because of their extremely low permeability. As a rule the aim of stimulation treatments is to make a system of multiple cracks. Real rock masses are almost heterogeneous. Strength of layered rocks like shales has anisotropic properties. Damage mechanics gives one of the natural ways of description of multiple cracks development. The phenomenological model of multiple cracks evolution in porous media based on general principles of thermodynamics [Kondaurov V.I., Izvekov O.Y., 2009] was generalized to the case of layered rocks. This model takes into account elastic domain existence, dependency of elastic domain on orientation of axis of anisotropy, reduction of elasticity modulus in active process, permeability and porosity change. The model involves latent energy of damage and elastic energy release due to damage evolution. In the report some coupled problems of damage and filtration are discussed. This work was supported by Russian President Grant for Young Scientists MK-7249.2013.5. Kondaurov V.I., Izvekov O.Y. A Model of Saturated Porous Media with an Elastic Brittle Skeleton // Proc. of the 4-th Biot Conference on Poromechanics, POROMECHANICS IV. - EStech Publications, Inc., PA,USA, 2009.

  11. Simulations of pulsatile suspension flow through bileaflet mechanical heart valves to quantify platelet damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Brian; Aidun, Cyrus; Yoganathan, Ajit

    2012-11-01

    Studies have shown that high shear stress and long exposure times on platelets have a strong impact on thromboembolic complications in bileaflet mechanical heart valves (BMHVs). This numerical study quantifies the platelet damage incurred in pulsatile flow through various BMHV designs. The lattice-Boltzmann method with external boundary force (LBM-EBF) was implemented to simulate pulsatile flow and capture the dynamics and surface shear stresses of modeled platelets with realistic geometry. The platelets are released in key regions of interest in the geometry as well as at various times of the cardiac cycle. The platelet damage is quantified using a linear shear stress-exposure time blood damage index (BDI) model. The multiscale computational method used to quantitatively measure the BDI during the pulsatile flow has been validated as being able to accurately capture bulk BMHV fluid flow and for accurately quantifying platelet damage in BMHV flows. These simulations will further knowledge of the geometric features and cardiac cycle times that most affect platelet damage. This study will ultimately lead to optimization of BMHV design in order to minimize thromboembolic complications.

  12. Damage and failure mechanisms of continuous glass fiber reinforced polyphenylene sulfide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, F.; Hiltner, A.; Baer, E.

    1992-01-01

    The damage that accompanies flexural deformation of a unidirectional glass fiber composite of polyphenylene sulfide was examined by AE and SEM. These complementary techniques were used to identify damage mechanisms at the microscale and correlate them with the macroscopic stress state in four-point bending. The flexural stress-strain curve was nominally linear to about 1.0 percent strain, but the onset of damage detectable by AE occurred at 0.3 percent strain. Two peaks in the AE amplitude distribution were observed at 35 dB and 60 dB. Low-amplitude events were detected along the entire length of the specimen, and correlation with direct observations of damage made by deforming the composite on the SEM stage suggested that these events arose from matrix cracking and fiber debonding concentrated at flaws on the composite. High amplitude events occurred primarily in the region of highest flexural stress between the inner loading points. They were attributed to fracture of glass fibers on the tension side and surface damage on the compressive side.

  13. Reversible and Irreversible Mechanical Damaging of Large Double-Stranded DNA upon Electrospraying.

    PubMed

    Shlyapnikov, Yuri M; Shlyapnikova, Elena A; Morozov, Victor N

    2016-07-19

    Electrohydrodynamic spraying (or electrospaying, ES) of DNA solutions is an attractive technique for applications in mass spectrometry, in microarray fabrication, and in generation of DNA nanoaerosols. Here we report how ES affects DNA structure and evaluate possible ways to reduce DNA damage upon ES. It is shown that under any ES conditions, linear λ-phage DNA is subjected to intensive rupture producing a mixture of fragments. In addition to such fragmentation, notable reversible changes in the DNA structure were revealed by a slight increase in DNA electrophoretic mobility. The degree of fragmentation was shown to decrease with decreased DNA length and with increased flow rate through the ES capillary. Fragments shorter than 5 kbp did not show any notable damage upon ES. Both experimental data and theoretical estimations of the forces acting on DNA during ES indicate that DNA is damaged by mechanical forces, and the damage takes place in the vicinity of the Taylor cone tip, presumably due to the high shear stress or/and viscous drag forces operating there. Condensation of λ-DNA with hexamminecobalt(III) ions completely protected it from any damage upon ES. PMID:27306261

  14. Mechanical blood trauma in assisted circulation: sublethal RBC damage preceding hemolysis.

    PubMed

    Olia, Salim E; Maul, Timothy M; Antaki, James F; Kameneva, Marina V

    2016-06-15

    After many decades of improvements in mechanical circulatory assist devices (CADs), blood damage remains a serious problem during support contributing to variety of adverse events, and consequently affecting patient survival and quality of life. The mechanisms of cumulative cell damage in continuous-flow blood pumps are still not fully understood despite numerous in vitro, in vivo, and in silico studies of blood trauma. Previous investigations have almost exclusively focused on lethal blood damage, namely hemolysis, which is typically negligible during normal operation of current generation CADs. The measurement of plasma free hemoglobin (plfHb) concentration to characterize hemolysis is straightforward, however sublethal trauma is more difficult to detect and quantify since no simple direct test exists. Similarly, while multiple studies have focused on thrombosis within blood pumps and accessories, sublethal blood trauma and its sequelae have yet to be adequately documented or characterized. This review summarizes the current understanding of sublethal trauma to red blood cells (RBCs) produced by exposure of blood to flow parameters and conditions similar to those within CADs. It also suggests potential strategies to reduce and/or prevent RBC sublethal damage in a clinically-relevant context, and encourages new research into this relatively uncharted territory. PMID:27034320

  15. Nebulization of ultradeformable liposomes: the influence of aerosolization mechanism and formulation excipients.

    PubMed

    Elhissi, Abdelbary M A; Giebultowicz, Joanna; Stec, Anna A; Wroczynski, Piotr; Ahmed, Waqar; Alhnan, Mohamed Albed; Phoenix, David; Taylor, Kevin M G

    2012-10-15

    Ultradeformable liposomes are stress-responsive phospholipid vesicles that have been investigated extensively in transdermal delivery. In this study, the suitability of ultradeformable liposomes for pulmonary delivery was investigated. Aerosols of ultradeformable liposomes were generated using air-jet, ultrasonic or vibrating-mesh nebulizers and their stability during aerosol generation was evaluated using salbutamol sulphate as a model hydrophilic drug. Although delivery of ultradeformable liposome aerosols in high fine particle fraction was achievable, the vesicles were very unstable to nebulization so that up to 98% drug losses were demonstrated. Conventional liposomes were relatively less unstable to nebulization. Moreover, ultradeformable liposomes tended to aggregate during nebulization whilst conventional vesicles demonstrated a "size fractionation" behaviour, with smaller liposomes delivered to the lower stage of the impinger and larger vesicles to the upper stage. A release study conducted for 2 h showed that ultradeformable liposomes retained only 30% of the originally entrapped drug, which was increased to 53% by inclusion of cholesterol within the formulations. By contrast, conventional liposomes retained 60-70% of the originally entrapped drug. The differences between ultradeformable liposomes and liposomes were attributed to the presence of ethanol or Tween 80 within the elastic vesicle formulations. Overall, this study demonstrated, contrary to our expectation, that materials included with the aim of making the liposomes more elastic and ultradeformable to enhance delivery from nebulizers were in fact responsible for vesicle instability during nebulization and high leakage rates of the drug. PMID:22796173

  16. Damage evolution and mechanical response of cross-ply ceramic composite laminates

    SciTech Connect

    Weitsman, Y.; Yu, N.; Zhu, H.

    1995-12-31

    A mechanistic model for the damage evolution and mechanical response of cross-ply ceramic composite laminates under monotonically increasing uniaxial tension is presented. The model accounts for a variety of damage mechanisms evolving in cross-ply ceramic composite laminates, such as fiber-bridged matrix cracks in 0{degrees}-plies, transversely oriented matrix cracks in 90{degrees}-plies, and slips at 0{degrees}/90{degrees} ply interfaces as well as at the fiber/matrix interfaces. Energy criteria are developed to determine the creation and progression of matrix cracks and slip zones. The model predicts that the crack density in 0{degrees}-plies becomes higher than that within the 90{degrees}-plies as the applied load is incrementally increased, which agrees with the experimental observation. It is also shown that the model provides a reasonable prediction for the nonlinear stress-strain behavior of crossply SiC/CAS ceramic composites.

  17. Propagation of damage in brain tissue: coupling the mechanics of oedema and oxygen delivery.

    PubMed

    Lang, Georgina E; Vella, Dominic; Waters, Sarah L; Goriely, Alain

    2015-11-01

    Brain tissue swelling, or oedema, is a dangerous consequence of traumatic brain injury and stroke. In particular, a locally swollen region can cause the injury to propagate further through the brain: swelling causes mechanical compression of the vasculature in the surrounding tissue and so can cut off that tissue's oxygen supply. We use a triphasic mathematical model to investigate this propagation, and couple tissue mechanics with oxygen delivery. Starting from a fully coupled, finite elasticity, model, we show that simplifications can be made that allow us to express the volume of the propagating region of damage analytically in terms of key parameters. Our results show that performing a craniectomy, to alleviate pressure in the brain and allow the tissue to swell outwards, reduces the propagation of damage; this finding agrees with experimental observations. PMID:25822263

  18. Exercise-induced muscle damage and potential mechanisms for the repeated bout effect.

    PubMed

    McHugh, M P; Connolly, D A; Eston, R G; Gleim, G W

    1999-03-01

    Unfamiliar, predominantly eccentric exercise, frequently results in muscle damage. A repeated bout of similar eccentric exercise results in less damage and is referred to as the 'repeated bout effect'. Despite numerous studies that have clearly demonstrated the repeated bout effect, there is little consensus as to the actual mechanism. In general, the adaptation has been attributed to neural, connective tissue or cellular adaptations. Other possible mechanisms include, adaptation in excitation-contraction coupling or adaptation in the inflammatory response. The 'neural theory' predicts that the initial damage is a result of high stress on a relatively small number of active fast-twitch fibres. For the repeated bout, an increase in motor unit activation and/or a shift to slow-twitch fibre activation distributes the contractile stress over a larger number of active fibres. Although eccentric training results in marked increases in motor unit activation, specific adaptations to a single bout of eccentric exercise have not been examined. The 'connective tissue theory' predicts that muscle damage occurs when the noncontractile connective tissue elements are disrupted and myofibrillar integrity is lost. Indirect evidence suggests that remodelling of the intermediate filaments and/or increased intramuscular connective tissue are responsible for the repeated bout effect. The 'cellular theory' predicts that muscle damage is the result of irreversible sarcomere strain during eccentric contractions. Sarcomere lengths are thought to be highly non-uniform during eccentric contractions, with some sarcomeres stretched beyond myofilament overlap. Loss of contractile integrity results in sarcomere strain and is seen as the initial stage of damage. Some data suggest that an increase in the number of sarcomeres connected in series, following an initial bout, reduces sarcomere strain during a repeated bout and limits the subsequent damage. It is unlikely that one theory can explain

  19. Mechanisms of surface-tension-induced epithelial cell damage in a model of pulmonary airway reopening.

    PubMed

    Bilek, Anastacia M; Dee, Kay C; Gaver, Donald P

    2003-02-01

    Airway collapse and reopening due to mechanical ventilation exerts mechanical stress on airway walls and injures surfactant-compromised lungs. The reopening of a collapsed airway was modeled experimentally and computationally by the progression of a semi-infinite bubble in a narrow fluid-occluded channel. The extent of injury caused by bubble progression to pulmonary epithelial cells lining the channel was evaluated. Counterintuitively, cell damage increased with decreasing opening velocity. The presence of pulmonary surfactant, Infasurf, completely abated the injury. These results support the hypotheses that mechanical stresses associated with airway reopening injure pulmonary epithelial cells and that pulmonary surfactant protects the epithelium from this injury. Computational simulations identified the magnitudes of components of the stress cycle associated with airway reopening (shear stress, pressure, shear stress gradient, or pressure gradient) that may be injurious to the epithelial cells. By comparing these magnitudes to the observed damage, we conclude that the steep pressure gradient near the bubble front was the most likely cause of the observed cellular damage. PMID:12433851

  20. Continuum Damage Mechanics Models for the Analysis of Progressive Failure in Open-Hole Tension Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Kyonchan; Li, Yingyong; Rose, Cheryl A.

    2011-01-01

    The performance of a state-of-the-art continuum damage mechanics model for interlaminar damage, coupled with a cohesive zone model for delamination is examined for failure prediction of quasi-isotropic open-hole tension laminates. Limitations of continuum representations of intra-ply damage and the effect of mesh orientation on the analysis predictions are discussed. It is shown that accurate prediction of matrix crack paths and stress redistribution after cracking requires a mesh aligned with the fiber orientation. Based on these results, an aligned mesh is proposed for analysis of the open-hole tension specimens consisting of different meshes within the individual plies, such that the element edges are aligned with the ply fiber direction. The modeling approach is assessed by comparison of analysis predictions to experimental data for specimen configurations in which failure is dominated by complex interactions between matrix cracks and delaminations. It is shown that the different failure mechanisms observed in the tests are well predicted. In addition, the modeling approach is demonstrated to predict proper trends in the effect of scaling on strength and failure mechanisms of quasi-isotropic open-hole tension laminates.

  1. Second-generation locking mechanisms and ethylene oxide sterilization reduce tibial insert backside damage in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Azzam, Michael G; Roy, Marcel E; Whiteside, Leo A

    2011-06-01

    This study evaluated the effects of polyethylene quality and locking mechanism on damage to the nonarticulating (backside) surface of retrieved tibial inserts in total knee arthroplasty. Inserts with peripheral capture (PC) locking mechanisms and ethylene oxide (EtO)-sterilized polyethylene were hypothesized to prevent major backside damage. A total of 156 inserts were sorted by locking mechanism and sterilization method and analyzed by damage scoring methods. Ninety-seven specimens exhibited burnishing. Significant positive linear correlations were observed between damage score and age in vivo for all combinations, but damage occurred at a significantly lower rate for second-generation PC implants with EtO sterilization. Most specimens in this group were undamaged (46/72), with others exhibiting only burnishing. Sex, body mass index, and weight did not influence backside damage. PMID:20541356

  2. The evaluation of damage mechanism of unreinforced masonry buildings after Van (2011) and Elazig (2010) Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güney, D.; Aydin, E.; Öztürk, B.

    2015-07-01

    On March 8th, 2010 Karakocan-Elazig earthquake of magnitude 6.0 occurred at a region where masonry and adobe construction is very common. Karakocan-Elazig is located in a high seismicity region on Eastern Anatolian Fault System (EAFS). Due to the earthquake, 42 people were killed and 14’113 buildings were damaged. Another city, Van located at South east of Turkey is hit by earthquakes with M = 7.2 occurred on October 23rd, 2011 at 13:41 (local time), whose epicenter was about 16 km north of Van (Tabanli village) and M = 5.6 on November 9th, 2011 with an epicenter near the town of Edremit, south of Van and caused the loss of life and heavy damages. Both earthquakes killed 644 people and 2608 people were injured. Approximately 10’000 buildings were seriously damaged. There are many traditional types of structures existing in the region hit by earthquakes (both Van and Elazig). These buildings were built as adobe, unreinforced masonry or mixed type. These types of buildings are very common in rural areas (especially south and east) of Turkey because of easy workmanship and cheap construction cost. Many of those traditional type structures experienced serious damages. The use of masonry is very common in some of the world's most hazard-prone regions, such as in Latin America, Africa, the Indian subcontinent and other parts of Asia, the Middle East, and southern Europe. Based on damage and failure mechanism of those buildings, the parameters affecting the seismic performance of those traditional buildings are analyzed in this paper. The foundation type, soil conditions, production method of the masonry blocks, construction method, the geometry of the masonry walls, workmanship quality, existence of wooden beams, type of roof, mortar between adobe blocks are studied in order to understand the reason of damage for these types of buildings.

  3. Mechanisms of Focused Ion Beam Implantation Damage and Recovery in Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, G. P. S.; Hull, R.

    2016-06-01

    The ion current density in focused ion beam (FIB) systems, 0.1-10 A cm-2, is at least three orders of magnitude greater than that in commercial broad ion beam implanters. This large difference in ion current density is expected to strongly affect the damage recovery dynamics. In this work, we study the ion implantation damage and recovery of Si(100) substrates implanted with 1 × 1012-5 × 1015 Si cm-2 fluences of 60-keV Si2+ at normal incidence in a mass-selecting FIB. Additionally, damage and recovery in different broad ion beam implants of 60-keV Si+ were studied for a comparison. For recovering implantation damage, specimens were annealed for different times at 730-900°C in an ultra-high purity nitrogen ambient, and for characterizing damage and recovery, Raman spectroscopy at wavelengths 405 nm and 514 nm was carried out. Raman measurements comprised of measurements of crystalline Si (c-Si) peak height of the peak at 520 cm-1, and the peak shift relative to that of un-implanted reference Si. Our measurements of structural damage—calculated from the attenuation in the c-Si peak heights for the implants relative to that of unimplanted Si(100)—indicates that the FIB implantations lead to a greater as-implanted damage but also typically lead to a better recovery than that for the commercial broad-area implants. The underlying mechanisms for these observations are discussed.

  4. A control system formulation of the mechanism that controls the secretions of serum group hormone in humans during sleep

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, J. C.; Young, D. R.

    1975-01-01

    Plasma growth hormone concentrations during sleep were determined experimentally. An elevated level of plasma growth hormone was observed during the initial phase of sleep and remained elevated for approximately 3 hr before returning to the steady-state level. Moreover, subsequent to a prolonged interruption of sleep, of the order of 2-3 hr, an elevated level of plasma growth hormone was again observed during the initial phase of resumed sleep. A control system formulation of the mechanism that controls the secretions of serum growth hormone in humans was used to account for the growth hormone responses observed.

  5. Comparison of Phases Formation Process in Initial and Mechanically Activated Ceramic Batches with Pyrochlore Formulations

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanovsky, S. V.; Chizhevskaya, S. V.; Yudintsev, S. V.

    2002-02-25

    Formation of two pyrochlore ceramics with formulations CaZr0.25U0.75Ti2O7 and CaUTi2O7 within the temperature range 1000-1500 C from batches prepared by grinding of oxide powders in a mortar and an activator with hydrostatic yokes AGO-2U as well as soaking of a Ca, Zr, and Ti oxide mixture with uranylnitrate solution was studied. The pyrochlore ceramics are produced through intermediate calcium uranate formation. Phase formation reactions in the batch pre-treated in the AGO-2U unit were completed within the temperature range 1000-1100 C that is lower than in the batches prepared by two other methods.

  6. The relationships between RBE and LET for different types of lethal damage in mammalian cells: Biophysical and molecular mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Barendsen, G.W.

    1994-09-01

    The relative biological effective (RBE) of radiations as a function of linear energy transfer (LET) is analyzed for different types of damage causing reproductive death of mammalian cells. Survival curves are evaluated assuming a linear-quadratic dose dependence of the induction of reproductive death of cells. The linear term represents damage from single particle tracks and the quadratic term represents damage due to interaction of lesions from independent tracks. Differences and similarities are discussed of the LET dependence of single-track lethal damage, sublethal damage, potentially lethal damage and DNA double-strand breaks. The RBE-LET relationships are correlated with local energy deposition in small regions of the cells. The analysis shows that single-track lethal damage is composed in part of a type of damage that is not repaired by delayed plating and is very strongly dependent on LET with maximum RBE values up to 20, while another component consists of potentially lethal damage that is weakly dependent on LET with maximum RBE values less than 3. Potentially lethal damage and sublethal damage depend similarly on LET as DNA double-strand breaks. The sector of single-track damage which is not repaired by delayed plating is hypothesized to be caused through a repair-exchange mechanism involving two double-strand breaks induced close together. The identification of these different components of damage leads to an interpretation of differences in radiosensitivity and in RBE-LET relationships among various types of cells. 68 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Theoretical research on damage mechanism of ultrafast laser ablation crystal silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Junfeng; Guo, Jin; Wang, Tingfeng

    2013-09-01

    High peak power picosecond laser ablation of silicon draws great attention in solar cell manufacture,laser optoelectric countermeasure applications, eta. This paper reports the damage process of ultrafast lasers interaction with silicon,which is based on Two-Temperature Model(TTM) and 1-on-1 damage threshold test method. Pulsed laser caused damage manifests in several ways, such as heat damage, mechanical effect and even eletrical effect. In this paper, a modified Two Temperature Model is applied in ultrashort laser interaction with silicon.The traditional Two-Temperature Model methods is proposed by Anismov in 1970s to calculate the interaction between ultrafast laser with metals, which is composed of free electrons and lattice. Beyond the carrier and lattice temperture model, an additional excited term and Auger recombination term of carriers is taken into account in this modified Two-Temperature Model model to reflect the characteristics in semicondutors. Under the same pulse-duration condition, the damage threshold is found to be 161 mJ/cm2 and a characteritic double-peak shape shows up. As the pulse energy density rises from 50mJ/cm2 to 161 mJ/cm2, the difference between carrier and lattice temperature steps down proportionally.Also,a detailed interaction process between photon-electron and electron-phonon is discussed. Electron and lattice temperature evolutes distinctly different, while the former is much higher than the latter until heat tranfer finished at 200 picoseconds. Two-peak feature of electron temperature is also identified. As the pulse duration increases from 20 picosecond to 60 picosecond, the he difference between carrier and lattice temperature steps down significantly. The calculated damage threshold does not change fundamentally, remaining approximately 0.16J/cm2. Also, the damage mechanism is found to be thermal heating with the pulse width between 20 and 60 picoseconds at threshold fluences which is identical to experiment test result

  8. Insight into mechanism of lanthanum (III) induced damage to plant photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Huiqing; Wang, Lihong; Li, Yueli; Sun, Jingwen; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua

    2016-05-01

    A great deal of literature is available regarding the environmental and ecological effects of rare earth element pollution on plants. These studies have shown that excess lanthanum (La) (III) in the environment can inhibit plant growth and even cause plant death. Moreover, inhibition of plant photosynthesis is known to be one of the physiological bases of these damages. However, the mechanism responsible for these effects is still unclear. In this study, the mechanism of La(III)-induced damage to plant photosynthesis was clarified from the viewpoint of the chloroplast ultrastructure, the contents of chloroplast mineral elements and chlorophyll, the transcription of chloroplast ATPase subunits and chloroplast Mg(2+)-ATPase activity, in which rice was selected as a study object. Following treatment with low level of La(III), the chloroplast ultrastructure of rice was not changed, and the contents of chloroplast mineral elements (Mg, P, K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, and Zn) increased, but the chlorophyll content did not change significantly. Moreover, the transcription of chloroplast ATPase subunits, chloroplast Mg(2+)-ATPase activity, the net photosynthetic rate and growth indices increased. Following treatment with high levels of La(III), the chloroplast ultrastructure was damaged, chloroplast mineral elements (except Cu and Zn) and chlorophyll contents decreased, and the transcription of chloroplast ATPase subunits, chloroplast Mg(2+)-ATPase activity, the net photosynthetic rate and growth indices decreased. Based on these results, a possible mechanism of La(III)-induced damage to plant photosynthesis was proposed to provide a reference for scientific evaluation of the potential ecological risk of rare earth elements in the environment. PMID:26802561

  9. Mechanisms of DNA damage response to targeted irradiation in organotypic 3D skin cultures.

    PubMed

    Acheva, Anna; Ghita, Mihaela; Patel, Gaurang; Prise, Kevin M; Schettino, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    DNA damage (caused by direct cellular exposure and bystander signaling) and the complex pathways involved in its repair are critical events underpinning cellular and tissue response following radiation exposures. There are limited data addressing the dynamics of DNA damage induction and repair in the skin particularly in areas not directly exposed. Here we investigate the mechanisms regulating DNA damage, repair, intracellular signalling and their impact on premature differentiation and development of inflammatory-like response in the irradiated and surrounding areas of a 3D organotypic skin model. Following localized low-LET irradiation (225 kVp X-rays), low levels of 53BP1 foci were observed in the 3D model (3.8±0.28 foci/Gy/cell) with foci persisting and increasing in size up to 48 h post irradiation. In contrast, in cell monolayers 14.2±0.6 foci/Gy/cell and biphasic repair kinetics with repair completed before 24 h was observed. These differences are linked to differences in cellular status with variable level of p21 driving apoptotic signalling in 2D and accelerated differentiation in both the directly irradiated and bystander areas of the 3D model. The signalling pathways utilized by irradiated keratinocytes to induce DNA damage in non-exposed areas of the skin involved the NF-κB transcription factor and its downstream target COX-2. PMID:24505255

  10. Thermomigration: An experimental damage mechanics study on nanoelectronic lead free solder alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul Hamid, Mohd Foad

    This dissertation focuses on experimental study of thermomigration in lead-free solder alloys. Thermomigration in microelectronic solder joints was not a concern until significant miniaturization of electronics devices required to run high current densities with smaller solder joint sizes. High current density induces electromigration and Joule heating at the same time. The imbalance of Joule heating generated at top and bottom of solder joint causes a temperature gradient which is large enough to induce thermomigration damage. In the literature, most studies report electromigration induced damage without considering the influence of thermomigration, thus the effect of electromigration and thermomigration can not be individually identified. This dissertation studies the experimental damage mechanics of thermomigration without electromigration by studying formation and destruction of intermetallic compound, and vacancy migration due to diffusion driving forces. Microstructural degradation and hardness testing were used to quantify thermomigration induced damage. After studying material science and physics behind the thermomigration process, using test vehicles, the combined effects of electromigration and thermomigration were studied experimentally. The studies were repeated at a subzero temperatures to see the effect of low temperature on thermomigration and electromigration, and reliability of nanoelectronic solder joints. A new time to failure equation is proposed to show a threshold temperature below which diffusion slows down significantly. By ensuring the solder operating temperature is well kept below the threshold value by proper thermal management, the solder joint life can be extended.

  11. Preventive role of lens antioxidant defense mechanism against riboflavin-mediated sunlight damaging of lens crystallins.

    PubMed

    Anbaraki, Afrooz; Khoshaman, Kazem; Ghasemi, Younes; Yousefi, Reza

    2016-10-01

    The main components of sunlight reaching the eye lens are UVA and visible light exerting their photo-damaging effects indirectly by the aid of endogenous photosensitizer molecules such as riboflavin (RF). In this study, lens proteins solutions were incubated with RF and exposed to the sunlight. Then, gel mobility shift analysis and different spectroscopic assessments were applied to examine the structural damaging effects of solar radiation on these proteins. Exposure of lens proteins to direct sunlight, in the presence of RF, leads to marked structural crosslinking, oligomerization and proteolytic instability. These structural damages were also accompanied with reduction in the emission fluorescence of Trp and Tyr and appearance of a new absorption peak between 300 and 400nm which can be related to formation of new chromophores. Also, photo-oxidation of lens crystallins increases their oligomeric size distribution as examined by dynamic light scattering analysis. The above mentioned structural insults, as potential sources of sunlight-induced senile cataract and blindness, were significantly attenuated in the presence of ascorbic acid and glutathione which are two important components of lens antioxidant defense system. Therefore, the powerful antioxidant defense mechanism of eye lens is an important barrier against molecular photo-damaging effects of solar radiations during the life span. PMID:27316765

  12. Reply to ``Comment on `Why quantum mechanics cannot be formulated as a Markov process' ''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillespie, Daniel T.

    1997-10-01

    It is argued that the stochastic model of a quantum-mechanical two-state oscillator discussed in the preceding Comment by Hardy et al. [Phys. Rev. A 56, 3301 (1997)] does not constitute a valid classical stochastic process.

  13. Duration of emission of volatile organic compounds from mechanically damaged plant leaves.

    PubMed

    Smith, Lincoln; Beck, John J

    2015-09-01

    Classical biological control of invasive alien weeds depends on the use of arthropod herbivores that are sufficiently host specific to avoid risk of injuring nontarget plants. Host plant specificity is usually evaluated by using a combination of behavioral and developmental experiments under choice, no-choice and field conditions. Secondary plant compounds are likely to have an important influence on host plant specificity. However, relatively little is known about the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that are emitted by target and nontarget plants, and how environmental conditions may affect their emission. Previous studies have shown that mechanical damage of leaves increases the composition and content of VOCs emitted. In this study we measured the VOC emissions of five species of plants in the subtribe Centaureinae (Asteraceae)--Carthamus tinctorius, Centaurea cineraria, Centaurea melitensis, Centaurea rothrockii, and Centaurea solstitialis--that have previously been used in host specificity experiments for a prospective biological control agent of yellow starthistle (C. solstitialis). Leaves of each plant were punctured with a needle and the VOCs were collected by solid-phase microextraction (SPME) periodically over 48 h and analyzed by GC-MS. A total of 49 compounds were detected. Damage caused an immediate increase of 200-600% in the composition of VOCs emitted from each plant species, and the amounts generally remained high for at least 48 h. The results indicate that a very unspecific mechanical damage can cause a prolonged change in the VOC profile of plants. PMID:26398629

  14. Tension Strength, Failure Prediction and Damage Mechanisms in 2D Triaxial Braided Composites with Notch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Timothy L.; Anglin, Colin

    1995-01-01

    The unnotched and notched (open hole) tensile strength and failure mechanisms of two-dimensional (2D) triaxial braided composites were examined. The effect of notch size and notch position were investigated. Damage initiation and propagation in notched and unnotched coupons were also examined. Theory developed to predict the normal stress distribution near an open hole and failure for tape laminated composites was evaluated for its applicability to 2D triaxial braided textile composite materials. Four different fiber architectures were considered; braid angle, yarn and braider size, percentage of longitudinal yarns and braider angle varied. Tape laminates equivalent to textile composites were also constructed for comparison. Unnotched tape equivalents were stronger than braided textiles but exhibited greater notch sensitivity. Notched textiles and tape equivalents have roughly the same strength at large notch sizes. Two common damage mechanisms were found: braider yarn cracking and near notch longitudinal yarn splitting. Cracking was found to initiate in braider yarns in unnotched and notched coupons, and propagate in the direction of the braider yarns until failure. Damage initiation stress decreased with increasing braid angle. No significant differences in prediction of near notch strain between textile and tape equivalents could be detected for small braid angle, but the correlations were weak for textiles with large braid angle. Notch strength could not be predicted using existing anisotropic theory for braided textiles due to their insensitivity to notch.

  15. Microcavitation as a Neuronal Damage Mechanism in Blast Traumatic Brain Injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franck, Christian; Estrada, Jonathan

    2015-11-01

    Blast traumatic brain injury (bTBI) is a leading cause of injury in the armed forces. Diffuse axonal injury, the hallmark feature of blunt TBI, has been investigated in direct mechanical loading conditions. However, recent evidence suggests inertial cavitation as a possible bTBI mechanism, particularly in the case of exposure to blasts. Cavitation damage to free surfaces has been well-studied, but bubble interactions within confined 3D environments, in particular their stress and strain signatures are not well understood. The structural damage due to cavitation in living tissues - particularly at the cellular level - are incompletely understood, in part due to the rapid bubble formation and deformation strain rates of up to ~ 105-106 s-1. This project aims to characterize material damage in 2D and 3D cell culture environments by utilizing a novel high-speed red-blue diffraction assisted image correlation method at speeds of up to 106 frames per second. We gratefully acknowledge funding from the Office of Naval Research (POC: Dr. Tim Bentley).

  16. MECHANISMS FOR COUNTERING OXIDATIVE STRESS AND DAMAGE IN RETINAL PIGMENT EPITHELIUM

    PubMed Central

    Plafker, Scott M.; O’Mealey, Gary B.; Szweda, Luke I.

    2013-01-01

    Clinical and experimental evidence supports that chronic oxidative stress is a primary contributing factor to numerous retinal degenerative diseases, such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Eyes obtained postmortem from AMD patients have extensive free radical damage to the proteins, lipids, DNA, and mitochondria of their retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. In addition, several mouse models of chronic oxidative stress develop many of the pathological hallmarks of AMD. However, the extent to which oxidative stress is an etiologic component versus its involvement in disease progression remains a major unanswered question. Further, whether the primary target of oxidative stress and damage is photoreceptors or RPE cells, or both, is still unclear. In this review, we discuss the major functions of RPE cells with an emphasis on the oxidative challenges these cells encounter and the endogenous antioxidant mechanisms employed to neutralize the deleterious effects that such stresses can elicit if left unchecked. PMID:22878106

  17. Mutational Strand Asymmetries in Cancer Genomes Reveal Mechanisms of DNA Damage and Repair.

    PubMed

    Haradhvala, Nicholas J; Polak, Paz; Stojanov, Petar; Covington, Kyle R; Shinbrot, Eve; Hess, Julian M; Rheinbay, Esther; Kim, Jaegil; Maruvka, Yosef E; Braunstein, Lior Z; Kamburov, Atanas; Hanawalt, Philip C; Wheeler, David A; Koren, Amnon; Lawrence, Michael S; Getz, Gad

    2016-01-28

    Mutational processes constantly shape the somatic genome, leading to immunity, aging, cancer, and other diseases. When cancer is the outcome, we are afforded a glimpse into these processes by the clonal expansion of the malignant cell. Here, we characterize a less explored layer of the mutational landscape of cancer: mutational asymmetries between the two DNA strands. Analyzing whole-genome sequences of 590 tumors from 14 different cancer types, we reveal widespread asymmetries across mutagenic processes, with transcriptional ("T-class") asymmetry dominating UV-, smoking-, and liver-cancer-associated mutations and replicative ("R-class") asymmetry dominating POLE-, APOBEC-, and MSI-associated mutations. We report a striking phenomenon of transcription-coupled damage (TCD) on the non-transcribed DNA strand and provide evidence that APOBEC mutagenesis occurs on the lagging-strand template during DNA replication. As more genomes are sequenced, studying and classifying their asymmetries will illuminate the underlying biological mechanisms of DNA damage and repair. PMID:26806129

  18. A Novel Mechanism of Spine Damages in Stroke via DAPK1 and Tau.

    PubMed

    Pei, Lei; Wang, Shan; Jin, Huijuan; Bi, Linlin; Wei, Na; Yan, Honglin; Yang, Xin; Yao, Chengye; Xu, Mengmeng; Shu, Shu; Guo, Yu; Yan, Huanhuan; Wu, Jianhua; Li, Hao; Pang, Pei; Tian, Tian; Tian, Qing; Zhu, Ling-Qiang; Shang, You; Lu, Youming

    2015-11-01

    Synaptic spine loss is one of the major preceding consequences of stroke damages, but its underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. Here, we report that a direct interaction of DAPK1 with Tau causes spine loss and subsequently neuronal death in a mouse model with stroke. We found that DAPK1 phosphorylates Tau protein at Ser262 (pS(262)) in cortical neurons of stroke mice. Either genetic deletion of DAPK1 kinase domain (KD) in mice (DAPK1-KD(-/-)) or blocking DAPK1-Tau interaction by systematic application of a membrane permeable peptide protects spine damages and improves neurological functions against stroke insults. Thus, disruption of DAPK1-Tau interaction is a promising strategy in clinical management of stroke. PMID:25995053

  19. A Novel Mechanism of Spine Damages in Stroke via DAPK1 and Tau

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Lei; Wang, Shan; Jin, Huijuan; Bi, Linlin; Wei, Na; Yan, Honglin; Yang, Xin; Yao, Chengye; Xu, Mengmeng; Shu, Shu; Guo, Yu; Yan, Huanhuan; Wu, Jianhua; Li, Hao; Pang, Pei; Tian, Tian; Tian, Qing; Zhu, Ling-Qiang; Shang, You; Lu, Youming

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic spine loss is one of the major preceding consequences of stroke damages, but its underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. Here, we report that a direct interaction of DAPK1 with Tau causes spine loss and subsequently neuronal death in a mouse model with stroke. We found that DAPK1 phosphorylates Tau protein at Ser262 (pS262) in cortical neurons of stroke mice. Either genetic deletion of DAPK1 kinase domain (KD) in mice (DAPK1-KD−/−) or blocking DAPK1-Tau interaction by systematic application of a membrane permeable peptide protects spine damages and improves neurological functions against stroke insults. Thus, disruption of DAPK1-Tau interaction is a promising strategy in clinical management of stroke. PMID:25995053

  20. Formulation, antileukemia mechanism, pharmacokinetics, and biodistribution of a novel liposomal emodin

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tiechuang; Yin, Xiaodong; Lu, Yaping; Shan, Weiguang; Xiong, Subin

    2012-01-01

    Emodin is a multifunctional Chinese traditional medicine with poor water solubility. D-α-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (TPGS) is a pegylated vitamin E derivate. In this study, a novel liposomal-emodin-conjugating TPGS was formulated and compared with methoxypolyethyleneglycol 2000-derivatized distearoyl-phosphatidylethanolamine (mPEG2000–DSPE) liposomal emodin. TPGS improved the encapsulation efficiency and stability of emodin egg phosphatidylcholine/cholesterol liposomes. A high encapsulation efficiency of 95.2% ± 3.0%, particle size of 121.1 ± 44.9 nm, spherical ultrastructure, and sustained in vitro release of TPGS liposomal emodin were observed; these were similar to mPEG2000–DSPE liposomes. Only the zeta potential of −13.1 ± 2.7 mV was significantly different to that for mPEG2000–DSPE liposomes. Compared to mPEG2000–DSPE liposomes, TPGS liposomes improved the cytotoxicity of emodin on leukemia cells by regulating the protein levels of myeloid cell leukemia 1 (Mcl-1), B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) and Bcl-2-associated X protein, which was further enhanced by transferrin. TPGS liposomes prolonged the circulation time of emodin in the blood, with the area under the concentration–time curve (AUC) 1.7 times larger than for free emodin and 0.91 times larger than for mPEG2000–DSPE liposomes. In addition, TPGS liposomes showed higher AUC for emodin in the lung and kidney than for mPEG2000–DSPE liposomes, and both liposomes elevated the amount of emodin in the heart. Overall, TPGS is a pegylated agent that could potentially be used to compose a stable liposomal emodin with enhanced therapeutics. PMID:22661889

  1. Plasticity and ductility in graphene oxide through a mechanochemically induced damage tolerance mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaoding; Mao, Lily; Soler-Crespo, Rafael A; Paci, Jeffrey T; Huang, Jiaxing; Nguyen, SonBinh T; Espinosa, Horacio D

    2015-01-01

    The ability to bias chemical reaction pathways is a fundamental goal for chemists and material scientists to produce innovative materials. Recently, two-dimensional materials have emerged as potential platforms for exploring novel mechanically activated chemical reactions. Here we report a mechanochemical phenomenon in graphene oxide membranes, covalent epoxide-to-ether functional group transformations that deviate from epoxide ring-opening reactions, discovered through nanomechanical experiments and density functional-based tight binding calculations. These mechanochemical transformations in a two-dimensional system are directionally dependent, and confer pronounced plasticity and damage tolerance to graphene oxide monolayers. Additional experiments on chemically modified graphene oxide membranes, with ring-opened epoxide groups, verify this unique deformation mechanism. These studies establish graphene oxide as a two-dimensional building block with highly tuneable mechanical properties for the design of high-performance nanocomposites, and stimulate the discovery of new bond-selective chemical transformations in two-dimensional materials. PMID:26289729

  2. Plasticity and ductility in graphene oxide through a mechanochemically induced damage tolerance mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiaoding; Mao, Lily; Soler-Crespo, Rafael A.; Paci, Jeffrey T.; Espinosa, Horacio D.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to bias chemical reaction pathways is a fundamental goal for chemists and material scientists to produce innovative materials. Recently, two-dimensional materials have emerged as potential platforms for exploring novel mechanically activated chemical reactions. Here we report a mechanochemical phenomenon in graphene oxide membranes, covalent epoxide-to-ether functional group transformations that deviate from epoxide ring-opening reactions, discovered through nanomechanical experiments and density functional-based tight binding calculations. These mechanochemical transformations in a two-dimensional system are directionally dependent, and confer pronounced plasticity and damage tolerance to graphene oxide monolayers. Additional experiments on chemically modified graphene oxide membranes, with ring-opened epoxide groups, verify this unique deformation mechanism. These studies establish graphene oxide as a two-dimensional building block with highly tuneable mechanical properties for the design of high-performance nanocomposites, and stimulate the discovery of new bond-selective chemical transformations in two-dimensional materials. PMID:26289729

  3. Plasticity and ductility in graphene oxide through a mechanochemically induced damage tolerance mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiaoding; Mao, Lily; Soler-Crespo, Rafael A.; Paci, Jeffrey T.; Huang, Jiaxing; Nguyen, Sonbinh T.; Espinosa, Horacio D.

    2015-08-01

    The ability to bias chemical reaction pathways is a fundamental goal for chemists and material scientists to produce innovative materials. Recently, two-dimensional materials have emerged as potential platforms for exploring novel mechanically activated chemical reactions. Here we report a mechanochemical phenomenon in graphene oxide membranes, covalent epoxide-to-ether functional group transformations that deviate from epoxide ring-opening reactions, discovered through nanomechanical experiments and density functional-based tight binding calculations. These mechanochemical transformations in a two-dimensional system are directionally dependent, and confer pronounced plasticity and damage tolerance to graphene oxide monolayers. Additional experiments on chemically modified graphene oxide membranes, with ring-opened epoxide groups, verify this unique deformation mechanism. These studies establish graphene oxide as a two-dimensional building block with highly tuneable mechanical properties for the design of high-performance nanocomposites, and stimulate the discovery of new bond-selective chemical transformations in two-dimensional materials.

  4. The Double-Well Potential in Quantum Mechanics: A Simple, Numerically Exact Formulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jelic, V.; Marsiglio, F.

    2012-01-01

    The double-well potential is arguably one of the most important potentials in quantum mechanics, because the solution contains the notion of a state as a linear superposition of "classical" states, a concept which has become very important in quantum information theory. It is therefore desirable to have solutions to simple double-well potentials…

  5. Acoustic emission data clustering for analyzing damage mechanisms in glass/polyester composites under mode I delamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oskouei, Amir Refahi; Khamedi, Ramin; Heidary, Hossein; Farajpur, Mehdi

    2012-05-01

    In using acoustic emissions (AE) for mechanical diagnostics, one major problem is the discrimination of events due to different types of damage occurring during loading of composite materials. In the present work, a procedure for the investigation of local damage in composite materials based on the analysis of the signals of Acoustic Emission (AE) is presented. One of the remaining problems is the analysis of the AE signals in order to identify the most critical damage mechanisms. In this work, unsupervised pattern recognition analyses (fuzzyc-means clustering) associated with a principal component analysis are the tools that are used for the classification of the monitored AE events. A cluster analysis of AE data is achieved and the resulting clusters are correlated to the damage mechanisms of the material under investigation. Time domain methods are used to determine new relevant descriptors to be introduced in the classification process in order to improve the characterization and the discrimination of the damage mechanisms. The results show that there is a good fitness between clustering groups and damage mechanisms. Also, AE with clustering procedure are as effective tools that provide a better discrimination of damage mechanisms in glass/polyester composite materials.

  6. Failure Predictions for VHTR Core Components using a Probabilistic Contiuum Damage Mechanics Model

    SciTech Connect

    Fok, Alex

    2013-10-30

    The proposed work addresses the key research need for the development of constitutive models and overall failure models for graphite and high temperature structural materials, with the long-term goal being to maximize the design life of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). To this end, the capability of a Continuum Damage Mechanics (CDM) model, which has been used successfully for modeling fracture of virgin graphite, will be extended as a predictive and design tool for the core components of the very high- temperature reactor (VHTR). Specifically, irradiation and environmental effects pertinent to the VHTR will be incorporated into the model to allow fracture of graphite and ceramic components under in-reactor conditions to be modeled explicitly using the finite element method. The model uses a combined stress-based and fracture mechanics-based failure criterion, so it can simulate both the initiation and propagation of cracks. Modern imaging techniques, such as x-ray computed tomography and digital image correlation, will be used during material testing to help define the baseline material damage parameters. Monte Carlo analysis will be performed to address inherent variations in material properties, the aim being to reduce the arbitrariness and uncertainties associated with the current statistical approach. The results can potentially contribute to the current development of American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) codes for the design and construction of VHTR core components.

  7. Effects of Tissue Mechanical Properties on Susceptibility to Histotripsy-induced Tissue Damage

    PubMed Central

    Vlaisavljevich, Eli; Kim, Yohan; Owens, Gabe; Roberts, William; Cain, Charles; Xu, Zhen

    2014-01-01

    Histotripsy is a non-invasive tissue ablation method capable of fractionating tissue by controlling acoustic cavitation. To determine the fractionation susceptibility of various tissues, we investigated histotripsy-induced damage on tissue phantoms and ex vivo tissues with different mechanical strengths. A histotripsy bubble cloud was formed at tissue phantom surfaces using 5-cycle long ultrasound pulses with peak negative pressure of 18 MPa and PRFs of 10, 100, and 1000 Hz. Results showed significantly smaller lesions were generated in tissue phantoms of higher mechanical strength. Histotripsy was also applied to 43 different ex vivo porcine tissues with a wide range of mechanical properties. Gross morphology demonstrated stronger tissues with higher ultimate stress, higher density, and lower water content were more resistant to histotripsy damage in comparison to weaker tissues. Based on these results, a self-limiting vessel-sparing treatment strategy was developed in an attempt to preserve major vessels while fractionating the surrounding target tissue. This strategy was tested in porcine liver in vivo. After treatment, major hepatic blood vessels and bile ducts remained intact within a completely fractionated liver volume. These results identify varying susceptibilities of tissues to histotripsy therapy and provide a rational basis to optimize histotripsy parameters for treatment of specific tissues. PMID:24351722

  8. Switch telomerase to ALT mechanism by inducing telomeric DNA damages and dysfunction of ATRX and DAXX.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yang; Shi, Guang; Zhang, Laichen; Li, Feng; Jiang, Yuanling; Jiang, Shuai; Ma, Wenbin; Zhao, Yong; Songyang, Zhou; Huang, Junjiu

    2016-01-01

    Activation of telomerase or alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) is necessary for tumours to escape from dysfunctional telomere-mediated senescence. Anti-telomerase drugs might be effective in suppressing tumour growth in approximately 85-90% of telomerase-positive cancer cells. However, there are still chances for these cells to bypass drug treatment after switching to the ALT mechanism to maintain their telomere integrity. But the mechanism underlying this switch is unknown. In this study, we used telomerase-positive cancer cells (HTC75) to discover the mechanism of the telomerase-ALT switch by inducing telomere-specific DNA damage, alpha-thalassemia X-linked syndrome protein (ATRX) knockdown and deletion of death associated protein (DAXX). Surprisingly, two important ALT hallmarks in the ALT-like HTC75 cells were observed after treatments: ALT-associated promyelocytic leukaemia bodies (APBs) and extrachromosomal circular DNA of telomeric repeats. Moreover, knocking out hTERT by utilizing the CRISPR/Cas9 technique led to telomere elongation in a telomerase-independent manner in ALT-like HTC75 cells. In summary, this is the first report to show that inducing telomeric DNA damage, disrupting the ATRX/DAXX complex and inhibiting telomerase activity in telomerase-positive cancer cells lead to the ALT switch. PMID:27578458

  9. Effects of Ionizing Radiation on Biological Molecules—Mechanisms of Damage and Emerging Methods of Detection

    PubMed Central

    Reisz, Julie A.; Bansal, Nidhi; Qian, Jiang; Zhao, Weiling

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The detrimental effects of ionizing radiation (IR) involve a highly orchestrated series of events that are amplified by endogenous signaling and culminating in oxidative damage to DNA, lipids, proteins, and many metabolites. Despite the global impact of IR, the molecular mechanisms underlying tissue damage reveal that many biomolecules are chemoselectively modified by IR. Recent Advances: The development of high-throughput “omics” technologies for mapping DNA and protein modifications have revolutionized the study of IR effects on biological systems. Studies in cells, tissues, and biological fluids are used to identify molecular features or biomarkers of IR exposure and response and the molecular mechanisms that regulate their expression or synthesis. Critical Issues: In this review, chemical mechanisms are described for IR-induced modifications of biomolecules along with methods for their detection. Included with the detection methods are crucial experimental considerations and caveats for their use. Additional factors critical to the cellular response to radiation, including alterations in protein expression, metabolomics, and epigenetic factors, are also discussed. Future Directions: Throughout the review, the synergy of combined “omics” technologies such as genomics and epigenomics, proteomics, and metabolomics is highlighted. These are anticipated to lead to new hypotheses to understand IR effects on biological systems and improve IR-based therapies. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21: 260–292. PMID:24382094

  10. Effects of tissue mechanical properties on susceptibility to histotripsy-induced tissue damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlaisavljevich, Eli; Kim, Yohan; Owens, Gabe; Roberts, William; Cain, Charles; Xu, Zhen

    2014-01-01

    Histotripsy is a non-invasive tissue ablation method capable of fractionating tissue by controlling acoustic cavitation. To determine the fractionation susceptibility of various tissues, we investigated histotripsy-induced damage on tissue phantoms and ex vivo tissues with different mechanical strengths. A histotripsy bubble cloud was formed at tissue phantom surfaces using 5-cycle long ultrasound pulses with peak negative pressure of 18 MPa and PRFs of 10, 100, and 1000 Hz. Results showed significantly smaller lesions were generated in tissue phantoms of higher mechanical strength. Histotripsy was also applied to 43 different ex vivo porcine tissues with a wide range of mechanical properties. Gross morphology demonstrated stronger tissues with higher ultimate stress, higher density, and lower water content were more resistant to histotripsy damage in comparison to weaker tissues. Based on these results, a self-limiting vessel-sparing treatment strategy was developed in an attempt to preserve major vessels while fractionating the surrounding target tissue. This strategy was tested in porcine liver in vivo. After treatment, major hepatic blood vessels and bile ducts remained intact within a completely fractionated liver volume. These results identify varying susceptibilities of tissues to histotripsy therapy and provide a rational basis to optimize histotripsy parameters for treatment of specific tissues.

  11. Switch telomerase to ALT mechanism by inducing telomeric DNA damages and dysfunction of ATRX and DAXX

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yang; Shi, Guang; Zhang, Laichen; Li, Feng; Jiang, Yuanling; Jiang, Shuai; Ma, Wenbin; Zhao, Yong; Songyang, Zhou; Huang, Junjiu

    2016-01-01

    Activation of telomerase or alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) is necessary for tumours to escape from dysfunctional telomere-mediated senescence. Anti-telomerase drugs might be effective in suppressing tumour growth in approximately 85–90% of telomerase-positive cancer cells. However, there are still chances for these cells to bypass drug treatment after switching to the ALT mechanism to maintain their telomere integrity. But the mechanism underlying this switch is unknown. In this study, we used telomerase-positive cancer cells (HTC75) to discover the mechanism of the telomerase-ALT switch by inducing telomere-specific DNA damage, alpha-thalassemia X-linked syndrome protein (ATRX) knockdown and deletion of death associated protein (DAXX). Surprisingly, two important ALT hallmarks in the ALT-like HTC75 cells were observed after treatments: ALT-associated promyelocytic leukaemia bodies (APBs) and extrachromosomal circular DNA of telomeric repeats. Moreover, knocking out hTERT by utilizing the CRISPR/Cas9 technique led to telomere elongation in a telomerase-independent manner in ALT-like HTC75 cells. In summary, this is the first report to show that inducing telomeric DNA damage, disrupting the ATRX/DAXX complex and inhibiting telomerase activity in telomerase-positive cancer cells lead to the ALT switch. PMID:27578458

  12. Inelastic deformation of metal matrix composites: Plasticity and damage mechanisms, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, B. S.; Newaz, G. M.

    1992-01-01

    The inelastic deformation mechanisms for the SiC (SCS-6)/Ti-15-3 system were studied at 538 C (1000 F) using a combination of mechanical measurements and detailed microstructural examinations. The objectives were to evaluate the contributions of plasticity and damage to the overall MMC response, and to compare the room temperature and elevated temperature deformation behaviors. Four different laminates were studied: (0)8, (90)8,(+ or -45)2s, and (0/90)2s, with the primary emphasis on the unidirectional (0)8, and (90)8 systems. The elevated temperature responses were similar to those at room temperature, involving a two-stage elastic-plastic type of response for the (0)8 system, and a characteristic three-stage deformation response for the (90)8 and (+ or -45)2s systems. The primary effects of elevated temperatures included: (1) reduction in the 'yield' and failure strengths; (2) plasticity through diffused slip rather than concentrated planar slip (which occurred at room temperature); and (3) time-dependent deformation. The inelastic deformation mechanism for the (0)8 MMC was dominated by plasticity at both temperatures. For the (90)8 and (+ or -45)2s MMCs, a combination of damage and plasticity contributed to the deformation at both temperatures.

  13. Modeling of adsorption isotherms of water vapor on Tunisian olive leaves using statistical mechanical formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knani, S.; Aouaini, F.; Bahloul, N.; Khalfaoui, M.; Hachicha, M. A.; Ben Lamine, A.; Kechaou, N.

    2014-04-01

    Analytical expression for modeling water adsorption isotherms of food or agricultural products is developed using the statistical mechanics formalism. The model developed in this paper is further used to fit and interpret the isotherms of four varieties of Tunisian olive leaves called “Chemlali, Chemchali, Chetoui and Zarrazi”. The parameters involved in the model such as the number of adsorbed water molecules per site, n, the receptor sites density, NM, and the energetic parameters, a1 and a2, were determined by fitting the experimental adsorption isotherms at temperatures ranging from 303 to 323 K. We interpret the results of fitting. After that, the model is further applied to calculate thermodynamic functions which govern the adsorption mechanism such as entropy, the free enthalpy of Gibbs and the internal energy.

  14. Molecular and sensory mechanisms to mitigate sunlight-induced DNA damage in treefrog tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Schuch, André P; Lipinski, Victor M; Santos, Mauricio B; Santos, Caroline P; Jardim, Sinara S; Cechin, Sonia Z; Loreto, Elgion L S

    2015-10-01

    The increased incidence of solar ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation has been proposed as an environmental stressor, which may help to explain the enigmatic decline of amphibian populations worldwide. Despite growing knowledge regarding the UV-induced biological effects in several amphibian models, little is known about the efficacy of DNA repair pathways. In addition, little attention has been given to the interplay between these molecular mechanisms with other physiological strategies that avoid the damage induced by sunlight. Here, DNA lesions induced by environmental doses of solar UVB and UVA radiation were detected in genomic DNA samples of treefrog tadpoles (Hypsiboas pulchellus) and their DNA repair activity was evaluated. These data were complemented by monitoring the induction of apoptosis in blood cells and tadpole survival. Furthermore, the tadpoles' ability to perceive and escape from UV wavelengths was evaluated as an additional strategy of photoprotection. The results show that tadpoles are very sensitive to UVB light, which could be explained by the slow DNA repair rates for both cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and pyrimidine (6,4) pyrimidone photoproducts (6,4PPs). However, they were resistant to UVA, probably as a result of the activation of photolyases during UVA irradiation. Surprisingly, a sensory mechanism that triggers their escape from UVB and UVA light avoids the generation of DNA damage and helps to maintain the genomic integrity. This work demonstrates the genotoxic impact of both UVB and UVA radiation on tadpoles and emphasizes the importance of the interplay between molecular and sensory mechanisms to minimize the damage caused by sunlight. PMID:26447197

  15. Pro-oxidant Induced DNA Damage in Human Lymphoblastoid Cells: Homeostatic Mechanisms of Genotoxic Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Seager, Anna L.

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress contributes to many disease etiologies including ageing, neurodegeneration, and cancer, partly through DNA damage induction (genotoxicity). Understanding the i nteractions of free radicals with DNA is fundamental to discern mutation risks. In genetic toxicology, regulatory authorities consider that most genotoxins exhibit a linear relationship between dose and mutagenic response. Yet, homeostatic mechanisms, including DNA repair, that allow cells to tolerate low levels of genotoxic exposure exist. Acceptance of thresholds for genotoxicity has widespread consequences in terms of understanding cancer risk and regulating human exposure to chemicals/drugs. Three pro-oxidant chemicals, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), potassium bromate (KBrO3), and menadione, were examined for low dose-response curves in human lymphoblastoid cells. DNA repair and antioxidant capacity were assessed as possible threshold mechanisms. H2O2 and KBrO3, but not menadione, exhibited thresholded responses, containing a range of nongenotoxic low doses. Levels of the DNA glycosylase 8-oxoguanine glycosylase were unchanged in response to pro- oxidant stress. DNA repair–focused gene expression arrays reported changes in ATM and BRCA1, involved in double-strand break repair, in response to low-dose pro-oxidant exposure; however, these alterations were not substantiated at the protein level. Determination of oxidatively induced DNA damage in H2O2-treated AHH-1 cells reported accumulation of thymine glycol above the genotoxic threshold. Further, the H2O2 dose-response curve was shifted by modulating the antioxidant glutathione. Hence, observed pro- oxidant thresholds were due to protective capacities of base excision repair enzymes and antioxidants against DNA damage, highlighting the importance of homeostatic mechanisms in “genotoxic tolerance.” PMID:22539617

  16. Mechanics and mechanisms of surface damage in Al-Si alloys under ultra-mild wear conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ming

    Al-Si alloys intended for use in engine components must operate under ultra-mild wear (UMW) conditions to fit an acceptable amount of wear during a typical vehicle life. This study simulated surface damage in a UMW regime on five chemically etched Al-Si alloy surfaces using a pin-on-disc tribometer at low loads (0.5-2.0 N) under boundary lubricated conditions. The five alloys contained 11 to 25 wt.% Si and differed in matrix hardness, silicon particle morphology, and size. The mechanisms leading to the UMW damage and the role that the matrix hardness and microstructure play on said mechanisms were studied. Quantitative measurement methods based on statistical analysis of particle height changes and material loss from elevated aluminum using a profilometer technique were developed and used to assess UMW. The Greenwood and Tripp's numerical model was adapted to analyze the contact that occurred between Al-Si alloys with silicon particles protruding above the aluminum and steel balls. The estimation of the real contact pressure applied to the silicon particles was used to rationalize the damage mechanisms. The UMW mechanisms consisted of (i) abrasive wear on the top of the silicon particle surfaces; (ii) sinking-in of the silicon particles; (iii) piling-up of the aluminium around sunken-in particles and (vi) wear of the aluminium by the counterface, which eventually led to the initiation of UMW-II. Increasing the size or areal density of silicon particles with small aspect ratios delayed the onset of UMW-II by providing resistance against the silicon particles sinking-in and the aluminum piling-up. The UMW wear rates, however, began to decrease after long sliding cycles once an oil residue layer supported by hardened ultra-fine subsurface grains formed on the deformed aluminium matrix. The layer formation depended on the microstructure and applied load. Overall experimental observations suggested that Al-11% Si with small silicon particles exhibited optimal long

  17. [DIFFERENTIATED APPROACH TO CLOSING OF WOUND SURFACES TRUNK AND EXTREMITIES AFTER ITS MECHANICAL DAMAGE].

    PubMed

    Ponomarenko, O V

    2015-07-01

    The results of examination and treatment of 231 patients on defects covering tissues of the trunk and limbs were presented. The severity of the injury determined by classification A. V. Kaplan, O. M. Markova. In 10 patients wound treatment method used, developed in the clinic, using the combined preparation of hyaluronic acid with sodium succinate (Latsert), ensuring efficiency of treatment. Differentiated approach to the selection of closing wound surfaces method caused by mechanical damage, allowed to achieve satisfactory results in 97.84% of cases. PMID:26591223

  18. Synthesis of a novel photopolymerized nanocomposite hydrogel for the treatment of acute mechanical damage to cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlichting, Kathryn; Copeland-Johnson, Trishelle; Goodman, Matthew; Lipert, Robert; McKinley, Todd; Martin, James; Mallapragada, Surya; Lin, Zhiqun

    2011-03-01

    Posttraumatic osteoarthritis is caused by a cascade of pathobiologic and pathomechanical events starting with intraarticular fractures in the cartilage. Currently, treatment of fractures is completely focused on restoration of the macroanatomy of the joint. The premise is that restoring the macroanatomy will prevent ongoing stresses and in turn prevent cartilage degeneration. However, current treatment ignores acute mechanical damage sustained by cartilage at the time of injury. This study describes the initial development of a novel nanocomposite photopolymerizing copolymer that has potential to restore local structural integrity to acutely injured cartilage, and subsequently act as a carrier for chondrocyte-enhancing bioactive agents.

  19. Surface damage of metallic implants due to mechanical loading and chemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Jaejoong

    The present study investigates interfacial damage mechanism of modular implants due to synergetic action of mechanical contact loading and corrosion. Modular implants are manufactured such that surfaces have a characteristic degree of roughness determined by tool tip size and motion of tool path or feeding speed. The central hypothesis for this work is that during contact loading of metallic implants, mechanisms of damage and dissolution are determined by contact loads, plastic deformation, residual stresses and environmental conditions at the nanoscale surface asperities; while during subsequent rest periods, mechanism of metallic dissolution is determined by the environmental conditions and residual stress field induced due to long range elastic interactions of the plastically deformed asperities. First part of the thesis is focused on investigating the mechanisms underlying surface roughness evolution due to stress-assisted dissolution during the rest period. The latter part is focused on investigating material removal mechanisms during single asperity contact of implant surfaces. Experimental study was performed to elucidate the roughness evolution mechanism by combined effect of multi-asperity contact and environmental corrosion. Cobalt-chromium-molybdenum specimen was subjected to either contact loading alone or alternating contact loading and exposure to reactive environment. Roughness of the specimen surface was monitored by optical profilometry and Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) calculation was used to characterize the evolving behavior of roughness modes. Finite element analysis (FEA) was employed to identify influences of surface morphological configurations and contact pressures on the residual stress development. Analytical model of multi-asperity contact has been developed for prediction of residual stress field for different roughness configurations during varying magnitude of contact loads based on elastic inclusion theory. Experimental results

  20. ANALYSES OF VARIOUS DAMAGE MECHANISMS IN TRANSPARENT ARMOR SUBJECT TO PROJECTILE IMPACT

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Canhai; Sun, Xin; Templeton, Douglas W.

    2009-01-23

    Design and manufacturing of transparent armor have been historically carried out using experimental approaches. In this study, we use advanced computational modeling tools to study the various stress components during the impact event and to identify the different crack/damage driving mechanisms for the different cracking patterns. Experimentally observed damage patterns for a thick glass laminate under fragmentation simulation projectile (FSP) impact are used to compare with the modeling results. AHPCRC developed modeling software EPIC’06 [1] is used in predicting the penetration resistance of transparent armor systems. It is found that a 1-parameter single state model can be used to predict the impact penetration depth with relatively good accuracy. In addition, hoop stress and circumferential stresses are found to produce ripple cracks, needle cracks and radial cracks. It is also found that a region of high hoop stress and circumferential stress is produced by the impact at the back side of the target plate, causing the floret damage region possibly leading to higher penetration depth for thinner laminates or higher velocity impact.

  1. Damage morphology and mechanism in ablation cutting of thin glass sheets with picosecond pulsed lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Mingying; Eppelt, Urs; Hartmann, Claudia; Schulz, Wolfgang; Zhu, Jianqiang; Lin, Zunqi

    2016-06-01

    We experimentally investigated the morphology and mechanism of laser-induced damage in the ablation cutting of thin glass sheets with picosecond pulsed lasers and we compared the experimental results to our models. After several passes of laser ablation, we observed two different kinds of damage morphologies on the cross-section of the cut channel. They are distinguished to be the damage region caused by high-density free-electrons and the heat-affected zone due to the heat accumulation, respectively. Furthermore, micro-cracks can be observed on the top surface of the workpiece near the cut edge. The nano-cracks could be generated by high energy free-electrons but opened and developed to be visible micro-cracks by thermal stress generated in the heat-affected zone. The crack length was proportional to the volume of heat-affected zone. Heat-affected-zone and visible-cracks free conditions of glass cutting were achieved by controlling the repetition rate and spatial overlap of laser pulses.

  2. Molecular mechanisms of DNA damage recognition for mammalian nucleotide excision repair.

    PubMed

    Sugasawa, Kaoru

    2016-08-01

    For faithful DNA repair, it is crucial for cells to locate lesions precisely within the vast genome. In the mammalian global genomic nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway, this difficult task is accomplished through multiple steps, in which the xeroderma pigmentosum group C (XPC) protein complex plays a central role. XPC senses the presence of oscillating 'normal' bases in the DNA duplex, and its binding properties contribute to the extremely broad substrate specificity of NER. Unlike XPC, which acts as a versatile sensor of DNA helical distortion, the UV-damaged DNA-binding protein (UV-DDB) is more specialized, recognizing UV-induced photolesions and facilitating recruitment of XPC. Recent single-molecule analyses and structural studies have advanced our understanding of how UV-DDB finds its targets, particularly in the context of chromatin. After XPC binds DNA, it is necessary to verify the presence of damage in order to avoid potentially deleterious incisions at damage-free sites. Accumulating evidence suggests that XPA and the helicase activity of transcription factor IIH (TFIIH) cooperate to verify abnormalities in DNA chemistry. This chapter reviews recent findings about the mechanisms underlying the efficiency, versatility, and accuracy of NER. PMID:27264556

  3. Anisotropic mechanical properties of zircon and the effect of radiation damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beirau, Tobias; Nix, William D.; Bismayer, Ulrich; Boatner, Lynn A.; Isaacson, Scott G.; Ewing, Rodney C.

    2016-06-01

    This study provides new insights into the relationship between radiation-dose-dependent structural damage due to natural U and Th impurities and the anisotropic mechanical properties (Poisson's ratio, elastic modulus and hardness) of zircon. Natural zircon samples from Sri Lanka (see Muarakami et al. in Am Mineral 76:1510-1532, 1991) and synthetic samples, covering a dose range of zero up to 6.8 × 1018 α-decays/g, have been studied by nanoindentation. Measurements along the [100] crystallographic direction and calculations, based on elastic stiffness constants determined by Özkan (J Appl Phys 47:4772-4779, 1976), revealed a general radiation-induced decrease in stiffness (~54 %) and hardness (~48 %) and an increase in the Poisson's ratio (~54 %) with increasing dose. Additional indentations on selected samples along the [001] allowed one to follow the amorphization process to the point that the mechanical properties are isotropic. This work shows that the radiation-dose-dependent changes of the mechanical properties of zircon can be directly correlated with the amorphous fraction as determined by previous investigations with local and global probes (Ríos et al. in J Phys Condens Matter 12:2401-2412, 2000a; Farnan and Salje in J Appl Phys 89:2084-2090, 2001; Zhang and Salje in J Phys Condens Matter 13:3057-3071, 2001). The excellent agreement, revealed by the different methods, indicates a large influence of structural and even local phenomena on the macroscopic mechanical properties. Therefore, this study indicates the importance of acquiring better knowledge about the mechanical long-term stability of radiation-damaged materials.

  4. Polycaprolactone/maltodextrin nanocarrier for intracellular drug delivery: formulation, uptake mechanism, internalization kinetics, and subcellular localization

    PubMed Central

    Korang-Yeboah, Maxwell; Gorantla, Yamini; Paulos, Simon A; Sharma, Pankaj; Chaudhary, Jaideep; Palaniappan, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) disease progression is associated with significant changes in intracellular and extracellular proteins, intracellular signaling mechanism, and cancer cell phenotype. These changes may have direct impact on the cellular interactions with nanocarriers; hence, there is the need for a much-detailed understanding, as nanocarrier cellular internalization and intracellular sorting mechanism correlate directly with bioavailability and clinical efficacy. In this study, we report the differences in the rate and mechanism of cellular internalization of a biocompatible polycaprolactone (PCL)/maltodextrin (MD) nanocarrier system for intracellular drug delivery in LNCaP, PC3, and DU145 PCa cell lines. PCL/MD nanocarriers were designed and characterized. PCL/MD nanocarriers significantly increased the intracellular concentration of coumarin-6 and fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled bovine serum albumin, a model hydrophobic and large molecule, respectively. Fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry analysis revealed rapid internalization of the nanocarrier. The extent of nanocarrier cellular internalization correlated directly with cell line aggressiveness. PCL/MD internalization was highest in PC3 followed by DU145 and LNCaP, respectively. Uptake in all PCa cell lines was metabolically dependent. Extraction of endogenous cholesterol by methyl-β-cyclodextrin reduced uptake by 75%±4.53% in PC3, 64%±6.01% in LNCaP, and 50%±4.50% in DU145, indicating the involvement of endogenous cholesterol in cellular internalization. Internalization of the nanocarrier in LNCaP was mediated mainly by macropinocytosis and clathrin-independent pathways, while internalization in PC3 and DU145 involved clathrin-mediated endocytosis, clathrin-independent pathways, and macropinocytosis. Fluorescence microscopy showed a very diffused and non-compartmentalized subcellular localization of the PCL/MD nanocarriers with possible intranuclear localization and minor colocalization in

  5. Formulation of the information capacity of the optical-mechanical line-scan imaging process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huck, F. O.; Park, S. K.

    1975-01-01

    An expression for the information capacity of the optical-mechanical line-scan imaging process is derived which includes the effects of blurring of spatial, photosensor noise, aliasing, and quantization. Both the information capacity for a fixed data density and the information efficiency (the ratio of information capacity to data density) exhibit a distinct single maximum when displayed as a function of sampling rate, and the location of this maximum was determined by the system frequency-response shape, signal-to-noise ratio, and quantization interval.

  6. Characterization of damage mechanisms associated with reference point indentation in human bone.

    PubMed

    Beutel, Bryan G; Kennedy, Oran D

    2015-06-01

    Measurement of bone mineral density (BMD) is the clinical gold standard in cases of compromised skeletal integrity, such as with osteoporosis. While BMD is a useful measurement to index skeletal health, it is also limited since it cannot directly assess any mechanical properties. The ability to directly assess mechanical properties of bone tissue would be clinically important. Reference point indentation (RPI) is a technology that has been designed to try and achieve this goal. While RPI has been shown to detect altered bone tissue properties, the underlying physical mechanism of these measurements has not been characterized. Thus, we designed a study whereby the contribution of (1) test cycle number and (2) test load level to RPI test-induced sub-surface damage was characterized and quantified. Standardized specimens were prepared from cadaveric human tibiae (n=6), such that 12 replicates of each testing condition could be carried out. A custom rig was fabricated to accurately position and map indentation sites. One set of tests was carried out with 1, 5, 10, 15 and 20 cycles (Max Load: 8 N, Freq: 2 Hz), and a second set of tests was carried out with Load levels of 2, 4, 6, 8 or 10 N (Cycle number: 20, Freq: 2 Hz). The RPI parameter Loading Slope (LS) was cycle dependent at 5, 10, 15 and 20 cycles (p<0.05). First Cycle Indentation Distance (ID 1st), Total Indentation Distance (TID), Mean Energy Dissipation (ED), First Cycle Unloading Slope (US 1st), Mean Unloading Slope (US) and LS were significantly different at 6, 8 and 10 N compared to 2 N (p<0.05). From the histomorphometric measurements, damage zone span was significantly different after 5, 10, 15 and 20 cycles compared with 1 cycle while indent profile width and indent profile depth were significantly different at 10, 15 and 20 cycles (p<0.05). With the load varying protocol, each of these parameters differed significantly at each increased load level (4, 6, 8, 10 N) compared with the basal level of 2 N (p<0

  7. Mechanism of cross-sectoral coordination between nature protection and forestry in the Natura 2000 formulation process in Slovakia.

    PubMed

    Sarvašová, Zuzana; Sálka, Jaroslav; Dobšinská, Zuzana

    2013-09-01

    Nature protection as a policy sector is not isolated and is directly or indirectly influenced by many other sectors (e.g. forestry, water management, rural development, energy, etc.). These policy sectors are neither completely segmented nor unaffected by the decisions taken in other policy sectors. Policy formulation in nature protection is therefore also influenced by different sectors. For that reason it is inevitable to stress the need for inter-sectoral coordination to assure their policy coherence. The aim of this article is to describe the mechanism and modes of cross-sectoral coordination and to analyze the relevant actors and their interaction, using the case of the Natura 2000 formulation process in Slovakia. The European Union (EU) set up an ecological network of special protected areas, known as Natura 2000 to ensure biodiversity by conserving natural habitats and wild fauna and flora in the territory of the Member States. An optimized nature protection must therefore carefully consider existing limits and crossdisciplinary relationships at the EU, national and regional levels. The relations between forestry and biodiversity protection are analyzed using the advocacy coalition framework (ACF). The ACF is used for analyzing how two coalitions, in this case ecological and forest owners' coalitions, advocate or pursue their beliefs from the nature protection and forestry policy field. The whole process is illustrated at the regional scale on the case study of Natura 2000 sites formulation in the Slovak Republic. For better reliability and validity of research, a combination of various empiric research methods was used, supported by existing theories. So called triangulation of sociological research or triangulation of methods consists of mutual results testing of individual methodological steps through identifying corresponding political-science theories, assessing their formal points using primary and secondary document analysis and assessing their

  8. Coupled hydro-mechanical properties of Cobourg limestone with special reference to excavation damage zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasseri, Mohammad H.; Sehizadeh, Mahdi; Ye, Sheng; Su, Grant; Nguyen, Son; Young, R. Paul

    2016-04-01

    Argillaceous rock formations being considered as potential host or cap rocks for the geological disposal of radioactive wastes are usually characterized by the presence of bedding planes, resulting in anisotropy of their strength and deformation properties. A laboratory experimental program was performed at the Rock Fracture Dynamics Facility at the University of Toronto to determine the coupled hydro-mechanical properties of the Cobourg limestone with special reference to its potential for damage. The program consists of triaxial tests with measurement of permeability using the pulse decay method and measurement of the seismic wave velocity at different stress levels. The tests were carried out on specimens parallel and perpendicular to the foliation planes within a geophysical imaging cell under different stress levels up to and beyond their peak strength. The specimens are characterized by random and irregular clay pockets and discontinuous argillaceous weak layers. Permeability of the specimens was measured with the pulse decay method under different pre - and post- failure deviatoric stresses. The specimens tested parallel to foliation planes show higher triaxial compressive strengths and higher axial strains at failure in comparison to the specimens tested perpendicular to the foliation planes. The permeability (k) values measured under different stress levels for all specimens show a consistent trend. The k value decreases with the stress increase at the beginning due to the closure of pre-existing fissures and beddings. The k value then increases continuously with the increase in the stress level with highest k values obtained at the post-failure stage. The evolution of the compressional and shear-wave velocities and shear wave splitting as a function of the axial stress is compatible with preferably oriented weak planes and with the evolution of the hydro-mechanical properties of the Cobourg limestone. From the test results, it can be interpreted that at

  9. Electron irradiation-induced change of structure and damage mechanisms in multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jian-Qun; Li, Xing-Ji; Liu, Chao-Ming; Ma, Guo-Liang; Gao, Feng

    2015-11-01

    Owing to their unique structure and excellent electrical property, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as an ideal candidate for making future electronic components have great application potentiality. In order to meet the requirements for space application in electronic components, it is necessary to study structural changes and damage mechanisms of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), caused by the irradiations of 70 and 110 keV electrons. In the paper, the changes of structure and damage mechanisms in the irradiated MWCNTs, induced by the irradiations of 70 and 110 keV electrons, are investigated. The changes in surface morphology and structure of the irradiated MWCNT film are characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. It is found that the MWCNTs show different behaviors in structural changes after 70 and 110 keV electron irradiation due to different damage mechanisms. SEM results reveal that the irradiation of 70 keV electrons does not change surface morphology of the MWCNT film, while the irradiation of 110 keV electrons with a high fluence of 5 × 1015 cm-2 leads to evident morphological changes, such as the formation of a rough surface, the entanglement of nanotubes and the shrinkage of nanotubes. Based on Raman spectroscopy, XPS, and XRD analyses, it is confirmed that the irradiation of 70 keV electrons increases the interlayer spacing of the MWCNTs and disorders their structure through electronic excitations and ionization effects, while the irradiation of 110 keV electrons obviously reduces the interlayer spacing of the MWCNTs and improves their graphitic order through knock-on atom displacements. The improvement of the irradiated MWCNTs by 110 keV electrons is attributed to the restructuring of defect sites induced by knock-on atom displacements. EPR spectroscopic analyses reveal that the MWCNTs exposed

  10. New thermo-mechanical fluid flow modeling of multiscale deformations in the Levant basin: formulation, verification, and preliminary analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belferman, Mariana; Katsman, Regina; Agnon, Amotz

    2015-04-01

    The Levant has been repeatedly devastated by numerous earthquakes since prehistorical time, as recorded in historical documents, archaeological ruins, and sedimentary archives. In order to understand the role of the dynamics of the water bodies in triggering the deformations in the Levant basin, a new theoretical thermo-mechanical model is constructed and extended by including a fluid flow component. The latter is modeled on a basis of two-way poroelastic coupling with momentum equation. This coupling is essential to capture the fluid flow evolution induced by dynamic water loading and to resolve porosity changes. All the components of the model, namely elasticity, creep, plasticity, fluid flow, etc., have been extensively verified and presented. Results of the initial sensitivity analysis addressing the relative importance of each process in earthquakes triggering are discussed. The rich archives of pre-instrumental destructive earthquakes will set constraints for future modeling under the present formulation.

  11. Characterization of HTPB-based solid fuel formulations: Performance, mechanical properties, and pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeLuca, L. T.; Galfetti, L.; Maggi, F.; Colombo, G.; Merotto, L.; Boiocchi, M.; Paravan, C.; Reina, A.; Tadini, P.; Fanton, L.

    2013-12-01

    Features such as safety, low-cost, and throttleability make hybrid rocket engines an attractive option for suborbital flights and space exploration missions in general. While the domain of possible liquid oxidizers is well characterized, the choice of a suitable solid fuel is still a matter of investigation. Space Propulsion Laboratory (SPLab) at Politecnico di Milano has developed a series of proprietary techniques to evaluate, on a relative grading, the quality of innovative solid fuels while visualizing at the same time their flame structure. But a serious alert was recently notified that soot emission from hydrocarbon fuels has the potential to contribute to global climate change. In this paper, HTPB polymer has been taken as baseline and characterized at laboratory level in terms of ballistic properties, mechanical testing, and thermochemical calculations.

  12. Effect of Temperature on Damage Evolution of Cr25Ni35Nb Alloy Subjected to Combined Mechanical and Environmental Degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Limin; Liu, Huansheng; Gong, Jianming; Geng, Luyang

    2015-07-01

    Due to combined mechanical and environmental degradation, i.e. coupled creep and carburization, Cr25Ni35Nb alloy often fails prior to the expected design life. In the present paper, based on the continuum damage mechanics, the constitutive model of coupled multi-damage factors for computing the damage evolution of Cr25Ni35Nb alloy was proposed. The damage prediction was carried out by using finite element method based on ABAQUS code. And then damage evolution processes at different operating temperatures (950 °C and 1050 °C) were simulated and the effect of service temperature on the damage evolution was discussed. The results showed that the rate of damage increased obviously with operating temperature increasing. The location with maximum damage is along the inner surface of tube, which implies that fracture begins along the inner surface of tube under the action of coupled creep and carburization damage and this is coincident with the actual observation of the failure of furnace tube.

  13. Damage-Resistant Composites Using Electrospun Nanofibers: A Multiscale Analysis of the Toughening Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Daelemans, Lode; van der Heijden, Sam; De Baere, Ives; Rahier, Hubert; Van Paepegem, Wim; De Clerck, Karen

    2016-05-11

    Today, fiber-reinforced polymer composites are a standard material in applications where a high stiffness and strength are required at minimal weight, such as aerospace structures, ultralight vehicles, or even flywheels for highly efficient power storage systems. Although fiber-reinforced polymer composites show many advantages compared to other materials, delamination between reinforcing plies remains a major problem limiting further breakthrough. Traditional solutions that have been proposed to toughen the interlaminar region between reinforcing plies have already reached their limit or have important disadvantages such as a high cost or the need for adapted production processes. Recently, electrospun nanofibers have been suggested as a more viable interlaminar toughening method. Although the expected benefits are numerous, the research on composite laminates enhanced with electrospun nanofibrous veils is still very limited. The work that has been done so far is almost exclusively focused on interlaminar fracture toughness tests with different kinds of nanofibers, where typically a trial and error approach has been used. A thorough understanding of the micromechanical fracture mechanisms and the parameters to obtain toughened composites has not been reported as of yet, but it is crucial to advance the research and design highly damage-resistant composites. This article provides such insight by analyzing the nanofiber toughening effect on three different levels for several nanofiber types. Only by combining the results from different levels, a thorough understanding can be obtained. These levels correspond to the hierarchical nature of a composite: the laminate, the interlaminar region, and the matrix resin. It is found that each level corresponds to certain mechanisms that result in a toughening effect. The bridging of microcracks by electrospun nanofibers is the main toughening mechanism resulting in damage resistance. Nevertheless, the way in which the

  14. A damage mechanics model for power-law creep and earthquake aftershock and foreshock sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Main, Ian G.

    2000-07-01

    It is common practice to refer to three independent stages of creep under static loading conditions in the laboratory: namely transient, steady-state, and accelerating. Here we suggest a simple damage mechanics model for the apparently trimodal behaviour of the strain and event rate dependence, by invoking two local mechanisms of positive and negative feedback applied to constitutive rules for time-dependent subcritical crack growth. In both phases, the individual constitutive rule for measured strain ɛ takes the form ɛ(t)=ɛ0[1+t/mτ]m, where τ is the ratio of initial crack length to rupture velocity. For a local hardening mechanism (negative feedback), we find that transient creep dominates, with 0mechanism (positive feedback), m<0, and crack growth is unstable and accelerating. In this case a quasi-static instability criterion ɛ->∞ can be defined at a finite failure time, resulting in the localization of damage and the formation of a throughgoing fracture. In the hybrid model, transient creep dominates in the early stages of damage and accelerating creep in the latter stages. At intermediate times the linear superposition of the two mechanisms spontaneously produces an apparent steady-state phase of relatively constant strain rate, with a power-law rheology, as observed in laboratory creep test data. The predicted acoustic emission event rates in the transient and accelerating phases are identical to the modified Omori laws for aftershocks and foreshocks, respectively, and provide a physical meaning for the empirical constants measured. At intermediate times, the event rate tends to a relatively constant background rate. The requirement for a finite event rate at the time of the main shock can be satisfied by modifying the instability criterion to having a finite crack velocity at the dynamic failure time, dx/dt->VR, where VR is the dynamic rupture velocity. The same hybrid

  15. The 2015 Nobel Prize in Chemistry The Discovery of Essential Mechanisms that Repair DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Lindahl, Tomas; Modrich, Paul; Sancar, Aziz

    2016-01-01

    The Royal Swedish Academy awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for 2015 to Tomas Lindahl, Paul Modrich and Aziz Sancar for their discoveries in fundamental mechanisms of DNA repair. This pioneering research described three different essential pathways that correct DNA damage, safeguard the integrity of the genetic code to ensure its accurate replication through generations, and allow proper cell division. Working independently of each other, Tomas Lindahl, Paul Modrich and Aziz Sancar delineated the mechanisms of base excision repair, mismatch repair and nucleotide excision repair, respectively. These breakthroughs challenged and dismissed the early view that the DNA molecule was very stable, paving the way for the discovery of human hereditary diseases associated with distinct DNA repair deficiencies and a susceptibility to cancer. It also brought a deeper understanding of cancer as well as neurodegenerative or neurological diseases, and let to novel strategies to treat cancer. PMID:27183258

  16. γ-Ray irradiation stability and damage mechanism of glycidyl amine epoxy resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diao, Feiyu; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Yujian; Fang, Jun; Luan, Weilin

    2016-09-01

    Irradiation stability of triglycidyl-p-aminophenol (TGPAP) epoxy resins was evaluated according to the changes of physico-chemical and mechanical properties under 60Co γ-ray irradiation with a dose rate of 10 kGy/h. The result shows that with the increase of radiation dose, bending strength, thermal stability, free radical concentration and storage modulus of epoxy resin decrease first, then increase slightly, and decline sharply at the end with a dose of 960 kGy, due to competition effects between radiation-induced degradation and cross-linking reaction. The damage mechanism was derived by analyzing structure and composition change of AFG-90 resins after irradiation via IR and XPS. Irradiation will result in weak bond breaking such as Csbnd C and Csbnd N bond, and new bond forming like Cdbnd C and Cdbnd O.

  17. Adaptive coupling between damage mechanics and peridynamics: A route for objective simulation of material degradation up to complete failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Fei; Lubineau, Gilles; Azdoud, Yan

    2016-09-01

    The objective (mesh-independent) simulation of evolving discontinuities, such as cracks, remains a challenge. Current techniques are highly complex or involve intractable computational costs, making simulations up to complete failure difficult. We propose a framework as a new route toward solving this problem that adaptively couples local-continuum damage mechanics with peridynamics to objectively simulate all the steps that lead to material failure: damage nucleation, crack formation and propagation. Local-continuum damage mechanics successfully describes the degradation related to dispersed microdefects before the formation of a macrocrack. However, when damage localizes, it suffers spurious mesh dependency, making the simulation of macrocracks challenging. On the other hand, the peridynamic theory is promising for the simulation of fractures, as it naturally allows discontinuities in the displacement field. Here, we present a hybrid local-continuum damage/peridynamic model. Local-continuum damage mechanics is used to describe "volume" damage before localization. Once localization is detected at a point, the remaining part of the energy is dissipated through an adaptive peridynamic model capable of the transition to a "surface" degradation, typically a crack. We believe that this framework, which actually mimics the real physical process of crack formation, is the first bridge between continuum damage theories and peridynamics. Two-dimensional numerical examples are used to illustrate that an objective simulation of material failure can be achieved by this method.

  18. A Tissue Phantom for Evaluation of Mechanical Damage Caused by Cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, Adam; Wang, Tzu-Yin; Yuan, Lingqian; Duryea, Alex; Xu, Zhen; Cain, Charles

    2010-03-01

    We have developed a phantom which acts as an indicator of mechanical tissue damage caused by cavitation in therapeutic ultrasound such as histotripsy. The phantom is an optically-transparent gel, allowing real-time visualization of cavitation. Lesions are visible as a change in transparency, giving immediate feedback of the damage. The phantom was formed in 3 layers of agarose gel, with the center layer containing 5% porcine red blood cells. It was found that the acoustic and mechanical properties are similar to tissue. To compare lesions induced in the phantom and tissue, phantoms and ex-vivo kidney were treated using a focused 1-MHz transducer applying 15 cycle pulses at a rate of 100 Hz and peak negative pressure of 14 MPa. Cavitation caused lysis of red blood cells, which changed the affected area from translucent red to transparent. Lesion morphology of the phantom was similar to tissue, with no cellular structures remaining inside the lesion and sharp boundaries between the transparent and translucent zones. Lesions in the phantom produced a hypoechoic appearance in the phantom on a B-Mode ultrasound image, as previously observed with histotripsy lesions generated in tissue. High-speed imaging was used to correlate cavitation activity with the formation of lesions spatially. During ultrasound exposure, cavitation clouds were observed in the phantom by high-speed optical imaging. Lesions in the gel only formed when and where cavitation was observed. The tissue phantom allows immediate visualization of cavitation and cavitational tissue damage providing a useful research tool for cavitational ultrasound therapy studies such as testing acoustic parameters or scanning algorithms.

  19. Plasma damage mechanisms in low k organosilicate glass and their inhibition by Ar ion bombardment

    SciTech Connect

    Kazi, Haseeb; Kelber, Jeffry A.

    2014-03-15

    In-situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and ex-situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy studies of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photons with or without O{sub 2}, and O radicals point to distinct mechanisms of carbon abstraction in nanoporous organosilicate glass (OSG) films. VUV alone in the absence of O{sub 2} results in Si-CH{sub 3} bond scission and recombination preferentially at silicon monomethyl sites, obeying diffusion kinetics. In contrast, the presence of O{sub 2} interferes with recombination, resulting in diffusion-dominated carbon loss kinetics, enhanced Si oxidation, and greatly accelerating the rate of carbon loss in both the near surface and bulk regions of the OSG, at both monomethyl and dimethyl sites. Carbon abstraction due to exposure to (O({sup 3}P)) does not follow diffusion kinetics, and such interactions yield a SiO{sub 2}-like surface layer inhibiting further O diffusion. Results indicate that diffusion-dominated carbon abstraction kinetics previously observed for OSG exposure to O{sub 2} plasma damage is primarily attributable to the diffusion of O{sub 2} down OSG nanopores, reacting at photoactivated sites, rather than the diffusion of O radicals. OSG pretreatment by 900 eV Ar{sup +} bombardment effectively inhibits both VUV + O{sub 2} and O damage mechanisms by formation of ∼1 nm thick SiO{sub 2}-like surface region that inhibits both O and O{sub 2} diffusion.

  20. Mechanisms of oxidative damage of low density lipoprotein in human atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Heinecke, J W

    1997-10-01

    Oxidatively damaged LDL may play a critical role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic vascular disease. Several pathways promote LDL oxidation in vitro but the physiologically relevant mechanisms have proven difficult to identify. Detection of stable compounds that result from specific reaction pathways has provided the first insights into the mechanism of oxidative damage in the human artery wall. Mass spectrometric analysis of protein oxidation products isolated from atherosclerotic tissue implicate tyrosyl radical, reactive nitrogen intermediates and hypochlorous acid in LDL oxidation and lesion formation in vivo. Hypochlorous acid is only generated by the phagocytic enzyme myeloperoxidase, which can also generate tyrosyl radical and reactive nitrogen intermediates. Chiral phase high-pressure liquid chromatography analysis of lipid oxidation products suggests that cellular lipoxygenases may also play a role at certain stages. In contrast, LDL isolated from atherosclerotic tissue is not enriched in protein oxidation products characteristic of free metal ions, which are the most widely studied in vitro model of LDL oxidation. These observations provide the first direct chemical evidence for reaction pathways that promote LDL oxidation in human atherosclerosis. PMID:9335950

  1. The Split Second Effect: The Mechanism of How Equinus Can Damage the Human Foot and Ankle.

    PubMed

    Amis, James

    2016-01-01

    We are currently in the process of discovering that many, if not the majority, of the non-traumatic acquired adult foot and ankle problems are caused by a singular etiology: non-neuromuscular equinus or the isolated gastrocnemius contracture. There is no question that this biomechanical association exists and in time much more will be uncovered. There are three basic questions that must be answered: why would our calves tighten as we normally age, how does a tight calf, or equinus, actually cause problems remotely in the foot and ankle, and how do the forces produced by equinus cause so many seemingly unrelated pathologies in the foot and ankle? The purpose of this paper is to address the second question: how does a tight calf mechanically cause problems remotely in the foot and ankle? There has been little evidence in the literature addressing the biomechanical mechanisms by which equinus creates damaging forces upon the foot and ankle, and as a result, a precise, convincing mechanism is still lacking. Thus, the mere concept that equinus has anything to do with foot pathology is generally unknown or disregarded. The split second effect, described here, defines exactly how the silent equinus contracture creates incremental and significant damage and injury to the human foot and ankle resulting in a wide variety of pathological conditions. The split second effect is a dissenting theory based on 30 years of clinical and academic orthopedic foot and ankle experience, keen clinical observation along the way, and review of the developing literature, culminating in examination of many hours of slow motion video of normal and abnormal human gait. To my knowledge, no one has ever described the mechanism in detail this precise. PMID:27512692

  2. The Split Second Effect: The Mechanism of How Equinus Can Damage the Human Foot and Ankle

    PubMed Central

    Amis, James

    2016-01-01

    We are currently in the process of discovering that many, if not the majority, of the non-traumatic acquired adult foot and ankle problems are caused by a singular etiology: non-neuromuscular equinus or the isolated gastrocnemius contracture. There is no question that this biomechanical association exists and in time much more will be uncovered. There are three basic questions that must be answered: why would our calves tighten as we normally age, how does a tight calf, or equinus, actually cause problems remotely in the foot and ankle, and how do the forces produced by equinus cause so many seemingly unrelated pathologies in the foot and ankle? The purpose of this paper is to address the second question: how does a tight calf mechanically cause problems remotely in the foot and ankle? There has been little evidence in the literature addressing the biomechanical mechanisms by which equinus creates damaging forces upon the foot and ankle, and as a result, a precise, convincing mechanism is still lacking. Thus, the mere concept that equinus has anything to do with foot pathology is generally unknown or disregarded. The split second effect, described here, defines exactly how the silent equinus contracture creates incremental and significant damage and injury to the human foot and ankle resulting in a wide variety of pathological conditions. The split second effect is a dissenting theory based on 30 years of clinical and academic orthopedic foot and ankle experience, keen clinical observation along the way, and review of the developing literature, culminating in examination of many hours of slow motion video of normal and abnormal human gait. To my knowledge, no one has ever described the mechanism in detail this precise. PMID:27512692

  3. Collagen insulated from tensile damage by domains that unfold reversibly: in situ X-ray investigation of mechanical yield and damage repair in the mussel byssus

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, Matthew J.; Gupta, Himadri S.; Fratzl, Peter; Waite, J. Herbert

    2009-01-01

    The byssal threads of the California mussel, Mytilus californianus, are highly hysteretic, elastomeric fibers that collectively perform a holdfast function in wave-swept rocky seashore habitats. Following cyclic loading past the mechanical yield point, threads exhibit a damage-dependent reduction in mechanical performance. However, the distal portion of the byssal thread is capable of recovering initial material properties through a time-dependent healing process in the absence of active cellular metabolism. Byssal threads are composed almost exclusively of multi-domain hybrid collagens known as preCols, which largely determine the mechanical properties of the thread. Here, the structure-property relationships that govern thread mechanical performance are further probed. The molecular rearrangements that occur during yield and damage repair were investigated using time-resolved in situ wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) coupled with cyclic tensile loading of threads and through thermally enhanced damage-repair studies. Results indicate that the collagen domains in byssal preCols are mechanically protected by the unfolding of sacrificial non-collagenous domains that refold on a slower time-scale. Time-dependent healing is primarily attributed to stochastic recoupling of broken histidine-metal coordination complexes. PMID:19275941

  4. Formulation of wide-ranging embedded-atom-type potentials: the role of mechanical stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechenik, Eugene; Kelson, Itzhak; Makov, Guy

    2013-01-01

    Wide-ranging inter-atomic potentials are necessary for modeling many problems in material physics that involve multiple atomic environments and phases. The domains of thermodynamic and mechanical stability of embedded-atom-type potentials are examined for the cubic phases. It is shown that the choice of the pair potential is critical in determining the domain of stability of embedded-atom-type potentials. In particular, the Lennard-Jones embedded-atom potential is shown not to stabilize the bcc phase. A simple four-parameter universal equation of state-based embedded-atom potential is shown to have a domain of stability for all the cubic phases and to reproduce the high-pressure equation of state. A model phase diagram for the three cubic phases is presented. This potential is fitted to 17 elemental systems and found to be able to reproduce both the elastic constants and the ground state crystalline structure. For elements with a low degree of elastic anisotropy, this potential can also reproduce the high-pressure behavior.

  5. A Hertzian contact mechanics based formulation to improve ultrasound elastography assessment of uterine cervical tissue stiffness.

    PubMed

    Briggs, Brandi N; Stender, Michael E; Muljadi, Patrick M; Donnelly, Meghan A; Winn, Virginia D; Ferguson, Virginia L

    2015-06-25

    Clinical practice requires improved techniques to assess human cervical tissue properties, especially at the internal os, or orifice, of the uterine cervix. Ultrasound elastography (UE) holds promise for non-invasively monitoring cervical stiffness throughout pregnancy. However, this technique provides qualitative strain images that cannot be linked to a material property (e.g., Young's modulus) without knowledge of the contact pressure under a rounded transvaginal transducer probe and correction for the resulting non-uniform strain dissipation. One technique to standardize elastogram images incorporates a material of known properties and uses one-dimensional, uniaxial Hooke's law to calculate Young's modulus within the compressed material half-space. However, this method does not account for strain dissipation and the strains that evolve in three-dimensional space. We demonstrate that an analytical approach based on 3D Hertzian contact mechanics provides a reasonable first approximation to correct for UE strain dissipation underneath a round transvaginal transducer probe and thus improves UE-derived estimates of tissue modulus. We validate the proposed analytical solution and evaluate sources of error using a finite element model. As compared to 1D uniaxial Hooke's law, the Hertzian contact-based solution yields significantly improved Young's modulus predictions in three homogeneous gelatin tissue phantoms possessing different moduli. We also demonstrate the feasibility of using this technique to image human cervical tissue, where UE-derived moduli estimations for the uterine cervix anterior lip agreed well with published, experimentally obtained values. Overall, UE with an attached reference standard and a Hertzian contact-based correction holds promise for improving quantitative estimates of cervical tissue modulus. PMID:26003483

  6. Multiscale Modeling of Damage Processes in Aluminum Alloys: Grain-Scale Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochhalter, J. D.; Veilleux, M. G.; Bozek, J. E.; Glaessgen, E. H.; Ingraffea, A. R.

    2008-01-01

    This paper has two goals related to the development of a physically-grounded methodology for modeling the initial stages of fatigue crack growth in an aluminum alloy. The aluminum alloy, AA 7075-T651, is susceptible to fatigue cracking that nucleates from cracked second phase iron-bearing particles. Thus, the first goal of the paper is to validate an existing framework for the prediction of the conditions under which the particles crack. The observed statistics of particle cracking (defined as incubation for this alloy) must be accurately predicted to simulate the stochastic nature of microstructurally small fatigue crack (MSFC) formation. Also, only by simulating incubation of damage in a statistically accurate manner can subsequent stages of crack growth be accurately predicted. To maintain fidelity and computational efficiency, a filtering procedure was developed to eliminate particles that were unlikely to crack. The particle filter considers the distributions of particle sizes and shapes, grain texture, and the configuration of the surrounding grains. This filter helps substantially reduce the number of particles that need to be included in the microstructural models and forms the basis of the future work on the subsequent stages of MSFC, crack nucleation and microstructurally small crack propagation. A physics-based approach to simulating fracture should ultimately begin at nanometer length scale, in which atomistic simulation is used to predict the fundamental damage mechanisms of MSFC. These mechanisms include dislocation formation and interaction, interstitial void formation, and atomic diffusion. However, atomistic simulations quickly become computationally intractable as the system size increases, especially when directly linking to the already large microstructural models. Therefore, the second goal of this paper is to propose a method that will incorporate atomistic simulation and small-scale experimental characterization into the existing multiscale

  7. a Study of Biophysical Mechanisms of Damage by Ionizing Radiation to Mammalian Cells in Vitro.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chun-Zhang

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. An extensive survey made of published survival data of damage by ionizing radiation to mammalian cells in vitro has led to the new conclusion that the damage is determined by the specific ionization or the mean free path between ionizing events along the charged particle tracks. The optimum damage is observed when the mean free path is equivalent to the DNA double strand spacing of 1.8 nm. Therefore, the biological mechanism of ionizing radiation to mammalian cells in vitro is intra track dominant. A 100 keV electron accelerator has been constructed and commissioned to produce a broad beam irradiation field of greater than 1 cm diameter. The fluence rate may be adjusted from 10^8cm^ {-2}sec^{-1} downwards to enable further development as a chronic irradiation facility. Another new feature of the accelerator is that it incorporates a differential vacuum system which permits irradiation of the monolayer cell cultures to be carried out in normal pressure. Experiments of irradiation to Chinese hamster cells, by ^{241}Am alpha particles at low fluence rate, have supplied satisfactory data for testing a new DNA-rupture model which is under development. For V79 cells irradiated at a low fluence rate of 10^5cm^{ -2}min^{-1}, when survival data were fitted into the model, new biophysical parameters were extracted and a proposal was made that the repair phenomenon of cellular survival at very low doses is determined by three time factors: the irradiation time, the damage fixation time and the repair time. The values obtained were 3-4 hours for the mean repair time, and more than 10 hours for the damage to be considered permanent. Details of the monolayer cell culture technique developed and used in the present experiments are described. Consideration has been given to the significance of the results obtained from the study in radiation protection and in radiotherapy. In future studies it is recommended that more

  8. DNA damage drives accelerated bone aging via an NF-κB-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qian; Liu, Kai; Robinson, Andria R.; Clauson, Cheryl L.; Blair, Harry C.; Robbins, Paul D.; Niedernhofer, Laura J.; Ouyang, Hongjiao

    2013-01-01

    Advanced age is one of the most important risk factors for osteoporosis. Accumulation of oxidative DNA damage has been proposed to contribute to age-related deregulation of osteoblastic and osteoclastic cells. ERCC1 (Excision Repair Cross Complementary group 1)-XPF (Xeroderma Pigmentosum Group F) is an evolutionarily conserved structure-specific endonuclease that is required for multiple DNA repair pathways. Inherited mutations affecting expression of ERCC1-XPF cause a severe progeroid syndrome in humans, including early onset of osteopenia and osteoporosis, or anomalies in skeletal development. Herein, we used progeroid ERCC1-XPF deficient mice, including Ercc1-null (Ercc1−/−) and hypomorphic (Ercc1−/Δ) mice, to investigate the mechanism by which DNA damage leads to accelerated bone aging. Compared to their wild-type littermates, both Ercc1−/− and Ercc1−/Δ mice display severe, progressive osteoporosis caused by reduced bone formation and enhanced osteoclastogenesis. ERCC1 deficiency leads to atrophy of osteoblastic progenitors in the bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC) population. There is increased cellular senescence of BMSCs and osteoblastic cells, as characterized by reduced proliferation, accumulation of DNA damage and a senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). This leads to enhanced secretion of inflammatory cytokines known to drive osteoclastogenesis, such as IL-6, TNFα, and RANKL and thereby induces an inflammatory bone microenvironment favoring osteoclastogenesis. Furthermore, we found that the transcription factor NF-κB is activated in osteoblastic and osteoclastic cells of the Ercc1 mutant mice. Importantly, we demonstrated that haploinsufficiency of the p65 NF-κB subunit partially rescued the osteoporosis phenotype of Ercc1−/Δ mice. Finally, pharmacological inhibition of the NF-κB signaling via an IKK inhibitor reversed cellular senescence and SASP in Ercc1−/Δ BMSCs. These results demonstrate that DNA damage drives

  9. Anisotropic mechanical properties of zircon and the effect of radiation damage

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Beirau, Tobias; Nix, William D.; Bismayer, Ulrich; Boatner, Lynn A.; Isaacson, Scott G.; Ewing, Rodney C.

    2016-06-02

    Our study provides new insights into the relationship between radiation-dose-dependent structural damage, due to natural U and Th impurities, and the anisotropic mechanical properties (Poisson s ratio, elastic modulus and hardness) of zircon. Natural zircon samples from Sri Lanka (see Muarakami et al. 1991) and synthetic samples, covering a dose range of zero up to 6.8 x 1018 -decays/g, have been studied by nanoindentation. Measurements along the [100] crystallographic direction and calculations, based on elastic stiffness constants determined by zkan (1976), revealed a general radiation-induced decrease in stiffness (~ 54 %) and hardness (~ 48 %) and an increase ofmore » the Poisson s ratio (~ 54 %) with increasing dose. Additional indentations on selected samples along the [001] allowed one to follow the amorphization process to the point that the mechanical properties are isotropic. This work shows that the radiation-dose-dependent changes of the mechanical properties of zircon can be directly correlated with the amorphous fraction as determined by previous investigations with local and global probes (Rios et al. 2000a; Farnan and Salje 2001; Zhang and Salje 2001). This agreement, revealed by the different methods, indicates a huge influence of structural and even local phenomena on the macroscopic mechanical properties.« less

  10. Synthesis of a Novel Photopolymerized Nanocomposite Hydrogel for Treatment of Acute Mechanical Damage to Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Schlichting, Kathryn; Copeland-Johnson, Trishelle M.; Goodman, Matthew; Lipert, Robert J.; Prozorov, Tanya; Liu, Xunpei; McKinley, Todd O.; Lin, Zhiqun; Martin, James A.; Mallapragada, Surya K.

    2014-01-01

    Intraarticular fractures initiate a cascade of pathobiologic and pathomechanical events that culminate in posttraumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA). Hallmark features of PTOA include destruction of the cartilage matrix in combination with loss of chondrocytes and acute mechanical damage (AMD). Currently, treatment of intraarticular fractures essentially is completely focused on restoration of the macroanatomy of the joint. However, current treatment ignores AMD sustained by cartilage at the time of injury. We are exploring aggressive biomaterial-based interventions designed to treat the primary pathologic components of AMD. This study describes the development of a novel injectable copolymer solution that forms gels at physiological temperatures that can be photocrosslinked, and can form nanocomposite gels insitu through mineralization. The injectable copolymer solution will allow the material to fill cracks in the cartilage after trauma. The mechanical properties of the nanocomposite are similar to that of native cartilage, as measured by compressive and shear testing. It thereby has the potential to mechanically stabilize and restore local structural integrity to acutely injured cartilage. Additionally, the insitu mineralization ensures good adhesion at the interface between the biomaterial and cartilage, as measured through tensile and shear testing. Therefore, we have successfully developed a new injectable insitu forming nanocomposite with mechanical properties of similar magnitude to that of native cartilage, and which can bond well to native cartilage. This material has the potential to stabilize injured cartilage and prevent PTOA. PMID:21530694

  11. A cumulative shear mechanism for tissue damage initiation in shock-wave lithotripsy

    PubMed Central

    Freund, Jonathan B.; Colonius, Tim; Evan, Andrew P.

    2007-01-01

    Evidence suggests that inertial cavitation plays an important role in the renal injury incurred during shock-wave lithotripsy. However, it is unclear how tissue damage is initiated, and significant injury typically occurs only after a sufficient dose of shock waves. While it has been suggested that shock-induced shearing might initiate injury, estimates indicate that individual shocks do not produce sufficient shear to do so. In this paper, we hypothesize that the cumulative shear of the many shocks is damaging. This mechanism depends upon whether there is sufficient time between shocks for tissue to relax to its unstrained state. We investigate the mechanism with a physics-based simulation model wherein the the basement membranes that define the tubules and vessels in the inner medulla are represented as elastic shells surrounded by viscous fluid. Material properties are estimated from in vitro tests of renal basement membranes and documented mechanical properties of cells and extracellular gels. Estimates for the net shear deformation from a typical lithotripter shock (~ 0.1%) are found from a separate dynamic shock simulation. The results suggest that the larger interstitial volume (~ 40%) near the papilla tip gives the tissue there a relaxation time comparable to clinical shock delivery rates (~ 1Hz), thus allowing shear to accumulate. Away from the papilla tip, where the interstitial volume is smaller (≲ 20%), the model tissue relaxes completely before the next shock would be delivered. Implications of the model are that slower delivery rates and broader focal zones should both decrease injury, consistent with some recent observations. PMID:17507147

  12. Mechanism for enhanced absorption of a solid dispersion formulation of LY2300559 using the artificial stomach duodenum model.

    PubMed

    Polster, Christopher S; Wu, Sy-Juen; Gueorguieva, Ivelina; Sperry, David C

    2015-04-01

    An artificial stomach duodenum (ASD) model has been used to demonstrate the performance difference between two formulations of LY2300559, a low-solubility acidic developmental drug. The two formulations investigated were a conventional high-shear wet granulation (HSWG) formulation and a solid dispersion formulation. A pharmacokinetic study in humans demonstrated the enhanced performance of the solid dispersion formulation relative to the HSWG formulation. The Cmax and AUC of the solid dispersion was 2.6 and 1.9 times greater, respectively, compared to the HSWG formulation. In the ASD, the solid dispersion formulation performance was characterized by three main phases: (1) rapid release in the stomach, creating a supersaturated concentration of drug, (2) precipitation in the stomach, and (3) rapid redissolution of the precipitate in the duodenum to concentration levels that are supersaturated relative to crystalline drug. A series of complementary experiments were employed to describe this performance behavior mechanistically. Imaging experiments with a pH indicating dye showed that local pH gradients from meglumine in the solid dispersion formulation were responsible for creating a high initial supersaturation concentration in the stomach. Upon dissipation of meglumine, the drug precipitated in the stomach as an amorphous solid. Because the precipitated drug is in an amorphous form, it can then rapidly redissolve as it transits to the more neutral environment of the duodenum. This unexpected sequence of physical state changes gives a mechanistic explanation for the enhanced in vivo performance of the solid dispersion formulation relative to the HSWG formulation. PMID:25723790

  13. Free radical damage to protein and DNA: mechanisms involved and relevant observations on brain undergoing oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Floyd, R A; Carney, J M

    1992-01-01

    Iron mediates damage to proteins and DNA. The mechanisms of damage not only involve iron but also oxygen free radical intermediates. Oxidative damage to DNA causes not only strand breaks, but also formation of specific base adducts, such as 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine. Oxidative damage also inactivates certain enzymes such as glutamine synthetase. Novel methods of assessing oxidative damage to tissue, including quantitation of salicylate hydroxylation as an index of hydroxyl free radical flux as well as specific lesions to proteins and DNA, have yielded results that clearly show that ischemia/reperfusion injury to mongolian gerbil brain involves oxidatively damaging events. Aging in gerbil as well as human brain is also associated with increased oxidative damage. Recent novel observations have shown that the spin-trapping agent phenyl alpha-tert-butylnitrone (PBN) offers protection in gerbil brain during ischemia/reperfusion injury. We also show that oxidative damage to brain during aging is decreased by chronic administration of PBN. The mechanism of action of PBN may be related to its trapping of specific free radicals, which triggers a cascade of oxidative events that eventually lead to tissue injury. PMID:1510377

  14. Mechanism of plasma-induced damage to low-k SiOCH films during plasma ashing of organic resists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Keigo; Miyawaki, Yudai; Takashima, Seigo; Fukasawa, Masanaga; Oshima, Keiji; Nagahata, Kazunori; Tatsumi, Tetsuya; Hori, Masaru

    2011-02-01

    Plasma-induced damage to porous SiOCH (p-SiOCH) films during organic resist film ashing using dual-frequency capacitively coupled O2 plasmas was investigated using the pallet for plasma evaluation method developed by our group. The damage was characterized by ellipsometry and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. Individual and synergetic damage associated with vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and UV radiation, radicals, and ions in the O2 plasma were clarified. It was found that the damage was caused not only by radicals but also by synergetic reactions of radicals with VUV and UV radiation emitted by the plasmas. It is noteworthy that the damage induced by plasma exposure without ion bombardment was larger than the damage with ion bombardment. These results differed from those obtained using an H2/N2 plasma for resist ashing. Finally, the mechanism of damage to p-SiOCH caused by O2 and H2/N2 plasma ashing of organic resist films is discussed. These results are very important in understanding the mechanism of plasma-induced damage to p-SiOCH films.

  15. Self-sealing of thermal fatigue and mechanical damage in fiber-reinforced composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moll, Jericho L.

    Fiber reinforced composite tanks provide a promising method of storage for liquid oxygen and hydrogen for aerospace applications. The inherent thermal fatigue of these vessels leads to the formation of microcracks, which allow gas phase leakage across the tank walls. In this dissertation, self-healing functionality is imparted to a structural composite to effectively seal microcracks induced by both mechanical and thermal loading cycles. Two different microencapsulated healing chemistries are investigated in woven glass fiber/epoxy and uni-weave carbon fiber/epoxy composites. Self-healing of mechanically induced damage was first studied in a room temperature cured plain weave E-glass/epoxy composite with encapsulated dicyclopentadiene (DCPD) monomer and wax protected Grubbs' catalyst healing components. A controlled amount of microcracking was introduced through cyclic indentation of opposing surfaces of the composite. The resulting damage zone was proportional to the indentation load. Healing was assessed through the use of a pressure cell apparatus to detect nitrogen flow through the thickness direction of the damaged composite. Successful healing resulted in a perfect seal, with no measurable gas flow. The effect of DCPD microcapsule size (51 microm and 18 microm) and concentration (0--12.2 wt%) on the self-sealing ability was investigated. Composite specimens with 6.5 wt% 51 microm capsules sealed 67% of the time, compared to 13% for the control panels without healing components. A thermally stable, dual microcapsule healing chemistry comprised of silanol terminated poly(dimethyl siloxane) plus a crosslinking agent and a tin catalyst was employed to allow higher composite processing temperatures. The microcapsules were incorporated into a satin weave E-glass fiber/epoxy composite processed at 120°C to yield a glass transition temperature of 127°C. Self-sealing ability after mechanical damage was assessed for different microcapsule sizees (25 microm and 42

  16. Modeling of Stone-impact Resistance of Monolithic Glass Ply Using Continuum Damage Mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Davies, Richard W.

    2005-04-01

    We study the stone-impact resistance of a monolithic glass ply using a combined experimental and computational approach. Instrumented stone impact tests were first carried out in controlled environment. Explicit finite element analyses were then used to simulate the interactions of the indentor and the glass layer during the impact event, and a continuum damage mechanics (CDM) model was used to describe the constitutive behavior of glass. The experimentally measured strain histories for low velocity impact served as validation of the modeling procedures. Next, stair-stepping impact experiments were performed with two indentor sizes on two glass ply thickness, and the test results were used to calibrate the critical stress parameters used in the CDM constitutive model. The purpose of this study is to establish the modeling procedures and the CDM critical stress parameters under impact loading conditions. The modeling procedures and the CDM model will be used in our future studies to predict through-thickness damage evolution patterns for different laminated windshield designs in automotive applications.

  17. Extended Kalman filtering for the detection of damage in linear mechanical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Escamilla-Ambrosio, P. J.; Lieven, N. A. J.

    2009-09-01

    This paper addresses the problem of assessing the location and extent of damage in a vibrating structure by means of vibration measurements. Frequency domain identification methods (e.g. finite element model updating) have been widely used in this area while time domain methods such as the extended Kalman filter (EKF) method, are more sparsely represented. The difficulty of applying EKF in mechanical system damage identification and localisation lies in: the high computational cost, the dependence of estimation results on the initial estimation error covariance matrix P(0), the initial value of parameters to be estimated, and on the statistics of measurement noise R and process noise Q. To resolve these problems in the EKF, a multiple model adaptive estimator consisting of a bank of EKF in modal domain was designed, each filter in the bank is based on different P(0). The algorithm was iterated by using the weighted global iteration method. A fuzzy logic model was incorporated in each filter to estimate the variance of the measurement noise R. The application of the method is illustrated by simulated and real examples.

  18. A numerical investigation of blood damage in the hinge area of bileaflet mechanical heart valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Min; Wu, Jingshu; Simon, Helene; Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Aidun, Cyrus; Yoganathan, Ajit

    2010-11-01

    Studies have shown that high shear stress and large recirculation regions have a strong impact on thromboembolic complications in Bileaflet mechanical heart valves (BMHV). This study quantitatively compares the hinge flow field and blood damage of the 23mm St. Jude Medical (SJM) regent with different hinge gap widths and the 23mm CarboMedics (CM) valves. The lattice-Boltzmann method with external boundary force (LBM-EBF) [Wu and Aidun, Int. J Num. Methods Fluids, 62, 7, 2009] was implemented to simulate the flow and capture the dynamics and the surface shear stress of the platelets with realistic geometry. The velocity boundary conditions for the small-scale hinge flow are obtained from previous 3D large-scale computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations [Simon et al, Annals of Biomedical Engineering, 38, 3, 2009]. The flow patterns of three hinges that were studied were similar during diastole. However, velocity magnitudes and shear stresses at the hinge gap were different, which may explain the higher blood damage index (BDI) value for the CM valve and lower BDI value for the SJM valve with a larger gap width. The multiscale computational method used to quantitatively measure the BDI during a full cardiac cycle will be discussed.

  19. Vibration damage mechanism analysis on rotor of diesel generating set with rigid coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Bing; Shi, Weizhen; Hua, Chunrong; Liu, Jingming; Dong, Dawei; Chen, Jun

    2015-07-01

    The crankshaft output end is generally connected with generator rotor through the coupling in diesel generating set. When using rigid coupling, the attachments and connecting parts of generator rotor (especially at larger gyration radius) are vulnerable to fatigue damage even if the vibration level of the generating set does not exceed the acceptable “usual value”. In order to investigate the reasons, the torsional vibration of the rotor in the diesel generating set was calculated and measured in this paper, which shows that using high rigidity coupling would result in large torsional vibration on the generator rotor, and that the linear vibration (the tangential vibration) value induced by torsional vibration at larger gyration radius of generator motor is almost the same as the vibration level of the generating set. Then, the vibration level of generating set was obtained, and the maximum vibration velocities of the generator are below the permissible value regulated by ISO 8528-9. But the velocities of synthetic vibration of the generating set vibration and the linear vibration induced by torsional vibration at larger gyration radius are much higher than permissible value 2(28mm/s) regulated by ISO 8528-9, which may be the reason of the mechanical damage of the attachments and connecting parts at larger gyration radius of generator motor caused by exceeded vibration.

  20. Representing Matrix Cracks Through Decomposition of the Deformation Gradient Tensor in Continuum Damage Mechanics Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leone, Frank A., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    A method is presented to represent the large-deformation kinematics of intraply matrix cracks and delaminations in continuum damage mechanics (CDM) constitutive material models. The method involves the additive decomposition of the deformation gradient tensor into 'crack' and 'bulk material' components. The response of the intact bulk material is represented by a reduced deformation gradient tensor, and the opening of an embedded cohesive interface is represented by a normalized cohesive displacement-jump vector. The rotation of the embedded interface is tracked as the material deforms and as the crack opens. The distribution of the total local deformation between the bulk material and the cohesive interface components is determined by minimizing the difference between the cohesive stress and the bulk material stress projected onto the cohesive interface. The improvements to the accuracy of CDM models that incorporate the presented method over existing approaches are demonstrated for a single element subjected to simple shear deformation and for a finite element model of a unidirectional open-hole tension specimen. The material model is implemented as a VUMAT user subroutine for the Abaqus/Explicit finite element software. The presented deformation gradient decomposition method reduces the artificial load transfer across matrix cracks subjected to large shearing deformations, and avoids the spurious secondary failure modes that often occur in analyses based on conventional progressive damage models.

  1. Mechanism of chronic dietary iron overload-induced liver damage in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dan; He, Huan; Yin, Dong; Que, Ailing; Tang, Lei; Liao, Zhangping; Huang, Qiren; He, Ming

    2013-04-01

    Chronic iron overload may result in hepatic fibrosis and even neoplastic transformation due to a burst of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Mitochondria have been proposed to be important in the production of ROS. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) in the burst of ROS, and to clarify the mechanism whereby ROS induced by iron overload results in hepatic damage. It has been demonstrated that when ferrocene-induced iron-overloaded mice were fed the cyclosporin A (CsA), a specific inhibitor of the mPTP, diet (10 mg/kg/day) for 50 days, liver-to-body weight ratio, serum levels of alanine transaminase (ALT) and aspartate transaminase (AST), ROS production, mitochondrial swelling, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ) and hepatocyte apoptosis decreased. However, the total antioxidant status, including superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and catalase activities, increased. The protective effect of CsA on the liver of iron-overloaded mice may be due to inhibition of the ROS burst and a successive antioxidant effect. To the best of our knowledge, these data provide the first support for the theory that ROS-induced ROS release (RIRR) may be involved in the burst of ROS in the liver and greatly contribute to the hepatic damage initiated by iron overload. PMID:23404080

  2. CHARACTERIZATION OF CONDITIONS OF NATURAL GAS STORAGE RESERVOIRS AND DESIGN AND DEMONSTRATION OF REMEDIAL TECHNIQUES FOR DAMAGE MECHANISMS FOUND THEREIN

    SciTech Connect

    J.H. Frantz Jr; K.G. Brown; W.K. Sawyer; P.A. Zyglowicz; P.M. Halleck; J.P. Spivey

    2004-12-01

    The underground gas storage (UGS) industry uses over 400 reservoirs and 17,000 wells to store and withdrawal gas. As such, it is a significant contributor to gas supply in the United States. It has been demonstrated that many UGS wells show a loss of deliverability each year due to numerous damage mechanisms. Previous studies estimate that up to one hundred million dollars are spent each year to recover or replace a deliverability loss of approximately 3.2 Bscf/D per year in the storage industry. Clearly, there is a great potential for developing technology to prevent, mitigate, or eliminate the damage causing deliverability losses in UGS wells. Prior studies have also identified the presence of several potential damage mechanisms in storage wells, developed damage diagnostic procedures, and discussed, in general terms, the possible reactions that need to occur to create the damage. However, few studies address how to prevent or mitigate specific damage types, and/or how to eliminate the damage from occurring in the future. This study seeks to increase our understanding of two specific damage mechanisms, inorganic precipitates (specifically siderite), and non-darcy damage, and thus serves to expand prior efforts as well as complement ongoing gas storage projects. Specifically, this study has resulted in: (1) An effective lab protocol designed to assess the extent of damage due to inorganic precipitates; (2) An increased understanding of how inorganic precipitates (specifically siderite) develop; (3) Identification of potential sources of chemical components necessary for siderite formation; (4) A remediation technique that has successfully restored deliverability to storage wells damaged by the inorganic precipitate siderite (one well had nearly a tenfold increase in deliverability); (5) Identification of the types of treatments that have historically been successful at reducing the amount of non-darcy pressure drop in a well, and (6) Development of a tool that can

  3. Laser-Induced Thermal-Mechanical Damage Characteristics of Cleartran Multispectral Zinc Sulfide with Temperature-Dependent Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yajing; Jiang, Yanxue; Yang, Yanqiang

    2015-01-01

    Laser-induced thermal-mechanical damage characteristics of window materials are the focus problems in laser weapon and anti-radiation reinforcement technology. Thermal-mechanical effects and damage characteristics are investigated for cleartran multispectral zinc sulfide (ZnS) thin film window materials irradiated by continuous laser using three-dimensional (3D) thermal-mechanical model. Some temperature-dependent parameters are introduced into the model. The temporal-spatial distributions of temperature and thermal stress are exhibited. The damage mechanism is analyzed. The influences of temperature effect of material parameters and laser intensity on the development of thermal stress and the damage characteristics are examined. The results show, the von Mises equivalent stress along the thickness direction is fluctuant, which originates from the transformation of principal stresses from compressive stress to tensile stress with the increase of depth from irradiated surface. The damage originates from the thermal stress but not the melting. The thermal stress is increased and the damage is accelerated by introducing the temperature effect of parameters or the increasing laser intensity.

  4. Pathological display of affect in patients with depression and right frontal brain damage. An alternative mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ross, E D; Stewart, R S

    1987-03-01

    Two patients are reported with the acute onset of pathological crying following right inferior frontal brain damage. Both had severe endogenous depression and neither had pseudobulbar palsy. These and other cases argue that two organic brain diseases--one structural and the other "physiopharmacological"--may interact to produce pathological display of affect that cannot be accounted for by traditional neurological explanations. A pharmacological mechanism for the rapid amelioration of pathological affect by tricyclic medications and its possible relationship to the newly discovered descending motor systems of the brain that use norepinephrine and serotonin as neurotransmitters is offered. These cases also suggest that pathological affect is a valuable clinical indicator of an underlying major depression in some brain-injured patients. PMID:3819712

  5. Time dependent reliability model incorporating continuum damage mechanics for high-temperature ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Stephen F.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1989-01-01

    Presently there are many opportunities for the application of ceramic materials at elevated temperatures. In the near future ceramic materials are expected to supplant high temperature metal alloys in a number of applications. It thus becomes essential to develop a capability to predict the time-dependent response of these materials. The creep rupture phenomenon is discussed, and a time-dependent reliability model is outlined that integrates continuum damage mechanics principles and Weibull analysis. Several features of the model are presented in a qualitative fashion, including predictions of both reliability and hazard rate. In addition, a comparison of the continuum and the microstructural kinetic equations highlights a strong resemblance in the two approaches.

  6. [Postural therapy during mechanical pulmonary ventilation with PEEP in patients with unilateral lung damage].

    PubMed

    Neverin, V K; Vlasenko, A V; Mitrokhin, A A; Galushka, S V; Ostapchenko, D V; Shishkina, E V

    2000-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation of the lungs (MVL) with positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) is difficult in patients with unilateral lung damage because of uneven distribution of volumes and pressures in the involved and intact lungs. Harmful effects are easier manifested under such conditions. Selective MVL with selective PEEP is widely used abroad for optimizing MVL, but this method is rather expensive and is not devoid of shortcomings. Our study carried out in 32 patients with unilateral lung involvement showed that traditional MVL with general PEEP can effectively (in 75% cases) regulate gaseous exchange and decrease its untoward effects if MVL is performed with the patient lying on the healthy side and not supine. MVL in patients with unilateral lung injury lying on the healthy side can be a simpler and cheaper alternative to selective MVL with selective PEEP. PMID:10833838

  7. Mitigation of Shear-Induced Blood Damage by Mechanical Bileaflet Heart Valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharin, Boris; Arjunon, Sivakkumar; Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; Yoganathan, Ajit; Glezer, Ari

    2010-11-01

    The strong transitory shear stress generated during the time-periodic closing of bileaflet mechanical heart valves that is associated with the formation of counter-rotating vortices near the leaflet edges may be damaging to blood elements and may result in platelet activation and therefore thrombosis and thromboembolism complications. These flow transients are investigated using fluorescent PIV in a new, low-volume test setup that reproduces the pulsatile physiological conditions associated with a 25 mm St. Jude Medical valve. The flow transients are partially suppressed and the platelet activation is minimized using miniature vortex generator arrays that are embedded on the surface of the leaflets. Measurements of the ensuing flow taken phase-locked to the leaflet motion demonstrate substantial modification of the transient vertical structures and concomitant reduction of Reynolds shear stresses. Human blood experiments validated the effectiveness of miniature vortex generators in reducing thrombus formation by over 42 percent.

  8. In situ damage monitoring in vibration mechanics: diagnostics and predictive maintenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basseville, M.; Benveniste, A.; Gach-Devauchelle, B.; Goursat, M.; Bonnecase, D.; Dorey, P.; Prevosto, M.; Olagnon, M.

    1993-09-01

    A system identification approach is presented for damage monitoring in vibration mechanics. Identification, detection, and diagnostics are performed using accelerometer measurements from the system at work so that the excitation is not controlled, usually not observed and may involve turbulent phenomena. Targeted applications include power engineering (rotating machines, core and pipes of nuclear power plants), civil engineering (large buildings subject to hurricanes or earthquakes, bridges, dams, offshore structures), aeronautics (wings and other structures subject to strength), automobile, rail transportation etc. The method is illustrated by a laboratory example, and the results of 3 years industrial usage. This paper is a progress report on a 10 year project involving three people almost permanently. We describe here the whole approach but omit the technical details which are available in previous papers.

  9. Radiation damage mechanisms for luminescence in Eu-doped GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Tringe, J. W.; Felter, T. E.; Talley, C. E.; Morse, J. D.; Stevens, C. G.; Castelaz, J. M.; Wetzel, C.

    2007-03-01

    Thin films of Eu-doped GaN were irradiated with 500 keV He{sup +} ions to understand radiation damage mechanisms and to quantify luminescence efficiency. The dependence of ion-beam-induced luminescence intensity on ion fluence was consistent with the simultaneous creation of nonradiative defects and the destruction of luminescent centers associated with 4f-4f core-level transitions in Eu{sup 3+}. This model contrasts with a previous description which takes into account only nonradiative defect generation in GaN:Eu. Based on light from a BaF{sub 2} scintillator standard, the luminescent energy generation efficiency of GaN:Eu films doped to {approx}3x10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} Eu is estimated to be {approx}0.1%.

  10. Damage mechanism at different transpassive potentials of solution-annealed 316 and 316l stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morshed Behbahani, K.; Pakshir, M.; Abbasi, Z.; Najafisayar, P.

    2015-01-01

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), anodic polarization and scanning electron microscopy techniques were used to investigate the damage mechanism in the transpassive potential region of AISI 316 and AISI 316L solution-annealed stainless steels (SS) with different degrees of sensitization. Depending on the DC potential applied during EIS tests, the AC responses in the transpassive region included three different regions: the first one associated with anodic dissolution of the passive layer, the second one contributed to the dissolution at the area near grain boundaries, and the last one attributed to pitting corrosion. In addition, the fitting results to experimental data showed that as the DC bias during the EIS test increases the charge transfer resistance ( R ct) decreases. Moreover, the R ct values decreased as the sensitization temperature increases but the AISI 316L SS samples exhibited a higher resistance to intergranular corrosion than 316 SS samples.

  11. The Response to Oxidative DNA Damage in Neurons: Mechanisms and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Narciso, Laura; Parlanti, Eleonora; Racaniello, Mauro; Simonelli, Valeria; Cardinale, Alessio; Merlo, Daniela; Dogliotti, Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence indicating that the mechanisms that control genome stability are of key importance in the development and function of the nervous system. The major threat for neurons is oxidative DNA damage, which is repaired by the base excision repair (BER) pathway. Functional mutations of enzymes that are involved in the processing of single-strand breaks (SSB) that are generated during BER have been causally associated with syndromes that present important neurological alterations and cognitive decline. In this review, the plasticity of BER during neurogenesis and the importance of an efficient BER for correct brain function will be specifically addressed paying particular attention to the brain region and neuron-selectivity in SSB repair-associated neurological syndromes and age-related neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26942017

  12. Damage mechanisms in thin film solar cells during sputtering deposition of transparent conductive coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Fan Qihua; Liao Xianbo; Deng, Michael; Deng Xunming

    2009-02-01

    Amorphous silicon (a-Si) based thin film solar cell grown on flexible stainless steel substrate is one of the most promising energy conversion devices in the future. This type of solar cell uses a transparent conductive oxide (TCO) film as top electrode. It has been a widely accepted opinion that the radio frequency sputtering deposition of the TCO film produces a higher yield than direct current sputtering, and the reason is not clear. Here we show that the damage to the solar cell during the sputtering process is caused by a reverse bias applied to the n-i-p junction. This reverse bias is related to the characteristics of plasma discharge. The mechanism we reveal may significantly affect the solar cell process.

  13. Kinetic gating mechanism of DNA damage recognition by Rad4/XPC

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xuejing; Velmurugu, Yogambigai; Zheng, Guanqun; Park, Beomseok; Shim, Yoonjung; Kim, Youngchang; Liu, Lili; Van Houten, Bennett; He, Chuan; Ansari, Anjum; Min, Jung-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    The xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC) complex initiates nucleotide excision repair by recognizing DNA lesions before recruiting downstream factors. How XPC detects structurally diverse lesions embedded within normal DNA is unknown. Here we present a crystal structure that captures the yeast XPC orthologue (Rad4) on a single register of undamaged DNA. The structure shows that a disulphide-tethered Rad4 flips out normal nucleotides and adopts a conformation similar to that seen with damaged DNA. Contrary to many DNA repair enzymes that can directly reject non-target sites as structural misfits, our results suggest that Rad4/XPC uses a kinetic gating mechanism whereby lesion selectivity arises from the kinetic competition between DNA opening and the residence time of Rad4/XPC per site. This mechanism is further supported by measurements of Rad4-induced lesion-opening times using temperature-jump perturbation spectroscopy. Kinetic gating may be a general mechanism used by site-specific DNA-binding proteins to minimize time-consuming interrogations of non-target sites. PMID:25562780

  14. Towards mechanism-based simulation of impact damage using Exascale computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shterenlikht, Anton; Margetts, Lee; McDonald, Samuel; Bourne, Neil

    2015-06-01

    Over the past 60 years, the finite element method has been very successful in modelling deformation in engineering structures. However the method requires the definition of constitutive models that represent the response of the material to applied loads. There are two issues. Firstly, the models are often difficult to define. Secondly, there is often no physical connection between the models and the mechanisms that accommodate deformation. In this paper, we present a potentially disruptive two-level strategy which couples the finite element method in the macroscale with cellular automata in the mesoscale. The cellular automata are used to simulate mechanisms, such as crack propagation. The stress-strain relationship emerges as a continuum mechanics scale interpretation of changes at the micro- and meso-scales. Iterative two-way updating between the cellular automata and finite elements drives the simulation forward as the material undergoes progressive damage at high strain rates. The strategy is particularly attractive on large-scale computing platforms as both methods scale well on tens of thousands of CPUs. Supported by the ARCHER Service (e347) and the Hartree Centre (HCP010).

  15. Kinetic gating mechanism of DNA damage recognition by Rad4/XPC

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chen, Xuejing; Velmurugu, Yogambigai; Zheng, Guanqun; Park, Beomseok; Shim, Yoonjung; Kim, Youngchang; Liu, Lili; Van Houten, Bennett; He, Chuan; Ansari, Anjum; et al

    2015-01-06

    The xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC) complex initiates nucleotide excision repair by recognizing DNA lesions before recruiting downstream factors. How XPC detects structurally diverse lesions embedded within normal DNA is unknown. Here we present a crystal structure that captures the yeast XPC orthologue (Rad4) on a single register of undamaged DNA. The structure shows that a disulphide-tethered Rad4 flips out normal nucleotides and adopts a conformations similar to that seen with damaged DNA. Contrary to many DNA repair enzymes that can directly reject non-target sites as structural misfits, our results suggest that Rad4/XPC uses a kinetic gating mechanism whereby lesion selectivitymore » arises from the kinetic competition between DNA opening and the residence time of Rad4/XPC per site. This mechanism is further supported by measurements of Rad4-induced lesion-opening times using temperature-jump pertubation spectroscopy. Kinetic gating may be a general mechanism used by site-specific DNA-binding proteins to minimize time-consuming interrogations of non-target sites.« less

  16. Effects of edge grinding and sealing on mechanical properties of machine damaged laminate composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmatulu, Ramazan; Yeoh, Jason; Alarifi, Ibrahim M.; Alharbi, Abdulaziz

    2016-04-01

    Fiber reinforced composites have been utilized for a number of different applications, including aircraft, wind turbine, automobile, construction, manufacturing, and many other industries. During the fabrication, machining (waterjet, diamond and band saws) and assembly of these laminate composites, various edge and hole delamination, fiber pullout and other micro and nanocracks can be formed on the composite panels. The present study mainly focuses on the edge grinding and sealing of the machine damaged fiber reinforced composites, such as fiberglass, plain weave carbon fiber and unidirectional carbon fiber. The MTS tensile test results confirmed that the composite coupons from the grinding process usually produced better and consistent mechanical properties compared to the waterjet cut samples only. In addition to these studies, different types of high strength adhesives, such as EPON 828 and Loctite were applied on the edges of the prepared composite coupons and cured under vacuum. The mechanical tests conducted on these coupons indicated that the overall mechanical properties of the composite coupons were further improved. These processes can lower the labor costs on the edge treatment of the composites and useful for different industrial applications of fiber reinforced composites.

  17. Kinetic gating mechanism of DNA damage recognition by Rad4/XPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xuejing; Velmurugu, Yogambigai; Zheng, Guanqun; Park, Beomseok; Shim, Yoonjung; Kim, Youngchang; Liu, Lili; van Houten, Bennett; He, Chuan; Ansari, Anjum; Min, Jung-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    The xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC) complex initiates nucleotide excision repair by recognizing DNA lesions before recruiting downstream factors. How XPC detects structurally diverse lesions embedded within normal DNA is unknown. Here we present a crystal structure that captures the yeast XPC orthologue (Rad4) on a single register of undamaged DNA. The structure shows that a disulphide-tethered Rad4 flips out normal nucleotides and adopts a conformation similar to that seen with damaged DNA. Contrary to many DNA repair enzymes that can directly reject non-target sites as structural misfits, our results suggest that Rad4/XPC uses a kinetic gating mechanism whereby lesion selectivity arises from the kinetic competition between DNA opening and the residence time of Rad4/XPC per site. This mechanism is further supported by measurements of Rad4-induced lesion-opening times using temperature-jump perturbation spectroscopy. Kinetic gating may be a general mechanism used by site-specific DNA-binding proteins to minimize time-consuming interrogations of non-target sites.

  18. Kinetic gating mechanism of DNA damage recognition by Rad4/XPC

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xuejing; Velmurugu, Yogambigai; Zheng, Guanqun; Park, Beomseok; Shim, Yoonjung; Kim, Youngchang; Liu, Lili; Van Houten, Bennett; He, Chuan; Ansari, Anjum; Min, Jung -Hyun

    2015-01-06

    The xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC) complex initiates nucleotide excision repair by recognizing DNA lesions before recruiting downstream factors. How XPC detects structurally diverse lesions embedded within normal DNA is unknown. Here we present a crystal structure that captures the yeast XPC orthologue (Rad4) on a single register of undamaged DNA. The structure shows that a disulphide-tethered Rad4 flips out normal nucleotides and adopts a conformations similar to that seen with damaged DNA. Contrary to many DNA repair enzymes that can directly reject non-target sites as structural misfits, our results suggest that Rad4/XPC uses a kinetic gating mechanism whereby lesion selectivity arises from the kinetic competition between DNA opening and the residence time of Rad4/XPC per site. This mechanism is further supported by measurements of Rad4-induced lesion-opening times using temperature-jump pertubation spectroscopy. Kinetic gating may be a general mechanism used by site-specific DNA-binding proteins to minimize time-consuming interrogations of non-target sites.

  19. Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Induce Autophagosome Accumulation through Multiple Mechanisms: Lysosome Impairment, Mitochondrial Damage, and ER Stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xudong; Zhang, Hongqiu; Liang, Xin; Zhang, Jinxie; Tao, Wei; Zhu, Xianbing; Chang, Danfeng; Zeng, Xiaowei; Liu, Gan; Mei, Lin

    2016-07-01

    Magnetite (iron oxide, Fe3O4) nanoparticles have been widely used for drug delivery and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Previous studies have shown that many metal-based nanoparticles including Fe3O4 nanoparticles can induce autophagosome accumulation in treated cells. However, the underlying mechanism is still not clear. To investigate the biosafety of Fe3O4 and PLGA-coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles, some experiments related to the mechanism of autophagy induction by these nanoparticles have been investigated. In this study, the results showed that Fe3O4, PLGA-coated Fe3O4, and PLGA nanoparticles could be taken up by the cells through cellular endocytosis. Fe3O4 nanoparticles extensively impair lysosomes and lead to the accumulation of LC3-positive autophagosomes, while PLGA-coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles reduce this destructive effect on lysosomes. Moreover, Fe3O4 nanoparticles could also cause mitochondrial damage and ER and Golgi body stresses, which induce autophagy, while PLGA-coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles reduce the destructive effect on these organelles. Thus, the Fe3O4 nanoparticle-induced autophagosome accumulation may be caused by multiple mechanisms. The autophagosome accumulation induced by Fe3O4 was also investigated. The Fe3O4, PLGA-coated Fe3O4, and PLGA nanoparticle-treated mice were sacrificed to evaluate the toxicity of these nanoparticles on the mice. The data showed that Fe3O4 nanoparticle treated mice would lead to the extensive accumulation of autophagosomes in the kidney and spleen in comparison to the PLGA-coated Fe3O4 and PLGA nanoparticles. Our data clarifies the mechanism by which Fe3O4 induces autophagosome accumulation and the mechanism of its toxicity on cell organelles and mice organs. These findings may have an important impact on the clinical application of Fe3O4 based nanoparticles. PMID:27287467

  20. Investigation of cavitation as a possible damage mechanism in blast-induced traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Goeller, Jacques; Wardlaw, Andrew; Treichler, Derrick; O'Bruba, Joseph; Weiss, Greg

    2012-07-01

    Cavitation was investigated as a possible damage mechanism for war-related traumatic brain injury (TBI) due to an improvised explosive device (IED) blast. When a frontal blast wave encounters the head, a shock wave is transmitted through the skull, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and tissue, causing negative pressure at the contrecoup that may result in cavitation. Numerical simulations and shock tube experiments were conducted to determine the possibility of cranial cavitation from realistic IED non-impact blast loading. Simplified surrogate models of the head consisted of a transparent polycarbonate ellipsoid. The first series of tests in the 18-inch-diameter shock tube were conducted on an ellipsoid filled with degassed water to simulate CSF and tissue. In the second series, Sylgard gel, surrounded by a layer of degassed water, was used to represent the tissue and CSF, respectively. Simulated blast overpressure in the shock tube tests ranged from a nominal 10-25 pounds per square inch gauge (psig; 69-170 kPa). Pressure in the simulated CSF was determined by Kulite thin line pressure sensors at the coup, center, and contrecoup positions. Using video taken at 10,000 frames/sec, we verified the presence of cavitation bubbles at the contrecoup in both ellipsoid models. In all tests, cavitation at the contrecoup was observed to coincide temporally with periods of negative pressure. Collapse of the cavitation bubbles caused by the surrounding pressure and elastic rebound of the skull resulted in significant pressure spikes in the simulated CSF. Numerical simulations using the DYSMAS hydrocode to predict onset of cavitation and pressure spikes during cavity collapse were in good agreement with the tests. The numerical simulations and experiments indicate that skull deformation is a significant factor causing cavitation. These results suggest that cavitation may be a damage mechanism contributing to TBI that requires future study. PMID:22489674

  1. Investigations of the damage mechanisms during ultrashort pulse laser ablation of dental tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domke, Matthias; Wick, Sebastian; Laible, Maike; Rapp, Stephan; Kuznetsova, Julia; Homann, Christian; Huber, Heinz P.; Sroka, Ronald

    2015-07-01

    Several investigations of dental tissue ablation with ultrashort pulsed lasers suggest that these lasers enable precise and selective material removal and reduce the formation of micro cracks and thermal effects, when compared to ns-pulses. In this study, two damage mechanisms are presented occurring during ablation of dentin using a laser emitting pulses of a duration of 380 fs at a wavelength of 1040 nm. First, it was found that nano cracks appear around the craters after single fs-pulse ablation. These cracks are directed to the crater and cross the dentinal tubules. Transient investigation of the single fs-pulse ablation process by pump-probe microscopy suggest that the driving mechanism could be a pressure wave that is released after stress confinement. Second, squared ablation holes were created by moving the laser focus at scan speeds between 0.5 mm/s and 2.0 m/s and fluences up to 14 J/cm2. It was found that deep cracks appear at the edges of the squared holes, if the scan speed is about 0.5 m/s. The fluence has only a minor impact on the crack formation. The crack propagation was investigated in the depth using x-ray micro tomography and optical coherence tomography. It was found that these cracks appear in the depth down to the dental pulp. These findings suggest that fast scanning of the laser beam is the key for damage free processing using ultrashort pulse lasers. Then, ablation rates of about 2.5 - 3.5 mm3/min/W can be achieved in dentine with pulse durations of 380 fs.

  2. Investigating Fault Zone Damage Processes Using Waveform Relocated Seismicity and High Precision Focal Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauksson, E.; Yang, W.

    2011-12-01

    We analyze waveform relocated seismicity and focal mechanisms located near the principal slip zones (PSZs) of the late Quaternary fault zones in southern California to address questions such as: 1) Do mainshocks, aftershocks, and interseismic seismicity occur in the same place? 2) Is there evidence for fault normal compression along strike-slip faults? 3) Does seismicity in the near-field (±2km) of PSZs respond strongly to stress changes from nearby large earthquakes? 4) Is there other evidence for weak faults? We show that major earthquakes that can slip more than several meters, aftershocks, and near-fault relocated background seismicity mostly rupture different surfaces within late Quaternary fault zones. Major earthquakes rupture along the mapped traces of the late Quaternary faults, called the PSZs. Aftershocks illuminate damage zones in the immediate vicinity of the PSZs, typically ±2 km wide. In contrast, the near-fault background seismicity is mostly accommodated on a secondary heterogeneous network of small slip surfaces, and forms spatially decaying distributions extending out to distances of ±10 km away from the PSZs. As part of our efforts to address these questions, we have completed waveform relocations of more than 500,000 earthquakes. We have also determined a new focal mechanism catalog of more than 150,000 events, applying the latest techniques that include using S/P amplitude ratios for additional constraints, and taking advantage of the new waveform based relocations. We use the data set of focal mechanisms to analyze the style of faulting and the stress field next to PSZs of major faults. For detailed analysis we select all the events located within ±10 km of major PSZs as defined in the SCEC Community Fault Model. There is a difference in the depth distribution as well as in the rake distribution on each side of the PSZs. The events may be deeper on one side of the PSZ as compared to the other. Further, the focal mechanisms often have a

  3. Different mechanisms for the photoinduced production of oxidative DNA damage by fluoroquinolones differing in photostability.

    PubMed

    Spratt, T E; Schultz, S S; Levy, D E; Chen, D; Schlüter, G; Williams, G M

    1999-09-01

    Several fluoroquinolone antibacterial agents exhibit an adverse phototoxic effect in humans and are photo-cocarcinogenic in mice. The UV-induced production of reactive oxygen species plays a role in the toxicity and may be involved in carcinogenicity. Four fluoroquinolones were examined for the ability to photochemically produce oxidative damage in naked DNA. The major structural difference in the fluoroquinolones that would have an effect on their photostability is the functionality at the 8-position. At this position, 1-cyclopropyl-7-(2,8-diazbicyclo[4.3.0]non-8-yl)-6, 8-difluoro-1,4-dihydro-4-oxo-3-quinolinecarboxylic acid (BAY y3118) contains a chlorine atom, lomefloxacin a fluorine atom, ciprofloxacin a proton, and moxifloxacin a methoxy group. The formation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodGuo) in calf thymus DNA was assessed by HPLC with electrochemical detection, and strand breaks were measured in pBR322 with agarose gel electrophoresis. The relative photolability of the fluoroquinolones correlated to the extent of production of 8-oxodGuo and strand breaks, with both UVA and UVB irradiation, in the following order: BAY y3118 approximately lomefloxacin > ciprofloxacin > moxifloxacin. Experiments were performed to determine whether the mechanism of damage was due to a type I (radical) or type II (singlet oxygen) pathway. Nitrogen depletion of oxygen resulted in a decrease in the extent of formation of 8-oxodGuo, suggesting that oxygen was involved. The use of selective radical or singlet oxygen inhibitors was inconclusive with respect to which pathway was involved. The use of D(2)O as a solvent, which would extend the lifetime of singlet oxygen, suggested that this species is involved in the formation of 8-oxodGuo by moxifloxacin and ciprofloxacin, but not by lomefloxacin and BAY y3118. Similarly, it was found that singlet oxygen was not involved in strand break formation. Thus, the evidence suggests that fluoroquinolones can photochemically

  4. Identification of volatile compounds emitted by Artemisia ordosica (Artemisia, Asteraceae) and changes due to mechanical damage and weevil infestation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Zhou, Dayong; Luo, Youqing; Wang, Jinlin; Zong, Shixiang

    2013-01-01

    Volatiles emitted by healthy, mechanically damaged, and weevil-infested Artemisia ordosica (Asteraceae) were obtained through a dynamic headspace method and analysed by automatic thermal desorption/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (ATD/GC/MS). Twenty-eight compounds in all were identified, and the qualitative as well as quantitative differences were compared. The green leaf volatiles 2-hexenal, (Z)-3-hexen-1-ol, 2-hexen-1-ol, 1-hexanol, and (Z)-3-hexen-1-ol acetate were present in all of the damaged plants, but in relatively lower portions when plants were infested by the weevil Adosopius sp., while the terpenoids alpha-copaene, beta-cedrene, and (E,E)-alpha-farnesene and the ester methyl salicylate were only present in weevil-damaged plants. The volatiles from healthy and weevil-infested leaves were dominated by D-limonene, whereas mechanically damaged leaves emitted beta-pinene as the dominant compound. PMID:24066517

  5. Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Induce Dopaminergic Damage: In vitro Pathways and In Vivo Imaging Reveals Mechanism of Neuronal Damage.

    PubMed

    Imam, Syed Z; Lantz-McPeak, Susan M; Cuevas, Elvis; Rosas-Hernandez, Hector; Liachenko, Serguei; Zhang, Yongbin; Sarkar, Sumit; Ramu, Jaivijay; Robinson, Bonnie L; Jones, Yvonne; Gough, Bobby; Paule, Merle G; Ali, Syed F; Binienda, Zbigniew K

    2015-10-01

    Various iron-oxide nanoparticles have been in use for a long time as therapeutic and imaging agents and for supplemental delivery in cases of iron-deficiency. While all of these products have a specified size range of ∼ 40 nm and above, efforts are underway to produce smaller particles, down to ∼ 1 nm. Here, we show that after a 24-h exposure of SHSY-5Y human neuroblastoma cells to 10 μg/ml of 10 and 30 nm ferric oxide nanoparticles (Fe-NPs), cellular dopamine content was depleted by 68 and 52 %, respectively. Increases in activated tyrosine kinase c-Abl, a molecular switch induced by oxidative stress, and neuronal α-synuclein expression, a protein marker associated with neuronal injury, were also observed (55 and 38 % percent increases, respectively). Inhibition of cell-proliferation, significant reductions in the number of active mitochondria, and a dose-dependent increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) were observed in neuronal cells. Additionally, using a rat in vitro blood-brain barrier (BBB) model, a dose-dependent increase in ROS accompanied by increased fluorescein efflux demonstrated compromised BBB integrity. To assess translational implications, in vivo Fe-NP-induced neurotoxicity was determined using in vivo MRI and post-mortem neurochemical and neuropathological correlates in adult male rats after exposure to 50 mg/kg of 10 nm Fe-NPs. Significant decrease in T 2 values was observed. Dynamic observations suggested transfer and retention of Fe-NPs from brain vasculature into brain ventricles. A significant decrease in striatal dopamine and its metabolites was also observed, and neuropathological correlates provided additional evidence of significant nerve cell body and dopaminergic terminal damage as well as damage to neuronal vasculature after exposure to 10 nm Fe-NPs. These data demonstrate a neurotoxic potential of very small size iron nanoparticles and suggest that use of these ferric oxide nanoparticles may result in neurotoxicity, thereby

  6. Fundamental Processes of Coupled Radiation Damage and Mechanical Behavior in Nuclear Fuel Materials for High Temperature Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Phillpot, Simon; Tulenko, James

    2011-09-08

    The objective of this work has been to elucidate the relationship among microstructure, radiation damage and mechanical properties for nuclear fuel materials. As representative nuclear materials, we have taken an hcp metal (Mg as a generic metal, and Ti alloys for fast reactors) and UO2 (representing fuel). The degradation of the thermo-mechanical behavior of nuclear fuels under irradiation, both the fissionable material itself and its cladding, is a longstanding issue of critical importance to the nuclear industry. There are experimental indications that nanocrystalline metals and ceramics may be more resistant to radiation damage than their coarse-grained counterparts. The objective of this project look at the effect of microstructure on radiation damage and mechanical behavior in these materials. The approach to be taken was state-of-the-art, large-scale atomic-level simulation. This systematic simulation program of the effects of irradiation on the structure and mechanical properties of polycrystalline Ti and UO2 identified radiation damage mechanisms. Moreover, it will provided important insights into behavior that can be expected in nanocrystalline microstructures and, by extension, nanocomposites. The fundamental insights from this work can be expected to help in the design microstructures that are less susceptible to radiation damage and thermomechanical degradation.

  7. Potential Mechanisms for Cancer Resistance in Elephants and Comparative Cellular Response to DNA Damage in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Abegglen, Lisa M.; Caulin, Aleah F.; Chan, Ashley; Lee, Kristy; Robinson, Rosann; Campbell, Michael S.; Kiso, Wendy K.; Schmitt, Dennis L.; Waddell, Peter J; Bhaskara, Srividya; Jensen, Shane T.; Maley, Carlo C.; Schiffman, Joshua D.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Evolutionary medicine may provide insights into human physiology and pathophysiology, including tumor biology. OBJECTIVE To identify mechanisms for cancer resistance in elephants and compare cellular response to DNA damage among elephants, healthy human controls, and cancer-prone patients with Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS). DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A comprehensive survey of necropsy data was performed across 36 mammalian species to validate cancer resistance in large and long-lived organisms, including elephants (n = 644). The African and Asian elephant genomes were analyzed for potential mechanisms of cancer resistance. Peripheral blood lymphocytes from elephants, healthy human controls, and patients with LFS were tested in vitro in the laboratory for DNA damage response. The study included African and Asian elephants (n = 8), patients with LFS (n = 10), and age-matched human controls (n = 11). Human samples were collected at the University of Utah between June 2014 and July 2015. EXPOSURES Ionizing radiation and doxorubicin. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Cancer mortality across species was calculated and compared by body size and life span. The elephant genome was investigated for alterations in cancer-related genes. DNA repair and apoptosis were compared in elephant vs human peripheral blood lymphocytes. RESULTS Across mammals, cancer mortality did not increase with body size and/or maximum life span (eg, for rock hyrax, 1% [95%CI, 0%–5%]; African wild dog, 8%[95%CI, 0%–16%]; lion, 2%[95%CI, 0% –7%]). Despite their large body size and long life span, elephants remain cancer resistant, with an estimated cancer mortality of 4.81% (95%CI, 3.14%–6.49%), compared with humans, who have 11% to 25%cancer mortality. While humans have 1 copy (2 alleles) of TP53, African elephants have at least 20 copies (40 alleles), including 19 retrogenes (38 alleles) with evidence of transcriptional activity measured by reverse transcription polymerase chain

  8. Epicutaneous Allergic Sensitization by Cooperation between Allergen Protease Activity and Mechanical Skin Barrier Damage in Mice.

    PubMed

    Shimura, Sakiko; Takai, Toshiro; Iida, Hideo; Maruyama, Natsuko; Ochi, Hirono; Kamijo, Seiji; Nishioka, Izumi; Hara, Mutsuko; Matsuda, Akira; Saito, Hirohisa; Nakae, Susumu; Ogawa, Hideoki; Okumura, Ko; Ikeda, Shigaku

    2016-07-01

    Allergen sources such as mites, insects, fungi, and pollen contain proteases. Airway exposure to proteases induces allergic airway inflammation and IgE/IgG1 responses via IL-33-dependent mechanisms in mice. We examined the epicutaneous sensitization of mice to a model protease allergen, papain; the effects of tape stripping, which induces epidermal barrier dysfunction; and the atopic march upon a subsequent airway challenge. Papain painting on ear skin and tape stripping cooperatively promoted dermatitis, the skin gene expression of proinflammatory cytokines and growth factors, up-regulation of serum total IgE, and papain-specific IgE/IgG1 induction. Epicutaneous sensitization induced T helper (Th) 2 cells and Th17 differentiation in draining lymph nodes. Ovalbumin and protease inhibitor-treated papain induced no or weak responses, whereas the co-administration of ovalbumin and papain promoted ovalbumin-specific IgE/IgG1 induction. Wild-type and IL-33-deficient mice showed similar responses in the epicutaneous sensitization phase. The subsequent airway papain challenge induced airway eosinophilia and maintained high papain-specific IgE levels in an IL-33-dependent manner. These results suggest that allergen source-derived protease activity and mechanical barrier damage such as that caused by scratching cooperatively promote epicutaneous sensitization and skin inflammation and that IL-33 is dispensable for epicutaneous sensitization but is crucial in the atopic march upon a subsequent airway low-dose encounter with protease allergens. PMID:26987428

  9. Trans-Differentiation of Neural Stem Cells: A Therapeutic Mechanism Against the Radiation Induced Brain Damage

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Bong Gu; Lee, Se Jeong; Kim, Kang Ho; Yang, Heekyoung; Lee, Young-Ae; Cho, Yu Jin; Im, Yong-Seok; Lee, Dong-Sup; Lim, Do-Hoon; Kim, Dong Hyun; Um, Hong-Duck; Lee, Sang-Hun; Lee, Jung-II; Nam, Do-Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Radiation therapy is an indispensable therapeutic modality for various brain diseases. Though endogenous neural stem cells (NSCs) would provide regenerative potential, many patients nevertheless suffer from radiation-induced brain damage. Accordingly, we tested beneficial effects of exogenous NSC supplementation using in vivo mouse models that received whole brain irradiation. Systemic supplementation of primarily cultured mouse fetal NSCs inhibited radiation-induced brain atrophy and thereby preserved brain functions such as short-term memory. Transplanted NSCs migrated to the irradiated brain and differentiated into neurons, astrocytes, or oligodendrocytes. In addition, neurotrophic factors such as NGF were significantly increased in the brain by NSCs, indicating that both paracrine and replacement effects could be the therapeutic mechanisms of NSCs. Interestingly, NSCs also differentiated into brain endothelial cells, which was accompanied by the restoration the cerebral blood flow that was reduced from the irradiation. Inhibition of the VEGF signaling reduced the migration and trans-differentiation of NSCs. Therefore, trans-differentiation of NSCs into brain endothelial cells by the VEGF signaling and the consequential restoration of the cerebral blood flow would also be one of the therapeutic mechanisms of NSCs. In summary, our data demonstrate that exogenous NSC supplementation could prevent radiation-induced functional loss of the brain. Therefore, successful combination of brain radiation therapy and NSC supplementation would provide a highly promising therapeutic option for patients with various brain diseases. PMID:22347993

  10. Revisiting the Molecular Mechanism of Neurological Manifestations in Antiphospholipid Syndrome: Beyond Vascular Damage

    PubMed Central

    Carecchio, M.; Cantello, R.; Comi, C.

    2014-01-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is a multiorgan disease often affecting the central nervous system (CNS). Typically, neurological manifestations of APS include thrombosis of cerebral vessels leading to stroke and requiring prompt initiation of treatment with antiplatelet drugs or anticoagulant therapy. In these cases, alterations of the coagulation system at various levels caused by multiple effects of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) have been postulated to explain the vascular damage to the CNS in APS. However, several nonvascular neurological manifestations of APS have progressively emerged over the past years. Nonthrombotic, immune-mediated mechanisms altering physiological basal ganglia function have been recently suggested to play a central role in the pathogenesis of these manifestations that include, among others, movement disorders such as chorea and behavioral and cognitive alterations. Similar clinical manifestations have been described in other autoimmune CNS diseases such as anti-NMDAR and anti-VGCK encephalitis, suggesting that the spectrum of immune-mediated basal ganglia disorders is expanding, possibly sharing some pathophysiological mechanisms. In this review, we will focus on thrombotic and nonthrombotic neurological manifestations of APS with particular attention to immune-mediated actions of aPL on the vascular system and the basal ganglia. PMID:24741580

  11. Sub-surface mechanical damage distributions during grinding of fused silica

    SciTech Connect

    Suratwala, T I; Wong, L L; Miller, P E; Feit, M D; Menapace, J A; Steele, R A; Davis, P A; Walmer, D

    2005-11-28

    The distribution and characteristics of surface cracking (i.e. sub-surface damage or SSD) formed during standard grinding processes has been investigated on fused silica glass. The SSD distributions of the ground surfaces were determined by: (1) creating a shallow (18-108 {micro}m) wedge/taper on the surface by magneto-rheological finishing; (2) exposing the SSD by HF acid etching; and (3) performing image analysis of the observed cracks from optical micrographs taken along the surface taper. The observed surface cracks are characterized as near-surface lateral and deeper trailing indent type fractures (i.e., chatter marks). The SSD depth distributions are typically described by a single exponential distribution followed by an asymptotic cutoff in depth (c{sub max}). The length of the trailing indent is strongly correlated with a given process. Using established fracture indentation relationships, it is shown that only a small fraction of the abrasive particles are being mechanically loaded and causing fracture, and it is likely the larger particles in the abrasive particle size distribution that bear the higher loads. The SSD depth was observed to increase with load and with a small amount of larger contaminant particles. Using a simple brittle fracture model for grinding, the SSD depth distribution has been related to the SSD length distribution to gain insight into ''effective'' size distribution of particles participating in the fracture. Both the average crack length and the surface roughness were found to scale linearly with the maximum SSD depth (c{sub max}). These relationships can serve as useful rules-of-thumb for nondestructively estimating SSD depth and to identify the process that caused the SSD. In certain applications such as high intensity lasers, SSD on the glass optics can serve as a reservoir for minute amounts of impurities that absorb the high intensity laser light and lead to subsequent laser-induced surface damage. Hence a more scientific

  12. Creep in Thermally Cracked Granite: Physical, Mechanical and Damage Properties Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Schubnel, A. J.; Fortin, J.; Gueguen, Y.; Ge, H.

    2011-12-01

    We investigate the effects of pervasive crack damage on the rupture processes of a fine-grained granite, under triaxial stress, in wet (H20) and dry (argon gas) saturated conditions, at room temperature. Eight samples of La Peyratte granite (a granodiorite with an average grain size of 200 microns) were cored with an initial porosity of <1%. Damage was introduced by heating four samples up to 700°C. These were then compared to the intact granite specimens. 4 samples were deformed at a constant strain rate of 2x10-6/s until brittle failure occurred. 4 other samples were deformed in creep conditions. During these 8 experiments, at each step, we recorded strains, elastic wave velocities and Acoustic Emissions (AE). Our main results are: 1. The brittle strength of the sample remained unchanged (approx. 500MPa deviatoric stress at 30MPa effective pressure), whether the sample was heat-treated or not. We did not observe any significant water weakening as well. However, the onset of dilatancy was observed at lower deviatoric stress in the heat-treated specimen than for the intact ones. 2. Acoustic emissions revealed useful in order to image the rupture processes. Indeed, AE locations and Focal mechanism were in good agreement with the post mortem analysis of sample. In intact specimen, failure occurred after a larger premonitory AE activity, while heat-treated specimen had a longer aftershocks activity. In creep conditions, we show that extreme damage localization is already initiated during the primary and secondary creep phases. 3. However, in all our experiments, we observed the development of an elastic fabric well before the onset of rupture. To be more precise, measuring the P wave velocities along two different horizontal travel paths - one perpendicular and one parallel to the eventual rupture plane, away from the nucleation zone - we showed that that both started to diverge as early as at 70% of the final rupture strength. This shows that quite early on during

  13. Mechanism of action of lung damage caused by a nanofilm spray product.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Søren T; Dallot, Constantin; Larsen, Susan W; Rose, Fabrice; Poulsen, Steen S; Nørgaard, Asger W; Hansen, Jitka S; Sørli, Jorid B; Nielsen, Gunnar D; Foged, Camilla

    2014-08-01

    Inhalation of waterproofing spray products has on several occasions caused lung damage, which in some cases was fatal. The present study aims to elucidate the mechanism of action of a nanofilm spray product, which has been shown to possess unusual toxic effects, including an extremely steep concentration-effect curve. The nanofilm product is intended for application on non-absorbing flooring materials and contains perfluorosiloxane as the active film-forming component. The toxicological effects and their underlying mechanisms of this product were studied using a mouse inhalation model, by in vitro techniques and by identification of the binding interaction. Inhalation of the aerosolized product gave rise to increased airway resistance in the mice, as evident from the decreased expiratory flow rate. The toxic effect of the waterproofing spray product included interaction with the pulmonary surfactants. More specifically, the active film-forming components in the spray product, perfluorinated siloxanes, inhibited the function of the lung surfactant due to non-covalent interaction with surfactant protein B, a component which is crucial for the stability and persistence of the lung surfactant film during respiration. The active film-forming component used in the present spray product is also found in several other products on the market. Hence, it may be expected that these products may have a toxicity similar to the waterproofing product studied here. Elucidation of the toxicological mechanism and identification of toxicological targets are important to perform rational and cost-effective toxicological studies. Thus, because the pulmonary surfactant system appears to be an important toxicological target for waterproofing spray products, study of surfactant inhibition could be included in toxicological assessment of this group of consumer products. PMID:24863969

  14. Mechanism of Action of Lung Damage Caused by a Nanofilm Spray Product

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Søren T.; Dallot, Constantin; Larsen, Susan W.; Rose, Fabrice; Poulsen, Steen S.; Nørgaard, Asger W.; Hansen, Jitka S.; Sørli, Jorid B.; Nielsen, Gunnar D.; Foged, Camilla

    2014-01-01

    Inhalation of waterproofing spray products has on several occasions caused lung damage, which in some cases was fatal. The present study aims to elucidate the mechanism of action of a nanofilm spray product, which has been shown to possess unusual toxic effects, including an extremely steep concentration-effect curve. The nanofilm product is intended for application on non-absorbing flooring materials and contains perfluorosiloxane as the active film-forming component. The toxicological effects and their underlying mechanisms of this product were studied using a mouse inhalation model, by in vitro techniques and by identification of the binding interaction. Inhalation of the aerosolized product gave rise to increased airway resistance in the mice, as evident from the decreased expiratory flow rate. The toxic effect of the waterproofing spray product included interaction with the pulmonary surfactants. More specifically, the active film-forming components in the spray product, perfluorinated siloxanes, inhibited the function of the lung surfactant due to non-covalent interaction with surfactant protein B, a component which is crucial for the stability and persistence of the lung surfactant film during respiration. The active film-forming component used in the present spray product is also found in several other products on the market. Hence, it may be expected that these products may have a toxicity similar to the waterproofing product studied here. Elucidation of the toxicological mechanism and identification of toxicological targets are important to perform rational and cost-effective toxicological studies. Thus, because the pulmonary surfactant system appears to be an important toxicological target for waterproofing spray products, study of surfactant inhibition could be included in toxicological assessment of this group of consumer products. PMID:24863969

  15. A Phenomenological Model for Mechanically Mediated Growth, Remodeling, Damage, and Plasticity of Gel-Derived Tissue Engineered Blood Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Raykin, Julia; Rachev, Alexander I.

    2011-01-01

    Mechanical stimulation has been shown to dramatically improve mechanical and functional properties of gel-derived tissue engineered blood vessels (TEBVs). Adjusting factors such as cell source, type of extracellular matrix, cross-linking, magnitude, frequency, and time course of mechanical stimuli (among many other factors) make interpretation of experimental results challenging. Interpretation of data from such multifactor experiments requires modeling. We present a modeling framework and simulations for mechanically mediated growth, remodeling, plasticity, and damage of gel-derived TEBVs that merge ideas from classical plasticity, volumetric growth, and continuum damage mechanics. Our results are compared with published data and suggest that this model framework can predict the evolution of geometry and material behavior under common experimental loading scenarios. PMID:19831486

  16. Influence of dioctyl phthalate (DOP) on the mechanical, optical and thermal properties of formulations for the industrial manufacture of radiation sterilizable medical disposables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Shamshad; Mehmood, Mazhar; Iqbal, Rashid

    2010-03-01

    Shelf life of the formulations designed for the industrial manufacture of radiation sterilizable syringes and other medical disposables is a very important issue world over. Radiation compatible formulations were developed earlier in the laboratory by the incorporation of primary and secondary antioxidants along with processing stabilizers in a random polypropylene copolymer. It has been reported in literature that the mobilizing agents namely hydrocarbons, greases, wax and the plasticizer, dioctyl phthalate (DOP) impart radiation resistance to the polypropylene by providing free volume. It was envisaged that the addition of DOP to the afore-mentioned formulation might favorably influence the mechanical, optical and thermal properties of our formulation. To study the influence of addition of DOP on the afore-mentioned properties, the addition of 1%, 2% and 3% of the mobilizer was made, followed by the irradiation of resulting heat pressed sheets to the industrial standard dose of 25 kGy. Two important characteristic mechanical properties to determine the suitability of the radiation sterilized materials comprise angle of breakage and the haze percent. After irradiation and even on accelerated ageing of the irradiated material, the angle of breakage of heat press sheets of formulations containing 1%, 2% and 3% of DOP was found to be 180°, demonstrating the role of DOP, in imparting additional radiation stability. In case of the irradiated control sample, the angle of breakage was much lower. In the heat pressed sheets containing the DOP, a remarkable retention in the tensile strength, percentage elongation at break, along with improved thermal stability was observed. The formulation devoid of DOP demonstrated poor retention of the afore-mentioned characteristic properties .The observed improvement in thermal stability of the formulations containing DOP hints at the likely possibility of reuse of these materials by autoclaving which is considered an additional

  17. Impact Damage Detection in Composite Plates using a Self-diagnostic Electro-Mechanical Impedance-based Structural Health Monitoring System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharif-Khodaei, Z.; Ghajari, M.; Aliabadi, M. H.

    2015-03-01

    In this work, application of the electro-mechanical impedance (EMI) method in structural health monitoring as a damage detection technique has been investigated. A damage metric based on the real and imaginary parts of the impedance measures is introduced. Numerical and experimental tests are carried out to investigate the applicability of the method for various types of damage, such as debonding between the transducers and the plate, faulty sensors and impact damage in composite plates. The effect of several parameters, such as environmental effects, frequency sweep, severity of damage, location of damage, etc., on the damage metric has been reported.

  18. Brittle, creep and melt damage mechanics of the lithosphere: is slow creep deformation a key to intraplate volcanic provinces?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Regenauer-Lieb, K.; Karrech, A.; Rosenbaum, G.; Lyakhovsky, V.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the problem of intraplate melt generation with the aim of understanding spatial and temporal relationships between magmatism and extremely slow intraplate deformation. We present numerical models that consider feedback between melt generation and lithospheric deformation and incorporate three different damage mechanisms: brittle damage, creep damage, and melt damage. Melt conditions are calculated with a Gibbs energy minimization method, and the energy equation solved self-consistently for latent heat and shear heating effects. We use an extremely slowly lithosphere extension model (1-1.5 mm/y) to investigate the mechanics leading to intraplate volcanism in a cold lithosphere (~50mW/m2) such as the Harrat Ash-Shaam volcanic field in NW Arabia. We find that the extremely slow extension is a key to a very potent melt transfer mechanism through the lithosphere. The mechanism relies on multiple feedback mechanisms active in the accommodation of strain in the presence of fluids. These are capable of generating melts in the lithosphere/asthenosphere even in regions of relatively low heat flux. Once low degrees of partial melts are generated, the triple feedback between brittle-creep and melt damage leads to high porosity lithospheric-scale shear zones capable of transferring melts and fluids to the surface. Efficient localization in the weaker ductile domains implies that the final pattern of strain distribution is controlled by slow creep from below rather than by brittle deformation from above. Our model provides an explanation for intraplate volcanic provinces, which appear to rely on slowly deforming lithospheres. A significant finding is that slow extension, rather than fast extension, can localize melt damage more effectively in the deeper creeping section of the lithosphere. This finding may have profound implications to the fundamental dynamic control on intraplate volcanism.

  19. A smart sensor using a mechanical memory for structural health monitoring of a damage-controlled building

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mita, Akira; Takhira, Shinpei

    2003-04-01

    A smart sensor using a mechanical memory that can monitor peak strain or displacement was developed. The mechanism of the mechanical memory relies on the pure plastic extension of the sensing section that is realized by elastic buckling of a thin wire. The change in length of the sensing section is detected via a change in resistance, inductance or capacitance. In addition, by introducing an LC-circuit into the sensor we can add a capability for wireless retrieval of the measured data. Basically, the sensor does not need any power supply for measurements. A small power supply is required only when the data retrieval becomes necessary. Theoretical and experimental studies show the feasibility of using the sensor developed for structural health monitoring of damage-controlled structures. Though the sensor is designed to memorize the peak strain or displacement only, it can be easily modified to measure other damage indices that are physical values well correlated with the critical damage in a structure. Typical damage indices include peak strain, peak displacement, peak acceleration, absorbed energy and accumulated plastic deformation. Simple and inexpensive passive sensors that can monitor such damage indices are particularly useful for quantifying the performance of a damage-controlled building, as most damaging energy due to a large earthquake is taken care of by structural control devices. The devices are usually covered by a wall or a fire-protection material, so a simple inspection by eye is not possible without removing cover materials. We believe the installation of the sensors developed will ensure the safety of such a building with minimal cost.

  20. Having a direct look: Analysis of DNA damage and repair mechanisms by next generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Bettina; Gartner, Anton

    2014-01-01

    Genetic information is under constant attack from endogenous and exogenous sources, and the use of model organisms has provided important frameworks to understand how genome stability is maintained and how various DNA lesions are repaired. The advance of high throughput next generation sequencing (NGS) provides new inroads for investigating mechanisms needed for genome maintenance. These emerging studies, which aim to link genetic toxicology and mechanistic analyses of DNA repair processes in vivo, rely on defining mutational signatures caused by faulty replication, endogenous DNA damaging metabolites, or exogenously applied genotoxins; the analysis of their nature, their frequency and distribution. In contrast to classical studies, where DNA repair deficiency is assessed by reduced cellular survival, the localization of DNA repair factors and their interdependence as well as limited analysis of single locus reporter assays, NGS based approaches reveal the direct, quantal imprint of mutagenesis genome-wide, at the DNA sequence level. As we will show, such investigations require the analysis of DNA derived from single genotoxin treated cells, or DNA from cell populations regularly passaged through single cell bottlenecks when naturally occurring mutation accumulation is investigated. We will argue that the life cycle of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, its genetic malleability combined with whole genome sequencing provides an exciting model system to conduct such analysis. PMID:25131498

  1. Mechanism of Radiation Damage Reduction in Equiatomic Multicomponent Single Phase Alloys.

    PubMed

    Granberg, F; Nordlund, K; Ullah, Mohammad W; Jin, K; Lu, C; Bei, H; Wang, L M; Djurabekova, F; Weber, W J; Zhang, Y

    2016-04-01

    Recently a new class of metal alloys, of single-phase multicomponent composition at roughly equal atomic concentrations ("equiatomic"), have been shown to exhibit promising mechanical, magnetic, and corrosion resistance properties, in particular, at high temperatures. These features make them potential candidates for components of next-generation nuclear reactors and other high-radiation environments that will involve high temperatures combined with corrosive environments and extreme radiation exposure. In spite of a wide range of recent studies of many important properties of these alloys, their radiation tolerance at high doses remains unexplored. In this work, a combination of experimental and modeling efforts reveals a substantial reduction of damage accumulation under prolonged irradiation in single-phase NiFe and NiCoCr alloys compared to elemental Ni. This effect is explained by reduced dislocation mobility, which leads to slower growth of large dislocation structures. Moreover, there is no observable phase separation, ordering, or amorphization, pointing to a high phase stability of this class of alloys. PMID:27081990

  2. Mechanism of Radiation Damage Reduction in Equiatomic Multicomponent Single Phase Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granberg, F.; Nordlund, K.; Ullah, Mohammad W.; Jin, K.; Lu, C.; Bei, H.; Wang, L. M.; Djurabekova, F.; Weber, W. J.; Zhang, Y.

    2016-04-01

    Recently a new class of metal alloys, of single-phase multicomponent composition at roughly equal atomic concentrations ("equiatomic"), have been shown to exhibit promising mechanical, magnetic, and corrosion resistance properties, in particular, at high temperatures. These features make them potential candidates for components of next-generation nuclear reactors and other high-radiation environments that will involve high temperatures combined with corrosive environments and extreme radiation exposure. In spite of a wide range of recent studies of many important properties of these alloys, their radiation tolerance at high doses remains unexplored. In this work, a combination of experimental and modeling efforts reveals a substantial reduction of damage accumulation under prolonged irradiation in single-phase NiFe and NiCoCr alloys compared to elemental Ni. This effect is explained by reduced dislocation mobility, which leads to slower growth of large dislocation structures. Moreover, there is no observable phase separation, ordering, or amorphization, pointing to a high phase stability of this class of alloys.

  3. Susceptibility to DNA Damage as a Molecular Mechanism for Non-Syndromic Cleft Lip and Palate

    PubMed Central

    Sunaga, Daniele Yumi; Francis-West, Philippa; Kuta, Anna; Almada, Bruno Vinícius Pimenta; Ferreira, Simone Gomes; de Andrade-Lima, Leonardo Carmo; Bueno, Daniela Franco; Raposo-Amaral, Cássio Eduardo; Menck, Carlos Frederico; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita

    2013-01-01

    Non-syndromic cleft lip/palate (NSCL/P) is a complex, frequent congenital malformation, determined by the interplay between genetic and environmental factors during embryonic development. Previous findings have appointed an aetiological overlap between NSCL/P and cancer, and alterations in similar biological pathways may underpin both conditions. Here, using a combination of transcriptomic profiling and functional approaches, we report that NSCL/P dental pulp stem cells exhibit dysregulation of a co-expressed gene network mainly associated with DNA double-strand break repair and cell cycle control (p = 2.88×10−2–5.02×10−9). This network included important genes for these cellular processes, such as BRCA1, RAD51, and MSH2, which are predicted to be regulated by transcription factor E2F1. Functional assays support these findings, revealing that NSCL/P cells accumulate DNA double-strand breaks upon exposure to H2O2. Furthermore, we show that E2f1, Brca1 and Rad51 are co-expressed in the developing embryonic orofacial primordia, and may act as a molecular hub playing a role in lip and palate morphogenesis. In conclusion, we show for the first time that cellular defences against DNA damage may take part in determining the susceptibility to NSCL/P. These results are in accordance with the hypothesis of aetiological overlap between this malformation and cancer, and suggest a new pathogenic mechanism for the disease. PMID:23776525

  4. Ultimate tensile strength of dentin: Evidence for a damage mechanics approach to dentin failure.

    PubMed

    Staninec, Michal; Marshall, Grayson W; Hilton, Joan F; Pashley, David H; Gansky, Stuart A; Marshall, Sally J; Kinney, John H

    2002-01-01

    Dentin structure and properties are known to vary with orientation and location. The present study explored the variation in the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of dentin with location in the tooth. Hourglass specimens were prepared from dentin located in the center, under cusps, and in the cervical regions of human molar teeth. These were tested in tension at various distances from the pulp. Median tensile strengths ranged from 44.4 MPa in the inner dentin near the pulp, to 97.8 MPa near the dentino-enamel junction (DEJ). This increase in the median UTS with distance from the pulp to the DEJ was statistically significant (P <.001). Of particular importance was the observation that the UTS measurements followed a Weibull probability distribution, with a Weibull modulus of about 4.5. The Weibull behavior of the UTS data strongly suggests that the large variances in fracture strength data result from a distribution of preexisting defects in the dentin. These findings justify a damage-mechanics approach to studies of dentin failure. PMID:12115767

  5. Sensing of damage and substrate stress in concrete using electro-mechanical impedance measurements of bonded PZT patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Arun; Subramaniam, Kolluru V. L.

    2016-09-01

    The influence of stress and induced damage in concrete on the electro-mechanical (EM) impedance response of bonded PZT patches is evaluated for applied compressive loading. Full field displacements obtained from digital image correlation are used to evaluate the level of stress-induced damage in concrete. Stress in the substrate produces an imposed strain on the PZT. A change in the imposed strain produces a rightward frequency shift and an increase in the amplitude of the resonant peak in the EM conductance spectrum of the PZT. An increase in the substrate compliance produces a decrease in the resonant frequency and an increase in the amplitude of the resonant peak. Changes in the resonant peak in the conductance spectrum induced by increasing substrate stress are of a significant magnitude when compared with the changes induced by damage. In the early stages of damage associated with distributed microcracking, the counteracting influences of increasing level of damage and increasing stress on the resonant peak result in no shift in frequency for measurements under applied load. There is however an increase in the amplitude of the resonance peak. When the applied stress is removed, there is a net decrease in frequency resulting from damage in the form of distributed microcracks. Measures of changes in the resonant peak based on root mean square deviation (RMSD), do not show any observable change when measurements are performed under applied loading. There is a consistent increase in RMSD values and frequency shift with increasing damage when the applied stress is removed. The centroidal measure of the normalized frequency spectrum reflects changes in substrate stress. At higher applied stress levels, there is a nonlinear increase in damage, leading to localization and cracking. The influence of damage is dominant in this region and significant changes are obtained in the RMSD values in both loaded and unloaded conditions.

  6. A new characterization approach for studying relationships between microstructure and creep damage mechanisms of uranium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iltis, X.; Ben Saada, M.; Mansour, H.; Gey, N.; Hazotte, A.; Maloufi, N.

    2016-06-01

    Four batches of UO2 pellets were studied comparatively, before and after creep tests, to evaluate a characterization methodology aimed to determine the links between microstructure and damage mechanisms induced by compressive creep of uranium dioxide at 1500 °C. They were observed by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with image analysis, to quantify their fabrication porosity and the occurrence of inter-granular cavities after creep, and electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD), especially to characterize sub-structures development associated with plastic deformation. Electron channeling contrast imaging (ECCI) was also applied to evidence dislocations, at an exploratory stage, on one of the deformed pellets. This approach helped to identify and quantify microstructural differences between batches. Their as-fabricated microstructures differed in terms of grain size and fabrication porosity distribution. The pellets which had the lowest strain rates were those with the largest number of intra-granular pores, regardless of their grain size. They also exhibited less numerous sub-boundaries within the grains. These first results clearly illustrate the benefit of systematic examinations of crept UO2 pellets at a mesoscopic scale, by SEM and EBSD, to study their deformation process. In addition, ECCI appears as a powerful tool to evidence local dislocations arrangements, in bulk samples. Even if the sampling was limited, the results of this study also tend to indicate that the intra-granular pores population, resulting from the manufacturing of the samples by powder metallurgy, could have a significant influence on the UO2 viscoplastic deformation mechanisms.

  7. A new characterization approach for studying relationships between microstructure and creep damage mechanisms of uranium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iltis, X.; Ben Saada, M.; Mansour, H.; Gey, N.; Hazotte, A.; Maloufi, N.

    2016-06-01

    Four batches of UO2 pellets were studied comparatively, before and after creep tests, to evaluate a characterization methodology aimed to determine the links between microstructure and damage mechanisms induced by compressive creep of uranium dioxide at 1500 °C. They were observed by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with image analysis, to quantify their fabrication porosity and the occurrence of inter-granular cavities after creep, and electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD), especially to characterize sub-structures development associated with plastic deformation. Electron channeling contrast imaging (ECCI) was also applied to evidence dislocations, at an exploratory stage, on one of the deformed pellets. This approach helped to identify and quantify microstructural differences between batches. Their as-fabricated microstructures differed in terms of grain size and fabrication porosity distribution. The pellets which had the lowest strain rates were those with the largest number of intra-granular pores, regardless of their grain size. They also exhibited less numerous sub-boundaries within the grains. These first results clearly illustrate the benefit of systematic examinations of crept UO2 pellets at a mesoscopic scale, by SEM and EBSD, to study their deformation process. In addition, ECCI appears as a powerful tool to evidence local dislocations arrangements, in bulk samples. Even if the sampling was limited, the results of this study also tend to indicate that the intra-granular pores population, resulting from the manufacturing of the samples by powder metallurgy, could have a significant influence on the UO2 viscoplastic deformation mechanisms.

  8. Investigation of Ductile Damage in DP980 Steel Sheets Using Mechanical Tests and X-ray Micro-Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, A.; Leguen, C.; Thuillier, S.; Maire, E.

    2011-05-01

    This study is part of a broader research project on the prediction of formability limits in bending on radius of the order of the sheet thickness, based on ductile damage. As a first step, ductile damage in DP980 steel sheet was investigated by means of micro-tomography and mechanical testing, including tensile and simple shear tests. The local strain in tension was measured with a digital image correlation device up to rupture, on macroscopic samples of standard dimensions. Moreover, interrupted tensile tests on smaller specimen were also performed, in order to analyze the void distribution by X-ray micro-tomography. The final aim is to perform numerical simulation of the tests, with Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman model, to take into account the influence of ductile damage on the mechanical behavior. A fair description of the void volume fraction was obtained as well as the stress level, in the case of small-size specimen.

  9. Scintillation mechanism and radiation damage in Ce{sub x}La{sub 1-x}F{sub 3} crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Wojtowicz, A.J.; Wisniewski, D. |; Lempicki, A.; Brecher, C.; Bartram, R.H.; Woody, C.; Levy, P.; Stoll, S.; Kierstead, J.; Pedrini, C.

    1994-08-01

    Recent spectroscopic and radiation damage experiments on a series of Ce{sub x}La{sub 1{minus}x}F{sub 3} crystals suggest that the scintillation light output is limited by an unusual quenching mechanism, which also plays a major role in minimizing radiation-induced damage. The intensity of the radiation-induced absorptions is a strong function of the Ce content x, reaching a maximum for x = 0.03 and a minimum for x = 1. This peculiar dependence appears to be due to the influence of deep-lying Ce levels on both scintillation mechanism and radiation damage. The authors suggest that various charge transfer processes can explain many aspects of the performance of Ce{sub x}La{sub 1{minus}x}F{sub 3} scintillators.

  10. Development of 66kV XLPE submarine cable using optical fiber as a mechanical-damage-detection-sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimoto, Toshio; Miyahara, Tsutomu; Takehana, Hajime; Tateno, Fuminori

    1995-10-01

    Submarine cables are exposed to great risk of serious mechanical damage by ship anchors or equipment used for fishing. Detection of such damage in a submarine cable is a very useful technology for improving the reliability of a submarine cable transmission line. A mechanical-damage-detection-sensor using optical fiber was developed. A prototype 66kV XLPE submarine cable incorporating the sensor was manufactured for trial, and the ability of a sensor was confirmed by compression test. Actual 66kV XLPE submarine cable incorporating the sensor was manufactured for trial, and the ability of a sensor was confirmed by compression test. Actual 66kV XLPE submarine cable with the sensor was manufactured and installed as an operating transmission line in Japan.

  11. HIPK2 restricts SIRT1 activity upon severe DNA damage by a phosphorylation-controlled mechanism.

    PubMed

    Conrad, E; Polonio-Vallon, T; Meister, M; Matt, S; Bitomsky, N; Herbel, C; Liebl, M; Greiner, V; Kriznik, B; Schumacher, S; Krieghoff-Henning, E; Hofmann, T G

    2016-01-01

    Upon severe DNA damage a cellular signalling network initiates a cell death response through activating tumour suppressor p53 in association with promyelocytic leukaemia (PML) nuclear bodies. The deacetylase Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) suppresses cell death after DNA damage by antagonizing p53 acetylation. To facilitate efficient p53 acetylation, SIRT1 function needs to be restricted. How SIRT1 activity is regulated under these conditions remains largely unclear. Here we provide evidence that SIRT1 activity is limited upon severe DNA damage through phosphorylation by the DNA damage-responsive kinase HIPK2. We found that DNA damage provokes interaction of SIRT1 and HIPK2, which phosphorylates SIRT1 at Serine 682 upon lethal damage. Furthermore, upon DNA damage SIRT1 and HIPK2 colocalize at PML nuclear bodies, and PML depletion abrogates DNA damage-induced SIRT1 Ser682 phosphorylation. We show that Ser682 phosphorylation inhibits SIRT1 activity and impacts on p53 acetylation, apoptotic p53 target gene expression and cell death. Mechanistically, we found that DNA damage-induced SIRT1 Ser682 phosphorylation provokes disruption of the complex between SIRT1 and its activator AROS. Our findings indicate that phosphorylation-dependent restriction of SIRT1 activity by HIPK2 shapes the p53 response. PMID:26113041

  12. HIPK2 restricts SIRT1 activity upon severe DNA damage by a phosphorylation-controlled mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, E; Polonio-Vallon, T; Meister, M; Matt, S; Bitomsky, N; Herbel, C; Liebl, M; Greiner, V; Kriznik, B; Schumacher, S; Krieghoff-Henning, E; Hofmann, T G

    2016-01-01

    Upon severe DNA damage a cellular signalling network initiates a cell death response through activating tumour suppressor p53 in association with promyelocytic leukaemia (PML) nuclear bodies. The deacetylase Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) suppresses cell death after DNA damage by antagonizing p53 acetylation. To facilitate efficient p53 acetylation, SIRT1 function needs to be restricted. How SIRT1 activity is regulated under these conditions remains largely unclear. Here we provide evidence that SIRT1 activity is limited upon severe DNA damage through phosphorylation by the DNA damage-responsive kinase HIPK2. We found that DNA damage provokes interaction of SIRT1 and HIPK2, which phosphorylates SIRT1 at Serine 682 upon lethal damage. Furthermore, upon DNA damage SIRT1 and HIPK2 colocalize at PML nuclear bodies, and PML depletion abrogates DNA damage-induced SIRT1 Ser682 phosphorylation. We show that Ser682 phosphorylation inhibits SIRT1 activity and impacts on p53 acetylation, apoptotic p53 target gene expression and cell death. Mechanistically, we found that DNA damage-induced SIRT1 Ser682 phosphorylation provokes disruption of the complex between SIRT1 and its activator AROS. Our findings indicate that phosphorylation-dependent restriction of SIRT1 activity by HIPK2 shapes the p53 response. PMID:26113041

  13. DIRECT-ACTING, DNA-DAMAGING AS (III)-METHYLATED SPECIES: IMPLICATIONS FOR A CARCINOGENIC MECHANISM OF ACTION OF ARSENICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Direct-acting, DNA-damaging As (III)-methylated species: implications for a carcinogenic . mechanism of action of arsenicals

    Inorganic arsenic (iAs, arsenite and arsenate) has been thought to act as a carcinogen without reacting directly with DNA; neither iAs nor the As(...

  14. Ion implantation in Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As : damage structures and amorphization mechanisms.

    SciTech Connect

    Lagow, B. W.; Turkot, B. A.; Robertson, I. M.; Coleman, J. J.; Roh, S. D.; Forbes, D. V.; Rehn, L. E.; Baldo, P. M.; Materials Science Division; Univ. of Illinois

    1998-07-01

    We review previous research on ion implantation in Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As-GaAs heterostructures, and include observations from our current work in order to assess the various mechanisms that have been proposed to account for damage accumulation and amorphization in this system. In considering all of the experimental observations, the most consistent description is one where amorphization occurs by a combination of point-defect buildup and direct impact amorphization mechanisms.

  15. Comparison of ex-situ volatile emissions from intact and mechanically damaged walnuts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The codling moth (Cydia pomonella) and navel orangeworm (Amyelois transitella) are insect pests that inflict serious economic damage to California walnuts. Feeding by these larvae causes physical damage, resulting in lower kernel quality, and can lead to fungal contamination by the aflatoxigenic fun...

  16. In Vitro Comparative Assessment of Mechanical Blood Damage Induced by Different Hemodialysis Treatments.

    PubMed

    Sakota, Ranko; Lodi, Carlo Alberto; Sconziano, Sara Antonia; Beck, Werner; Bosch, Juan P

    2015-12-01

    routinely used dialysis treatments, bloodlines and machines. Although the in vitro measurement of the fHb increase in bovine blood does not allow a prediction of the absolute level of blood mechanical damage or the possible effects in humans, such measurements are valuable for assessing hemolytic harm by performing tests comparing the proposed treatment with existing devices. PMID:25981394

  17. Common Practice Lightning Strike Protection Characterization Technique to Quantify Damage Mechanisms on Composite Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szatkowski, George N.; Dudley, Kenneth L.; Koppen, Sandra V.; Ely, Jay J.; Nguyen, Truong X.; Ticatch, Larry A.; Mielnik, John J.; Mcneill, Patrick A.

    2013-01-01

    To support FAA certification airworthiness standards, composite substrates are subjected to lightning direct-effect electrical waveforms to determine performance characteristics of the lightning strike protection (LSP) conductive layers used to protect composite substrates. Test results collected from independent LSP studies are often incomparable due to variability in test procedures & applied practices at different organizations, which impairs performance correlations between different LSP data sets. Under a NASA supported contract, The Boeing Company developed technical procedures and documentation as guidance in order to facilitate a test method for conducting universal common practice lightning strike protection test procedures. The procedures obtain conformity in future lightning strike protection evaluations to allow meaningful performance correlations across data sets. This universal common practice guidance provides the manufacturing specifications to fabricate carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) test panels, including finish, grounding configuration, and acceptable methods for pretest nondestructive inspection (NDI) and posttest destructive inspection. The test operations guidance elaborates on the provisions contained in SAE ARP5416 to address inconsistencies in the generation of damage protection performance data, so as to provide for maximum achievable correlation across capable lab facilities. In addition, the guidance details a direct effects test bed design to aid in quantification of the multi-physical phenomena surrounding a lightning direct attachment supporting validation data requirements for the development of predictive computational modeling. The lightning test bed is designed to accommodate a repeatable installation procedure to secure the test panel and eliminate test installation uncertainty. It also facilitates a means to capture the electrical waveform parameters in 2 dimensions, along with the mechanical displacement and thermal

  18. Blood damage through a bileaflet mechanical heart valve: a quantitative computational study using a multiscale suspension flow solver.

    PubMed

    Min Yun, B; Aidun, Cyrus K; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2014-10-01

    Bileaflet mechanical heart valves (BMHVs) are among the most popular prostheses to replace defective native valves. However, complex flow phenomena caused by the prosthesis are thought to induce serious thromboembolic complications. This study aims at employing a novel multiscale numerical method that models realistic sized suspended platelets for assessing blood damage potential in flow through BMHVs. A previously validated lattice-Boltzmann method (LBM) is used to simulate pulsatile flow through a 23 mm St. Jude Medical (SJM) Regent™ valve in the aortic position at very high spatiotemporal resolution with the presence of thousands of suspended platelets. Platelet damage is modeled for both the systolic and diastolic phases of the cardiac cycle. No platelets exceed activation thresholds for any of the simulations. Platelet damage is determined to be particularly high for suspended elements trapped in recirculation zones, which suggests a shift of focus in blood damage studies away from instantaneous flow fields and toward high flow mixing regions. In the diastolic phase, leakage flow through the b-datum gap is shown to cause highest damage to platelets. This multiscale numerical method may be used as a generic solver for evaluating blood damage in other cardiovascular flows and devices. PMID:25070372

  19. Assessing the Impact of Mechanical Damage on Full-Thickness Porcine and Human Skin Using an In Vitro Approach

    PubMed Central

    Dabboue, Hinda; Builles, Nicolas; Frouin, Éric; Scott, Dan; Ramos, Jeanne; Marti-Mestres, Gilberte

    2015-01-01

    For most xenobiotics, the rates of percutaneous absorption are limited by diffusion through the horny layer of skin. However, percutaneous absorption of chemicals may seriously increase when the skin is damaged. The aim of this work was to develop an in vitro representative model of mechanically damaged skins. The epidermal barrier was examined following exposure to a razor, a rotating brush, and a microneedle system in comparison to tape-stripping which acted as a reference. Excised full-thickness skins were mounted on a diffusion chamber in order to evaluate the effect of injuries and to mimic physiological conditions. The transepidermal water loss (TEWL) was greatly increased when the barrier function was compromised. Measurements were made for all the damaged biopsies and observed histologically by microscopy. On human and porcine skins, the tape-stripping application (0 to 40 times) showed a proportional increase in TEWL which highlights the destruction of the stratum corneum. Similar results were obtained for all cosmetic instruments. This is reflected in our study by the nonsignificant difference of the mean TEWL scores between 30 strips and mechanical damage. For a specific appreciation, damaged skins were then selected to qualitatively evaluate the absorption of a chlorogenic acid solution using fluorescence microscopy. PMID:26247021

  20. Assessing the Impact of Mechanical Damage on Full-Thickness Porcine and Human Skin Using an In Vitro Approach.

    PubMed

    Dabboue, Hinda; Builles, Nicolas; Frouin, Éric; Scott, Dan; Ramos, Jeanne; Marti-Mestres, Gilberte

    2015-01-01

    For most xenobiotics, the rates of percutaneous absorption are limited by diffusion through the horny layer of skin. However, percutaneous absorption of chemicals may seriously increase when the skin is damaged. The aim of this work was to develop an in vitro representative model of mechanically damaged skins. The epidermal barrier was examined following exposure to a razor, a rotating brush, and a microneedle system in comparison to tape-stripping which acted as a reference. Excised full-thickness skins were mounted on a diffusion chamber in order to evaluate the effect of injuries and to mimic physiological conditions. The transepidermal water loss (TEWL) was greatly increased when the barrier function was compromised. Measurements were made for all the damaged biopsies and observed histologically by microscopy. On human and porcine skins, the tape-stripping application (0 to 40 times) showed a proportional increase in TEWL which highlights the destruction of the stratum corneum. Similar results were obtained for all cosmetic instruments. This is reflected in our study by the nonsignificant difference of the mean TEWL scores between 30 strips and mechanical damage. For a specific appreciation, damaged skins were then selected to qualitatively evaluate the absorption of a chlorogenic acid solution using fluorescence microscopy. PMID:26247021

  1. Cavitation distribution within large phantom vessel and mechanical damage formed on surrounding vessel wall.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yangzi; Yin, Hui; Li, Zhaopeng; Wan, Mingxi

    2013-11-01

    Blood vessel is one of the most important targets encountered during focused ultrasound (FU) therapy. The lasting high temperature caused by continuous FU can result in structural modification of small vessel. For the vessel with a diameter larger than 2mm, convective cooling can significantly weaken the thermal effect of FU. Meanwhile, the continued presence of ultrasound will cause repetitive cavitation and acoustic microstreaming, making comprehension of continuous wave induced cavitation effect in large vessels necessary. The Sonoluminescence (SL) method, mechanical damage observation and high-speed camera were used in this study to investigate the combination effect of ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) and continuous FU in large phantom vessels with a diameter of 10mm without consideration of thermal effect. When the focus was positioned at the proximal wall, cylindrical hole along the acoustic axis opposite the ultrasound wave propagation direction was observed at the input power equal to or greater than 50 W. When the focus was located at the distal wall, only small tunnels can be found. The place where the cylindrical hole formed was corresponding to where bubbles gathered and emitted brilliant light near the wall. Without UCAs neither such bright SL nor cylindrical hole can be found. However, the UCAs concentration had little influence on the SL distribution and the length of cylindrical hole. The SL intensity near the proximal vessel wall and the length of the cylindrical hole both increased with the input power. It is suggested that these findings need to be considered in the large vessel therapy and UCAs usage. PMID:23623758

  2. Modelling and simulations of the chemo-mechanical behaviour of leached cement-based materials: Interactions between damage and leaching

    SciTech Connect

    Stora, E.; Bary, B.; Deville, E.; Montarnal, P.

    2010-08-15

    The assessment of the durability of cement-based materials, which could be employed in underground structures for nuclear waste disposal, requires accounting for deterioration factors, such as chemical attacks and damage, and for the interactions between these phenomena. The objective of the present paper consists in investigating the long-term behaviour of cementitious materials by simulating their response to chemical and mechanical solicitations. In a companion paper (Stora et al., submitted to Cem. Concr. Res. 2008), the implementation of a multi-scale homogenization model into an integration platform has allowed for evaluating the evolution of the mineral composition, diffusive and elastic properties inside a concrete material subjected to leaching. To complete this previous work, an orthotropic micromechanical damage model is presently developed and incorporated in this numerical platform to estimate the mechanical and diffusive properties of damaged cement-based materials. Simulations of the chemo-mechanical behaviour of leached cementitious materials are performed with the tool thus obtained and compared with available experiments. The numerical results are insightful about the interactions between damage and chemical deteriorations.

  3. Prevention Effects and Possible Molecular Mechanism of Mulberry Leaf Extract and its Formulation on Rats with Insulin-Insensitivity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Li, Xuemei; Xie, Chen; Luo, Xiuzhen; Bao, Yonggang; Wu, Bin; Hu, Yuchi; Zhong, Zhong; Liu, Chang; Li, MinJie

    2016-01-01

    For centuries, mulberry leaf has been used in traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of diabetes. This study aims to test the prevention effects of a proprietary mulberry leaf extract (MLE) and a formula consisting of MLE, fenugreek seed extract, and cinnamon cassia extract (MLEF) on insulin resistance development in animals. MLE was refined to contain 5% 1-deoxynojirimycin by weight. MLEF was formulated by mixing MLE with cinnamon cassia extract and fenugreek seed extract at a 6:5:3 ratio (by weight). First, the acute toxicity effects of MLE on ICR mice were examined at 5 g/kg BW dose. Second, two groups of normal rats were administrated with water or 150 mg/kg BW MLE per day for 29 days to evaluate MLE's effect on normal animals. Third, to examine the effects of MLE and MLEF on model animals, sixty SD rats were divided into five groups, namely, (1) normal, (2) model, (3) high-dose MLE (75 mg/kg BW) treatment; (4) low-dose MLE (15 mg/kg BW) treatment; and (5) MLEF (35 mg/kg BW) treatment. On the second week, rats in groups (2)-(5) were switched to high-energy diet for three weeks. Afterward, the rats were injected (ip) with a single dose of 105 mg/kg BW alloxan. After four more days, fasting blood glucose, post-prandial blood glucose, serum insulin, cholesterol, and triglyceride levels were measured. Last, liver lysates from animals were screened with 650 antibodies for changes in the expression or phosphorylation levels of signaling proteins. The results were further validated by Western blot analysis. We found that the maximum tolerance dose of MLE was greater than 5 g/kg in mice. The MLE at a 150 mg/kg BW dose showed no effect on fast blood glucose levels in normal rats. The MLE at a 75 mg/kg BW dose and MLEF at a 35 mg/kg BW dose, significantly (p < 0.05) reduced fast blood glucose levels in rats with impaired glucose and lipid metabolism. In total, 34 proteins with significant changes in expression and phosphorylation levels were identified. The

  4. Prevention Effects and Possible Molecular Mechanism of Mulberry Leaf Extract and its Formulation on Rats with Insulin-Insensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Chen; Luo, Xiuzhen; Bao, Yonggang; Wu, Bin; Hu, Yuchi; Zhong, Zhong; Liu, Chang; Li, MinJie

    2016-01-01

    For centuries, mulberry leaf has been used in traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of diabetes. This study aims to test the prevention effects of a proprietary mulberry leaf extract (MLE) and a formula consisting of MLE, fenugreek seed extract, and cinnamon cassia extract (MLEF) on insulin resistance development in animals. MLE was refined to contain 5% 1-deoxynojirimycin by weight. MLEF was formulated by mixing MLE with cinnamon cassia extract and fenugreek seed extract at a 6:5:3 ratio (by weight). First, the acute toxicity effects of MLE on ICR mice were examined at 5 g/kg BW dose. Second, two groups of normal rats were administrated with water or 150 mg/kg BW MLE per day for 29 days to evaluate MLE’s effect on normal animals. Third, to examine the effects of MLE and MLEF on model animals, sixty SD rats were divided into five groups, namely, (1) normal, (2) model, (3) high-dose MLE (75 mg/kg BW) treatment; (4) low-dose MLE (15 mg/kg BW) treatment; and (5) MLEF (35 mg/kg BW) treatment. On the second week, rats in groups (2)-(5) were switched to high-energy diet for three weeks. Afterward, the rats were injected (ip) with a single dose of 105 mg/kg BW alloxan. After four more days, fasting blood glucose, post-prandial blood glucose, serum insulin, cholesterol, and triglyceride levels were measured. Last, liver lysates from animals were screened with 650 antibodies for changes in the expression or phosphorylation levels of signaling proteins. The results were further validated by Western blot analysis. We found that the maximum tolerance dose of MLE was greater than 5 g/kg in mice. The MLE at a 150 mg/kg BW dose showed no effect on fast blood glucose levels in normal rats. The MLE at a 75 mg/kg BW dose and MLEF at a 35 mg/kg BW dose, significantly (p < 0.05) reduced fast blood glucose levels in rats with impaired glucose and lipid metabolism. In total, 34 proteins with significant changes in expression and phosphorylation levels were identified. The

  5. Damage mechanisms and transparency changes in CO2-laser-irradiated glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guignard, Franck; Autric, Michel L.; Baudinaud, Vincent

    1998-04-01

    Transverse excited atmospheric pressure CO2 laser induced damage on BK7 and fused silica has been investigated. Damage processes have been characterized by looking at the transparency changes during irradiation with a helium-neon laser and plasma formation, with a photodiode. Both results are compared with thermal coupling and damage threshold measurements. The two glass qualities show slightly different behavior. BK7 shows surface crazing after irradiation, fused silica shows micro-fractures formation. In both cases, residual tensile stresses induced near the surface on cooling is identified as the most likely cause of cracking. A model was developed to calculate temperature and residual stresses, calculations results gives good agreement with damage thresholds measured.

  6. Scaling Between Fault Length, Damaged Zone Thickness and Width of Secondary Fault Fans Derived from Fracture Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ampuero, Jean Paul; Mao, Xiaolin

    2016-04-01

    The interaction between earthquakes, fault network geometry and fault zone structure is a key question motivating the integration of dynamic rupture and long-term crustal deformation modeling. Here, we address the scaling between fault structural properties from the perspective of dynamic and quasi-static processes involved in fault system evolution. Faults are surrounded by materials damaged through quasi-static and dynamic processes, forming damaged zones whose thickness and damage intensity may vary as a function of fault maturity and length. In the vicinity (typically less than a few hundred meters) of their principal slip surface, faults develop an "inner damage zone", usually characterized by micro-fracture observations. At a larger scale, faults develop an "outer damage zone" of secondary macroscopic fault branches at their tips, which organize into fans of splay faults. Inner damage zones can significantly affect earthquake ruptures, enhance near-field ground motions and facilitate fluid transport in the crust. Fault zone trapped waves can generate pulse-like rupture and oscillatory rupture speed, facilitate supershear rupture transition and allow for steady rupture propagation at speeds that are unstable or inadmissible in homogeneous media. The effects of a fault damage zone crucially depend on its thickness. Field observations of inner damage zone thickness as a function of cumulated slip show linear scaling at small slip but saturation at large slip, with maximum damage zone thickness of a few hundred meters. We previously developed fracture mechanics theoretical arguments and dynamic rupture simulations with off-fault inelastic deformation that predict saturation of the thickness of co-seismic damage zone controlled by the depth extent of the seismogenic zone. In essence, the stress intensity factor at the front of a rupture, which controls the distance reached by the large off-fault stresses that cause damage, scales with the shortest characteristic

  7. Mechanical damage to pollen aids nutrient acquisition in Heliconius butterflies (Nymphalidae).

    PubMed

    Krenn, Harald W; Eberhard, Monika J B; Eberhard, Stefan H; Hikl, Anna-Laetitia; Huber, Werner; Gilbert, Lawrence E

    2009-12-01

    Neotropical Heliconius and Laparus butterflies actively collect pollen onto the proboscis and extract nutrients from it. This study investigates the impact of the processing behaviour on the condition of the pollen grains. Pollen samples (n = 72) were collected from proboscides of various Heliconius species and Laparus doris in surrounding habitats of the Tropical Research Station La Gamba (Costa Rica). Examination using a light microscope revealed that pollen loads contained 74.88 ± 53.67% of damaged Psychotria pollen, 72.04 ± 23.4% of damaged Psiguria/Gurania pollen, and 21.35 ± 14.5% of damaged Lantana pollen (numbers represent median ± first quartile). Damaged pollen grains showed deformed contours, inhomogeneous and/or leaking contents, or they were empty. Experiments with Heliconius and Laparus doris from a natural population in Costa Rica demonstrated that 200 min of pollen processing behaviour significantly increased the percentage of damaged pollen of Psychotria compared to pollen from anthers (P = 0.015, Z = -2.44, Mann-Whitney U-test). Examination of pollen loads from green house reared Heliconius butterflies resulted in significantly greater amounts of damaged Psiguria pollen after 200 min of processing behaviour compared to pollen from flowers (P < 0.001, Z = -4.583, Mann-Whitney U-test). These results indicate that pollen processing functions as extra oral digestion whereby pollen grains are ruptured to make the content available for ingestion. PMID:24900162

  8. Thermomechanical Fatigue Damage/Failure Mechanisms in SCS-6/Timetal 21S [0/90](Sub S) Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castelli, Michael G.

    1994-01-01

    The thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) deformation, damage, and life behaviors of SCS6/Timetal 21S (0/90)s were investigated under zero-tension conditions. In-phase (IP) and out-of-phase (OP) loadings were investigated with a temperature cycle from 150 to 650 deg C. An advanced TMF test technique was used to quantify mechanically damage progression. The technique incorporated explicit measurements of the macroscopic (1) isothermal static moduli at the temperature extremes of the TMF cycle and (2) coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) as functions of the TMF cycles. The importance of thermal property degradation and its relevance to accurate post-test data analysis and interpretation is briefly addressed. Extensive fractography and metallography were conducted on specimens from failed and interrupted tests to characterize the extent of damage at the microstructure level. Fatigue life results indicated trends analogous to those established for similar unidirectional(0) reinforced titanium matrix composite systems. High stress IP and mid to low stress OP loading conditions were life-limiting in comparison to maximum temperature isothermal conditions. Dominant damage mechanisms changed with cycle type. Damage resulting from IP TMF conditions produced measurable decreases in static moduli but only minimal changes in the CTE. Metallography on interrupted and failed specimens revealed extensive (0) fiber cracking with sparse matrix damage. No surface initiated matrix cracks were present. Comparable OP TMF conditions initiated environment enhanced surface cracking and matrix cracking initiated at (90) fiber/matrix (F/M) interfaces. Notable static moduli and CTE degradations were measured. Fractography and metallography revealed that the transverse cracks originating from the surface and (90) F/M interfaces tended to converge and coalesce at the (0) fibers.

  9. Seismic damage before eruptions as a tool to map pre-eruptive mechanics: worldwide average patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, A.; Grasso, J. R.

    2010-12-01

    Volcanic eruptions and earthquakes are shown to interact at different time and space scales, from a few hundreds of km for VEI>5 eruptions and Mag>7 earthquakes (Linde and Sacks, 1998), down to a few km with Mag<3 VT earthquakes that are contemporary to regular small effusive eruptions. When distances are normalized by the seismic fault length, VEI>0 and Mag>5, Lemarchand and Grasso, (2007) suggest that the seismicity rate before eruptions follows inverse Omori’s law (Omori, 1896) similar to the one observed for earthquakes, but with possible different exponent values. Given this similarity, we were interested to further compare the properties of the upper crust damage contemporary to worldwide eruptions (expressed through the seismicity), to the properties of the upper crust damage triggered by the standard tectonic loading of worldwide earthquakes. Using two empirical laws (Gutemberg-Richter law, Omori law) ETAS model well reproduces the main observed properties of tectonic seismicity. It will here be considered as null hypothesis. Differences from ETAS model or global tectonic seismicity patterns are used to track down the seismic signature of the magma movement and the pre-eruptive mechanisms. First, we analyzed the crustal response to loading, thanks to patterns of seismicity: i) before 525 Mag>7 earthquakes, USGS worldwide catalog 1973-2009, ii) before earthquakes of synthetic ETAS simulation, iii) before 1179 worldwide eruptions from the Smithsonian Institution catalog, 1973-2009. Using stacked sequences of seismic events before eruption times and for different classes of eruptions sizes, we found that the parameters of inverse Omori law significantly differ from the expected values of ETAS model or the ones of real tectonic seismicity: i) The productivity in foreshocks scales linearly to VEI; ii) The exponent of the power-law increase of foreshock rates vary with the eruption size. For VEI<2 eruptions, the 0.49 p-value of foreshock sequences is smaller

  10. Characterization of exposure dependent fatigue crack growth kinetics and damage mechanisms for aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ro, Yunjo

    The effect of environmental exposure [given by the ratio of water vapor pressure to the loading frequency (PH2O/f)] on fatigue crack growth rates (FCGR) and damage mechanisms has been investigated for Al-Cu-Li/Mg alloys tested at constant stress intensity range (DeltaK = KMAX - KMIN). Different exposure dependences of the FCGR are explained by H-embrittlement and 3 rate-limiting processes that are similar for each alloy and aging condition. It is shown that the dislocation slip character (heterogeneous planar vs. wavy) controls FCGR at low to moderate exposures, rather than alloy composition and strengthening precipitate reactivity. However, the benefit of planar slip is significantly reduced at higher exposures. An SEM-based electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD)/stereology method was used to successfully quantify changes in fatigue fracture surface crystallography as a function of exposure for a peak aged Al-Cu-Li alloy and an under-aged Al-Cu-Mg alloy. Near-{111} slip band cracking (SBC) observed under high vacuum conditions is gradually replaced by near-{001}/{011} and high index, {hkl}, cracking planes as PH2O/f is increased. The complete absence of near-{111} SBC at higher exposures suggests H enhanced decohesion rather than slip based damage process enhanced by H. This conclusion was substantiated by direct TEM observation. Focused Ion Beam (FIB) milling was used to produce thin foils for TEM, which successfully revealed the underlying dislocation structure at the crack surface and within surrounding materials in under-aged Al-Cu-Mg tested at exposure conditions of ˜10 -8 and 50 Pa·sec. Both conditions exhibit a similar layer of dislocation cells just below the fracture surface which abruptly changes to localized slip bands away from the fracture surface, confirming the presence of a strain gradient at the crack tip. However, the thickness of the substructure layer and slip band width observed at ˜10-8 Pa·sec was larger than those observed at 50 Pa

  11. The Adenovirus E4orf4 Protein Provides a Novel Mechanism for Inhibition of the DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Kechker, Peter; Sharf, Rakefet; Kleinberger, Tamar

    2016-01-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is a conglomerate of pathways designed to detect DNA damage and signal its presence to cell cycle checkpoints and to the repair machinery, allowing the cell to pause and mend the damage, or if the damage is too severe, to trigger apoptosis or senescence. Various DDR branches are regulated by kinases of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-like protein kinase family, including ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and ATM- and Rad3-related (ATR). Replication intermediates and linear double-stranded genomes of DNA viruses are perceived by the cell as DNA damage and activate the DDR. If allowed to operate, the DDR will stimulate ligation of viral genomes and will inhibit virus replication. To prevent this outcome, many DNA viruses evolved ways to limit the DDR. As part of its attack on the DDR, adenovirus utilizes various viral proteins to cause degradation of DDR proteins and to sequester the MRN damage sensor outside virus replication centers. Here we show that adenovirus evolved yet another novel mechanism to inhibit the DDR. The E4orf4 protein, together with its cellular partner PP2A, reduces phosphorylation of ATM and ATR substrates in virus-infected cells and in cells treated with DNA damaging drugs, and causes accumulation of damaged DNA in the drug-treated cells. ATM and ATR are not mutually required for inhibition of their signaling pathways by E4orf4. ATM and ATR deficiency as well as E4orf4 expression enhance infection efficiency. Furthermore, E4orf4, previously reported to induce cancer-specific cell death when expressed alone, sensitizes cells to killing by sub-lethal concentrations of DNA damaging drugs, likely because it inhibits DNA damage repair. These findings provide one explanation for the cancer-specificity of E4orf4-induced cell death as many cancers have DDR deficiencies leading to increased reliance on the remaining intact DDR pathways and to enhanced susceptibility to DDR inhibitors such as E4orf4. Thus DDR inhibition

  12. Damage monitoring using fiber optic sensors and by analysing electro-mechanical admittance signatures obtained from piezo sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maheshwari, Muneesh; Annamdas, Venu Gopal M.; Pang, John Hock Lye; Tjin, Swee C.; Asundi, Anand

    2015-12-01

    Damage monitoring is the need of the hour in this age of infrastructure. Many methods are being used for damage monitoring in different mechanical and civil structures. Some of them are strain based methods in which abruptly increased strain signifies the presence of damage in the structure. This article focuses on crack monitoring of a fixedfixed beam using fiber optic sensors which can measure strain locally or globally. The two types of fiber optic sensors used in this research are fiber Bragg grating (FBG) and fiber optic polarimetric sensors (FOPS). FBG and FOPS are used for local strain monitoring (at one point only) and global strain monitoring (in the entire specimen) respectively. At the centre of the specimen, a piezoelectric wafer active sensor (PWAS) is also attached. PWAS is used to obtain electromechanical admittance (EMA) signatures. Further, these EMA signatures are analysed to access the damage state in the beam. These multiple smart materials together provide improved information on damages in the specimen which is very valuable for the structural health monitoring (SHM) of the specimen.

  13. Efficacy of electrolyzed water and an acidic formulation compared with regularly used chemical sanitizers for tableware sanitization during mechanical and manual ware-washing protocols.

    PubMed

    Handojo, Aldo; Lee, Jaesung; Hipp, Joel; Pascall, Melvin A

    2009-06-01

    This study investigated residual bacteria and different food types left on tableware items after various washing and sanitization protocols. Escherichia coli K-12 and Staphylococcus epidermidis were inoculated into whole milk and soft cream cheese. The milk was used to contaminate regular drinking glasses and the cheese was used to contaminate plates and silverware. These tableware items were washed in manual (43 degrees C) and mechanical (49 degrees C) washers and sanitized with different sanitizers (24 degrees C) for 5 s. Quaternary ammonium compound, sodium hypochlorite, peroxyacetic acid, neutral electrolyzed water (NEW), and a combination of citric acid with sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (acidic formulation) were used as the chemical sanitizers. Tap water was used as a control. Results showed that at least 5-log reductions in both bacterial numbers were achieved for all sanitizers in both types of washers, except for the control. With mechanical dishwashing, the NEW and acidic formulation treatments reduced bacterial populations by >6.9 and >6.0 log CFU per tableware item, respectively. With the manual operation, bacterial numbers were reduced by >5.4 and >6.0 log CFU per tableware item, respectively. This study revealed that NEW and the acidic formulation are as effective as the other chemical sanitizers for food contact surface sanitization in manual and mechanical ware washing. PMID:19610348

  14. Delamination identification of laminated composite plates using a continuum damage mechanics model and subset selection technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Shen; Yun, Gun Jin; Qiao, Pizhong

    2010-05-01

    In this paper, a new model-based delamination detection methodology is presented for laminated composite plates and its performance is studied both numerically and experimentally. This methodology consists of two main parts: (1) modal analysis of an undamaged baseline finite element (FE) model and experimental modal testing of panels with delamination damage at single or multiple locations and (2) a sensitivity based subset selection technique for single or multiple delamination damage localizations. As an identification model, a higher-order finite element model is combined with a rational micromechanics-based CDM model which defines the delamination damage parameter as a ratio of delaminated area to entire area. The subset selection technique based on sensitivity of the dynamic residual force has been known to be capable of detecting multiple damage locations. However, there has been no experimental study specifically for the applications in laminated composite structures. To implement the methodology, a sensitivity matrix for the laminated composite plate model has been derived. Applications of the proposed methodology to an E-glass/epoxy symmetric composite panel composed of 16 plies [CSM/UM1208/3 layers of C1800]s = [CSM/0/(90/0)3]s with delamination damage are demonstrated both numerically and experimentally. A non-contact scanning laser vibrometer (SLV), a lead zirconate titanate (PZT) actuator and a polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) sensor are used to conduct experimental modal testing. From the experimental example, capabilities of the proposed methodology for damage identification are successfully demonstrated for a 2D laminated composite panel. Furthermore, various damage scenarios are considered to show its performance and detailed results are discussed for future improvements.

  15. Analysis of the Deformation and Damage Mechanisms of Pearlitic Steel by EBSD and "in-situ" SEM Tensile Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidhom, Habib; Yahyaoui, H.; Braham, C.; Gonzalez, G.

    2015-07-01

    The processes governing the deformation and damage of C70 pearlitic steel were investigated in nanometer and micrometer scales using electron backscatter diffraction technique and "in-situ" scanning electron microscope tensile testing. The ferrite behavior was identified by "in-situ" x-ray tensile tests. Investigations were carried out on annealed microstructure with two interlamellar spacings of Sp = 170 and Sp = 230 nm. It is shown that pearlite yielding is controlled by the deformation mechanisms occurring in ferrite. Deformation and damage mechanisms were proposed. At low strain, pearlite deforms homogeneously with low misorientation (<5°) inside the pearlite colonies and elongates the cementite plates. At high strain, pearlite deforms heterogeneously in intense localized shear bands inside the more favorably oriented pearlite colonies. Misorientation reaches values up to 15°. Cementite deforms by an offset of lamella along the shear bands. The nucleation of these shear bands occurs at strain level of E 11 = 7% for coarse pearlite and at a higher value for fine pearlite. Damage occurs by brittle fracture of the elongated cementite lamellae parallel to the tensile axis and which are developed by shear micro-cracks along the slip bands. The plastic-induced damage is thus delayed by the fine pearlite structure.

  16. Autonomous Repair Mechanism of Creep Damage in Fe-Au and Fe-Au-B-N Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S.; Kwakernaak, C.; Tichelaar, F. D.; Sloof, W. G.; Kuzmina, M.; Herbig, M.; Raabe, D.; Brück, E.; van der Zwaag, S.; van Dijk, N. H.

    2015-12-01

    The autonomous repair mechanism of creep cavitation during high-temperature deformation has been investigated in Fe-Au and Fe-Au-B-N alloys. Combined electron-microscopy techniques and atom probe tomography reveal how the improved creep properties result from Au precipitation within the creep cavities, preferentially formed on grain boundaries oriented perpendicular to the applied stress. The selective precipitation of Au atoms at the free creep cavity surface results in pore filling, and thereby, autonomous repair of the creep damage. The large difference in atomic size between the Au and Fe strongly hampers the nucleation of precipitates in the matrix. As a result, the matrix acts as a reservoir for the supersaturated solute until damage occurs. Grain boundaries and dislocations are found to act as fast transport routes for solute gold from the matrix to the creep cavities. The mechanism responsible for the self-healing can be characterized by a simple model for cavity growth and cavity filling.

  17. A space-time tensor formulation for continuum mechanics in general curvilinear, moving, and deforming coordinate systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avis, L. M.

    1976-01-01

    Tensor methods are used to express the continuum equations of motion in general curvilinear, moving, and deforming coordinate systems. The space-time tensor formulation is applicable to situations in which, for example, the boundaries move and deform. Placing a coordinate surface on such a boundary simplifies the boundary condition treatment. The space-time tensor formulation is also applicable to coordinate systems with coordinate surfaces defined as surfaces of constant pressure, density, temperature, or any other scalar continuum field function. The vanishing of the function gradient components along the coordinate surfaces may simplify the set of governing equations. In numerical integration of the equations of motion, the freedom of motion of the coordinate surfaces provides a potential for enhanced resolution of the continuum field function. An example problem of an incompressible, inviscid fluid with a top free surface is considered, where the surfaces of constant pressure (including the top free surface) are coordinate surfaces.

  18. A review of formulation techniques that impact the disintegration and mechanical properties of oradispersible drug delivery technologies.

    PubMed

    Manyikana, Martina; Choonara, Yahya E; Tomar, Lomas K; Tyagi, Charu; Kumar, Pradeep; du Toit, Lisa C; Pillay, Viness

    2016-01-01

    The drug treatment of acute disorders such as neuropathic pain, migraines, insomnia, vomiting, allergic rhinitis or erectile dysfunction requires an immediate pharmacological effect that may be achieved through parenteral drug administration. However, the parenteral route is not always convenient for reasons that are well known. Therefore, in the recent past there has been a barrage of interest in formulating new, non-invasive, reliable and convenient oradispersible drug delivery technologies (ODDTs). Research in this area has focused extensively on developing ODDTs that are capable of releasing drugs immediately when they come into contact with saliva. This disregards the necessity of water during administration and several other advantages that is an attribute that makes this technology lucrative for groups such as pediatrics, geriatrics, psychiatrics and unconscious patients. Many reviews have been compiled on the salient features of ODDTs. However, none to date has focused on the actual formulation techniques used to produce these technologies and how this may impact their disintegration and physical stability for fulfilling their purpose. Therefore this review provides a concise incursion on the recent formulation techniques, excipients used as well as methods of testing the performance of ODDTs and critically assesses these in terms of improving their performance. PMID:25560782

  19. Subsurface mechanical damage during bound abrasive grinding of fused silica glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaineau, P.; André, D.; Laheurte, R.; Darnis, P.; Darbois, N.; Cahuc, O.; Neauport, J.

    2015-10-01

    The subsurface damage (SSD) introduced during bound abrasive grinding of fused silica glass was measured using a wet etch technique. Various process parameters and grinding configurations were studied. The relation between the SSD depth, the process parameters and forces applied by the grinding wheel on the sample was investigated and compared to a simulation using a discrete element method to model the grinding interface. The results reveal a relation between the SSD depth and the grinding forces normalized by the abrasive concentration. Regarding the creation of the SSD, numerical simulations indicate that only a small fraction of the largest particles in the diamond wheel are responsible for the depth of the damaged layer.

  20. Characterizing temperature-dependent photo-oxidation to explain the abrupt transition from thermal to non-thermal laser damage mechanisms at 413 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denton, Michael L.; Clark, C. D., III; Noojin, Gary D.; Estlack, Larry E.; Schenk, Adam C.; Burney, Curtis W.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Thomas, Robert J.

    2011-03-01

    Laser exposure duration dictates whether tissues subjected to short visible wavelengths ( <= 514 nm) are damaged by thermal (e.g. 0.1 s) or non-thermal ( >= 100 s) mechanisms. Somewhere between these extremes, an abrupt transition between the two damage mechanisms has been found for both in vitro and animal retinal models (J. Biomed. Opt. 15, 030512, 2010). Non-thermal (photochemical) damage is characterized by an inverse relationship between damage threshold irradiance and exposure duration (irradiance reciprocity). We have found that exposures of 40 - 60 s in an in vitro retinal model require radiant exposures well above the expected requirement for nonthermal damage, introducing the concept that damage was forced to be thermal in mechanism. Here we quantify and compare photo-oxidative processes at ambient temperatures between 35 - 50 °C.

  1. CHARACTERIZATION OF CONDITIONS OF NATURAL GAS STORAGE RESERVOIRS AND DESIGN AND DEMONSTRATION OF REMEDIAL TECHNIQUES FOR DAMAGE MECHANISMS FOUND THEREIN

    SciTech Connect

    J.H. Frantz; K.E. Brown

    2003-02-01

    There are four primary goals of contract DE-FG26-99FT40703: (1) We seek to better understand how and why two damage mechanisms--(1) inorganic precipitants, and (2) hydrocarbons and organic residues, occur at the reservoir/wellbore interface in gas storage wells. (2) We plan on testing potential prevention and remediation strategies related to these two damage mechanisms in the laboratory. (3) We expect to demonstrate in the field, cost-effective prevention and remediation strategies that laboratory testing deems viable. (4) We will investigate new technology for the gas storage industry that will provide operators with a cost effective method to reduce non-darcy turbulent flow effects on flow rate. For the above damage mechanisms, our research efforts will demonstrate the diagnostic technique for determining the damage mechanisms associated with lost deliverability as well as demonstrate and evaluate the remedial techniques in the laboratory setting and in actual gas storage reservoirs. We plan on accomplishing the above goals by performing extensive lab analyses of rotary sidewall cores taken from at least two wells, testing potential remediation strategies in the lab, and demonstrating in the field the applicability of the proposed remediation treatments. The benefits from this work will be quantified from this study and extrapolated to the entire storage industry. The technology and project results will be transferred to the industry through DOE dissemination and through the industry service companies that work on gas storage wells. Achieving these goals will enable the underground gas storage industry to more cost-effectively mitigate declining deliverability in their storage fields. Work completed to date includes the following: (1) Solicited potential participants from the gas storage industry; (2) Selected one participant experiencing damage from inorganic precipitates; (3) Developed laboratory testing procedures; (4) Collected cores from National Fuel Gas

  2. Measure of mechanical impacts in commercial blueberry packing lines and potential damage to blueberry fruit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Modern blueberry packing lines create impact damage to blueberries which will result in fruit bruising. In this study, impacts created by commercial blueberry packing lines were measured quantitatively using a miniature instrumented sphere. Impacts were recorded at transfer points. Average peakG ...

  3. Application of ARMAV models to the identification and damage detection of mechanical and civil engineering structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodeux, J. B.; Golinval, J. C.

    2001-06-01

    In this paper, the application of auto-regressive moving average vector models to system identification and damage detection is investigated. These parametric models have already been applied for the analysis of multiple input-output systems under ambient excitation. Their main advantage consists in the capability of extracting modal parameters from the recorded time signals, without the requirement of excitation measurement. The excitation is supposed to be a stationary Gaussian white noise. The method also allows the estimation of modal parameter uncertainties. On the basis of these uncertainties, a statistically based damage detection scheme is performed and it becomes possible to assess whether changes of modal parameters are caused by, e.g. some damage or simply by estimation inaccuracies. The paper reports first an example of identification and damage detection applied to a simulated system under random excitation. The `Steel-Quake' benchmark proposed in the framework of COST Action F3 `Structural Dynamics' is also analysed. This structure was defined by the Joint Research Centre in Ispra (Italy) to test steel building performance during earthquakes. The proposed method gives an excellent identification of frequencies and mode shapes, while damping ratios are estimated with less accuracy.

  4. Task order #24 update: exploration of damage mechanisms in cylindrical geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kaul, Ann M

    2011-01-14

    A typical method of failure for ductile materials is spallation damage, which is caused by the nucleation, growth and coalescence of voids due to the presence of high tensile stress in the material. Spallation damage models, such as TEPLA, are currently implemented in hydrodynamic computer codes used at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Parameters for such constitutive models are derived from data sets obtained primarily from gas gun and shock-driven experiments, which are designed to allow one-dimensional analysis of the evolution of the failure characteristics. However, in a non-planar geometry, advanced failure models predict failure to be a multi-dimensional process. Additionally, a limited amount of data exists for the process of void nucleation, growth and coalescence. Another lightly researched area is the state of the material in the event that the spallation layer is recollected and voids are closed. The experiments described here are being conducted as part of a Campaign-l effort to provide data addressing these issues. The Russian Damage Experimental Series is designed to provide fundamental non-planar (cylindrical) spallation damage data, including early time processes (void nucleation, growth and coalescence) and late time processes (recollection of the spallation layer). Previous experiments produced data addressing some of the early time processes. This presentation will be provided to LANL and VNIIEF colleagues as a means of assessing the status of Task Order No.24 at the current time.

  5. Negative effect of crystallization on the mechanism of laser damage in a HfO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} multilayer

    SciTech Connect

    Tateno, Ryo; Okada, Hajime; Otobe, Tomohito; Kawase, Keigo; Koga, James K.; Kosuge, Atsushi; Nagashima, Keisuke; Sugiyama, Akira; Kashiwagi, Kunihiro

    2012-12-15

    Elucidation of the mechanisms of laser damage is indispensable in realizing high resistance mirrors for the next generation of ultra-short pulse high intensity lasers. In this study, the surface and a section of the laser-damaged area of a laser mirror were observed with a laser microscope and a transmission electron microscope (cross-sectional TEM), respectively. A grain boundary of HfO{sub 2} microcrystal was observed in the damaged area. This observation and an evaluation of the mirror's damage resistance showed that the formation of crystals in the multilayer mirror is one of the major determinants of damage resistance.

  6. Toughness and damage susceptibility in human cortical bone is proportional to mechanical inhomogeneity at the osteonal-level.

    PubMed

    Katsamenis, Orestis L; Jenkins, Thomas; Thurner, Philipp J

    2015-07-01

    Limitations associated with current clinical fracture risk assessment tools highlight the need for increased understanding of the fracture mechanisms of the bone and, ideally, a means of assessing this in vivo. Being a multi-layered hierarchical structure, the overall properties of the bone are dictated by its structural and compositional properties over multiple length scales. In this study, we investigate the osteonal-, micro- and tissue-level mechanical behaviour of cortical bone tissue samples from young and elderly donors through atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever-based nanoindentation, reference point microindentation (RPI) and fracture toughness experiments respectively. We demonstrate that bone's fracture toughness and crack growth resistance at the tissue-level are significantly correlated to damage susceptibility at the micro-level, and mechanical inhomogeneity between lamellae and interlamellar areas at the osteonal-level. In more detail, reduced nanoelasticity inhomogeneity of lamellar/interlamellar layers within the osteons correlated to increased indentation depth at the micro-level and an overall reduction in crack-growth toughness and fracture toughness of the tissue. Our data also suggest that deterioration of bone's mechanical properties is expressed concurrently at these three levels, and that mechanical inhomogeneity between the principal structural units of the cortical tissue holds a key role on bone's toughness behaviour. We hypothesise that the reduction in nanoelasticity inhomogeneity is--at least to some extent--responsible for the inability of the microstructure to effectively adapt to the applied load, e.g. by redistributing strains, in a non-catastrophic manner preventing damage formation and propagation. Our hypothesis is further supported by synchrotron radiation micro-computed tomography (SRμCT) data, which show that failure of tougher bone specimens is governed by increased deflection of the crack path and broadly spread

  7. The formulation of dynamical contact problems with friction in the case of systems of rigid bodies and general discrete mechanical systems—Painlevé and Kane paradoxes revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, Alexandre; Ballard, Patrick

    2016-08-01

    The dynamics of mechanical systems with a finite number of degrees of freedom (discrete mechanical systems) is governed by the Lagrange equation which is a second-order differential equation on a Riemannian manifold (the configuration manifold). The handling of perfect (frictionless) unilateral constraints in this framework (that of Lagrange's analytical dynamics) was undertaken by Schatzman and Moreau at the beginning of the 1980s. A mathematically sound and consistent evolution problem was obtained, paving the road for many subsequent theoretical investigations. In this general evolution problem, the only reaction force which is involved is a generalized reaction force, consistently with the virtual power philosophy of Lagrange. Surprisingly, such a general formulation was never derived in the case of frictional unilateral multibody dynamics. Instead, the paradigm of the Coulomb law applying to reaction forces in the real world is generally invoked. So far, this paradigm has only enabled to obtain a consistent evolution problem in only some very few specific examples and to suggest numerical algorithms to produce computational examples (numerical modeling). In particular, it is not clear what is the evolution problem underlying the computational examples. Moreover, some of the few specific cases in which this paradigm enables to write down a precise evolution problem are known to show paradoxes: the Painlevé paradox (indeterminacy) and the Kane paradox (increase in kinetic energy due to friction). In this paper, we follow Lagrange's philosophy and formulate the frictional unilateral multibody dynamics in terms of the generalized reaction force and not in terms of the real-world reaction force. A general evolution problem that governs the dynamics is obtained for the first time. We prove that all the solutions are dissipative; that is, this new formulation is free of Kane paradox. We also prove that some indeterminacy of the Painlevé paradox is fixed in this

  8. Damage effect and mechanism of the GaAs high electron mobility transistor induced by high power microwave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Liu; Chang-Chun, Chai; Yin-Tang, Yang; Jing, Sun; Zhi-Peng, Li

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we present the damage effect and mechanism of high power microwave (HPM) on AlGaAs/GaAs pseudomorphic high-electron-mobility transistor (pHEMT) of low-noise amplifier (LNA). A detailed investigation is carried out by simulation and experiment study. A two-dimensional electro-thermal model of the typical GaAs pHEMT induced by HPM is established in this paper. The simulation result reveals that avalanche breakdown, intrinsic excitation, and thermal breakdown all contribute to damage process. Heat accumulation occurs during the positive half cycle and the cylinder under the gate near the source side is most susceptible to burn-out. Experiment is carried out by injecting high power microwave into GaAs pHEMT LNA samples. It is found that the damage to LNA is because of the burn-out at first stage pHEMT. The interiors of the damaged samples are observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS). Experimental results accord well with the simulation of our model. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2014CB339900) and the Open Fund of Key Laboratory of Complex Electromagnetic Environment Science and Technology, China Academy of Engineering Physics (Grant No. 2015-0214.XY.K).

  9. Damage effect and mechanism of the GaAs pseudomorphic high electron mobility transistor induced by the electromagnetic pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao-Wen, Xi; Chang-Chun, Chai; Gang, Zhao; Yin-Tang, Yang; Xin-Hai, Yu; Yang, Liu

    2016-04-01

    The damage effect and mechanism of the electromagnetic pulse (EMP) on the GaAs pseudomorphic high electron mobility transistor (PHEMT) are investigated in this paper. By using the device simulation software, the distributions and variations of the electric field, the current density and the temperature are analyzed. The simulation results show that there are three physical effects, i.e., the forward-biased effect of the gate Schottky junction, the avalanche breakdown, and the thermal breakdown of the barrier layer, which influence the device current in the damage process. It is found that the damage position of the device changes with the amplitude of the step voltage pulse. The damage appears under the gate near the drain when the amplitude of the pulse is low, and it also occurs under the gate near the source when the amplitude is sufficiently high, which is consistent with the experimental results. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2014CB339900), and the Open Fund of Key Laboratory of Complex Electromagnetic Environment Science and Technology, China Academy of Engineering Physics (CAEP) (Grant No. 2015-0214.XY.K).

  10. The Pros and the Cons for the Use of Silybin-Rich Oral Formulations in Treatment of Liver Damage (NAFLD in Particular).

    PubMed

    Rosso, Natalia; Marin, Veronica; Giordani, Antonio; Persiani, Stefano; Sala, Federica; Cavicchioli, Lucio; Rovati, Lucio C; Tiribelli, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) worldwide is becoming a challenge for the modern global care system. The lipotoxic process is characterized by an oxidative stress followed by a burst of the inflammatory response, prompting the wound healing process (fibrosis), which can ultimately lead to the development of cirrhosis and the subsequent complications. There is no consensus concerning an effective pharmacological treatment. Therefore, there is a need for effective therapeutic compounds. Silibinin the major active compound of Milk Thistle may be a potential candidate mainly due to its anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-fibrotic properties. In spite of the large number of data obtained in experimental models, the translation of the evidence in clinical setting is far to be conclusive. The aim of this paper is to critically review the aspects of the use of the different formulations of Silibinin in several experimental and clinical settings and to provide hints on the needed future studies. PMID:26219393

  11. Polysorbate 20 Degradation in Biopharmaceutical Formulations: Quantification of Free Fatty Acids, Characterization of Particulates, and Insights into the Degradation Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, Anthony; Demeule, Barthélemy; Lin, Baiwei; Yadav, Sandeep

    2015-11-01

    Polysorbate 20 (PS20), a commonly used surfactant in biopharmaceuticals, showed degradation upon long-term (∼18-36 months) storage of two monoclonal antibody (mAb, mAb-A, and mAb-B) drug products at 2-8 °C. The PS20 degradation resulted in the accumulation of free fatty acids (FFA), which ultimately precipitated to form particles upon long-term storage. This study documents the development, qualification, and application of a method for FFA quantification in soluble and insoluble fraction of protein formulation. The method was applied to the quantification of capric acid, lauric acid, myristic acid, palmitic/oleic acid, and stearic acid in placebo as well as active protein formulations on stability. Quantification of FFA in both the soluble and insoluble fraction of mAb-A and mAb-B provided a better mechanistic understanding of PS20 degradation and the dynamics of subsequent fatty acid particle formation. Additionally, the use of this method for monitoring and quantitation of the FFA on real time storage stability appears to aid in identifying batches with higher probability for particulate formation upon extended storage at 5 °C. PMID:26419339

  12. Damage Mechanisms of a TiB2-Reinforced Steel Matrix Composite for Lightweight Automotive Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y. Z.; Luo, Z. C.; Yi, H. L.; Huang, M. X.

    2016-05-01

    The microscopic strain-and-stress fields related to primary and eutectic particles in a lightweight steel matrix composite (SMC) produced by in situ precipitation of TiB2 particles during solidification were investigated by means of microscale digital image correlation and finite element method. The damage process in this SMC is a sequential process of primary particles cracking, the fracture of the surrounding eutectic particles, and finally the growth and coalescence of voids in the ferrite matrix.

  13. Heat-processed Panax ginseng and diabetic renal damage: active components and action mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ki Sung; Ham, Jungyeob; Kim, Young-Joo; Park, Jeong Hill; Cho, Eun-Ju; Yamabe, Noriko

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is one of the serious complications in patients with either type 1 or 2 diabetes mellitus but current treatments remain unsatisfactory. Results of clinical research studies demonstrate that Panax ginseng can help adjust blood pressure and reduce blood sugar and may be advantageous in the treatment of tuberculosis and kidney damage in people with diabetes. The heat-processing method to strengthen the efficacy of P. ginseng has been well-defined based on a long history of ethnopharmacological evidence. The protective effects of P. ginseng on pathological conditions and renal damage associated with diabetic nephropathy in the animal models were markedly improved by heat-processing. The concentrations of less-polar ginsenosides (20(S)-Rg3, 20(R)-Rg3, Rg5, and Rk1) and maltol in P. ginseng were significantly increased in a heat-processing temperature-dependent manner. Based on researches in animal models of diabetes, ginsenoside 20(S)-Rg3 and maltol were evaluated to have therapeutic potential against diabetic renal damage. These effects were achieved through the inhibition of inflammatory pathway activated by oxidative stress and advanced glycation endproducts. These findings indicate that ginsenoside 20(S)-Rg3 and maltol are important bioactive constituents of heat-processed ginseng in the control of pathological conditions associated with diabetic nephropathy. PMID:24233065

  14. Damage Prediction and Estimation in Structural Mechanics Based on Data Mining

    SciTech Connect

    Sandhu, S S; Kanapady, R; Tamma, K K; Kamath, C; Kumar, V

    2001-07-23

    Damage in a material includes localized softening or cracks in a structural component due to high operational loads, or the presence of flaws in a structure due to various manufacturing processes. Methods that identify the presence, the location and the severity of damage in the structure are useful for non-destructive evaluation procedures that are typically employed in agile manufacturing and rapid prototyping systems. The current state-of-the art techniques for these inverse problems are computationally intensive or ill conditioned when insufficient data exists. Early work by a number of researchers has shown that data mining techniques can provide a potential solution to this problem. In this paper, they investigate the use of data mining techniques for predicting failure in a variety of 2D and 3D structures using artificial neural networks (ANNs) and decision trees. This work shows that if the correct features are chosen to build the model, and the model is trained on an adequate amount of data, the model can then correctly classify the failure event as well as predict location and severity of the damage in these structures.

  15. Mechanism of endogenetic chromophore mediated photo-damage and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Timon Cheng-Yi; Liu, Jiang; Cui, Li-Ping; Xu, Xiao-Yang; Lu, Jian; Liu, Song-Hao

    2006-01-01

    Photobiomodulation is an effect of low intensity monochromatic light or laser irradiation on biological systems, which stimulates or inhibits biological functions but does not results in irreducible damage. However, many cellular experiments, animal experiments or clinic studies with monochromatic light or laser irradiation which intensity is not so high that it directly destroys cells have found no photobiomodulation but cell compartment damage, apoptosis or necrosis so that a new concept, a moderate intensity laser or monochromatic light, should be defined if its intensity is so high that no photobiomodulation can be observed, but is so low that it can not directly destroy cells. There might be two pathways mediated the effects of a moderate intensity laser or monochromatic light: one is mediated by the photodynamic effects of endogenetic photosensitizers to induce apoptosis or necrosis, one is mediated by laser or monochromatic light induced stress wave through endogenetic chromophore to induce apoptosis. These effects can be used to understand laser or monochromatic light induced cell compartment damage, apoptosis or necrosis. They are beneficial in phototherapy of cancer and scar, but deleterious in phototherapy of delayed onset of muscular soreness.

  16. Continuum Damage Mechanics Used to Predict the Creep Life of Monolithic Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, Lynn M.; Jadaan, Osama M.

    1998-01-01

    Significant improvements in propulsion and power generation for the next century will require revolutionary advances in high-temperature materials and structural design. Advanced ceramics are candidate materials for these elevated temperature applications. High-temperature and long-duration applications of monolithic ceramics can place their failure mode in the creep rupture regime. An analytical methodology in the form of the integrated design program-Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures/Creep (CARES/Creep) has been developed by the NASA Lewis Research Center to predict the life of ceramic structural components subjected to creep rupture conditions. This program utilizes commercially available finite element packages and takes into account the transient state of stress and creep strain distributions (stress relaxation as well as the asymmetric response to tension and compression). The creep life of a component is discretized into short time steps, during which the stress distribution is assumed constant. Then, the damage is calculated for each time step on the basis of a modified Monkman-Grant (MMG) creep rupture criterion. The cumulative damage is subsequently calculated as time elapses in a manner similar to Miner's rule for cyclic fatigue loading. Failure is assumed to occur when the normalized cumulative damage at any point in the component reaches unity. The corresponding time is the creep rupture life for that component.

  17. 3,6-O-[N-(2-Aminoethyl)-acetamide-yl]-chitosan exerts antibacterial activity by a membrane damage mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yan, Feilong; Dang, Qifeng; Liu, Chengsheng; Yan, Jingquan; Wang, Teng; Fan, Bing; Cha, Dongsu; Li, Xiaoli; Liang, Shengnan; Zhang, Zhenzhen

    2016-09-20

    A novel chitosan derivative, 3,6-O-[N-(2-aminoethyl)-acetamide-yl]-chitosan (AACS), was successfully prepared to improve water solubility and antibacterial activity of chitosan. AACS had good antibacterial activity, with minimum inhibitory concentrations of 0.25mg/mL, against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Cell membrane integrity, electric conductivity and NPN uptake tests showed that AACS caused quickly increasing the release of intracellular nucleic acids, the uptake of NPN, and the electric conductivity by damaging membrane integrity. On the other hand, hydrophobicity, cell viability and SDS-PAGE experiments indicated that AACS was able to reduce the surface hydrophobicity, the cell viability and the intracellular proteins through increasing membrane permeability. SEM observation further confirmed that AACS could kill bacteria via disrupting their membranes. All results above verified that AACS mainly exerted antibacterial activity by a membrane damage mechanism, and it was expected to be a new food preservative. PMID:27261735

  18. DNA damage responses: mechanisms and roles in human disease: 2007 G.H.A. Clowes Memorial Award Lecture.

    PubMed

    Kastan, Michael B

    2008-04-01

    Significant progress has been made in recent years in elucidating the molecular controls of cellular responses to DNA damage in mammalian cells. Much of our understanding of the mechanisms involved in cellular DNA damage response pathways has come from studies of human cancer susceptibility syndromes that are altered in DNA damage responses. Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM), the gene mutated in the disorder ataxia-telangiectasia, codes for a protein kinase that is a central mediator of responses to DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) in cells. Once activated, ATM phosphorylates numerous substrates in the cell that modulate the response of the cell to the DNA damage. We recently developed a novel system to create DNA DSBs at defined endogenous sites in the human genome and used this system to detect protein recruitment and loss at and around these breaks by chromatin immunoprecipitation. Results from this system showed the functional importance of ATM kinase activity and phosphorylation in the response to DSBs and supported a model in which ordered chromatin structure changes that occur after DNA breakage and that depend on functional NBS1 and ATM facilitate DNA DSB repair. Insights about these pathways provide us with opportunities to develop new approaches to benefit patients. Examples and opportunities for developing inhibitors that act as sensitizers to chemotherapy or radiation therapy or activators that could improve responses to cellular stresses, such as oxidative damage, are discussed. Relevant to the latter, we have shown benefits of an ATM activator in disease settings ranging from metabolic syndrome to cancer prevention. PMID:18403632

  19. Characterization and mechanisms of photoageing-related changes in skin. Damages of basement membrane and dermal structures.

    PubMed

    Amano, Satoshi

    2016-08-01

    Sun-exposed skin is characterized by superficial changes such as wrinkles, sagging and pigmentary changes, and also many internal changes in the structure and function of epidermis, basement membrane (BM) and dermis. These changes (so-called photoageing) are predominantly induced by the ultraviolet (UV) component of sunlight. Epidermis of UV-irradiated skin produced several enzymes such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), urinary plasminogen activator (uPA)/plasmin and heparanase, which degrade dermal collagen fibres and elastic fibres in the dermis, and components of epidermal BM. The BM at the dermal-epidermal junction (DEJ) controls dermal-epidermal signalling and plays an important role in the maintenance of a healthy epidermis and dermis. BM is repetitively damaged in sun-exposed skin compared with unexposed skin, leading to epidermal and dermal deterioration and accelerated skin ageing. UV exposure also induces an increase in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), an angiogenic factor, while thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1), an anti-angiogenic factor, is decreased; these changes induce angiogenesis in papillary dermis with increased migration of elastase-positive leucocytes, leading to dermal elastic fibre damage. Elastic fibres, such as oxytalan fibres in papillary dermis, are associated with not only skin resilience, but also skin surface texture, and elastic fibre formation by fibroblasts is facilitated by increased expression of fibulin-5. Thus, induction of fibulin-5 expression is a damage-repair mechanism, and fibulin-5 is an early marker of photoaged skin. UV-induced skin damage is cumulative and leads to premature ageing of skin. However, appropriate daily skincare may ameliorate photoageing by inhibiting processes causing damage and enhancing repair processes. PMID:27539897

  20. Computer simulation of initial events in the biochemical mechanisms of DNA damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatterjee, A.; Holley, W. R.

    1993-01-01

    Understanding the systematic and quantitative correlation between the physical events of energy deposition by ionizing radiation and the ensuing chemical and biochemical processes leading to DNA damage is one of the goals in radiation research. Significant progress has been made toward achieving the stated goal by using theoretical modeling techniques. These techniques are strongly dependent on computer simulation procedures. A review of such techniques with details of various stages of simulation development, including a comparison with available experimental data, is presented in this article.

  1. Fatigue damage growth mechanisms in continuous fiber reinforced titanium matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.; Naik, R. A.; Pollock, W. D.

    1990-01-01

    The role of fiber/matrix interface strength, residual thermal stresses, and fiber and matrix properties on fatigue damage accumulation in continuous fiber metal matrix composites (MMC) will be discussed. Results from titanium matrix/silicon-carbide fiber composites will be the primary topic of discussion. Results have been obtained from both notched and unnotched specimens at room and elevated temperatures. The stress in the 0 deg fibers has been indentified as the controlling factor in fatigue life. Fatigue of the notched specimens indicated that cracks can grow many fiber spacings in the matrix materials without breaking fibers.

  2. Fatigue damage growth mechanisms in continuous fiber reinforced titanium matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.; Naik, R. A.; Pollock, W. D.

    1990-01-01

    The role of fiber/matrix interface strength, residual thermal stresses, and fiber and matrix properties on fatigue damage accumulation in continuous fiber metal matrix composites (MMC) is discussed. Results from titanium matrix silicon carbide fiber composites is the primary topic of discussion. Results were obtained from both notched and unnotched specimens at room and elevated temperatures. The stress in the 0 deg fibers was identified as the controlling factor in fatigue life. Fatigue of the notched specimens indicated that cracks can grow in the matrix materials without breaking fibers.

  3. Computer simulation of initial events in the biochemical mechanisms of DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, A; Holley, W R

    1993-01-01

    Understanding the systematic and quantitative correlation between the physical events of energy deposition by ionizing radiation and the ensuing chemical and biochemical processes leading to DNA damage is one of the goals in radiation research. Significant progress has been made toward achieving the stated goal by using theoretical modeling techniques. These techniques are strongly dependent on computer simulation procedures. A review of such techniques with details of various stages of simulation development, including a comparison with available experimental data, is presented in this article. PMID:11537895

  4. Isothermal life prediction of composite lamina using a damage mechanics approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abuelfoutouh, Nader Mohamed; Verrilli, M. J.; Halford, G. R.

    1989-01-01

    A method for predicting isothermal plastic fatigue life of a composite lamina is presented in which both fibers and matrix are isotropic materials. In general, the fatigue resistances of the matrix, fibers, and interfacial material must be known in order to predict composite fatigue life. Composite fatigue life is predicted using only the matrix fatigue resistance due to inelasticity micromechanisms. The effect of the fiber orientation on loading direction is accounted for while predicting composite life. The application is currently limited to isothermal cases where the internal thermal stresses that might arise from thermal strain mismatch between fibers and matrix are negligible. The theory is formulated to predict the fatigue life of a composite lamina under either load or strain control. It is applied currently to predict the life of tungsten-copper composite lamina at 260 C under tension-tension load control. The calculated life of the lamina is in good agreement with available composite low cycle fatigue data.

  5. Eigenproperties of suspension bridges with damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Materazzi, Annibale Luigi; Ubertini, Filippo

    2011-12-01

    The vertical vibration of suspension bridges with a damage in the main cables is studied using a continuum formulation. Starting from a model for damaged suspended cables recently proposed in the literature, an improved expression for the dynamic increment of cable tension is derived. The nonlinear equation of motion of the damaged bridge is obtained by extending this model to include the stiffening girder. The linear undamped modal eigenproperties are then extracted, in closed-form, from the linearized equation of motion, thus generalizing to the presence of an arbitrary damage the expressions known from the literature for undamaged suspension bridges. The linear dynamics of the damaged bridge reveals to be completely described by means of the same two non-dimensional parameters that govern the linear dynamics of undamaged bridges and which account for the mechanical characteristics of both the main cable and the girder, with the addition of three non-dimensional parameters characterizing damage intensity, position and extent. After presenting the mathematical formulation, a parametric analysis is conducted with the purpose of investigating the sensitivity of natural frequencies and mode shapes to damage, which, in fact, is a crucial point concerning damage detection applications using inverse methods. All through the paper, systematic comparisons with finite element simulations are presented for the purpose of model validation.

  6. Genetic analysis of repair and damage tolerance mechanisms for DNA-protein cross-links in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Salem, Amir M H; Nakano, Toshiaki; Takuwa, Minako; Matoba, Nagisa; Tsuboi, Tomohiro; Terato, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Yamada, Masami; Nohmi, Takehiko; Ide, Hiroshi

    2009-09-01

    DNA-protein cross-links (DPCs) are unique among DNA lesions in their unusually bulky nature. We have recently shown that nucleotide excision repair (NER) and RecBCD-dependent homologous recombination (HR) collaboratively alleviate the lethal effect of DPCs in Escherichia coli. In this study, to gain further insight into the damage-processing mechanism for DPCs, we assessed the sensitivities of a panel of repair-deficient E. coli mutants to DPC-inducing agents, including formaldehyde (FA) and 5-azacytidine (azaC). We show here that the damage tolerance mechanism involving HR and subsequent replication restart (RR) provides the most effective means of cell survival against DPCs. Translesion synthesis does not serve as an alternative damage tolerance mechanism for DPCs in cell survival. Elimination of DPCs from the genome relies primarily on NER, which provides a second and moderately effective means of cell survival against DPCs. Interestingly, Cho rather than UvrC seems to be an effective nuclease for the NER of DPCs. Together with the genes responsible for HR, RR, and NER, the mutation of genes involved in several aspects of DNA repair and transactions, such as recQ, xth nfo, dksA, and topA, rendered cells slightly but significantly sensitive to FA but not azaC, possibly reflecting the complexity of DPCs or cryptic lesions induced by FA. UvrD may have an additional role outside NER, since the uvrD mutation conferred a slight azaC sensitivity on cells. Finally, DNA glycosylases mitigate azaC toxicity, independently of the repair of DPCs, presumably by removing 5-azacytosine or its degradation product from the chromosome. PMID:19617358

  7. Neither a nitric oxide donor nor potassium channel blockage inhibit RBC mechanical damage induced by a roller pump.

    PubMed

    Ulker, Pinar; Meiselman, Herbert J; Baskurt, Oguz K

    2008-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBC) are exposed to various levels of shear stresses when they are exposed to artificial flow environments, such as extracorporeal flow circuits and hemodialysis equipment. This mechanical trauma affects RBC and the resulting effect is determined by the magnitude of shear forces and exposure time. It has been previously demonstrated that nitric oxide (NO) donors and potassium channel blockers could prevent the sub-hemolytic damage to RBC, when they are exposed to 120 Pa shear stress in a Couette shearing system. This study aimed at testing the effectiveness of NO donor sodium nitroprussid (SNP, 10⁻⁴ M) and non-specific potassium channel blocker tetraethylammonium (TEA, 10⁻⁷ M) in preventing the mechanical damage to RBC in a simple flow system including a roller pump and a glass capillary of 0.12 cm diameter. RBC suspensions were pumped through the capillary by the roller pump at a flow rate that maintains 200 mmHg hydrostatic pressure at the entrance of the capillary. An aliquot of 10 ml of RBC suspension of 0.4 L/L hematocrit was re-circulated through the capillary for 30 minutes. Plasma hemoglobin concentrations were found to be significantly increased (~7 folds compared to control aliquot which was not pumped through the system) and neither SNP nor TEA prevented this hemolysis. Alternatively, RBC deformability assessed by laser diffraction ektacytometry was not altered after 30 min of pumping and both SNP and TEA had no effect on this parameter. The results of this study indicated that, in contrast with the findings in RBC exposed to a well-defined magnitude of shear stress in a Couette shearing system, the mechanical damage induced by a roller pump could not be prevented by NO donor or potassium channel blocker. PMID:19662112

  8. Structure and mechanism of the UvrA-UvrB DNA damage sensor.

    PubMed

    Pakotiprapha, Danaya; Samuels, Martin; Shen, Koning; Hu, Johnny H; Jeruzalmi, David

    2012-03-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is used by all organisms to eliminate DNA lesions. We determined the structure of the Geobacillus stearothermophilus UvrA-UvrB complex, the damage-sensor in bacterial NER and a new structure of UvrA. We observe that the DNA binding surface of UvrA, previously found in an open shape that binds damaged DNA, also exists in a closed groove shape compatible with native DNA only. The sensor contains two UvrB molecules that flank the UvrA dimer along the predicted path for DNA, ~80 Å from the lesion. We show that the conserved signature domain II of UvrA mediates a nexus of contacts among UvrA, UvrB and DNA. Further, in our new structure of UvrA, this domain adopts an altered conformation while an adjacent nucleotide binding site is vacant. Our findings raise unanticipated questions about NER and also suggest a revised picture of its early stages. PMID:22307053

  9. Structure and mechanism of the UvrA-UvrB DNA damage sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Pakotiprapha, Danaya; Samuels, Martin; Shen, Koning; Hu, Johnny H; Jeruzalmi, David

    2012-04-17

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is used by all organisms to eliminate DNA lesions. We determined the structure of the Geobacillus stearothermophilus UvrA-UvrB complex, the damage-sensor in bacterial NER and a new structure of UvrA. We observe that the DNA binding surface of UvrA, previously found in an open shape that binds damaged DNA, also exists in a closed groove shape compatible with native DNA only. The sensor contains two UvrB molecules that flank the UvrA dimer along the predicted path for DNA, ~80 Å from the lesion. We show that the conserved signature domain II of UvrA mediates a nexus of contacts among UvrA, UvrB and DNA. Further, in our new structure of UvrA, this domain adopts an altered conformation while an adjacent nucleotide binding site is vacant. Our findings raise unanticipated questions about NER and also suggest a revised picture of its early stages.

  10. Accumulation of oxidatively generated DNA damage in the brain: a mechanism of neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liuji; Lee, Heung M; Greeley, George H; Englander, Ella W

    2007-02-01

    Unrepaired or erroneously repaired DNA lesions drive genomic instability and contribute to cellular and organ decline. Since delayed neuropathologies are common in survivors of smoke inhalation injuries, we asked whether the integrity of brain DNA might be compromised by acute exposure to combustion smoke. Although many studies demonstrate that the brain is equipped to repair oxidatively damaged DNA, to date, the capacity for accurate DNA repair under conditions of disrupted oxygenation and oxidative stress has not been defined. We show that DNA adducts detectable by their ability to block PCR amplification form in the rat hippocampus after acute exposure to smoke. To identify the different types of adducts and to dissect their temporal formation and repair profiles in vivo in the brain, we used DNA-modifying enzymes to convert specific adducts into strand breaks prior to PCR amplification. Using this strategy, we detected formation of oxidative DNA adducts early on after smoke inhalation, while mismatched bases emerged at the later recovery times, potentially due to an erroneous DNA repair process. Erroneous repair can be mutagenic and because the initial smoke-induced oxidative damage to DNA is extensive, compromised fidelity of DNA repair may underlie neurotoxicity and contribute to delayed death of hippocampal neurons. PMID:17210451

  11. A continuum damage mechanics approach to simulation of creep and fracture in ice sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duddu, R.; Bassis, J. N.; Waisman, H.; Tuminaro, R.

    2011-12-01

    We investigate iceberg calving from grounded tidewater and outlet glaciers using a novel creep continuum damage model for polycrystalline ice, which is valid for low stresses or strain rates. The proposed three-dimensional model is based on a thermo-viscoelastic constitutive law for ice creep and a local damage accumulation law for tension, compression and shear loadings. The model has been validated by published experimental data and is implemented in the commercially available finite element code ABAQUS by adopting a strain-based algorithm in a Lagrangian description. The model is then used to investigate conditions that enable surface, englacial and basal crevasse formation resulting from different boundary conditions applied to an idealized rectangular slab of ice in contact with the ocean. Preliminary simulations, based on imposed stress fields, suggest that a low tensile stress is required for crevasse (crack) opening and propagation to the bottom of the ice slab. In all the subsequent simulations the internal stress field is explicitly calculated. Basal boundary condition of the ice slab is varied from free slip to Newtonian frictional slip to study its effect on crack growth. The simulation results suggest that in the case of deeper (thicker) ice sheets compression failure of ice at the bottom is a possible mode of failure and that the height of the sea water level influences the depth of the crevasses.

  12. A damage mechanics of a particle-reinforced ductile matrix composite with progressive partial debonding

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Y.H.; Weng, G.J.

    1995-12-31

    A micromechanical damage theory is developed to determine the overall elastoplastic stress-strain behavior of a ductile composite containing homogeneously dispersed prolate inclusions which, under the action of external tension, experience debonding on the top and bottom of the interface. The debonding process is described by Weibull`s probability function in terms of the tensile stress of the inclusions. Qiu and Weng`s energy approach is also used here to determine the internal stress state of the damaged composite. The initial two-phase system gradually turns into a three-phase one as the debonded inclusions lose their load-carrying capacity partially. The stress-strain responses are then derived as a function of volume concentrations of still bonded particles and already debonded ones, and of the shape of inclusions and the average interfacial strength. It is shown that the stress-strain curve of the system always starts out with that of perfectly a bonded composite, then deviates from it, and finally approaches a state parallel to that of a porous material containing similarly aligned voids. A detail comparison is provided with the results from Mochida, Taya, and Obata`s rigid particle theory with an elastic matrix and Togho and Weng`s completely debonding theory with an elastoplastic matrix. It is found that the behavior of a partially debonded composite always lies between the two.

  13. How much can disaster and climate science contribute to loss and damage mechanisms in international climate policy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huggel, Christian; Allen, Simon; Eicken, Hajo; Hansen, Gerrit; Stone, Dáithí

    2015-04-01

    As the 5th Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) recently has shown, there is increasing evidence of observed impacts of climate change on natural and human systems. Some of these impacts are negative and result in damage and loss of lives and assets. In international climate policy negotiations under the UNFCCC the discussions on loss and damage have gained significant traction during the past negotiation rounds. At COP 19 the Warsaw International Mechanism for Loss and Damage (WIM) was created as an institutional arrangement to address this issue. Thereby, loss and damage (L&D) are typically defined as the residual damage and loss that occur beyond mitigation and adaptation efforts. This implies that effective mitigation and adaptation policy can substantially reduce L&D. While there is wide agreement that knowledge and understanding needs to be strengthened on how L&D due to climate change affects countries, in particular highly vulnerable countries and populations, there is still substantial disagreement on several aspects. In fact, after COP20 in Lima a number of options are on the table, including whether L&D should be located under the adaptation framework or form a separate institutional arrangement, or whether a compensation regime should be established to support developing countries. Similarly, the scientific framework for a clear L&D concept, its application in real-world cases, and implications for international climate policy, in particular with respect to questions of responsibility, liability, compensation and financing, is still evolving. Earlier proposals, for instance, have included a threshold concept, with payments released upon crossing of certain thresholds of climate (related) parameters, similar to insurance procedures. The threshold would be defined as a departure of the parameter from baseline conditions, for instance a rainfall event that is more intense than a certain baseline based threshold. Further

  14. An automated dynamic fracture procedure and a continuum damage mechanics based model for finite element simulations of delamination failure in laminated composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aminjikarai Vedagiri, Srinivasa Babu

    explicitly in the model induces spurious high-frequency oscillations in the finite element results after crack initiation, a "gradual nodal release" procedure is implemented as part of the model to overcome this problem. Also, an in-built contact algorithm of DYNA3D is modified to adapt it to the remeshing strategy to maintain proper contact conditions at newly added elements. Finally, the model is suitably modified for simulating delamination failure in laminated composites and used to predict delamination resistance characteristics which are important considerations for effective use of composite structures. Continuum damage mechanics is a popular approach for modeling the in-plane failure modes in composites. However, its applicability to modeling delamination has not been sufficiently analyzed yet. Hence, as the second part of this dissertation work, a new material model is developed for unidirectional polymer matrix composites in which this approach is used to predict delamination failure and used to perform a qualitative study of the damage mechanics approach to modeling delamination. The new material model is developed using micro-mechanics and accounts for the strain-rate dependent behavior of polymer matrix composites. It is implemented for three different element formulations with different transverse shear strain assumptions and the effect of these assumptions on the delamination prediction using this approach is analyzed.

  15. DNA Damage: Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Study on the Oxygen Binding and Substrate Hydroxylation Step in AlkB Repair Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Quesne, Matthew G; Latifi, Reza; Gonzalez-Ovalle, Luis E; Kumar, Devesh; de Visser, Sam P

    2014-01-01

    AlkB repair enzymes are important nonheme iron enzymes that catalyse the demethylation of alkylated DNA bases in humans, which is a vital reaction in the body that heals externally damaged DNA bases. Its mechanism is currently controversial and in order to resolve the catalytic mechanism of these enzymes, a quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) study was performed on the demethylation of the N1-methyladenine fragment by AlkB repair enzymes. Firstly, the initial modelling identified the oxygen binding site of the enzyme. Secondly, the oxygen activation mechanism was investigated and a novel pathway was found, whereby the catalytically active iron(IV)–oxo intermediate in the catalytic cycle undergoes an initial isomerisation assisted by an Arg residue in the substrate binding pocket, which then brings the oxo group in close contact with the methyl group of the alkylated DNA base. This enables a subsequent rate-determining hydrogen-atom abstraction on competitive σ-and π-pathways on a quintet spin-state surface. These findings give evidence of different locations of the oxygen and substrate binding channels in the enzyme and the origin of the separation of the oxygen-bound intermediates in the catalytic cycle from substrate. Our studies are compared with small model complexes and the effect of protein and environment on the kinetics and mechanism is explained. PMID:24339041

  16. Computational simulations of flow dynamics and blood damage through a bileaflet mechanical heart valve scaled to pediatric size and flow.

    PubMed

    Yun, B Min; McElhinney, Doff B; Arjunon, Shiva; Mirabella, Lucia; Aidun, Cyrus K; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2014-09-22

    Despite pressing needs, there are currently no FDA approved prosthetic valves available for use in the pediatric population. This study is performed for predictive assessment of blood damage in bileaflet mechanical heart valves (BMHVs) with pediatric sizing and flow conditions. A model of an adult-sized 23 mm St. Jude Medical (SJM) Regent(™) valve is selected for use in simulations, which is scaled in size for a 5-year old child and 6-month old infant. A previously validated lattice-Boltzmann method (LBM) is used to simulate pulsatile flow with thousands of suspended platelets for cases of adult, child, and infant BMHV flows. Adult BMHV flows demonstrate more disorganized small-scale flow features, but pediatric flows are associated with higher fluid shear stresses. Platelet damage in the pediatric cases is higher than in adult flow, highlighting thrombus complication dangers of pediatric BMHV flows. This does not necessarily suggest clinically important differences in thromboembolic potential. Highly damaged platelets in pediatric flows are primarily found far downstream of the valve, as there is less flow recirculation in pediatric flows. In addition, damage levels are well below expected thresholds for platelet activation. The extent of differences here documented between the pediatric and adult cases is of concern, demanding particular attention when pediatric valves are designed and manufactured. However, the differences between the pediatric and adult cases are not such that development of pediatric sized valves is untenable. This study may push for eventual approval of prosthetic valves resized for the pediatric population. Further studies will be necessary to determine the validity and potential thrombotic and clinical implications of these findings. PMID:25011622

  17. Twist-open mechanism of DNA damage recognition by the Rad4/XPC nucleotide excision repair complex.

    PubMed

    Velmurugu, Yogambigai; Chen, Xuejing; Slogoff Sevilla, Phillip; Min, Jung-Hyun; Ansari, Anjum

    2016-04-19

    DNA damage repair starts with the recognition of damaged sites from predominantly normal DNA. In eukaryotes, diverse DNA lesions from environmental sources are recognized by the xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC) nucleotide excision repair complex. Studies of Rad4 (radiation-sensitive 4; yeast XPC ortholog) showed that Rad4 "opens" up damaged DNA by inserting a β-hairpin into the duplex and flipping out two damage-containing nucleotide pairs. However, this DNA lesion "opening" is slow (˜5-10 ms) compared with typical submillisecond residence times per base pair site reported for various DNA-binding proteins during 1D diffusion on DNA. To address the mystery as to how Rad4 pauses to recognize lesions during diffusional search, we examine conformational dynamics along the lesion recognition trajectory using temperature-jump spectroscopy. Besides identifying the ˜10-ms step as the rate-limiting bottleneck towards opening specific DNA site, we uncover an earlier ˜100- to 500-μs step that we assign to nonspecific deformation (unwinding/"twisting") of DNA by Rad4. The β-hairpin is not required to unwind or to overcome the bottleneck but is essential for full nucleotide-flipping. We propose that Rad4 recognizes lesions in a step-wise "twist-open" mechanism, in which preliminary twisting represents Rad4 interconverting between search and interrogation modes. Through such conformational switches compatible with rapid diffusion on DNA, Rad4 may stall preferentially at a lesion site, offering time to open DNA. This study represents the first direct observation, to our knowledge, of dynamical DNA distortions during search/interrogation beyond base pair breathing. Submillisecond interrogation with preferential stalling at cognate sites may be common to various DNA-binding proteins. PMID:27035942

  18. Twist-open mechanism of DNA damage recognition by the Rad4/XPC nucleotide excision repair complex

    PubMed Central

    Velmurugu, Yogambigai; Chen, Xuejing; Slogoff Sevilla, Phillip; Min, Jung-Hyun; Ansari, Anjum

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage repair starts with the recognition of damaged sites from predominantly normal DNA. In eukaryotes, diverse DNA lesions from environmental sources are recognized by the xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC) nucleotide excision repair complex. Studies of Rad4 (radiation-sensitive 4; yeast XPC ortholog) showed that Rad4 “opens” up damaged DNA by inserting a β-hairpin into the duplex and flipping out two damage-containing nucleotide pairs. However, this DNA lesion “opening” is slow (˜5–10 ms) compared with typical submillisecond residence times per base pair site reported for various DNA-binding proteins during 1D diffusion on DNA. To address the mystery as to how Rad4 pauses to recognize lesions during diffusional search, we examine conformational dynamics along the lesion recognition trajectory using temperature-jump spectroscopy. Besides identifying the ˜10-ms step as the rate-limiting bottleneck towards opening specific DNA site, we uncover an earlier ˜100- to 500-μs step that we assign to nonspecific deformation (unwinding/“twisting”) of DNA by Rad4. The β-hairpin is not required to unwind or to overcome the bottleneck but is essential for full nucleotide-flipping. We propose that Rad4 recognizes lesions in a step-wise “twist-open” mechanism, in which preliminary twisting represents Rad4 interconverting between search and interrogation modes. Through such conformational switches compatible with rapid diffusion on DNA, Rad4 may stall preferentially at a lesion site, offering time to open DNA. This study represents the first direct observation, to our knowledge, of dynamical DNA distortions during search/interrogation beyond base pair breathing. Submillisecond interrogation with preferential stalling at cognate sites may be common to various DNA-binding proteins. PMID:27035942

  19. An approach for generating trajectory-based dynamics which conserves the canonical distribution in the phase space formulation of quantum mechanics. I. Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian; Miller, William H.

    2011-03-01

    We have reformulated and generalized our recent work [J. Liu and W. H. Miller, J. Chem. Phys. 126, 234110 (2007)] into an approach for generating a family of trajectory-based dynamics methods in the phase space formulation of quantum mechanics. The approach (equilibrium Liouville dynamics) is in the spirit of Liouville's theorem in classical mechanics. The trajectory-based dynamics is able to conserve the quantum canonical distribution for the thermal equilibrium system and approaches classical dynamics in the classical (ℏ → 0), high temperature (β → 0), and harmonic limits. Equilibrium Liouville dynamics provides the framework for the development of novel theoretical/computational tools for studying quantum dynamical effects in large/complex molecular systems.

  20. An approach for generating trajectory-based dynamics which conserves the canonical distribution in the phase space formulation of quantum mechanics. I. Theories.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Miller, William H

    2011-03-14

    We have reformulated and generalized our recent work [J. Liu and W. H. Miller, J. Chem. Phys. 126, 234110 (2007)] into an approach for generating a family of trajectory-based dynamics methods in the phase space formulation of quantum mechanics. The approach (equilibrium Liouville dynamics) is in the spirit of Liouville's theorem in classical mechanics. The trajectory-based dynamics is able to conserve the quantum canonical distribution for the thermal equilibrium system and approaches classical dynamics in the classical (ℏ → 0), high temperature (β → 0), and harmonic limits. Equilibrium Liouville dynamics provides the framework for the development of novel theoretical∕computational tools for studying quantum dynamical effects in large∕complex molecular systems. PMID:21405150

  1. Torsional and biaxial (tension-torsion) fatigue damage mechanisms in Waspaloy at room temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jayaraman, N.; Ditmars, M. M.

    1989-01-01

    Strain controlled torsional and biaxial (tension-torsion) low cycle fatigue behavior of Waspaloy was studied at room temperature as a function of heat treatment. Biaxial tests were conducted under proportional and nonproportional cyclic conditions. The deformation behavior under these different cyclic conditions was evaluated by slip trace analysis. For this, a Schmidt-type factor was defined for multiaxial loading conditions, and it was shown that when the slip deformation is predominant, nonproportional cycles are more damaging than proportional or pure axial or torsional cycles. This was attributed to the fact that under nonproportional cyclic conditions, deformation was through multiple slip, as opposed to single slip for other loading conditions, which gave rise to increased hardening. The total life for a given test condition was found to be independent of heat treatment. This was interpreted as being due to the differences in the cycles to initiation and propagation of cracks.

  2. A study of fatigue damage mechanisms in Waspaloy from 25 to 800 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerch, B. A.; Jayaraman, N.; Antolovich, S. D.

    1984-01-01

    The objective of the study was to examine the effect of various microstructures on the fatigue and damage accumulation behavior of Waspaloy, a nickel-base alloy commonly used in aircraft engines. Shearing was the dominant deformation mode in specimens with coarse grains and small (50-80 A) gamma prime particles, whereas Orowan looping was dominant in fine-grained specimens with large (about 900 A) gamma prime particles. At temperatures up to 500 C, cracks initiated transgranularly, while at 800 C the failure process was intergranular for both coarse-grained and fine-grained specimens. At temperatures above 500 C, a significant decrease in the fatigue life was observed for both coarse-grained and fine-grained material.

  3. Ichthyophonus-induced cardiac damage: a mechanism for reduced swimming stamina in salmonids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kocan, R.; LaPatra, S.; Gregg, J.; Winton, J.; Hershberger, P.

    2006-01-01

    Swimming stamina, measured as time-to-fatigue, was reduced by approximately two-thirds in rainbow trout experimentally infected with Ichthyophonus. Intensity of Ichthyophonus infection was most severe in cardiac muscle but multiple organs were infected to a lesser extent. The mean heart weight of infected fish was 40% greater than that of uninfected fish, the result of parasite biomass, infiltration of immune cells and fibrotic (granuloma) tissue surrounding the parasite. Diminished swimming stamina is hypothesized to be due to cardiac failure resulting from the combination of parasite-damaged heart muscle and low myocardial oxygen supply during sustained aerobic exercise. Loss of stamina in Ichthyophonus-infected salmonids could explain the poor performance previously reported for wild Chinook and sockeye salmon stocks during their spawning migration. ?? 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Mechanism for radiation damage resistance in yttrium oxide dispersion strengthened steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodrick, J.; Hepburn, D. J.; Ackland, G. J.

    2014-02-01

    ODS steels based on yttrium oxide have been suggested as potential fusion reactor wall materials due to their observed radiation resistance properties. Presumably this radiation resistance can be related to the interaction of the particle with vacancies, self-interstitial atoms (SIAs) and other radiation damage debris. Density functional theory has been used to investigate this at the atomic scale. Four distinct interfaces, some based on HRTEM observations, between iron and yttrium oxide were investigated. It is been shown that the Y2O3-Fe interface acts as a strong trap with long-range attraction for both interstitial and vacancy defects, allowing recombination without altering the interface structure. The catalytic elimination of defects without change to the microstructure explains the improved behaviour of ODS steels with respect to radiation creep and swelling.

  5. Antagonizing Effects and Mechanisms of Afzelin against UVB-Induced Cell Damage

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Seoung Woo; Jung, Eunsun; Kim, Seungbeom; Kim, Jang-Hyun; Kim, Eui-Gyun; Lee, Jongsung; Park, Deokhoon

    2013-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation induces DNA damage, oxidative stress, and inflammatory processes in human keratinocytes, resulting in skin inflammation, photoaging, and photocarcinogenesis. Adequate protection of skin against the harmful effects of UV irradiation is essential. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the protective effects of afzelin, one of the flavonoids, against UV irradiation in human keratinocytes and epidermal equivalent models. Spectrophotometric measurements revealed that the afzelin extinction maxima were in the UVB and UVA range, and UV transmission below 376 nm was <10%, indicating UV-absorbing activity of afzelin. In the phototoxicity assay using the 3T3 NRU phototoxicity test (3T3-NRU-PT), afzelin presented a tendency to no phototoxic potential. In addition, in order to investigate cellular functions of afzelin itself, cells were treated with afzelin after UVB irradiation. In human keratinocyte, afzelin effectively inhibited the UVB-mediated increase in lipid peroxidation and the formation of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. Afzelin also inhibited UVB-induced cell death in human keratinocytes by inhibiting intrinsic apoptotic signaling. Furthermore, afzelin showed inhibitory effects on UVB-induced release of pro-inflammatory mediators such as interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, and prostaglandin-E2 in human keratinocytes by interfering with the p38 kinase pathway. Using an epidermal equivalent model exposed to UVB radiation, anti-apoptotic activity of afzelin was also confirmed together with a photoprotective effect at the morphological level. Taken together, our results suggest that afzelin has several cellular activities such as DNA-protective, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory as well as UV-absorbing activity and may protect human skin from UVB-induced damage by a combination of UV-absorbing and cellular activities. PMID:23626759

  6. Pneumomediastinum or lung damage in breath-hold divers from different mechanisms: a report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Toklu, Akin Savaş; Erelel, Mustafa; Arslan, Abdullah

    2013-12-01

    Normally pulmonary over-inflation is not an issue during breath-hold diving, in contrast to lung squeeze. Compared with compressed air diving, pulmonary barotrauma is rare in breath-hold diving. Several mechanisms can lead to an increase in intrathoracic pressure in breath-hold diving that may cause alveolar rupture. Here we report three cases of pulmonary barotrauma in breath-hold diving. Using high-resolution chest tomography, bullous damage in Case 1, and pneumomediastinum in Cases 2 and 3 were detected. Transient neurological symptoms in Cases 1 and 2 suggested cerebral arterial gas embolism. The mechanisms that caused intrapulmonary overpressure were, respectively, lung packing ('buccal pumping'), considerable effort and straining at depth, and breathing compressed air at depth and ascending without exhaling. All three cases recovered without specific treatment such as recompression. PMID:24510331

  7. Fatigue creep damage at the cement-bone interface: an experimental and a micro-mechanical finite element study

    PubMed Central

    Waanders, Daan; Janssen, Dennis; Miller, Mark A.; Mann, Kenneth A.; Verdonschot, Nico

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this study was to quantify the micromechanics of the cement-bone interface under tensile fatigue loading using finite element analysis (FEA) and to understand the underlying mechanisms that play a role in the fatigue behavior of this interface. Laboratory cement-bone specimens were subjected to a tensile fatigue load, while local displacements and crack growth on the specimen's surface were monitored. FEA models were created from these specimens based upon micro-computed tomography data. To accurately model interfacial gaps at the interface between the bone and cement, a custom-written erosion algorithm was applied to the bone model. A fatigue load was simulated in the FEA models while monitoring the local displacements and crack propagation. The results showed the FEA models were able to capture the general experimental creep damage behavior and creep stages of the interface. Consistent with the experiments, the majority of the deformation took place at the contact interface. Additionally, the FEA models predicted fatigue crack patterns similar to experimental findings. Experimental surface cracks correlated moderately with FEA surface cracks (r2=0.43), but did not correlate with the simulated crack volume fraction (r2=0.06). Although there was no relationship between experimental surface cracks and experimental creep damage displacement (r2=0.07), there was a strong relationship between the FEA crack volume fraction and the FEA creep damage displacement (r2=0.76). This study shows the additional value of FEA of the cement-bone interface relative to experimental studies and can therefore be used to optimize its mechanical properties. PMID:19682690

  8. Multiscale models of skeletal muscle reveal the complex effects of muscular dystrophy on tissue mechanics and damage susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Virgilio, Kelley M.; Martin, Kyle S.; Peirce, Shayn M.; Blemker, Silvia S.

    2015-01-01

    Computational models have been increasingly used to study the tissue-level constitutive properties of muscle microstructure; however, these models were not created to study or incorporate the influence of disease-associated modifications in muscle. The purpose of this paper was to develop a novel multiscale muscle modelling framework to elucidate the relationship between microstructural disease adaptations and modifications in both mechanical properties of muscle and strain in the cell membrane. We used an agent-based model to randomly generate new muscle fibre geometries and mapped them into a finite-element model representing a cross section of a muscle fascicle. The framework enabled us to explore variability in the shape and arrangement of fibres, as well as to incorporate disease-related changes. We applied this method to reveal the trade-offs between mechanical properties and damage susceptibility in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). DMD is a fatal genetic disease caused by a lack of the transmembrane protein dystrophin, leading to muscle wasting and death due to cardiac or pulmonary complications. The most prevalent microstructural variations in DMD include: lack of transmembrane proteins, fibrosis, fatty infiltration and variation in fibre cross-sectional area. A parameter analysis of these variations and case study of DMD revealed that the nature of fibrosis and density of transmembrane proteins strongly affected the stiffness of the muscle and susceptibility to membrane damage. PMID:25844152

  9. Mechanical Response of Stitched T300 Mat/Urethane 420 IMR Composite Laminates: Property/Orientation Dependence and Damage Evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, S.; Weitsman, Y.J.

    2000-03-01

    This report presents experimental and analytical results of investigations on the mechanical response of stitched T300 mat/urethane 420 IMR composite laminates with three different lay-up configurations. Tensile tests and short-term creep and recovery tests were conducted on the laminate coupons at various orientations. The X-ray photographic technique was adopted to detect the internal damage due to external loading history. The tensile data of laminates with antisymmetric and symmetric lay-ups indicated that lay- up sequences of cross-ply laminates do not have much influence on their tensile properties. However, misalignments within the stitch-bonded plies disturb the symmetry of intended quasi-isotropic laminates and thereby cause the mechanical properties to exhibit a certain amount of angular dependence. Classic lamination theory was found to be able to provide a very good prediction of tensile properties for the stitched laminates within linear range. Creep and recovery response of laminate coupons is greatly dependent on loading angles and load levels. The internal damage of laminate coupons is also directly related to loading angles and load levels as well as loading history.

  10. TREATMENT OF HYDROCARBON, ORGANIC RESIDUE AND PRODUCTION CHEMICAL DAMAGE MECHANISMS THROUGH THE APPLICATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE IN NATURAL GAS STORAGE WELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence J. Pekot; Ron Himes

    2004-05-31

    Core specimens and several material samples were collected from two natural gas storage reservoirs. Laboratory studies were performed to characterize the samples that were believed to be representative of a reservoir damage mechanism previously identified as arising from the presence of hydrocarbons, organic residues or production chemicals. A series of laboratory experiments were performed to identify the sample materials, use these materials to damage the flow capacity of the core specimens and then attempt to remove or reduce the induced damage using either carbon dioxide or a mixture of carbon dioxide and other chemicals. Results of the experiments showed that pure carbon dioxide was effective in restoring flow capacity to the core specimens in several different settings. However, in settings involving asphaltines as the damage mechanism, both pure carbon dioxide and mixtures of carbon dioxide and other chemicals provided little effectiveness in damage removal.

  11. Review of the Mechanism of Action and Clinical Efficacy of Recombinant Human Hyaluronidase Coadministration with Current Prandial Insulin Formulations

    PubMed Central

    Muchmore, Douglas B.; Vaughn, Daniel E.

    2010-01-01

    For patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes, achieving good glycemic control is critical for successful treatment outcomes. As many patients remain unable to reach glycemic goals with currently available rapid-acting analog insulins, ultrafast insulin products are being developed that provide an even faster pharmacokinetic profile compared with current rapid prandial insulin products. The overall strategy of these ultrafast insulin products is to better mimic the normal physiologic response to insulin that occurs in healthy individuals to further improve glycemic control. Recombinant human hyaluronidase (rHuPH20) is a genetically engineered soluble hyaluronidase approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as an adjuvant to increase the absorption and dispersion of other injected drugs; mammalian hyaluronidases as a class have over 6 decades of clinical use supporting the safety and/or efficacy of hyaluronidase coadministration. Clinical findings have demonstrated that coadministration of rHuPH20 with insulin or an insulin analog achieved faster systemic absorption, reduced inter- and intrapatient variability of insulin absorption, and achieved faster metabolic effects compared with injection of either insulin formulation alone. The magnitude of this acceleration is similar to the incrementally faster absorption of prandial insulin analogs as compared with regular insulin. In addition, coadministration of rHuPH20 with regular insulin or insulin analog also improved the achievement of prandial glycemic targets. Thus, rHuPH20 coadministration shows promise as a method of establishing a more rapid insulin profile to prandial insulin in patients with diabetes and has the potential to yield substantial improvements in postprandial glycemic excursion. PMID:20307403

  12. Nanomicelle formulation for topical delivery of cyclosporine A into the cornea: in vitro mechanism and in vivo permeation evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Chuanlong; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Zhao; Li, Mengshuang; Li, Fengjie; Cui, Fenghua; Liu, Ting; Shi, Weiyun; Wu, Xianggen

    2015-01-01

    A stable topical ophthalmic cyclosporine A (CsA) formulation with good tolerance and high efficacy is still a desire in pharmaceutics and clinics. This article describes the preparation of CsA containing nanomicelles using a polyvinyl caprolactam-polyvinyl acetate-polyethylene glycol (PVCL-PVA-PEG) graft copolymer. Both the polymer itself and the CsA nanomicelles were evaluated for cytotoxicity and ocular irritation. The in vitro uptake and intracellular fate of nanomicelles were characterized. In vivo cornea permeation test performed with 0.5 mg/mL CsA containing nanomicelles, and compared with a commercially available CsA (10 mg/mL) oil-based ophthalmic solution. The CsA nanomicelle ophthalmic solution was simple to prepare and remained storage stable. PVCL-PVA-PEG had no cytotoxicity as its monomer solution, and as its micelle solution (IC50(48 h) = 14.02 mg/mL). CsA nanomicelles also had excellent ocular tolerance in rabbits. The use of nanomicelles significantly improved in vitro cellular uptake, apparently by an energy dependent intracellular endocytosis pathway that involved early endosomes, late endosomes, lysosomes, and ER. In vivo permeation showed that 0.5 mg/mL CsA nanomicelles delivered high levels of CsA into the cornea, when compared to the oil-based 10 mg/mL CsA ophthalmic solution. These findings indicated PVCL-PVA-PEG nanomicelles could be a promising topical delivery system for ocular administration of CsA.

  13. Casein films: effects of formulation, environmental conditions, and addition of citric pectin on the structure and mechanical properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thin casein films for food packaging applications reportedly possess good strength and low oxygen permeability, but low water-resistance and elasticity. Modifying and customizing the mechanical properties of the films to target specific behaviors depending on environmental conditions would enable a...

  14. The effect of thermal damage on the mechanical properties of polymer regrinds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundu, Nikhil K.

    1990-01-01

    Reprocessed polymers are subjected to high processing temperatures that result in the breakdown of molecular chains and changes in the molecular structures. These phenomena are reflected in the mechanical properties of materials. Practically every regrind is seen as a new material. These experiments deal with the molding, regrinding, and reprocessing of test specimens for the study of their mechanical properties. The comparative test data from each recycled material would give students an insight of the molecular structures and property degradation. Three important rheological and mechanical properties such as melt flow, impact strength, and flexural strength are to be determined. These properties play key roles in the selection of engineering materials. The material selected for demonstration was Makrolon 3000L, a polycarbonate thermoplastic from Bayer AG. The thermal degradation due to repeated processing is reflected in the decrease in molecular weight and breakdown of molecular chains causing increase in melt flow. The Izod-impact resistance and the flexural strength deteriorate gradually.

  15. A servo-mechanical load frame for in situ, non-invasive, imaging of damage development

    SciTech Connect

    Breunig, T.M.; Nichols, M.C.; Gruver, J.S.; Kinney, J.H.; Haupt, D.L.

    1993-12-31

    The X-ray tomographic microscope (XTM) is a non-invasive X-ray imaging instrument for characterizing a material`s structure three-dimensionally with microscopic spatial resolution. The authors have designed a servomechanical load frame for use with the XTM which will allow imaging of samples under load. The load frame is capable of generating tensile or compressive forces up to 15.6 kN with a design system stiffness of 8.76 {times} 10{sup 8} N/m. The test specimen can be rotated through 360{degree}, without induced bending or torque. Torqueless motion is accomplished by synchronously rotating the grips on precision bearings with an accuracy of 0.01{degree}. With this load frame it will be possible, for the first time, to image the initiation and accumulation of internal damage (0.5 {mu}m detectability) formed in a 6 mm diameter specimen during the application of a monotonic or low frequency cyclic load. This is accomplished by interrupting the test and maintaining a fixed load (or displacement) during the non-invasive XTM data collection procedure. This paper describes the in situ load frame design and experimental capabilities. This system can be used to enhance the understanding of failure in composite materials.

  16. Investigation of surface damage precursor evolutions and laser-induced damage threshold improvement mechanism during Ion beam etching of fused silica.

    PubMed

    Shi, Feng; Zhong, Yaoyu; Dai, Yifan; Peng, Xiaoqiang; Xu, Mingjin; Sui, Tingting

    2016-09-01

    Surface damage precursor evolution has great influence on laser-induced damage threshold improvement of fused silica surface during Ion beam etching. In this work, a series of ion sputtering experiment are carried out to obtain the evolutions of damage precursors (dot-form microstructures, Polishing-Induced Contamination, Hertz scratches, and roughness). Based on ion sputtering theory, surface damage precursor evolutions are analyzed. The results show that the dot-form microstructures will appear during ion beam etching. But as the ion beam etching depth goes up, the dot-form microstructures can be mitigated. And ion-beam etching can broaden and passivate the Hertz scratches without increasing roughness value. A super-smooth surface (0.238nm RMS) can be obtained finally. The relative content of Fe and Ce impurities both significantly reduce after ion beam etching. The laser-induced damage threshold of fused silica is improved by 34% after ion beam etching for 800nm. Research results can be a reference on using ion beam etching process technology to improve laser-induced damage threshold of fused silica optics. PMID:27607688

  17. Numerical investigation of the hydro-mechanical contribution to seismic attenuation in damaged rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollmann, Nele; Jänicke, Ralf; Renner, Jörg; Steeb, Holger

    2016-04-01

    The investigation of hydro-mechanical processes, in particular the modeling of seismic waves in fractured porous media, is essential for the physical interpretation of data obtained from seismic exploration. Here, we specifically investigate attenuation processes in fluid-saturated porous rock containing fracture networks to identify effective hydro-mechanical properties by numerical simulation. The main purpose of this work is the characterization of the overall hydro-mechanical properties by computational homogenization. We determine an effective Skempton coefficient by investigating the fluid pressure and the solid displacement of the skeleton saturated by compressible fluids. Fracture networks are stochastically generated to mimic geological in-situ situations. The fractures are approximated as ellipses with aspect ratios up to 1/100, i.e. they constitute thin and long hydraulic conduits with high permeabilities. Simulations are designed on the material scale with and without conservation of fluid mass in the control volume. Using computational homogenization approaches, we define an effective Skempton coefficient. A range of fracture networks with different characteristic properties is studied for different varieties of fractures. On the material scale we find strongly heterogeneous pressure propagation in the fracture network and the surrounding rock, respectively. The pressure diffusion is much faster in the fracture network than in the matrix, rendering the macroscopic hydro-mechanical behavior strongly time dependent. The effective Skempton coefficient converges to an ensemble-specific instantaneous value and to 1 for long-time studies. The ultimate objective of our study is to evaluate whether constraints on the structure of fracture networks can be deduced from observations of attenuation and its frequency dependence.

  18. Exposure damage mechanisms for KCl windows in high power laser systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaszuk, P. R.; Woody, B. A.; Hulse, C. O.; Davis, J. W.; Waters, J. P.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental study of the 10.6 micrometer and 0.6328 micrometer optical properties of single crystal and europium doped polycrystal is described. Significant variations in the optical properties are observed over periods of exposure up to 100 hours. Models are proposed to predict the 10.6 micrometer absorptivity for long exposure periods. Mechanical creep has been detected in both materials at high temperature.

  19. DNA-damaging disinfection byproducts: alkylation mechanism of mutagenic mucohalic acids.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Bombarelli, Rafael; González-Pérez, Marina; Arenas-Valgañón, Jorge; Céspedes-Camacho, Isaac Fabián; Calle, Emilio; Casado, Julio

    2011-10-15

    Hydroxyhalofuranones form a group of genotoxic disinfection byproduct (DBP) of increasing interest. Among them, mucohalic acids (3,4-dihalo-5-hydroxyfuran-2(5H)-one, MXA) are known mutagens that react with nucleotides, affording etheno, oxaloetheno, and halopropenal derivatives. Mucohalic acids have also found use in organic synthesis due to their high functionalization. In this work, the alkylation kinetics of mucochloric and mucobromic acids with model nucleophiles aniline and NBP has been studied experimentally. Also, the alkylation mechanism of nucleosides by MXA has been studied in silico. The results described allow us to reach the following conclusions: (i) based on the kinetic and computational evidence obtained, a reaction mechanism was proposed, in which MXA react directly with amino groups in nucleotides, preferentially attacking the exocyclic amino groups over the endocyclic aromatic nitrogen atoms; (ii) the suggested mechanism is in agreement with both the product distribution observed experimentally and the mutational pattern of MXA; (iii) the limiting step in the alkylation reaction is addition to the carbonyl group, subsequent steps occurring rapidly; and (iv) mucoxyhalic acids, the hydrolysis products of MXA, play no role in the alkylation reaction by MXA. PMID:21910489

  20. Cancer cachexia causes skeletal muscle damage via transient receptor potential vanilloid 2‐independent mechanisms, unlike muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Nobuyuki; Ohtake, Hitomi; Kamauchi, Shinya; Hashimoto, Naohiro; Kiyono, Tohru; Wakabayashi, Shigeo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Muscle wasting during cancer cachexia contributes to patient morbidity. Cachexia‐induced muscle damage may be understood by comparing its symptoms with those of other skeletal muscle diseases, but currently available data are limited. Methods We modelled cancer cachexia in mice bearing Lewis lung carcinoma/colon adenocarcinoma and compared the associated muscle damage with that in a murine muscular dystrophy model (mdx mice). We measured biochemical and immunochemical parameters: amounts/localization of cytoskeletal proteins and/or Ca2+ signalling proteins related to muscle function and abnormality. We analysed intracellular Ca2+ mobilization and compared results between the two models. Involvement of Ca2+‐permeable channel transient receptor potential vanilloid 2 (TRPV2) was examined by inoculating Lewis lung carcinoma cells into transgenic mice expressing dominant‐negative TRPV2. Results Tumourigenesis caused loss of body and skeletal muscle weight and reduced muscle force and locomotor activity. Similar to mdx mice, cachexia muscles exhibited myolysis, reduced sarcolemmal sialic acid content, and enhanced lysosomal exocytosis and sarcolemmal localization of phosphorylated Ca2+/CaMKII. Abnormal autophagy and degradation of dystrophin also occurred. Unlike mdx muscles, cachexia muscles did not exhibit regeneration markers (centrally nucleated fibres), and levels of autophagic proteolytic pathway markers increased. While a slight accumulation of TRPV2 was observed in cachexia muscles, Ca2+ influx via TRPV2 was not elevated in cachexia‐associated myotubes, and the course of cachexia pathology was not ameliorated by dominant‐negative inhibition of TRPV2. Conclusions Thus, cancer cachexia may induce muscle damage through TRPV2‐independent mechanisms distinct from those in muscular dystrophy; this may help treat patients with tumour‐induced muscle wasting. PMID:27239414

  1. Mechanism of Cluster DNA Damage Repair in Response to High-Atomic Number and Energy Particles Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Asaithamby, Aroumougame; Chen, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation (i.e., γ- and X-rays) induces DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) that are rapidly repaired (rejoined). In contrast, DNA damage induced by the dense ionizing track of high-atomic number and energy (HZE) particles are slowly repaired or are irreparable. These unrepaired and/or misrepaired DNA lesions may contribute to the observed higher relative biological effectiveness for cell killing, chromosomal aberrations, mutagenesis, and carcinogenesis in HZE particle irradiated cells compared to those treated with low-LET radiation. The types of DNA lesions induced by HZE particles have been characterized in vitro and usually consist of two or more closely spaced strand breaks, abasic sites, or oxidized bases on opposing strands. It is unclear why these lesions are difficult to repair. In this review, we highlight the potential of a new technology allowing direct visualization of different types of DNA lesions in human cells and document the emerging significance of live-cell imaging for elucidation of the spatio-temporal characterization of complex DNA damage. We focus on the recent insights into the molecular pathways that participate in the repair of HZE particle-induced DSBs. We also discuss recent advances in our understanding of how different end-processing nucleases aid in repair of DSBs with complicated ends generated by HZE particles. Understanding the mechanism underlying the repair of DNA damage induced by HZE particles will have important implications for estimating the risks to human health associated with HZE particle exposure. PMID:21126526

  2. Mechanisms of hepatoprotection of Terminalia catappa L. extract on D-Galactosamine-induced liver damage.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xin-Hui; Gao, Ling; Gao, Jing; Fan, Yi-Mei; Xu, Li-Zhi; Zhao, Xiao-Ning; Xu, Qiang

    2004-01-01

    The hepatoprotective effects of the extract of Terminalia catappa L. leaves (TCE) against D-Galactosamine (D-GalN)-induced liver injury and the mechanisms underlying its protection were studied. In acute hepatic injury test, it was found that serum ALT activity was remarkably increased (3.35-fold) after injection of D-GalN in mice. But with oral pretreatment of TCE (20, 50 and 100 mg/kg/d) for 7days, change in serum ALT was notably reversed. In primary cultured hepatocytes from fetal mice, it was found that cell viability was decreased by 45.0% after addition of D-GalN, while incubation with TCE (0.1, 0.5 and 1.0 mg/ml) for 36 hours could prevent the decrease in a dose-dependent manner. Meanwhile, D-GalN-induced both the increase of AST level (1.9-fold) and the decrease of SOD activity (48.0%) in supernatant of primary cultured hepatocytes could also be inhibited by pretreatment with TCE. In order to study the possible mechanisms underlying its hepatoprotective effects, one effective component separated from TCE, 2alpha, 3beta, 23-trihydroxyursane-12-en-28-oic acid (DHUA), was used to determine anti-mitochondrial swelling activity and superoxide radicals scavenging activity in vitro. It was found that at the concentration range of 50-500 micromol/L DHUA, Ca2+ -induced mitochondrial swelling was dose-dependently inhibited, and superoxide radicals scavenging activity was also shown in a dose-dependent manner. It was concluded that TCE has hepatoprotective activity and the mechanisms underlying its protective effects may be related to the direct mitochondrion protection and strong scavenging activity on reactive oxygen species (ROS). PMID:15481641

  3. Ultraviolet-B-induced DNA damage and ultraviolet-B tolerance mechanisms in species with different functional groups coexisting in subalpine moorlands.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing-Wei; Kamiyama, Chiho; Hidema, Jun; Hikosaka, Kouki

    2016-08-01

    High doses of ultraviolet-B (UV-B; 280-315 nm) radiation can have detrimental effects on plants, and especially damage their DNA. Plants have DNA repair and protection mechanisms to prevent UV-B damage. However, it remains unclear how DNA damage and tolerance mechanisms vary among field species. We studied DNA damage and tolerance mechanisms in 26 species with different functional groups coexisting in two moorlands at two elevations. We collected current-year leaves in July and August, and determined accumulation of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) as UV-B damage and photorepair activity (PRA) and concentrations of UV-absorbing compounds (UACs) and carotenoids (CARs) as UV-B tolerance mechanisms. DNA damage was greater in dicot than in monocot species, and higher in herbaceous than in woody species. Evergreen species accumulated more CPDs than deciduous species. PRA was higher in Poaceae than in species of other families. UACs were significantly higher in woody than in herbaceous species. The CPD level was not explained by the mechanisms across species, but was significantly related to PRA and UACs when we ignored species with low CPD, PRA and UACs, implying the presence of another effective tolerance mechanism. UACs were correlated negatively with PRA and positively with CARs. Our results revealed that UV-induced DNA damage significantly varies among native species, and this variation is related to functional groups. DNA repair, rather than UV-B protection, dominates in UV-B tolerance in the field. Our findings also suggest that UV-B tolerance mechanisms vary among species under evolutionary trade-off and synergism. PMID:27139425

  4. A FFT-based formulation for efficient mechanical fields computation in isotropic and anisotropic periodic discrete dislocation dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertin, N.; Upadhyay, M. V.; Pradalier, C.; Capolungo, L.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel full-field approach based on the fast Fourier transform (FFT) technique to compute mechanical fields in periodic discrete dislocation dynamics (DDD) simulations for anisotropic materials: the DDD-FFT approach. By coupling the FFT-based approach to the discrete continuous model, the present approach benefits from the high computational efficiency of the FFT algorithm, while allowing for a discrete representation of dislocation lines. It is demonstrated that the computational time associated with the new DDD-FFT approach is significantly lower than that of current DDD approaches when large number of dislocation segments are involved for isotropic and anisotropic elasticity, respectively. Furthermore, for fine Fourier grids, the treatment of anisotropic elasticity comes at a similar computational cost to that of isotropic simulation. Thus, the proposed approach paves the way towards achieving scale transition from DDD to mesoscale plasticity, especially due to the method’s ability to incorporate inhomogeneous elasticity.

  5. Growth of ADP-KDP mixed crystal and its optical, mechanical, dielectric, piezoelectric and laser damage threshold studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajesh, P.; Ramasamy, P.; Bhagavannarayana, G.

    2013-01-01

    Good quality ADP-KDP mixed crystal (90:10) is grown by slow cooling method. The size of the grown crystal is 80×10×10 mm3. The mounted seed size was 5×10×10 mm3 and the crystal was grown along the 'c' axis. HRXRD studies have been done in the near and far regions of the seed crystal. The FWHM of these diffraction curves are 28 and 29 arcsec, which are almost the same. The close values of FWHM of both the specimens indicate that the quality of the crystal remains nearly the same throughout the crystal. 80% of transparency is observed from the UV-vis studies in the entire visible region. Vickers hardness studies indicate that the mixed crystal is mechanically more stable compared to the ADP. Higher piezoelectric coefficient is observed in mixed crystals. Dielectric measurements are carried out. From the laser damage threshold studies, it is observed that higher energy is required to damage the mixed crystal and it indicates that the laser stability of the mixed crystal is high.

  6. Effect of acetaminophen exposure in Oncorhynchus mykiss gills and liver: detoxification mechanisms, oxidative defence system and peroxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Ramos, A S; Correia, A T; Antunes, S C; Gonçalves, F; Nunes, B

    2014-05-01

    The increasing presence of pharmaceutical drugs in nature is cause of concern due to the occurrence of oxidative stress in non-target species. Acetaminophen is widely used in human medicine as an analgesic and antipyretic drug, and it is one of the most sold non-prescription drugs. The present study aimed to assess the toxic effects of acetaminophen (APAP) in Oncorhynchus mykiss following acute and chronic exposures in realistic levels. In order to evaluate the APAP effects in the rainbow trout, gills and liver were analyzed with biochemical biomarkers, such as catalase (CAT), total and selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GRed) and glutathione-S-transferases (GSTs) activity and also lipid peroxidation levels (TBARS). The results obtained in all tests indicate that a significant response of oxidative stress was established, along with the increase of APAP concentrations. The establishment of an oxidative stress scenario occurred with the involvement of all tested biomarkers, sustaining a generalized set of pro-oxidative effects elicited by APAP. Additionally, the occurrence of oxidative damage strongly suggests the impairment of the antioxidant defense mechanism of O. mykiss. It is important to note that the occurrence of oxidative deleterious effects and peroxidative damages occurred for concentrations similar to those already reported for several freshwater ecosystems. The importance of these assumptions is further discussed under the scope of ecological relevance of the assessment of effects caused by pharmaceuticals in non-target organisms. PMID:24816177

  7. Molecular Mechanisms of Ultraviolet Radiation-Induced DNA Damage and Repair

    PubMed Central

    Rastogi, Rajesh P.; Richa; Kumar, Ashok; Tyagi, Madhu B.; Sinha, Rajeshwar P.

    2010-01-01

    DNA is one of the prime molecules, and its stability is of utmost importance for proper functioning and existence of all living systems. Genotoxic chemicals and radiations exert adverse effects on genome stability. Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) (mainly UV-B: 280–315 nm) is one of the powerful agents that can alter the normal state of life by inducing a variety of mutagenic and cytotoxic DNA lesions such as cyclobutane-pyrimidine dimers (CPDs), 6-4 photoproducts (6-4PPs), and their Dewar valence isomers as well as DNA strand breaks by interfering the genome integrity. To counteract these lesions, organisms have developed a number of highly conserved repair mechanisms such as photoreactivation, base excision repair (BER), nucleotide excision repair (NER), and mismatch repair (MMR). Additionally, double-strand break repair (by homologous recombination and nonhomologous end joining), SOS response, cell-cycle checkpoints, and programmed cell death (apoptosis) are also operative in various organisms with the expense of specific gene products. This review deals with UV-induced alterations in DNA and its maintenance by various repair mechanisms. PMID:21209706

  8. Surface damage and mechanical properties degradation of Cr/W multilayer films irradiated by Xe20+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Feida; Tang, Xiaobin; Huang, Hai; Liu, Jian; Li, Huan; Qiu, Yunlong; Chen, Da

    2015-12-01

    3 MeV Xe20+ ion irradiation experiments were performed on the Cr/W multilayer films to investigate the evolution of surface morphology and mechanical properties. Results showed that the W layer in the as-deposited pure W and Cr/W multilayer films are simple cubic structure, but it is not stable under ions irradiation. After exposure to 2.14 × 1018 m-2 Xe ions irradiation, the W layer has completely transformed into the bcc structure. For surface morphology characterization, serious swelling effects were observed in the pure W films. Compared with the pure W films, the Cr/W multilayer films showed much better resistance against the irradiation-induced swelling. Meanwhile, the decrease of hardness and Young's modulus of the Cr/W multilayer films was also less than the pure W films. Results of surface morphology and mechanical tests suggested that radiation tolerance of the Cr/W multilayer films is significantly better than the pure W films.

  9. Thermal/Mechanical Response and Damage Growth in Polymeric Composites at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitley, Karen S.; Gates, Thomas S.

    2002-01-01

    In order to increase the reliability of the next generation of space transportation systems, the mechanical behavior of polymeric matrix composite (PMC) materials at cryogenic temperatures must be investigated. This paper presents experimental data on the residual mechanical properties of a carbon fiber polymeric composite, IM7/PETI-5 both before and after aging at cryogenic temperatures. Tension modulus and strength were measured at room temperature, -196 C, and -269 C on five different specimen ply lay-ups, [0](sub 12), [90](sub 12), [+/-45](sub 3S), [+/-25](sub 3s) and [45,90(sub 3),-45,0(sub 3),-45,90(sub 3),45]. Specimens were preconditioned with one set of coupons being isothermally aged for 555 hours at -184 C in an unloaded state. Another set of corresponding coupons were mounted in constant displacement fixtures such that a constant uniaxial strain was applied to the specimens for 555 hours at -184 C. The measured lamina level properties indicated that cryogenic temperatures have an appreciable influence on behavior, and residual stress calculations based on lamination theory showed that the transverse tensile ply stresses could be quite high for cryogenic test temperatures. Microscopic examination of the surface morphology showed evidence of degradation along the exposed edges of the material due to aging at cryogenic temperatures.

  10. Damage mechanism involved in the solid particle erosion of CVD diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Alun R.; Field, John E.

    2001-09-01

    Sophisticated electro-optic sensors are employed on aircraft and missiles, and it is essential to protect them from relatively high-speed impacts with airborne dust particles. A loss in transmission caused by such an event can impair guidance, and catastrophic failure may occur. Protection is afforded by the installation of a hard cover that is transparent in the relevant regime. Diamond is potentially by far the most attractive window material due to excellent optical and mechanical properties, but it is difficult to shape. Chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond is a polycrystalline synthetic with properties that approach those of single crystal diamond, and it can be more easily shaped. The aims of the present research were to quantify the erosion and transmission losses, and to understand the material removal mechanisms involved. Steady-state erosion rates were obtained for CVD diamond of different grain sizes, using 300-600 micrometers quartz erodent at velocities between 60 and 140 m/s. Images of CVD diamond at various stages of erosion, obtained using an optical microscope and an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM), reveal that erosion initially occurs at grain boundaries and that so-called micro-features also have some influence on erosion.

  11. An investigation of the effects of history dependent damage in time dependent fracture mechanics: nano-scale studies of damage evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Brust, F.W. Jr; Mohan, R.; Yang, Y.P.; Oh, J.; Katsube, N.

    2002-12-01

    High-temperature operation of technical engineering systems is critical for system efficiency, and will be a key driver in the future US DOE energy policy. Developing an understanding of high-temperature creep and creep-fatigue failure processes is a key driver for the research work described here. The focus is on understanding the high-temperature deformation and damage development on the nano-scale (50 to 500 nm) level. The high-temperature damage development process, especially with regard to low and high cyclic loading, which has received little attention to date, is studied. Damage development under cyclic loading develops in a fashion quite different from the constant load situation. The development of analytical methodologies so that high-temperature management of new systems can be realized is the key goal of this work.

  12. Unidirectional growth of potassium hydrogen malate single crystals and its characterizations on optical, mechanical, dielectric, laser damage threshold studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boopathi, K.; Rajesh, P.; Ramasamy, P.

    2013-02-01

    Single crystals of potassium hydrogen malate (PHM) were successfully grown by Sankaranarayanan-Ramasamy (SR) method and conventional slow evaporation solution technique which have the sizes of 35 mm in length, 20 mm in diameter and 15 × 10 × 3 mm3 respectively. The grown PHM crystals have been subjected to single crystal X-ray diffractometer, UV-Vis NIR studies, dielectric measurements, Vickers microhardness analysis and Laser damage threshold. The range and percentage of optical transmission is represented by recording UV-Vis-NIR analysis. The dielectric constant and loss measurement was made as function of temperature in the range of 40-150°C. Mechanical strength and laser stability of the SR method grown crystals was higher than the conventional method grown crystal.

  13. Potential new mechanisms of placental damage in celiac disease: anti-transglutaminase antibodies impair human endometrial angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Di Simone, Nicoletta; De Spirito, Marco; Di Nicuolo, Fiorella; Tersigni, Chiara; Castellani, Roberta; Silano, Marco; Maulucci, Giuseppe; Papi, Massimiliano; Marana, Riccardo; Scambia, Giovanni; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2013-10-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune enteropathy triggered by gluten ingestion and characterized by circulating anti-transglutaminase type 2 (anti-TG2) autoantibodies. An epidemiological link between maternal CD and increased risk of pregnancy failure has been established; however, the mechanism underlying this association is still poorly understood. Because proper endometrial angiogenesis and decidualization are prerequisites for placental development, we investigated the effect of anti-TG2 antibodies on the process of endometrial angiogenesis. Binding of anti-TG2 antibodies to human endometrial endothelial cells (HEECs) was evaluated by ELISA. Angiogenesis was studied in vitro on HEECs and in vivo in a murine model. In particular, we investigated the effect of anti-TG2 antibodies on HEEC matrix metalloprotease-2 (MMP-2) activity by gelatin zymography, cytoskeletal organization and membrane properties by confocal microscopy, and activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) by Western blot analysis. Anti-TG2 antibodies bound to HEECs and decreased newly formed vessels both in vitro and in vivo. Anti-TG2 antibodies impaired angiogenesis by inhibiting the activation of MMP-2, disarranging cytoskeleton fibers, changing the physical and mechanical properties of cell membranes, and inhibiting the intracellular phosphorylation of FAK and ERK. Anti-TG2 antibodies inhibit endometrial angiogenesis affecting the TG2-dependent migration of HEECs and extracellular matrix degradation, which are necessary to form new vessels. Our results identify pathogenic mechanisms of placental damage in CD. PMID:23966323

  14. Unveiling Ultra-High Temperature Wear and Indentation Damage Mechanisms of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bumgardner, Clifton; Li, Xiaodong

    2015-12-01

    Thermal barrier coatings are necessary to protect turbine blades within jet engines from extreme environments that the substrate material may not be capable of withstanding. Therefore, failure of the coating due to wear during its operational lifecycle is a critical event. In order to understand the failure mechanisms of the coating layers, a zirconia-based coating on a nickel alloy substrate was subjected to wear testing to simulate pressure and temperature conditions within a jet engine. Using a Hertzian contact model, the maximum shear and its depth were determined and analyzed in conjunction with the coating material properties and scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry images. The coupled imaging and contact model analyses made possible the identification of the location and time of delamination and its underlying causes. Our findings provide key insights for the development of more resilient thermal barrier coatings.

  15. Numerical simulation of damage evolution for ductile materials and mechanical properties study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Amri, A.; Hanafi, I.; Haddou, M. E. Y.; Khamlichi, A.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents results of a numerical modelling of ductile fracture and failure of elements made of 5182H111 aluminium alloys subjected to dynamic traction. The analysis was performed using Johnson-Cook model based on ABAQUS software. The modelling difficulty related to prediction of ductile fracture mainly arises because there is a tremendous span of length scales from the structural problem to the micro-mechanics problem governing the material separation process. This study has been used the experimental results to calibrate a simple crack propagation criteria for shell elements of which one has often been used in practical analyses. The performance of the proposed model is in general good and it is believed that the presented results and experimental-numerical calibration procedure can be of use in practical finite-element simulations.

  16. Micro-mechanical analysis of damage growth and fracture in discontinuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goree, James G.; Richardson, David E.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental verification is presented for a new two parameter fracture model based on the equivalent remote biaxial stresses (ERBS). A detailed comparison is made between the new theory and the constant K(sub IC) approach of linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM). Fracture is predicted through a failure curve representing the change in a variable fracture toughness K(sub IC) with the ERBS ratio B(sub E). The nonsingular term (T) in the series expansion of the near crack-tip transverse stress is included in the model. Experimental results for polymethyl methacrylate (PPMA) show that the theory can account for the effects of geometry on fracture toughness as well as indicate the initiation of crack branching. It is shown that the new criterion predicts failure for PMMA with a 95 percent confidence zone which is nearly three times smaller than that of the LEFM K(sub IC) approach.

  17. Two more approaches for generating trajectory-based dynamics which conserves the canonical distribution in the phase space formulation of quantum mechanics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian

    2011-05-21

    We show two more approaches for generating trajectory-based dynamics in the phase space formulation of quantum mechanics: "equilibrium continuity dynamics" (ECD) in the spirit of the phase space continuity equation in classical mechanics, and "equilibrium Hamiltonian dynamics" (EHD) in the spirit of the Hamilton equations of motion in classical mechanics. Both ECD and EHD can recover exact thermal correlation functions (of even nonlinear operators, i.e., nonlinear functions of position or momentum operators) in the classical, high temperature, and harmonic limits. Both ECD and EHD conserve the quasi-probability within the infinitesimal volume dx(t)dp(t) around the phase point (x(t), p(t)) along the trajectory. Numerical tests of both approaches in the Wigner phase space have been made for two strongly anharmonic model problems and a double well system, for each potential auto-correlation functions of both linear and nonlinear operators have been calculated. The results suggest EHD and ECD are two additional potential useful approaches for describing quantum effects for complex systems in condense phase. PMID:21599047

  18. Platelet Apoptosis in Adult Immune Thrombocytopenia: Insights into the Mechanism of Damage Triggered by Auto-Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Goette, Nora P; Glembotsky, Ana C; Lev, Paola R; Grodzielski, Matías; Contrufo, Geraldine; Pierdominici, Marta S; Espasandin, Yesica R; Riveros, Dardo; García, Alejandro J; Molinas, Felisa C; Heller, Paula G; Marta, Rosana F

    2016-01-01

    Mechanisms leading to decreased platelet count in immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) are heterogeneous. This study describes increased platelet apoptosis involving loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), caspase 3 activation (aCasp3) and phosphatidylserine (PS) externalization in a cohort of adult ITP patients. Apoptosis was not related to platelet activation, as PAC-1 binding, P-selectin exposure and GPIb-IX internalization were not increased. Besides, ITP platelets were more sensitive to apoptotic stimulus in terms of aCasp3. Incubation of normal platelets with ITP plasma induced loss of ΔΨm, while PS exposure and aCasp3 remained unaltered. The increase in PS exposure observed in ITP platelets could be reproduced in normal platelets incubated with ITP plasma by adding normal CD3+ lymphocytes to the system as effector cells. Addition of leupeptin -a cathepsin B inhibitor- to this system protected platelets from apoptosis. Increased PS exposure was also observed when normal platelets and CD3+ lymphocytes were incubated with purified IgG from ITP patients and was absent when ITP plasma was depleted of auto-antibodies, pointing to the latter as responsible for platelet damage. Apoptosis was present in platelets from all patients carrying anti-GPIIb-IIIa and anti-GPIb auto-antibodies but was absent in the patient with anti-GPIa-IIa auto-antibodies. Platelet damage inversely correlated with platelet count and decreased during treatment with a thrombopoietin receptor agonist. These results point to a key role for auto-antibodies in platelet apoptosis and suggest that antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity is the mechanism underlying this phenomenon. PMID:27494140

  19. Platelet Apoptosis in Adult Immune Thrombocytopenia: Insights into the Mechanism of Damage Triggered by Auto-Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Goette, Nora P.; Glembotsky, Ana C.; Lev, Paola R.; Grodzielski, Matías; Contrufo, Geraldine; Pierdominici, Marta S.; Espasandin, Yesica R.; Riveros, Dardo; García, Alejandro J.; Molinas, Felisa C.; Heller, Paula G.

    2016-01-01

    Mechanisms leading to decreased platelet count in immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) are heterogeneous. This study describes increased platelet apoptosis involving loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), caspase 3 activation (aCasp3) and phosphatidylserine (PS) externalization in a cohort of adult ITP patients. Apoptosis was not related to platelet activation, as PAC-1 binding, P-selectin exposure and GPIb-IX internalization were not increased. Besides, ITP platelets were more sensitive to apoptotic stimulus in terms of aCasp3. Incubation of normal platelets with ITP plasma induced loss of ΔΨm, while PS exposure and aCasp3 remained unaltered. The increase in PS exposure observed in ITP platelets could be reproduced in normal platelets incubated with ITP plasma by adding normal CD3+ lymphocytes to the system as effector cells. Addition of leupeptin -a cathepsin B inhibitor- to this system protected platelets from apoptosis. Increased PS exposure was also observed when normal platelets and CD3+ lymphocytes were incubated with purified IgG from ITP patients and was absent when ITP plasma was depleted of auto-antibodies, pointing to the latter as responsible for platelet damage. Apoptosis was present in platelets from all patients carrying anti-GPIIb-IIIa and anti-GPIb auto-antibodies but was absent in the patient with anti-GPIa-IIa auto-antibodies. Platelet damage inversely correlated with platelet count and decreased during treatment with a thrombopoietin receptor agonist. These results point to a key role for auto-antibodies in platelet apoptosis and suggest that antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity is the mechanism underlying this phenomenon. PMID:27494140

  20. Mechanical properties of some pigmented and unpigmented aqueous-based film coating formulations applied to aspirin tablets.

    PubMed

    Okhamafe, A O; York, P

    1986-06-01

    The Brinell hardness and Young's modulus of pigmented and unpigmented films of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose alone, and in combination with either polyethylene glycol 400 (plasticizer) or polyvinyl alcohol, which were applied to aspirin tablets, have been measured. Generally hardness and modulus data showed similar trends. The hardness and modulus of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose fell in the presence of polyethylene glycol 400 as a result of its plasticizing action. On the other hand, the hardness and modulus of the film former rose slightly when polyvinyl alcohol was initially incorporated, probably due to the crystalline phase of the additive, and then decreased when the level of the additive was further raised. Hardness and modulus were higher in films pigmented with talc than in those containing titanium dioxide because of the plate-like shape of talc and its greater interaction with the polymer systems. Some correlation was found between the Young's moduli of the applied films and those of the corresponding free films, with the moduli of the latter two 2-5 times greater. Ageing at 37 degrees C and 75% r.h. was found to cause a decrease in the mechanical properties of the unplasticized film coating systems probably as a result of decreased molecular order and enhanced polymer chain mobility. PMID:2873217

  1. Evaluation of the Influence of Formulation and Process Variables on Mechanical Properties of Oral Mucoadhesive Films Using Multivariate Data Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Landová, Hana; Gajdziok, Jan; Doležel, Petr; Muselík, Jan; Dvořáčková, Kateřina; Jekl, Vladimír; Hauptman, Karel

    2014-01-01

    Oral mucosa is an attractive region for the local and systemic application of many drugs. Oral mucoadhesive films are preferred for their prolonged time of residence, the improved bioavailability of the drug they contain, their painless application, their protection against lesions, and their nonirritating properties. This work was focused on preparation of nonmedicated carmellose-based films using both solvent casting and impregnation methods, respectively. Moreover, a modern approach to evaluation of mucoadhesive films applying analysis of texture and subsequent multivariate data analysis was used. In this experiment, puncture strength strongly correlated with tensile strength and could be used to obtain necessary information about the mechanical film characteristics in films prepared using both methods. Puncture work and tensile work were not correlated in films prepared using the solvent casting method, as increasing the amount of glycerol led to an increase in the puncture work in thinner films. All measured texture parameters in films prepared by impregnation were significantly smaller compared to films prepared by solvent casting. Moreover, a relationship between the amount of glycerol and film thickness was observed, and a greater recalculated tensile/puncture strength was needed for an increased thickness in films prepared by impregnation. PMID:25136560

  2. Arctigenin Treatment Protects against Brain Damage through an Anti-Inflammatory and Anti-Apoptotic Mechanism after Needle Insertion

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jie; Li, Na; Xia, Yang; Gao, Zhong; Zou, Sa-feng; Kong, Liang; Yao, Ying-Jia; Jiao, Ya-Nan; Yan, Yu-Hui; Li, Shao-Heng; Tao, Zhen-Yu; Lian, Guan; Yang, Jing-Xian; Kang, Ting-Guo

    2016-01-01

    Convection enhanced delivery (CED) infuses drugs directly into brain tissue. Needle insertion is required and results in a stab wound injury (SWI). Subsequent secondary injury involves the release of inflammatory and apoptotic cytokines, which have dramatic consequences on the integrity of damaged tissue, leading to the evolution of a pericontusional-damaged area minutes to days after in the initial injury. The present study investigated the capacity for arctigenin (ARC) to prevent secondary brain injury and the determination of the underlying mechanism of action in a mouse model of SWI that mimics the process of CED. After CED, mice received a gavage of ARC from 30 min to 14 days. Neurological severity scores (NSS) and wound closure degree were assessed after the injury. Histological analysis and immunocytochemistry were used to evaluated the extent of brain damage and neuroinflammation. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) was used to detect universal apoptosis. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) was used to test the inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-10) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) content. Gene levels of inflammation (TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10) and apoptosis (Caspase-3, Bax and Bcl-2) were detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Using these, we analyzed ARC’s efficacy and mechanism of action. Results: ARC treatment improved neurological function by reducing brain water content and hematoma and accelerating wound closure relative to untreated mice. ARC treatment reduced the levels of TNF-α and IL-6 and the number of allograft inflammatory factor (IBA)- and myeloperoxidase (MPO)-positive cells and increased the levels of IL-10. ARC-treated mice had fewer TUNEL+ apoptotic neurons and activated caspase-3-positive neurons surrounding the lesion than controls, indicating increased neuronal survival. Conclusions: ARC treatment confers

  3. Deformation mechanisms and damage in α-alumina under hypervelocity impact loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cheng; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya; Branicio, Paulo S.

    2008-04-01

    Deformation mechanisms in α-alumina under hypervelocity impact are investigated using molecular dynamics simulations containing 540×106 atoms. A cylindrical projectile impacting normal to the (0001) surface at 18km/s generates large temperature and pressure gradients around the impact face, and consequently local amorphization of the substrate in a surrounding hemispherical region is produced. Away from the impact face, a wide range of deformations emerge and disappear as a function of time under the influence of local stress fields, e.g., basal and pyramidal slips and basal and rhombohedral twins, all of which show good agreement with the experimental and theoretical results. New deformation modes are observed, such as twins along {01¯11}, which propagate at a roughly constant speed of 8km/s and nucleate a large amount of defects where subsequent fractures initiate. The relation between deformation patterns and local stress levels is investigated. During unloading, we observe that microcracks nucleate extensively at the intersections of previous deformations within an hourglass-shaped volume that connects top and bottom free surfaces. From the simulation, the fracture toughness of alumina is estimated to be 2.0±0.5MPa√m. The substrate eventually fails along the surface of the hourglass region during spallation when clusters of substrate material are ejected from both free surfaces.

  4. Mitigation of Shear-Induced Blood Damage of Mechanical Bileaflet Heart Valves using Embedded Vortex Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, Pablo; Arjunon, Sivakkumar; Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; Yoganathan, Ajit; Glezer, Ari

    2012-11-01

    The strong transitory shear stress generated during the time-periodic closing of the mechanical prosthetic bileaflet aortic heart valve, is considered to be one of the main factors responsible for complications, associated with thrombosis and thromboembolism. These flow transients are investigated using phase and time-averaged PIV in a low-volume (about 150 ml) test setup that simulates the pulsatile physiological conditions associated with a 23 mm St. Jude Medical valve. The PIV measurements are accompanied by continuous monitoring of the ventricular and aortic pressures and valve flow rate. Following the valve closure, the leakage flow between the valve leaflets is caused by the pressure buildup across the leaflets, leading to the formation of a regurgitation jet starting from the BMHV B-datum line. As in a typical starting jet, a counter-rotating vortex pair is formed along each leaflet edge and the vorticity sheet is associated with high shear stress that may be result in blood platelet activation. The present investigation demonstrates that the placement of arrays of mm-scale vortex generators near the edges of the leaflets diffuses the vortex sheet and suppresses the formation of these vortices, weakening the local velocity gradients and small-scale vortical structures. Supported by NIH and NSF.

  5. Translesion synthesis mechanisms depend on the nature of DNA damage in UV-irradiated human cells

    PubMed Central

    Quinet, Annabel; Martins, Davi Jardim; Vessoni, Alexandre Teixeira; Biard, Denis; Sarasin, Alain; Stary, Anne; Menck, Carlos Frederico Martins

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet-induced 6-4 photoproducts (6-4PP) and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) can be tolerated by translesion DNA polymerases (TLS Pols) at stalled replication forks or by gap-filling. Here, we investigated the involvement of Polη, Rev1 and Rev3L (Polζ catalytic subunit) in the specific bypass of 6-4PP and CPD in repair-deficient XP-C human cells. We combined DNA fiber assay and novel methodologies for detection and quantification of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) gaps on ongoing replication forks and postreplication repair (PRR) tracts in the human genome. We demonstrated that Rev3L, but not Rev1, is required for postreplicative gap-filling, while Polη and Rev1 are responsible for TLS at stalled replication forks. Moreover, specific photolyases were employed to show that in XP-C cells, CPD arrest replication forks, while 6-4PP are responsible for the generation of ssDNA gaps and PRR tracts. On the other hand, in the absence of Polη or Rev1, both types of lesion block replication forks progression. Altogether, the data directly show that, in the human genome, Polη and Rev1 bypass CPD and 6-4PP at replication forks, while only 6-4PP are also tolerated by a Polζ-dependent gap-filling mechanism, independent of S phase. PMID:27095204

  6. Translesion synthesis mechanisms depend on the nature of DNA damage in UV-irradiated human cells.

    PubMed

    Quinet, Annabel; Martins, Davi Jardim; Vessoni, Alexandre Teixeira; Biard, Denis; Sarasin, Alain; Stary, Anne; Menck, Carlos Frederico Martins

    2016-07-01

    Ultraviolet-induced 6-4 photoproducts (6-4PP) and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) can be tolerated by translesion DNA polymerases (TLS Pols) at stalled replication forks or by gap-filling. Here, we investigated the involvement of Polη, Rev1 and Rev3L (Polζ catalytic subunit) in the specific bypass of 6-4PP and CPD in repair-deficient XP-C human cells. We combined DNA fiber assay and novel methodologies for detection and quantification of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) gaps on ongoing replication forks and postreplication repair (PRR) tracts in the human genome. We demonstrated that Rev3L, but not Rev1, is required for postreplicative gap-filling, while Polη and Rev1 are responsible for TLS at stalled replication forks. Moreover, specific photolyases were employed to show that in XP-C cells, CPD arrest replication forks, while 6-4PP are responsible for the generation of ssDNA gaps and PRR tracts. On the other hand, in the absence of Polη or Rev1, both types of lesion block replication forks progression. Altogether, the data directly show that, in the human genome, Polη and Rev1 bypass CPD and 6-4PP at replication forks, while only 6-4PP are also tolerated by a Polζ-dependent gap-filling mechanism, independent of S phase. PMID:27095204

  7. Mono and sequential ion irradiation induced damage formation and damage recovery in oxide glasses: Stopping power dependence of the mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mir, A. H.; Monnet, I.; Toulemonde, M.; Bouffard, S.; Jegou, C.; Peuget, S.

    2016-02-01

    Simple and complex borosilicate glasses were irradiated with single and double ion beams of light and heavy ions over a broad fluence and stopping power range. As a result of the heavy ion irradiation (U, Kr, Au), the hardness was observed to diminish and saturate after a decrease by 35 ± 1%. Unlike slow and swift heavy ion irradiation, irradiation with light ions (He,O) induced a saturation hardness decrease of 18 ± 1% only. During double ion beam irradiation; where glasses were first irradiated with a heavy ion (gold) and then by a light ion (helium), the light ion irradiation induced partial damage recovery. As a consequence of the recovery effect, the hardness of the pre-irradiated glasses increased by 10-15% depending on the chemical composition. These results highlight that the nuclear energy loss and high electronic energy loss (≥4 keV/nm) result in significant and similar modifications whereas light ions with low electronic energy loss (≤1 keV/nm) result in only mild damage formation in virgin glasses and recovery in highly pre-damaged glasses. These results are important to understand the damage formation and recovery in actinide bearing minerals and in glasses subjected to self-irradiation by alpha decays.

  8. Combined meso-scale modeling and experimental investigation of the effect of mechanical damage on the transport properties of cementitious composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghavan, Balaji; Niknezhad, Davood; Bernard, Fabrice; Kamali-Bernard, Siham

    2016-09-01

    The transport properties of cementitious composites such as concrete are important indicators of their durability, and are known to be heavily influenced by mechanical loading. In the current work, we use meso-scale hygro-mechanical modeling with a morphological 3D two phase mortar-aggregate model, in conjunction with experimentally obtained properties, to investigate the coupling between mechanical loading and damage and the permeability of the composite. The increase in permeability of a cylindrical test specimen at 28% aggregate fraction during a uniaxial displacement-controlled compression test at 85% of the peak load was measured using a gas permeameter. The mortar's mechanical behavior is assumed to follow the well-known compression damaged plasticity (CDP) model with isotropic damage, at varying thresholds, and obtained from different envelope curves. The damaged intrinsic permeability of the mortar evolves according to a logarithmic matching law with progressive loading. We fit the matching law parameters to the experimental result for the test specimen by inverse identification using our meso-scale model. We then subject a series of virtual composite specimens to quasi-static uniaxial compressive loading with varying boundary conditions to obtain the simulated damage and strain evolutions, and use the damage data and the previously identified parameters to determine the evolution of the macroscopic permeability tensor for the specimens, using a network model. We conduct a full parameter study by varying aggregate volume fraction, granulometric distribution, loading/boundary conditions and "matching law" parameters, as well as for different strain-damage thresholds and uniaxial loading envelope curves. Based on this study, we propose Avrami equation-based upper and lower bounds for the evolution of the damaged permeability of the composite.

  9. Fracture and damage; Winter Annual Meeting of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Anaheim, CA, Nov. 8-13, 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagar, Arvind (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The latest developments in the area of fracture and damage at high temperatures are discussed, in particular: modeling; analysis and experimental techniques for interface damage in composites including the effects of residual stresses and temperatures; and crack growth, inelastic deformation and fracture parameters for isotropic materials. Also included are damage modeling and experiments at elevated temperatures.

  10. Mechanism of Inhibition of Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide-Induced Membrane Damage by a Small Organic Fluorogen

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoxu; Wan, Mingwei; Gao, Lianghui; Fang, Weihai

    2016-01-01

    Human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) is believed to be responsible for the death of insulin-producing β-cells. However, the mechanism of membrane damage at the molecular level has not been fully elucidated. In this article, we employ coarse- grained dissipative particle dynamics simulations to study the interactions between a lipid bilayer membrane composed of 70% zwitterionic lipids and 30% anionic lipids and hIAPPs with α-helical structures. We demonstrated that the key factor controlling pore formation is the combination of peptide charge-induced electroporation and peptide hydrophobicity-induced lipid disordering and membrane thinning. According to these mechanisms, we suggest that a water-miscible tetraphenylethene BSPOTPE is a potent inhibitor to rescue hIAPP-induced cytotoxicity. Our simulations predict that BSPOTPE molecules can bind directly to the helical regions of hIAPP and form oligomers with separated hydrophobic cores and hydrophilic shells. The micelle-like hIAPP-BSPOTPE clusters tend to be retained in the water/membrane interface and aggregate therein rather than penetrate into the membrane. Electrostatic attraction between BSPOTPE and hIAPP also reduces the extent of hIAPP binding to the anionic lipid bilayer. These two modes work together and efficiently prevent membrane poration. PMID:26887358

  11. Mechanism of Inhibition of Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide-Induced Membrane Damage by a Small Organic Fluorogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoxu; Wan, Mingwei; Gao, Lianghui; Fang, Weihai

    2016-02-01

    Human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) is believed to be responsible for the death of insulin-producing β-cells. However, the mechanism of membrane damage at the molecular level has not been fully elucidated. In this article, we employ coarse- grained dissipative particle dynamics simulations to study the interactions between a lipid bilayer membrane composed of 70% zwitterionic lipids and 30% anionic lipids and hIAPPs with α-helical structures. We demonstrated that the key factor controlling pore formation is the combination of peptide charge-induced electroporation and peptide hydrophobicity-induced lipid disordering and membrane thinning. According to these mechanisms, we suggest that a water-miscible tetraphenylethene BSPOTPE is a potent inhibitor to rescue hIAPP-induced cytotoxicity. Our simulations predict that BSPOTPE molecules can bind directly to the helical regions of hIAPP and form oligomers with separated hydrophobic cores and hydrophilic shells. The micelle-like hIAPP-BSPOTPE clusters tend to be retained in the water/membrane interface and aggregate therein rather than penetrate into the membrane. Electrostatic attraction between BSPOTPE and hIAPP also reduces the extent of hIAPP binding to the anionic lipid bilayer. These two modes work together and efficiently prevent membrane poration.

  12. Mechanism of Inhibition of Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide-Induced Membrane Damage by a Small Organic Fluorogen.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoxu; Wan, Mingwei; Gao, Lianghui; Fang, Weihai

    2016-01-01

    Human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) is believed to be responsible for the death of insulin-producing β-cells. However, the mechanism of membrane damage at the molecular level has not been fully elucidated. In this article, we employ coarse- grained dissipative particle dynamics simulations to study the interactions between a lipid bilayer membrane composed of 70% zwitterionic lipids and 30% anionic lipids and hIAPPs with α-helical structures. We demonstrated that the key factor controlling pore formation is the combination of peptide charge-induced electroporation and peptide hydrophobicity-induced lipid disordering and membrane thinning. According to these mechanisms, we suggest that a water-miscible tetraphenylethene BSPOTPE is a potent inhibitor to rescue hIAPP-induced cytotoxicity. Our simulations predict that BSPOTPE molecules can bind directly to the helical regions of hIAPP and form oligomers with separated hydrophobic cores and hydrophilic shells. The micelle-like hIAPP-BSPOTPE clusters tend to be retained in the water/membrane interface and aggregate therein rather than penetrate into the membrane. Electrostatic attraction between BSPOTPE and hIAPP also reduces the extent of hIAPP binding to the anionic lipid bilayer. These two modes work together and efficiently prevent membrane poration. PMID:26887358

  13. Response to ``Comment on `Bohmian mechanics with complex action: A new trajectory-based formulation of quantum mechanics' '' [J. Chem. Phys. 127, 197101 (2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldfarb, Yair; Degani, Ilan; Tannor, David J.

    2007-11-01

    In their comment, Sanz and Miret-Artés (SMA) describe previous trajectory-based formalisms based on the quantum Hamilton-Jacobi (QHJ) formalism. In this reply, we highlight our unique contributions: the identification of the smallness of the quantum force in the complex QHJ and its solution using complex trajectories. SMA also raise the question of how the term locality should be used in quantum mechanics. We suggest that at least certain aspects of nonlocality can depend on the method used to solve the problem.

  14. Response to 'Comment on 'Bohmian mechanics with complex action: A new trajectory-based formulation of quantum mechanics'' [J. Chem. Phys. 127, 197101 (2007)

    SciTech Connect

    Goldfarb, Yair; Degani, Ilan; Tannor, David J.

    2007-11-21

    In their comment, Sanz and Miret-Artes (SMA) describe previous trajectory-based formalisms based on the quantum Hamilton-Jacobi (QHJ) formalism. In this reply, we highlight our unique contributions: the identification of the smallness of the quantum force in the complex QHJ and its solution using complex trajectories. SMA also raise the question of how the term locality should be used in quantum mechanics. We suggest that at least certain aspects of nonlocality can depend on the method used to solve the problem.

  15. Brittle dynamic damage due to earthquake rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, Harsha; Thomas, Marion

    2016-04-01

    The micromechanical damage mechanics formulated by Ashby and Sammis, 1990, and generalized by Deshpande and Evans 2008 has been extended to allow for a more generalized stress state and to incorporate an experimentally motivated new crack growth (damage evolution) law that is valid over a wide range of loading rates. This law is sensitive to both the crack tip stress field and its time derivative. Incorporating this feature produces additional strain-rate sensitivity in the constitutive response. The model is also experimentally verified by predicting the failure strength of Dionysus-Pentelicon marble over wide range of strain rates. We then implement this constitutive response to understand the role of dynamic brittle off-fault damage on earthquake ruptures. We show that off-fault damage plays an important role in asymmetry of rupture propagation and is a source of high-frequency ground motion in the near source region.

  16. Mechanisms of recovery from sublethal damage and potentially lethal damage induced by BrdUrd/313 nm light treatment: alkali-labile lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Hagan, M. P.; Han, A.; Smith, V. N.

    1984-01-01

    BrdUrd pulse labelling of synchronous Chinese hamster cell cultures was used to correlate repair of sublethal damage with removal of alkali-labile lesions. Both processes were modified in a quantitatively similar manner by cysteamine. In addition, the age responses for repair of sublethal damage and for cysteamine reduction of repair agreed. Through the use of thymidine as an S-phase-blocking agent it was further demonstrated that progression past the S-phase of the cell cycle was required for the loss of resistance to UVB light in BrdUrd-substituted cells. Similarly, a thymidine block administered before synthesis upon the BrdUrd-substituted template prevented the cell from acquiring the sensitivity to UVB light normally associated with synthesis on a lesioned template. The UVB-light-sensitive mutant V79-UC was shown to have reduced capacities both for the accumulation of sublethal injury and for the removal of alkali-labile lesions. These data support the notion that alkali-labile lesions are responsible for sublethal damage in BrdUrd pulse-labelled Chinese hamster cells. PMID:6582920

  17. Prediction of Damage in Randomly Oriented Short-Fibre Composites by means of A Mechanistic Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2004-05-01

    A micro-macro mechanistic approach to damage in short-fiber composites is developed in this paper. At the micro-scale, the damage mechanisms such as matrix cracking, fiber/matrix debonding are analyzed to define the associated damage variables. The stiffness reduction law dependent on these variables is then established using micromechanical models and average orientation distributions of fibers and microcracks. The macroscopic response is obtained by means of thermodynamics of continuous media, continuum damage mechanics and a finite element formulation.

  18. Prediction of Damage in Randomly Oriented Short-Fibre Composites by means of A Mechanistic Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba NGHIEP; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2004-03-01

    A micro-macro mechanistic approach to damage in short-fiber composites is developed in this paper. At the micro-scale, the damage mechanisms such as matrix cracking, fiber/matrix debonding are analyzed to define the associated damage variables. The stiffness reduction law dependent on these variables is then established using micromechanical models and average orientation distributions of fibers and microcracks. The macroscopic response is obtained by means of thermodynamics of continuous media, continuum damage mechanics and a finite element formulation.

  19. Saltcrete formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Semones, G.B.; Connell, J.M.; Jorgensen, S.C.

    1994-09-28

    The information gathered since the first report shows that the currently generated waste and most of the waste in inventory has low concentrations of hazardous chemicals and is certifiable for disposable. This is based on preliminary analyses. Sampling and analysis for the purpose of gathering the legally defensible data required for certification and permanent disposal is in progress. The main technical issue is the expansion of the waste form. Some of the cemented waste expands and damages the containers. According to a petrology study, the expansion is caused by the formation of darapskite, a nitrate-sulfate salt. Darapskite occurs when there is high porosity causing microfractures and waste form expansion.

  20. Deformation and damage mechanisms of zinc coatings on hot-dip galvanized steel sheets: Part I. Deformation modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parisot, Rodolphe; Forest, Samuel; Pineau, André; Grillon, François; Demonet, Xavier; Mataigne, Jean-Michel

    2004-03-01

    Zinc-based coatings are widely used for protection against corrosion of steel-sheet products in the automotive industry. The objective of the present article is to investigate the deformation modes at work in three different microstructures of a thin (8 µm) zinc coating on an interstitial-free steel substrate under tension, plane-strain tension, and expansion loading. Damage mechanisms are addressed in a companion article. The plastic slip and twinning activity in the zinc grains of an untempered cold-rolled coating (labeled NSK), a tempered cold-rolled coating (labeled SK), and a recrystallized coating are compared with the response of the corresponding bulk low-alloyed zinc material. The in-plane grain size in the NSK and SK coatings ranges from 300 to 600 µm, vs about 30 µm in the recrystallized coating and bulk material. The coatings exhibit a strong crystallographic texture, with the c-axis generally normal to the sheet plane. Basal slip is shown to be the main deformation mechanism in bulk zinc and the recrystallized coating, whereas pyramidal π2 slip and mechanical twinning are found to be major modes in the NSK and SK coatings. These results, obtained from an extensive, quantitative slip-line analysis combined with electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) measurements, are explained by the constraining effect of the substrate. This effect is successfully modeled using a simple Taylor-like polycrystalline approach. The recrystallized coating behaves much like the bulk material. The interpretation of this grain-size effect between the NSK and SK coating, on the one hand, and the recrystallized coating, on the other hand, requires a full three-dimensional finite-element analysis of the multicrystalline coating provided in this work. The simulations show that strong strain gradients can develop in the recrystallized coating from the interface to the surface, which is not the case in the NSK and SK coatings.

  1. Evolutionary malignant resistance of cells to damaging factors as common biological defence mechanism in neoplastic development. Review of conception.

    PubMed

    Monceviciute-Eringiene, E

    2000-09-01

    Cells have some inborn resistance to harmful factors, which could be called physiological or natural resistance. The mechanisms of multixenobiotic resistance (MXR) and multidrug resistance (MDR) have common features in the formation of acquired resistance in microorganisms, carcinogenesis, tumour metastases and chemotherapy or irradiation. ATP-dependent membrane P-glycoprotein, as an MDR efflux pump, glutathione S-transferases and other products of evolutionary resistance-related genes arised for exportation and detoxification of cytotoxic xenobiotics and drugs are transmitted from bacteria to man. On the one hand, this evolutionary MXR as a common biological defence mechanism is a "driving" power to conserve homeostasis of cells, tissues and organs. On the other hand, mutation, selection and simplification of properties are the causes of functional and morphological changes in tumour cells which regress to a more primitive mode of existence (atavism) for adaptation to survival. In the present work are presented data on the forms of E. coli resistant to antibiotics and of sarcoma 45 resistant to alkylic preparations. They may be helpful in revealing the causes of resistance and acquired accelerated growth of cells. The development of tumours as fibromas 14-15 years following injection of a vital dye trypan blue into human skin supports our conception that neoplastic growth is a particular case of the evolutionary resistance of cells adapted to the damaging factors. So, tumour cells adopting the enhancement mechanisms of general biological persistent resistance, i. e. undergoing repeated cycles of malignancy enhancement, adapt themselves to survive under the changed unfavourable conditions. PMID:11144527

  2. TREATMENT OF HYDROCARBON, ORGANIC RESIDUE AND PRODUCTION CHEMICAL DAMAGE MECHANISMS THROUGH THE APPLICATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE IN NATURAL GAS STORAGE WELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence J. Pekot

    2004-06-30

    Two gas storage fields were studied for this project. Overisel field, operated by Consumer's Energy, is located near the town of Holland, Michigan. Huntsman Storage Unit, operated by Kinder Morgan, is located in Cheyenne County, Nebraska near the town of Sidney. Wells in both fields experienced declining performance over several years of their annual injection/production cycle. In both fields, the presence of hydrocarbons, organic materials or production chemicals was suspected as the cause of progressive formation damage leading to the performance decline. Core specimens and several material samples were collected from these two natural gas storage reservoirs. Laboratory studies were performed to characterize the samples that were believed to be representative of a reservoir damage mechanism previously identified as arising from the presence of hydrocarbons, organic residues or production chemicals. A series of laboratory experiments were performed to identify the sample materials, use these materials to damage the flow capacity of the core specimens and then attempt to remove or reduce the induced damage using either carbon dioxide or a mixture of carbon dioxide and other chemicals. Results of the experiments showed that pure carbon dioxide was effective in restoring flow capacity to the core specimens in several different settings. However, in settings involving asphaltines as the damage mechanism, both pure carbon dioxide and mixtures of carbon dioxide and other chemicals provided little effectiveness in damage removal.

  3. [Protective effect of Angelica sinensis polysaccharides on subacute renal damages induced by D-galactose in mice and its mechanism].

    PubMed

    Fan, Yan-ling; Xia, Jie-yu; Jia, Dao-yong; Zhang, Meng-si; Zhang, Yan-yan; Wang, Lu; Huang, Guo-ning; Wang, Ya-ping

    2015-11-01

    To explore the protective effect of Angelica sinensis polysaccharides(ASP) on subacute renal damages induced by D-galactose in mice and its mechanism. Male C57BL/6J mice were randomly divided into 3 groups, with 10 mice in each group. The D-galactose model group was subcutaneously injected with D-galactose (120 mg x kg(-1)), qd x 42; the ASP + D-galactose model group was intraperitoneally injected with ASP since the 8th day of the replication of the D-galactose model, qd x 35; and the normal control group was subcutaneously injected with saline at the same dose and time. On the 2nd day of after the injection, the peripheral blood was collected to measure the content of BUN, Crea, UA, Cys-C; paraffin sections were made to observe the renal histomorphology by HE staining; senescence-associated β-g-alactosidase (SA-β-Gal) stain was used to observe the relative optical density (ROD) in renal tissues; transmission electron microscopy was assayed to observe the renal ultrastructure; the renal tissue homogenate was prepared to measure the content of SOD, GSH-PX, MDA; the content of AGEs and 8-OH-dG were measured by ELISA. According to the result, compared with the D-galactose model group, the ASP + D-galactose model group showed obviously decreases in the content of BUN, Crea, UA, Cysc, AGES, 8-OH-dG, the number of hardening renal corpuscle, renal capsular space and renal tubular lumen, ROD of SA-β-Gal staining positive kidney cells, mesangial cells, basement membrane thickness, podocyte secondary processes fusion and MDA and increases in the number of normal renal corpuscle, ribosome and rough endoplasmic reticulum in podocytes, the activity of SOD and GSH-PX. In Conclusion, A. sinensis polysaccharides can antagonize kidney subacute damages induced by D-galactose in mice. Its protective mechanism may be correlated with the inhibition of the oxidative stress injury. PMID:27071262

  4. Plasma damage mechanisms for low-k porous SiOCH films due to radiation, radicals, and ions in the plasma etching process

    SciTech Connect

    Uchida, Saburo; Takashima, Seigo; Hori, Masaru; Fukasawa, Masanaga; Ohshima, Keiji; Nagahata, Kazunori; Tatsumi, Tetsuya

    2008-04-01

    Low dielectric constant (low-k) films have been widely used as insulating materials in ultra-large-scale integrated circuits. Low-k films receive heavy damage during the plasma processes of etching or ashing, resulting in an increase in their dielectric constant. In order to realize damage-free plasma processes for low-k films, it is essential to determine the influence of radiation, radicals, and ions emitted in the plasma process on the characteristics of low-k films. We have developed a technique to evaluate the influence of radiation, radicals, ions, and their synergies on films in real plasma processes and have named it pallet for plasma evaluation (PAPE). Using the PAPE, plasma-induced damage on porous SiOCH films were investigated in dual-frequency capacitively coupled H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} plasmas. The damage was characterized by ellipsometry, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and thermal desorption spectroscopy. On the basis of the results, the damage mechanisms associated with vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and UV radiation, radicals, and ions were clarified. The damage was caused not only by ions and radicals but also by VUV and UV radiation emitted by the plasmas. Moreover, it was found that the synergy between the radiation and the radicals enhanced the damage.

  5. Damage mechanics - failure modes

    SciTech Connect

    Krajcinovic, D.; Vujosevic, M.

    1996-12-31

    The present study summarizes the results of the DOE sponsored research program focused on the brittle failure of solids with disordered microstructure. The failure is related to the stochastic processes on the microstructural scale; namely, the nucleation and growth of microcracks. The intrinsic failure modes, such as the percolation, localization and creep rupture, are studied by emphasizing the effect of the micro-structural disorder. A rich spectrum of physical phenomena and new concepts that emerges from this research demonstrates the reasons behind the limitations of traditional, deterministic, and local continuum models.

  6. YAP and TAZ in epithelial stem cells: A sensor for cell polarity, mechanical forces and tissue damage.

    PubMed

    Elbediwy, Ahmed; Vincent-Mistiaen, Zoé I; Thompson, Barry J

    2016-07-01

    The YAP/TAZ family of transcriptional co-activators drives cell proliferation in epithelial tissues and cancers. Yet, how YAP and TAZ are physiologically regulated remains unclear. Here we review recent reports that YAP and TAZ act primarily as sensors of epithelial cell polarity, being inhibited when cells differentiate an apical membrane domain, and being activated when cells contact the extracellular matrix via their basal membrane domain. Apical signalling occurs via the canonical Crumbs/CRB-Hippo/MST-Warts/LATS kinase cascade to phosphorylate and inhibit YAP/TAZ. Basal signalling occurs via Integrins and Src family kinases to phosphorylate and activate YAP/TAZ. Thus, YAP/TAZ is localised to the nucleus in basal stem/progenitor cells and cytoplasm in differentiated squamous cells or columnar cells. In addition, other signals such as mechanical forces, tissue damage and possibly receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) can influence MST-LATS or Src family kinase activity to modulate YAP/TAZ activity. PMID:27173018

  7. Repeated exposures to roadside particulate matter extracts suppresses pulmonary defense mechanisms, resulting in lipid and protein oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Pardo, Michal; Porat, Ziv; Rudich, Assaf; Schauer, James J; Rudich, Yinon

    2016-03-01

    Exposure to particulate matter (PM) pollution in cities and urban canyons can be harmful to the exposed population. However, the underlying mechanisms that lead to health effects are not yet elucidated. It is postulated that exposure to repeated, small, environmentally relevant concentrations can affect lung homeostasis. This study examines the impact of repeated exposures to urban PM on mouse lungs with focus on inflammatory and oxidative stress parameters. Aqueous extracts from collected urban PM were administered to mice by 5 repeated intra-tracheal instillations (IT). Multiple exposures, led to an increase in cytokine levels in both bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and in the blood serum, indicating a systemic reaction. Lung mRNA levels of antioxidant/phase II detoxifying enzymes decreased by exposure to the PM extract, but not when metals were removed by chelation. Finally, disruption of lung tissue oxidant-inflammatory/defense balance was evidenced by increased levels of lipid and protein oxidation. Unlike response to a single IT exposure to the same dose and source of extract, multiple exposures result in lung oxidative damage and a systemic inflammatory reaction. These could be attributed to compromised capacity to activate the protective Nrf2 tissue defense system. It is suggested that water-soluble metals present in urban PM, potentially from break and tire wear, may constitute major drivers of the pulmonary and systemic responses to multiple exposure to urban PM. PMID:26735168

  8. Exposure of pink salmon embryos to dissolved polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons delays development, prolonging vulnerability to mechanical damage.

    PubMed

    Carls, Mark G; Thedinga, John F

    2010-06-01

    Exposure to dissolved polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from crude oil delays pink salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha) embryo development, thus prolonging their susceptibility to mechanical damage (shock). Exposure also caused mortality, edema, and anemia consistent with previous studies. Hatching and yolk consumption were delayed, indicating the rate of embryonic development was slowed by PAH exposure. The net result was that exposed embryos were more susceptible to shock than normal, unexposed embryos. Susceptibility to shock was protracted by 4-6d for more than a month in embryos exposed to exponentially declining, dissolved PAH concentrations in water passed through oiled rock; the initial total PAH concentration was 22.4microgL(-1) and the geometric mean concentration was 4.5microgL(-1) over the first 20d. Protracted susceptibility to shock caused by exposure to PAHs dissolved from oil could potentially increase the reported incidence of mortality in oiled stream systems, such as those in Prince William Sound after the Exxon Valdez oil spill, if observers fail to discriminate between direct mortality and shock-induced mortality. PMID:20089299

  9. Molecular Mechanisms of Lipoic Acid Protection against Aflatoxin B1-Induced Liver Oxidative Damage and Inflammatory Responses in Broilers

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qiugang; Li, Yan; Fan, Yu; Zhao, Lihong; Wei, Hua; Ji, Cheng; Zhang, Jianyun

    2015-01-01

    Alpha-lipoic acid (α-LA) was evaluated in this study for its molecular mechanisms against liver oxidative damage and inflammatory responses induced by aflatoxin B1 (AFB1). Birds were randomly allocated into four groups with different diets for three weeks: a basal diet, a 300 mg/kg α-LA supplementation in a basal diet, a diet containing 74 μg/kg AFB1, and 300 mg/kg α-LA supplementation in a diet containing 74 μg/kg AFB1. In the AFB1 group, the expression of GSH-PX mRNA was down-regulated (p < 0.05), and the levels of lipid peroxide and nitric oxide were increased (p < 0.05) in the chicken livers compared to those of the control group. Additionally, the mRNA level of the pro-inflammatory factor interleukin-6 was up-regulated significantly (p < 0.05), the protein expressions of both the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65 and the inducible nitric oxide synthase were enhanced significantly (p < 0.05) in the AFB1 group. All of these negative effects were inhibited by α-LA. These results indicate that α-LA may be effective in preventing hepatic oxidative stress, down-regulating the expression of hepatic pro-inflammatory cytokines, as well as inhibiting NF-κB expression. PMID:26694462

  10. Ly6Chigh Monocytes Protect against Kidney Damage during Sepsis via a CX3CR1-Dependent Adhesion Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Chousterman, Benjamin G; Boissonnas, Alexandre; Poupel, Lucie; Baudesson de Chanville, Camille; Adam, Julien; Tabibzadeh, Nahid; Licata, Fabrice; Lukaszewicz, Anne-Claire; Lombès, Amélie; Deterre, Philippe; Payen, Didier; Combadière, Christophe

    2016-03-01

    Monocytes have a crucial role in both proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory phenomena occurring during sepsis. Monocyte recruitment and activation are orchestrated by the chemokine receptors CX3CR1 and CCR2 and their cognate ligands. However, little is known about the roles of these cells and chemokines during the acute phase of inflammation in sepsis. Using intravital microscopy in a murine model of polymicrobial sepsis, we showed that inflammatory Ly6C(high) monocytes infiltrated kidneys, exhibited altered motility, and adhered strongly to the renal vascular wall in a chemokine receptor CX3CR1-dependent manner. Adoptive transfer of Cx3cr1-proficient monocyte-enriched bone marrow cells into septic Cx3cr1-depleted mice prevented kidney damage and promoted mouse survival. Modulation of CX3CR1 activation in septic mice controlled monocyte adhesion, regulated proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokine expression, and was associated with the extent of kidney lesions such that the number of lesions decreased when CX3CR1 activity increased. Consistent with these results, the pro-adhesive I249 CX3CR1 allele in humans was associated with a lower incidence of AKI in patients with sepsis. These data show that inflammatory monocytes have a protective effect during sepsis via a CX3CR1-dependent adhesion mechanism. This receptor might be a new therapeutic target for kidney injury during sepsis. PMID:26160897

  11. Molecular Mechanisms of Lipoic Acid Protection against Aflatoxin B₁-Induced Liver Oxidative Damage and Inflammatory Responses in Broilers.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qiugang; Li, Yan; Fan, Yu; Zhao, Lihong; Wei, Hua; Ji, Cheng; Zhang, Jianyun

    2015-12-01

    Alpha-lipoic acid (α-LA) was evaluated in this study for its molecular mechanisms against liver oxidative damage and inflammatory responses induced by aflatoxin B₁ (AFB₁). Birds were randomly allocated into four groups with different diets for three weeks: a basal diet, a 300 mg/kg α-LA supplementation in a basal diet, a diet containing 74 μg/kg AFB₁, and 300 mg/kg α-LA supplementation in a diet containing 74 μg/kg AFB₁. In the AFB₁ group, the expression of GSH-PX mRNA was down-regulated (p < 0.05), and the levels of lipid peroxide and nitric oxide were increased (p < 0.05) in the chicken livers compared to those of the control group. Additionally, the mRNA level of the pro-inflammatory factor interleukin-6 was up-regulated significantly (p < 0.05), the protein expressions of both the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65 and the inducible nitric oxide synthase were enhanced significantly (p < 0.05) in the AFB₁ group. All of these negative effects were inhibited by α-LA. These results indicate that α-LA may be effective in preventing hepatic oxidative stress, down-regulating the expression of hepatic pro-inflammatory cytokines, as well as inhibiting NF-κB expression. PMID:26694462

  12. High order ADER schemes for a unified first order hyperbolic formulation of continuum mechanics: Viscous heat-conducting fluids and elastic solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumbser, Michael; Peshkov, Ilya; Romenski, Evgeniy; Zanotti, Olindo

    2016-06-01

    This paper is concerned with the numerical solution of the unified first order hyperbolic formulation of continuum mechanics recently proposed by Peshkov and Romenski [110], further denoted as HPR model. In that framework, the viscous stresses are computed from the so-called distortion tensor A, which is one of the primary state variables in the proposed first order system. A very important key feature of the HPR model is its ability to describe at the same time the behavior of inviscid and viscous compressible Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids with heat conduction, as well as the behavior of elastic and visco-plastic solids. Actually, the model treats viscous and inviscid fluids as generalized visco-plastic solids. This is achieved via a stiff source term that accounts for strain relaxation in the evolution equations of A. Also heat conduction is included via a first order hyperbolic system for the thermal impulse, from which the heat flux is computed. The governing PDE system is hyperbolic and fully consistent with the first and the second principle of thermodynamics. It is also fundamentally different from first order Maxwell-Cattaneo-type relaxation models based on extended irreversible thermodynamics. The HPR model represents therefore a novel and unified description of continuum mechanics, which applies at the same time to fluid mechanics and solid mechanics. In this paper, the direct connection between the HPR model and the classical hyperbolic-parabolic Navier-Stokes-Fourier theory is established for the first time via a formal asymptotic analysis in the stiff relaxation limit. From a numerical point of view, the governing partial differential equations are very challenging, since they form a large nonlinear hyperbolic PDE system that includes stiff source terms and non-conservative products. We apply the successful family of one-step ADER-WENO finite volume (FV) and ADER discontinuous Galerkin (DG) finite element schemes to the HPR model in the stiff

  13. EFFECT OF LASER LIGHT ON LASER PLASMAS: Explosive breeding of point defects as a mechanism for multipulse damage to absorbing media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volodin, B. L.; Emel'yanov, Vladimir I.; Shlykov, Yu G.

    1993-01-01

    A mechanism based on the concept of an explosive breeding of point defects is outlined for the multipulse damage to semiconductors by short laser pulses. Analytic expressions are derived for the critical temperature, the critical intensity, and the intensity dependence of the critical number of pulses. The theoretical results agree well with experimental data.

  14. In-line inspection technologies for mechanical damage and SCC in pipelines: Final report on tasks 1 and 2. Report for June 1996-September 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Bubenik, T.A.; Nestleroth, J.B.; Davis, R.J.; Crouch, A.; Udpa, S.

    1998-12-01

    The report is a summary of work conducted under a research and development contract entitled `In-Line Inspection Technologies for Mechanical Damage and SCC (Stress-Corrosion Cracking) in Pipelines.` This project evaluated and developed in-line inspection technologies for detecting mechanical damage and cracking in natural gas transmission and hazardous liquid pipelines. The work consists of three major tasks. Task 1 covers inspection methods for mechanical damage. Task 2 covers methods of detecting stress-corrosion cracks. Task 3 covers verification testing. This report is a summary of the work completed in the first two tasks. Task 1 examined magnetic flux leakage (MFL) for detecting mechanical damage. It evaluated existing signal generation and analysis methods to establish a baseline from which today`s tools can be evaluated and tomorrows advances measured, and it developed improvements to signal analysis methods and verified them through pull rig testing. Finally, it built an experience base and defect sets to generalize the results from individual tools and analysis methods to the full range of practical applications. Task 2 evaluated two inspection technologies for detecting cracks. Three subtasks were conducted to evaluate velocity-induced remote-field techniques, remote-field eddy-current techniques, and external techniques for sizing stress-corrosion cracks.

  15. The role of microstructure on deformation and damage mechanisms in a Nickel-based superalloy at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciejewski, Kimberly E.

    The overall objective of this research work is the development and implementation of a mechanistic based time-dependent crack growth model which considers the role of creep, fatigue and environment interactions on both the bulk and the grain boundary phase in ME3 disk material. The model is established by considering a moving crack tip along a grain boundary path in which damage events are described in terms of the grain boundary deformation and related accommodation processes. Modeling of these events was achieved by adapting a cohesive zone approach (an interface with internal singular surfaces) in which the grain boundary dislocation network is smeared into a Newtonian fluid element. The deformation behavior of this element is controlled by the continuum in both far field (internal state variable model) and near field (crystal plasticity model) and the intrinsic grain boundary viscosity which is characterized by microstructural parameters, including grain boundary precipitates and morphology, and is able to define the mobility of the element by scaling the motion of dislocations into a mesoscopic scale. Within the cohesive zone element, the motion of gliding dislocations in the tangential direction relates to the observed grain boundary sliding displacement, the rate of which is limited by the climb of dislocations over grain boundary obstacles. Effects of microstructural variation and orientation of the surrounding continuum are embedded in the tangential stress developing in the grain boundary. The mobility of the element in the tangential direction (i.e. by grain boundary sliding) characterizes the accumulation of irreversible displacement while the vertical movement (migration), although present, is assumed to alter stress by relaxation and, thus, is not considered a contributing factor in the damage process. This process is controlled by the rate at which the time-dependent sliding reaches a critical displacement and as such, a damage criterion is

  16. Repairing of N-mustard derivative BO-1055 induced DNA damage requires NER, HR, and MGMT-dependent DNA repair mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Ching-Ying; Chou, Wen-Cheng; Wu, Chin-Chung; Wong, Teng-Song; Kakadiya, Rajesh; Lee, Te-Chang; Su, Tsann-Long; Wang, Hui-Chun

    2015-09-22

    Alkylating agents are frequently used as first-line chemotherapeutics for various newly diagnosed cancers. Disruption of genome integrity by such agents can lead to cell lethality if DNA lesions are not removed. Several DNA repair mechanisms participate in the recovery of mono- or bi-functional DNA alkylation. Thus, DNA repair capacity is correlated with the therapeutic response. Here, we assessed the function of novel water-soluble N-mustard BO-1055 (ureidomustin) in DNA damage response and repair mechanisms. As expected, BO-1055 induces ATM and ATR-mediated DNA damage response cascades, including downstream Chk1/Chk2 phosphorylation, S/G2 cell-cycle arrest, and cell death. Further investigation revealed that cell survival sensitivity to BO-1055 is comparable to that of mitomycin C. Both compounds require nucleotide excision repair and homologous recombination, but not non-homologous end-joining, to repair conventional cross-linking DNA damage. Interestingly and unlike mitomycin C and melphalan, MGMT activity was also observed in BO-1055 damage repair systems, which reflects the occurrence of O-alkyl DNA lesions. Combined treatment with ATM/ATR kinase inhibitors significantly increases BO-1055 sensitivity. Our study pinpoints that BO-1055 can be used for treating tumors that with deficient NER, HR, and MGMT DNA repair genes, or for synergistic therapy in tumors that DNA damage response have been suppressed. PMID:26208482

  17. Repairing of N-mustard derivative BO-1055 induced DNA damage requires NER, HR, and MGMT-dependent DNA repair mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chin-Chung; Wong, Teng-Song; Kakadiya, Rajesh; Lee, Te-Chang; Su, Tsann-Long; Wang, Hui-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Alkylating agents are frequently used as first-line chemotherapeutics for various newly diagnosed cancers. Disruption of genome integrity by such agents can lead to cell lethality if DNA lesions are not removed. Several DNA repair mechanisms participate in the recovery of mono- or bi-functional DNA alkylation. Thus, DNA repair capacity is correlated with the therapeutic response. Here, we assessed the function of novel water-soluble N-mustard BO-1055 (ureidomustin) in DNA damage response and repair mechanisms. As expected, BO-1055 induces ATM and ATR-mediated DNA damage response cascades, including downstream Chk1/Chk2 phosphorylation, S/G2 cell-cycle arrest, and cell death. Further investigation revealed that cell survival sensitivity to BO-1055 is comparable to that of mitomycin C. Both compounds require nucleotide excision repair and homologous recombination, but not non-homologous end-joining, to repair conventional cross-linking DNA damage. Interestingly and unlike mitomycin C and melphalan, MGMT activity was also observed in BO-1055 damage repair systems, which reflects the occurrence of O-alkyl DNA lesions. Combined treatment with ATM/ATR kinase inhibitors significantly increases BO-1055 sensitivity. Our study pinpoints that BO-1055 can be used for treating tumors that with deficient NER, HR, and MGMT DNA repair genes, or for synergistic therapy in tumors that DNA damage response have been suppressed. PMID:26208482

  18. Experimental Investigation of Damage and Fracture Mechanisms Controlling the Performance of Full Aperture Easy Open Ends for Food Containers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, D. L. P.; Nagy, G. T.; Owen, D. R. J.

    2011-05-01

    Can manufacturers produce hundreds of millions of cans annually, increasingly, food cans are being opened by lifting a tab on the can end that initiates a fracture, which then propagates around a circumferential score. The damage and fracture mechanisms that lead to crack initiation and propagation in the opening process, however, are not fully understood, therefore optimisation of easy open end scores is largely based on trial and error. This paper presents an experimental analysis that concentrates on the combined shear and bending forces as applied to the particular industrial method concerning full aperture easy open ends. The influence of a gradually increasing gap measured between the score and shear force location on traditional groove geometries and depths are examined for two different packaging steels. Earlier studies have shown that the complete opening cycle depends on fracture modes I, II & III as well as their combination. Experimental results for Modes I, II & III will be presented, however attention will focus on the behaviour of the initial fracture point, whereby prior investigations have shown it to be influenced primarily by mode II shearing. After initial specimen manufacture, where the score is formed by pressing a punch into a thin steel sheet the predeformed scored specimens are loaded in shear to simulate the local stress field found during the initial opening phase. Experiments have been completed using a novel Mode II experimental technique that has been designed for use in the majority of commercially available tensile test machines. Experimental results indicate that opening forces can change radically with different gap sizes and that there is considerable potential for the industrialised process of can end manufacture to be optimised through the efficient management and control of the can ends dimensional parameters.

  19. Mechanical Properties and Real-Time Damage Evaluations of Environmental Barrier Coated SiC/SiC CMCs Subjected to Tensile Loading Under Thermal Gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appleby, Matthew; Zhu, Dongming; Morscher, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) require new state-of-the art environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) to withstand increased temperature requirements and high velocity combustion corrosive combustion gasses. The present work compares the response of coated and uncoated SiC/SiC CMC substrates subjected to simulated engine environments followed by high temperature mechanical testing to asses retained properties and damage mechanisms. Our focus is to explore the capabilities of electrical resistance (ER) measurements as an NDE technique for testing of retained properties under combined high heat-flux and mechanical loading conditions. Furthermore, Acoustic Emission (AE) measurements and Digital Image Correlation (DIC) were performed to determine material damage onset and accumulation.

  20. Elucidation of the mechanisms of action of Bacteriophage K/nano-emulsion formulations against S. aureus via measurement of particle size and zeta potential.

    PubMed

    Esteban, Patricia Perez; Jenkins, A Toby A; Arnot, Tom C

    2016-03-01

    In earlier work we have demonstrated the effect that nano-emulsions have on bacterial growth, and most importantly the enhanced bacteriophage infectivity against Staphylococcus aureus in planktonic culture when phage are carried in nano-emulsions. However, the mechanisms of enhancement of the bacteriophage killing effect are not specifically understood. This work focuses on the investigation of the possible interactions between emulsion droplets and bacterial cells, between emulsion droplets and bacteriophages, and finally interactions between all three components: nano-emulsion droplets, bacteria, and bacteriophages. The first approach consists of simple calculations to determine the spatial distribution of the components, based on measurements of particle size. It was found that nano-emulsion droplets are much more numerous than bacteria or bacteriophage, and due to their size and surface area they must be covering the surface of both cells and bacteriophage particles. Stabilisation of bacteriophages due to electrostatic forces and interaction with nano-emulsion droplets is suspected, since bacteriophages may be protected against inactivation due to 'charge shielding'. Zeta potential was measured for the individual components in the system, and for all of them combined. It was concluded that the presence of nano-emulsions could be reducing electrostatic repulsion between bacterial cells and bacteriophage, both of which are very negatively 'charged'. Moreover, nano-emulsions lead to more favourable interaction between bacteriophages and bacteria, enhancing the anti-microbial or killing effect. These findings are relevant since the physicochemical properties of nano-emulsions (i.e. particle size distribution and zeta potential) are key in determining the efficacy of the formulation against infection in the context of responsive burn wound dressings-which is the main target for this work. PMID:26700237

  1. Damage Mechanisms and Controlled Crack Propagation in a Hot Pressed Silicon Nitride Ceramic. Ph.D. Thesis - Northwestern Univ., 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calomino, Anthony Martin

    1994-01-01

    The subcritical growth of cracks from pre-existing flaws in ceramics can severely affect the structural reliability of a material. The ability to directly observe subcritical crack growth and rigorously analyze its influence on fracture behavior is important for an accurate assessment of material performance. A Mode I fracture specimen and loading method has been developed which permits the observation of stable, subcritical crack extension in monolithic and toughened ceramics. The test specimen and procedure has demonstrated its ability to generate and stably propagate sharp, through-thickness cracks in brittle high modulus materials. Crack growth for an aluminum oxide ceramic was observed to be continuously stable throughout testing. Conversely, the fracture behavior of a silicon nitride ceramic exhibited crack growth as a series of subcritical extensions which are interrupted by dynamic propagation. Dynamic initiation and arrest fracture resistance measurements for the silicon nitride averaged 67 and 48 J/sq m, respectively. The dynamic initiation event was observed to be sudden and explosive. Increments of subcritical crack growth contributed to a 40 percent increase in fracture resistance before dynamic initiation. Subcritical crack growth visibly marked the fracture surface with an increase in surface roughness. Increments of subcritical crack growth loosen ceramic material near the fracture surface and the fracture debris is easily removed by a replication technique. Fracture debris is viewed as evidence that both crack bridging and subsurface microcracking may be some of the mechanisms contributing to the increase in fracture resistance. A Statistical Fracture Mechanics model specifically developed to address subcritical crack growth and fracture reliability is used together with a damaged zone of material at the crack tip to model experimental results. A Monte Carlo simulation of the actual experiments was used to establish a set of modeling input

  2. Soaking formulations that can soften and remove hardened bovine manure: part II, effects on quality of leather

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previously developed soaking formulations were shown to soften adobe-type manure and facilitating its removal thus limiting its damaging effects on bovine hides. The mechanical stress due to the weight and pressure of hard to remove adobe-type manure on bovine hides can cause unwanted holes in the ...

  3. Gurson's Model: ALE Formulation and Strain Localization

    SciTech Connect

    Cunda, Luiz A. B. da; Creus, Guillermo J.

    2007-05-17

    This paper presents a brief review of Gurson's damage model, employed to describes the strength degradation in ductile metals submitted to large plastic deformations. The damage model is applied using finite elements and an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation (ALE), to ensure a better quality to the finite elements mesh. The study of the combined application of ALE and Gurson approach to damage modeling and strain localization is the object of this paper.

  4. The role of microstructure on deformation and damage mechanisms in a Nickel-based superalloy at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciejewski, Kimberly E.

    The overall objective of this research work is the development and implementation of a mechanistic based time-dependent crack growth model which considers the role of creep, fatigue and environment interactions on both the bulk and the grain boundary phase in ME3 disk material. The model is established by considering a moving crack tip along a grain boundary path in which damage events are described in terms of the grain boundary deformation and related accommodation processes. Modeling of these events was achieved by adapting a cohesive zone approach (an interface with internal singular surfaces) in which the grain boundary dislocation network is smeared into a Newtonian fluid element. The deformation behavior of this element is controlled by the continuum in both far field (internal state variable model) and near field (crystal plasticity model) and the intrinsic grain boundary viscosity which is characterized by microstructural parameters, including grain boundary precipitates and morphology, and is able to define the mobility of the element by scaling the motion of dislocations into a mesoscopic scale. Within the cohesive zone element, the motion of gliding dislocations in the tangential direction relates to the observed grain boundary sliding displacement, the rate of which is limited by the climb of dislocations over grain boundary obstacles. Effects of microstructural variation and orientation of the surrounding continuum are embedded in the tangential stress developing in the grain boundary. The mobility of the element in the tangential direction (i.e. by grain boundary sliding) characterizes the accumulation of irreversible displacement while the vertical movement (migration), although present, is assumed to alter stress by relaxation and, thus, is not considered a contributing factor in the damage process. This process is controlled by the rate at which the time-dependent sliding reaches a critical displacement and as such, a damage criterion is

  5. Modeling Fatigue Damage in Long-Fiber Thermoplastics

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Kunc, Vlastimil; Bapanapalli, Satish K.

    2009-10-30

    This paper applies a fatigue damage model recently developed for injection-molded long-fiber thermoplastics (LFTs) to predict the modulus reduction and fatigue lifetime of glass/polyamide 6,6 (PA6,6) specimens. The fatigue model uses a multiscale mechanistic approach to describe fatigue damage accumulation in these materials subjected to cyclic loading. Micromechanical modeling using a modified Eshelby-Mori-Tanaka approach combined with averaging techniques for fiber length and orientation distributions is performed to establish the stiffness reduction relation for the composite as a function of the microcrack volume fraction. Next, continuum damage mechanics and a thermodynamic formulation are used to derive the constitutive relations and the damage evolution law. The fatigue damage model has been implemented in the ABAQUS finite element code and has been applied to analyze fatigue of the studied glass/PA6,6 specimens. The predictions agree well with the experimental results.

  6. Early stage fatigue damage occurs in bovine tendon fascicles in the absence of changes in mechanics at either the gross or micro-structural level.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Jennifer H; Riley, Graham P; Screen, Hazel R C

    2014-10-01

    Many tendon injuries are believed to result from repetitive motion or overuse, leading to the accumulation of micro-damage over time. In vitro fatigue loading can be used to characterise