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Sample records for damping mechanisms analisis

  1. On damping mechanisms in beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Inman, D. J.

    1989-01-01

    A partial differential equation model of a cantilevered beam with a tip mass at its free end is used to study damping in a composite. Four separate damping mechanisms consisting of air damping, strain rate damping, spatial hysteresis and time hysteresis are considered experimentally. Dynamic tests were performed to produce time histories. The time history data is then used along with an approximate model to form a sequence of least squares problems. The solution of the least squares problem yields the estimated damping coefficients. The resulting experimentally determined analytical model is compared with the time histories via numerical simulation of the dynamic response. The procedure suggested here is compared with a standard modal damping ratio model commonly used in experimental modal analysis.

  2. Spatial versus time hysteresis in damping mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Fabiano, R. H.; Wang, Y.; Inman, D. J.; Cudney, H., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    A description is given of continuing investigations on the task of estimating internal damping mechanisms in flexible structures. Specifically, two models for internal damping in Euler-Bernoulli beams are considered: spatial hysteresis and time hysteresis. A theoretically sound computational algorithm for estimation is described, and experimental results are discussed. It is concluded that both models perform well in the sense that they accurately predict response for the experiments conducted.

  3. Damping mechanisms in chemically vapor deposited SiC fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, James A.; Goldsby, Jon C.

    1993-01-01

    Evaluating the damping of reinforcement fibers is important for understanding their microstructures and the vibrational response of their structural composites. In this study the damping capacities of two types of chemically vapor deposited silicon carbide fibers were measured from -200 C to as high as 800 C. Measurements were made at frequencies in the range 50 to 15000 Hz on single cantilevered fibers. At least four sources were identified which contribute to fiber damping, the most significant being thermoelastic damping and grain boundary sliding. The mechanisms controlling all sources and their potential influence on fiber and composite performance are discussed.

  4. Surface contamination and changes of mechanical damping in Berea sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, Will Marlin

    Small changes in the pore fluid chemistry of Berea sandstone cause significant changes in mechanical damping. A method of detecting contaminants in porous rocks is under ongoing development. Here I report several laboratory measurements done in support of this development, including that of a large difference in mechanical damping between clean and chemically treated Berea sandstone. I develop a model of a surface-chemistry related damping mechanism, and qualitatively compare results from calculations to experimental results. I rule out other damping mechanisms, and conclude that the observed damping is due to surface chemistry effects (contact angle hysteresis). To help verify experimental results, an anelastic structure with calculable damping properties was built. Damping of this structure was measured by the same method used for damping measurements on Berea sandstone. Results from these measurements show good agreement to the calculated response of the structure in the frequency range 0.03--1 Hz.* *This dissertation includes a CD that is compound (contains both a paper copy and a D as part of the dissertation. The CD requires the following applications: Adobe Acrobat.

  5. Contaminant-induced mechanical damping in partially saturated Berea sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, W. M.; Spetzler, H. A.

    2002-08-01

    We have measured mechanical damping in partially saturated Berea sandstone that is strongly dependent on the presence of a small amount of oil. This effect is observed as a function of water saturation and average strain amplitude. These observations are presented as evidence of a damping mechanism previously observed and characterized in artificial cracks. We conclude that this damping effect is due to surface chemistry changes in the rock, and infer that seismic attenuation can be used to monitor small changes in pore fluid chemistry under certain conditions.

  6. An investigation of the mechanical damping of ductile iron

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, S.H.; Stuch, T.E.; Salzbrenner, R.

    1995-11-01

    Ductile iron has been suggested as a candidate material for a number of practical applications, including turbine casings, automotive components, and transportation and storage casks for hazardous and radioactive materials. The applications require the enhanced ductility resulting from the presence of spherical graphite nodules in the ductile ferrite iron matrix. Proper design of such components requires a knowledge of the mechanical properties, including how energy is absorbed and dissipated (mechanical damping) by the test material. This article is a study of the mechanical damping of a series of well-characterized ductile iron materials (four separate materials) as a function of strain amplitude, temperature over the range of {minus}100 C to + 100 C, and magnetic field. The major sources of damping were found to be dislocation motion in the graphite phase and magnetomechanical damping in the ferrite phase. The magnitude of the magnetomechanical damping was much larger than that due to dislocation motion. An additional goal of the investigation was to determine if any correlation existed between the measured mechanical damping and the fracture toughness of the ductile iron materials; no correlation was found.

  7. Discrete mechanism damping effects in the solar array flight experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinson, E. D.

    1986-01-01

    Accelerometer data were collected during on-orbit structural dynamic testing of the Solar Array Flight Experiment aboard the Space Shuttle, and were analyzed at Lockheed Missile and Space Co. to determine the amount of damping present in the structure. The results of this analysis indicated that the damping present in the fundamental in-plane mode of the structure substantially exceeded that of the fundamental out-of-plane mode. In an effort to determine the source of the higher in-plane damping, a test was performed involving a small device known as a constant-force spring motor or constant-torque mechanism. Results from this test indicate that this discrete device is at least partially responsible for the increased in-plane modal damping of the Solar Array Flight Experiment structure.

  8. Thiol-ene/methacrylate systems for mechanical damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNair, Olivia; Senyurt, Askim; Wei, Huanyu; Gould, Trent; Piland, Scott; Hoyle, Charles; Savin, Daniel

    2010-03-01

    Ternary thiol-ene-methacrylate (TEMA) networks as materials for mechanical energy damping are unique to the sports world. Using a photoinitiation process, TEMA systems are formed via an initial thiol-ene step-growth mechanism along with traditional radical polymerization of acrylate and ene monomers. Final networks have two-part morphologies: acrylate homopolymer sectors imbedded in a multi-component mesh. Several (TEMA) systems have been synthesized and analyzed via thermal and mechanical probing. Initial studies on these ternary systems have shown excellent properties compared to traditional ethylene vinyl alcohol (EVA) copolymers. For example, PEMA networks exhibit glass transition temperatures 33 K higher than EVA, resulting in improved damping at room temperature. This research will help develop relationships between tan delta, glass transition and their effects on mechanical energy damping for ternary (TEMA) systems.

  9. An Independent Test of a Subresonant Mechanical Damping Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, W.; Spetzler, H. A.

    2001-12-01

    To estimate the precision and accuracy of an apparatus built to measure mechanical damping in crustal rocks, we have constructed a structure from aluminum and high-Newtonian-viscosity silicone oil. This structure is similar in design to many shock absorbers, but with no moving piston. Oil is forced from a reservoir, through a capillary, by elastic deformation of the reservoir wall. Oil returns through the capillary as the deformation relaxes under diminished load. The structure can be modeled as a linear set of elastic and viscous elements. The dynamic structural behavior of this structure was analysed mathematically, and its damping as a function of frequency was calculated. Measurements were made of the structure in the damping spectrometer using frequencies in the range 1 mHz - 100 Hz, and both sets of results are compared. The Debye peak predicted by calculation is well resolved in the measurement, and, within uncertainty, experiment and theory agree in the region of the peak. This confirms that the spectrometer is useful in this range. Further use of a calculated structure similar to this could aid in mechanical damping measurements under less favorable conditions such as under confining pressure, and possibly lead to the development of a low-frequency mechanical damping standard.

  10. Negative nonlinear damping of a multilayer graphene mechanical resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Vibhor; Shevchuk, Olga; Blanter, Ya. M.; Steele, Gary A.

    2016-06-01

    We experimentally investigate the nonlinear response of a multilayer graphene resonator using a superconducting microwave cavity to detect its motion. The radiation pressure force is used to drive the mechanical resonator in an optomechanically induced transparency configuration. By varying the amplitudes of drive and probe tones, the mechanical resonator can be brought into a nonlinear limit. Using the calibration of the optomechanical coupling, we quantify the mechanical Duffing nonlinearity. By increasing the drive force, we observe a decrease in the mechanical dissipation rate at large amplitudes, suggesting a negative nonlinear damping mechanism in the graphene resonator. Increasing the optomechanical backaction further, we observe instabilities in the mechanical response.

  11. Integrated mechanics for the passive damping of polymer-matrix composites and composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1991-01-01

    Some recent developments on integrated damping mechanics for unidirectional composites, laminates, and composite structures are reviewed. Simplified damping micromechanics relate the damping of on-axis and off-axis composites to constituent properties, fiber volume ratio, fiber orientation, temperature, and moisture. Laminate and structural damping mechanics for thin composites are summarized. Discrete layer damping mechanics for thick laminates, including the effects of interlaminar shear damping, are developed and semianalytical predictions of modal damping in thick simply supported specialty composite plates are presented. Applications show the advantages of the unified mechanics, and illustrate the effect of fiber volume ratio, fiber orientation, structural geometry, and temperature on the damping. Additional damping properties for composite plates of various laminations, aspect ratios, fiber content, and temperature illustrate the merits and ranges of applicability of each theory (thin or thick laminates).

  12. Determining damping mechanisms in a composite beam by experimental modal analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cudney, H. H.; Inman, D. J.

    1989-01-01

    A method of estimating the distributed damping parameters of a beam based on measured modal parameters (frequency and damping ratios) is derived. Three different mathematical models were used to model the damping mechanism of a quasi-isotropic pultruded cantilevered beam. These three models were (1) viscous (air) damping, (2) strain-rate damping, and (3) both viscous and strain-rate damping. Values were obtained for each of the damping models as well as the modulus of elasticity of the beam. It is found that the two-parameter damping model provides the best fit to measure modal data. However, the two-parameter damping model can only reproduce the measured damping ratios to within 85 percent.

  13. The physical mechanisms of the perception of dampness in fabrics.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Plante, A M; Holcombe, B V

    1992-11-01

    The detection of dampness in hygroscopic materials has been investigated both by subjective tests and by the application of a model of the physical mechanisms involved. Subjects were asked to rate the degree of dampness of a range of materials of different moisture contents after a short period of contact with the inner forearm. Skin and fabric inner surface temperatures were recorded. It was found that highly hygroscopic wool fabrics were perceived as being dryer and maintained a higher temperature at the skin surface than polyester, a less hygroscopic fabric, during fabric-skin contact. A physical model of the sorption/desorption process in hygroscopic materials has been developed from knowledge of fibre sorption kinetics and used to study the physical processes which take place at the skin-fabric interface during transient contact. These predictions agree well with the subjective responses and the measured temperatures. PMID:1476564

  14. Nonlinear damping in mechanical resonators made from carbon nanotubes and graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichler, A.; Moser, J.; Chaste, J.; Zdrojek, M.; Wilson-Rae, I.; Bachtold, A.

    2011-06-01

    The theory of damping is discussed in Newton's Principia and has been tested in objects as diverse as the Foucault pendulum, the mirrors in gravitational-wave detectors and submicrometre mechanical resonators. In general, the damping observed in these systems can be described by a linear damping force. Advances in nanofabrication mean that it is now possible to explore damping in systems with one or more atomic-scale dimensions. Here we study the damping of mechanical resonators based on carbon nanotubes and graphene sheets. The damping is found to strongly depend on the amplitude of motion, and can be described by a nonlinear rather than a linear damping force. We exploit the nonlinear nature of damping in these systems to improve the figures of merit for both nanotube and graphene resonators. For instance, we achieve a quality factor of 100,000 for a graphene resonator.

  15. Mechanics of damping for fiber composite laminates including hygro-thermal effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1989-01-01

    An integrated mechanics theory was developed for the modeling of composite damping from the micromechanics to the laminate level. Simplified, design oriented equations based on hysteretic damping are presented for on-axis plies, off-axis plies, and laminates including the effect of temperature, moisture, and interply hysteretic damping. The temperature rise within vibrating composite laminates resulting from strain energy dissipation is also modeled, and their coupled hygro-thermo-mechanical response is predicted. The method correlates well with reported damping measurements. Application examples illustrate the effect of various ply, laminate, and hygro-thermal parameters on the overall damping performance of composite laminates.

  16. Mechanics of damping for fiber composite laminates including hygro-thermal effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Chamis, C. C.

    1989-01-01

    An integrated mechanics theory has been developed for the modeling of composite damping from the micromechanics to the laminate level. Simplified, design oriented equations based on hysteretic damping are presented for on-axis plies, off-axis plies, and laminates including the effect of temperature, moisture, and interply hysteretic damping. The temperature rise within vibrating composite laminates resulting from strain energy dissipation is also modeled, and their coupled hygro-thermo-mechanical response is predicted. The method correlates well with reported damping measurements. Application examples illustrate the effect of various ply, laminate, and hygro-thermal parameters on the overall damping performance of composite laminates.

  17. Coronal Seismology: Inferring Magnetic Fields and Exploring Damping Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAteer, R. T. James; Ireland, Jack

    2015-08-01

    Recent observations in extreme ultra-violet wavelengths have shown that the solar corona oscillates at many different spatial sizes and temporal size scales. However, much remains unknown about many of these oscillations; they are intermittent for unknown reasons, appear on some coronal features and not on other, similar, neighboring features, and may (or may not) be magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wave modes. Definitive causes of the structure and origins of these oscillations are still largely lacking. Here, we use automated oscillation detection routines to study a large sample of oscillations, inferring physical mechanisms as to how and why the corona varies.First, we measure the oscillation content of different physical regions on the Sun in SDO AIA data, using two different automated oscillation detection algorithms. This shows a power-law distribution in oscillatory frequency, disagreeing with strong historical assumptions about the nature of coronal heating and coronal seismology. We show how such disagreements can be reconciled by using a power-law background for oscillatory signals.Second we use coronal seismology to provide a means to infer coronal plasma parameters and to differentiate between potential damping mechanisms. Recent sets of kink-mode observations (usually 5-8 loops) have come insights into how the coronal is structured and how it evolves. We present a complex set of flare-induced, off-limb, coronal kink-mode oscillations of almost 100 loops. These display a spread of periods, amplitudes, and damping times, allowing us to probe the spatial distribution of these parameters for the first time. Both Fourier and Wavelet routines are used to automatically extract and characterize these oscillations. An initial period of P~500s, results in an inferred coronal magnetic field of B~20G. The decrease in the oscillation period of the loop position corresponds to a drop in number density inside the coronal loop, as predicted by MHD. As the the period drops

  18. Cellular Magnesium Matrix Foam Composites for Mechanical Damping Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shunmugasamy, Vasanth Chakravarthy; Mansoor, Bilal; Gupta, Nikhil

    2016-01-01

    The damping characteristics of metal alloys and metal matrix composites are relevant to the automotive, aerospace, and marine structures. Use of lightweight materials can help in increasing payload capacity and in decreasing fuel consumption. Lightweight composite materials possessing high damping capabilities that can be designed as structural members can greatly benefit in addressing these needs. In this context, the damping properties of lightweight metals such as aluminum and magnesium and their respective composites have been studied in the existing literature. This review focuses on analyzing the damping properties of aluminum and magnesium alloys and their cellular composites. The damping properties of various lightweight alloys and composites are compared on the basis of their density to understand the potential for weight saving in structural applications. Magnesium alloys are observed to possess better damping properties in comparison to aluminum. However, aluminum matrix syntactic foams reinforced with silicon carbide hollow particles possess a damping capacity and density comparable to magnesium alloy. By using the data presented in the study, composites with specific compositions and properties can be selected for a given application. In addition, the comparison of the results helps in identifying the areas where attention needs to be focused to address the future needs.

  19. A fundamental mechanism of legged locomotion with hip torque and leg damping.

    PubMed

    Shen, Z H; Seipel, J E

    2012-12-01

    New models and theories of legged locomotion are needed to better explain and predict the robustly stable legged locomotion of animals and some bio-inspired robots. In this paper we observe that a hip-torque and leg-damping mechanism is fundamental to many legged robots and some animals and determine its affect on locomotion dynamics. We discuss why this hip-torque-and-leg-damping mechanism is not so easily understood. We investigate how hip-torque and leg-damping affect the stability and robustness of locomotion using a mathematical model: First, we extend the canonical spring-loaded-inverted-pendulum model to include constant hip torque and leg damping proportional to leg length speed. Then, we calculate the stability and robustness of locomotion as a function of increasing levels of torque and damping, starting from zero-the energy conserving and marginally stable special case-to high levels of torque and damping. We find that the stabilizing effects of hip-torque and leg-damping occur in the context of the piecewise-continuous dynamics of legged locomotion, and so linear intuition does not apply. We discover that adding hip torque and leg damping changes the stability of legged locomotion in an unexpected way. When a small amount of torque and damping are added, legged locomotion is initially destabilized. As more torque and damping are added, legged locomotion turns stable and becomes increasingly more stable and more robust the more torque and damping are added. Also, stable locomotion becomes more probable over the biologically-relevant region of the parameter space, indicating greater prediction and explanatory capabilities of the model. These results provide a more clear understanding of the hip-torque-and-leg-damping mechanism of legged locomotion, and extend existing theory of legged locomotion towards a greater understanding of robustly stable locomotion. PMID:22989956

  20. The ROSETTA PHILAE Lander damping mechanism as probe for the Comet soil strength.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roll, R.

    2015-10-01

    The ROSETTA Lander is equipped with an one axis damping mechanism to dissipate kinetic energy during the touch down. This damping is necessary to avoid damages to the Lander by a hard landing shock and more important to avoid re-bouncing from ground with high velocity. The damping mechanism works best for perpendicular impact, which means the velocity vector is parallel to the damper axis and all three feet touch the ground at the same time. That is usually not the case. Part of the impact energy can be transferred into rotational energy at ground contact if the impact is not perpendicular. This energy will lift up the Lander from the ground if the harpoons and the hold down thruster fail, as happen in mission. The damping mechanism itself is an electrical generator, driven by a spindle inside a telescopic tube. This tube was extended in mission for landing by 200mm. A maximum damping length of 140mm would be usually required to compensate a landing velocity of 1m/s, if the impact happens perpendicular on hard ground. After landing the potentiometer of the telescopic tube reading shows a total damping length of only 42,5mm. The damping mechanism and the overall mechanical behavior of the Lander at touch down are well tested and characterized and transferred to a multi-body computer model. The incoming and outgoing flightpath of PHILAE allow via computer-simulation the reconstruction of the touch down. It turns out, that the outgoing flight direction is dominated by the local ground slope and that the damping length is strongly dependent on the soil strength. Damping of soft comet ground must be included to fit the damping length measured. Scenario variations of the various feet contact with different local surface features (stone or regolith) and of different soil models finally lead to a restricted range for the soil strength at the touch down area.

  1. A semi-active magnetorheological fluid mechanism with variable stiffness and damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greiner-Petter, Christoph; Suryadi Tan, Aditya; Sattel, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    In this paper a semi-active fluid-mechanism is presented, which offers a variable stiffness and damping by utilizing two magnetorheological fluid valves and two springs. The study incorporates the attributes of variable damping and stiffness into one compact device. A model for the magnetical, rheological, fluidical and mechanical behaviour of the whole system is derived. An experimental setup of the proposed system and an appropriate test bench are built in order to study the variable mechanical impedance behaviour with the corresponding simulations. The results proof that the stiffness of the system can be varied among three different values, while its damping is continuously variable.

  2. Damped Mechanical Oscillator: Experiment and Detailed Energy Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corridoni, Tommaso; D'Anna, Michele; Fuchs, Hans

    2014-01-01

    The damped oscillator is discussed in every high school textbook or introductory physics course, and a large number of papers are devoted to it in physics didactics journals. Papers typically focus on kinematic and dynamic aspects and less often on energy. Among the latter, some are devoted to the peculiar decreasing behavior of energy…

  3. Computational fluid mechanics utilizing the variational principle of modeling damping seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abernathy, J. M.; Farmer, R.

    1985-01-01

    An analysis for modeling damping seals for use in Space Shuttle main engine turbomachinery is being produced. Development of a computational fluid mechanics code for turbulent, incompressible flow is required.

  4. Computational fluid mechanics utilizing the variational principle of modeling damping seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The pressure solution for incompressible flow was investigated in support of a computational fluid mechanics model which simulates the damping seals considered for use in the space shuttle main engine turbomachinery. Future work directions are discussed briefly.

  5. Electroresponsive Aqueous Silk Protein As “Smart” Mechanical Damping Fluid

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Here we demonstrate the effectiveness of an electroresponsive aqueous silk protein polymer as a smart mechanical damping fluid. The aqueous polymer solution is liquid under ambient conditions, but is reversibly converted into a gel once subjected to an electric current, thereby increasing or decreasing in viscosity. This nontoxic, biodegradable, reversible, edible fluid also bonds to device surfaces and is demonstrated to reduce friction and provide striking wear protection. The friction and mechanical damping coefficients are shown to modulate with electric field exposure time and/or intensity. Damping coefficient can be modulated electrically, and then preserved without continued power for longer time scales than conventional “smart” fluid dampers. PMID:24750065

  6. Application of damping mechanism model and stacking fault probability in Fe-Mn alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, S.K.; Wen, Y.H.; Li, N. Teng, J.; Ding, S.; Xu, Y.G.

    2008-06-15

    In this paper, the damping mechanism model of Fe-Mn alloy was analyzed using dislocation theory. Moreover, as an important parameter in Fe-Mn based alloy, the effect of stacking fault probability on the damping capacity of Fe-19.35Mn alloy after deep-cooling or tensile deformation was also studied. The damping capacity was measured using reversal torsion pendulum. The stacking fault probability of {gamma}-austenite and {epsilon}-martensite was determined by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD) profile analysis. The microstructure was observed using scanning electronic microscope (SEM). The results indicated that with the strain amplitude increasing above a critical value, the damping capacity of Fe-19.35Mn alloy increased rapidly which could be explained using the breakaway model of Shockley partial dislocations. Deep-cooling and suitable tensile deformation could improve the damping capacity owning to the increasing of stacking fault probability of Fe-19.35Mn alloy.

  7. Feasibility study of a large-scale tuned mass damper with eddy current damping mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhihao; Chen, Zhengqing; Wang, Jianhui

    2012-09-01

    Tuned mass dampers (TMDs) have been widely used in recent years to mitigate structural vibration. However, the damping mechanisms employed in the TMDs are mostly based on viscous dampers, which have several well-known disadvantages, such as oil leakage and difficult adjustment of damping ratio for an operating TMD. Alternatively, eddy current damping (ECD) that does not require any contact with the main structure is a potential solution. This paper discusses the design, analysis, manufacture and testing of a large-scale horizontal TMD based on ECD. First, the theoretical model of ECD is formulated, then one large-scale horizontal TMD using ECD is constructed, and finally performance tests of the TMD are conducted. The test results show that the proposed TMD has a very low intrinsic damping ratio, while the damping ratio due to ECD is the dominant damping source, which can be as large as 15% in a proper configuration. In addition, the damping ratios estimated with the theoretical model are roughly consistent with those identified from the test results, and the source of this error is investigated. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the damping ratio in the proposed TMD can be easily adjusted by varying the air gap between permanent magnets and conductive plates. In view of practical applications, possible improvements and feasibility considerations for the proposed TMD are then discussed. It is confirmed that the proposed TMD with ECD is reliable and feasible for use in structural vibration control.

  8. The damped Pinney equation and its applications to dissipative quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, F.

    2010-02-01

    The present work considers the damped Pinney equation, defined as the model arising when a linear in velocity damping term is included in the Pinney equation. In the general case, the resulting equation does not admit Lie point symmetries or reduction to a simpler form by any obvious coordinate transformation. In this context, the method of Kuzmak-Luke is applied to derive a perturbation solution, for weak damping and slow time dependence of the frequency function. The perturbative and numerical solutions are shown to be in good agreement. The results are applied to examine the time evolution of Gaussian-shaped wave functions in the Kostin formulation of dissipative quantum mechanics.

  9. Mechanical loading, damping, and load-driven bone formation in mouse tibiae.

    PubMed

    Dodge, Todd; Wanis, Mina; Ayoub, Ramez; Zhao, Liming; Watts, Nelson B; Bhattacharya, Amit; Akkus, Ozan; Robling, Alexander; Yokota, Hiroki

    2012-10-01

    Mechanical loads play a pivotal role in the growth and maintenance of bone and joints. Although loading can activate anabolic genes and induce bone remodeling, damping is essential for preventing traumatic bone injury and fracture. In this study we investigated the damping capacity of bone, joint tissue, muscle, and skin using a mouse hindlimb model of enhanced loading in conjunction with finite element modeling to model bone curvature. Our hypothesis was that loads were primarily absorbed by the joints and muscle tissue, but that bone also contributed to damping through its compression and natural bending. To test this hypothesis, fresh mouse distal lower limb segments were cyclically loaded in axial compression in sequential bouts, with each subsequent bout having less surrounding tissue. A finite element model was generated to model effects of bone curvature in silico. Two damping-related parameters (phase shift angle and energy loss) were determined from the output of the loading experiments. Interestingly, the experimental results revealed that the knee joint contributed to the largest portion of the damping capacity of the limb, and bone itself accounted for approximately 38% of the total phase shift angle. Computational results showed that normal bone curvature enhanced the damping capacity of the bone by approximately 40%, and the damping effect grew at an accelerated pace as curvature was increased. Although structural curvature reduces critical loads for buckling in beam theory, evolution apparently favors maintaining curvature in the tibia. Histomorphometric analysis of the tibia revealed that in response to axial loading, bone formation was significantly enhanced in the regions that were predicted to receive a curvature-induced bending moment. These results suggest that in addition to bone's compressive damping capacity, surrounding tissues, as well as naturally-occurring bone curvature, also contribute to mechanical damping, which may ultimately affect

  10. Transfer function modeling of damping mechanisms in distributed parameter models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, J. C.; Inman, D. J.

    1994-01-01

    This work formulates a method for the modeling of material damping characteristics in distributed parameter models which may be easily applied to models such as rod, plate, and beam equations. The general linear boundary value vibration equation is modified to incorporate hysteresis effects represented by complex stiffness using the transfer function approach proposed by Golla and Hughes. The governing characteristic equations are decoupled through separation of variables yielding solutions similar to those of undamped classical theory, allowing solution of the steady state as well as transient response. Example problems and solutions are provided demonstrating the similarity of the solutions to those of the classical theories and transient responses of nonviscous systems.

  11. Damped Mechanical Oscillator: Experiment and Detailed Energy Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corridoni, Tommaso; D'Anna, Michele; Fuchs, Hans

    2014-02-01

    The damped oscillator is discussed in every high school textbook or introductory physics course, and a large number of papers are devoted to it in physics didactics journals. Papers typically focus on kinematic and dynamic aspects and less often on energy. Among the latter, some are devoted to the peculiar decreasing behavior of energy characterized by ripples, which can easily be demonstrated by using a dynamic modeling approach.8 In this note we consider an oscillator consisting of a cart running on a horizontal track, two springs, and a damping device created with magnets and a metal plate attached to the cart (Fig. 1). Using sensors and data-acquisition software,9 we measure kinematic quantities and three forces: those of the springs on the cart and, separately, the force between magnets and the plate. A detailed analysis of the energy exchanges between the cart and the interacting parts is obtained. In particular, we show that only the energy exchanges with the magnets are affected by dissipative processes while over a suitable time interval the net energy exchanged between cart and springs equals zero.

  12. Experimental investigation and CFD simulation of active damping mechanism for propellant slosh in spacecraft launch systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leuva, Dhawal

    2011-07-01

    Motion of propellant in the liquid propellant tanks due to inertial forces transferred from actions like stage separation and trajectory correction of the launch vehicle is known as propellant slosh. If unchecked, propellant slosh can reach resonance and lead to complete loss of the spacecraft stability, it can change the trajectory of the vehicle or increase consumption of propellant from the calculated requirements, thereby causing starvation of the latter stages of the vehicle. Predicting the magnitude of such slosh events is not trivial. Several passive mechanisms with limited operating range are currently used to mitigate the effects of slosh. An active damping mechanism concept developed here can operate over a large range of slosh frequencies and is much more effective than passive damping devices. Spherical and cylindrical tanks modeled using the ANSYS CFX software package considers the free surface of liquid propellant exposed to atmospheric pressure. Hydrazine is a common liquid propellant and since it is toxic, it cannot be used in experiment. But properties of hydrazine are similar to the properties of water; therefore water is substituted as propellant for experimental study. For close comparison of the data, water is substituted as propellant in CFD simulation. The research is done in three phases. The first phase includes modeling free surface slosh using CFD and validation of the model by comparison to previous experimental results. The second phase includes developing an active damping mechanism and simulating the behavior using a CFD model. The third phase includes experimental development of damping mechanism and comparing the CFD simulation to the experimental results. This research provides an excellent tool for low cost analysis of damping mechanisms for propellant slosh as well as proves that the concept of an active damping mechanism developed here, functions as expected.

  13. Solution Accounts for Structural Damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roussos, L. A.; Hyer, M. W.; Thornton, E. A.

    1982-01-01

    New analytical technique determines dynamic response of damped structures dominated by internal structural damping mechanisms. Though structural damping is often negligible compared with damping due to air friction and friction in joints, structural damping can be of major importance in structures having heavy damping treatments or in outer-space structures. Finite-element model includes nonlinear, nonviscous internal damping.

  14. Varying chromaticity: A damping mechanism for the transverse head-tail instability

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, W.; Wurtele, J.S.; Sessler, A.M.; Wurtele, J.S.

    1997-10-01

    A detailed analytical and numerical study of the suppression of the transverse head-tail instability by modulating the chromaticity over a synchrotron period is presented. We find that a threshold can be developed, and it can be increased to a value larger than the strong head-tail instability threshold. The stability criterion derived agrees very well with the simulations. The underlying physical mechanisms of the damping scheme are rotation of the head-tail phase such that the instability does not occur, and Landau damping due to the incoherent betatron tune spread generated by the varying chromaticity. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  15. Perturbation analysis of internal balancing for lightly damped mechanical systems with gyroscopic and circulatory forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blelloch, P. A.; Mingori, D. L.; Wei, J. D.

    1987-01-01

    Approximate expressions are developed for internally balanced singular values corresponding to the modes of mechanical systems with gyroscopic forces, light damping, and small circulatory forces. A brief overview is first given of the balanced realization model reduction method, including a discussion of recent work. The models considered are defined, and a perturbation analysis is used to show that the modal representation becomes asymptotically balanced as damping reduces to zero. The approximate balanced singular values are calculated, and a simple example of a flexible, dual-spin spacecraft is given as an illustration of the results.

  16. Non-Gilbert-damping Mechanism in a Ferromagnetic Heusler Compound Probed by Nonlinear Spin Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Pirro, P; Sebastian, T; Brächer, T; Serga, A A; Kubota, T; Naganuma, H; Oogane, M; Ando, Y; Hillebrands, B

    2014-11-28

    The nonlinear decay of propagating spin waves in the low-Gilbert-damping Heusler film Co_{2}Mn_{0.6}Fe_{0.4}Si is reported. Here, two initial magnons with frequency f_{0} scatter into two secondary magnons with frequencies f_{1} and f_{2}. The most remarkable observation is that f_{1} stays fixed if f_{0} is changed. This indicates, that the f_{1} magnon mode has the lowest instability threshold, which, however, cannot be understood if only Gilbert damping is present. We show that the observed behavior is caused by interaction of the magnon modes f_{1} and f_{2} with the thermal magnon bath. This evidences a significant contribution of the intrinsic magnon-magnon scattering mechanisms to the magnetic damping in high-quality Heusler compounds. PMID:25494091

  17. Bifurcations in autonomous mechanical systems under the influence of joint damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hetzler, Hartmut

    2014-11-01

    This contribution deals with the impact of joint damping on two classes of stability problems which are often found in engineering problems. In a first part, the principle structure of the equations of motion is derived when joints are modeled using Masing-, Prandtl- and Coulomb-elements. For these general formulations, some fundamental statements concerning stability and attractiveness of steady-state solutions may be given for large amplitudes and configurations which are not too close to the linear stability threshold. The second part focuses on analyzing the behavior at small amplitudes and in the vicinity of the linear stability threshold in more detail: to this end, a static stability problem (buckling) and two oscillatory self-excitation mechanisms (negative damping, non-conservative coupling) are discussed. For all considered problems, adding joint damping transforms the equilibrium points into sets of equilibria and bifurcations of the non-smooth problems occur near the linear stability threshold. Concerning the buckling problem adding joint damping does not alter the behavior fundamentally: still a local bifurcation occurs and attractiveness or instability of equilibrium solutions is preserved. In contrast, the oscillatory instability examples are strongly influenced by joint damping: here, global discontinuous bifurcations may occur. Besides the joint friction also the joint-stiffness may play a crucial role, since it determines whether attractive solutions in or about the equilibrium set exist. It is found that only in some cases a linear stability analysis of the corresponding system without joints may give correct indications on the behavior: consequently, neglecting joint-damping in stability analyses may lead to wrong results concerning self-excitation.

  18. Single-domain wall propagation and damping mechanism during magnetic switching of bistable amorphous microwires.

    PubMed

    Varga, R; Garcia, K L; Vázquez, M; Vojtanik, P

    2005-01-14

    The mechanism of nucleation and propagation of a single-domain wall is studied as a function of temperature in bistable Fe-based amorphous microwire with a unique simple domain structure. An extended nucleation-propagation model is proposed with a negative nucleation field. From quantitative analysis of the propagating wall characteristics, a new damping is theoretically introduced as arising from structural relaxation which dominates in the low temperature regime. PMID:15698124

  19. Effect of microstructure on the mechanical and damping behaviour of dragonfly wing veins

    PubMed Central

    Rajabi, H.; Shafiei, A.; Darvizeh, A.; Dirks, J.-H.; Appel, E.; Gorb, S. N.

    2016-01-01

    Insect wing veins are biological composites of chitin and protein arranged in a complex lamellar configuration. Although these hierarchical structures are found in many ‘venous wings' of insects, very little is known about their physical and mechanical characteristics. For the first time, we carried out a systematic comparative study to gain a better understanding of the influence of microstructure on the mechanical characteristics and damping behaviour of the veins. Morphological data have been used to develop a series of three-dimensional numerical models with different material properties and geometries. Finite-element analysis has been employed to simulate the mechanical response of the models under different loading conditions. The modelling strategy used in this study enabled us to determine the effects selectively induced by resilin, friction between layers, shape of the cross section, material composition and layered structure on the stiffness and damping characteristics of wing veins. Numerical simulations suggest that although the presence of the resilin-dominated endocuticle layer results in a much higher flexibility of wing veins, the dumbbell-shaped cross section increases their bending rigidity. Our study further shows that the rubber-like cuticle, friction between layers and material gradient-based design contribute to the higher damping capacity of veins. The results of this study can serve as a reference for the design of novel bioinspired composite structures. PMID:26998340

  20. Effect of microstructure on the mechanical and damping behaviour of dragonfly wing veins.

    PubMed

    Rajabi, H; Shafiei, A; Darvizeh, A; Dirks, J-H; Appel, E; Gorb, S N

    2016-02-01

    Insect wing veins are biological composites of chitin and protein arranged in a complex lamellar configuration. Although these hierarchical structures are found in many 'venous wings' of insects, very little is known about their physical and mechanical characteristics. For the first time, we carried out a systematic comparative study to gain a better understanding of the influence of microstructure on the mechanical characteristics and damping behaviour of the veins. Morphological data have been used to develop a series of three-dimensional numerical models with different material properties and geometries. Finite-element analysis has been employed to simulate the mechanical response of the models under different loading conditions. The modelling strategy used in this study enabled us to determine the effects selectively induced by resilin, friction between layers, shape of the cross section, material composition and layered structure on the stiffness and damping characteristics of wing veins. Numerical simulations suggest that although the presence of the resilin-dominated endocuticle layer results in a much higher flexibility of wing veins, the dumbbell-shaped cross section increases their bending rigidity. Our study further shows that the rubber-like cuticle, friction between layers and material gradient-based design contribute to the higher damping capacity of veins. The results of this study can serve as a reference for the design of novel bioinspired composite structures. PMID:26998340

  1. Flow aeroacoustic damping using coupled mechanical-electrical impedance in lined pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yong; Huang, Yi-Yong; Chen, Xiao-Qian; Bai, Yu-Zhu; Tan, Xiao-Dong

    2015-05-01

    We report a new noise-damping concept which utilizes a coupled mechanical-electrical acoustic impedance to attenuate an aeroacoustic wave propagating in a moving gas confined by a cylindrical pipeline. An electrical damper is incorporated to the mechanical impedance, either through the piezoelectric, electrostatic, or electro-magnetic principles. Our numerical study shows the advantage of the proposed methodology on wave attenuation. With the development of the micro-electro-mechanical system and material engineering, the proposed configuration may be promising for noise reduction. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11404405, 91216201, 51205403, and 11302253).

  2. On the effect of damping on the stabilization of mechanical systems via parametric excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhipova, Inga M.; Luongo, Angelo

    2016-06-01

    The effect of damping on the re-stabilization of statically unstable linear Hamiltonian systems, performed via parametric excitation, is studied. A general multi-degree-of-freedom mechanical system is considered, close to a divergence point, at which a mode is incipiently stable and n - 1 modes are (marginally) stable. The asymptotic dynamics of system is studied via the Multiple Scale Method, which supplies amplitude modulation equations ruling the slow flow. Several resonances between the excitation and the natural frequencies, of direct 1:1, 1:2, 2:1, or sum and difference combination types, are studied. The algorithm calls for using integer or fractional asymptotic power expansions and performing nonstandard steps. It is found that a slight damping is able to increase the performances of the control system, but only far from resonance. Results relevant to a sample system are compared with numerical findings based on the Floquet theory.

  3. Thermo-mechanical Response and Damping Behavior of Shape Memory Alloy-MAX Phase Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kothalkar, Ankush Dilip; Benitez, Rogelio; Hu, Liangfa; Radovic, Miladin; Karaman, Ibrahim

    2014-05-01

    NiTi/Ti3SiC2 interpenetrating composites that combine two unique material systems—a shape memory alloy (SMA) and a MAX phase—demonstrating two different pseudoelastic mechanisms, were processed using spark plasma sintering. The goal of mixing these two material systems was to enhance the damping behavior and thermo-mechanical response of the composite by combining two pseudoelastic mechanisms, i.e., reversible stress-induced martensitic transformation in SMA and reversible incipient kink band formation in MAX phase. Equal volume fractions of equiatomic NiTi and Ti3SiC2 were used. Microstructural characterization was conducted using scanning electron microscopy to study the distribution of NiTi, Ti3SiC2, and remnant porosity in the composite. Thermo-mechanical testing in the form of thermal cycles under constant stress levels was performed in order to characterize shape memory behavior and thereby introducing residual stresses in the composites. Evolution of two-way shape memory effect was studied and related to the presence of residual stresses in the composites. Damping behavior, implying the energy dissipation per loading-unloading cycle under increasing compressive stresses, of pure NiTi, pure Ti3SiC2, as-sintered, and thermo-mechanically cycled (TC) NiTi/Ti3SiC2 composites, was investigated and compared to the literature data. In this study, the highest energy dissipation was observed for the TC composite followed by the as-sintered (AS) composite, pure NiTi, and pure Ti3SiC2 when compared at the same applied stress levels. Both the AS and TC composites showed higher damping up to 200 MPa stress than any of the metal—MAX phase composites reported in the literature to date. The ability to enhance the performance of the composite by controlling the thermo-mechanical loading paths was further discussed.

  4. Effect of Aging Treatment on the Damping Capacity and Mechanical Properties of Mg-6Al-1Zn Alloy

    PubMed Central

    El-Morsy, Abdel-Wahab; Farahat, Ahmed I. Z.

    2015-01-01

    The damping capacity and mechanical properties of Mg-6Al-1Zn alloy after heat treatment were investigated. The damping characteristics of un-heat-treated, solution treated, and aged Mg-6Al-1Zn specimens were determined by measuring the damping ratio and the logarithmic decrement of free vibrations of a bending beam clamped at one side. The microstructural evaluations confirmed that the β-Mg17Al12 phase was reprecipitated after aging and increased with an increase in aging time. The peak level of damping ratio and logarithmic decrement was obtained after 34 hr of aging time, over which the damping capacity declined according to increasing amount of strong pining points. PMID:25918738

  5. Damping mechanisms in alumina borate whisker-reinforced-aluminum matrix composites with or without SnO{sub 2} coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, J.; Wang, X. F.; Zheng, Z. Z.

    2010-01-15

    SnO{sub 2} was successfully coated on the surface of alumina borate whiskers. The pure aluminum matrix composites reinforced with a SnO{sub 2}-coated alumina borate whisker were fabricated by squeeze casting. The effects of coating contents on the damping properties of the coated composites at various temperatures, frequencies, and strain amplitudes were examined. The microstructures of the coated composites were also investigated through transmission electron microscopy observations. These results indicate that the introduction of Sn at the interface between whisker and matrix in the coated composites during the squeeze casting process alters not only the interface structures but also the dislocation status of the matrices in the vicinity of the interface. The results of damping characterization indicate that the damping capacities of the coated composites strongly depend on the coating contents and strain amplitudes. A damping peak at low temperatures appeared not only in the coated composites but also in the noncoated one, which is related to dislocation motion and interfacial slip caused by Sn. A damping peak at high temperatures appeared only in the coated composites, and the damping mechanisms at high temperature change with the increase in strain amplitudes. Sn played an important role on the damping mechanisms of the coated composites all along.

  6. Nonlinearity of mechanical damping and stiffness of a spring-suspended sectional model system for wind tunnel tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Guangzhong; Zhu, Ledong

    2015-10-01

    The wind tunnel test of spring-suspended sectional models (SSSM) is an important means in the research of wind engineering, which is very frequently employed to check the performances of flutter and vortex-induced resonance of bridges as well as to identify the various aerodynamic and aeroelastic parameters of bridge components, such as aerodynamic derivatives of self-excited forces. However, in practice, the mechanical damping ratios and natural frequencies of SSSM system are prevailingly supposed to be constant in the whole procedure of a test. This assumption often leads to notable errors of the test results or dispersion of the identified aerodynamic parameters because the mechanical damping ratios and natural frequencies of SSSM system are proved to vary in fact to some extent with the change of oscillating amplitude. On that account, the mechanical nonlinearity of SSSM system is investigated and discussed in this paper by taking a flat-closed box section as a research background. The conventional linear model is firstly proved to fail to predict precisely the long-duration free decay responses of the SSSM system. The formulae of equivalent linearization approximation (ELA) are then derived by using a multiple-scale method to model the mechanical nonlinearities in the first-order approximate sense, and a time-domain system identification method is proposed on this basis to identify equivalent amplitude-dependent (EAD) damping ratio and frequency. The proposed ELA and nonlinear system identification methods are then found to be precise enough to model the mechanical nonlinearities of SSSM system. The characteristics of EAD damping ratio and frequency of both the bending and torsional modes are then discussed in detail. It is then found that the major energy dissipation of SSSM vibrations at both the bending and torsional modes generally comes from the combined effect of viscous damping and quadratic damping. However, for the vibration at the bending mode with

  7. Damped leaf flexure hinge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhong; Chen, Guisheng; Zhang, Xianmin

    2015-05-01

    Flexure-based mechanism like compliant actuation system embeds complex dynamics that will reduce the control bandwidth and limits their dynamic positioning precision. This paper presents a theoretical model of a leaf flexure hinge with damping layers using strain energy method and Kelvin damping model. The modified loss factor of the damped leaf flexure hinge is derived, and the equivalent viscous damping coefficient of the damped leaf hinge is obtained, which could be used to improve the pseudo-rigid-model. The free vibration signals of the hinge in three different damping configurations are measured. The experimental modal analysis also is performed on the three kinds of damped leaf flexure hinges in order to evaluate their 1st order bending natural frequency and vibration-suppressing effects. The evaluation of modified loss factor model also is performed. The experimental results indicate that the constrained layer damping can enhance the structure damping of the hinge even if only single damping layer each side, the modified loss factor model can get good predicts of a damped leaf flexure hinge in the frequency range below 1st order natural frequency, and it is necessary that the dimensional parameters of the damping layers and basic layer of the hinge should be optimized for simplification at the mechanism's design stage.

  8. Damped leaf flexure hinge.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhong; Chen, Guisheng; Zhang, Xianmin

    2015-05-01

    Flexure-based mechanism like compliant actuation system embeds complex dynamics that will reduce the control bandwidth and limits their dynamic positioning precision. This paper presents a theoretical model of a leaf flexure hinge with damping layers using strain energy method and Kelvin damping model. The modified loss factor of the damped leaf flexure hinge is derived, and the equivalent viscous damping coefficient of the damped leaf hinge is obtained, which could be used to improve the pseudo-rigid-model. The free vibration signals of the hinge in three different damping configurations are measured. The experimental modal analysis also is performed on the three kinds of damped leaf flexure hinges in order to evaluate their 1st order bending natural frequency and vibration-suppressing effects. The evaluation of modified loss factor model also is performed. The experimental results indicate that the constrained layer damping can enhance the structure damping of the hinge even if only single damping layer each side, the modified loss factor model can get good predicts of a damped leaf flexure hinge in the frequency range below 1st order natural frequency, and it is necessary that the dimensional parameters of the damping layers and basic layer of the hinge should be optimized for simplification at the mechanism's design stage. PMID:26026549

  9. Simulation of Thin-Film Damping and Thermal Mechanical Noise Spectra for Advanced Micromachined Microphone Structures

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Neal A.; Okandan, Murat; Littrell, Robert; Bicen, Baris; Degertekin, F. Levent

    2008-01-01

    In many micromachined sensors the thin (2–10 μm thick) air film between a compliant diaphragm and backplate electrode plays a dominant role in shaping both the dynamic and thermal noise characteristics of the device. Silicon microphone structures used in grating-based optical-interference microphones have recently been introduced that employ backplates with minimal area to achieve low damping and low thermal noise levels. Finite-element based modeling procedures based on 2-D discretization of the governing Reynolds equation are ideally suited for studying thin-film dynamics in such structures which utilize relatively complex backplate geometries. In this paper, the dynamic properties of both the diaphragm and thin air film are studied using a modal projection procedure in a commonly used finite element software and the results are used to simulate the dynamic frequency response of the coupled structure to internally generated electrostatic actuation pressure. The model is also extended to simulate thermal mechanical noise spectra of these advanced sensing structures. In all cases simulations are compared with measured data and show excellent agreement—demonstrating 0.8 pN/√Hz and 1.8 μPa/√Hz thermal force and thermal pressure noise levels, respectively, for the 1.5 mm diameter structures under study which have a fundamental diaphragm resonance-limited bandwidth near 20 kHz. PMID:19081811

  10. Effect of hot working on the damping capacity and mechanical properties of AZ31 magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, K.; Kang, C.; Kim, K.

    2015-04-01

    Magnesium alloys have received much attention for their lightweight and other excellent properties, such as low density, high specific strength, and good castability, for use in several industrial and commercial applications. However, both magnesium and its alloys show limited room-temperature formability owing to the limited number of slip systems associated with their hexagonal close-packed crystal structure. It is well known that crystallographic texture plays an important role in both plastic deformation and macroscopic anisotropy of magnesium alloys. Many authors have concentrated on improving the room- temperature formability of Mg alloys. However, despite having a lot of excellent properties in magnesium alloy, the study for various properties of magnesium alloy have not been clarified enough yet. Mg alloys are known to have a good damping capacity compared to other known metals and their alloys. Also, the damping properties of metals are generally recognized to be dependent on microstructural factors such as grain size and texture. However, there are very few studies on the relationship between the damping capacity and texture of Magnesium alloys. Therefore, in this study, specimens of the AZ31 magnesium alloy, were processed by hot working, and their texture and damping property investigated. A 60 mm × 60 mm × 40 mm rectangular plate was cut out by machining an ingot of AZ31 magnesium alloy (Mg-3Al-1Zn in mass%), and rolling was carried out at 673 K to a rolling reduction of 30%. Then, heat treatment was carried out at temperatures in the range of 573-723 K for durations in the range of 30-180 min. The samples were immediately quenched in oil after heat treatment to prevent any change in the microstructure. Texture was evaluated on the compression planes by the Schulz reflection method using nickel-filtered Cu Kα radiation. Electron backscatter diffraction measurements were conducted to observe the spatial distribution of various orientations. Specimens

  11. Experimental validation and testing of components for active damping control for micromachined mechanical vibration isolation filters using electrostatic actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, Robert; Flowers, George; Sanders, Nicole; Horvath, Roland; Johnson, Wayne; Kranz, Michael; Whitley, Michael

    2006-03-01

    Missiles, rockets and certain types of industrial machinery are exposed extreme vibration environments, with high frequency/amplitude mechanical vibrations which may be detrimental to components that are sensitive to these high frequency mechanical vibrations, such as MEMS gyroscopes and resonators, oscillators and some micro optics. Exposure to high frequency mechanical vibrations can lead to a variety of problems, from reduced sensitivity and an increased noise floor to the outright mechanical failure of the device. One approach to mitigate such effects is to package the sensitive device on a micromachined vibration isolator tuned to the frequency range of concern. In this regard, passive micromachined silicon lowpass filter structures (spring-mass-damper) have been developed and demonstrated. However, low damping (especially if operated in near-vacuum environments) and a lack of tunability after fabrication has limited the effectiveness and general applicability of such systems. Through the integration of a electrostatic actuator, a relative velocity sensor and the passive filter structure, an active micromachined mechanical lowpass vibration isolation filter can be realized where the damping and resonant frequency can be tuned. This paper presents the development and validation of a key component of the micromachined active filter, a sensor for measuring the relative velocity between micromachined structures.

  12. Direct path from microscopic mechanics to Debye shielding, Landau damping and wave-particle interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escande, D. F.; Elskens, Yves; Doveil, F.

    2015-02-01

    The derivation of Debye shielding and Landau damping from the N-body description of plasmas is performed directly by using Newton’s second law for the N-body system. This is done in a few steps with elementary calculations using standard tools of calculus and no probabilistic setting. Unexpectedly, Debye shielding is encountered together with Landau damping. This approach is shown to be justified in the one-dimensional case when the number of particles in a Debye sphere becomes large. The theory is extended to accommodate a correct description of trapping and chaos due to Langmuir waves. On top of their well-known production of collisional transport, the repulsive deflections of electrons are shown to produce shielding, in such a way that each particle is shielded by all other ones, while keeping in uninterrupted motion.

  13. Computational fluid mechanics utilizing the variational principle of modeling damping seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abernathy, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics code for application to traditional incompressible flow problems has been developed. The method is actually a slight compressibility approach which takes advantage of the bulk modulus and finite sound speed of all real fluids. The finite element numerical analog uses a dynamic differencing scheme based, in part, on a variational principle for computational fluid dynamics. The code was developed in order to study the feasibility of damping seals for high speed turbomachinery. Preliminary seal analyses have been performed.

  14. Quadratic Damping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, Temple H.

    2012-01-01

    Quadratic friction involves a discontinuous damping term in equations of motion in order that the frictional force always opposes the direction of the motion. Perhaps for this reason this topic is usually omitted from beginning texts in differential equations and physics. However, quadratic damping is more realistic than viscous damping in many…

  15. Gold, platinum, and aluminum nanodisk plasmons: material independence, subradiance, and damping mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Zorić, Igor; Zäch, Michael; Kasemo, Bengt; Langhammer, Christoph

    2011-04-26

    Localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPR) are collective electronic excitations in metallic nanoparticles. The LSPR spectral peak position, as a function of nanoparticle size and material, is known to depend primarily on dynamic depolarization and electron structure related effects. The former gives rise to the well-known spectral red shift with increasing nanoparticle size. A corresponding understanding of the LSPR spectral line width for a wide range of nanoparticle sizes and different metals does, however, not exist. In this work, the radiative and nonradiative damping contributions to the LSPR line width over a broad nanoparticle size range (40-500 nm) for a selection of three metals with fundamentally different bulk dielectric properties (Au, Pt, and Al) are explored experimentally and theoretically. Excellent agreement was obtained between the observed experimental trends and the predictions based on electrostatic spheroid theory (MLWA), and the obtained results were successfully related to the specific band structure of the respective metal. Moreover, for the first time, a clear transition from a radiation damping dominated to a quenched radiation damping regime (subradiance) in large nanoparticles was observed and probed by varying the electron density through appropriate material choice. To minimize inhomogeneous broadening (commonly present in ensemble-based spectroscopic measurements), a novel, electron-beam lithography (EBL)-based nanofabrication method was developed. The method generates large-area 2D patterns of randomly distributed nanodisks with well-defined size and shape, narrow size distribution, and tunable (minimum) interparticle distance. In order to minimize particle-particle coupling effects, sparse patterns with a large interparticle distance (center-to-center ≥6 particle diameters) were considered. PMID:21438568

  16. Lattice Boltzmann investigation of acoustic damping mechanism and performance of an in-duct circular orifice.

    PubMed

    Ji, Chenzhen; Zhao, Dan

    2014-06-01

    In this work, three-dimensional numerical simulations of acoustically excited flow through a millimeter-size circular orifice are conducted to assess its noise damping performance, with particular emphasis on applying the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) as an alternative computational aeroacoustics tool. The model is intended to solve the discrete lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) by using the pseudo-particle based technique. The LBE controls the particles associated with collision and propagation over a discrete lattice mesh. Flow variables such as pressure, density, momentum, and internal energy are determined by performing a local integration of the particle distribution at each time step. This is different from the conventional numerical investigation attempting to solve Navier-Stokes (NS) equations by using high order finite-difference or finite-volume methods. Compared with the conventional NS solvers, one of the main advantages of LBM may be a reduced computational cost. Unlike frequency domain simulations, the present investigation is conducted in time domain, and the orifice damping behavior is quantified over a broad frequency range at a time by forcing an oscillating flow with multiple tones. Comparing the numerical results with those obtained from the theoretical models, large eddy simulation, and experimental measurements, good agreement is observed. PMID:24907789

  17. Turbojet engine blade damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, A. V.; Cutts, D. G.; Sridhar, S.

    1981-01-01

    The potentials of various sources of nonaerodynamic damping in engine blading are evaluated through a combination of advanced analysis and testing. The sources studied include material hysteresis, dry friction at shroud and root disk interfaces as well as at platform type external dampers. A limited seris of tests was conducted to evaluate damping capacities of composite materials (B/AL, B/AL/Ti) and thermal barrier coatings. Further, basic experiments were performed on titanium specimens to establish the characteristics of sliding friction and to determine material damping constants J and n. All the tests were conducted on single blades. Mathematical models were develthe several mechanisms of damping. Procedures to apply this data to predict damping levels in an assembly of blades are developed and discussed.

  18. A sub-Angstrom Sample Scanner for Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy (MRFM): Contact Mechanics and Controlled Damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Shih-Hui; Dougherty, William; Garbini, Joseph; Sidles, John; MacBeth, Melissa

    2001-03-01

    A 3-D scan head for MRFM faces three challenges: 1) Experiments are conducted under ultrahigh vacuum and cryogenic conditions; 2) The scanner must achieve sub-Angstrom resolution; 3) Interferometric detection requires a stiff, compact mechanism. Our strategy is to use a piezoceramic tube to actuate two modes of positioning: "coarse positioning" to generate large range motion, and "fine positioning" to create high-resolution linear actuation. Inertial stick-slip friction is used for coarse positioning. We have applied contact mechanics to solve for the deflection and friction forces between the slider and piezoceramic actuator. Simulation combining classical contact theory with the reset integrator friction model of Hassig agrees closely with our experiments. The use of feedback control to damp piezoceramic tube oscillation during stick-slip cycles is an innovation in our design. Coarse steps as small as 2 nm are consistently achieved.

  19. Landau damping

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2010-10-01

    Section 2.5.8 of the Handbook of Accelerator Physics and Engineering on Landau damping is rewritten. An solvable example is first given to demonstrate the interplay between Landau damping and decoherence. This example is an actual one when the beam oscillatory motion is driven by a wake force. The dispersion relation is derived and its implication on Landau damping is illustrated. The rest of the article touches on the Landau damping of transverse and longitudinal beam oscillations. The stability criteria are given for a bunched beam and the changes of the criteria when the beam is lengthened and becomes unbunched.

  20. Coulomb Damping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, Temple H.

    2012-01-01

    Viscous damping is commonly discussed in beginning differential equations and physics texts but dry friction or Coulomb friction is not despite dry friction being encountered in many physical applications. One reason for avoiding this topic is that the equations involve a jump discontinuity in the damping term. In this article, we adopt an energy…

  1. Damping of nanomechanical resonators.

    PubMed

    Unterreithmeier, Quirin P; Faust, Thomas; Kotthaus, Jörg P

    2010-07-01

    We study the transverse oscillatory modes of nanomechanical silicon nitride strings under high tensile stress as a function of geometry and mode index m≤9. Reproducing all observed resonance frequencies with classical elastic theory we extract the relevant elastic constants. Based on the oscillatory local strain we successfully predict the observed mode-dependent damping with a single frequency-independent fit parameter. Our model clarifies the role of tensile stress on damping and hints at the underlying microscopic mechanisms. PMID:20867737

  2. Evaluation of Nanomaterial Approaches to Damping in Epoxy Resin and Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Composite Structures by Dynamic Mechanical Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, G.; Heimann, Paula J.; Scheiman, Daniel A.; Duffy, Kirsten P.; Johnston, J. Chris; Roberts, Gary D.

    2013-01-01

    Vibration mitigation in composite structures has been demonstrated through widely varying methods which include both active and passive damping. Recently, nanomaterials have been investigated as a viable approach to composite vibration damping due to the large surface available to generate energy dissipation through friction. This work evaluates the influence of dispersed nanoparticles on the damping ratio of an epoxy matrix. Limited benefit was observed through dispersion methods, however nanoparticle application as a coating resulting in up to a three-fold increase in damping.

  3. Damping, thermal, and mechanical properties of polyurethane based on poly(tetramethylene glycol)/epoxy interpenetrating polymer networks: effects of composition and isocyanate index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qihua; Chen, Shoubing; Wang, Tingmei; Zhang, Xinrui

    2011-07-01

    A series of polyurethane (PU) samples based on poly(tetramethylene glycol)/epoxy resin (EP) graft interpenetrating polymer networks (IPNs) were prepared and their damping, thermal, and mechanical properties were systematically studied in terms of composition and the value of the PU isocyanate index ( R). The damping properties and thermal stability measurements revealed that the formation of PU/EP IPN could improve not only the damping capacity but also the thermal stability. Meanwhile, mechanical tests showed that the tensile strengths of the IPNs decreased while their impact strengths increased with increasing PU content. The value of R also had significant impacts on the properties of the IPNs when the PU and EP ratio was fixed, which could be an effective means for manipulating the fabrication of PU/EP IPNs. The morphologies of the PU/EP IPNs were observed by SEM and AFM characterization and the relationship between the morphologies and properties is discussed. With the results in hand, the PU/EP IPNs hold promise for use in structural damping materials.

  4. Mechanical characteristics of rat vibrissae: resonant frequencies and damping in isolated whiskers and in the awake behaving animal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, Mitra J.; Johnson, Nicholas J.; Towal, R. Blythe; Assad, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the natural resonance properties and damping characteristics of rat macrovibrissae (whiskers). Isolated whiskers rigidly fixed at the base showed first-mode resonance peaks between 27 and 260 Hz, principally depending on whisker length. These experimentally measured resonant frequencies were matched using a theoretical model of the whisker as a conical cantilever beam, with Young's modulus as the only free parameter. The best estimate for Young's modulus was approximately 3-4 GPa. Results of both vibration and impulse experiments showed that the whiskers are strongly damped, with damping ratios between 0.11 and 0.17. In the behaving animal, whiskers that deflected past an object were observed to resonate but were damped significantly more than isolated whiskers. The time course of damping varied depending on the individual whisker and the phase of the whisking cycle, which suggests that the rat may modulate biomechanical parameters that affect damping. No resonances were observed for whiskers that did not contact the object or during free whisking in air. Finally, whiskers on the same side of the face were sometimes observed to move in opposite directions over the full duration of a whisk. We discuss the potential roles of resonance during natural exploratory behavior and specifically suggest that resonant oscillations may be important in the rat's tactile detection of object boundaries.

  5. Surge-damping vacuum valve

    DOEpatents

    Bullock, Jack C.; Kelly, Benjamin E.

    1980-01-01

    A valve having a mechanism for damping out flow surges in a vacuum system which utilizes a slotted spring-loaded disk positioned adjacent the valve's vacuum port. Under flow surge conditions, the differential pressure forces the disk into sealing engagement with the vacuum port, thereby restricting the flow path to the slots in the disk damping out the flow surge.

  6. Structural damping studies at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Clarence P., Jr.; Buehrle, Ralph D.

    1994-01-01

    Results of an engineering study to measure changes in structural damping properties of two cryogenic wind tunnel model systems and two metallic test specimens at cryogenic temperatures are presented. Data are presented which indicate overall, a trend toward reduced structural damping at cryogenic temperatures (-250 degrees F) when compared with room temperature damping properties. The study was focused on structures and materials used for model systems tested in the National Transonic Facility (NTF). The study suggests that the significant reductions in damping at extremely cold temperatures are most likely associated with changes in mechanical joint compliance damping rather than changes in material (solid) damping.

  7. Development of the novel ferrous-based stainless steel for biomedical applications, part I: high-temperature microstructure, mechanical properties and damping behavior.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ching-Zong; Chen, Shih-Chung; Shih, Yung-Hsun; Hung, Jing-Ming; Lin, Chia-Cheng; Lin, Li-Hsiang; Ou, Keng-Liang

    2011-10-01

    This research investigated the high-temperature microstructure, mechanical properties, and damping behavior of Fe-9 Al-30 Mn-1C-5 Co (wt.%) alloy by means of electron microscopy, experimental model analysis, and hardness and tensile testing. Subsequent microstructural transformation occurred when the alloy under consideration was subjected to heat treatment in the temperature range of 1000-1150 °C: γ → (γ+κ). The κ-phase carbides had an ordered L'1(2)-type structure with lattice parameter a = 0.385 nm. The maximum yield strength (σ(y)), hardness, elongation, and damping coefficient of this alloy are 645 MPa, Hv 292, ~54%, and 178.5 × 10(-4), respectively. These features could be useful in further understanding the relationship between the biocompatibility and the wear and corrosion resistance of the alloy, so as to allow the development of a promising biomedical material. PMID:21783164

  8. Superconductive material and magnetic field for damping and levitation support and damping of cryogenic instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolgin, Benjamin P. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A superconductive load bearing support without a mechanical contact and vibration damping for cryogenic instruments in space is presented. The levitation support and vibration damping is accomplished by the use of superconducting magnets and the 'Meissner' effect. The assembly allows for transfer of vibration energy away from the cryogenic instrument which then can be damped by the use of either an electronic circuit or conventional vibration damping mean.

  9. General decay rates for the wave equation with mixed-type damping mechanisms on unbounded domain with finite measure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias Silva, Flávio R.; Nascimento, Flávio A. F.; Rodrigues, José H.

    2015-12-01

    This paper is concerned with the study of the uniform decay rates of the energy associated with the wave equation subject to a locally distributed viscoelastic dissipation and a nonlinear frictional damping u_{tt}- Δ u+ int_0^t g(t-s)div[a(x)nabla u(s)] ds + b(x) f(u_t)=0 quad on quad Ω×]0,infty[, where {Ωsubset{R}^n, n≥ 2} is an unbounded open set with finite measure and unbounded smooth boundary {partialΩ = Γ}. Supposing that the localization functions satisfy the "competitive" assumption {a(x)+b(x)≥δ>0} for all {xin Ω} and the relaxation function g satisfies certain nonlinear differential inequalities introduced by Lasiecka et al. (J Math Phys 54(3):031504, 2013), we extend to our considered domain the prior results of Cavalcanti and Oquendo (SIAM J Control Optim 42(4):1310-1324, 2003). In addition, while in Cavalcanti and Oquendo (2003) the authors just consider exponential and polynomial decay rate estimates, in the present article general decay rate estimates are obtained.

  10. Identification and evaluation of linear damping models in beam vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boers, B. L.; Rosenberg, G. S.; Wambsganss, M. W., Jr.

    1969-01-01

    Sensitive method, identifying effective damping mechanisms, involves comparing experimentally determined ratio of first to second mode magnification factors related to common point on beam. Cluster size has little effect on frequencies of elements, magnification factor decreases with cluster size, and viscous and stress damping are dominant damping mechanisms.

  11. Phenomenology of chiral damping in noncentrosymmetric magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akosa, Collins Ashu; Miron, Ioan Mihai; Gaudin, Gilles; Manchon, Aurélien

    2016-06-01

    A phenomenology of magnetic chiral damping is proposed in the context of magnetic materials lacking inversion symmetry. We show that the magnetic damping tensor acquires a component linear in magnetization gradient in the form of Lifshitz invariants. We propose different microscopic mechanisms that can produce such a damping in ferromagnetic metals, among which local spin pumping in the presence of an anomalous Hall effect and an effective "s-d" Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya antisymmetric exchange. The implication of this chiral damping in terms of domain-wall motion is investigated in the flow and creep regimes.

  12. Understanding the damped SHM without ODEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Chiu-king

    2016-03-01

    Instead of solving ordinary differential equations (ODEs), the damped simple harmonic motion (SHM) is surveyed qualitatively from basic mechanics and quantitatively by the instrumentality of a graph of velocity against displacement. In this way, the condition b≥slant \\sqrt{4mk}~ for the occurrence of the non-oscillating critical damping and heavy-damping is derived. Besides, we prove in the under-damping, the oscillation is isochronous and the diminishing amplitude satisfies a rule of ‘constant ratio’. All are done on a non-ODE basis.

  13. Understanding the Damped SHM without ODEs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Chiu-king

    2016-01-01

    Instead of solving ordinary differential equations (ODEs), the damped simple harmonic motion (SHM) is surveyed qualitatively from basic mechanics and quantitatively by the instrumentality of a graph of velocity against displacement. In this way, the condition b ? [square root]4mk for the occurrence of the non-oscillating critical damping and…

  14. Magnetic Damping For Maglev

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhu, S.; Cai, Y.; Rote, D. M.; Chen, S. S.

    1998-01-01

    Magnetic damping is one of the important parameters that control the response and stability of maglev systems. An experimental study to measure magnetic damping directly is presented. A plate attached to a permanent magnet levitated on a rotating drum was tested to investigate the effect of various parameters, such as conductivity, gap, excitation frequency, and oscillation amplitude, on magnetic damping. The experimental technique is capable of measuring all of the magnetic damping coefficients, some of which cannot be measured indirectly.

  15. Passive damping in EDS maglev systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Rote, D. M.

    2002-05-03

    There continues to be strong interest in the subjects of damping and drag forces associated with electrodynamic suspension (EDS) systems. While electromagnetic drag forces resist the forward motion of a vehicle and therefore consume energy, damping forces control, at least in part, the response of the vehicle to disturbances. Ideally, one would like to reduce the drag forces as much as possible while retaining adequate damping forces to insure dynamic stability and satisfactory ride quality. These two goals turn out to be difficult to achieve in practice. It is well known that maglev systems tend to be intrinsically under damped. Consequently it is often necessary in a practical system design to enhance the damping passively or actively. For reasons of cost and simplicity, it is desirable to rely as much as possible on passive damping mechanisms. In this paper, rough estimates are made of the passive damping and drag forces caused by various mechanisms in EDS systems. No attention will be given to active control systems or secondary suspension systems which are obvious ways to augment passive damping mechanisms if the latter prove to be inadequate.

  16. Timoshenko systems with indefinite damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz Rivera, Jaime E.; Racke, Reinhard

    2008-05-01

    We consider the Timoshenko system in a bounded domain . The system has an indefinite damping mechanism, i.e. with a damping function a=a(x) possibly changing sign, present only in the equation for the rotation angle. We shall prove that the system is still exponentially stable under the same conditions as in the positive constant damping case, and provided and , for [epsilon] small enough. The decay rate will be described explicitly. In the arguments, we shall also give a new proof of exponential stability for the constant case . Moreover, we give a precise description of the decay rate and demonstrate that the system has the spectrum determined growth (SDG) property, i.e. the type of the induced semigroup coincides with the spectral bound for its generator.

  17. Damping constant estimation in magnetoresistive readers

    SciTech Connect

    Stankiewicz, Andrzej Hernandez, Stephanie

    2015-05-07

    The damping constant is a key design parameter in magnetic reader design. Its value can be derived from bulk or sheet film ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) line width. However, dynamics of nanodevices is usually defined by presence of non-uniform modes. It triggers new damping mechanisms and produces stronger damping than expected from traditional FMR. This work proposes a device-level technique for damping evaluation, based on time-domain analysis of thermally excited stochastic oscillations. The signal is collected using a high bandwidth oscilloscope, by direct probing of a biased reader. Recorded waveforms may contain different noise signals, but free layer FMR is usually a dominating one. The autocorrelation function is a reflection of the damped oscillation curve, averaging out stochastic contributions. The damped oscillator formula is fitted to autocorrelation data, producing resonance frequency and damping constant values. Restricting lag range allows for mitigation of the impact of other phenomena (e.g., reader instability) on the damping constant. For a micromagnetically modeled reader, the technique proves to be much more accurate than the stochastic FMR line width approach. Application to actual reader waveforms yields a damping constant of ∼0.03.

  18. Damping constant estimation in magnetoresistive readers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stankiewicz, Andrzej; Hernandez, Stephanie

    2015-05-01

    The damping constant is a key design parameter in magnetic reader design. Its value can be derived from bulk or sheet film ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) line width. However, dynamics of nanodevices is usually defined by presence of non-uniform modes. It triggers new damping mechanisms and produces stronger damping than expected from traditional FMR. This work proposes a device-level technique for damping evaluation, based on time-domain analysis of thermally excited stochastic oscillations. The signal is collected using a high bandwidth oscilloscope, by direct probing of a biased reader. Recorded waveforms may contain different noise signals, but free layer FMR is usually a dominating one. The autocorrelation function is a reflection of the damped oscillation curve, averaging out stochastic contributions. The damped oscillator formula is fitted to autocorrelation data, producing resonance frequency and damping constant values. Restricting lag range allows for mitigation of the impact of other phenomena (e.g., reader instability) on the damping constant. For a micromagnetically modeled reader, the technique proves to be much more accurate than the stochastic FMR line width approach. Application to actual reader waveforms yields a damping constant of ˜0.03.

  19. Mechanical Resonance and Damping Properties of Gallium Nitride Nanowires in Selected-Area Growth Arrays Measured via Optical Bragg Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houlton, John; Brubaker, M. D.; Bertness, K. A.; Rogers, C. T.

    We report the use of optical Bragg scattering to measure the mechanical resonance frequencies and quality factors (Q) of gallium nitride (GaN) nanowires (NWs) in selected-area growth arrays. The GaN NWs are grown by catalyst-free molecular beam epitaxy on silicon (111) wafers. Hexagonal arrays of approximately 100 GaN NWs with pitch spacings of 400 - 1000 nm have been prepared. The NWs contained in such arrays have diameters ranging from 100-300 nm and lengths from 3 - 10 μm. A diode laser operating at 640 nm and 2 mW of optical power is used to perform Bragg scattering homodyne detection to passively read out the thermally induced Brownian mechanical motion of the NWs. The first order cantilever-mode mechanical resonance frequencies of these NWs have been measured to be between 2 - 12 MHz. We find that the optical readout via Bragg scattered light allows the simultaneous detection of all lowest order mechanical resonances in a given array. Q factors ranging from 1,000 - 12,000 have been seen at room temperature and 10-5 Torr pressures. Qs as high as 25,000 have been seen at temperatures of 80 K. These results show that the narrow mechanical resonances observed in freely-grown GaN NWs can also be seen in NWs prepared via selected-area growth. We gratefully acknowledge funding via NIST MSE Grant # 1553451.

  20. Landau damping of auroral hiss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, D. D.; Gurnett, D. A.; Menietti, J. D.; Winningham, J. D.; Burch, J. L.

    1994-01-01

    Auroral hiss is observed to propagate over distances comparable to an Earth radius from its source in the auroral oval. The role of Landau damping is investigated for upward propagating auroral hiss. By using a ray tracing code and a simplified model of the distribution function, the effect of Landau damping is calculated for auroral hiss propagation through the environment around the auroral oval. Landau damping is found to be the likely mechanism for explaining some of the one-sided auroral hiss funnels observed by Dynamics Explorer 1. It is also found that Landau damping puts a lower limit on the wavelength of auroral hiss. Poleward of the auroral oval, Landau damping is found in a typical case to limit omega/k(sub parallel) to values of 3.4 x 10(exp 4) km/s or greater, corresponding to resonance energies of 3.2 keV or greater and wavelengths of 2 km or greater. For equatorward propagation, omega/k(sub parallel) is limited to values greater than 6.8 x 10(exp 4) km/s, corresponding to resonance energies greater than 13 keV and wavelengths greater than 3 km. Independent estimates based on measured ratios of the magnetic to electric field intensity also show that omega/k(sub parallel) corresponds to resonance energies greater than 1 keV and wavelengths greater than 1 km. These results lead to the difficulty that upgoing electron beams sufficiently energetic to directly generate auroral hiss of the inferred wavelength are not usually observed. A partial transmission mechanism utilizing density discontinuities oblique to the magnetic field is proposed for converting auroral hiss to wavelengths long enough to avoid damping of the wave over long distances. Numerous reflections of the wave in an upwardly flared density cavity could convert waves to significantly increased wavelengths and resonance velocities.

  1. Landau damping of auroral hiss

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, D.D.; Gurnett, D.A.; Menietti, J.D.; Winningham, J.D.; Burch, J.L.

    1994-02-01

    Auroral hiss is observed to propagate over distances comparable to an Earth radius from its source in the auroral oval. The role of Landau damping is investigated for upward propagating auroral hiss. By using a ray tracing code and a simplified model of the distribution function, the effect of Landau damping is calculated for auroral hiss propagation through the environment around the auroral oval. Landau damping is found to be the likely mechanism for explaining some of the one-sided auroral hiss funnels observed by Dynamics Explorer 1. It is also found that Landau damping puts a lower limit on the wavelength of auroral hiss. Poleward of the auroral oval, Landau damping is found in a typical case to limit {omega}/k{parallel} to values of 3.4 x 10{sup 4} km/s or greater, corresponding to resonance energies of 3.2 keV or greater and wavelengths of 2 km or greater. For equatorward propagation, {omega}/k{parallel} is limited to values greater than 6.8 x 10{sup 4} km/s, corresponding to resonance energies greater than 13 keV and wavelengths greater than 3 km. Independent estimates based on measured ratios of the magnetic to electric field intensity also show that {omega}/k{parallel} corresponds to resonance energies greater than 1 keV and wavelengths greater than 1 km. These results lead to the difficulty that upgoing electron beams sufficiently energetic to directly generate auroral hiss of the inferred wavelength are not usually observed. A partial transmission mechanism utilizing density discontinuities oblique to the magnetic field is proposed for converting auroral hiss to wavelengths long enough to avoid damping of the wave over long distances. Numerous reflections of the wave in an upwardly flared density cavity could convert waves to significantly increased wavelengths and resonance velocities. 36 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. The effects of interply damping layers on the dynamic response of composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Chamis, C. C.

    1991-01-01

    Integrated damping mechanics for composite laminates with constrained interlaminar layers of polymer damping materials are developed. Discrete layer damping mechanics are presented for composite materials with damping layers, in connection with a semi-analytical method for predicting the modal damping in simply-supported specialty composite plates. Several application cases are used to demonstrate the advantages of the method. Damping predictions for graphite-epoxy composite plates of various laminations demonstrate the potential for higher damping than geometrically equivalent aluminum plates. The effects of aspect ratio, damping layer thickness, and fiber volume ratio on static and dynamic characteristics of the composite plate are also investigated.

  3. The effects of interply damping layers on the dynamic response of composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.

    1991-01-01

    Integrated damping mechanics for composite laminates with interlaminar constrained layers of damping polymer materials are developed. Discrete layer damping mechanics for composite laminates with damping layers, in connection with a semi-analytical method for predicting the modal damping in simply-supported specialty composite plates are presented. Application cases demonstrate the advantages of the method. Damping predictions for graphite/epoxy composite plates of various laminations demonstrate the potential for higher damping than geometrically equivalent aluminum plates. The effects of aspect ratio, damping layer thickness, and fiber volume ratio on static and dynamic characteristics of the composite plate are also investigated.

  4. The DAMPE mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jian; Guo, Jianhua; Chang, Jin; Cai, Mingsheng

    2016-07-01

    The DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) was launched into space on Dec.17, 2015 to a 500km dawn-to-dusk sun-synchronous orbit aiming at detecting high energy electron(gamma) as well as cosmic heavy ions up to 10TeV and 1PeV respectively to try to understand the mechanisms of particle acceleration in celestial sources and the propagation of cosmic rays in the Galaxy, to probe the nature of dark matter, a form of matter necessary to account for gravitational effects observed in very large scale structures such as anomalies in the rotation of galaxies and the gravitational lensing of light by galaxy clusters that cannot be accounted for by the quantity of observed matter , and to study the high-energy behavior of gamma-ray bursts, pulsars, Active Galaxy Nuclei and other transients,etc. After months' commissioning, DAMPE has been in the observational mode. This paper reports the status of its detectors and latest results collected so far.

  5. Nonclassical non-Gaussian state of a mechanical resonator via selectively incoherent damping in a three-mode optomechanical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kang-jing; Yan, Yan; Zhu, Jia-pei; Xiao, Yun-feng; Li, Gao-xiang

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we propose a scheme for the generation of a nonclassical non-Gaussian motional state of a mechanical resonator (MR) in the three-mode optomechanical system in which two linearly coupled single-mode cavities interact dispersively with the mechanical oscillator simultaneously. With one cavity driven by a weak laser field and by properly tuning the driving frequency, a desirable phononic Liouvillian superoperator can be obtained by engineering the selective interaction Hamiltonian confined to Fock subspaces. It is shown that the MR can be driven dissipatively into a steady non-Gaussian nonclassical state, which possesses sub-Poisson statistics, although its Wigner function is positive. The present scheme can be useful for obtaining single phonons.

  6. Damping Mechanisms for Microgravity Vibration Isolation (MSFC Center Director's Discretionary Fund Final Report, Project No. 94-07)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whorton, M. S.; Eldridge, J. T.; Ferebee, R. C.; Lassiter, J. O.; Redmon, J. W., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    As a research facility for microgravity science, the International Space Station (ISS) will be used for numerous investigations such as protein crystal growth, combustion, and fluid mechanics experiments which require a quiescent acceleration environment across a broad spectrum of frequencies. These experiments are most sensitive to low-frequency accelerations and can tolerate much higher accelerations at higher frequency. However, the anticipated acceleration environment on ISS significantly exceeds the required acceleration level. The ubiquity and difficulty in characterization of the disturbance sources precludes source isolation, requiring vibration isolation to attenuate the anticipated disturbances to an acceptable level. This memorandum reports the results of research in active control methods for microgravity vibration isolation.

  7. Nucleon exchange in damped nuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Randrup, J.

    1986-04-01

    Starting from the general context of one-body nuclear dynamics, the nucleon-exchange mechanism in damped nuclear reactions is discussed. Some of its characteristic effects on various dinuclear observables are highlighted and a few recent advances are described.

  8. Red cell DAMPs and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Mendonça, Rafaela; Silveira, Angélica A A; Conran, Nicola

    2016-09-01

    Intravascular hemolysis, or the destruction of red blood cells in the circulation, can occur in numerous diseases, including the acquired hemolytic anemias, sickle cell disease and β-thalassemia, as well as during some transfusion reactions, preeclampsia and infections, such as those caused by malaria or Clostridium perfringens. Hemolysis results in the release of large quantities of red cell damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) into the circulation, which, if not neutralized by innate protective mechanisms, have the potential to activate multiple inflammatory pathways. One of the major red cell DAMPs, heme, is able to activate converging inflammatory pathways, such as toll-like receptor signaling, neutrophil extracellular trap formation and inflammasome formation, suggesting that this DAMP both activates and amplifies inflammation. Other potent DAMPs that may be released by the erythrocytes upon their rupture include heat shock proteins (Hsp), such as Hsp70, interleukin-33 and Adenosine 5' triphosphate. As such, hemolysis represents a major inflammatory mechanism that potentially contributes to the clinical manifestations that have been associated with the hemolytic diseases, such as pulmonary hypertension and leg ulcers, and likely plays a role in specific complications of sickle cell disease such as endothelial activation, vaso-occlusive processes and tissue injury. PMID:27251171

  9. Dynamical analysis of fluid lines coupled to mechanical systems taking into account fluid frequency-dependent damping and non-conventional constitutive models: Part 2 - Coupling with mechanical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catania, Giuseppe; Sorrentino, Silvio

    2015-01-01

    The design of hydraulic transmission systems for control and actuation requires accurate knowledge of their dynamic response: some standard techniques are known to obtain a consistent dynamic model of a fluid line, including the contribution of inertia, compressibility and friction. In this study an efficient procedure is developed for simulating the dynamic response of a fluid line coupled with mechanical systems, in both the frequency and time domains. A bi-dimensional approach is adopted for the fluid line, and the laminar flow frequency-dependent friction is modeled using non-integer order differential laws, which may improve the accuracy in comparison with more traditional Newtonian models. The coupling problem with mechanical systems is studied by means of both continuous models of the fluid line (yielding frequency response functions in exact analytical form), and discretized models of the fluid line (to express time response functions in approximate analytical form), focusing on the damping properties of the resulting vibrating systems.

  10. Liquid-induced damping of mechanical feedback effects in single electron tunneling through a suspended carbon nanotube

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, D. R.; Stiller, P. L.; Strunk, Ch.; Hüttel, A. K.

    2015-09-21

    In single electron tunneling through clean, suspended carbon nanotube devices at low temperature, distinct switching phenomena have regularly been observed. These can be explained via strong interaction of single electron tunneling and vibrational motion of the nanotube. We present measurements on a highly stable nanotube device, subsequently recorded in the vacuum chamber of a dilution refrigerator and immersed in the {sup 3}He/ {sup 4}He mixture of a second dilution refrigerator. The switching phenomena are absent when the sample is kept in the viscous liquid, additionally supporting the interpretation of dc-driven vibration. Transport measurements in liquid helium can thus be used for finite bias spectroscopy where otherwise the mechanical effects would dominate the current.

  11. Fatty acid competition as a mechanism by which Enterobacter cloacae suppresses Pythium ultimum sporangium germination and damping-off.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, K; Nelson, E B

    2000-12-01

    Interactions between plant-associated microorganisms play important roles in suppressing plant diseases and enhancing plant growth and development. While competition between plant-associated bacteria and plant pathogens has long been thought to be an important means of suppressing plant diseases microbiologically, unequivocal evidence supporting such a mechanism has been lacking. We present evidence here that competition for plant-derived unsaturated long-chain fatty acids between the biological control bacterium Enterobacter cloacae and the seed-rotting oomycete, Pythium ultimum, results in disease suppression. Since fatty acids from seeds and roots are required to elicit germination responses of P. ultimum, we generated mutants of E. cloacae to evaluate the role of E. cloacae fatty acid metabolism on the suppression of Pythium sporangium germination and subsequent plant infection. Two mutants of E. cloacae EcCT-501R3, Ec31 (fadB) and EcL1 (fadL), were reduced in beta-oxidation and fatty acid uptake, respectively. Both strains failed to metabolize linoleic acid, to inactivate the germination-stimulating activity of cottonseed exudate and linoleic acid, and to suppress Pythium seed rot in cotton seedling bioassays. Subclones containing fadBA or fadL complemented each of these phenotypes in Ec31 and EcL1, respectively. These data provide strong evidence for a competitive exclusion mechanism for the biological control of P. ultimum-incited seed infections by E. cloacae where E. cloacae prevents the germination of P. ultimum sporangia by the efficient metabolism of fatty acid components of seed exudate and thus prevents seed infections. PMID:11097912

  12. Eigensolutions of non-proportionally damped systems based on continuous damping sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lázaro, Mario

    2016-02-01

    The viscous damping model has been widely used to represent dissipative forces in structures under mechanical vibrations. In multiple degree of freedom systems, such behavior is mathematically modeled by a damping matrix, which in general presents non-proportionality, that is, it does not become diagonal in the modal space of the undamped problem. Eigensolutions of non-proportional systems are usually estimated assuming that the modal damping matrix is diagonally dominant (neglecting the off-diagonal terms) or, in the general case, using the state-space approach. In this paper, a new closed-form expression for the complex eigenvalues of non-proportionally damped system is proposed. The approach is derived assuming small damping and involves not only the diagonal terms of the modal damping matrix, but also the off-diagonal terms, which appear under higher order. The validity of the proposed approach is illustrated through a numerical example.

  13. RMS active damping augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Michael G.; Scott, Michael A.; Demeo, Martha E.

    1992-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include: RMS active damping augmentation; potential space station assembly benefits to CSI; LaRC/JSC bridge program; control law design process; draper RMS simulator; MIMO acceleration control laws improve damping; potential load reduction benefit; DRS modified to model distributed accelerations; accelerometer location; Space Shuttle aft cockpit simulator; simulated shuttle video displays; SES test goals and objectives; and SES modifications to support RMS active damping augmentation.

  14. Magnetic damping for maglev

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.S.; Zhu, S.; Cai, Y.; Rote, D.M.

    1994-12-31

    Magnetic damping is one of the important parameters to control the response and stability of maglev systems. An experimental study is presented to measure the magnetic damping using a direct method. A plate attached to a permanent magnet levitated on a rotating drum was tested to investigate the effect of various parameters on magnetic damping such as conductivity, gap, excitation frequency, and oscillation amplitude. The experimental technique is capable of measuring all magnetic damping coefficients, some of which can not be measured by an indirect method.

  15. Decoherence and Landau-Damping

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2005-12-01

    The terminologies, decoherence and Landau damping, are often used concerning the damping of a collective instability. This article revisits the difference and relation between decoherence and Landau damping. A model is given to demonstrate how Landau damping affects the rate of damping coming from decoherence.

  16. Continuum damping of ideal toroidal Alfven eigenmodes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.D.; Zhang, Y.Z.; Mahajan, S.M.

    1993-08-01

    A perturbation theory based on the two dimensional (2D) ballooning transform is systematically developed for ideal toroidal Alfven eigenmodes (TAEs). A formula, similar to the Fermi golden rule for decaying systems in quantum mechanics, is derived for the continuum damping rate of the TAE; the decay (damping) rate is expressed explicitly in terms of the coupling of the TAE to the continuum spectrum. Numerical results are compared with previous calculations. It is found that in some narrow intervals of the parameter m{cflx {epsilon}} the damping rate varies very rapidly. These regions correspond precisely to the root missing intervals of the numerical solution by Rosenbluth et al.

  17. Turbine blade damping study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominic, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    Research results and progress on the performance of bladed systems is reported the different topics discussed include: the study of turbine blade damping; forced vibrations of friction damped beam moistures in two dimensions; and a users manual for a computer program for dynamic analysis of bladed systems.

  18. Damped acceleration cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B.

    1988-07-01

    Structures with slots to strongly damp higher order longitudinal and transverse modes should allow the use, in linear colliders, of multiple bunches, and thus attain luminosities of over 10/sup 34/cm/sup /minus/2/sec/sup /minus/1/. Preliminary measurements on model structures suggest that such damping can be achieved. 10 refs., 9 figs.

  19. Damping behavior of Discontinuous Fiber Reinforced Thermoplastic Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haldar, Amit Kumar; Aggarwal, Ishan; Batra, N. K.

    2010-11-01

    Discontinuous fiber reinforced composites are being used in many antivibration applications due to their time and temperature dependent specific mechanical properties. For utilization of this material to specific engineering applications there is a need to understand the damping behavior of composites under dynamic loading. For this work, unreinforced and 20% long and short reinforced glass fiber polypropylene composite materials were tested for free transverse vibration damping characteristics under static as well as fatigue loading conditions. The damping characteristics are quantified by decay pattern and natural frequency. Presence of reinforced fibers increases the damping capacity. Among reinforcements, short fiber reinforced polypropylene shows increased damping capacity then long glass fiber reinforced polypropylene.

  20. Vibration damping of mechanical seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, R. R.

    1970-01-01

    Bellows seal filled with spherical powder reacts to vibration inputs by absorbing displacement energy through inertia and friction of the particle masses acting on the inside surface of the cylinders.

  1. Damping models in elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGarry, Matthew D. J.; Berger, Hans-Uwe; Van Houten, Elijah E. W.

    2007-03-01

    Current optimization based Elastography reconstruction algorithms encounter difficulties when the motion approaches resonant conditions, where the model does a poor job of approximating the real behavior of the material. Model accuracy can be improved through the addition of damping effects. These effects occur in-vivo due to the complex interaction between microstructural elements of the tissue; however reconstruction models are typically formulated at larger scales where the structure can be treated as a continuum. Attenuation behavior in an elastic continuum can be described as a mixture of inertial and viscoelastic damping effects. In order to develop a continuum damping model appropriate for human tissue, the behavior of each aspect of this proportional, or Rayleigh damping needs to be characterized. In this paper we investigate the nature of these various damping representations with a goal of best describing in-vivo behavior of actual tissue in order to improve the accuracy and performance of optimization based elastographic reconstruction. Inertial damping effects are modelled using a complex density, where the imaginary part is equivalent to a damping coefficient, and the effects of viscoelasticity are modelled through the use of complex shear moduli, where the real and imaginary parts represent the storage and loss moduli respectively. The investigation is carried out through a combination of theoretical analysis, numerical experiment, investigation of gelatine phantoms and comparison with other continua such as porous media models.

  2. Spatial cyclotron damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, C. L.

    1970-01-01

    To examine spatial electron cyclotron damping in a uniform Vlasov plasma, it is noted that the plasma response to a steady-state transverse excitation consists of several terms (dielectric-pole, free-streaming, and branch-cut), but that the cyclotron-damped pole term is the dominant term for z l = c/w sub ce provided (w sub pe/w sub ce) squared (c/a) is much greater than 1. If the latter inequality does not hold, then the free-streaming and branch-cut terms persist well past z = c/w sub ce as w sub 1 approaches w sub ce, making experimental measurement of cyclotron damping essentially impossible. Considering only (w sub pe/w sub ce) squared (c/a) is much greater than 1, it is shown how collisional effects should be estimated and how a finite-width excitation usually has little effect on the cyclotron-damped part of the response. Criteria is established concerning collisional damping, measurable damping length sizes, and allowed uncertainty in the magnetic field Beta. Results of numerical calculations, showing the regions in the appropriate parameter spaces that meet these criteria, are presented. From these results, one can determine the feasibility of, or propose parameter values for, an experiment designed to measure spatial cyclotron damping. It is concluded that the electron temperature T sub e should be at least 1 ev., and preferably 10 ev. or higher, for a successful experiment.

  3. Concepts and effects of damping in isolators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerley, J.

    1984-01-01

    A series of innovative designs and inventions which led to the solution of many aerospace vibration and shock problems through damping techniques is presented. The design of damped airborne structures has presented a need for such creative innovation. The primary concern was to discover what concepts were necessary for good structural damping. Once these concepts are determined and converted into basic principles, the design of hardware follows. The following hardware and techniques were developed in support of aerospace program requirements: shipping containers, alignment cables for precision mechanisms, isolation of small components such as relays and flight instruments, isolation for heavy flight equipment, coupling devices, universal joints, use of wire mesh to replace cable, isolation of 16-dB, 5000 lb horn, and compound damping devices to get better isolation from shock and vibration in a high steady environment.

  4. Active damping and compensation of satellite appendages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charon, W.; Baier, H.

    1993-10-01

    Future space missions will employ large and, for lightweight reasons, extremely flexible structures with very high performance requirements such as high pointing accuracy and stability, and high shape precision. This requires actively damping out vibrations induced by spacecraft maneuvers. The damping of the solar array vibrations is a characteristic task for such active interface devices. The example of an active interface for damping the bending vibrations of large conventional solar arrays is addressed. Other typical active components are active tube sections for damping the vibrations of large booms, and interfaces between satellite and vibrating large masts carrying high precision reflectors or measurement systems. The mechanical properties of the interfaces and the technological requirements related to their development are determined. New 'smart' materials are prominent among current concerns. Piezoelectric polymer foils bonded to structural shell surfaces, embedded thin piezoceramics plates, and embedded fiber optics sensors, as well as the implementation of materials such as memory alloys, are here addressed.

  5. STREAK damping. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, J.; Peyton, S.; Freiberg, H.

    1989-12-01

    This report documents a study aimed at improving the damping in STREAK. A form and value for an artificial viscosity is recommended which appears to control ringing and overshoots without overdamping.

  6. DAMPs, ageing, and cancer: The 'DAMP Hypothesis'.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jin; Xie, Yangchun; Sun, Xiaofang; Zeh, Herbert J; Kang, Rui; Lotze, Michael T; Tang, Daolin

    2015-11-01

    Ageing is a complex and multifactorial process characterized by the accumulation of many forms of damage at the molecular, cellular, and tissue level with advancing age. Ageing increases the risk of the onset of chronic inflammation-associated diseases such as cancer, diabetes, stroke, and neurodegenerative disease. In particular, ageing and cancer share some common origins and hallmarks such as genomic instability, epigenetic alteration, aberrant telomeres, inflammation and immune injury, reprogrammed metabolism, and degradation system impairment (including within the ubiquitin-proteasome system and the autophagic machinery). Recent advances indicate that damage-associated molecular pattern molecules (DAMPs) such as high mobility group box 1, histones, S100, and heat shock proteins play location-dependent roles inside and outside the cell. These provide interaction platforms at molecular levels linked to common hallmarks of ageing and cancer. They can act as inducers, sensors, and mediators of stress through individual plasma membrane receptors, intracellular recognition receptors (e.g., advanced glycosylation end product-specific receptors, AIM2-like receptors, RIG-I-like receptors, and NOD1-like receptors, and toll-like receptors), or following endocytic uptake. Thus, the DAMP Hypothesis is novel and complements other theories that explain the features of ageing. DAMPs represent ideal biomarkers of ageing and provide an attractive target for interventions in ageing and age-associated diseases. PMID:25446804

  7. Damping modeling in Timoshenko beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Wang, Y.

    1992-01-01

    Theoretical and numerical results of damping model studies for composite material beams using the Timoshenko theory is presented. Based on the damping models developed for Euler-Bernoulli beams, the authors develop damping methods for both bending and shear in investigation of Timoshenko beams. A computational method for the estimation of the damping parameters is given. Experimental data with high-frequency excitation were used to test Timoshenko beam equations with different types of damping models for bending and shear in various combinations.

  8. Non-Linear Slosh Damping Model Development and Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, H. Q.; West, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Propellant tank slosh dynamics are typically represented by a mechanical model of spring mass damper. This mechanical model is then included in the equation of motion of the entire vehicle for Guidance, Navigation and Control (GN&C) analysis. For a partially-filled smooth wall propellant tank, the critical damping based on classical empirical correlation is as low as 0.05%. Due to this low value of damping, propellant slosh is potential sources of disturbance critical to the stability of launch and space vehicles. It is postulated that the commonly quoted slosh damping is valid only under the linear regime where the slosh amplitude is small. With the increase of slosh amplitude, the critical damping value should also increase. If this nonlinearity can be verified and validated, the slosh stability margin can be significantly improved, and the level of conservatism maintained in the GN&C analysis can be lessened. The purpose of this study is to explore and to quantify the dependence of slosh damping with slosh amplitude. Accurately predicting the extremely low damping value of a smooth wall tank is very challenging for any Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) tool. One must resolve thin boundary layers near the wall and limit numerical damping to minimum. This computational study demonstrates that with proper grid resolution, CFD can indeed accurately predict the low damping physics from smooth walls under the linear regime. Comparisons of extracted damping values with experimental data for different tank sizes show very good agreements. Numerical simulations confirm that slosh damping is indeed a function of slosh amplitude. When slosh amplitude is low, the damping ratio is essentially constant, which is consistent with the empirical correlation. Once the amplitude reaches a critical value, the damping ratio becomes a linearly increasing function of the slosh amplitude. A follow-on experiment validated the developed nonlinear damping relationship. This discovery can

  9. Experiments with particle damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollkamp, Joseph J.; Gordon, Robert W.

    1998-06-01

    High cycle fatigue in jet engines is a current military concern. The vibratory stresses that cause fatigue can be reduced by adding damping. However, the high temperatures that occur in the gas turbine greatly hinder the application of mature damping technologies. One technology which may perform in the harsh environment is particle damping. Particle damping involves placing metallic or ceramic particles inside structural cavities. As the cavity vibrates, energy is dissipated through particle collisions. Performance is influenced by many parameters including the type, shape, and size of the particles; the amount of free volume for the particles to move in; density of the particles; and the level of vibration. This paper presents results from a series of experiments designed to gain an appreciation of the important parameters. The experimental setup consists of a cantilever beam with drilled holes. These holes are partially filled with particles. The types of particles, location of the particles, fill level, and other parameters are varied. Damping is estimated for each configuration. Trends in the results are studied to determine the influence of the varied parameter.

  10. Damped flexible seal

    DOEpatents

    DuBois, Neil J.; Amaral, Antonio M.

    1992-10-27

    A damped flexible seal assembly for a torpedo isolates the tailcone thereof rom vibrational energy present in the drive shaft assembly. A pair of outside flanges, each of which include an inwardly facing groove and an O-ring constrained therein, provide a watertight seal against the outer non-rotating surface of the drive shaft assembly. An inside flange includes an outwardly-facing groove and an O-ring constrained therein, and provides a watertight seal against the inner surface of the tail cone. Two cast-in-place elastomeric seals provide a watertight seal between the flanges and further provide a damping barrier between the outside flanges and the inside flanges for damping vibrational energy present in the drive shaft assembly before the energy can reach the tailcone through the seal assembly.

  11. DAMPs and autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiuhong; Kang, Rui; Zeh, III, Herbert J.; Lotze, Michael T.; Tang, Daolin

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is a lysosome-mediated catabolic process involving the degradation of intracellular contents (e.g., proteins and organelles) as well as invading microbes (e.g., parasites, bacteria and viruses). Multiple forms of cellular stress can stimulate this pathway, including nutritional imbalances, oxygen deprivation, immunological response, genetic defects, chromosomal anomalies and cytotoxic stress. Damage-associated molecular pattern molecules (DAMPs) are released by stressed cells undergoing autophagy or injury, and act as endogenous danger signals to regulate the subsequent inflammatory and immune response. A complex relationship exists between DAMPs and autophagy in cellular adaption to injury and unscheduled cell death. Since both autophagy and DAMPs are important for pathogenesis of human disease, it is crucial to understand how they interplay to sustain homeostasis in stressful or dangerous environments. PMID:23388380

  12. Process Damping Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Sam

    2011-12-01

    The phenomenon of process damping as a stabilising effect in milling has been encountered by machinists since milling and turning began. It is of great importance when milling aerospace alloys where maximum surface speed is limited by excessive tool wear and high speed stability lobes cannot be attained. Much of the established research into regenerative chatter and chatter avoidance has focussed on stability lobe theory with different analytical and time domain models developed to expand on the theory first developed by Trusty and Tobias. Process damping is a stabilising effect that occurs when the surface speed is low relative to the dominant natural frequency of the system and has been less successfully modelled and understood. Process damping is believed to be influenced by the interference of the relief face of the cutting tool with the waveform traced on the cut surface, with material properties and the relief geometry of the tool believed to be key factors governing performance. This study combines experimental trials with Finite Element (FE) simulation in an attempt to identify and understand the key factors influencing process damping performance in titanium milling. Rake angle, relief angle and chip thickness are the variables considered experimentally with the FE study looking at average radial and tangential forces and surface compressive stress. For the experimental study a technique is developed to identify the critical process damping wavelength as a means of measuring process damping performance. For the range of parameters studied, chip thickness is found to be the dominant factor with maximum stable parameters increased by a factor of 17 in the best case. Within the range studied, relief angle was found to have a lesser effect than expected whilst rake angle had an influence.

  13. Damping seals for turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonpragenau, G. L.

    1985-01-01

    Rotor whirl stabilization of high performance turbomachinery which operates at supercritical speed is discussed. Basic whirl driving forces are reviewed. Stabilization and criteria are discussed. Damping seals are offered as a solution to whirl and high vibration problems. Concept, advantages, retrofitting, and limits of damping seals are explained. Dynamic and leakage properties are shown to require a rough stator surface for stability and efficiency. Typical seal characteristics are given for the case of the high pressure oxidizer turbopump of the Space Shuttle. Ways of implementation and bearing load effects are discussed.

  14. Note: Tesla transformer damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, J. L.

    2012-07-01

    Unexpected heavy damping in the two winding Tesla pulse transformer is shown to be due to small primary inductances. A small primary inductance is a necessary condition of operability, but is also a refractory inefficiency. A 30% performance loss is demonstrated using a typical "spiral strip" transformer. The loss is investigated by examining damping terms added to the transformer's governing equations. A significant alteration of the transformer's architecture is suggested to mitigate these losses. Experimental and simulated data comparing the 2 and 3 winding transformers are cited to support the suggestion.

  15. Observations of TCRVβ Gene Expression in Rats with Dampness Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yan; Sun, Bao-Guo; Zhang, Shi-Jun; Chen, Ze-Xiong; Hardi, Carlini Fan; Xiang, Ting

    2014-01-01

    Environmental dampness is one factor which can cause human diseases. The effects of exposure to humidity on human immune function are diverse and numerous. In the theory of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), dampness is defined as one of the major pathogenic factors in the human body. It is divided into “external dampness” and “internal dampness.” However the molecular mechanism leading to humidity-induced immunosuppression is obscure. In the present study, we investigated the expression of the T-cell antigen receptor variable β (TCRVβ) subfamilies in rats which were fed in different humid environment. And the expression levels of the TCRVβ subfamilies were detected using FQ-PCR. We found that the dampness might reduce the immunological recognition function of rats. And the obstruction of the immunological recognition function might be caused by internal dampness rather than external dampness. PMID:24976850

  16. The Study of Damped Harmonic Oscillations Using an Electronic Counter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wadhwa, Ajay

    2009-01-01

    We study damped harmonic oscillations in mechanical systems like the loaded spring and simple pendulum with the help of an oscillation measuring electronic counter. The experimental data are used in a software program that solves the differential equation for damped vibrations of any system and determines its position, velocity and acceleration as…

  17. Damping seal for turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonpragenau, G. L. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A damping seal between a high speed rotor member and stator member that separates pressurized fluid compartments is described. It is characterized by the rotor member having a smooth outer surface and the stator member having its bore surface roughened by a plurality of pockets or depressions.

  18. Exotic damping ring lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B.

    1987-05-01

    This paper looks at, and compares three types of damping ring lattices: conventional, wiggler lattice with finite ..cap alpha.., wiggler lattice with ..cap alpha.. = 0, and observes the attainable equilibrium emittances for the three cases assuming a constraint on the attainable longitudinal impedance of 0.2 ohms. The emittance obtained are roughly in the ratio 4:2:1 for these cases.

  19. Spin-orbit damping in transition metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmore, Keith

    2008-03-01

    Magnetization dynamics are routinely described with the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation. However, it is expected that the LLG equation fails to properly describe the large amplitude dynamics that occur during magnetization reversal. Improving switching speeds in nanoscale devices by tailoring materials requires both a qualitative understanding of the relaxation processes that contribute to damping and the ability to quantitatively calculate the resulting damping rates. We consider small amplitude LLG damping in transition metals as a prelude to approaching the more complicated mechanisms expected in complete reversal events. LLG damping rates in pure transition metal systems have non-monotonic temperature dependencies that have been empirically shown by Heinrich et al. [1] to have one part proportional to the conductivity and one part proportional to the resistivity. Kambersky [2] postulated that both contributions result from a torque between the spin and orbital moments. We have conducted first-principles calculations that validate this claim for single element systems [3]. Our calculations for Fe, Co, and Ni both qualitatively match the two trends observed in measurements and quantitatively agree with the observed damping rates. We will discuss how the spin-orbit interaction produces two contributions to damping with nearly opposite temperature dependencies and compare calculations of the damping rate versus resistivity with experimental results. [1] B. Heinrich, D.J. Meredith, and J.F. Cochran, J. Appl. Phys., 50(11), 7726 (1979). [2] V. Kambersky, Czech. J. Phys. B, 26, 1366 (1976). [3] K. Gilmore, Y.U. Idzerda, and M.D. Stiles, Phys. Rev. Lett., 99, 027204 (2007).

  20. Damping formulas and experimental values of damping in flutter models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, Robert P

    1940-01-01

    The problem of determining values of structural damping for use in flutter calculations is discussed. The concept of equivalent viscous damping is reviewed and its relation to the structural damping coefficient g introduced in NACA Technical Report No. 685 is shown. The theory of normal modes is reviewed and a number of methods are described for separating the motions associated with different modes. Equations are developed for use in evaluating the damping parameters from experimental data. Experimental results of measurements of damping in several flutter models are presented.

  1. Highly damped kinematic coupling for precision instruments

    DOEpatents

    Hale, Layton C.; Jensen, Steven A.

    2001-01-01

    A highly damped kinematic coupling for precision instruments. The kinematic coupling provides support while causing essentially no influence to its nature shape, with such influences coming, for example, from manufacturing tolerances, temperature changes, or ground motion. The coupling uses three ball-cone constraints, each combined with a released flexural degree of freedom. This arrangement enables a gain of higher load capacity and stiffness, but can also significantly reduce the friction level in proportion to the ball radius divided by the distance between the ball and the hinge axis. The blade flexures reduces somewhat the stiffness of the coupling and provides an ideal location to apply constrained-layer damping which is accomplished by attaching a viscoelastic layer and a constraining layer on opposite sides of each of the blade flexures. The three identical ball-cone flexures provide a damped coupling mechanism to kinematically support the projection optics system of the extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) system, or other load-sensitive apparatus.

  2. Radiative Damping and Functional Differential Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raju, Suvrat; Raju, C. K.

    We propose a general technique to solve the classical many-body problem with radiative damping. We modify the short-distance structure of Maxwell electrodynamics. This allows us to avoid runaway solutions as if we had a covariant model of extended particles. The resulting equations of motion are functional differential equations (FDEs) rather than ordinary differential equations (ODEs). Using recently developed numerical techniques for stiff, retarded FDEs, we solve these equations for the one-body central force problem with radiative damping. Our results indicate that locally the magnitude of radiation damping may be well approximated by the standard third-order expression but the global properties of our solutions are dramatically different. We comment on the two-body problem and applications to quantum field theory and quantum mechanics.

  3. Biomimetic Gradient Polymers with Enhanced Damping Capacities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; Zhang, Huan; Guo, Jing; Cheng, Beichen; Cao, Yuan; Lu, Shengjun; Zhao, Ning; Xu, Jian

    2016-04-01

    Designing gradient structures, mimicking biological materials, such as pummelo peels and tendon, is a promising strategy for developing advanced materials with superior energy damping capacities. Here a facile and effective approach for fabricating polymers with composition gradients at millimeter length scale is presented. The gradient thiol-ene polymers (TEPs) are created by the use of density difference of ternary thiol-ene-ene precursors and the subsequent photo-crosslinking via thiol-ene reaction. The compositional gradients are analyzed via differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), compressive modulus testing, atomic force microscopy (AFM) indentation, and swelling measurements. In contrast to homogeneous TEPs networks, the resultant gradient polymer shows a broader effective damping temperature range combining with good mechanical properties. The present result provides an effective route toward high damping materials by the fabrication of gradient structures. PMID:26776353

  4. Fluid damping of cylindrical liquid storage tanks.

    PubMed

    Habenberger, Joerg

    2015-01-01

    A method is proposed in order to calculate the damping effects of viscous fluids in liquid storage tanks subjected to earthquakes. The potential equation of an ideal fluid can satisfy only the boundary conditions normal to the surface of the liquid. To satisfy also the tangential interaction conditions between liquid and tank wall and tank bottom, the potential flow is superimposed by a one-dimensional shear flow. The shear flow in this boundary layer yields to a decrease of the mechanical energy of the shell-liquid-system. A damping factor is derived from the mean value of the energy dissipation in time. Depending on shell geometry and fluid viscosity, modal damping ratios are calculated for the convective component. PMID:26405635

  5. Passively damped vibration welding system and method

    DOEpatents

    Tan, Chin-An; Kang, Bongsu; Cai, Wayne W.; Wu, Tao

    2013-04-02

    A vibration welding system includes a controller, welding horn, an anvil, and a passive damping mechanism (PDM). The controller generates an input signal having a calibrated frequency. The horn vibrates in a desirable first direction at the calibrated frequency in response to the input signal to form a weld in a work piece. The PDM is positioned with respect to the system, and substantially damps or attenuates vibration in an undesirable second direction. A method includes connecting the PDM having calibrated properties and a natural frequency to an anvil of an ultrasonic welding system. Then, an input signal is generated using a weld controller. The method includes vibrating a welding horn in a desirable direction in response to the input signal, and passively damping vibration in an undesirable direction using the PDM.

  6. Effect of Ti addition on the structural, mechanical and damping properties of magnetron sputtered Ni-Mn-Sn ferromagnetic shape memory alloy thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, Nitin; Kaur, Davinder

    2012-12-01

    Titanium (Ti) co-sputtered Ni50.4Mn34.7Sn14.9 films deposited by magnetron sputtering onto Si(1 0 0) substrates at 823 K were investigated. X-ray diffraction profiles revealed the formation of highly (2 2 0)-oriented Ni-Mn-Sn-Ti austenite phase with significant decrease in grain size with increasing Ti power. Hardness (H), elastic modulus (Er), damping (tan δ), figure of merit (FOM) and coefficient of restitution (e) of the films were evaluated using nanoindentation tests. A significant improvement in the hardness (10.5 GPa) and toughness H^3/E_r^2 (0.040) was observed in the Ni51.0Mn28.2Sn11.0Ti9.7 nanocomposite film as compared with pure Ni50.4Mn34.7Sn14.9films. An impact model, which incorporates material behaviour, is presented that predicts the experimentally observed material quantities, including energy dissipation metrics such as the coefficient of restitution e with high accuracy. The highest damping factor (tan δ = 0.061), high FOM (0.79) with low coefficient of restitution (e = 0.28) quantifies excellent energy dissipation capacity in the Ni51.0Mn28.2Sn11.0Ti9.7 nanocomposite. Temperature dependence of magnetization (M-T) curves showed an increase in martensitic transformation temperatures with increasing Ti content. The Ni-Mn-Sn-Ti composite films exhibit ferromagnetic behaviour at room temperature.

  7. Design of passive piezoelectric damping for space structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagood, Nesbitt W., IV; Aldrich, Jack B.; Vonflotow, Andreas H.

    1994-09-01

    Passive damping of structural dynamics using piezoceramic electromechanical energy conversion and passive electrical networks is a relatively recent concept with little implementation experience base. This report describes an implementation case study, starting from conceptual design and technique selection, through detailed component design and testing to simulation on the structure to be damped. About 0.5kg. of piezoelectric material was employed to damp the ASTREX testbed, a 500kg structure. Emphasis was placed upon designing the damping to enable high bandwidth robust feedback control. Resistive piezoelectric shunting provided the necessary broadband damping. The piezoelectric element was incorporated into a mechanically-tuned vibration absorber in order to concentrate damping into the 30 to 40 Hz frequency modes at the rolloff region of the proposed compensator. A prototype of a steel flex-tensional motion amplification device was built and tested. The effective stiffness and damping of the flex-tensional device was experimentally verified. When six of these effective springs are placed in an orthogonal configuration, strain energy is absorbed from all six degrees of freedom of a 90kg. mass. A NASTRAN finite element model of the testbed was modified to include the six-spring damping system. An analytical model was developed for the spring in order to see how the flex-tensional device and piezoelectric dimensions effect the critical stress and strain energy distribution throughout the component. Simulation of the testbed demonstrated the damping levels achievable in the completed system.

  8. Cu-Al-Ni-SMA-Based High-Damping Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, Gabriel A.; Barrado, Mariano; San Juan, Jose; Nó, María Luisa

    2009-08-01

    Recently, absorption of vibration energy by mechanical damping has attracted much attention in several fields such as vibration reduction in aircraft and automotive industries, nanoscale vibration isolations in high-precision electronics, building protection in civil engineering, etc. Typically, the most used high-damping materials are based on polymers due to their viscoelastic behavior. However, polymeric materials usually show a low elastic modulus and are not stable at relatively low temperatures (≈323 K). Therefore, alternative materials for damping applications are needed. In particular, shape memory alloys (SMAs), which intrinsically present high-damping capacity thanks to the dissipative hysteretic movement of interfaces under external stresses, are very good candidates for high-damping applications. A completely new approach was applied to produce high-damping composites with relatively high stiffness. Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloy powders were embedded with metallic matrices of pure In, a In-10wt.%Sn alloy and In-Sn eutectic alloy. The production methodology is described. The composite microstructures and damping properties were characterized. A good particle distribution of the Cu-Al-Ni particles in the matrices was observed. The composites exhibit very high damping capacities in relatively wide temperature ranges. The methodology introduced provides versatility to control the temperature of maximum damping by adjusting the shape memory alloy composition.

  9. Damping seals for turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonpragenau, G. L.

    1982-01-01

    A rotor seal is proposed that restricts leakage like a labyrinth seal, but extends the stabilizing speed range beyond twice the first critical speed. The dynamic parameters were derived from bulk flow equations without requiring a dominant axial flow. The flow is considered incompressible and turbulent. Damping seals are shown to be feasible for extending the speed range of high performance turbomachinery beyond the limit imposed by conventional seals.

  10. Dependence of kink oscillation damping on the amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddard, C. R.; Nakariakov, V. M.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Kink oscillations of coronal loops are one of the most intensively studied oscillatory phenomena in the solar corona. In the large-amplitude rapidly damped regime, these oscillations are observed to have a low quality factor with only a few cycles of oscillation detected before they are damped. The specific mechanism responsible for rapid damping is commonly accepted to be associated with the linear coupling between collective kink oscillations and localised torsional oscillations, the phenomenon of resonant absorption of the kink mode. The role of finite amplitude effects, however, is still not clear. Aims: We investigated the empirical dependence of the kink oscillation damping time and its quality factor, which is defined as the ratio of damping time to oscillation period, on the oscillation amplitude. Methods: We analysed decaying kink oscillation events detected previously with TRACE, SDO/AIA and and STEREO/EUVI in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) 171 Å band. Results: We found that the ratio of the kink oscillation damping time to the oscillation period systematically decreases with the oscillation amplitude. We approximated the quality factor dependence on the oscillation displacement amplitude via the power-law dependence with the exponent of -1/2, however we stress that this is a by-eye estimate, and a more rigorous estimation of the scaling law requires more accurate measurements and increased statistics. We conclude that damping of kink oscillations of coronal loops depends on the oscillation amplitude, indicating the possible role of non-linear mechanisms for damping.

  11. Characteristics and computer model simulation of magnetic damping forces in maglev systems

    SciTech Connect

    He, J.L.; Rote, D.M.; Chen, S.S.

    1994-05-01

    This report discusses the magnetic damping force in electrodynamic suspension (EDS) maglev systems. The computer model simulations, which combine electrical system equations with mechanical motion equations on the basis of dynamic circuit theory, were conducted for a loop-shaped coil guideway. The intrinsic damping characteristics of the EDS-type guideway are investigated, and the negative damping phenomenon is confirmed by the computer simulations. The report also presents a simple circuit model to aid in understanding damping-force characteristics.

  12. The moment problem and vibrations damping of beams and plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atamuratov, Andrey G.; Mikhailov, Igor E.; Muravey, Leonid A.

    2016-06-01

    Beams and plates are the elements of different complex mechanical structures, for example, pipelines and aerospace platforms. That is why the problem of damping of their vibrations caused by unwanted perturbations is actual task.

  13. Chiral damping of magnetic domain walls.

    PubMed

    Jué, Emilie; Safeer, C K; Drouard, Marc; Lopez, Alexandre; Balint, Paul; Buda-Prejbeanu, Liliana; Boulle, Olivier; Auffret, Stephane; Schuhl, Alain; Manchon, Aurelien; Miron, Ioan Mihai; Gaudin, Gilles

    2016-03-01

    Structural symmetry breaking in magnetic materials is responsible for the existence of multiferroics, current-induced spin-orbit torques and some topological magnetic structures. In this Letter we report that the structural inversion asymmetry (SIA) gives rise to a chiral damping mechanism, which is evidenced by measuring the field-driven domain-wall (DW) motion in perpendicularly magnetized asymmetric Pt/Co/Pt trilayers. The DW dynamics associated with the chiral damping and those with Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) exhibit identical spatial symmetry. However, both scenarios are differentiated by their time reversal properties: whereas DMI is a conservative effect that can be modelled by an effective field, the chiral damping is purely dissipative and has no influence on the equilibrium magnetic texture. When the DW motion is modulated by an in-plane magnetic field, it reveals the structure of the internal fields experienced by the DWs, allowing one to distinguish the physical mechanism. The chiral damping enriches the spectrum of physical phenomena engendered by the SIA, and is essential for conceiving DW and skyrmion devices owing to its coexistence with DMI (ref. ). PMID:26689141

  14. Chiral damping of magnetic domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jué, Emilie; Safeer, C. K.; Drouard, Marc; Lopez, Alexandre; Balint, Paul; Buda-Prejbeanu, Liliana; Boulle, Olivier; Auffret, Stephane; Schuhl, Alain; Manchon, Aurelien; Miron, Ioan Mihai; Gaudin, Gilles

    2016-03-01

    Structural symmetry breaking in magnetic materials is responsible for the existence of multiferroics, current-induced spin-orbit torques and some topological magnetic structures. In this Letter we report that the structural inversion asymmetry (SIA) gives rise to a chiral damping mechanism, which is evidenced by measuring the field-driven domain-wall (DW) motion in perpendicularly magnetized asymmetric Pt/Co/Pt trilayers. The DW dynamics associated with the chiral damping and those with Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) exhibit identical spatial symmetry. However, both scenarios are differentiated by their time reversal properties: whereas DMI is a conservative effect that can be modelled by an effective field, the chiral damping is purely dissipative and has no influence on the equilibrium magnetic texture. When the DW motion is modulated by an in-plane magnetic field, it reveals the structure of the internal fields experienced by the DWs, allowing one to distinguish the physical mechanism. The chiral damping enriches the spectrum of physical phenomena engendered by the SIA, and is essential for conceiving DW and skyrmion devices owing to its coexistence with DMI (ref. ).

  15. Methods for improving damping. Part 3: Damping material data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-12-01

    ESDU 92001 presents modulus and loss factor for 27 damping materials in the form of reduced temperature nomograms which allow the effects of frequency and temperature on those properties to be considered simultaneously. The data were supplied by 5 manufacturers, and their addresses in the UK and US are provided. The information is a necessary input in computational procedures, described in ESDU 91013, dealing with the application of layered damping treatments to beam- and plate-like structures. Notes are included on the measurement and reliability of the damping quantities that affect the variability allowances to be made when assessing a damping treatment for a particular application. Factors to be considered when selecting a damping material are discussed. Approximate relationships between the elastic properties of damping materials are given.

  16. Nonlinear damping and quasi-linear modelling.

    PubMed

    Elliott, S J; Ghandchi Tehrani, M; Langley, R S

    2015-09-28

    The mechanism of energy dissipation in mechanical systems is often nonlinear. Even though there may be other forms of nonlinearity in the dynamics, nonlinear damping is the dominant source of nonlinearity in a number of practical systems. The analysis of such systems is simplified by the fact that they show no jump or bifurcation behaviour, and indeed can often be well represented by an equivalent linear system, whose damping parameters depend on the form and amplitude of the excitation, in a 'quasi-linear' model. The diverse sources of nonlinear damping are first reviewed in this paper, before some example systems are analysed, initially for sinusoidal and then for random excitation. For simplicity, it is assumed that the system is stable and that the nonlinear damping force depends on the nth power of the velocity. For sinusoidal excitation, it is shown that the response is often also almost sinusoidal, and methods for calculating the amplitude are described based on the harmonic balance method, which is closely related to the describing function method used in control engineering. For random excitation, several methods of analysis are shown to be equivalent. In general, iterative methods need to be used to calculate the equivalent linear damper, since its value depends on the system's response, which itself depends on the value of the equivalent linear damper. The power dissipation of the equivalent linear damper, for both sinusoidal and random cases, matches that dissipated by the nonlinear damper, providing both a firm theoretical basis for this modelling approach and clear physical insight. Finally, practical examples of nonlinear damping are discussed: in microspeakers, vibration isolation, energy harvesting and the mechanical response of the cochlea. PMID:26303921

  17. Vibrational modes and damping in the cochlear partition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Maoiléidigh, Dáibhid; Hudspeth, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    It has been assumed in models of cochlear mechanics that the primary role of the cochlear active process is to counteract the damping of the basilar membrane, the vibration of which is much larger in a living animal than post mortem. Recent measurements of the relative motion between the reticular lamina and basilar membrane imply that this assumption is incorrect. We propose that damping is distributed throughout the cochlear partition rather than being concentrated in the basilar membrane. In the absence of significant damping, the cochlear partition possesses three modes of vibration, each associated with its own locus of Hopf bifurcations. Hair-cell activity can amplify any of these modes if the system's operating point lies near the corresponding bifurcation. The distribution of damping determines which mode of vibration predominates. For physiological levels of damping, only one mode produces a vibration pattern consistent with experimental measurements of relative motion and basilar-membrane motion.

  18. Passively Damped Laminated Piezoelectric Shell Structures with Integrated Electric Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, Dimitris A.

    1999-01-01

    Multi-field mechanics are presented for curvilinear piezoelectric laminates interfaced with distributed passive electric components. The equations of motion for laminated piezoelectric shell structures with embedded passive electric networks are directly formulated and solved using a finite element methodology. The modal damping and frequencies of the piezoelectric shell are calculated from the poles of the system. Experimental and numerical results are presented for the modal damping and frequency of composite beams with a resistively shunted piezoceramic patch. The modal damping and frequency of plates, cylindrical shells and cylindrical composite blades with piezoelectric-resistor layers are predicted. Both analytical and experimental studies illustrate a unique dependence of modal damping and frequencies on the shunting resistance and show the effect of structural shape and curvature on piezoelectric damping.

  19. Flow damping due to stochastization of the magnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Ida, K.; Yoshinuma, M.; Tsuchiya, H.; Kobayashi, T.; Suzuki, C.; Yokoyama, M.; Shimizu, A.; Nagaoka, K.; Inagaki, S.; Itoh, K.; Akiyama, T.; Emoto, M.; Evans, T.; Dinklage, A.; Du, X.; Fujii, K.; Goto, M.; Goto, T.; Hasuo, M.; Hidalgo, C.; Ichiguchi, K.; Ishizawa, A.; Jakubowski, M.; Kamiya, K.; Kasahara, H.; Kawamura, G.; Kato, D.; Kobayashi, M.; Morita, S.; Mukai, K.; Murakami, I.; Murakami, S.; Narushima, Y.; Nunami, M.; Ohdach, S.; Ohno, N.; Osakabe, M.; Pablant, N.; Sakakibara, S.; Seki, T.; Shimozuma, T.; Shoji, M.; Sudo, S.; Tanaka, K.; Tokuzawa, T.; Todo, Y.; Wang, H.; Yamada, H.; Takeiri, Y.; Mutoh, T.; Imagawa, S.; Mito, T.; Nagayama, Y.; Watanabe, K. Y.; Ashikawa, N.; Chikaraishi, H.; Ejiri, A.; Furukawa, M.; Fujita, T.; Hamaguchi, S.; Igami, H.; Isobe, M.; Masuzaki, S.; Morisaki, T.; Motojima, G.; Nagasaki, K.; Nakano, H.; Oya, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Sakamoto, R.; Sakamoto, M.; Sanpei, A.; Takahashi, H.; Tokitani, M.; Ueda, Y.; Yoshimura, Y.; Yamamoto, S.; Nishimura, K.; Sugama, H.; Yamamoto, T.; Idei, H.; Isayama, A.; Kitajima, S.; Masamune, S.; Shinohara, K.; Bawankar, P. S.; Bernard, E.; von Berkel, M.; Funaba, H.; Huang, X. L.; Ii, T.; Ido, T.; Ikeda, K.; Kamio, S.; Kumazawa, R.; Moon, C.; Muto, S.; Miyazawa, J.; Ming, T.; Nakamura, Y.; Nishimura, S.; Ogawa, K.; Ozaki, T.; Oishi, T.; Ohno, M.; Pandya, S.; Seki, R.; Sano, R.; Saito, K.; Sakaue, H.; Takemura, Y.; Tsumori, K.; Tamura, N.; Tanaka, H.; Toi, K.; Wieland, B.; Yamada, I.; Yasuhara, R.; Zhang, H.; Kaneko, O.; Komori, A.

    2015-01-01

    The driving and damping mechanism of plasma flow is an important issue because flow shear has a significant impact on turbulence in a plasma, which determines the transport in the magnetized plasma. Here we report clear evidence of the flow damping due to stochastization of the magnetic field. Abrupt damping of the toroidal flow associated with a transition from a nested magnetic flux surface to a stochastic magnetic field is observed when the magnetic shear at the rational surface decreases to 0.5 in the large helical device. This flow damping and resulting profile flattening are much stronger than expected from the Rechester–Rosenbluth model. The toroidal flow shear shows a linear decay, while the ion temperature gradient shows an exponential decay. This observation suggests that the flow damping is due to the change in the non-diffusive term of momentum transport. PMID:25569268

  20. Damping measurements in flowing water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutu, A.; Seeley, C.; Monette, C.; Nennemann, B.; Marmont, H.

    2012-11-01

    Fluid-structure interaction (FSI), in the form of mass loading and damping, governs the dynamic response of water turbines, such as Francis turbines. Water added mass and damping are both critical quantities in evaluating the dynamic response of the turbine component. Although the effect of fluid added mass is well documented, fluid damping, a critical quantity to limit vibration amplitudes during service, and therefore to help avoiding possible failure of the turbines, has received much less attention in the literature. This paper presents an experimental investigation of damping due to FSI. The experimental setup, designed to create dynamic characteristics similar to the ones of Francis turbine blades is discussed, together with the experimental protocol and examples of measurements obtained. The paper concludes with the calculated damping values and a discussion on the impact of the observed damping behaviour on the response of hydraulic turbine blades to FSI.

  1. Magnetically Damped Furnace (MDF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Magnetically Damped Furnace (MDF) breadboard is being developed in response to NASA's mission and goals to advance the scientific knowledge of microgravity research, materials science, and related technologies. The objective of the MDF is to dampen the fluid flows due to density gradients and surface tension gradients in conductive melts by introducing a magnetic field during the sample processing. The MDF breadboard will serve as a proof of concept that the MDF performance requirements can be attained within the International Space Station resource constraints.

  2. The Joint Damping Experiment (JDX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folkman, Steven L.; Bingham, Jeff G.; Crookston, Jess R.; Dutson, Joseph D.; Ferney, Brook D.; Ferney, Greg D.; Rowsell, Edwin A.

    1997-01-01

    The Joint Damping Experiment (JDX), flown on the Shuttle STS-69 Mission, is designed to measure the influence of gravity on the structural damping of a high precision three bay truss. Principal objectives are: (1) Measure vibration damping of a small-scale, pinjointed truss to determine how pin gaps give rise to gravity-dependent damping rates; (2) Evaluate the applicability of ground and low-g aircraft tests for predicting on-orbit behavior; and (3) Evaluate the ability of current nonlinear finite element codes to model the dynamic behavior of the truss. Damping of the truss was inferred from 'Twang' tests that involve plucking the truss structure and recording the decay of the oscillations. Results are summarized as follows. (1) Damping, rates can change by a factor of 3 to 8 through changing the truss orientation; (2) The addition of a few pinned joints to a truss structure can increase the damping by a factor as high as 30; (3) Damping is amplitude dependent; (4) As gravity induced preloads become large (truss long axis perpendicular to gravity vector) the damping is similar to non-pinjointed truss; (5) Impacting in joints drives higher modes in structure; (6) The torsion mode disappears if gravity induced preloads are low.

  3. New concepts for damping rings

    SciTech Connect

    Raimondi, P.; Wolski, A.

    2002-05-30

    The requirements for very low emittance and short damping time in the damping rings of future linear colliders, naturally lead to very small beta functions and dispersion in the ring arcs. This makes it difficult to make chromatic correction while maintaining good dynamics. We have therefore developed a lattice with very simple arcs (designed to give the best product of emittance and damping time), and with separate chromatic correction in a dedicated section. The chromatic correction is achieved using a series of non-interleaved sextupole pairs. The performance of such a solution is comparable to that of current damping ring designs, while there are a number of potential advantages.

  4. Rheology behavior and optimal damping effect of granular particles in a non-obstructive particle damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kai; Chen, Tianning; Wang, Xiaopeng; Fang, Jianglong

    2016-03-01

    To explore the optimal damping mechanism of non-obstructive particle dampers (NOPDs), research on the relationship between the damping performance of NOPDs and the motion mode of damping particles in NOPDs was carried out based on the rheological properties of vibrated granular particles. Firstly, the damping performance of NOPDs under different excitation intensity and gap clearance was investigated via cantilever system experiments, and an approximate evaluation of the effective mass and effective damping of NOPDs was performed by fitting the experimental data to an equivalent single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) system with no damping particles. Then the phase diagrams which could show the motion mode of damping particles under different excitation intensity and gap clearance were obtained via a series of vibration table tests. Moreover, the dissipation characteristic of damping particles was explored by the discrete element method (DEM). The study results indicate that when NOPDs play the optimal damping effect the granular Leidenfrost effect whereby the entire particle bed in NOPDs is levitated above the vibrating base by a layer of highly energetic particles is observed. Finally, the damping characteristics of NOPDs was explained by collisions and frictions between particle-particle and particle-wall based on the rheology behavior of damping particles and a new dissipation mechanism was first proposed for the optimal damping performance of NOPDs.

  5. Active Damping Using Distributed Anisotropic Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiller, Noah H.; Cabell, Randolph H.; Quinones, Juan D.; Wier, Nathan C.

    2010-01-01

    A helicopter structure experiences substantial high-frequency mechanical excitation from powertrain components such as gearboxes and drive shafts. The resulting structure-borne vibration excites the windows which then radiate sound into the passenger cabin. In many cases the radiated sound power can be reduced by adding damping. This can be accomplished using passive or active approaches. Passive treatments such as constrained layer damping tend to reduce window transparency. Therefore this paper focuses on an active approach utilizing compact decentralized control units distributed around the perimeter of the window. Each control unit consists of a triangularly shaped piezoelectric actuator, a miniature accelerometer, and analog electronics. Earlier work has shown that this type of system can increase damping up to approximately 1 kHz. However at higher frequencies the mismatch between the distributed actuator and the point sensor caused control spillover. This paper describes new anisotropic actuators that can be used to improve the bandwidth of the control system. The anisotropic actuators are composed of piezoelectric material sandwiched between interdigitated electrodes, which enables the application of the electric field in a preferred in-plane direction. When shaped correctly the anisotropic actuators outperform traditional isotropic actuators by reducing the mismatch between the distributed actuator and point sensor at high frequencies. Testing performed on a Plexiglas panel, representative of a helicopter window, shows that the control units can increase damping at low frequencies. However high frequency performance was still limited due to the flexible boundary conditions present on the test structure.

  6. The Influence of Damping on Waves and Vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaul, L.

    1999-01-01

    SummaryThis paper provides a unified approach for conventional and generalised linear models of viscoelastic constitutive behaviour. Creep, relaxation and hysteresis effects of materials and structures are described consistently. Advantages of the fractional derivative concept are outlined. Mathematical consequences resulting from operator non-locality in time domain and uniqueness questions arising in frequency domain are addressed. The elastic-viscoelastic correspondence principle serves as a tool to obtain as well analytical and numerical BEM and FEM solutions of wave propagation and vibration problems by transform methods. Characteristics of viscoelastic waves and vibrations are discussed. The paper focusses on material damping but includes aspects of radiation damping description by discretisation methods as well. Important aspects of damping description are beyond the scope of selected topics of this survey paper. This is why additional reading is recommended on the following subjects: Thermo-viscoelasticity and non-linear viscoelasticity [3, 4, 21], determination of mechanical properties by experimental methods [2, 4, 38, 43], damping devices and surface damping treatment [31, 38, 43], material damping data [3, 31] and structural damping [45] including the nonlinear dissipation in mechanical joints such as bolted or riveted connections [46-48]. A list which is by far not complete.

  7. Damping capacity measurements for characterization of degradation in advanced materials

    SciTech Connect

    Mantena, R.; Gibson, R.F.; Place, T.A.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes the application of damping capacity measurements for characterization of degradation in advanced materials. A recently developed impulse-frequency response technique was used to obtain damping capacity measurements on crossplied E-glass/epoxy laminates which had been subjected to four-point bending and cantilever bending to produce matrix cracking in the transverse plies. The size and location of the damage zone were correlated with changes in damping. With the expected introduction of Rapidly Solidified Alloys (RSA) as effective alternatives to conventional materials, the applicability of damping capacity measurements as a nondestructive means of evaluating degradation in these materials was also studied. A conventional A710 structural steel having three different microstructures was used for developing the methodology to be used later on RSA specimens. It is shown that damping is more sensitive to matrix cracking than stiffness is in E-glass/epoxy composite specimens. In the case of A710 steel, the damping changes at low strain, though significant, do not correlate with the mechanical property data. Damping data at high strains does correlate with the mechanical property data, however.

  8. SAR image quality effects of damped phase and amplitude errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelenka, Jerry S.; Falk, Thomas

    The effects of damped multiplicative, amplitude, or phase errors on the image quality of synthetic-aperture radar systems are considered. These types of errors can result from aircraft maneuvers or the mechanical steering of an antenna. The proper treatment of damped multiplicative errors can lead to related design specifications and possibly an enhanced collection capability. Only small, high-frequency errors are considered. Expressions for the average intensity and energy associated with a damped multiplicative error are presented and used to derive graphic results. A typical example is used to show how to apply the results of this effort.

  9. The Latest Results from DAMPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jin

    2016-07-01

    DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) successfully launched on Dec.17, 2015 is the first Chinese astronomical satellite that can measure 2 GeV-10 TeV electrons and gamma-rays with unprecedented energy resolution. In this talk I will introduce the design, the beam-test, the on-orbit calibration and some preliminary results of DAMPE.

  10. Damping Vibration at an Impeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hager, J. A.; Rowan, B. F.

    1982-01-01

    Vibration of pump shaft is damped at impeller--where vibration-induced deflections are greatest--by shroud and seal. Damping reduces vibrational motion of shaft at bearings and load shaft places on them. Flow through clearance channel absorbs vibration energy.

  11. Gilbert-like damping caused by time retardation in atomistic magnetization dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thonig, Danny; Henk, Jürgen; Eriksson, Olle

    2015-09-01

    Gilbert-like damping in magnetization dynamics is commonly attributed to the interplay of the spin, the electron, and the phonon reservoirs. Spatial correlations within the spin reservoir itself, for example magnons, mediate damping as well. We show theoretically that temporal correlations within the spin reservoir cause a similar effect. We investigate the role of time retardation in the atomistic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation using two different retardation kernels. Although viscous damping is explicitly excluded, we find both analytically and numerically that damping and higher-order effects emerge due to time retardation. Thus, our results establish a mechanism for damping and inertia in magnetic systems.

  12. Random Response of Linear Hysteretic Damping

    SciTech Connect

    Floris, Claudio

    2008-07-08

    The probabilistic characterization of the response of a single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) oscillator with linear hysteretic damping excited by ground motion described by zero mean stationary Gaussian processes is achieved by profiting from a steady-state solution of the motion equation, valid when the excitation is given by the superposition of harmonics. The model of linear hysteretic damping has been introduced to fit damping mechanisms in which the dissipation rate is independent of frequency, and mathematically it is described by the Hilbert transform of the response. Though this model is debated since it violates the principle of causality, its intrinsic simplicity makes it preferable to other models. The steady-state solution of the motion equation proposed in this paper allows a closed form evaluation of the respone mean square value. However, the numerical examples show that this quantity is affected by the mechanism of energy dissipation only when this is large. On the contrary, for a low capacity of dissipation the response mean square value is rather insensitive to the dissipation mechanism.

  13. Damping seal verification setup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cappel, K. L.

    1985-01-01

    The heart of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) is a set of turbopumps that propel cryogenic fluids at very high pressures and flow rates, at rotor speeds up to 37,000 rpm. Bushing seals that cause the flow in the fluid film to become turbulent, by means of a multiplicity of pockets, were shown theoretically not only to inhibit subsynchronous whirl, but to reduce leakage as well. However, experimental data that relate these two desirable characteristics to such parameters as pocket depth, Reynolds number (based on clearance and axial flow rate), and rotating speed are limited. To obtain the required data, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) commissioned Wyle Laboratories to design, build and operate a test rig in which the damping efficacy and leakage reduction of typical candidate seals are to be evaluated.

  14. Damping measurements using operational data

    SciTech Connect

    James, G.H.; Carne, T.G.; Veers, P.S.

    1996-08-01

    The authors have measured modal damping using strain-gauge data from an operating wind turbine. This new technique for measuring modal damping is easier and less expensive than previously used methods. Auto-correlation and cross-correlation functions of the strain-gauge data have been shown to consist of decaying sinusoids which correspond to the modal frequencies and damping ratios of the wind turbine. The authors have verified the method by extracting damping values from an analytically generated data set. Actual operating response data from the DOE/Sandia 34-m Test Bed has been used to calculate modal damping ratios as a function of rotor rotation rate. This capability will allow more accurate fatigue life prediction and control.

  15. Damping Bearings In High-Speed Turbomachines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Pragenau, George L.

    1994-01-01

    Paper presents comparison of damping bearings with traditional ball, roller, and hydrostatic bearings in high-speed cryogenic turbopumps. Concept of damping bearings described in "Damping Seals and Bearings for a Turbomachine" (MFS-28345).

  16. Viscous damping of toroidal angular momentum in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Stacey, W. M.

    2014-09-15

    The Braginskii viscous stress tensor formalism was generalized to accommodate non-axisymmetric 3D magnetic fields in general toroidal flux surface geometry in order to provide a representation for the viscous damping of toroidal rotation in tokamaks arising from various “neoclassical toroidal viscosity” mechanisms. In the process, it was verified that the parallel viscosity contribution to damping toroidal angular momentum still vanishes even in the presence of toroidal asymmetries, unless there are 3D radial magnetic fields.

  17. Flux-driven algebraic damping of diocotron modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chim, Chi Yung; O'Neil, Thomas M.

    2015-06-01

    Recent experiments with pure electron plasmas in a Malmberg-Penning trap have observed the algebraic damping of m = 1 and m = 2 diocotron modes. Transport due to small field asymmetries produces a low density halo of electrons moving radially outward from the plasma core, and the mode damping begins when the halo reaches the resonant radius Rm, where there is a matching of ωm = mωE (Rm) for the mode frequency ωm and E × B-drift rotation frequency ωE. The damping rate is proportional to the flux of halo particles through the resonant layer. The damping is related to, but distinct from, spatial Landau damping, in which a linear wave-particle resonance produces exponential damping. This new mechanism of damping is due to transfer of canonical angular momentum from the mode to halo particles, as they are swept around the "cat's eye" orbits of the resonant wave-particle interaction. This paper provides a simple derivation of the time dependence of the mode amplitudes.

  18. Nonlinear damping calculation in cylindrical gear dynamic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilbault, Raynald; Lalonde, Sébastien; Thomas, Marc

    2012-04-01

    The nonlinear dynamic problem posed by cylindrical gear systems has been extensively covered in the literature. Nonetheless, a significant proportion of the mechanisms involved in damping generation remains to be investigated and described. The main objective of this study is to contribute to this task. Overall, damping is assumed to consist of three sources: surrounding element contribution, hysteresis of the teeth, and oil squeeze damping. The first two contributions are considered to be commensurate with the supported load; for its part however, squeeze damping is formulated using expressions developed from the Reynolds equation. A lubricated impact analysis between the teeth is introduced in this study for the minimum film thickness calculation during contact losses. The dynamic transmission error (DTE) obtained from the final model showed close agreement with experimental measurements available in the literature. The nonlinear damping ratio calculated at different mesh frequencies and torque amplitudes presented average values between 5.3 percent and 8 percent, which is comparable to the constant 8 percent ratio used in published numerical simulations of an equivalent gear pair. A close analysis of the oil squeeze damping evidenced the inverse relationship between this damping effect and the applied load.

  19. Flux-driven algebraic damping of diocotron modes

    SciTech Connect

    Chim, Chi Yung; O’Neil, Thomas M.

    2015-06-29

    Recent experiments with pure electron plasmas in a Malmberg-Penning trap have observed the algebraic damping of m = 1 and m = 2 diocotron modes. Transport due to small field asymmetries produces a low density halo of electrons moving radially outward from the plasma core, and the mode damping begins when the halo reaches the resonant radius R{sub m}, where there is a matching of ω{sub m} = mω{sub E} (R{sub m}) for the mode frequency ω{sub m} and E × B-drift rotation frequency ω{sub E}. The damping rate is proportional to the flux of halo particles through the resonant layer. The damping is related to, but distinct from, spatial Landau damping, in which a linear wave-particle resonance produces exponential damping. This new mechanism of damping is due to transfer of canonical angular momentum from the mode to halo particles, as they are swept around the “cat’s eye” orbits of the resonant wave-particle interaction. This paper provides a simple derivation of the time dependence of the mode amplitudes.

  20. Beliaev damping in quasi-two-dimensional dipolar condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Ryan M.; Natu, Stefan

    2016-05-01

    We study the effects of quasiparticle interactions in a quasi-two-dimensional (quasi-2D), zero-temperature Bose-Einstein condensate of dipolar atoms, which can exhibit a roton-maxon feature in its quasiparticle spectrum. Our focus is the Beliaev damping process, in which a quasiparticle collides with the condensate and resonantly decays into a pair of quasiparticles. Remarkably, the rate for this process exhibits a highly nontrivial dependence on the quasiparticle momentum and the dipolar interaction strength. For weak interactions, low-energy phonons experience no damping, and higher-energy quasiparticles undergo anomalously weak damping. In contrast, the Beliaev damping rates become anomalously large for stronger dipolar interactions, as rotons become energetically accessible as final states. When the dipoles are tilted off the axis of symmetry, the damping rates acquire an anisotropic character. Surprisingly, this anisotropy does not simply track the anisotropy of the dipolar interactions, rather, the mechanisms for damping are qualitatively modified in the anisotropic case. Our study reveals the unconventional nature of Beliaev damping in dipolar condensates, and has important implications for ongoing studies of equilibrium and nonequilibrium dynamics in these systems. Further, our results are relevant for other 2D superfluids with roton excitations, including spin-orbit-coupled Bose gases, magnon condensates, and 4He films.

  1. Reducing extrinsic damping of surface acoustic waves at gigahertz frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelda, Dhruv; Sadhu, Jyothi; Ghossoub, Marc G.; Ertekin, Elif; Sinha, Sanjiv

    2016-04-01

    High-frequency surface acoustic waves (SAWs) in the gigahertz range can be generated using absorption from an ultrafast laser in a patterned metallic grating on a substrate. Reducing the attenuation at these frequencies can yield better sensors as well as enable them to better probe phonon and electron-phonon interactions near surfaces. It is not clear from existing experiments which mechanisms dominate damping at high frequencies. We calculate damping times of SAWs due to various mechanisms in the 1-100 GHz range to find that mechanical loading of the grating on the substrate dominates dissipation by radiating energy from the surface into the bulk. To overcome this and enable future measurements to probe intrinsic damping, we propose incorporating distributed acoustic Bragg reflectors in the experimental structure. Layers of alternating materials with contrasting acoustic impedances embedded a wavelength away from the surface serve to reflect energy back to the surface. Using numerical simulations, we show that a single Bragg reflector is sufficient to increase the energy density at the surface by more than five times. We quantify the resulting damping time to find that it is longer than the intrinsic damping time. The proposed structure can enable future measurements of intrinsic damping in SAWs at ˜100 GHz.

  2. Damped Modes in Plasma Microturbulence: Saturation, Regulation, and Energy Partition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makwana, Kiritkumar D.

    Plasma microturbulence at the scale of the ion gyroradius and smaller is considered to be the primary cause of heat loss in tokamaks. Damped modes are stable roots of the plasma dispersion relation and form an inseparable part of the microturbulent spectrum. We study several microturbulence models that describe vastly different fusion plasmas. All of them show saturation by damped modes that dissipate energy at almost the same rate as the energy injection rate of the unstable modes. Dissipation by damped modes peaks at low wavenumbers where the instability also peaks, distinguishing it from the traditional viscous dissipation mechanism at large wavenumbers. Damped modes are typically found to be important in saturation when their damping rate is not much larger than the instability growth rate. Until now, the regulation of ion temperature gradient driven (ITG) turbulence by zonal flows has been explained using the zonal flow-drift wave shearing paradigm: zonal flow shearing enhances energy transfer from large scale drift waves to smaller, dissipative scales. However, we show, in both fluid and gyrokinetic simulations, that the zonal flows help transfer a majority of the energy injected by the unstable modes to the damped modes, leading to saturation. Although the transfer to damped modes simultaneously excites smaller scales, a significant fraction of the injected energy is dissipated by damped modes in the large-scale, unstable region. This transfer occurs via three-wave interactions that include a zonal flow, an unstable mode and a damped mode. Such interactions dominate due to their coupling coefficients, the strong zonal flow amplitude and their minimum frequency sum that leads to the largest correlation time and enhanced energy transfer. The slew of damped modes in gyrokinetic simulations is analyzed using proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) modes and linear eigenmodes. Spectra of energy and amplitude attenuation rates of damped modes are calculated, showing

  3. Relativity damps OPEP in nuclear matter

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, M.K.

    1998-06-01

    Using a relativistic Dirac-Brueckner analysis the OPEP contribution to the ground state energy of nuclear matter is studied. In the study the pion is derivative-coupled. The author finds that the role of the tensor force in the saturation mechanism is substantially reduced compared to its dominant role in a usual nonrelativistic treatment. He shows that the damping of derivative-coupled OPEP is actually due to the decrease of M{sup *}/M with increasing density. He points out that if derivative-coupled OPEP is the preferred form of nuclear effective lagrangian nonrelativistic treatment of nuclear matter is in trouble. Lacking the notion of M{sup *} it cannot replicate the damping. He suggests an examination of the feasibility of using pseudoscalar coupled {pi}N interaction before reaching a final conclusion about nonrelativistic treatment of nuclear matter.

  4. Plasmon damping in graphene out of equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhiyuan; Basov, Dimitri; Fogler, Michael

    Motivated by recent experiments with graphene under high photoexcitation, we study theoretically plasmons of graphene in the two-temperature regime, i.e., the regime where electrons are much hotter than the lattice. We calculate the plasmon damping due to scattering of electrons by acoustic phonons, which is the dominant intrinsic contribution in clean graphene. As the system relaxes to equilibrium, the plasmon frequency adiabatically changes with time. We show that this causes a partial compensation of the plasmon damping. A similar mechanism may apply to another collective mode (the energy wave) predicted to exist in graphene in the low-frequency hydrodynamic regime. Implications for infrared and THz pump-probe experiments are discussed.

  5. Self-Damping Sprung Wheel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce

    1993-01-01

    Self-damping sprung wheel provides shock-absorbing suspension for wheelchair, reducing user's discomfort when traversing rough terrain or obstacles. Pair of self-damping sprung wheels installed in place of conventional large rear wheels of standard wheelchair, which user operates in conventional manner. Rim deflects in vicinity of contact with ground or floor. Includes inner and outer hoops bending when obstacle encountered. Shear deformation of elastomeric hoop between them absorbs energy. Thus, three hoops act together as damping spring. Alternative version of wheel designed for bicycle.

  6. Indirect evidence for Levy walks in squeeze film damping

    SciTech Connect

    Schlamminger, S.; Hagedorn, C. A.; Gundlach, J. H.

    2010-06-15

    Molecular flow gas damping of mechanical motion in confined geometries, and its associated noise, is important in a variety of fields, including precision measurement, gravitational wave detection, and microelectromechanical systems devices. We used two torsion balance instruments to measure the strength and distance-dependence of 'squeeze film' damping. Measured quality factors derived from free decay of oscillation are consistent with gas particle superdiffusion in Levy walks and inconsistent with those expected from traditional Gaussian random walk particle motion. The distance-dependence of squeeze film damping observed in our experiments is in agreement with a parameter-free Monte Carlo simulation. The squeeze film damping of the motion of a plate suspended a distance d away from a parallel surface scales with a fractional power between d{sup -1} and d{sup -2}.

  7. A study of material damping in large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Highsmith, A. L.; Allen, D. H.

    1989-01-01

    A constitutive model was developed for predicting damping as a function of damage in continuous fiber reinforced laminated composites. The damage model is a continuum formulation, and uses internal state variables to quantify damage and its subsequent effect on material response. The model is sensitive to the stacking sequence of the laminate. Given appropriate baseline data from unidirectional material, and damping as a function of damage in one crossply laminate, damage can be predicted as a function of damage in other crossply laminates. Agreement between theory and experiment was quite good. A micromechanics model was also developed for examining the influence of damage on damping. This model explicitly includes crack surfaces. The model provides reasonable predictions of bending stiffness as a function of damage. Damping predictions are not in agreement with the experiment. This is thought to be a result of dissipation mechanisms such as friction, which are not presently included in the analysis.

  8. Dynamical analysis of fluid lines coupled to mechanical systems taking into account fluid frequency-dependent damping and non-conventional constitutive models: part 1 - Modeling fluid lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catania, Giuseppe; Sorrentino, Silvio

    2015-01-01

    The design of hydraulic transmission systems for control and actuation requires accurate knowledge of their dynamic response: some standard techniques are known to obtain a consistent dynamic model of a fluid line, including the contribution of inertia, compressibility and friction. In this paper an efficient procedure is developed for simulating the dynamic response of a fluid line in both the frequency and time domains, focusing the attention on the modal analysis of a discretized model, in view of coupling with mechanical systems. A bi-dimensional approach is adopted, and the laminar flow frequency-dependent friction is modeled using non-integer order differential laws, which may improve the accuracy of the simulated responses in comparison with more traditional Newtonian models.

  9. Gilbert damping in noncollinear ferromagnets.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zhe; Hals, Kjetil M D; Liu, Yi; Starikov, Anton A; Brataas, Arne; Kelly, Paul J

    2014-12-31

    The precession and damping of a collinear magnetization displaced from its equilibrium are well described by the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. The theoretical and experimental complexity of noncollinear magnetizations is such that it is not known how the damping is modified by the noncollinearity. We use first-principles scattering theory to investigate transverse domain walls (DWs) of the important ferromagnetic alloy Ni80Fe20 and show that the damping depends not only on the magnetization texture but also on the specific dynamic modes of Bloch and Néel DWs in ways that were not theoretically predicted. Even in the highly disordered Ni80Fe20 alloy, the damping is found to be remarkably nonlocal. PMID:25615368

  10. Damping measurements using operational data

    SciTech Connect

    James, G.H.; Carne, T.G.; Veers, P.S.

    1991-01-01

    We have measured modal damping using strain-gauge data from an operating wind turbine. Previously, such measurements were difficult and expensive. Auto-correlation and cross-correlation functions of the strain-gauge data have been shown to consist of decaying sinusoids which correspond to the modal frequencies and damping ratios of the wind turbine. We have verified the method by extracting damping values from an analytically generated data set. Actual operating response data from the DOE/Sandia 34-meter Test Bed has been used to calculate modal damping ratios as a function of rotor rotation rate. This capability will allow more accurate fatigue life prediction and control. 16 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Enhancing the damping of wind turbine rotor blades, the DAMPBLADE project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaviaropoulos, P. K.; Politis, E. S.; Lekou, D. J.; Sørensen, N. N.; Hansen, M. H.; Bulder, B. H.; Winkelaar, D.; Lindenburg, C.; Saravanos, D. A.; Philippidis, T. P.; Galiotis, C.; Hansen, M. O. L.; Kossivas, T.

    2006-01-01

    A research programme enabling the development of damped wind turbine blades, having the acronym DAMPBLADE, has been supported by the EC under its 5th Framework Programme. In DAMPBLADE the following unique composite damping mechanisms were exploited aiming to increase the structural damping: tailoring of laminate damping anisotropy, damping layers and damped polymer matrices. Additional objectives of the project were the development of the missing critical analytical technologies enabling the explicit modelling of composite structural damping and a novel composite blade design capacity enabling the direct prediction of aeroelastic stability and fatigue life; the development and characterization of damped composite materials; and the evaluation of new technology via the design and fabrication of damped prototype blades and their full-scale laboratory testing. After 4 years of work a 19 m glass/polyester damped blade was designed, manufactured and tested using the know-how acquired. Modal analysis of this blade at the testing facility of CRES showed a nearly 80% increase in the damping ratio of both the first flap and lag modes compared with the earlier, standard, design practice. Copyright

  12. Vibration damping method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Redmond, James M.; Barney, Patrick S.; Parker, Gordon G.; Smith, David A.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention provides vibration damping method and apparatus that can damp vibration in more than one direction without requiring disassembly, that can accommodate varying tool dimensions without requiring re-tuning, and that does not interfere with tool tip operations and cooling. The present invention provides active dampening by generating bending moments internal to a structure such as a boring bar to dampen vibration thereof.

  13. Vibration damping method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Redmond, J.M.; Barney, P.S.; Parker, G.G.; Smith, D.A.

    1999-06-22

    The present invention provides vibration damping method and apparatus that can damp vibration in more than one direction without requiring disassembly, that can accommodate varying tool dimensions without requiring re-tuning, and that does not interfere with tool tip operations and cooling. The present invention provides active dampening by generating bending moments internal to a structure such as a boring bar to dampen vibration thereof. 38 figs.

  14. The effects of the space environment on damping materials and damping designs on flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kluesener, M. F.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of space environments on damping materials and damping designs on flexible structures were investigated. The following items were examined: damping of flexible spacecraft appendages; composite loss factor (n sub s) vs. time in high vacuum for damped test beams and damping of flexible structures. The STEP experiments show inherent damping of flexible structures in space effective possible damping design configurations for space structures, effects of passively damped components on the system loss factor of flexible structures and the effect of space environment on properties of damping materials.

  15. The frictionless damping of a piston in thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bringuier, E.

    2015-09-01

    The paper revisits Rüchardt’s experiment and the two-chamber variant of Clark and Katz, where the oscillating motion of a freely sliding piston involves the adiabatic exponent of the gas enclosed in a thermally isolated chamber. While the common theoretical account of the experiment correctly predicts the frequency of the oscillation, the damping is usually ascribed to a linear frictional force of an undetermined mechanical nature. In this paper, we argue that the irreversibility of the damped motion calls for a thermodynamical treatment involving dissipation (entropy production). The theory of Rüchardt’s experiment is reworked at the undergraduate level by allowing entropy to change owing to heat transfer into or out of the chamber. It is calculated that a linear heat transfer can explain the observed damping without assuming any mechanical friction. The calculation is quantitatively supported by an experiment. It is also calculated that the mechanical and thermal equilibrations occur at the same rate. Besides possibly improving Rüchardt and Clark-and-Katz apparatuses by shedding light on the damping, the paper helps to better grasp thermodynamics, and how to use entropy, by constrasting the mechanical and thermodynamical reasonings on the example of the damped motion of a piston.

  16. Comparative study of medium damped and detuned linear accelerator structures

    SciTech Connect

    Jean-Francois Ostiguy et al.

    2001-08-22

    Long range wakefields are a serious concern for a future linear collider based on room temperature accelerating structures. They can be suppressed either by detuning and or local damping or with some combination of both strategies. Detuning relies on precisely phasing the contributions of the dipole modes excited by the passage of a single bunch. This is accomplished by controlling individual mode frequencies, a process which dictates individual cell dimensional tolerances. Each mode must be excited with the correct strength; this in turn, determines cell-to-cell alignment tolerances. In contrast, in a locally damped structure, the modes are attenuated at the cell level. Clearly, mode frequencies and relative excitation become less critical in that context; mechanical fabrication tolerances can be relaxed. While local damping is ideal from the stand-point of long range wakefield suppression, this comes at the cost of reducing the shunt impedance and possibly unacceptable localized heating. Recently, the Medium Damped Structure (MDS), a compromise between detuning and local damping, has generated some interest. In this paper, we compare a hypothetical MDS to the NLC Rounded Damped Detuned Structure (RDDS) and investigate possible advantages from the standpoint fabrication tolerances and their relation to beam stability and emittance preservation.

  17. Damping filter method for obtaining spatially localized solutions.

    PubMed

    Teramura, Toshiki; Toh, Sadayoshi

    2014-05-01

    Spatially localized structures are key components of turbulence and other spatiotemporally chaotic systems. From a dynamical systems viewpoint, it is desirable to obtain corresponding exact solutions, though their existence is not guaranteed. A damping filter method is introduced to obtain variously localized solutions and adapted in two typical cases. This method introduces a spatially selective damping effect to make a good guess at the exact solution, and we can obtain an exact solution through a continuation with the damping amplitude. The first target is a steady solution to the Swift-Hohenberg equation, which is a representative of bistable systems in which localized solutions coexist and a model for spanwise-localized cases. Not only solutions belonging to the well-known snaking branches but also those belonging to isolated branches known as "isolas" are found with continuation paths between them in phase space extended with the damping amplitude. This indicates that this spatially selective excitation mechanism has an advantage in searching spatially localized solutions. The second target is a spatially localized traveling-wave solution to the Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation, which is a model for streamwise-localized cases. Since the spatially selective damping effect breaks Galilean and translational invariances, the propagation velocity cannot be determined uniquely while the damping is active, and a singularity arises when these invariances are recovered. We demonstrate that this singularity can be avoided by imposing a simple condition, and a localized traveling-wave solution is obtained with a specific propagation speed. PMID:25353864

  18. A generalized interpolation inequality and its application to the stabilization of damped equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bégout, Pascal; Soria, Fernando

    In this paper, we establish a generalized Hölder's or interpolation inequality for weighted spaces in which the weights are non-necessarily homogeneous. We apply it to the stabilization of some damped wave-like evolution equations. This allows obtaining explicit decay rates for smooth solutions for more general classes of damping operators. In particular, for 1-d models, we can give an explicit decay estimate for pointwise damping mechanisms supported on any strategic point.

  19. Damped population oscillation in a spontaneously decaying two-level atom coupled to a monochromatic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sun Kyung; Lee, Hai-Woong

    2006-12-01

    We investigate the time evolution of atomic population in a two-level atom driven by a monochromatic radiation field, taking spontaneous emission into account. The Rabi oscillation exhibits amplitude damping in time caused by spontaneous emission. We show that the semiclassical master equation leads in general to an overestimation of the damping rate and that a correct quantitative description of the damped Rabi oscillation can thus be obtained only with a full quantum mechanical theory.

  20. Transport description of damped nuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Randrup, J.

    1983-04-01

    Part I is an elementary introduction to the general transport theory of nuclear dynamics. It can be read without any special knowledge of the field, although basic quantum mechanics is required for the formal derivation of the general expression for the transport coefficients. The results can also be used in a wider context than the present one. Part II gives the student an up-to-date orientation about recent progress in the understanding of the angular-momentum variables in damped reactions. The emphasis is here on the qualitative understanding of the physics rather than the, at times somewhat tedious, formal derivations. (WHK)

  1. Analytical modeling of squeeze air film damping of biomimetic MEMS directional microphone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishfaque, Asif; Kim, Byungki

    2016-08-01

    Squeeze air film damping is introduced in microelectromechanical systems due to the motion of the fluid between two closely spaced oscillating micro-structures. The literature is abundant with different analytical models to address the squeeze air film damping effects, however, there is a lack of work in modeling the practical sensors like directional microphones. Here, we derive an analytical model of squeeze air film damping of first two fundamental vibration modes, namely, rocking and bending modes, of a directional microphone inspired from the fly Ormia ochracea's ear anatomy. A modified Reynolds equation that includes compressibility and rarefaction effects is used in the analysis. Pressure distribution under the vibrating diaphragm is derived by using Green's function. From mathematical modeling of the fly's inspired mechanical model, we infer that bringing the damping ratios of both modes in the critical damping range enhance the directional sensitivity cues. The microphone parameters are varied in derived damping formulas to bring the damping ratios in the vicinity of critical damping, and to show the usefulness of the analytical model in tuning the damping ratios of both modes. The accuracy of analytical damping results are also verified by finite element method (FEM) using ANSYS. The FEM results are in full compliance with the analytical results.

  2. Aerodynamic pitching damping of vehicle-inspired bluff bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsubokura, Makoto; Cheng, Seeyuan; Nakashima, Takuji; Nouzawa, Takahide; Okada, Yoshihiro

    2010-11-01

    Aerodynamic damping mechanism of road vehicles subjected to pitching oscillation was investigated by using large-eddy simulation technique. The study was based on two kinds of simplified vehicle models, which represent real sedan-type vehicles with different pitching stability in the on-road test. The simplified vehicle modes were developed so as to reproduce the characteristic flow structures above the trunk deck of the real vehicles measured in a wind-tunnel at the static case without oscillation. The forced sinusoidal pitching oscillation was imposed on the models and their pitching damping factors were evaluated through the phase-averaged pitching moment. Then flow structures in the wake of the models were extracted and its contribution to the damping mechanism was discussed. It was found that slight difference of the front and rear pillars' shape drastically affects the flow structures in the wake of the models, which enhance or restrain the vehicles' pitching instability.

  3. Damped vacuum states of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philbin, T. G.

    2016-09-01

    We consider one-dimensional propagation of quantum light in the presence of a block of material, with a full account of dispersion and absorption. The electromagnetic zero-point energy for some frequencies is damped (suppressed) by the block below the free-space value, while for other frequencies it is increased. We also calculate the regularized (Casimir) zero-point energy at each frequency and find that it too is damped below the free-space value (zero) for some frequencies. The total Casimir energy is positive.

  4. Resolving the controversy of a possible relationship between perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and the magnetic damping parameter

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, Justin M.; Nembach, Hans T.; Silva, T. J.

    2014-08-11

    We use broadband ferromagnetic resonance spectroscopy to systematically measure the Landau-Lifshitz damping parameter, perpendicular anisotropy, and the orbital moment asymmetry in Co{sub 90}Fe{sub 10}/Ni multilayers. No relationship is found between perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and the damping parameter in this material. However, inadequate accounting for inhomogeneous linewidth broadening, spin-pumping, and two-magnon scattering could give rise to an apparent relationship between anisotropy and damping. In contrast, the orbital-moment asymmetry and the perpendicular anisotropy are linearly proportional to each other. These results demonstrate a fundamental mechanism by which perpendicular anisotropy can be varied independently of the damping parameter.

  5. Theoretical prediction of the damping of a railway wheel with sandwich-type dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merideno, Inaki; Nieto, Javier; Gil-Negrete, Nere; Giménez Ortiz, José Germán; Landaberea, Aitor; Iartza, Jon

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents a procedure for predicting the damping added to a railway wheel when sandwich-type dampers are installed. Although there are different ways to reduce the noise generated by a railway wheel, most devices are based on the mechanism of increasing wheel damping. This is why modal damping ratios are a clear indicator of the efficiency of the damping device and essential when a vibro-acoustic study of a railway wheel is carried out. Based on a number of output variables extracted from the wheel and damper models, the strategy explained herein provides the final damping ratios of the damped wheel. Several different configurations are designed and experimentally tested. Theoretical and experimental results agree adequately, and it is demonstrated that this procedure is a good tool for qualitative comparison between different solutions in the design stages.

  6. Dealing with damping-off

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Damping-off is a common disease that rots and kills both seeds and recently germinated seedlings. The disease is caused by number of different soilborne pathogens, including true fungi (Botrytis, Fusarium, and Rhizoctonia species) and oomycetes (Phytophthora and Pythium species). The seedlings of mo...

  7. Damped Oscillator with Delta-Kicked Frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manko, O. V.

    1996-01-01

    Exact solutions of the Schrodinger equation for quantum damped oscillator subject to frequency delta-kick describing squeezed states are obtained. The cases of strong, intermediate, and weak damping are investigated.

  8. A Look at Damped Harmonic Oscillators through the Phase Plane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daneshbod, Yousef; Latulippe, Joe

    2011-01-01

    Damped harmonic oscillations appear naturally in many applications involving mechanical and electrical systems as well as in biological systems. Most students are introduced to harmonic motion in an elementary ordinary differential equation (ODE) course. Solutions to ODEs that describe simple harmonic motion are usually found by investigating the…

  9. Six degree of freedom active vibration damping for space application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haynes, Leonard S.

    1993-01-01

    Work performed during the period 1 Jan. - 31 Mar. 1993 on six degree of freedom active vibration damping for space application is presented. A performance and cost report is included. Topics covered include: actuator testing; mechanical amplifier design; and neural network control system development and experimental evaluation.

  10. The One-Dimensional Damped Forced Harmonic Oscillator Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores-Hidalgo, G.; Barone, F. A.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we give a general solution to the problem of the damped harmonic oscillator under the influence of an arbitrary time-dependent external force. We employ simple methods accessible for beginners and useful for undergraduate students and professors in an introductory course of mechanics.

  11. Magnetization damping in noncollinear spin valves with antiferromagnetic interlayer couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, Takahiro; Bauer, Gerrit E. W.; Takahashi, Saburo

    2015-08-01

    We study the magnetic damping in the simplest of synthetic antiferromagnets, i.e., antiferromagnetically exchange-coupled spin valves, in the presence of applied magnetic fields that enforce noncolliear magnetic configurations. We formulate the dynamic exchange of spin currents in a noncollinear texture based on the spin-diffusion theory with quantum mechanical boundary conditions at the ferrromagnet/normal-metal interfaces and derive the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equations coupled by the interlayer static and dynamic exchange interactions. We predict noncollinearity-induced additional damping that is modulated by an applied magnetic field. We compare theoretical results with published experiments.

  12. Squeezed states of damped oscillator chain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manko, O. V.

    1993-01-01

    The Caldirola-Kanai model of one-dimensional damped oscillator is extended to the chain of coupled parametric oscillators with damping. The correlated and squeezed states for the chain of coupled parametric oscillators with damping are constructed. Based on the concept of the integrals of motion, it is demonstrated how squeezing phenomenon arises due to parametric excitation.

  13. Prognostic and Predictive Value of DAMPs and DAMP-Associated Processes in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fucikova, Jitka; Moserova, Irena; Urbanova, Linda; Bezu, Lucillia; Kepp, Oliver; Cremer, Isabelle; Salek, Cyril; Strnad, Pavel; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Spisek, Radek

    2015-01-01

    It is now clear that human neoplasms form, progress, and respond to therapy in the context of an intimate crosstalk with the host immune system. In particular, accumulating evidence demonstrates that the efficacy of most, if not all, chemo- and radiotherapeutic agents commonly employed in the clinic critically depends on the (re)activation of tumor-targeting immune responses. One of the mechanisms whereby conventional chemotherapeutics, targeted anticancer agents, and radiotherapy can provoke a therapeutically relevant, adaptive immune response against malignant cells is commonly known as “immunogenic cell death.” Importantly, dying cancer cells are perceived as immunogenic only when they emit a set of immunostimulatory signals upon the activation of intracellular stress response pathways. The emission of these signals, which are generally referred to as “damage-associated molecular patterns” (DAMPs), may therefore predict whether patients will respond to chemotherapy or not, at least in some settings. Here, we review clinical data indicating that DAMPs and DAMP-associated stress responses might have prognostic or predictive value for cancer patients. PMID:26300886

  14. Spin-Damping in an RF atomic magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alem, Orang; Romalis, Michael V.; Sauer, Karen L.

    2009-05-01

    Optically pumped atomic magnetometers have demonstrated an improved sensitivity over standard tuned coils for frequencies less than 50 MHz, making these radio-frequency (RF) magnetometers attractive for low-field NMR (for example, Budker and Romalis, Nature Physics 3, April 2007). Such magnetometers are often plagued by transient effects resulting in decreased sensitivity. The decay time of these transients, or ringing, can last for milliseconds, which is particularly detrimental for rapidly decaying NMR signals. We have found that actively damping the ringing of the atomic spins can significantly reduce such dead time. This spin-damping of the atomic transients is achieved through a negative feedback mechanism in which part of the optical signal during ringing is used to apply an RF field forcing the realignment of the atomic spins with the static magnetic field. We have successfully implemented spin-damping in 100 μs and recovered our femto-Tesla signal previously obscured by the ringing.

  15. Active damping performance of the KAGRA seismic attenuation system prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Yoshinori; Sekiguchi, Takanori; Takahashi, Ryutaro; Aso, Yoichi; Barton, Mark; Erasmo Peña Arellano, Fabián; Shoda, Ayaka; Akutsu, Tomotada; Miyakawa, Osamu; Kamiizumi, Masahiro; Ishizaki, Hideharu; Tatsumi, Daisuke; Hirata, Naoatsu; Hayama, Kazuhiro; Okutomi, Koki; Miyamoto, Takahiro; Ishizuka, Hideki; DeSalvo, Riccardo; Flaminio, Raffaele

    2016-05-01

    The Large-scale Cryogenic Gravitational wave Telescope (formerly LCGT now KAGRA) is presently under construction in Japan. This May we assembled a prototype of the seismic attenuation system (SAS) for the beam splitter and the signal recycling mirrors of KAGRA, which we call Type-B SAS, and evaluated its performance at NAOJ (Mitaka, Toyko). We investigated its frequency response, active damping performance, vibration isolation performance and long-term stability both in and out of vacuum. From the frequency response test and the active damping performance test, we confirmed that the SAS worked as we designed and that all mechanical resonances which could disturb lock acquisition and observation are damped within 1 minute, which is required for KAGRA, by the active controls.

  16. Atomistic simulations of material damping in amorphous silicon nanoresonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Sankha; Song, Jun; Vengallatore, Srikar

    2016-06-01

    Atomistic simulations using molecular dynamics (MD) are emerging as a valuable tool for exploring dissipation and material damping in nanomechanical resonators. In this study, we used isothermal MD to simulate the dynamics of the longitudinal-mode oscillations of an amorphous silicon nanoresonator as a function of frequency (2 GHz–50 GHz) and temperature (15 K–300 K). Damping was characterized by computing the loss tangent with an estimated uncertainty of 7%. The dissipation spectrum displays a sharp peak at 50 K and a broad peak at around 160 K. Damping is a weak function of frequency at room temperature, and the loss tangent has a remarkably high value of ~0.01. In contrast, at low temperatures (15 K), the loss tangent increases monotonically from 4× {{10}-4} to 4× {{10}-3} as the frequency increases from 2 GHz to 50 GHz. The mechanisms of dissipation are discussed.

  17. Magnetomechanical damping in cryogenic TbDy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dooley, J.; Good, N.; White, C.; Leland, S.; Fultz, B.

    2002-01-01

    Vibration damping in polycrystalline TbDy alloys was studied at cryogenic temperatures. The material was prepared by cold-rolling to induce crystallographic texture, and was then heat-treated to relieve internal stress. Mechanical hysteretic losses were measured at various strains, frequencies, and loading configurations at 77 K. Some textured TbDy materials demonstrated 22.6% energy dissipation in mechanical measurements at low frequency (0.01 Hz) and a mean logarithmic decrement of 0.23 at a higher frequency (25 kHz). Ultrasonic velocities of longitudinal and shear elastic waves were measured on single and polycrystalline TbDy; little variation in ultrasonic velocities was found evenfor samples with large variation in crystallographic texture and magnetomechanical properties.

  18. Design of passive piezoelectric damping for space structures. Final Report Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagood, Nesbitt W., IV; Aldrich, Jack B.; Vonflotow, Andreas H.

    1994-01-01

    Passive damping of structural dynamics using piezoceramic electromechanical energy conversion and passive electrical networks is a relatively recent concept with little implementation experience base. This report describes an implementation case study, starting from conceptual design and technique selection, through detailed component design and testing to simulation on the structure to be damped. About 0.5kg. of piezoelectric material was employed to damp the ASTREX testbed, a 500kg structure. Emphasis was placed upon designing the damping to enable high bandwidth robust feedback control. Resistive piezoelectric shunting provided the necessary broadband damping. The piezoelectric element was incorporated into a mechanically-tuned vibration absorber in order to concentrate damping into the 30 to 40 Hz frequency modes at the rolloff region of the proposed compensator. A prototype of a steel flex-tensional motion amplification device was built and tested. The effective stiffness and damping of the flex-tensional device was experimentally verified. When six of these effective springs are placed in an orthogonal configuration, strain energy is absorbed from all six degrees of freedom of a 90kg. mass. A NASTRAN finite element model of the testbed was modified to include the six-spring damping system. An analytical model was developed for the spring in order to see how the flex-tensional device and piezoelectric dimensions effect the critical stress and strain energy distribution throughout the component. Simulation of the testbed demonstrated the damping levels achievable in the completed system.

  19. Research on the damping properties of Fe12O19Sr/the polyurethane elastomer composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Qin, Yan; Sun, P. C.; Huang, Z. X.

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic elastomer composite is a promising damping material. In this paper, both strontium ferrite (Fe12O19Sr) powders and polyurethane elastomer which were mixed by mechanical blending method were used as the magnetic filler and as the matrix respectively, the properties of the magnetic damping composite materials were studied. The results show that the magnetic properties of the magnetic elastomers composite are enhanced with the ferrite loading. The mechanical properties and Shore hardness are highly influenced by mass fraction of ferrite particles. The damping properties of magnetic elastomer composite reach best when the strontium ferrite loading is 15phr, and the damping properties deteriorate when the loading continue increasing. The damping properties of the composites with the X direction of magnetization are better than that with Y direction of magnetization.

  20. Passive damping for space truss structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Gun-Shing; Wada, Ben K.

    1988-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies of passive damping techniques in truss-type structures are presented, with emphasis on the use of viscoelastic damping in the parallel load path. The constraining member length is shown to be a convenient design variable for enhancing damping performance. Results are presented for integral damping members made of thin-wall aluminum tubes, concentric constraining members, and viscoelastic materials in a six-bay truss structure at low frequency and low dynamic strain conditions. Integral members with graphite/epoxy constraining members exhibited relatively low damping values due to the possible polymer interaction during the cocure stage.

  1. Forced oscillations with linear and nonlinear damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Aijun; Ma, Li; Keene, David; Klingel, Joshua; Payne, Marvin; Wang, Xiao-jun

    2016-01-01

    A general solution is derived for the differential equations of forced oscillatory motion with both linear damping ( ˜v ) and nonlinear damping ( ˜v2 ). Experiments with forced oscillators are performed using a flat metal plate with a drag force due to eddy currents and a flat piece of stiffened cardboard with a drag force due to air resistance serving as the linear and nonlinear damping, respectively. Resonance of forced oscillations for different damping forces and quality factors is demonstrated. The experimental measurements and theoretical calculations are in good agreement, and damping constants are determined.

  2. Integrated analysis and design of thick composite structures for optimal passive damping characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    The development of novel composite mechanics for the analysis of damping in composite laminates and structures and the more significant results of this effort are summarized. Laminate mechanics based on piecewise continuous in-plane displacement fields are described that can represent both intralaminar stresses and interlaminar shear stresses and the associated effects on the stiffness and damping characteristics of a composite laminate. Among other features, the mechanics can accurately model the static and damped dynamic response of either thin or thick composite laminates, as well as, specialty laminates with embedded compliant damping layers. The discrete laminate damping theory is further incorporated into structural analysis methods. In this context, an exact semi-analytical method for the simulation of the damped dynamic response of composite plates was developed. A finite element based method and a specialty four-node plate element were also developed for the analysis of composite structures of variable shape and boundary conditions. Numerous evaluations and applications demonstrate the quality and superiority of the mechanics in predicting the damped dynamic characteristics of composite structures. Finally, additional development was focused on the development of optimal tailoring methods for the design of thick composite structures based on the developed analytical capability. Applications on composite plates illustrated the influence of composite mechanics in the optimal design of composites and the potential for significant deviations in the resultant designs when more simplified (classical) laminate theories are used.

  3. Clipped viscous damping with negative stiffness for semi-active cable damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, F.; Boston, C.

    2011-04-01

    This paper investigates numerically and experimentally clipped viscous damping with negative stiffness for semi-active cable damping. From simulations it is concluded that unclipped and clipped viscous damping with negative stiffness is equivalent to unclipped and clipped LQR. It is shown that optimized unclipped viscous damping with negative stiffness generates critical cable damping by an anti-node at the actuator position. The resulting curvature at the actuator position is larger than the curvature close to the anchors due to the disturbance forces which may lead to premature cable fatigue at the actuator position. Optimized clipped viscous damping with negative stiffness does not show this drawback, can be implemented using a semi-active damper and produces twice as much cable damping as optimal viscous damping. Close to the optimal tuning, it leads to approximately the same control force as optimal semi-active friction damping with negative stiffness, which explains the superior cable damping. The superior damping results from the negative stiffness that increases the damper motion. Clipped viscous damping with negative stiffness is validated on a strand cable with a magneto-rheological damper. The measured cable damping is twice that achieved by emulated viscous damping, which confirms the numerical results. A tuning rule for clipped viscous damping with negative stiffness of real cables with flexural rigidity is given.

  4. Electromagnetic induction and damping: Quantitative experiments using a PC interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Avinash; Mohapatra, Y. N.; Kumar, Satyendra

    2002-04-01

    A bar magnet, attached to an oscillating system, passes through a coil periodically, generating a series of electromotive force pulses. A novel method for the quantitative verification of Faraday's law is described which eliminates all errors associated with angular measurements, thereby revealing subtle features of the underlying mechanics. When electromagnetic damping is activated by short-circuiting the coil, a distinctly linear decay of the oscillation amplitude is observed. A quantitative analysis reveals an interesting interplay of the electromagnetic and mechanical time scales.

  5. Simultaneously high stiffness and damping in nanoengineered microtruss composites.

    PubMed

    Meaud, Julien; Sain, Trisha; Yeom, Bongjun; Park, Sei Jin; Shoultz, Anna Brieland; Hulbert, Gregory; Ma, Zheng-Dong; Kotov, Nicholas A; Hart, A John; Arruda, Ellen M; Waas, Anthony M

    2014-04-22

    Materials combining high stiffness and mechanical energy dissipation are needed in automotive, aviation, construction, and other technologies where structural elements are exposed to dynamic loads. In this paper we demonstrate that a judicious combination of carbon nanotube engineered trusses held in a dissipative polymer can lead to a composite material that simultaneously exhibits both high stiffness and damping. Indeed, the combination of stiffness and damping that is reported is quite high in any single monolithic material. Carbon nanotube (CNT) microstructures grown in a novel 3D truss topology form the backbone of these nanocomposites. The CNT trusses are coated by ceramics and by a nanostructured polymer film assembled using the layer-by-layer technique. The crevices of the trusses are then filled with soft polyurethane. Each constituent of the composite is accurately modeled, and these models are used to guide the manufacturing process, in particular the choice of the backbone topology and the optimization of the mechanical properties of the constituent materials. The resulting composite exhibits much higher stiffness (80 times) and similar damping (specific damping capacity of 0.8) compared to the polymer. Our work is a step forward in implementing the concept of materials by design across multiple length scales. PMID:24620996

  6. Gravitational damping of Alfven waves in stellar atmospheres and winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khabibrakhmanov, I. K.; Mullan, D. J.

    1994-01-01

    We consider how gravity affects the propagation of Alfven waves in a stellar atmosphere. We show that when the ion gyrofrequency exceeds the collision rate, the waves are absorbed at a rate proportional to the gravitational acceleration g. Estimates show that this mechanism can readily account for the observed energy losses in the solar chromosphere. The mechanism predicts that the pressure at the top of the chromosphere P(sub Tc) should scale with g as P(sub Tc) proportional to g(exp delta), where delta approximately equals 2/3; this is close to empirical results which suggest delta approximately equals 0.6. Gravitational damping leads to deposition of energy at a rate proportional to the mass of the particles. Hence, heavier ion are heated more effectively than protons. This is consistent with the observed proportionality between ion temperature and mass in the solar wind. Gravitational damping causes the local g to be effectively decreased by an amount proportional to the wave energy. This feature affects the acceleration of the solar wind. Gravitational damping may also lead to self-regulation of the damping of Alfven waves in stellar winds: this is relevant in the context of slow massive winds in cool giants.

  7. Experimental Vibration Damping Characteristics of the Third-stage Rotor of a Three-stage Transonic Axial-flow Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Frederick A.

    1988-01-01

    Rotor blade aerodynamic damping is experimentally determined in a three-stage transonic axial flow compressor having design aerodynamic performance goals of 4.5:1 pressure ratio and 65.5 lbm/sec weight flow. The combined damping associated with each mode is determined by a least squares fit of a single degree of freedom system transfer function to the nonsynchronous portion of the rotor blade strain gage output power spectra. The combined damping consists of the aerodynamic damping and the structural and mechanical damping. The aerodynamic damping varies linearly with the inlet total pressure for a given corrected speed, weight flow, and pressure ratio while the structural and mechanical damping is assumed to remain constant. The combined damping is determined at three inlet total pressure levels to obtain the aerodynamic damping. The third-stage rotor blade aerodynamic damping is presented and discussed for the design equivalent speed with the stator blades reset for maximum efficiency. The compressor overall preformance and experimental Campbell diagrams for the third-stage rotor blade row are also presented.

  8. Experimental vibration damping characteristics of the third-stage rotor of a three-stage transonic axial-flow compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Frederick A.

    1988-01-01

    Rotor blade aerodynamic damping is experimentally determined in a three-stage transonic axial flow compressor having design aerodynamic performance goals of 4.5:1 pressure ratio and 65.5 lbm/sec weight flow. The combined damping associated with each mode is determined by a least squares fit of a single degree of freedom system transfer function to the nonsynchronous portion of the rotor blade strain gage output power spectra. The combined damping consists of the aerodynanmic damping and the structural and mechanical damping. The aerodynamic damping varies linearly with the inlet total pressure for a given corrected speed, weight flow, and pressure ratio while the structural and mechanical damping is assumed to remain constant. The combined damping is determined at three inlet total pressure levels to obtain the aerodynamic damping. The third-stage rotor blade aerodynamic damping is presented and discussed for the design equivalent speed with the stator blades reset for maximum efficiency. The compressor overall performance and experimental Campbell diagrams for the third-stage rotor blade row are also presented.

  9. State protection under collective damping and diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Ponte, M. A. de; Mizrahi, S. S.; Moussa, M. H. Y.

    2011-07-15

    In this paper we provide a recipe for state protection in a network of oscillators under collective damping and diffusion. Our strategy is to manipulate the network topology, i.e., the way the oscillators are coupled together, the strength of their couplings, and their natural frequencies, in order to create a relaxation-diffusion-free channel. This protected channel defines a decoherence-free subspace (DFS) for nonzero-temperature reservoirs. Our development also furnishes an alternative approach to build up DFSs that offers two advantages over the conventional method: it enables the derivation of all the network-protected states at once, and also reveals, through the network normal modes, the mechanism behind the emergence of these protected domains.

  10. Targeting damage-associated molecular pattern molecules (DAMPs) and DAMP receptors in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Boone, Brian A; Lotze, Michael T

    2014-01-01

    Damage-associated molecular pattern molecules (DAMPs) are proteins released from cells under stress due to nutrient deprivation, hypoxia, trauma, or treatment with chemotherapy, among a variety of other causes. When released, DAMPs activate innate immunity, providing a pathway to a systemic inflammatory response in the absence of infection. By regulating inflammation in the tumor microenvironment, promoting angiogenesis, and increasing autophagy with evasion of apoptosis, DAMPs facilitate cancer growth. DAMPs and DAMP receptors have a key role in melanoma pathogenesis. Due to their crucial role in the development of melanoma and chemoresistance, DAMPs represent intriguing targets at a time when novel treatments are desperately needed. PMID:24258998

  11. A procedure for the evaluation of damping effects in composite laminated structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vescovini, Riccardo; Bisagni, Chiara

    2015-10-01

    The paper presents an approach based on experimental tests and numerical simulations for taking into account damping effects during the design and the analysis of composite structures. The experiments are conducted using the Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) and unidirectional coupons are tested to characterize the damping properties of the plies. Starting from these results, first order shear deformation theory is applied to determine the damping properties of the laminate, which are then used in the context of a numerical procedure based on finite element analyses and strain energy method. The results are presented for an aircraft stiffened panel, illustrating the evaluation of the specific damping capacities of the structure, and performing direct transient analyses to investigate the effect of damping on the panel response to pulse loadings.

  12. Dynamic Stiffness and Damping Characteristics of a High-Temperature Air Foil Journal Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Samuel A.; DellaCorte, Christopher; Valco, Mark J.; Prahl, Joseph M.; Heshmat, Hooshang

    2001-01-01

    Using a high-temperature optically based displacement measurement system, a foil air bearing's stiffness and damping characteristics were experimentally determined. Results were obtained over a range of modified Sommerfeld Number from 1.5E6 to 1.5E7, and at temperatures from 25 to 538 C. An Experimental procedure was developed comparing the error in two curve fitting functions to reveal different modes of physical behavior throughout the operating domain. The maximum change in dimensionless stiffness was 3.0E-2 to 6.5E-2 over the Sommerfeld Number range tested. Stiffness decreased with temperature by as much as a factor of two from 25 to 538 C. Dimensionless damping was a stronger function of Sommerfeld Number ranging from 20 to 300. The temperature effect on damping being more qualitative, showed the damping mechanism shifted from viscous type damping to frictional type as temperature increased.

  13. Damping of prominence longitudinal oscillations due to mass accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruderman, Michael S.; Luna, Manuel

    2016-06-01

    thread at the moment when it is perturbed. First we consider small amplitude oscillations and use the linear description. Then we consider nonlinear oscillations and assume that the damping is slow, meaning that the damping time is much larger that the characteristic oscillation time. The thread oscillations are described by the solution of the nonlinear pendulum problem with slowly varying amplitude. The nonlinearity reduces the damping time, however this reduction is small. Again the damping time is inversely proportional to the accretion rate. We also obtain that the oscillation periods decrease with time. However even for the largest initial oscillation amplitude considered in our article the period reduction does not exceed 20%. We conclude that the mass accretion can damp the motion of the threads rapidly. Thus, this mechanism can explain the observed strong damping of large-amplitude longitudinal oscillations. In addition, the damping time can be used to determine the mass accretion rate and indirectly the coronal heating.

  14. Introduction to DAMPE event reconstruction (On behalf of DAMPE collaboration)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zang, Jingjing

    2016-07-01

    The Dark Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) is a high energy particle physics experiment satellite, launched on 17 Dec 2015. To measure basic attributes of cosmic ray particles, DAMPE is equipped with four sub-detectors, BGO calorimeter (BGO), plastic scintillator detector (PSD), silicon tungsten tracker (STK) and neutron detector (NUD). On orbit, the high energy particle data are acquired and recorded by well-designed Data Acquisition system. After that, a series of elaborate event reconstruction algorithms are implemented to determine the energy, direction and particle ID of each event. The energy reconstruction algorithm firstly treats the sum of the BGO crystal energy as the overall energy estimator and various corrections are performed to calculate energy leakage from side and back of the calorimeter. The track reconstruction starts with cluster finding in STK, then shower axis of BGO and barycentre of clusters are used to extract seed of tracks. These seeds will be projected on the next layer by Kalman Filter method which will finally give location and direction of particle tracks. Based on shower development in BGO and tracks reconstructed by STK, we also combine data from PSD and NUD and developed a series of algorithms to evaluate particle's charge and identification. In this talk, we will describe technical strategies of event reconstruction and provide their basic performance.

  15. ICAN/DAMP-integrated composite analyzer with damping analysis capabilities: User's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, Dimitrious A.; Sanfeliz, Jose G.

    1992-01-01

    This manual describes the use of the computer code ICAN/DAMP (Integrated Composite Analyzer with Damping Analysis Capabilities) for the prediction of damping in polymer-matrix composites. The code is written in FORTRAN 77 and is a version of the ICAN (Integrated Composite ANalyzer) computer program. The code incorporates a new module for synthesizing the material damping from micromechanics to laminate level. Explicit micromechanics equations based on hysteretic damping are programmed relating the on-axis damping capacities to the fiber and matrix properties and fiber volume ratio. The damping capacities of unidirectional composites subjected to off-axis loading are synthesized from on-axis damping values. The hygrothermal effect on the damping performance of unidirectional composites caused by temperature and moisture variation is modeled along with the damping contributions from interfacial friction between broken fibers and matrix. The temperature rise is continuously vibrating composite plies and composite laminates is also estimated. The ICAN/DAMP user's manual provides descriptions of the damping analysis module's functions, structure, input requirements, output interpretation, and execution requirements. It only addresses the changes required to conduct the damping analysis and is used in conjunction with the 'Second Generation Integrated Composite Analyzer (ICAN) Computer Code' user's manual (NASA TP-3290).

  16. Dampness in buildings and health. Nordic interdisciplinary review of the scientific evidence on associations between exposure to "dampness" in buildings and health effects (NORDDAMP).

    PubMed

    Bornehag, C G; Blomquist, G; Gyntelberg, F; Järvholm, B; Malmberg, P; Nordvall, L; Nielsen, A; Pershagen, G; Sundell, J

    2001-06-01

    Several epidemiological investigations concerning indoor environments have indicated that "dampness" in buildings is associated to health effects such as respiratory symptoms, asthma and allergy. The aim of the present interdisciplinary review is to evaluate this association as shown in the epidemiological literature. A literature search identified 590 peer-reviewed articles of which 61 have been the foundation for this review. The review shows that "dampness" in buildings appears to increase the risk for health effects in the airways, such as cough, wheeze and asthma. Relative risks are in the range of OR 1.4-2.2. There also seems to be an association between "dampness" and other symptoms such as tiredness, headache and airways infections. It is concluded that the evidence for a causal association between "dampness" and health effects is strong. However, the mechanisms are unknown. Several definitions of dampness have been used in the studies, but all seems to be associated with health problems. Sensitisation to mites may be one but obviously not the only mechanism. Even if the mechanisms are unknown, there is sufficient evidence to take preventive measures against dampness in buildings. PMID:11394014

  17. Viscous damping for base isolated structures

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D.; Hussain, S.; Retamal, E.

    1995-12-01

    Seismic Base Isolation can use elastomeric pads, sliding plates or inverted pendulums. Each method can include an energy dissipation means, but only as some kind of hysteretic damping. Hysteretic damping has limitations in terms of energy absorption and may tend to excite higher modes in some cases. It`s possible to avoid these problems with viscous dampers. Viscous damping adds energy dissipation through loads that are 900 out of phase with bending and shear loads so even with damping levels as high as 40% of critical adverse side effects tend to be minimal. This paper presents basic theory of viscous damping, and also describes a sample project. Viscous dampers being built for the new San Bernardino Medical Center reduce both deflections and loads by 50% compared with high damping elastomer base isolation bearings by themselves.

  18. CHARACTERIZATION OF DAMPING IN BOLTED LAP JOINTS

    SciTech Connect

    C. MALONEY; D. PEAIRS; ET AL

    2000-08-01

    The dynamic response of a jointed beam was measured in laboratory experiments. The data were analyzed and the system was mathematically modeled to establish plausible representations of joint damping behavior. Damping is examined in an approximate, local linear framework using log decrement and half power bandwidth approaches. in addition, damping is modeled in a nonlinear framework using a hybrid surface irregularities model that employs a bristles-construct. Experimental and analytical results are presented.

  19. The next linear collider damping ring lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Wolski, Andrzej; Corlett, John N.

    2001-06-20

    We report on the lattice design of the Next Linear Collider (NLC) damping rings. The damping rings are required to provide low emittance electron and positron bunch trains to the NLC linacs, at a rate of 120 Hz. We present an optical design, based on a theoretical minimum emittance (TME) lattice, to produce the required normalized extracted beam emittances gex = 3 mm-mrad and gey = 0.02 mm mrad. An assessment of dynamic aperture and non-linear effects is given. The positron pre-damping ring, required to reduce the emittance of the positron beam such that it may be accepted by a main damping ring, is also described.

  20. Viscous damped space structure for reduced jitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, James F.; Davis, L. Porter

    1987-01-01

    A technique to provide modal vibration damping in high performance space structures was developed which uses less than one once of incompressible fluid. Up to 50 percent damping can be achieved which can reduce the settling times of the lowest structural mode by as much as 50 to 1. This concept allows the designers to reduce the weight of the structure while improving its dynamic performance. Damping by this technique is purely viscous and has been shown by test to be linear over 5 orders of input magnitude. Amplitudes as low as 0.2 microinch were demonstrated. Damping in the system is independent of stiffness and relatively insensitive to temperature.

  1. Relaxation damping in oscillating contacts

    PubMed Central

    Popov, M.; Popov, V.L.; Pohrt, R.

    2015-01-01

    If a contact of two purely elastic bodies with no sliding (infinite coefficient of friction) is subjected to superimposed oscillations in the normal and tangential directions, then a specific damping appears, that is not dependent on friction or dissipation in the material. We call this effect “relaxation damping”. The rate of energy dissipation due to relaxation damping is calculated in a closed analytic form for arbitrary axially-symmetric contacts. In the case of equal frequency of normal and tangential oscillations, the dissipated energy per cycle is proportional to the square of the amplitude of tangential oscillation and to the absolute value of the amplitude of normal oscillation, and is dependent on the phase shift between both oscillations. In the case of low frequency tangential oscillations with superimposed high frequency normal oscillations, the dissipation is proportional to the ratio of the frequencies. Generalization of the results for macroscopically planar, randomly rough surfaces as well as for the case of finite friction is discussed. PMID:26549011

  2. Acoustic transducer with damping means

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Richard W.; Adamson, Gerald E.

    1976-11-02

    An ultrasonic transducer specifically suited to high temperature sodium applications is described. A piezoelectric active element is joined to the transducer faceplate by coating the faceplate and juxtaposed active element face with wetting agents specifically compatible with the bonding procedure employed to achieve the joint. The opposite face of the active element is fitted with a backing member designed to assure continued electrical continuity during adverse operating conditions which can result in the fracturing of the active element. The fit is achieved employing a spring-loaded electrode operably arranged to electrically couple the internal transducer components, enclosed in a hermetically sealed housing, to accessory components normally employed in transducer applications. Two alternative backing members are taught for assuring electrical continuity. The first employs a resilient, discrete multipoint contact electrode in electrical communication with the active element face. The second employs a resilient, elastomeric, electrically conductive, damped member in electrical communication with the active element face in a manner to effect ring-down of the transducer. Each embodiment provides continued electrical continuity within the transducer in the event the active element fractures, while the second provides the added benefit of damping.

  3. Relaxation damping in oscillating contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, M.; Popov, V. L.; Pohrt, R.

    2015-11-01

    If a contact of two purely elastic bodies with no sliding (infinite coefficient of friction) is subjected to superimposed oscillations in the normal and tangential directions, then a specific damping appears, that is not dependent on friction or dissipation in the material. We call this effect “relaxation damping”. The rate of energy dissipation due to relaxation damping is calculated in a closed analytic form for arbitrary axially-symmetric contacts. In the case of equal frequency of normal and tangential oscillations, the dissipated energy per cycle is proportional to the square of the amplitude of tangential oscillation and to the absolute value of the amplitude of normal oscillation, and is dependent on the phase shift between both oscillations. In the case of low frequency tangential oscillations with superimposed high frequency normal oscillations, the dissipation is proportional to the ratio of the frequencies. Generalization of the results for macroscopically planar, randomly rough surfaces as well as for the case of finite friction is discussed.

  4. A Method for Determination of Damping for Edgewise Blade Vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, K.; Petersen, J. T.; Nim, E.; Øye, S.; Petersen, B.

    2000-10-01

    Violent edgewise blade vibrations have in recent years been a large problem for some stall-regulated wind turbines. Owing to the complexity of the phenomenon, it has been difficult to predict the risk of these vibrations with aeroelastic load prediction tools. One problem is the choice of parameters in the aeroelastic model, e.g. structural damping and aerodynamic aerofoil characteristics. In many cases a high degree of uncertainty in the predicted response exists and the need for experimental verification methods is obvious. In this work a new method to identify the effective damping for the edgewise blade mode shape for wind turbines has been developed. The method consists of an exciter mechanism which makes it possible to excite the edgewise blade mode shapes from the wind turbine nacelle. Furthermore, the method consists of an analysis method which enables a straightforward determination of the damping. The analysis method is based on a local blade whirl description of the edgewise blade vibrations. The method is verified on a Bonus wind turbine, and for this specific turbine the effective damping for edgewise blade vibrations has been determined. The results support the further development of aeroelastic models and show potential for fine-tuning of parameters of importance for the edgewise blade vibration problem. Furthermore, the method can be used for experimental investigation of the risk of edgewise blade vibrations for a specific turbine.

  5. Flexural self-damping in overhead electrical transmission conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawlins, Charles B.

    2009-06-01

    Internal damping of tensioned cables during flexure by transverse vibration is analyzed. The flexure causes relative movements between the wires or strands of the cable, movements which are constrained by friction between them. Under conditions common to vibration of overhead transmission line conductors the friction is great enough to prevent gross sliding. However, there is microslip at the edges of the interstrand contacts, so there is frictional dissipation. In addition, the frictional forces cause shear strains at the contacts with resulting material damping. An analysis is presented that connects the bodily flexure of the conductor with the internal interstrand movements and forces, and with the amounts of dissipation that occur—self-damping. Comparison of estimates based on the analysis with measured data on self-damping reveals reasonable agreement, for a limited range. Cases lying outside that range appear to be associated with treatments applied to cable samples involved in the measurements prior to testing. Possible mechanisms activated by these treatments are discussed.

  6. Spin current control of damping in YIG/Pt nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safranski, Christopher; Barsukov, Igor; Lee, Han Kyu; Schneider, Tobias; Jara, Alejandro; Smith, Andrew; Chang, Houchen; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav; Wu, Mingzhong; Krivorotov, Ilya

    Understanding of spin transport at ferromagnet/normal metal interfaces is of great importance for spintronics applications. We report the effect of pure spin currents in YIG(30 nm)/Pt(6 nm) nanowires. The samples show magneto-resistance from two distinct mechanisms: (i) spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) and (ii) inverse spin Hall effect (iSHE) along with spin Seebeck current (SSC) induced by Ohmic heating of the Pt layer. Using the SMR and iSHE effects, we measure the spin wave eigenmodes by spin-torque ferromagnetic resonance (ST-FMR). Direct current applied to the Pt layer results in injection of spin Hall current into YIG that acts as damping or anti-damping spin torque depending on the polarity. In addition, Ohmic heating gives rise to a SSC acting as anti-damping regardless of current polarity. ST-FMR reveals current-induced variation of the spin wave mode linewidth that is asymmetric in the bias current and decreases to zero for anti-damping spin Hall current. Near this current, we observe complex interaction among the spin wave eigenmodes that we asses using micromagnetic simulations. Our results advance understanding of magnetization dynamics driven by pure spin currents.

  7. Tuned vibration absorbers with nonlinear viscous damping for damped structures under random load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shum, K. M.

    2015-06-01

    The classical problem for the application of a tuned vibration absorber is to minimize the response of a structural system, such as displacement, velocity, acceleration or to maximize the energy dissipated by tuned vibration absorber. The development of explicit optimal absorber parameters is challenging for a damped structural system since the fixed points no longer exist in the frequency response curve. This paper aims at deriving a set of simple design formula of tuned vibration absorber with nonlinear viscous damping based on the frequency tuning for harmonic load for a damped structural system under white noise excitation. The vibration absorbers being considered include tuned mass damper (TMD) and liquid column vibration absorber (LCVA). Simple approximate expression for the standard deviation velocity response of tuned vibration absorber for damped primary structure is also derived in this study to facilitate the estimation of the damping coefficient of TMD with nonlinear viscous damping and the head loss coefficient of LCVA. The derived results indicate that the higher the structural inherent damping the smaller the supplementary damping provided by a tuned vibration absorber. Furthermore, the optimal damping of tuned vibration absorber is shown to be independent of structural damping when it is tuned using the frequency tuning for harmonic load. Finally, the derived closed-form expressions are demonstrated to be capable of predicting the optimal parameters of tuned vibration absorbers with sufficient accuracy for preliminary design of tuned vibration absorbers with nonlinear viscous damping for a damped primary structure.

  8. Application of viscous and Iwan modal damping models to experimental measurements from bolted structures

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Deaner, Brandon J.; Allen, Matthew S.; Starr, Michael James; Segalman, Daniel J.; Sumali, Hartono

    2015-01-20

    Measurements are presented from a two-beam structure with several bolted interfaces in order to characterize the nonlinear damping introduced by the joints. The measurements (all at force levels below macroslip) reveal that each underlying mode of the structure is well approximated by a single degree-of-freedom (SDOF) system with a nonlinear mechanical joint. At low enough force levels, the measurements show dissipation that scales as the second power of the applied force, agreeing with theory for a linear viscously damped system. This is attributed to linear viscous behavior of the material and/or damping provided by the support structure. At larger forcemore » levels, the damping is observed to behave nonlinearly, suggesting that damping from the mechanical joints is dominant. A model is presented that captures these effects, consisting of a spring and viscous damping element in parallel with a four-parameter Iwan model. As a result, the parameters of this model are identified for each mode of the structure and comparisons suggest that the model captures the stiffness and damping accurately over a range of forcing levels.« less

  9. Application of viscous and Iwan modal damping models to experimental measurements from bolted structures

    SciTech Connect

    Deaner, Brandon J.; Allen, Matthew S.; Starr, Michael James; Segalman, Daniel J.; Sumali, Hartono

    2015-01-20

    Measurements are presented from a two-beam structure with several bolted interfaces in order to characterize the nonlinear damping introduced by the joints. The measurements (all at force levels below macroslip) reveal that each underlying mode of the structure is well approximated by a single degree-of-freedom (SDOF) system with a nonlinear mechanical joint. At low enough force levels, the measurements show dissipation that scales as the second power of the applied force, agreeing with theory for a linear viscously damped system. This is attributed to linear viscous behavior of the material and/or damping provided by the support structure. At larger force levels, the damping is observed to behave nonlinearly, suggesting that damping from the mechanical joints is dominant. A model is presented that captures these effects, consisting of a spring and viscous damping element in parallel with a four-parameter Iwan model. As a result, the parameters of this model are identified for each mode of the structure and comparisons suggest that the model captures the stiffness and damping accurately over a range of forcing levels.

  10. Passive vibration damping of carbon fiber reinforced plastic with PZT particles and SMA powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jaemin; Lee, Woo Il; Lee, Dasom; Park, Sungho; Moon, Sungnam

    2016-04-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) has been used various industrial fields, because of high strength, light weight, corrosion resistance and other properties. In this study, lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramic particles which is one of typical piezoelectric material and shape memory alloy powder dispersed in CFRP laminate in order to improve the vibration damping by dissipating vibration energy quickly. The loss factor (tanδ) is measured in Dynamic mechanical analyzer (DMA) which is used to measure the viscoelastic behavior of a material to verify the change in vibration damping. The results show that there exists difference on vibration damping ability between CFRP with PZT ceramic particles and CFRP with SMA powder.

  11. Protecting entanglement from correlated amplitude damping channel using weak measurement and quantum measurement reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Xing; Yao, Yao; Xie, Ying-Mao; Wang, Xing-Hua; Li, Yan-Ling

    2016-06-01

    Based on the quantum technique of weak measurement, we propose a scheme to protect the entanglement from correlated amplitude damping decoherence. In contrast to the results of memoryless amplitude damping channel, we show that the memory effects play a significant role in the suppression of entanglement sudden death and protection of entanglement under severe decoherence. Moreover, we find that the initial entanglement could be drastically amplified by the combination of weak measurement and quantum measurement reversal even under the correlated amplitude damping channel. The underlying mechanism can be attributed to the probabilistic nature of weak measurements.

  12. Estimation on nonlinear damping in second order distributed parameter systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Reich, Simeon; Rosen, I. G.

    1989-01-01

    An approximation and convergence theory for the identification of nonlinear damping in abstract wave equations is developed. It is assumed that the unknown dissipation mechanism to be identified can be described by a maximal monotone operator acting on the generalized velocity. The stiffness is assumed to be linear and symmetric. Functional analytic techniques are used to establish that solutions to a sequence of finite dimensional (Galerkin) approximating identification problems in some sense approximate a solution to the original infinite dimensional inverse problem.

  13. Status report of RMS active damping augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Mike; Demeo, Martha E.

    1993-01-01

    A status report of Remote Manipulator System (RMS) active damping augmentation is presented. Topics covered include: active damping augmentation; benefits of RMS ADA; simulated payload definition; sensor and actuator definition; ADA control law design; Shuttle Engineering Simulator (SES) real-time simulation; and astronaut evaluation.

  14. Damping device for a stationary labyrinth seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Aini, Yehia M. (Inventor); Mitchell, William S. (Inventor); Roberts, Lawrence P. (Inventor); Montgomery, Stuart K. (Inventor); Davis, Gary A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A stationary labyrinth seal system includes a seal housing having an annular cavity, a plurality of damping devices, and a retaining ring. The damping devices are positioned within the annular cavity and are maintained within the annular cavity by the retaining ring.

  15. HOME DAMPNESS AND RESPIRATORY MORBIDITY IN CHILDREN

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study examined the relationship between measures of home dampness and respiratory illness and symptoms in a cohort of 4,625 eight- to 12-year old children in six U.S. cities. ome dampness was characterized from questionnaire reports of mold or mildew damage inside the home, ...

  16. Study for ILC Damping Ring at KEKB

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, J.W.; Fukuma, H.; Kanazawa, K.I.; Koiso, H.; Masuzawa, M.; Ohmi, Kazuhito; Ohnishi, Y.; Oide, Katsunobu; Suetsugu, Y.; Tobiyama, M.; Pivi, M.; /SLAC

    2011-11-04

    ILC damping ring consists of very low emittance electron and positron storage rings. It is necessary for ILC damping ring to study electron cloud effects in such low emittance positron ring. We propose a low emittance operation of KEKB to study the effects.

  17. Satellite Dynamic Damping via Active Force Control Augmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varatharajoo, Renuganth

    2012-07-01

    An approach that incorporates the Active Force Control (AFC) technique into a conventional Proportional-Derivative (PD) controller is proposed for a satellite active dynamic damping towards a full attitude control. The AFC method has been established to facilitate a robust motion control of dynamical systems in the presence of disturbances, parametric uncertainties and changes that are commonly prevalent in the real-world environment. The usefulness of the method can be extended by introducing intelligent mechanisms to approximate the mass or inertia matrix of the dynamic system to trigger the compensation effect of the controller. AFC is a technique that relies on the appropriate estimation of the inertial or mass parameters of the dynamic system and the measurements of the acceleration and force signals induced by the system if practical implementation is ever considered. In AFC, it is shown that the system subjected to a number of disturbances remains stable and robust via the compensating action of the control strategy. We demonstrate that it is possible to design a spacecraft attitude feedback controller that will ensure the system dynamics set point remains unchanged even in the presence of the disturbances provided that the actual disturbances can be modeled effectively. In order to further facilitate this analysis, a combined energy and attitude control system (CEACS) is proposed as a model satellite attitude control actuator. All the governing equations are established and the proposed satellite attitude control architecture is made amenable to numerical treatments. The results show that the PD-AFC attitude damping performances are superiorly better than that of the solely PD type. It is also shown that the tunings of the AFC system gains are crucial to ensure a better attitude damping performance and this process is mandatory for AFC systems. Finally, the results demonstrate an important satellite dynamic damping enhancement capability using the AFC

  18. Optimization of SMA layers in composite structures to enhance damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghdoust, P.; Cinquemani, S.; Lecis, N.; Bassani, P.

    2016-04-01

    The performance of lightweight structures can be severely affected by vibration. New design concepts leading to lightweight, slender structural components can increase the vulnerability of the components to failure due to excessive vibration. The intelligent approach to address the problem would be the use of materials which are more capable in dissipating the energy due to their high value of loss factor. Among the different materials available to achieve damping, much attention has been attached to the use of shape memory alloys (SMAs) because of their unique microstructure, leading to good damping capacity. This work describes the design and optimization of a hybrid layered composite structure for the passive suppression of flexural vibrations in slender and light structures. Embedding the SMA layers in composite structure allows to combine different properties: the lightness of the base composite (e.g. fiber glass), the mechanical strength of the insert of metallic material and the relevant damping properties of SMA, in the martensitic phase. In particular, we put our attention on embedding the CuZnAl in the form of thin sheet in a layered composite made by glass fiber reinforced epoxy. By appropriately positioning of the SMA sheets so that they are subjected to the maximum curvature, the damping of the hybrid system can be considerably enhanced. Accordingly analytical method for evaluating the energy dissipation of the thin sheets with different shapes and patterns is developed and is followed by a shape optimization based on genetic algorithm. Eventually different configurations of the hybrid beam structure with different patterns of SMA layer are proposed and compared in the term of damping capacity.

  19. Analytical Solution and Physics of a Propellant Damping Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, H. Q.; Peugeot, John

    2011-01-01

    NASA design teams have been investigating options for "detuning" Ares I to prevent oscillations originating in the vehicle solid-rocket main stage from synching up with the natural resonance of the rest of the vehicle. An experimental work started at NASA MSFC center in 2008 using a damping device showed great promise in damping the vibration level of an 8 resonant tank. However, the mechanisms of the vibration damping were not well understood and there were many unknowns such as the physics, scalability, technology readiness level (TRL), and applicability for the Ares I vehicle. The objectives of this study are to understand the physics of intriguing slosh damping observed in the experiments, to further validate a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software in propellant sloshing against experiments with water, and to study the applicability and efficiency of the slosh damper to a full scale propellant tank and to cryogenic fluids. First a 2D fluid-structure interaction model is built to model the system resonance of liquid sloshing and structure vibration. A damper is then added into the above model to simulate experimentally observed system damping phenomena. Qualitative agreement is found. An analytical solution is then derived from the Newtonian dynamics for the thrust oscillation damper frequency, and a slave mass concept is introduced in deriving the damper and tank interaction dynamics. The paper will elucidate the fundamental physics behind the LOX damper success from the derivation of the above analytical equation of the lumped Newtonian dynamics. Discussion of simulation results using high fidelity multi-phase, multi-physics, fully coupled CFD structure interaction model will show why the LOX damper is unique and superior compared to other proposed mitigation techniques.

  20. Micromechanical analysis of damping performance of piezoelectric structural fiber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Qingli; Ng, Kenny

    2010-04-01

    Recent studies showed that the active piezoelectric structural fiber (PSF) composites may achieve significant and simultaneous improvements in sensing/actuating, stiffness, fracture toughness and vibration damping. These characteristics can be of particular importance in various civil, mechanical and aerospace structures. This study firstly conducted the micromechanical finite element analysis to predict the elastic properties and piezoelectrical coupling parameters of a special type of an active PSF composite laminate. The PSF composite laminates are made of longitudinally poled PSFs that are unidirectionally deployed in the polymer binding matrix. The passive damping performance of these active composites was studied under the cyclic force loadings with different frequencies. It was found that the passive electric-mechanical coupling behavior can absorb limited dynamic energy and delay the structure responses with minimum viscoelastic damping. The actuating function of piezoelectric materials was then applied to reduce the dynamic mechanical deformation. The step voltage inputs were imposed to the interdigital electrodes of PSF laminate transducer along the poled direction. The cyclic pressure loading was applied transversely to the composite laminate. The electromechnical interaction with the 1-3 coupling parameter generated the transverse expansion, which can reduce the cyclic deformation evenly by shifting the response waves. This study shows the promise in using this type of active composites as actuators to improve stability of the structure dynamic.

  1. Large space structure damping design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilkey, W. D.; Haviland, J. K.

    1983-01-01

    Several FORTRAN subroutines and programs were developed which compute complex eigenvalues of a damped system using different approaches, and which rescale mode shapes to unit generalized mass and make rigid bodies orthogonal to each other. An analytical proof of a Minimum Constrained Frequency Criterion (MCFC) for a single damper is presented. A method to minimize the effect of control spill-over for large space structures is proposed. The characteristic equation of an undamped system with a generalized control law is derived using reanalysis theory. This equation can be implemented in computer programs for efficient eigenvalue analysis or control quasi synthesis. Methods to control vibrations in large space structure are reviewed and analyzed. The resulting prototype, using electromagnetic actuator, is described.

  2. VIBRATION DAMPING AND SHOCK MOUNT

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, D.J.; Forman, G.W.

    1963-12-10

    A shock absorbing mount in which vibrations are damped by an interference fit between relatively movable parts of the mount is described. A pair of generally cup-shaped parts or members have skirt portions disposed in an oppositely facing nesting relationship with the skirt of one member frictionally engaging the skirt of the other. The outermost skirt may be slotted to provide spring-like segments which embrace the inner skirt for effecting the interference fit. Belleville washers between the members provide yieldable support for a load carried by the mount. When a resonant frequency of vibration forces acting upon the moumt attains a certain level the kinetic energy of these forces is absorbed by sliding friction between the parts. (AEC)

  3. Damping characteristics of damaged fiber composite components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberle, K.

    1986-01-01

    Defects in fiber composite components produce changes with respect to the vibrational characteristics of the material. These changes can be recognized in the form of a frequency shift or an alteration of the damping process. The present investigation is concerned with questions regarding the possibility of a utilization of the changes in suitable defect-detecting inspection procedures. A description is given of a method for measuring the damping characteristics of a specimen. This method provides a spectrum of the damping coefficients of the sample as a basis for a comprehensive evaluation of the damping behavior. The correlation between defects and change in the damping characteristics is demonstrated with the aid of results obtained in measurements involving specimens of carbon-fiber composites and a component consisting of glass-fiber-reinforced plastics.

  4. Landau damping in a turbulent setting

    SciTech Connect

    Plunk, G. G.

    2013-03-15

    To address the problem of Landau damping in kinetic turbulence, we consider the forcing of the linearized Vlasov equation by a stationary random source. It is found that the time-asymptotic density response is dominated by resonant particle interactions that are synchronized with the source. The energy consumption of this response is calculated, implying an effective damping rate, which is the main result of this paper. Evaluating several cases, it is found that the effective damping rate can differ from the Landau damping rate in magnitude and also, remarkably, in sign. A limit is demonstrated in which the density and current become phase-locked, which causes the effective damping to be negligible; this result offers a fresh perspective from which to reconsider recent observations of kinetic turbulence satisfying critical balance.

  5. Experimental Investigation of the Damping Behavior of the Particle Damping in the Transient Vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavan, Shrirang Pandurang; Kale, Arvind Kamalakar; Mulla, Faiz Abdulkadar

    2016-01-01

    Particle damping is a non linear type of damping in which energy of the vibratory system is dissipated by the impact and the frictional losses made by the particles used for the damping purposes. The particle damping technique is useful over other types of damping as it is temperature independent. So it is reliable over wide temperature range and hence is essentially used in the cryogenic and the gas turbine related applications. For experimentation, cantilever beam with particle enclosure attached to its free end has been extensively used and the effect of the particle material, particle size, mass ratio and enclosure height on the damping performance has been studied [1]. For a small weight penalty, rather large amounts of damping can be achieved [2].

  6. Collisionless damping of geodesic acoustic mode in plasma with nonextensive distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Hui-Bin; Song, Hai-Ying; Liu, Shi-Bing

    2014-06-15

    Geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) in collisionless toroidal plasmas with a constant electrostatic potential around a magnetic surface is investigated based on the linear gyrokinetic theory in context of nonextensive statistics mechanics. The damping rate of GAM is shown to be dependent on the nonextensive parameters of ions, and in the extensive limit, the result in Maxwellian distribution plasma is recovered. The damping rate is found to be enhanced as the nonextensive parameter of ion decreases.

  7. Damping Rate of n=1 EAEs as a Function of Plasma Elongation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boswell, C. J.; Fasoli, A.

    2005-10-01

    Fast particles can resonate with Alfv'en eigenmodes (AEs) and drive them unstable up to amplitudes at which they cause rapid radial transport of the fast particles. Knowing the mechanisms that damp the AEs may allow the ability to control the impact they have on the radial transport of the fast particles. Detailed studies of the damping rate of the n=1 toroidally-induced Alfv'en eigenmodes (TAEs) on JET have shown that in limiter discharges as the elongation and triangularity of the plasma shape is increased the damping rate of the TAEs also increases. New studies, presented here, of the damping rate of the n=1 elliptically-induced Alfv'en eigenmodes (EAEs) localized at the edge of the plasma, show that as the plasma elongation, κ, increases the damping rate decreases to γ/φ= 0.7% at κ= 1.55, less than 1/4 the TAE damping rate at the same elongation. This may be due to the widening of the EAE gap as elongation increases and therefore less interaction with the shear Alfv'en continuum, an effect that does not occur for the TAE gap. This difference in behavior between the n=1 TAEs and the n=1 EAEs may help in the understanding of the processes that lead to the total damping rate of AEs in general.

  8. Combined action of phase-mixing and Landau damping causing strong decay of geodesic acoustic modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palermo, F.; Biancalani, A.; Angioni, C.; Zonca, F.; Bottino, A.

    2016-07-01

    We report evidence of a new mechanism able to damp very efficiently geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) in the presence of a nonuniform temperature profile in a toroidally confined plasma. This represents a particular case of a general mechanism that we have found and that can be observed whenever the phase-mixing acts in the presence of a damping effect that depends on the wave number k r . Here, in particular, the combined effect of the Landau and continuum damping is found to quickly redistribute the GAM energy in phase-space, due to the synergy of the finite orbit width of the passing ions and the cascade in wave number given by the phase-mixing. This damping mechanism is investigated analytically and numerically by means of global gyrokinetic simulations. When realistic parameter values of plasmas at the edge of a tokamak are used, damping rates up to 2 orders of magnitude higher than the Landau damping alone are obtained. We find in particular that, for temperature and density profiles characteristic of the high confinement mode, the so-called H-mode, the GAM decay time becomes comparable to or lower than the nonlinear drive time, consistently with experimental observations (Conway G. D. et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 106 (2011) 065001).

  9. The effect of microstructure at interface between coating and substrate on damping capacity of coating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xueqin; Pei, Yanling; Ma, Yue

    2013-10-01

    Samples with various interface microstructures between the coating and the substrate were designed and fabricated in this paper. Dynamic mechanical thermal analyzer (DMTA) was utilized to investigate the dynamic mechanical properties of the samples and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to observe the interface microstructure between the substrate and coating. The effect of the interface microstructure on damping was studied, and results indicated that the larger the coating/substrate interface thickness was and the more interface defects were, the higher interface system damping was. When the micro-hardness ratio of substrate to coating was increased, the damping of coating system was enhanced. The effect of the APS and EB-PVD coating on damping capacity was investigated. There was a dramatic increase in the damping value of the APS coating when the strain was higher than 20 ppm, while the damping amplitude effect of the EB-PVD coating was not so obvious, which could mainly be caused by the different energy dissipation mechanisms of the two coatings.

  10. COLLISIONLESS DAMPING AT ELECTRON SCALES IN SOLAR WIND TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    TenBarge, J. M.; Howes, G. G.; Dorland, W.

    2013-09-10

    The dissipation of turbulence in the weakly collisional solar wind plasma is governed by unknown kinetic mechanisms. Two candidates have been suggested to play an important role in the dissipation, collisionless damping via wave-particle interactions and dissipation in small-scale current sheets. High resolution spacecraft measurements of the turbulent magnetic energy spectrum provide important constraints on the dissipation mechanism. The limitations of popular fluid and hybrid numerical schemes for simulation of the dissipation of solar wind turbulence are discussed, and instead a three-dimensional kinetic approach is recommended. We present a three-dimensional nonlinear gyrokinetic simulation of solar wind turbulence at electron scales that quantitatively reproduces the exponential form of the turbulent magnetic energy spectrum measured in the solar wind. A weakened cascade model that accounts for nonlocal interactions and collisionless Landau damping also quantitatively agrees with the observed exponential form. These results establish that a turbulent cascade of kinetic Alfven waves that is terminated by collisionless Landau damping is sufficient to explain the observed magnetic energy spectrum in the dissipation range of solar wind turbulence.