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  1. Osteoporosis: Preventing Falls

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Osteoporosis Preventing Falls Past Issues / Winter 2011 Table of ... next to your bed Free NIH Videos About Osteoporosis The NIHSeniorHealth Web site features five brief, informative ...

  2. [Prevention of osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Dambacher, M A; Kissling, R; Neff, M

    1998-11-01

    The European Parliament presented June 10th in Brussels the 'Osteoporosis Report in EU--Means for Prevention'. It was emphasized that in the EU more than 3500 million Ecu have to be spent for hospitalization and that more than 500,000 hospitals beds are being used by osteoporotic patients. According to some calculations this number will double within the next 50 years. The EU has set up eight steps to be considered, e.g. have densitometric measurements available for persons with high risk and have these measurement paid by the insurances to further finance and support research for the very important areas of prevention and treatment. One distinguishes between primary, secondary and tertiary prevention of osteoporosis. Primary prevention aims at reaching at adolescent age a peak bone mass as high as possible. Secondary prevention aims at reducing bone loss peri- and postmenopausal. The tertiary prevention with manifest osteoporosis aims at preventing fractures. Emphasis of the primary prevention is, besides a sufficient calcium intake, to omit risk factors; with secondary prevention the use of medical treatments such as estrogens/gestagens, bisphosphonates, and recently also SERMs is applied. The tertiary prevention tries mostly to reduce the femur fractures. In addition to drugs such as vitamin D/calcium, vitamin D metabolites and bisphosphonates it is very important to create 'a fall-proof home'. Also very useful are hip protectors. PMID:9865147

  3. Osteoporosis: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment and Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Osteoporosis Osteoporosis: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment and Prevention Past Issues / Winter 2011 Table of Contents Osteoporosis can strike at any age, although the risk ...

  4. Osteoporosis: Prevention and Management Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Evers, Susan; Myers, Anita

    1987-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a major cause of morbidity in post-menopausal women. Strategies to prevent or delay bone loss in normal post-menopausal women and to reduce the risk of fractures in women with osteoporosis are within the scope of family practice. Certain factors, such as inadequate calcium intake, estrogen deficiency, cigarette smoking and lack of physical activity can be modified in peri- and post-menopausal women. For patients with osteoporosis, there is potential for lowering the risk of fractures by means of calcium supplements or other therapies, physical training and rehabilitation, and modification of factors associated with risk of falling. PMID:21267348

  5. [Nutritional factors in preventing osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Martín Jiménez, Juan Antonio; Consuegra Moya, Belkis; Martín Jiménez, María Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis, main risk factor for suffering fragility fractures, is an important public health problem which has undoubted social, health and economic impact; but mainly causes pain, functional limitation and severe alterations in the patient's quality of life. Its current prevalence is very high and a further increase is expected due to a higher life expectancy and the progressive ageing of the population. In the prevention of osteoporosis, the main goal is to prevent fragility fractures; for this reason, it is necessary to: 1) promote bone formation in youth, to get sufficient bone mass peak, 2) reduce bone loss in adulthood, especially after menopause, 3) maintain bone health throughout life, and 4) prevent falls. There is enough evidence that multifactorial strategies (assessment of risk factors, healthy lifestyle habits, smoking cessation, moderation in alcohol consumption, physical exercise, outdoor activity with prudent exposure to sunlight, and a varied and balanced diet), are effective in the population at risk. Regarding factors for the prevention of osteoporosis, current recommendations are: increased consumption of calcium, phosphorus, magnesium and fluoride; provide adequate vitamin D (even with fortified food if necessary); consumption of foods rich in omega-3 acids; reduction of salt and prepared ready meals; sufficient but moderate intake of protein and, in the absence of intolerance, promote the consumption of milk and dairy products, especially yogurt and fermented milk products. PMID:26267775

  6. Osteoporosis Prevention, Screening, and Treatment: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Kling, Juliana M.; Clarke, Bart L.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Osteoporosis, defined as low bone mass leading to increased fracture risk, is a major health problem that affects approximately 10 million Americans. The aging U.S. population is predicted to contribute to as much as a 50% increase in prevalence by 2025. Although common, osteoporosis can be clinically silent, and without prevention and screening, the costs of osteoporotic fracture–related morbidity and mortality will burden the U.S. healthcare system. This is a particularly relevant concern in the context of diminishing health care resources. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry is the most widely used, validated technique for measuring bone mineral density (BMD) and diagnosing osteoporosis. Cost-effectiveness analyses support early detection and treatment of high-risk patients with antiresorptive medications such as bisphosphonates. Moreover, optimization of bone health throughout life can help prevent osteoporosis. Current guidelines recommend screening women by age 65 years, but because no guidelines for screening intervals exist, decisions are made on the basis of clinical judgment alone. Although the recent literature provides some guidance, this review further explores current recommendations in light of newer evidence to provide more clarity on prevention, screening, and management strategies for patients with osteoporosis in the primary care setting. PMID:24766381

  7. Preventing osteoporosis in every day life.

    PubMed

    Lau, E M C

    2004-03-01

    Osteoporosis is a condition characterized by low bone mineral density, microarchitectural deterioration of bone tissue, and a consequent increase in fracture risk. The public health impact of osteoporosis stems from its association with fractures of the hip, spine and forearm. Between 10 and 20 percent of hip fracture patients die within a year of the event, and among those who survive, almost two-thirds remain disabled. The medical costs of osteoporosis and its attendant fractures have been placed at 5.2 billion dollars each year in the US and 615 million pound sterling each year in the UK. In Asia, osteoporosis is rapidly becoming a major public health problem with an increasing incidence of hip fracture and a rapidly aging population. By the year 2050, more than half of the hip fracture around the world would occur in Asia, with the total number approaching 3.2 million. Osteoporosis can be attributed to both genetic factors and environmental factors. While it is difficult to modify genes, much can be done to prevent osteoporosis in our every day life. These are discussed below. PMID:15577003

  8. Better Bones Buddies: An Osteoporosis Prevention Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schrader, Susan L.; Blue, Rebecca; Horner, Arlene

    2005-01-01

    Although osteoporosis typically surfaces in later life, peak bone mass attained before age 20 is a key factor in its prevention. However, most American children's diets lack sufficient calcium during the critical growth periods of preadolescence and adolescence to achieve peak bone mass. "Better Bones (BB) Buddies" is an educational program…

  9. To prevent the osteoporosis playing in advance

    PubMed Central

    Colì, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Summary There are several possibilities for the prevention of primary, secondary and tertiary osteoporosis but till now they have not been promoted enough and bone fragility is thought about only after the onset of a fracture (tertiary prevention). By recent studies and discoveries it is becoming increasingly clear that there is a relationship between growth and development in early childhood and bone health in old age. Suboptimal bone development leads to a reduction in peak bone mass, and a higher risk of osteoporotic fracture later in life. Preventative strategies against osteoporosis can be aimed at either optimizing the peak bone mass obtained, or reducing the rate of bone loss. Optimization of peak bone mass may be more amenable to public health strategies. Technological advances and our knowledge of osteoporosis have increased in the last decade and so tertiary prevention should be considered a failure in the field of public health. If we want to make advances in the osteoporotic field, we must start in childhood, before the bone mass peak is reached and the gold-standard is starting with prevention as soon as possible, also during fetal development. PMID:24133522

  10. Osteoporosis

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Osteoporosis is a condition that leads to loss of bone mass. From the outside, osteoporotic bone is shaped like normal bone. However, the inside of ... aware of the presence of the disease. Prevention is the best measure for treating osteoporosis by eating ...

  11. Prevention and treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, J Christopher; Tella, Sri Harsha

    2014-01-01

    In the beginning, that is from the 1960's, when a link between menopause and osteoporosis was first identified; estrogen treatment was the standard for preventing bone loss, however there was no fracture data, even though it was thought to be effective. This continued until the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) study in 2001 that published data on 6 years of treatment with hormone therapy that showed an increase in heart attacks and breast cancer. Even though the risks were small, 1 per 1500 users annually, patients were worried and there was a large drop off in estrogen use. In later analyses the WHI study showed that estrogen reduced fractures and actually prevented heart attacks in the 50-60 year age group. Estrogen alone appeared to be safer to use than estrogen + the progestin medroxyprogesterone acetate and actually reduced breast cancer. PMID:24176761

  12. Rabbiteye blueberry prevents osteoporosis in ovariectomized rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objective It has been forecasted that the rabbiteye blueberry could inhibit osteoporosis. However, the inhibition and prevention of osteoporosis via rabbiteye blueberry are still elusive. This study was aim to evaluate the anti-osteoporosis effects of rabbiteye blueberry in ovariectomized rats. Methods Thirty rats were randomly divided into three groups of ten rats each as follows: sham-operated group (SG), ovariectomized model control group (OMG), and ovariectomized rabbiteye blueberry treatment group (OBG). The blood mineral levels, the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and osteoprotegerin (OPG) level were determined. The expression analyses of type I collagen, integrin-β1, and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) were performed. Besides, the bone mineral density (BMD) and bone histomorphometry (BH) were measured. Results The ALP activity in SG and OBG was significantly lower than that in OMG. For the OPG level, the significant increase of OPG level in OBG was indicated compared with the other groups. The mRNA expression levels of type I collagen, integrin-β1, and FAK in OMG were significantly lower than those in other groups. The BMD in OMG were all significantly lower than those in SG and OBG. For BH, blueberry significantly improved the trabecular bone volume fraction, trabecular thickness, mean trabecular bone number, and bone formation rate, and decreased the trabecular separation, the percent of bone resorption perimeter, and mean osteoclast number in OBG compared with OMG. Conclusions The rabbiteye blueberries had an effective inhibition in bone resorption, bone loss, and reduction of bone strength of ovariectomized rats and could improve the BMD, osteogenic activity, and trabecular bone structure. PMID:25102951

  13. PIXE studies of osteoporosis preventive treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ynsa, M. D.; Pinheiro, T.; Ager, F. J.; Alves, L. C.; Millán, J. C.; Gómez-Zubelbia, M. A.; Respaldiza, M. A.

    2002-04-01

    Particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and nuclear microprobe (NMP) have been used in an exploratory work to study elemental alterations in tissues of experimental animals submitted to osteoporosis preventive treatments. Osteopathologies have been associated with several factors, such as hormonal disturbances, metabolic aberrations, low dietary Ca and vitamin D intake, excess of iron, among other possible factors. Hormonal treatments seem to be beneficial to the incorporation of Ca in bone but breast and endometrial cancers constitute significant side effects that cannot be ignored. Wistar female rats were used to test the effect of estrogen therapy in osteoporosis progression. The variations of elemental concentrations in uterus and the Ca content of femoral bones of ovariectomised rats under estrogen therapy were investigated. PIXE, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and secondary electron microscopy techniques were applied for the characterisation of biological materials, with respect to morphology and trace element distribution determination. The increase of Ca and Fe concentrations in uterus and the variations for Ca distribution patterns in bone of rats submitted to estrogen therapy were the major features observed.

  14. Prevention and treatment of osteoporosis in women.

    PubMed

    Al-Azzawi, Farook; Barlow, David; Hillard, Tim; Studd, John; Williamson, Jenny; Rees, Margaret

    2007-12-01

    Osteoporosis affects one in three women. There has been some confusion among women and health professionals about the management of osteoporosis since the publication of the Women's Health Initiative and Million Women studies. This guidance regarding estrogen-based and non-estrogen-based treatments for osteoporosis responds to the controversies about the benefits and risks of individual agents. Treatment choice should be based on up-to-date evidence and targeted to individual women's needs. PMID:18088530

  15. Bisphosphonates for the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Maraka, Spyridoula; Kennel, Kurt A

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a systemic skeletal disorder characterized by bone loss, which leads to impaired bone strength and an increased risk of fractures. Two million fractures are attributed to osteoporosis annually in the United States and they are associated with serious morbidity and mortality. Bisphosphonates reduce the risk of fracture by suppressing bone resorption and increasing bone strength, and they have been widely used for the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. However, the use of these drugs for the management of osteoporosis remains a clinical challenge. There are several important considerations including appropriate patient selection, pretreatment evaluation, potential adverse effects, patient preferences, and adherence. This review will discuss the evidence informing the clinical strategy for using bisphosphonates in patients with osteoporosis and those at high risk of fracture, focusing on the benefits and risks of treatment. We will also consider issues related to the monitoring and duration of treatment. PMID:26333528

  16. Life Expectancy in Patients Treated for Osteoporosis: Observational Cohort Study Using National Danish Prescription Data.

    PubMed

    Abrahamsen, Bo; Osmond, Clive; Cooper, Cyrus

    2015-09-01

    Osteoporosis is a chronic disease, carrying an elevated risk of fractures, morbidity, and death. Long-term treatment may be required, but the long-term risks with osteoporosis drugs remain incompletely understood. The competing risk of death may be a barrier to treating the oldest, yet this may not be rational if the risk of death is reduced by treatment. It is difficult to devise goal-directed long-term strategies for managing osteoporosis without firm information about residual life expectancy in treated patients. We conducted an observational study in Danish national registries tracking prescriptions for osteoporosis drugs, comorbid conditions, and deaths. We included 58,637 patients and 225,084 age- and sex-matched control subjects. Information on deaths until the end of 2013 was retrieved, providing a follow-up period of 10 to 17 years. In men younger than 80 years and women younger than 60 years, the relative risk of dying declined from being strongly increased in the first year to a stable but elevated level in subsequent years. In women older than 65 to 70 years, there was only a small elevation in risk in the first year of treatment followed by lower than background population mortality. The residual life expectancy of a 50-year-old man beginning osteoporosis treatment was estimated to be 18.2 years and that of a 75-year-old man was 7.5 years. Estimates in women were 26.4 years and 13.5 years, respectively. This study shows an excess mortality in men and in women younger than 70 years who are treated for osteoporosis compared with the background population. This excess risk is more pronounced in the first few years on treatment. The average life expectancy of osteoporosis patients is in excess of 15 years in women younger than 75 years and in men younger than 60 years, highlighting the importance of developing tools for long-term management. PMID:25663501

  17. Osteoporosis

    MedlinePlus

    Osteoporosis makes your bones weak and more likely to break. Anyone can develop osteoporosis, but it is common in older women. As ... than 50 will break a bone due to osteoporosis. Risk factors include Getting older Being small and ...

  18. Osteoporosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > ePublications > Our ePublications > Osteoporosis fact sheet ePublications Osteoporosis fact sheet This information in Spanish (en español) Print this fact sheet Osteoporosis fact sheet (PDF, 412 KB) Related information Menopause ...

  19. Knowledge about osteoporosis prevention among women screened by bone densitometry

    PubMed Central

    Firlej, Ewelina; Żołnierczuk-Kieliszek, Dorota; Dziedzic, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Osteoporosis is an illness characterized by the handicapped endurance of the bones, causing an increased risk of fracture. Aim of the study Aim of the study was to establish the level of knowledge about osteoporosis prevention among women screened by bone densitometry and to answer the question whether the level of knowledge is dependent on socio-demographic factors. Material and methods The research was realized by means of a survey method, a poll technique in 2014. The study involved 292 women aged 51-83. The examined women were patients undergoing bone densitometry in the healthcare centres in Lublin. The osteoporosis knowledge test (OKT, revised 2011) by Phyllis Gendler was used as a research tool. Gathered material was subject to descriptive and statistical analysis. Tukey's test, t-Student test and variance analysis (ANOVA) were all applied. A statistical significance level was set at α = 0.05. Results and conclusions Respondents presented the basic exercise knowledge (M = 9.97) and low knowledge concerning risk factors, screening and treatment of osteoporosis (M = 7.87). The calcium knowledge remained on an average level (M = 14.03). Better educated women, city inhabitants as well as women having very good or good social and welfare conditions showed a significantly higher level of knowledge about osteoporosis prevention. Even women undergoing bone densitometry examination present insufficient knowledge about osteoporosis prevention. PMID:27582684

  20. Guidelines for the diagnosis, prevention and management of osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Rossini, M; Adami, S; Bertoldo, F; Diacinti, D; Gatti, D; Giannini, S; Giusti, A; Malavolta, N; Minisola, S; Osella, G; Pedrazzoni, M; Sinigaglia, L; Viapiana, O; Isaia, G C

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis poses a significant public health issue. National Societies have developed Guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of this disorder with an effort of adapting specific tools for risk assessment on the peculiar characteristics of a given population. The Italian Society for Osteoporosis, Mineral Metabolism and Bone Diseases (SIOMMMS) has recently revised the previously published Guidelines on the diagnosis, riskassessment, prevention and management of primary and secondary osteoporosis. The guidelines were first drafted by a working group and then approved by the board of SIOMMMS. Subsequently they received also the endorsement of other major Scientific Societies that deal with bone metabolic disease. These recommendations are based on systematic reviews of the best available evidence and explicit consideration of cost effectiveness. When minimal evidence is available, recommendations are based on leading experts' experience and opinion, and on good clinical practice. The osteoporosis prevention should be based on the elimination of specific risk factors. The use of drugs registered for the treatment of osteoporosis are recommended when the benefits overcome the risk, and this is the case only when the risk of fracture is rather high as measured with variables susceptible to pharmacological effect. DeFRA (FRAX® derived fracture risk assessment) is recognized as a useful tool for easily estimate the long-term fracture risk. Several secondary forms of osteoporosis require a specific diagnostic and therapeutic management. PMID:27339372

  1. Hormone replacement therapy and the prevention of postmenopausal osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Levancini, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Fracture prevention is one of the public health priorities worldwide. Estrogen deficiency is the major factor in the pathogenesis of postmenopausal osteoporosis, the most common metabolic bone disease. Different effective treatments for osteoporosis are available. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) at different doses rapidly normalizes turnover, preserves bone mineral density (BMD) at all skeletal sites, leading to a significant, reduction in vertebral and non-vertebral fractures. Tibolone, a selective tissue estrogenic activity regulator (STEAR), is effective in the treatment of vasomotor symptoms, vaginal atrophy and prevention/treatment of osteoporosis with a clinical efficacy similar to that of conventional HRT. Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) such as raloxifene and bazedoxifene reduce turnover and maintain or increase vertebral and femoral BMD and reduce the risk of osteoporotic fractures. The combination of bazedoxifene and conjugated estrogens, defined as tissue selective estrogen complex (TSEC), is able to reduce climacteric symptoms, reduce bone turnover and preserve BMD. In conclusion, osteoporosis prevention can actually be considered as a major additional benefit in climacteric women who use HRT for treatment of climacteric symptoms. The use of a standard dose of HRT for osteoporosis prevention is based on biology, epidemiology, animal and preclinical data, observational studies and randomized, clinical trials. The antifracture effect of a lower dose HRT or TSEC is supported by the data on BMD and turnover, with compelling scientific evidence. PMID:26327857

  2. Prevention and treatment of senile osteoporosis and hip fractures.

    PubMed

    Duque, G; Demontiero, O; Troen, B R

    2009-02-01

    Osteoporosis is a major health issue worldwide, with significant economic consequences and adverse impacts on the quality of life. Hip fractures are the most devastating complication of osteoporosis, are likely to increase exponentially with an increasingly aged population, are associated with high recurrence rate, and lead to significant morbidity and mortality. This review discusses the prevalence and impact of hip fractures, the assessment of fracture risk, fall prevention, and treatment of osteoporosis with emphasis on evidence for hip fracture reduction among the various agents currently available. The aim is to provide recommendations to optimize hip fracture prevention and treatment. Ample evidence exists in the literature of many other risk factors independent from bone mineral density that increase fracture risk. These clinical risk factors have been validated in large cohorts and are incorporated into clinical tools that are invaluable in treatment decisions. In addition, strategies to prevent or reduce falls are integral to comprehensive osteoporosis management. Vitamin D combined with calcium has a role in primary prevention. Alendronate, residronate, strontium and zoledronic acid have proven efficacy in primary and secondary hip fracture prevention. An aggressive approach to investigate, assess and manage an individual's fracture risk and fall risk is paramount to reduce the high morbidity and mortality associated with hip fractures. The choice of therapy should be determined by the patient's calculated fracture risk and efficacy of the potential treatment, including long term compliance associated with the agent of choice. PMID:19277006

  3. The Role of Calcium in Prevention and Treatment of Osteoporosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heaney, Robert P.

    1987-01-01

    Osteoporosis results from several factors. Calcium deficiency is only one, and high calcium intake will prevent only those cases in which calcium is the limiting factor. Calcium cannot reverse, but only arrest, bone loss. A high calcium intake for every member of the population is advocated. (Author/MT)

  4. Osteoporosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... IT? HIV AND OSTEOPOROSIS ANTACIDS AND BONE MINERAL DENSITY HOW DO I KNOW IF I HAVE OSTEOPOROSIS? ... have unusually high rates of low bone mineral density and broken bones. This may be because of ...

  5. Osteoporosis

    SciTech Connect

    Riggs, B.L. Melton III, L.J. )

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 20 chapters. Some of the titles are: Radiology of asteoporosis; Quantitative computed tomography in assessment of osteoporosis; Nuclear medicine and densitometry; Assessment of bone turnover by histormorphometry in osteoporosis; and The biochemistry of bone.

  6. Preventing and Treating Brittle Bones and Osteoporosis | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Javascript on. Feature: Osteoporosis Preventing and Treating Brittle Bones and Osteoporosis Past Issues / Winter 2011 Table of ... at high risk due to low bone mass. Bone and Bone Loss Bone is living, growing tissue. ...

  7. Osteoporosis: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment and Prevention | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn Javascript on. Feature: Osteoporosis Osteoporosis: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment and Prevention Past Issues / Winter 2011 Table ... bump, or fall causes a bone to break. Diagnosis A bone mineral density test is the best ...

  8. Osteoporosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Having a family history of osteoporosis Taking certain medicines Being a white or Asian woman Having osteopenia, which is low bone density Osteoporosis is a silent disease. You might not know you have it until you break a ... medicines can also help. NIH: National Institute of Arthritis ...

  9. Olives and Bone: A Green Osteoporosis Prevention Option

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Kok-Yong; Ima-Nirwana, Soelaiman

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal degeneration due to aging, also known as osteoporosis, is a major health problem worldwide. Certain dietary components confer protection to our skeletal system against osteoporosis. Consumption of olives, olive oil and olive polyphenols has been shown to improve bone health. This review aims to summarize the current evidence from cellular, animal and human studies on the skeletal protective effects of olives, olive oil and olive polyphenols. Animal studies showed that supplementation of olives, olive oil or olive polyphenols could improve skeletal health assessed via bone mineral density, bone biomechanical strength and bone turnover markers in ovariectomized rats, especially those with inflammation. The beneficial effects of olive oil and olive polyphenols could be attributed to their ability to reduce oxidative stress and inflammation. However, variations in the bone protective, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects between studies were noted. Cellular studies demonstrated that olive polyphenols enhanced proliferation of pre-osteoblasts, differentiation of osteoblasts and decreased the formation of osteoclast-like cells. However, the exact molecular pathways for its bone health promoting effects are yet to be clearly elucidated. Human studies revealed that daily consumption of olive oil could prevent the decline in bone mineral density and improve bone turnover markers. As a conclusion, olives, olive oil and its polyphenols are potential dietary interventions to prevent osteoporosis among the elderly. PMID:27472350

  10. Olives and Bone: A Green Osteoporosis Prevention Option.

    PubMed

    Chin, Kok-Yong; Ima-Nirwana, Soelaiman

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal degeneration due to aging, also known as osteoporosis, is a major health problem worldwide. Certain dietary components confer protection to our skeletal system against osteoporosis. Consumption of olives, olive oil and olive polyphenols has been shown to improve bone health. This review aims to summarize the current evidence from cellular, animal and human studies on the skeletal protective effects of olives, olive oil and olive polyphenols. Animal studies showed that supplementation of olives, olive oil or olive polyphenols could improve skeletal health assessed via bone mineral density, bone biomechanical strength and bone turnover markers in ovariectomized rats, especially those with inflammation. The beneficial effects of olive oil and olive polyphenols could be attributed to their ability to reduce oxidative stress and inflammation. However, variations in the bone protective, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects between studies were noted. Cellular studies demonstrated that olive polyphenols enhanced proliferation of pre-osteoblasts, differentiation of osteoblasts and decreased the formation of osteoclast-like cells. However, the exact molecular pathways for its bone health promoting effects are yet to be clearly elucidated. Human studies revealed that daily consumption of olive oil could prevent the decline in bone mineral density and improve bone turnover markers. As a conclusion, olives, olive oil and its polyphenols are potential dietary interventions to prevent osteoporosis among the elderly. PMID:27472350

  11. Novel molecular targets for prevention of obesity and osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Rayalam, Srujana; Yang, Jeong-Yeh; Della-Fera, Mary Anne; Baile, Clifton A

    2011-12-01

    Evidence from both epidemiological studies and basic research suggests that obesity and osteoporosis are interrelated. Though there is an increase in the prevalence of these disorders, a limited number of treatments are available, one of the reasons being the complexity of the pathways involved and difficulty in identifying a single molecular target. Due to adverse effects of pharmaceuticals, intake of herbal drugs by patients without a physician's recommendation is increasing globally. Lack of success with targeted monotherapy has encouraged scientists to determine whether combinations of phytochemicals that interfere with numerous cell-signaling pathways can be a more effective approach to treat complex diseases. For example, evidence is emerging that specific combinations of phytochemicals are far more effective than single compounds in decreasing adipogenesis and promoting bone formation. Since multiple pathways are dysfunctional in obesity and osteoporosis, an ideal approach for preventing and treating these diseases may be to use a combination of phytochemicals to address several targets simultaneously. PMID:21429725

  12. Osteoporosis

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Osteoporosis is a condition that leads to loss of bone mass. From the outside, osteoporotic bone is shaped like normal bone. ... routine activities, like walking, standing, or bathing. Often, a person will sustain a fracture before becoming aware ...

  13. Eggshell calcium in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Rovenský, J; Stancíková, M; Masaryk, P; Svík, K; Istok, R

    2003-01-01

    In this paper the most significant biological and clinical aspects of a biopreparation made of chicken eggshells are reviewed. Eggshell powder is a natural source of calcium and other elements (e.g. strontium and fluorine) which may have a positive effect on bone metabolism. Experimental and clinical studies performed to date have shown a number of positive properties of eggshell powder, such as antirachitic effects in rats and humans. A positive effect was observed on bone density in animal models of postmenopausal osteoporosis in ovariectomized female rats. In vitro eggshell powder stimulates chondrocyte differentiation and cartilage growth. Clinical studies in postmenopausal women and women with senile osteoporosis showed that eggshell powder reduces pain and osteoresorption and increases mobility and bone density or arrests its loss. The bioavailability of calcium from this source, as tested in piglets, was similar or better than that of food grade purified calcium carbonate. Clinical and experimental studies showed that eggshell powder has positive effects on bone and cartilage and that it is suitable in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. PMID:15018022

  14. [Osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Uebelhart, Brigitte; Rizzoli, René

    2015-01-14

    Bone events related to bariatric surgery remain controversial. Denosumab, used in osteoporosis treatment, is safe and efficient. Romosozumab, an antibody raised against sclerostin, is a promising bone anabolic agent. Odanacatib, a cathepsin-K inhibitor, decreases bone resorption and reduces osteoporotic fracture risk. Denosumab, as bone resorption inhibitor, and Teriparatide, as anabolic agent, have been tested together in patients with osteoporosis. Calcium supplements and cardiovascular risk are still debated. Drug holiday, after long-term treatment with bisphosphonates, is not associated with an increased fracture rate in patients with moderate risk. PMID:25799662

  15. Should we prescribe calcium supplements for osteoporosis prevention?

    PubMed

    Reid, Ian R

    2014-02-01

    Advocacy for the use of calcium supplements arose at a time when there were no other effective interventions for the prevention of osteoporosis. Their promotion was based on the belief that increasing calcium intake would increase bone formation. Our current understandings of the biology of bone suggest that this does not occur, though calcium does act as a weak antiresorptive. Thus, it slows postmenopausal bone loss but, despite this, recent meta-analyses suggest no significant prevention of fractures. In sum, there is little substantive evidence of benefit to bone health from the use of calcium supplements. Against this needs to be balanced the likelihood that calcium supplement use increases cardiovascular events, kidney stones, gastrointestinal symptoms, and admissions to hospital with acute gastrointestinal problems. Thus, the balance of risk and benefit seems to be consistently negative. As a result, current recommendations are to obtain calcium from the diet in preference to supplements. Dietary calcium intake has not been associated with the adverse effects associated with supplements, probably because calcium is provided in smaller boluses, which are absorbed more slowly since they come together with quantities of protein and fat, resulting in a slower gastric transit time. These findings suggest that calcium supplements have little role to play in the modern therapeutics of osteoporosis, which is based around the targeting of safe and effective anti-resorptive drugs to individuals demonstrated to be at increased risk of future fractures. PMID:24707464

  16. [Osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Hintze, Gerhard; Graf, Dieter

    2016-06-01

    Osteoporosis is among the main causes for bone fractures. In this overview we report on the prevalence of the disease, the diagnostic procedures, and the therapeutic options. The prevalence increases with age and women are more often affected than men. The diagnosis usually is made on the basis of dual X-ray absorptiometry. Prophylactic measures include a sufficient intake of calcium and vitamin D. Bisphosphonates play a central role in the pharmacotherapy of this disease. PMID:27439255

  17. Eurycoma longifolia: Medicinal Plant in the Prevention and Treatment of Male Osteoporosis due to Androgen Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Mohd Effendy, Nadia; Mohamed, Norazlina; Muhammad, Norliza; Naina Mohamad, Isa; Shuid, Ahmad Nazrun

    2012-01-01

    Osteoporosis in elderly men is now becoming an alarming health issue due to its relation with a higher mortality rate compared to osteoporosis in women. Androgen deficiency (hypogonadism) is one of the major factors of male osteoporosis and it can be treated with testosterone replacement therapy (TRT). However, one medicinal plant, Eurycoma longifolia Jack (EL), can be used as an alternative treatment to prevent and treat male osteoporosis without causing the side effects associated with TRT. EL exerts proandrogenic effects that enhance testosterone level, as well as stimulate osteoblast proliferation and osteoclast apoptosis. This will maintain bone remodelling activity and reduce bone loss. Phytochemical components of EL may also prevent osteoporosis via its antioxidative property. Hence, EL has the potential as a complementary treatment for male osteoporosis. PMID:22844328

  18. [Osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Al-Khawajah, F F

    2002-01-01

    It is well known that people, especially white people, are getting osteoporosis more often than previously thought. Until now, no direct causative factor has been determined, but genetic factors are very likely to be involved. Usually, affected individuals are initially asymptomatic while the disease process is going on, and they come to the attention of the medical profession only late when their bones are fractured as a result of a simple trauma. Also it is vital to let people know that heavy sports, at times, can be harmful. PMID:15339135

  19. Eldecalcitol prevents endothelial dysfunction in postmenopausal osteoporosis model rats.

    PubMed

    Serizawa, Kenichi; Yogo, Kenji; Tashiro, Yoshihito; Takeda, Satoshi; Kawasaki, Ryohei; Aizawa, Ken; Endo, Koichi

    2016-02-01

    Postmenopausal women have high incidence of cardiovascular events as estrogen deficiency can cause endothelial dysfunction. Vitamin D is reported to be beneficial on endothelial function, but it remains controversial whether vitamin D is effective for endothelial dysfunction under the treatment for osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. The aim of this study was to evaluate the endothelial protective effect of eldecalcitol (ELD) in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. ELD (20  ng/kg) was orally administrated five times a week for 4 weeks from 1 day after surgery. After that, flow-mediated dilation (FMD) as an indicator of endothelial function was measured by high-resolution ultrasound in the femoral artery of living rats. ELD ameliorated the reduction of FMD in OVX rats. ELD inhibited the increase in NOX4, nitrotyrosine, and p65 and the decrease in dimer/monomer ratio of nitric oxide synthase in OVX rat femoral arteries. ELD also prevented the decrease in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) in femoral arteries and cultured endothelial cells. Although PPARγ is known to inhibit osteoblastogenesis, ELD understandably increased bone mineral density of OVX rats without increase in PPARγ in bone marrow. These results suggest that ELD prevented the deterioration of endothelial function under condition of preventing bone loss in OVX rats. This endothelial protective effect of ELD might be exerted through improvement of endothelial nitric oxide synthase uncoupling, which is mediated by an antioxidative effect through normalization of vascular PPARγ/NF-κB signaling. PMID:26537128

  20. Evaluation of Three Osteoporosis Prevention Programs for Young Women: Application of the Health Belief Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lein, Donald H.; Turner, Lori; Wilroy, Jereme

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of theory-based osteoporosis prevention programs on calcium and vitamin D intakes and osteoporosis health beliefs in young women. Methods: Women (N = 152) aged 19 to 25 years were randomly assigned to one of 3 groups: a brochure group (n = 51), a computer-tailored program group…

  1. Evaluation of a Computer-Tailored Osteoporosis Prevention Intervention in Young Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lein, Donald H., Jr.; Clark, Diane; Turner, Lori W.; Kohler, Connie L.; Snyder, Scott; Morgan, Sarah L.; Schoenberger, Yu-Mei M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a theory-based computer-tailored osteoporosis prevention program on calcium and vitamin D intake and osteoporosis health beliefs in young women. Additionally, this study tested whether adding bone density testing to the intervention improved the outcomes. Methods: One hundred…

  2. Labisia pumila Prevents Complications of Osteoporosis by Increasing Bone Strength in a Rat Model of Postmenopausal Osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Fathilah, Siti Noor; Abdullah, Shahrum; Mohamed, Norazlina; Shuid, Ahmad Nazrun

    2012-01-01

    Estrogen replacement therapy (ERT) is the main treatment postmenopausal osteoporosis. However, ERT causes serious side effects, such as cancers and thromboembolic problems. Labisia pumila var. alata (LPva) is a herb with potential as an alternative to ERT to prevent complications of osteoporosis, especially fragility fractures. This study was conducted to determine the effects of LPva on the biomechanical strength of femora exposed to osteoporosis due to estrogen deficiency, using the postmenopausal rat model. Thirty-two female rats were randomly divided into four groups: Sham-operated (Sham), ovariectomized control (OVXC), ovariectomized with Labisia pumila var. alata (LP), and ovariectomized with ERT (Premarin) (ERT). The LPva and ERT were administered via oral gavage daily at doses of 17.5 mg/kg and 64.5 μg/kg, respectively. Following two months of treatment, the rats were euthanized, and their right femora were prepared for bone biomechanical testing. The results showed that ovariectomy compromised the femoral strength, while LPva supplementation to the ovariectomized rats improved the femoral strength. Therefore, LPva may be as effective as ERT in preventing fractures due to estrogen-deficient osteoporosis. PMID:22991574

  3. Labisia pumila Prevents Complications of Osteoporosis by Increasing Bone Strength in a Rat Model of Postmenopausal Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Fathilah, Siti Noor; Abdullah, Shahrum; Mohamed, Norazlina; Shuid, Ahmad Nazrun

    2012-01-01

    Estrogen replacement therapy (ERT) is the main treatment postmenopausal osteoporosis. However, ERT causes serious side effects, such as cancers and thromboembolic problems. Labisia pumila var. alata (LPva) is a herb with potential as an alternative to ERT to prevent complications of osteoporosis, especially fragility fractures. This study was conducted to determine the effects of LPva on the biomechanical strength of femora exposed to osteoporosis due to estrogen deficiency, using the postmenopausal rat model. Thirty-two female rats were randomly divided into four groups: Sham-operated (Sham), ovariectomized control (OVXC), ovariectomized with Labisia pumila var. alata (LP), and ovariectomized with ERT (Premarin) (ERT). The LPva and ERT were administered via oral gavage daily at doses of 17.5 mg/kg and 64.5 μg/kg, respectively. Following two months of treatment, the rats were euthanized, and their right femora were prepared for bone biomechanical testing. The results showed that ovariectomy compromised the femoral strength, while LPva supplementation to the ovariectomized rats improved the femoral strength. Therefore, LPva may be as effective as ERT in preventing fractures due to estrogen-deficient osteoporosis. PMID:22991574

  4. Secondary prevention of fractures and compliance to treatment in osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Trevisan, Carlo

    2011-04-01

    Osteoporosis is a mechanical incompetence of bone which finally leads to fracture. The occurrence of a fracture for a minor trauma is the definitive evidence of bone fragility and an indication of an higher probability for other fractures. Fracture at any site is a strong risk factor for a subsequent fracture, therefore any patient with a prevalent fracture is an ideal candidate for treatment due to the high risk for recurrence and to a favourable cost-benefit ratio. Most of the available pharmacological agents approved for osteoporosis treatment are effective in reducing fracture risk in this class of patients. Unfortunately, poor compliance is very common in patients treated for osteoporosis and this leads to reduced benefits and ineffectual costs. Dose regimen simplification is neither the only nor the most important solution to improve compliance, and a multifaceted strategy targeting cognitive, behavioural and emotional factors should be employed. PMID:21970911

  5. [Osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Reza-Albarrán, Alfredo Adolfo

    2016-09-01

    Calcium intake has a role on the development of peak bone mass, and has a mild impact on the maintenance of bone mass during adulthood and the reduction of bone loss rate in postmenopausal women and the elderly in both genders. Calcium dietary intake should be privileged over supplementation. Dairy products are the main calcium dietary sources. Prospective studies have not clearly demonstrated an effect on the prevention of fractures, because of the practical difficulties of a long follow-up in order to get to solid conclusions; however the physiological rationale is that an adequate calcium intake and 25(OH) vitamin D levels exceeding 20 ng/ml is beneficial for bone health and may decrease to certain extent the risk of fractures. PMID:27603893

  6. Project Healthy Bones: An Osteoporosis Prevention Program for Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klotzbach-Shimomura, Kathleen

    2001-01-01

    Project Healthy Bones is a 24-week exercise and education program for older women and men at risk for or who have osteoporosis. The exercise component is designed to improve strength, balance, and flexibility. The education curriculum stresses the importance of exercise, nutrition, safety, drug therapy, and lifestyle factors. (SK)

  7. Nutritional education in the primary prevention of osteoporosis in perimenopausal and postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Woźniak-Holecka, Joanna; Sobczyk, Karolina

    2014-03-01

    Osteoporosis affects millions of people in the whole world and brings about far-reaching physical and psycho-social consequences for patients and financial ones for the health care system, and therefore it is classified as one of public health problems and treated as a social disease. Women belong to the increased osteoporosis illness risk group due to lower top bone mass reached earlier in life as compared to men and due to hormonal changes occurring in the menopausal period, which affect loss of the bone mineral density (BMD). Limitation of the osteoporosis-related financial and social costs increase requires efficient preventive actions on the level of early, primary, secondary or tertiary prevention. At all the four osteoporosis prevention phases, the crucial role is played by health education and nutrition education, the latter being the key element of the former one. The nutritional education purpose is to acquaint patients with nutrition recommendations that are the basic element of the osteoporosis prevention and to make them change their nutrition habits, which will improve their osseous metabolism. The education should be based on results of the latest scientific researches and focus on recommendations relating to proper supplementing of calcium and vitamin D, simultaneously including all the other nutrition components, necessary to decrease the osteoporosis risk. The primary prevention oriented to a specific group at risk for osteoporosis, including peri- or postmenopausal women, should be provided in cooperation with the different levels' medical professionals and it should focus on causing positive changes in patients both as regards nutrition habits and physical activities. PMID:26327830

  8. Nutritional education in the primary prevention of osteoporosis in perimenopausal and postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Sobczyk, Karolina

    2014-01-01

    Osteoporosis affects millions of people in the whole world and brings about far-reaching physical and psycho-social consequences for patients and financial ones for the health care system, and therefore it is classified as one of public health problems and treated as a social disease. Women belong to the increased osteoporosis illness risk group due to lower top bone mass reached earlier in life as compared to men and due to hormonal changes occurring in the menopausal period, which affect loss of the bone mineral density (BMD). Limitation of the osteoporosis-related financial and social costs increase requires efficient preventive actions on the level of early, primary, secondary or tertiary prevention. At all the four osteoporosis prevention phases, the crucial role is played by health education and nutrition education, the latter being the key element of the former one. The nutritional education purpose is to acquaint patients with nutrition recommendations that are the basic element of the osteoporosis prevention and to make them change their nutrition habits, which will improve their osseous metabolism. The education should be based on results of the latest scientific researches and focus on recommendations relating to proper supplementing of calcium and vitamin D, simultaneously including all the other nutrition components, necessary to decrease the osteoporosis risk. The primary prevention oriented to a specific group at risk for osteoporosis, including peri- or postmenopausal women, should be provided in cooperation with the different levels’ medical professionals and it should focus on causing positive changes in patients both as regards nutrition habits and physical activities. PMID:26327830

  9. Building healthy bones throughout life: an evidence-informed strategy to prevent osteoporosis in Australia.

    PubMed

    Ebeling, Peter R; Daly, Robin M; Kerr, Deborah A; Kimlin, Michael G

    2013-10-01

    Osteoporosis imposes a tremendous burden on Australia: 1.2 million Australians have osteoporosis and 6.3 million have osteopenia. In the 2007–08 financial year, 82 000 Australians suffered fragility fractures, of which > 17 000 were hip fractures. In the 2000–01 financial year, direct costs were estimated at $1.9 billion per year and an additional $5.6 billion on indirect costs. Osteoporosis was designated a National Health Priority Area in 2002; however, implementation of national plans has not yet matched the rhetoric in terms of urgency. Building healthy bones throughout life, the Osteoporosis Australia strategy to prevent osteoporosis throughout the life cycle, presents an evidence-informed set of recommendations for consumers, health care professionals and policymakers. The strategy was adopted by consensus at the Osteoporosis Australia Summit in Sydney, 20 October 2011. Primary objectives throughout the life cycle are: to maximise peak bone mass during childhood and adolescence to prevent premature bone loss and improve or maintain muscle mass, strength and functional capacity in healthy adults to prevent and treat osteoporosis in order to minimise the risk of suffering fragility fractures, and reduce falls risk, in older people. The recommendations focus on three affordable and important interventions — to ensure people have adequate calcium intake, vitamin D levels and appropriate physical activity throughout their lives. Recommendations relevant to all stages of life include: daily dietary calcium intakes should be consistent with Australian and New Zealand guidelines serum levels of vitamin D in the general population should be above 50nmol/L in winter or early spring for optimal bone health regular weight-bearing physical activity, muscle strengthening exercises and challenging balance/mobility activities should be conducted in a safe environment. PMID:25370432

  10. Prevention of space flight induced soft tissue calcification and disuse osteoporosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Victor S.; Leblanc, Adrian; Huntoon, Carolyn L.

    1990-01-01

    Medical complications such as renal stone formation, increased uric acid output, and disuse osteoporosis are discussed. A series of experiments was conducted in order to study and eventually reduce these flight hazards. Attempts to prevent the negative calcium balance and loss of calcaneal density during prolonged bed rest had only a limited success. Of the five biochemical regiments tested, only diphosphonate applied in a high dose had a positive effect in elliminating mineral losses. It is found that clodronate can prevent disuse osteoporosis and that fluoride can enhance bone formation. It is concluded that exercises, combined with pharmaceutical agents, are beneficial during long-duration space missions.

  11. Hibernating bears as a model for preventing disuse osteoporosis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donahue, S.W.; McGee, M.E.; Harvey, K.B.; Vaughan, M.R.; Robbins, C.T.

    2006-01-01

    The hibernating bear is an excellent model for disuse osteoporosis in humans because it is a naturally occurring large animal model. Furthermore, bears and humans have similar lower limb skeletal morphology, and bears walk plantigrade like humans. Black bears (Ursus americanus) may not develop disuse osteoporosis during long periods of disuse (i.e. hibernation) because they maintain osteoblastic bone formation during hibernation. As a consequence, bone volume, mineral content, porosity, and strength are not adversely affected by annual periods of disuse. In fact, cortical bone bending strength has been shown to increase with age in hibernating black bears without a significant change in porosity. Other animals require remobilization periods 2-3 times longer than the immobilization period to recover the bone lost during disuse. Our findings support the hypothesis that black bears, which hibernate for as long as 5-7 months annually, have evolved biological mechanisms to mitigate the adverse effects of disuse on bone porosity and strength. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The Development of an Osteoporosis Prevention Education Intervention: Its Effectiveness, Conclusions, and Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, Vu H.; Wang, Ze; Waigandt, Alexander C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Osteoporosis prevention education interventions have been found to be ineffective. Purpose: To determine the effectiveness of a developed intervention based on the health belief model, which emphasized its visible severity and proximal time of onset. Method: A sample of 109 college women were randomly assigned to either a treatment or…

  13. Relative Effectiveness of Osteoporosis Drugs for Preventing Nonvertebral Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Cadarette, Suzanne M.; Katz, Jeffrey N.; Brookhart, M. Alan; Stürmer, Til; Stedman, Margaret R.; Solomon, Daniel H.

    2012-01-01

    Background Little information is available on the comparative effectiveness of osteoporosis pharmacotherapies. Objective To compare the relative effectiveness of osteoporosis treatments to reduce nonvertebral fracture risk among older adults. Design Cohort study. Setting Enrollees in 2 statewide pharmaceutical benefit programs for persons age 65 years or older. Patients 43 135 new recipients of oral bisphosphonates, nasal calcitonin, and raloxifene who began treatment from 2000 to 2005. The mean age was 79 years (SD, 6.9), and 96% were women. Measurements The primary outcome was nonvertebral fracture (hip, humerus, or radius or ulna) within 12 months of treatment initiation. Cox proportional hazard models stratified by state and adjusted for risk factors for fracture were used to compare fracture rates. Alendronate was the reference category in all analyses. Results A total of 1051 nonvertebral fractures were observed within 12 months (2.62 fractures per 100 person-years). No large differences in fracture risk were found between risedronate (hazard ratio [HR], 1.01 [95% CI, 0.85 to 1.21]) or raloxifene (HR, 1.18 [CI, 0.96 to 1.46]) and alendronate. However, among those with a fracture history, raloxifene recipients experienced more nonvertebral fractures within 12 months (HR, 1.78 [CI, 1.20 to 2.63]) compared with alendronate recipients. Patients who received calcitonin experienced more nonvertebral fractures than those who received alendronate (HR, 1.40, [CI, 1.20 to 1.63]). Results were similar in sensitivity analyses that examined different lengths of follow-up (6 months and 24 months), were restricted to hip fracture as the outcome, and were completed in various subgroups. Limitation Confounder adjustment was limited to health care utilization data, and the confidence bounds of some comparisons were too wide to rule out potential clinically important differences between agents. Conclusion Differences in fracture risk between risedronate or raloxifene and

  14. The Development and Validation of the Osteoporosis Prevention and Awareness Tool (OPAAT) in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Kok Thong; Low, Bee Yean

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To develop and validate Osteoporosis Prevention and Awareness Tool (OPAAT) in Malaysia. Methods The OPAAT was modified from the Malaysian Osteoporosis Knowledge Tool and developed from an exploratory study on patients. Face and content validity was established by an expert panel. The OPAAT consists of 30 items, categorized into three domains. A higher score indicates higher knowledge level. English speaking non-osteoporotic postmenopausal women ≥50 years of age and pharmacists were included in the study. Results A total of 203 patients and 31 pharmacists were recruited. Factor analysis extracted three domains. Flesch reading ease was 59.2. The mean±SD accuracy rate was 0.60±0.22 (range: 0.26-0.94). The Cronbach’s α for each domain ranged from 0.286-0.748. All items were highly correlated (Spearman’s rho: 0.761-0.990, p<0.05), with no significant change in the overall test-retest scores, indicating that OPAAT has achieved stable reliability. Pharmacists had higher knowledge score than patients (80.9±8.7vs63.6±17.4, p<0.001), indicating that the OPAAT was able to discriminate between the knowledge levels of pharmacists and patients. Conclusion The OPAAT was found to be a valid and reliable instrument for assessing patient’s knowledge about osteoporosis and its prevention in Malaysia. The OPAAT can be used to identify individuals in need of osteoporosis educational intervention. PMID:25938494

  15. Inter-correlation of knowledge, attitude, and osteoporosis preventive behaviors in women around the age of peak bone mass

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background As silent and preventable in nature, postmenopausal osteoporosis awareness should be raised among young women prior to an irreversible period of declining bone mass. We therefore decided to assess the inter-correlation of knowledge, attitude and osteoporosis preventive behaviors in women around the age of peak bone mass. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in 430 women aged 20–35 years. The participants’ knowledge, attitude and behaviors concerning osteoporosis prevention were assessed along with demographic data using a four-part questionnaire. The items in this questionnaire were established by extensive literature review, including the Guideline for Management of Osteoporosis of the Thai Osteoporosis Foundation (TOPF) 2010. The content was validated by experts in osteoporosis and reliability was obtained with a Cronbach’s alpha score of 0.83. Results The mean age of women in this study was 29.4 ± 4.6 years. Half of the participants (49.5%) had heard about osteoporosis, mostly from television (95.3%, n = 203/213) and the internet (72.8%, n = 155/213). Most women had certain knowledge (85.2%) and positive attitude towards osteoporosis (53.3%). Nevertheless, 80% of the studied population did not have appropriate osteoporosis behaviors. We found significant correlation between the level of attitudes and osteoporosis behaviors (adjusted odd ratio = 3.3 with 95% confidence interval of 1.9-5.7); attitude and educational level (adjusted odd ratio = 2.2 with 95% confidence interval of 1.4-3.4); and attitude and knowledge (adjusted odd ratio = 3.5 with 95% confidence interval of 1.8-6.8). Conclusion Despite having certain knowledge about osteoporosis, the young women did not seem to have appropriate osteoporosis preventive behaviors. Developing a right attitude towards osteoporosis may be a key determinant to improving health practices in order to prevent osteoporosis. PMID:24588970

  16. Virgin Coconut Oil Supplementation Prevents Bone Loss in Osteoporosis Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Hayatullina, Zil; Muhammad, Norliza; Mohamed, Norazlina; Soelaiman, Ima-Nirwana

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress and free radicals have been implicated in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis. Therefore, antioxidant compounds have the potential to be used in the prevention and treatment of the disease. In this study, we investigated the effects of virgin coconut oil (VCO) on bone microarchitecture in a postmenopausal osteoporosis rat model. VCO is a different form of coconut oil as it is rich with antioxidants. Three-month-old female rats were randomly grouped into baseline, sham-operated, ovariectomized control (Ovx), and ovariectomized rats fed with 8% VCO in their diet for six weeks (Ovx+VCO). Bone histomorphometry of the right femora was carried out at the end of the study. Rats supplemented with VCO had a significantly greater bone volume and trabecular number while trabecular separation was lower than the Ovx group. In conclusion, VCO was effective in maintaining bone structure and preventing bone loss in estrogen-deficient rat model. PMID:23024690

  17. Prevention of Osteoporosis by Oral Administration of Phytate-Removed and Deamidated Soybean β-Conglycinin

    PubMed Central

    Akao, Makoto; Abe, Ryusuke; Sato, Noriko; Hasegawa-Tanigome, Atsuko; Kumagai, Hitoshi; Kumagai, Hitomi

    2015-01-01

    Phytate-removed and deamidated soybean β-conglycinin (PrDS) prepared by ion-exchange resins was supplemented to be 4% in the diet administered to ovariectomized rats to investigate its preventive effect on osteoporosis. The apparent calcium absorption rate decreased following ovariectomy and was not replenished by oral administration of phytate-removed soybean β-conglycinin (PrS) or casein. On the other hand, administration of PrDS restored the calcium absorption rate to the same level as the sham group. Markers of bone resorption, such as serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) and urinary deoxypyridinoline (DPD), increased, and the bone mineral density and breaking stress decreased following ovariectomy. However, PrDS supplementation suppressed the changes caused by the decrease in calcium absorption from the small intestine. Therefore, PrDS supplementation shows promise for the prevention of postmenopausal osteoporosis. PMID:25607735

  18. Self-reported osteoporosis prevention in inhaled corticosteroid users in community pharmacy setting

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Valerie; Cave, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The use of inhaled corticosteroids is the standard maintenance therapy in asthma therapy and as adjunct therapy in moderate to severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. A dose-related increase in fracture risk is associated with inhaled corticosteroid use; there is an inverse relationship between bone mineral density and duration and cumulative dose of inhaled corticosteroid. Adequate intake of calcium and vitamin D are cornerstones of osteoporosis prevention. The objectives are to assess whether the proportion of patients receiving inhaled corticosteroids are taking calcium and vitamin D; the association between long-term inhaled corticosteroid use and abnormal bone mineral density or fractures; and how many qualified patients received bone mineral density scans. Methods: Patients who filled a prescription for inhaled corticosteroids at selected community pharmacies across Alberta were recruited for a survey of their osteoporosis prevention activities. Results: A total of 256 patients from 12 community pharmacies were included. The average age was 60 ± 17.4 years with 65% female. There were 21%, 51%, and 28% of patients on high, medium, and low dose inhaled corticosteroids, respectively. Only 17% of patients >50 years old received recommended calcium and vitamin D supplementation and 87 (73%) of the qualified patients received bone mineral density scan. Conclusion: Osteoporosis prevention in inhaled corticosteroid users is currently poorly addressed. More promotion is needed to raise pharmacist awareness of the risks of inhaled corticosteroids. PMID:26770786

  19. Development of clinical practice guidelines for prevention and treatment of osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Johnston, C C

    1996-01-01

    Clinical practice guidelines should be written for the physician who sees patients who already have or are at high risk for osteoporosis. They should also guide the physician in distinguishing between those at high and low risk and provide general guidelines for prevention of osteoporosis for the low-risk patient. Patients at high risk may require intervention to prevent further bone loss. The guidelines should be based on the strongest evidence available and be easy to comprehend and apply. Methods to identify individuals at high risk for osteoporosis must be described. Effective interventions also should be described, as should their benefits and risks. Elderly individuals who have a poor diet and little sun exposure may be vitamin D deficient unless a supplement is given. Factors that may be deleterious to the skeleton should be avoided. Weight-bearing exercise is important throughout life. Assessment of fracture risk is important in choosing candidates for intervention, especially interventions aimed at preventing osteoporosis. Measuring bone mass at any skeletal site is the necessary initial step for most individuals; measurement at the hip may best assess the risk of hip fracture. Some risk factors independent of bone mass may also aid in patient selection. The WHO has defined osteoporosis as a bone mass at least 2.5 standard deviations (SDs) below the mean of young normal. Such individuals and those with bone mass from 1 to 2.5 SDs below the mean of young normal may also be considered for intervention. The decision will depend on assessments of the risks, the costs of treatment, the desire of the patient, and the presence of other independent risk factors. The patient with an acute fracture may require an orthopedic intervention and should receive adequate analgesia. Physical therapy is an important adjunct that aids recovery. A number of therapeutic interventions, including adequate calcium intake throughout life and an adequate vitamin D intake, are

  20. Evaluation of food products fortified with oyster shell for the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, S A; Gibriel, Abdullah A Y; Abdellatif, A K; Ebied, H M

    2015-10-01

    Production and evaluation of different diet formulas fortified with oyster shell for the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. Eighty-eight female albino rats were recruited and divided into 11 groups (8 rats each). Group 1 represented negative control while the remaining groups were ovariectomized. Group 2 acted as positive control. Groups 3-5 were fed on basal diet. Groups 6-8 were fed on lentil soup while groups 9-11 were fed on vegetable soup. Group 4, 7, 10 were fed on diets fortified with oyster shell. Groups 5, 8 and 11 were fed on diet formulas fortified with calcium citrate. All calcium fortified diet formulas, especially lentil soup, have minimized risk factors associated with osteoporosis as indicated from the significant increase in tibial weight, total protein, total calcium and phosphorus with noticeable reduction in ALP activity compared to positive group. Maximum recovery was observed for diet fortified with oyster shell. These data suggest that food products fortified with oyster shell as natural and inexpensive source could be beneficial for the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. PMID:26396435

  1. Preventive Effect of Crocin on Osteoporosis in an Ovariectomized Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Peng-Chong; Xiao, Wen-Xing; Yan, Ya-Bo; Zhao, Xiong; Liu, Shuai; Feng, Jing; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Jun; Feng, Ya-Fei; Lei, Wei

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the therapeutic effects of crocin on ovariectomy-induced osteoporosis in rats. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to a sham-operated group (sham) and five ovariectomy (OVX) subgroups, that is, OVX with vehicle (OVX), OVX with 17β-estradiol (E2, 25 μg/kg/day), and OVX with graded crocin doses (5, 10, or 20 mg/kg/day). Daily oral administration of E2 or crocin started 4 weeks after OVX and lasted for 16 weeks. Our results showed that crocin dose-dependently inhibited the BMD reduction of L4 vertebrae and femurs caused by OVX and prevented the deterioration of trabecular microarchitecture, which were accompanied by a significant decrease in skeletal remodeling as evidenced by the lower levels of bone turnover markers. Furthermore, crocin reversed the oxidative stress status in both serum and bone tissue. The present study indicates that the administration of crocin at higher doses over a 16-week period can prevent OVX-induced osteoporosis in rats without hyperplastic effects on the uterus, which may, at least partially, be attributed to crocin's antioxidative property. In brief, crocin is a natural alternative for postmenopausal osteoporosis treatment in elderly women. PMID:25202337

  2. The epigenetically active small chemical N-methyl pyrrolidone (NMP) prevents estrogen depletion induced osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Gjoksi, Bebeka; Ghayor, Chafik; Siegenthaler, Barbara; Ruangsawasdi, Nisarat; Zenobi-Wong, Marcy; Weber, Franz E

    2015-09-01

    Currently, there are several treatments for osteoporosis however; they all display some sort of limitation and/or side effects making the need for new treatments imperative. We have previously demonstrated that NMP is a bioactive drug which enhances bone regeneration in vivo and acts as an enhancer of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) in vitro. NMP also inhibits osteoclast differentiation and attenuates bone resorption. In the present study, we tested NMP as a bromodomain inhibitor and for osteoporosis prevention on ovariectomized (OVX) induced rats while treated systemically with NMP. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were ovariectomized and weekly NMP treatment was administrated 1 week after surgery for 15 weeks. Bone parameters and related serum biomarkers were analyzed. 15 weeks of NMP treatment decreased ovariectomy-induced gained weight in average by 43% and improved bone mineral density (BMD) and bone volume over total volume (BV/TV) in rat femur on average by 25% and 41% respectively. Moreover, mineral apposition rate and bone biomarkers of bone turnover in the treatment group were at similar levels with those of the Sham group. Due to the function of NMP as a low affinity bromodomain inhibitor and its mechanism of action involving osteoblasts/osteoclasts balance and inhibitory effect on inflammatory cytokines, NMP is a promising therapeutic compound for the prevention of osteoporosis. PMID:25959414

  3. Prevention of disuse osteoporosis: Effect of sodium fluoride during five weeks of bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Victor S.

    1987-01-01

    An attempt was made to modify factors which promote disuse osteoporosis and thereby prevent it from occurring. Since fluoride is currently used to enhance bone formation in the treatment of low turnover osteoporosis, it was hypothesized that if the fluoride ion was available over a long period of time that it would slow the demonstrated loss of calcium by inhibiting bone resorption and enhancing bone formation. This study was used to determine whether oral medication with sodium F will modify or prevent 5 weeks of bed rest induced disuse osteoporosis, to determine the longitudinal effects of 5 weeks of bed rest on PTH, CT and calcitriol, to measure muscle volume changes and metabolic activity by magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy during prolonged bed rest, to measure changes in peak muscle strength and fatigability, and to measure bone turnover in bone biopsies. Subjects were studied during 1 week of equilibration, 4 weeks of control ambulation, 5 weeks of bed rest, and 1 week of reambulation.

  4. [Secondary prevention of osteoporosis and identification of high risk patients].

    PubMed

    Lehmann, R; Pfeifer, M; Minne, H; Allolio, B

    2000-08-01

    Low bone mass is a major determinant of bone fragility. With respect to hip fracture risk however, there is limited contribution of BMD to the exponential age-related increase in hip fracture incidence. Large prospective studies have identified a number of additional risk factors for hip fractures independent of bone density. These can be classified as skeletal factors and fall-related factors. Body height and hip axis length are positively correlated with fracture risk. Neuromuscular impairment with low gait speed, difficulty in doing a tandem walk, lower limb dysfunction, body sway or inability to rise from a chair without using one's arms predict future fracture risk. According to the concept of evidence-based medicine (EBM) preventive strategies are now available. Supplementation with calcium and vitamin D restores bone quality through suppression of secondary hyperparathyroidism and decreases the risk of falling through improvement of neuromuscular co-ordination and body sway. Treatment with the bisphosphonates alendronate and risedronate increase bone strength and result in a significant reduction of vertebral as well as non-vertebral fractures. Hip protectors absorb energy during a fall and reduce hip fracture risk by 56%. Risk factor based patient selection may improve the cost-effectiveness of therapy. PMID:10996933

  5. The Effect of an Educational Program Based on Health Belief Model on Preventing Osteoporosis in Women

    PubMed Central

    Jeihooni, Ali Khani; Hidarnia, Alireza; Kaveh, Mohammad Hossein; Hajizadeh, Ebrahim; Askari, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Osteoporosis is the most common metabolic bone disease. The study's objective is to investigate the effect of an educational program based on Health Belief Model (HBM) on preventing osteoporosis in women. Methods: In this quasi-experimental study, 120 patients (60 experimental and 60 control) who were registered under the health centers in Fasa City, Fars Province, Iran, were selected in 2014. A questionnaire consisting of demographic information, HBM constructs was used to measure nutrition and walking performance for the prevention of osteoporosis before, immediately after intervention, and 6 months later. Bone mineral density (BMD) was recorded at the lumbar spine and femur before and 6 months after intervention. Results: The mean age of women participated in the study was 41.75 ± 5.4 years for the experimental group, and 41.77 ± 5.43 years for the control group. The mean body mass index was 22.44 ± 3.30 for the experimental group and 22.27 ± 3.05 for the control group. The average number of women deliveries for the experimental group was 2.57 ± 1.47 and 2.50 ± 1.19 for the control group. There is no significant difference between the two groups in education level (P = 0.771), marital status (P = 0.880), occupation (P = 0.673), breastfeeding (P = 0.769), smoking (P = 0.315), history of osteoporosis in the family (P = 0.378), history of special diseases (P = 0.769), and records of bone densitometry (P = 0.543). Immediately and 6 months after intervention, the experimental group showed a significant increase in the knowledge, perceived susceptibility, perceived severity, perceived benefits, perceived barriers, self-efficacy, internal cues to action, nutrition, and walking performance compared to the control group. Six months after intervention, the value of lumbar spine BMD T-score in the experimental group increased to 0.127, while in the control group it reduced to −0.043. The value of the hip BMD T-score in the intervention group increased

  6. [Prevention and therapeutic effects of sika deer velvet collagen hydrolysate on osteoporosis in rats by retinoic acid].

    PubMed

    Li, Yinqing; Zhao, Yu; Sun, Xiaodi; Qu, Xiaobo

    2010-03-01

    The objective was to evaluate the preventive and therapeutic effects of the collagen hydrolysate extracted from Sika deer velvet (CSDV) on osteoporosis rats induced by retinoicacid. Histomorphometric indices and serum biochemical parameters were measured in osteoporosis rats treated with/without antler collagen and in sham-operated rats. Our results were as follows: compared with the osteoporosis group, significant elevation in the levels of bone mineral density (BMD), Ca, P and static histomorphometric indexes and biomechanical properties, but reduction in the level of serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) were observed in antler collagen-treated groups. However, the above function with the collagenase solution velvet material varied with the different doses. In conclusion, the extracted collagen is found to play a role in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis rats by retinoic acid. PMID:20545204

  7. Treating osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Akhil; March, Lyn

    2016-01-01

    summary Osteoporotic fractures are common resulting in increased morbidity and mortality. Exercise can help prevent osteoporosis. It can also benefit patients with osteoporosis, but the exercises must be tailored to the patient. Most Australians should be able to obtain adequate calcium in their diet and vitamin D from the sun. Supplements may be needed in some patients and they are recommended for use with other drugs for osteoporosis. Bisphosphonates, and in some patients denosumab, are first-line drugs for osteoporosis. Raloxifene and strontium ranelate can be considered in patients who cannot take bisphosphonates or denosumab. Teriparatide is reserved for patients with severe osteoporosis and the use of strontium ranelate is declining because of cardiovascular safety concerns. PMID:27340321

  8. Exercise, Eating, Estrogen, and Osteoporosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Jim

    1986-01-01

    Osteoporosis affects millions of people, especially women. Three methods for preventing or managing osteoporosis are recommended: (1) exercise; (2) increased calcium intake; and (3) estrogen replacement therapy. (CB)

  9. Bu-Shen-Ning-Xin decoction suppresses osteoclastogenesis via increasing dehydroepiandrosterone to prevent postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Gui, Yuyan; Qiu, Xuemin; Xu, Yingping; Li, Dajin; Wang, Ling

    2015-06-01

    Bu-Shen-Ning-Xin decoction (BSNXD), a traditional Chinese medicine, has been used to prevent and treat age-related diseases such as postmenopausal osteoporosis (PMO) for decades. This study sought to investigate the underlying mechanisms of BSNXD in terms of receptor activation of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclastogenesis in vitro because of the critical roles of bone resorption in the development and progression of osteoporosis. In mice, serum levels of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), and 17-β-estradiol (E2) were evaluated with an enzyme immunoassay kit after ovariectomy. Levels of DHEA and DHEAS increased significantly following administration of BSNXD while the level of E2 did not. In addition, tartrate-resistance acid phosphatase staining showed that DHEA profoundly inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in vitro in a dose-dependent manner via estrogen receptor α (ERα) but not via estrogen receptor β or androgen receptors. Cytotoxicity was not detected in the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. These data suggest that BSNXD prevents PMO by increasing DHEA via the ERαpathway to suppress osteoclastogenesis. PMID:26166370

  10. COMMENTARY: A revised Clinician’s Guide to the Prevention and Treatment of Osteoporosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Osteoporosis is an important health problem now, and the incidence of fractures and their associated costs are rising rapidly as our population age. The National Osteoporosis Foundation (NOF) has estimated that by 2010, 12 million men and women in the U. S. will have osteoporosis and over 40 million...

  11. 1994 C. H. McCloy Research Lecture: Does Physical Activity Play a Role in Preventing Osteoporosis?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drinkwater, Barbara L.

    1994-01-01

    Review considers problems encountered in relating women's physical activity to increases in bone mass, noting the implications of recommending exercise to help prevent osteoporosis based on that information. Research indicates that for the full benefit of exercise on skeletal health, there must be adequate gonadal hormone levels. (SM)

  12. Middle School-Aged Child Enjoyment of Food Tastings Predicted Interest in Nutrition Education on Osteoporosis Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Feon W.; Monnat, Shannon M.; Lohse, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Background: "NEEDs for Bones" (NFB), based on the Health Belief Model, is a 4-lesson osteoporosis-prevention curriculum for 11- to 14-year-olds. This study examined the relationship between enjoyment of food tastings and interest in NFB. Methods:NFB was administered by teachers as part of standard practice and evaluated after the fourth…

  13. Quercetin prevents experimental glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis: a comparative study with alendronate.

    PubMed

    Derakhshanian, Hoda; Djalali, Mahmoud; Djazayery, Abolghassem; Nourijelyani, Keramat; Ghadbeigi, Sajad; Pishva, Hamideh; Saedisomeolia, Ahmad; Bahremand, Arash; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2013-05-01

    Glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis (GIO) is the most common type of secondary osteoporosis. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of quercetin, a plant-derived flavonoid, with alendronate in the prevention of GIO. Fifty-six Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly distributed among 7 groups (8 rats per group) and treated for 6 weeks with one of the following: (i) normal saline; (ii) 40 mg methylprednisolone sodium succinate (MP)/kg body mass; (iii) MP + 40 μg alendronate/kg; (iv) MP + 50 mg quercetin/kg; (v) MP + 40 μg alendronate/kg + 50 mg quercetin/kg; (vi) MP + 150 mg quercetin/kg; and (vii) MP + 40 μg alendronate/kg + 150 mg quercetin/kg. MP and alendronate were injected subcutaneously and quercetin was administered by oral gavage 3 days a week. At the end of the study, femur breaking strength was significantly decreased as a consequence of MP injection. This decrease was completely compensated for in groups receiving 50 mg quercetin/kg plus alendronate, and 150 mg quercetin/kg with or without alendronate. Quercetin noticeably elevated osteocalcin as a bone formation marker, while alendronate did not show such an effect. In addition, administration of 150 mg quercetin/kg increased femoral trabecular and cortical thickness by 36% and 22%, respectively, compared with the MP-treated group. These data suggest that 150 mg quercetin/kg, alone or in combination with alendronate, can completely prevent GIO through its bone formation stimulatory effect. PMID:23656499

  14. The role of healthy diet in the prevention of osteoporosis in perimenopausal period

    PubMed Central

    Kostecka, Małgorzata

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study was to assess the diet for its effect on normal bone mineralization and qualitative analysis of dietary supplements used in the prevention of osteoporosis. Methods: Research data were acquired based on a questionnaire developed by the author. A 24-hour diet recall method was used with the involvement of Dieta 5.0 software developed by the National Food and Nutrition Institute in Warsaw in Poland. The second part of the study involved an analysis of the most popular dietary supplements available over the counter. Complexometric titration was used to separate and identify calcium. Results: The results of a 24-hour diet recall indicate that 47% of the respondents consumed 550-750 mg of calcium daily, and only 21% of the subjects consumed more than 1200 mg of calcium every day. The results give cause for concern: none of the analyzed diets supplied the recommended daily amounts of vitamin D, and only 29% of the respondents admitted taking vitamin D supplements. The results of the survey indicate that consumers have insufficient knowledge about lifestyle diseases, including osteoporosis. Conclusion: Diet of large part of society is not properly balanced which can cause abnormalities in achieving proper bone mineralization. Long-term deficiencies in calcium and vitamin D in daily diet are the cause for taking dietary supplements. Unfortunately, some preparations on the market do not have adequate storage. It happens that these preparations are poorly absorbed and the amount of active compound is too low. Changes in the nutritional regimen are required already during childhood because nutritional mistakes are the main cause of diet-related diseases in adulthood. PMID:25097513

  15. [Osteoporosis in rheumatoid arthritis--significance of alfacalcidol in prevention and therapy].

    PubMed

    Schacht, E

    2000-01-01

    production of Th2 helper cells which produce bone protective cytokines like IL-4 and IL-10. It is important to know that D-hormone protects osteoblasts against TNF-alpha-induced cell death. After conversion to D-hormone in the liver and bone, alfacalcidol antagonises the above described pathogenetic factors of the corticosteroids. D-hormone is one of the body's own immunoregulators, which is produced in macrophages in cases of need to reduce immunological overreactions in a feed-back loop. Improved understanding of the pathogenesis of corticosteroid-induced osteoporosis and of the pharmacological effects of alfacalcidol in this type of iatrogenic bone loss as well as the results of specific animal models simulating bone loss in inflammatory diseases explain the favourable effects of alfacalcidol in this indication. Various clinical studies have demonstrated clearly that alfacalcidol retards corticosteroid-induced bone loss in contrast to plain vitamin D. Due to its immunomodulating properties, alfacalcidol is particularly suitable for RA-induced bone loss and for the prevention of transplantation osteoporosis, and an adjuvant contribution to the disease-modifying therapy of RA and to the immunosuppressive therapy after transplantation can not be excluded. PMID:10769429

  16. Osteoporosis Prevention in College Women: Application of the Expanded Health Belief Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Lorraine Silver

    2002-01-01

    Examined personal characteristics and expanded health belief model (EHBM) constructs associated with osteoporosis- protective behaviors among college women. Survey results indicated that the EHBM was useful in evaluating osteoporosis- protective behavior. High numbers of women did not meet current exercise and calcium guidelines. Exercise…

  17. Immunization with FSHβ fusion protein antigen prevents bone loss in a rat ovariectomy-induced osteoporosis model

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, Wenxin; Yan, Xingrong; Du, Huicong; Cui, Jihong; Li, Liwen Chen, Fulin

    2013-05-03

    Highlights: •A GST-FSH fusion protein was successfully expressed in E. coli. •Immunization with GST-FSH antigen can raise high-titer anti-FSH polyclonal sera. •Anti-FSH polyclonal sera can neutralize osteoclastogenic effect of FSH in vitro. •FSH immunization can prevent bone loss in a rat osteoporosis model. -- Abstract: Osteoporosis, a metabolic bone disease, threatens postmenopausal women globally. Hormone replacement therapy (HTR), especially estrogen replacement therapy (ERT), is used widely in the clinic because it has been generally accepted that postmenopausal osteoporosis is caused by estrogen deficiency. However, hypogonadal α and β estrogen receptor null mice were only mildly osteopenic, and mice with either receptor deleted had normal bone mass, indicating that estrogen may not be the only mediator that induces osteoporosis. Recently, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), the serum concentration of which increases from the very beginning of menopause, has been found to play a key role in postmenopausal osteoporosis by promoting osteoclastogenesis. In this article, we confirmed that exogenous FSH can enhance osteoclast differentiation in vitro and that this effect can be neutralized by either an anti-FSH monoclonal antibody or anti-FSH polyclonal sera raised by immunizing animals with a recombinant GST-FSHβ fusion protein antigen. Moreover, immunizing ovariectomized rats with the GST-FSHβ antigen does significantly prevent trabecular bone loss and thereby enhance the bone strength, indicating that a FSH-based vaccine may be a promising therapeutic strategy to slow down bone loss in postmenopausal women.

  18. Gaining perspective: the effects of message frame on viewer attention to and recall of osteoporosis prevention print advertisements.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, Deborah A; Latimer-Cheung, Amy E

    2013-11-01

    This study examined how framed messages affect viewer attention to and cognitive processing of osteoporosis prevention print ads. Attention was measured with eye tracking technology. Cognitive processing was assessed through masked recall. A total of 60 college-aged women viewed 12 gain-framed, 12 loss-framed, and 12 neutral-framed ads. Number of fixations, dwell time, and recall of gain-framed osteoporosis prevention ads were higher than loss-framed or neutral-framed ads, p < .01. Message recall was positively correlated with the number of fixations and dwell time for the gain-framed and neutral-framed messages, p < .01. These findings provide preliminary insight into potential mechanisms underlying message framing effects. PMID:23188916

  19. The Determination of Predictive Construct of Physical Behavior Change on Osteoporosis Prevention Women Aged 30-50: A Trans-Theoretical Method Study.

    PubMed

    Malekshahi, Farideh; Hidarnia, Alirezad; Niknami, Shamseddin; Aminshokravi, Frakhondeh

    2016-03-01

    Osteoporosis is a major public health priority in Iran and throughout the world. The prevention of osteoporosis has recently become the ultimate goal of many health professionals. Behavior change is one of the most powerful strategies to prevent osteoporosis. This study aimed to determine the predictive construct of physical preventive behavior of osteoporosis in women aged 30-50 in Khorramabad, west of Iran. This study included 269 women selected from all the health centers of Khorramabad city according to the inclusion criteria of the study and through random cluster and systematic sampling. The data gathering tools were valid and reliable questionnaires of demographic information, stages of change, decisional balance, self-efficacy, and physical activity. Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. The mean of the subjects' age was 38.72±7.003, and the mean of light weekly physical activity was 38.83±56.400. The results showed that the construct of self-efficacy had the highest predictive power of the preventive behavior. The results also showed that self-efficacy among the constructs of the Trans-theoretical Model was the only predictive construct for osteoporosis prevention behavior. Therefore, the findings of this study can serve as a base for educational interventions in behavioral changes to prevent of osteoporosis by health authorities. PMID:26493413

  20. The Determination of Predictive Construct of Physical Behavior Change on Osteoporosis Prevention Women Aged 30-50: A Trans-theoretical Method Study

    PubMed Central

    Malekshahi, Farideh; Hidarnia, Alireza; Niknami, Shamseddin; Aminshokravi, Frakhondeh

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a major public health priority in Iran and throughout the world. The prevention of osteoporosis has recently become the ultimate goal of many health professionals. Behavior change is one of the most powerful strategies to prevent osteoporosis. This study aimed to determine the predictive construct of physical preventive behavior of osteoporosis in women aged 30-50 in Khorramabad, west of Iran. This study included 269 women selected from all the health centers of Khorramabad city according to the inclusion criteria of the study and through random cluster and systematic sampling. The data gathering tools were valid and reliable questionnaires of demographic information, stages of change, decisional balance, self-efficacy, and physical activity. Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. The mean of the subjects’ age was 38.72±7.003, and the mean of light weekly physical activity was 38.83±56.400. The results showed that the construct of self-efficacy had the highest predictive power of the preventive behavior. The results also showed that self-efficacy among the constructs of the Trans-theoretical Model was the only predictive construct for osteoporosis prevention behavior. Therefore, the findings of this study can serve as a base for educational interventions in behavioral changes to prevent of osteoporosis by health authorities. PMID:26493413

  1. Alpha-1 antitrypsin gene therapy prevented bone loss in ovariectomy induced osteoporosis mouse model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Osteoporosis is a major healthcare burden affecting mostly postmenopausal women characterized by compromised bone strength and increased risk of fragility fracture. Although pathogenesis of this disease is complex, elevated proinflammatory cytokine production is clearly involved in bone loss at meno...

  2. Alendronate prevents glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis in patients with rheumatic diseases: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Kan, Shun-Li; Yuan, Zhi-Fang; Li, Yan; Ai, Jie; Xu, Hong; Sun, Jing-Cheng; Feng, Shi-Qing

    2016-06-01

    Glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis (GIOP) is a serious problem for patients with rheumatic diseases requiring long-term glucocorticoid treatment. Alendronate, a bisphosphonate, has been recommended in the prevention of GIOP. However, the efficacy and safety of alendronate in preventing GIOP remains controversial. We performed a meta-analysis to investigate the efficacy and safety of alendronate in preventing GIOP in patients with rheumatic diseases.We retrieved randomized controlled trials from PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library. Two reviewers extracted the data and evaluated the risk of bias and quality of the evidence. We calculated the risk ratio (RR) with a 95% confidence interval (CI) for dichotomous outcomes, and the mean difference (MD) with a 95% CI for continuous outcomes using Review Manager, version 5.3.A total of 339 studies were found, and 9 studies (1134 patients) were included. Alendronate was not able to reduce the incidence of vertebral fractures (RR = 0.63, 95% CI: 0.10-4.04, P = 0.62) and nonvertebral fractures (RR = 0.40, 95% CI: 0.15-1.12, P = 0.08). Alendronate significantly increased the percent change in bone mineral density (BMD) at the lumbar spine (MD = 3.66, 95% CI: 2.58-4.74, P < 0.05), total hip (MD = 2.08, 95% CI: 0.41-3.74, P < 0.05), and trochanter (MD = 1.68, 95% CI: 0.75-2.61, P < 0.05). Significant differences were not observed in the percent change in BMD at the femoral neck (MD = -0.33, 95% CI: -2.79 to 2.13, P = 0.79) and total body (MD = 0.64, 95% CI: -0.06 to 1.34, P = 0.07). No significant differences in the adverse events were observed in patients treated with alendronate versus the controls (RR = 1.00, 95% CI: 0.94-1.07, P = 0.89). The odds of gastrointestinal adverse events were significantly reduced (RR = 0.77, 95% CI: 0.62-0.97, P < 0.05).Our analysis suggests that alendronate can increase the percent change in BMD at the lumbar spine, total hip, and

  3. Osteoporosis: Therapeutic Options.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Stefka; Vasileva, Liliya; Ivanova, Stanislava; Peikova, Lily; Obreshkova, Danka

    2016-01-01

    The definition of osteoporosis was originally formulated at a conference of the World Health Organization (WHO) in 1993 as 'a systemic skeletal disease characterized by decreased bone mass and altered micro-architecture of bone tissue, leading to enhanced bone fragility and risk of fractures'. Osteoporosis is characterized by low bone mineral density (BMD) and loss of the structural and bio-mechanical properties that are required to maintain bone homeostasis. This review aims to address the currently available options in prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. Management of osteoporosis includes non-pharmacological treatment - diet rich of calcium and vitamin D, healthy lifestyle, proper exercise plan, and pharmacological therapy. Combination of non-pharmacological and pharmacological treatment options have to be considered for prevention of osteoporosis and minimization of the risk of fractures. Given the heterogeneity of osteoporosis syndrome and lack of significant number of comparative studies, the choice of a pharmacological agents should be individualized. PMID:27180344

  4. Naringin prevents ovariectomy-induced osteoporosis and promotes osteoclasts apoptosis through the mitochondria-mediated apoptosis pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Fengbo; Sun, Xiaolei; Ma, Jianxiong; Ma, Xinlong; Zhao, Bin; Zhang, Yang; Tian, Peng; Li, Yanjun; Han, Zhe

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • Naringin possesses many pharmacological activities, promotes the proliferation of osteoblast. • Undecalcified histological obtain dynamic parameters of callus formation and remodeling. • Naringin regulate osteoclast apoptosis by mitochondrial pathway. - Abstract: Naringin, the primary active compound of the traditional Chinese medicine Rhizoma drynariae, possesses many pharmacological activities. The present study is an effort to explore the anti-osteoporosis potential of naringin in vivo and in vitro. In vivo, we used ovariectomized rats to clarify the mechanisms by which naringin anti-osteoporosis. In vitro, we used osteoclasts to investigate naringin promotes osteoclasts apoptosis. Naringin was effective at enhancing BMD, trabecular thickness, bone mineralization, and mechanical strength in a dose-dependent manner. The result of RT-PCR analysis revealed that naringin down-regulated the mRNA expression levels of BCL-2 and up-regulated BAX, caspase-3 and cytochrome C. In addition, naringin significantly reduced the bone resorption area in vitro. These findings suggest that naringin promotes the apoptosis of osteoclasts by regulating the activity of the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway and prevents OVX-induced osteoporosis in rats.

  5. Comparison of the phytohormones genistein, resveratrol and 8-prenylnaringenin as agents for preventing osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Sehmisch, Stephan; Hammer, Frauke; Christoffel, Julie; Seidlova-Wuttke, Dana; Tezval, Mohammad; Wuttke, Wolfgang; Stuermer, Klaus Michael; Stuermer, Ewa Klara

    2008-06-01

    As the average age of society increases, identifying and preventing osteoporosis becomes more important. According to the results of the Women's Health Initiative study, substitution of estradiol is not recommended in hormone replacement therapy (HRT), although phytoestrogens might be a safe alternative. In this study, the osteoprotective effects of genistein (Gen), resveratrol (Res) and 8-prenylnaringenin (8PN) were evaluated by analysing bone biomechanical strength and bone mineral density. After ovariectomy, 88 female rats received soy-free food (C), and according to their grouping, were fed estradiol (E), GEN, RES or 8PN for 12 weeks. The phytohormones were given in two dosages. To analyse the osteoprotective effects of the tested substances, bone biomechanical properties and bone mineral density (BMD) were evaluated on the upper tibial metaphysis. Bone biomechanical properties were significantly improved after treatment with E (F (max): 90.6 N) and 8PN (85.0 N) compared to GEN (76.0 N), RES (72.6 N) and C (76.6 N). Bone biomechanical properties with 8PN (yL: 55.7 N) supplementation reached a level similar to that seen after E (49.3 N) supplementation. Treatment with GEN (38.5 N) was not as effective as E and 8PN, but demonstrated improved biomechanical properties compared to C (40.1 N) and RES (36.3 N). E (Cn.Dn. 217 mg/cm (3)) and 8PN (165 mg/cm3) showed superior results in the analysis of bone mineral density compared to C (112 mg/cm (3)). GEN (164 mg/cm (3)) also demonstrated superior results, though not as good as E and 8PN. RES (124 mg/cm (3)) revealed no effect on bone density. Treatment with 8PN resulted in very good biomechanical properties and showed an increased BMD. GEN had a smaller effect on bone biomechanical strength, while RES did not have an effect on bone biomechanical strength or BMD. Therefore, 8PN might be a safe alternative for HRT, but further studies are needed. PMID:18537073

  6. Osteoporosis in women.

    PubMed

    Bowman, M A; Spangler, J G

    1997-03-01

    Many preventive and treatment strategies are now available for osteoporosis, offering many women the opportunity to forego its many complications. Exercise with calcium and vitamin D supplements is recommended for most patients. Estrogens are a preferred treatment but not acceptable to many women. Alendronate, a bisphosphonate, recently became available to treat osteoporosis. Calcitonin, subcutaneous or intranasal, also can be useful. PMID:9016728

  7. Delphinidin, One of the Major Anthocyanidins, Prevents Bone Loss through the Inhibition of Excessive Osteoclastogenesis in Osteoporosis Model Mice

    PubMed Central

    Muramatsu, Masashi; Nomura, Atsushi; Inoue, Fumihide; Into, Takeshi; Yoshiko, Yuji; Niida, Shumpei

    2014-01-01

    Anthocyanins, one of the flavonoid subtypes, are a large family of water-soluble phytopigments and have a wide range of health-promoting benefits. Recently, an anthocyanin-rich compound from blueberries was reported to possess protective property against bone loss in ovariectomized (OVX) animal models. However, the active ingredients in the anthocyanin compound have not been identified. Here we show that delphinidin, one of the major anthocyanidins in berries, is a potent active ingredient in anti-osteoporotic bone resorption through the suppression of osteoclast formation. In vitro examinations revealed that delphinidin treatment markedly inhibited the differentiation of RAW264.7 cells into osteoclasts compared with other anthocyanidins, cyanidin and peonidin. Oral administration of delphinidin significantly prevented bone loss in both RANKL-induced osteoporosis model mice and OVX model mice. We further provide evidence that delphinidin suppressed the activity of NF-κB, c-fos, and Nfatc1, master transcriptional factors for osteoclastogenesis. These results strongly suggest that delphinidin is the most potent inhibitor of osteoclast differentiation and will be an effective agent for preventing bone loss in postmenopausal osteoporosis. PMID:24824988

  8. Middle school-aged child enjoyment of food tastings predicts interest in nutrition education on osteoporosis prevention

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Feon W.; Monnat, Shannon M.; Lohse, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND NEEDs for Bones (NFB), based on the Health Belief Model, is a 4-lesson osteoporosis-prevention curriculum for 11-14 year-olds. This study examined the relationship between enjoyment of food tastings and interest in NFB. METHODS NFB was administered by teachers as part of standard practice and evaluated after the 4th lesson using a 21-item survey. Significant clustering of students within classrooms required use of random-intercept multilevel ordinal regression models in SAS proc GLIMMIX, with students nested within classrooms. Analyses considered tasting experience, eating attitudes, sex, grade, and cohort. RESULTS Students (N = 1619; 50% girls) participated from 85 4th-8th grade classrooms (47% 6th grade; 31% 7th grade) in 16 Pennsylvania SNAP-Ed eligible schools over 2 academic years. For all foods tasted, students who did not enjoy the food tasting were less interested in the lesson than students who did enjoy the food tasting (all p < .001); refried beans (OR 0.30), soy milk (OR = 0.55), cranapple juice (OR = 0.51), sunflower kernels (OR = 0.48), and Swiss cheese (OR = 0.49). CONCLUSIONS Enjoyment of food tasting activities can predict interest in nutrition education on osteoporosis prevention, supporting resource allocation and inclusion of food tasting activities in school-age nutrition education. PMID:26032277

  9. Maxcal-C (a polyherbal formulation) prevents ovariectomy-induced osteoporosis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Maheshwari, Rajesh A.; Dhakwala, Falak; Balaraman, R.; Seth, Avinash K.; Soni, Hardik; Patel, Ghanshyam

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the present study was to investigate the anti-osteoporotic activity of Maxcal-C in ovariectomy (OVX)-induced osteoporosis in rats. Materials and Methods: Sham-operated control rats were designated as Group I; Group II animals served as OVX control; Group III OVX control rats treated with Calcium Sandoz (50 mg/kg, p.o.); Group IV and V OVX control rats treated with Maxcal-C (250 and 500 mg/kg, p.o.), respectively. All the aforementioned treatments were given for four weeks after the development of osteoporosis. At the end of the treatment, serum biochemical parameters such as serum calcium and alkaline phosphate were measured. After sacrificing the animals, femoral bone parameters with histology, body weight, and bone breaking strength of 5th lumbar vertebra were measured. Results: The treatment with Maxcal-C showed a significant improvement in serum biochemical, femoral bone parameters, and bone breaking strength of 5th lumbar vertebra with histopathological changes. Conclusion: The finding of the present study indicates that Maxcal-C showed a potential anti-osteoporotic activity. These results support the traditional use of Maxcal-C in the treatment of osteoporosis. PMID:26600648

  10. The Anti-Inflammatory, Phytoestrogenic, and Antioxidative Role of Labisia pumila in Prevention of Postmenopausal Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Nadia, M. E.; Nazrun, A. S.; Norazlina, M.; Isa, N. M.; Norliza, M.; Ima Nirwana, S.

    2012-01-01

    Osteoporosis is characterized by skeletal degeneration with low bone mass and destruction of microarchitecture of bone tissue which is attributed to various factors including inflammation. Women are more likely to develop osteoporosis than men due to reduction in estrogen during menopause which leads to decline in bone-formation and increase in bone-resorption activity. Estrogen is able to suppress production of proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-1, IL-6, IL-7, and TNF-α. This is why these cytokines are elevated in postmenopausal women. Studies have shown that estrogen reduction is able to stimulate focal inflammation in bone. Labisia pumila (LP) which is known to exert phytoestrogenic effect can be used as an alternative to ERT which can produce positive effects on bone without causing side effects. LP contains antioxidant as well as exerting anti-inflammatory effect which can act as free radical scavenger, thus inhibiting TNF-α production and COX-2 expression which leads to decline in RANKL expression, resulting in reduction in osteoclast activity which consequently reduces bone loss. Hence, it is the phytoestrogenic, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidative properties that make LP an effective agent against osteoporosis. PMID:22611381

  11. The latest from the ivd industry: prevention, diagnosis and therapy of osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    2005-01-01

    At first glance the human bone appears to be solid, rigid and unchangeable. But in point of fact this is not so, for a process of change is continuously going on, during which bone mass is resorbed and formed. Up until the age of 30 bone mass continues to be formed, although at an increasingly slower pace. A few years of equilibrium between bone formation and bone resorption follow. Thereafter, from about the age of 40, a continuous slow loss of bone mass sets in. This is considered to be a normal process of aging. But if the speed of resorption exceeds a certain degree and bone resorption increases, osteoporosis can develop after several years. Osteoporosis is therefore an illness in which bone mass has been massively resorbed over the past years and/or is being acutely resorbed. Given the altered demographic structure--an ever larger number of people living to an advanced age--the number of people affected by osteoporosis is increasing. Once the bone loss reaches a certain degree, there is a greater susceptibility to bone fractures. Particularly affected are the vertebrae, the neck of the femur, and the forearm. PMID:15719707

  12. Optimal vitamin D status for the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Holick, Michael F

    2007-01-01

    Vitamin D(3) (cholecalciferol) sufficiency is essential for maximising bone health. Vitamin D enhances intestinal absorption of calcium and phosphorus. The major source of vitamin D for both children and adults is exposure of the skin to sunlight. Season, latitude, skin pigmentation, sunscreen use, clothing and aging can dramatically influence the synthesis of vitamin D in the skin. Very few foods naturally contain vitamin D or are fortified with vitamin D. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D; calcifediol] is the best measure of vitamin D status. Vitamin D deficiency [as defined by a serum 25(OH)D level of <50 nmol/L (<20 ng/mL)] is pandemic. This deficiency is very prevalent in osteoporotic patients. Vitamin D deficiency causes osteopenia, osteoporosis and osteomalacia, increasing the risk of fracture. Unlike osteoporosis, which is a painless disease, osteomalacia causes aching bone pain that is often misdiagnosed as fibromyalgia or chronic pain syndrome or is simply dismissed as depression. Vitamin D deficiency causes muscle weakness, increasing the risk of falls and fractures, and should be aggressively treated with pharmacological doses of vitamin D. Vitamin D sufficiency can be sustained by sensible sun exposure or ingesting at least 800-1000 IU of vitamin D(3) daily. Patients being treated for osteoporosis should be adequately supplemented with calcium and vitamin D to maximise the benefit of treatment. PMID:18020534

  13. The Anti-Inflammatory, Phytoestrogenic, and Antioxidative Role of Labisia pumila in Prevention of Postmenopausal Osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Nadia, M E; Nazrun, A S; Norazlina, M; Isa, N M; Norliza, M; Ima Nirwana, S

    2012-01-01

    Osteoporosis is characterized by skeletal degeneration with low bone mass and destruction of microarchitecture of bone tissue which is attributed to various factors including inflammation. Women are more likely to develop osteoporosis than men due to reduction in estrogen during menopause which leads to decline in bone-formation and increase in bone-resorption activity. Estrogen is able to suppress production of proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-1, IL-6, IL-7, and TNF-α. This is why these cytokines are elevated in postmenopausal women. Studies have shown that estrogen reduction is able to stimulate focal inflammation in bone. Labisia pumila (LP) which is known to exert phytoestrogenic effect can be used as an alternative to ERT which can produce positive effects on bone without causing side effects. LP contains antioxidant as well as exerting anti-inflammatory effect which can act as free radical scavenger, thus inhibiting TNF-α production and COX-2 expression which leads to decline in RANKL expression, resulting in reduction in osteoclast activity which consequently reduces bone loss. Hence, it is the phytoestrogenic, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidative properties that make LP an effective agent against osteoporosis. PMID:22611381

  14. Prevention of Bone Loss in a Model of Postmenopausal Osteoporosis through Adrenomedullin Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Herrero, Sonia; Larrayoz, Ignacio M.; Ochoa-Callejero, Laura; Fernández, Luis J.; Allueva, Alexis; Ochoa, Ignacio; Martínez, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent advances in the understanding and treatment options for osteoporosis, this condition remains a serious public health issue. Adrenomedullin (AM) is a regulatory peptide with reported activity on bone remodeling. To better understand this relationship we built an inducible knockout for AM. An outstanding feature of knockout mice is their heavier weight due, in part, to the presence of denser bones. The femur of knockout animals was denser, had more trabeculae, and a thicker growth plate than wild type littermates. The endocrine influence of AM on bone seems to be elicited through an indirect mechanism involving, at least, the regulation of insulin, glucose, ghrelin, and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). To confirm the data we performed a pharmacological approach using the AM inhibitor 16311 in a mouse model of osteoporosis. Ovariectomized females showed significant bone mass loss, whereas ovariectomized females treated with 16311 had similar bone density to sham operated females. In conclusion, we propose the use of AM inhibitors for the treatment of osteoporosis and other conditions leading to the loss of bone mass. PMID:27445864

  15. Exercise for patients with osteoporosis: management of vertebral compression fractures and trunk strengthening for fall prevention.

    PubMed

    Sinaki, Mehrsheed

    2012-11-01

    Maintenance of bone health and quality requires mechanical strain, but the mechanical force needs to be within the bone's biomechanical competence. In osteoporosis, compression of vertebral bodies can be insidious. Therefore, absence of pain does not necessarily indicate absence of vertebral microfracture and deformity. Further, patients with previous vertebral fractures are at risk for further vertebral fractures and their associated morbidity. Exercise is a part of the comprehensive management of patients with osteoporosis and has been associated with improvement of quality of life and lowered risk of future fracture. The exercise prescription needs to match the needs of the patient. If exercise is not prescribed properly, then it may have negative consequences. In general, an exercise program, therapeutic or recreational, needs to address flexibility, muscle strength, core stability, cardiovascular fitness, and gait steadiness. As with pharmacotherapy, therapeutic exercises need to be individualized on the basis of musculoskeletal status and an individual's exercise interest. In osteoporosis, axial strength and stability are of primary importance. In particular, a spinal extensor strengthening program should be performed with progressive measured resistance as tolerated. To address falls and fractures, an exercise program should also include balance and lower extremity strength training. Proper dosing of oral cholecalciferol and calcium supplements can enhance the effect of strengthening exercises. Finally, a coordinated approach, such as the Spinal Proprioception Extension Exercise Dynamic (SPEED) program, can improve back extensor strength, the level of physical activity, and locomotion, and reduce back pain and fear and risk of falls. PMID:23174554

  16. [Clinical efficacy instant goat milk in the complex therapy and prevention of osteoporosis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Shostak, N A; Muradiants, A A; Kondrashov, A A; Denisova, S N

    2014-01-01

    Osteoporosis (OP) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) refers to a secondary immune-mediated metabolic osteopathy characterized by periarticular and systemic decreased bone mass, impaired bone strength and increased risk of fractures. According to some studies, adding milk in the diet helps to increase bone mineral density and to reduce the risk of osteoporosis and maintain normal levels of vitamin D. To study the state of mineral and bone metabolism in RA patients zeith osteopenic syndrome and to evaluate the effectiveness of treatment and prevention of OP by adding dry goat milk "Amalteya" in the diet. The study included 42 patients with a documented diagnosis of RA (ACR, 1987) - 23 men (mean age 59 years) and 19 postmenopausal women (mean age 62 years) with the presence of osteoporosis and osteopenia according to the dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. 21 (50%) RA patients (main group) received standard antiosteoporotichesky (alendronate 70 mg/week + calcium 1000 mg/day + Vitamin D3 800 IU/day) therapy and milk powder Amalteya® (400 ml/day). The control group (21 patients with RA) received only standard antiosteoporotic therapy. Follow-up lasted for 6 months. The concentration of total calcium in the blood of RA patients was on average 2.33 mmol/l, ionized Ca - 1,18 mmol/l and inorganic P - 1,09 mmol/l, which corresponds to normal values. Vitamin D deficiency was found in 17,5% of patients, and failure - in 32,5% of patients with RA. After 6 months of the treatment it was found that b-CrossLaps levels tend to be reducing in both of the groups and with reduction of bone formation marker osteocalcin in the group not receiving goat milk. Also, due to the background of ongoing combinative therapy it was clear that concentrations of 1,25(OH)2D and 25(OH)D in the blood serum are increasing (by 18,5-28,2% at the main group and by 8,0-17,9% at the control group), however, inter-group differences was below the level of the reliable importance. It was strongly marked in the group

  17. The effect of a community-based cardiovascular disease prevention project in a Danish municipality.

    PubMed

    Osler, M; Jespersen, N B

    1993-09-01

    A community-based project for the prevention of cardiovascular diseases was undertaken in 1989 in a rural Danish municipality (Slangerup) with about 8000 inhabitants. Project goals were to draw attention to project activities and improve smoking, eating and exercise behaviours. The intervention was planned using the social learning theory, a communication-behaviour change model and community organisation principle. The strategy used for intervention involved both mass communication and active involvement of the local population in group activities. The objectives of the intervention were assessed by data obtained from representative cross-section surveys in intervention and a control area at baseline (1989) and one year later. More respondents in the intervention (82%) than control (67%) area were aware of local health projects. Ten % reported that they stopped smoking within the last year, 39% ate less fat, and 28% did more exercise, with no differences between intervention and control area. Several explanations are proposed for the limited effect of the project on behaviours. One possible explanation is that the project almost ended up being a pure mass media campaign which may increase awareness, but, as experience shows, may have limited influence on adoption of new behaviour. The Danish population around 1990 is very well informed and educated in this field due to earlier nationwide interventions. No further behavioural effects are obtainable with mass media campaigns. PMID:8222768

  18. Estrogen and Osteoporosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsay, Robert

    1987-01-01

    This article reviews the use of estrogen in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. Dosage levels, interactions with other factors, side effects, and the mechanism of estrogen action are discussed. (Author/MT)

  19. Dairy products, dietary calcium and bone health: possibility of prevention of osteoporosis in women: the Polish experience.

    PubMed

    Wadolowska, Lidia; Sobas, Kamila; Szczepanska, Justyna W; Slowinska, Malgorzata A; Czlapka-Matyasik, Magdalena; Niedzwiedzka, Ewa

    2013-07-01

    The objective of the study was to analyze the consumption of dairy products and dietary calcium by women in the context of bone mineral density and to assess opportunities to prevent osteoporosis in a dietary manner. The study was carried out with 712 Polish women. In 170 women aged 32 to 59 bone mineral density (BMD) was measured. The data on the consumption of dairy products and dietary calcium and some other osteoporosis risk factors was collected from 712 women. The average calcium intake from a diet was 507 mg/day. Only 2% of the women met Polish calcium intake recommendations. During adulthood, dairy product consumption or dietary calcium intake did not differ significantly between women with low BMD (below -1 SD) and women with regular BMD (≥-1 SD) (47.4 vs. 44.3 servings/week and 459 vs. 510 mg/day, respectively, p > 0.05). The odds ratios adjusted for age, menstruation and BMI in women with upper BMD tercile in comparison to the reference group (bottom tercile) was 2.73 (95% CI: 1.14, 6.55; p < 0.05) for the daily consumption of dairy products during the pre-school period and 2.40 (95% CI: 1.01, 5.70; p < 0.05) for the daily consumption of dairy products during the school period. Two clusters of women were established. In the S1 cluster, low BMD (below -1 SD) was associated with older age (≥ 50 years), lack of menstrual cycle. In the S2 cluster, regular BMD (≥-1 SD) was related to younger aged women (<50 years), presence of menstrual cycle, consumption of higher level of dairy products (≥28 servings/week) during adulthood and daily intake of dairy products during childhood and adolescence. The results indicate that good bone health to the larg e extent depended upon the combined impact of dietary factors and some non-modifiable risk factors of osteoporosis such as age and the presence of menstruation. Consumption of dairy products in childhood and adolescence may improve bone mineral density and reduce the risk of osteoporosis in adult women. PMID

  20. Sarcopenia and Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Hyung-Min; Han, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Public health strategies designed to accomodate the ever-increasing human lifespan are urgently required. A good clinical understanding of frailty, as well as knowledge regarding how to prevent it, will therefore be required in order to overcome this challenge. Sarcopenia is an important component of the frailty syndrome, and its association with osteoporosis can lead to fractures and incident disability. Therefore, this review examined the literatuire pertaining to the association of sarcopenia with osteoporosis in order to assess preventive strategies.

  1. Herba Epimedii: An Ancient Chinese Herbal Medicine in the Prevention and Treatment of Osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lili; Li, Yu; Guo, Yubo; Ma, Rufeng; Fu, Min; Niu, Jianzhao; Gao, Sihua; Zhang, Dongwei

    2016-01-01

    Herba Epimedii (HEP) known as YinYangHuo in Chinese is the dried leaf of the Epimediium, and has been historically used in combination with other herbs to treat skeletal diseases in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). Here, we review the historical TCM interpretation of the action of HEP, its use in clinical trials, its main phytochemical constituents and its pharmacological findings. 85 clinical trials were identified which used HEP in TCM prescriptions with other herbs to treat primary and secondary osteoporosis from 2005 to now. More than 60 individual compounds were isolated and characterized from HEP and studied in various animal and cell models. HEP and its constituents exhibited a variety of anti-resorptive and bone formation-stimulating effects, which target different pathways in the bone remodeling cycle. These compounds may provide new perspectives in alternative treatment regimes and reveal novel chemical scaffolds for the development of anti-osteoporotic drugs. These approaches are also useful for guiding our research to employ an integrative therapeutic approach to treat complex diseases such as osteoporosis diseases which could be superior to the conventional single target - single drug approach. PMID:26561074

  2. Prevention of muscle wasting and osteoporosis: the value of examining novel animal models.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Beau D; Franklin, Craig E

    2016-09-01

    Bone mass and skeletal muscle mass are controlled by factors such as genetics, diet and nutrition, growth factors and mechanical stimuli. Whereas increased mechanical loading of the musculoskeletal system stimulates an increase in the mass and strength of skeletal muscle and bone, reduced mechanical loading and disuse rapidly promote a decrease in musculoskeletal mass, strength and ultimately performance (i.e. muscle atrophy and osteoporosis). In stark contrast to artificially immobilised laboratory mammals, animals that experience natural, prolonged bouts of disuse and reduced mechanical loading, such as hibernating mammals and aestivating frogs, consistently exhibit limited or no change in musculoskeletal performance. What factors modulate skeletal muscle and bone mass, and what physiological and molecular mechanisms protect against losses of muscle and bone during dormancy and following arousal? Understanding the events that occur in different organisms that undergo natural periods of prolonged disuse and suffer negligible musculoskeletal deterioration could not only reveal novel regulatory factors but also might lead to new therapeutic options. Here, we review recent work from a diverse array of species that has revealed novel information regarding physiological and molecular mechanisms that dormant animals may use to conserve musculoskeletal mass despite prolonged inactivity. By highlighting some of the differences and similarities in musculoskeletal biology between vertebrates that experience disparate modes of dormancy, it is hoped that this Review will stimulate new insights and ideas for future studies regarding the regulation of atrophy and osteoporosis in both natural and clinical models of muscle and bone disuse. PMID:27582559

  3. Surveillance of deaths on board Danish merchant ships, 1986-93: implications for prevention.

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, H L

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe and analyse the types and circumstances of all natural and non-natural deaths among seamen on board Danish merchant ships. METHODS: Data on 147 cases were obtained from maritime authorities, an insurance company, shipping companies, hospitals, death registers, and death certificates in the period from 1986-93. RESULTS: The 53 natural deaths were dominated by cardiovascular diseases and infectious diseases. Insufficient treatment on board was identified as a contributing factor for death in some cases. Medical advice was not always sought and the advice given was in some cases insufficient. 73 fatal accidents were identified. The incidence of accidents of 5.29/10,000 person-years was 11.5 times higher than the incidence of 0.46/10,000 for the Danish male workforce ashore. 23 accidents (31%) were due to maritime casualties and 26 (36%) were occupational accidents. The remaining 24 (33%) were accidents during off duty hours including six self intoxications. Rough weather, inadequate awareness of safety, lack of use of personal protection devices, and inexperience were associated with many of the fatal injuries directly related to work. Alcohol played a major part in 12 out of 18 fatal injuries occurring during off duty hours. CONCLUSIONS: The maritime workplace was identified as a high risk workplace and in many aspects differs from the conditions ashore. Acute diseases and serious injuries pose special risks to seamen because of a lack of direct access to professional medical care at sea. Primary prevention of certain diseases is needed and possible. Improved training, improved systems of work, improved safety awareness, and greater use of personal protection devices are needed to prevent fatal injuries. Medical training of ships' officers providing medical care on board and specific training of doctors giving medical advise to ships should be improved to meet the needs. PMID:8664966

  4. [Epidemiology of osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Scheidt-Nave, C; Ziegler, R; Raspe, H

    1998-03-15

    Epidemiological studies have identified osteoporosis as a disease of significant public health impact and have delineated numerous potential risk factors. Nevertheless, it has proven difficult to establish preventive strategies for several reasons. First, there has been no final agreement on the definition of osteoporosis, which has hampered efforts to characterize the magnitude of the problem as a whole. Secondly, as osteoporosis is a multifactorial chronic disorder, effective programs for risk assessment and intervention depend on the development of complex disease models. In summarizing the contributions of epidemiological studies to the current understanding of osteoporosis this review intends to outline the scientific background for the European Vertebral Osteoporosis Study (EVOS) and its successors. PMID:9564151

  5. [Osteoporosis: a clinical perspective].

    PubMed

    Matikainen, Niina

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis is defined by decreased bone density and microarchitectural deterioration that predispose to fragility fractures. The WHO diagnostic criteria of osteoporosis require bone densitometry but treatment is possible on the basis of high clinical fracture risk and can be assessed by the FRAX risk algorithm. All those subject to fracture risk should be advised about proper basic treatment of osteoporosis, including exercise, prevention of falls, smoking cessation, avoidance of alcohol intake, and dietary or supplemental abundance of calcium and vitamin D. Underlying diseases must be studied after diagnosis of osteoporosis even if treatment is initiated without densitometry. When indicated, specific osteoporosis therapy includes bisphosphonates, denosumab, teriparatide, strontium ranelate or SERMs. In hypogonadism, gonadal steroids may be indicated alone or in addition to a specific treatment. Treatment effect and continuation are assessed after 2 to 5 years. PMID:27400591

  6. Silicon: A Review of Its Potential Role in the Prevention and Treatment of Postmenopausal Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Price, Charles T.; Koval, Kenneth J.; Langford, Joshua R.

    2013-01-01

    Physicians are aware of the benefits of calcium and vitamin D supplementation. However, additional nutritional components may also be important for bone health. There is a growing body of the scientific literature which recognizes that silicon plays an essential role in bone formation and maintenance. Silicon improves bone matrix quality and facilitates bone mineralization. Increased intake of bioavailable silicon has been associated with increased bone mineral density. Silicon supplementation in animals and humans has been shown to increase bone mineral density and improve bone strength. Dietary sources of bioavailable silicon include whole grains, cereals, beer, and some vegetables such as green beans. Silicon in the form of silica, or silicon dioxide (SiO2), is a common food additive but has limited intestinal absorption. More attention to this important mineral by the academic community may lead to improved nutrition, dietary supplements, and better understanding of the role of silicon in the management of postmenopausal osteoporosis. PMID:23762049

  7. Osteoporosis prevention among chronic glucocorticoid users: results from a public health insurance database

    PubMed Central

    Trijau, Sophie; de Lamotte, Gaëlle; Pradel, Vincent; Natali, François; Allaria-Lapierre, Véronique; Coudert, Hervé; Pham, Thao; Sciortino, Vincent; Lafforgue, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Long-term glucocorticoid therapy is the leading cause of secondary osteoporosis. The management of glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis (GIOP) seems to be inadequate in many European countries. Objective To evaluate the rate of screening and treatment of GIOP. Design Information was collected from a national public health-insurance database in our geographic area of Provence-Alpes-Côte-d'Azur and in Corsica, from September 2009 through August 2011. Patients We identified participants aged 15 years and over starting glucocorticoid therapy (≥7.5 mg of prednisone equivalent per day during at least 90 days consecutive). This cohort was compared with an age-matched and sex-matched population that did not receive glucocorticoids. Main outcome measures Bone mass, prescription of bone antiresorptive medication and use of calcium and/or vitamin D treatment. Results We identified 32 812 patients who were prescribed glucocorticoid therapy, yielding 1% prevalence. Incidence of glucocorticoid therapy was 2.8/1000 inhabitants/year. Males represented 44%, the mean age was 58 years. The median prednisone-equivalent dose was 11 mg/day (IQR 9–18 mg/day). 8% underwent bone mass measurement. Calcium and/or vitamin D, and bisphosphonates were prescribed in 18% and 12%, respectively. Results were lower for the control population: 3% underwent bone mass measurement and 3% received bisphosphonate therapy. The rates of osteodensitometry and treatments were higher in women over 55 years of age than in men and women 55 years of age and younger, and also when glucocorticoid therapy was initiated by a rheumatologist versus other physician specialty. Conclusions The management of GIOP remains very inadequate, despite the availability of a statutory health insurance system. Targeted interventions are needed to improve the management of GIOP. PMID:27486526

  8. Osteoporosis in Men

    PubMed Central

    Khosla, Sundeep; Amin, Shreyasee; Orwoll, Eric

    2008-01-01

    With the aging of the population, there is a growing recognition that osteoporosis and fractures in men are a significant public health problem, and both hip and vertebral fractures are associated with increased morbidity and mortality in men. Osteoporosis in men is a heterogeneous clinical entity: whereas most men experience bone loss with aging, some men develop osteoporosis at a relatively young age, often for unexplained reasons (idiopathic osteoporosis). Declining sex steroid levels and other hormonal changes likely contribute to age-related bone loss, as do impairments in osteoblast number and/or activity. Secondary causes of osteoporosis also play a significant role in pathogenesis. Although there is ongoing controversy regarding whether osteoporosis in men should be diagnosed based on female- or male-specific reference ranges (because some evidence indicates that the risk of fracture is similar in women and men for a given level of bone mineral density), a diagnosis of osteoporosis in men is generally made based on male-specific reference ranges. Treatment consists both of nonpharmacological (lifestyle factors, calcium and vitamin D supplementation) and pharmacological (most commonly bisphosphonates or PTH) approaches, with efficacy similar to that seen in women. Increasing awareness of osteoporosis in men among physicians and the lay public is critical for the prevention of fractures in our aging male population. PMID:18451258

  9. Osteoporosis in Gastrointestinal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Krela-Kaźmierczak, Iwona; Szymczak, Aleksandra; Łykowska-Szuber, Liliana; Eder, Piotr; Linke, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Secondary osteoporosis occurs as an isolated pathology or co-exists with types I and II osteoporosis. The gastroenterologist may come across osteoporosis or osteopenia in a patient with a gastrointestinal disease. This is often a young patient in whom investigations should be carried out and appropriate treatment initiated, aimed at preventing bone fractures and the formation of the best peak bone mass. Osteoporosis occurs in patients with the following conditions: Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, celiac disease, post gastrectomy patients, patients with short bowel syndrome, chronic hepatitis and cirrhosis, treated with steroids (steroid-induced osteoporosis) and patients using proton pump inhibitors chronically (state of achlorhydria). It is therefore necessary to approve a list of risk factors of secondary osteoporosis, the presence of which would be an indication for screening for osteoporosis, including a DXA study and the development of a separate algorithm for the therapeutic management of secondary osteoporosis accompanying gastrointestinal diseases, especially in premenopausal young women and young men, because there are currently no registered drugs with proven antifracture activity for this group of patients. PMID:26935513

  10. What People with Rheumatoid Arthritis Need to Know about Osteoporosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... increased risk for osteoporosis, are two to three times more likely than men to have rheumatoid arthritis as well. Osteoporosis Management Strategies Strategies for preventing and treating osteoporosis in ...

  11. Osteoporosis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Osteoporosis is a condition characterized by progressive loss of bone density, thinning of bone tissue and increased vulnerability to fractures. Osteoporosis may result from disease, dietary or hormonal deficiency ...

  12. [Endocrine disorders and osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Yuka

    2015-10-01

    Secondary osteoporosis is a bone disease characterized by decreased bone mass that predisposes fractures due to underlying disorders or medication. Disorders of the endocrine system, such as primary hyperparathyroidism, hyperthyroidism, hypogonadism, growth hormone deficiency, Cushing's syndrome, and anorexia nervosa frequently cause secondary osteoporosis. In those diseases, hormone excess or deficiency affects functions of osteoblasts, osteocyte, and osteoclasts, leading to aberrant bone remodeling. Bisphosphonates are the first-choice pharmacological agents for fracture prevention in most patients with secondary osteoporosis along with treatment of the underlying disease. PMID:26529938

  13. A survey of steroid-related osteoporosis diagnosis, prevention and treatment practices of pediatric rheumatologists in North America

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of our study is to assess practices of North American pediatric rheumatologists regarding monitoring, prevention, and treatment of low bone mineral density (BMD) in children on long-term glucocorticoid treatment. Long-term glucocorticoid therapy is associated with accelerated bone loss. Children with JIA and lupus have low baseline BMD and incident vertebral fractures commonly occur in these groups of patients even after a relatively short period of time being on systemic glucocorticoids. There are no established guidelines for identification, prevention, and treatment of glucocorticoid-induced bone loss in children. Methods A cross-sectional online survey was conducted with 199 physicians who were listed in the ACR database as practicing pediatric rheumatology in North America. Results 86 physicians (43%) responded; 87% were board-certified in pediatric rheumatology. 95% used dual energy X-ray absorptiometry as their primary modality for assessing BMD. 79% “rarely” or “never” obtained a baseline BMD measurement prior to initiation of glucocorticoid therapy. 42% of respondents followed BMD annually. 93% “frequently” or “always” prescribed calcium for patients on long-term corticosteroid therapy; 81% “frequently” or “always” prescribed vitamin D. In patients diagnosed with osteoporosis, 35%-50 % of the practitioners “sometimes”, “frequently” or “always” prescribed bisphosphonates. Bisphosphonates are prescribed at similar rates for male and female patients, and slightly more frequently for pubertal than for pre-pubertal patients. 96% of respondents “rarely” or “never” prescribed calcitonin for patients on long-term glucocorticoid therapy; 92% “rarely” or “never” prescribe this medication for patients with known osteopenia or osteoporosis. Conclusions Utilization of DXA in children on long-term corticosteroid therapy varies greatly among North American pediatric rheumatologists. Most

  14. Pomegranate Peel Extract Prevents Bone Loss in a Preclinical Model of Osteoporosis and Stimulates Osteoblastic Differentiation in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Spilmont, Mélanie; Léotoing, Laurent; Davicco, Marie-Jeanne; Lebecque, Patrice; Miot-Noirault, Elisabeth; Pilet, Paul; Rios, Laurent; Wittrant, Yohann; Coxam, Véronique

    2015-11-01

    The nutritional benefits of pomegranate have attracted great scientific interest. The pomegranate, including the pomegranate peel, has been used worldwide for many years as a fruit with medicinal activity, mostly antioxidant properties. Among chronic diseases, osteoporosis, which is associated with bone remodelling impairment leading to progressive bone loss, could eventually benefit from antioxidant compounds because of the involvement of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of osteopenia. In this study, with in vivo and ex vivo experiments, we investigated whether the consumption of pomegranate peel extract (PGPE) could limit the process of osteopenia. We demonstrated that in ovariectomized (OVX) C57BL/6J mice, PGPE consumption was able to significantly prevent the decrease in bone mineral density (-31.9%; p < 0.001 vs. OVX mice) and bone microarchitecture impairment. Moreover, the exposure of RAW264.7 cells to serum harvested from mice that had been given a PGPE-enriched diet elicited reduced osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption, as shown by the inhibition of the major osteoclast markers. In addition, PGPE appeared to substantially stimulate osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity at day 7, mineralization at day 21 and the transcription level of osteogenic markers. PGPE may be effective in preventing the bone loss associated with ovariectomy in mice, and offers a promising alternative for the nutritional management of this disease. PMID:26569295

  15. Pomegranate Peel Extract Prevents Bone Loss in a Preclinical Model of Osteoporosis and Stimulates Osteoblastic Differentiation in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Spilmont, Mélanie; Léotoing, Laurent; Davicco, Marie-Jeanne; Lebecque, Patrice; Miot-Noirault, Elisabeth; Pilet, Paul; Rios, Laurent; Wittrant, Yohann; Coxam, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    The nutritional benefits of pomegranate have attracted great scientific interest. The pomegranate, including the pomegranate peel, has been used worldwide for many years as a fruit with medicinal activity, mostly antioxidant properties. Among chronic diseases, osteoporosis, which is associated with bone remodelling impairment leading to progressive bone loss, could eventually benefit from antioxidant compounds because of the involvement of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of osteopenia. In this study, with in vivo and ex vivo experiments, we investigated whether the consumption of pomegranate peel extract (PGPE) could limit the process of osteopenia. We demonstrated that in ovariectomized (OVX) C57BL/6J mice, PGPE consumption was able to significantly prevent the decrease in bone mineral density (−31.9%; p < 0.001 vs. OVX mice) and bone microarchitecture impairment. Moreover, the exposure of RAW264.7 cells to serum harvested from mice that had been given a PGPE-enriched diet elicited reduced osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption, as shown by the inhibition of the major osteoclast markers. In addition, PGPE appeared to substantially stimulate osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity at day 7, mineralization at day 21 and the transcription level of osteogenic markers. PGPE may be effective in preventing the bone loss associated with ovariectomy in mice, and offers a promising alternative for the nutritional management of this disease. PMID:26569295

  16. Osteoporosis: Cloris Leachman Leads by Example

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn Javascript on. Feature: Osteoporosis Cloris Leachman Leads By Example Past Issues / Winter 2011 Table of ... age discrimination! Read More "Osteoporosis" Articles Cloris Leachman Leads By Example / Preventing and Treating Brittle Bones and ...

  17. Physical activity in the prevention and amelioration of osteoporosis in women : interaction of mechanical, hormonal and dietary factors.

    PubMed

    Borer, Katarina T

    2005-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a serious health problem that diminishes quality of life and levies a financial burden on those who fear and experience bone fractures. Physical activity as a way to prevent osteoporosis is based on evidence that it can regulate bone maintenance and stimulate bone formation including the accumulation of mineral, in addition to strengthening muscles, improving balance, and thus reducing the overall risk of falls and fractures. Currently, our understanding of how to use exercise effectively in the prevention of osteoporosis is incomplete. It is uncertain whether exercise will help accumulate more overall peak bone mass during childhood, adolescence and young adulthood. Also, the consistent effectiveness of exercise to increase bone mass, or at least arrest the loss of bone mass after menopause, is also in question. Within this framework, section 1 introduces mechanical characteristics of bones to assist the reader in understanding their responses to physical activity. Section 2 reviews hormonal, nutritional and mechanical factors necessary for the growth of bones in length, width and mineral content that produce peak bone mass in the course of childhood and adolescence using a large sample of healthy Caucasian girls and female adolescents for reference. Effectiveness of exercise is evaluated throughout using absolute changes in bone with the underlying assumption that useful exercise should produce changes that approximate or exceed the absolute magnitude of bone parameters in a healthy reference population. Physical activity increases growth in width and mineral content of bones in girls and adolescent females, particularly when it is initiated before puberty, carried out in volumes and at intensities seen in athletes, and accompanied by adequate caloric and calcium intakes. Similar increases are seen in young women following the termination of statural growth in response to athletic training, but not to more limited levels of physical activity

  18. Poncirin prevents bone loss in glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hyung-Young; Won, Ye-Yeon; Chung, Yoon-Sok

    2012-09-01

    Poncirin, a flavonoid isolated from the fruit of Poncirus trifoliata, possesses anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory activities. However, the action of poncirin in bone biology is unclear. In this study, the in vivo and in vitro effects of poncirin in a glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis (GIO) mouse model were investigated. Seven-month-old male mice were assigned to the following five groups: (1) sham-implantation (sham), (2) prednisolone 2.1 mg/kg/day (GC), (3) GC treated with 10 mg/kg/day of genistein, (4) GC treated with 3 mg/kg/day of poncirin, (5) and GC treated with 10 mg/kg/day of strontium (GC + SrCl(2)). After 8 weeks, bone loss was measured by microcomputed tomography. Osteocalcin (OC) and C-terminal telopeptides of type I collagen (CTX) were evaluated in sera. Runx2 protein, OC and osteoprotegerin (OPG) mRNA expression, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and mineral nodule assay were performed in C3H10T1/2 or primary bone marrow stromal cells. Poncirin significantly increased the bone mineral density and improved the microarchitecture. Poncirin increased serum OC, Runx2 protein production, expression of OC and OPG mRNA, ALP activity, and mineral nodule formation; and decreased serum CTX. These effects were more prominent in the poncirin group compared to the other positive control groups (genistein and strontium). The poncirin-mediated restoration of biochemical bone markers, increased bone mineral density, and improved trabecular microarchitecture likely reflect increased bone formation and decreased bone resorption in GIO mice. PMID:22407507

  19. OSTEOPOROSIS DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Márcio Passini Gonçalves

    2015-01-01

    Articles that update the state of knowledge regarding osteoporosis run the risk of quickly becoming obsolete because research and studies on osteoporosis today are arousing great interest among researchers, the pharmaceutical and medical equipment industries, governments and even WHO. All orthopedists know about osteoporosis because of its most deleterious effect: osteoporotic fracture. Osteoporosis without fractures does not arouse suspicion because this is a pathological condition with a nonspecific clinical profile. Osteoporotic fractures have an economic cost (from treatment), a social cost (from its sequelae) and a medical cost (from deaths). Many fractures could be avoided through diagnosing osteoporosis prior to the first fracture and thus many temporary and permanent disabilities could be avoided and many lives saved. Awareness of the risk factors for osteoporosis raises suspicions and bone densitometry aids in diagnosis. Treatment should be based on the physiopathology of the disease. Hence, for prevention or treatment of osteoporosis, the activity of osteoclasts should be diminished or the activity of osteoblasts should be increased, or both. Treatment that reduces the incidence of fractures by improving the bone geometry and microarchitecture would be ideal. Newly formed bone tissue needs to have good cell and matrix quality, normal mineralization, a good ratio between mineralized (mechanically resistant) and non-mineralized (flexible) bone, and no accumulated damage. The ideal treatment should have a positive remodeling rate and fast and long-lasting therapeutic effects. Such effects need to be easily detectable. They need to be safe. PMID:27022545

  20. Rare causes of osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Marcucci, Gemma; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Summary Osteoporosis is a metabolic bone disease characterized by loss of bone mass and strength, resulting in increased risk of fractures. It is classically divided into primary (post-menopausal or senile), secondary and idiopathic forms. There are many rare diseases, that cause directly or indirectly osteoporosis. The identification and classification of most of these rare causes of osteoporosis is crucial for the specialists in endocrinology and not, in order to prevent this bone complication and to provide for an early therapy. Several pathogenic mechanisms are involved, including various aspects of bone metabolism such as: decreased bone formation, increased bone resorption, altered calcium, phosphorus and/or vitamin D homeostasis, and abnormal collagen synthesis. In this review, less common forms of primary and secondary osteoporosis are described, specifying, if applicable: genetic causes, epidemiology, clinical features, and pathogenic mechanisms causing osteoporosis. A greater awareness of all rare causes of osteoporosis could reduce the number of cases classified as idiopathic osteoporosis and allow the introduction of appropriate and timely treatments. PMID:26604941

  1. Municipalities Collaborating in Public Health: The Danish Smoking Prevention and Cessation Partnership

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Pernille Tanggaard; El Ansari, Walid; Rasmussen, Hanna Barbara; Stock, Christiane

    2010-01-01

    This study explored the Smoking Prevention and Cessation Partnership (SPCP) which builds upon a collaboration between two Danish municipalities targeted at the prevention of tobacco smoking. The aim of the study was to describe the processes of SPCP, to examine the difficulties this collaboration faced, and to assess how these experiences could be used to improve future partnership collaboration. We employed qualitative methodology comprising 12 semi-structured one-to-one interviews with SPCP’s stakeholders and an analysis of the partnership documents and reports. The findings suggested that the main potentials of the partnership were the personal relations between the members and stakeholders with the possibilities of the creation of new connections with other actors. Barriers to successful partnership building were the implementation of the new Local Government Reform as a competing task, and that the two municipalities were heterogenic in respect to organizational issues and working methods. Other impediments included the lack of continuity in leadership, the lack of clarity regarding the form of collaboration and roles, as well as different expectations of the stakeholders. We conclude that four factors remain critical for partnerships. The first is the clarity of the collaborative effort. Second, partnerships need to take into account the structural circumstances and culture/value systems of all stakeholders. Third is the impact of contextual factors on the development of the partnership; and the fourth factor is the bearing of personal/individual factors on the partnership e.g., personal engagement in the project. Early attention to these four factors could contribute to more effective partnership working. PMID:21139870

  2. Bazedoxifene and Conjugated Equine Estrogen: A Combination Product for the Management of Vasomotor Symptoms and Osteoporosis Prevention Associated with Menopause.

    PubMed

    Umland, Elena M; Karel, Lauren; Santoro, Nanette

    2016-05-01

    Bazedoxifene (BZA), a third-generation selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM), has been combined with conjugated equine estrogen (CE) to create a tissue selective estrogen complex (TSEC) for the management of vasomotor symptoms (VMS) and the prevention of osteoporosis (OP) associated with menopause. Both of these outcomes of menopause contribute to significant negative effects on quality of life and increases in utilization of health care resources and dollars. Current treatment modalities for VMS and OP include estrogen therapy that requires the use of progestin in women who have a uterus to reduce the risk of endometrial hyperplasia and resultant cancer. However, progestin use results in nuisance bleeding as well as a further increased risk of breast cancer when combined with estrogen. And while SERMs can be used to prevent OP, their use alone has been shown to increase hot flashes. The combination of BZA and CE does not require progestin treatment with CE as the BZA component acts as an antagonist on endometrial tissue. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval of BZA/CE in 2013 was based on a series of five phase 3 studies known as the Selective estrogens, Menopause And Response to Therapy (SMART) trials. These trials, in their entirety, evaluated the impact of BZA/CE on VMS frequency and severity, bone mineral density, bone turnover markers, vaginal symptoms, lipid profiles, sleep, quality of life, breast density, and endometrial safety. The approved dose of BZA/CE is 20 mg BZA and 0.45 mg CE. Although this TSEC manages VMS while opposing breast and endometrial proliferation, preventing bone resorption, and improving lipid profiles, long-term experience with BZA/CE is currently lacking. PMID:27027527

  3. [On "2015 Guidelines for Prevention and Treatment of Osteoporosis". Osteoporosis associated with lifestyle-related diseases: other lifestyle-related diseases].

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Mika

    2015-09-01

    Lifestyle-related diseases other than type 2 diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease have also been reported in recent studies to have a possible effect on bone metabolism. In particular, evidence is accumulating regarding decreases in bone mineral density and an increased risk of fracture due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In COPD, the fracture risk increases in both men and women, and the condition is considered a risk factor independent of glucocorticoid administration. Moreover, since kyphosis resulting from vertebral fractures adversely affects respiratory function, assessment of osteoporosis is recommended for all patients with COPD, regardless of sex. As for dyslipidemia and hypertension, due to the possible involvement of various factors, no consensus has been reached regarding the effects of the condition itself on bone. PMID:26320534

  4. Anti-osteopontin monoclonal antibody prevents ovariectomy-induced osteoporosis in mice by promotion of osteoclast apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Bo; Dai, Jianxin; Wang, Huaqing; Wei, Huafeng; Zhao, Jian; Guo, Yajun; and others

    2014-09-26

    Highlight: • We first report that anti-osteopontin mAb could protect osteoporosis in mice. • Anti-osteopontin mAb could promote the osteoclast apoptosis. • Targeting osteopontin might have therapeutic potentials for osteoporosis. - Abstract: Osteopontin (OPN) is abundant in mineralized tissues and has long been implicated in bone remodeling. However, the therapeutic effect of targeting OPN in bone loss diseases and the underlying molecular mechanism remain largely unknown. Here, we reported that anti-OPN mAb (23C3) could protect against ovariectomy-induced osteoporosis in mice, demonstrated by microcomputed tomography analysis and histopathology evaluation. In vitro assay showed that 23C3 mAb reduced osteoclasts (OCs)-mediated bone resorption through promotion of mature OC apoptosis. Thus, the study has important implications for understanding the role of OPN in OC bone resorption and survival, and OPN antagonists may have therapeutic potential for osteoporosis and other osteopenic diseases.

  5. Development and validation of a health belief model based instrument for measuring factors influencing exercise behaviors to prevent osteoporosis in pre-menopausal women (HOPE)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The health belief model (HBM) is the most commonly used conceptual framework for evaluating osteoporosis health belief and behaviors. The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate the psychometric properties of a health belief model based questionnaire for exercise behavior for preventing osteoporosis among women aged 30 years and over. Methods This was a cross sectional study of a convenience sample of women aged 30 years and over in Tehran, Iran using a theory-based instrument (HOPE). The instrument contained 39 items covering issues relate to osteoporosis prevention behavior. In this methodological study, exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were used for psychometric evaluation. The Cronbach’s alpha coefficient and Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) was used to evaluate the reliability of the scale. Results In all 240 women participated in the study. The mean age of participant was 39.2 ± 7.8 years. The initial analysis extracted nine factors for the questionnaire that jointly accounted for 66.5% of variance observed. Confirmatory factor analysis showed that the data obtained was fit with Health Belief Model (HBM) and self-regulation construct (X2 = 1132.80, df = 629, P < 0.0001, CFI = 0.94, GFI = 0.91, RMSEA = 0.05 and SRMR = 0.06). The Cronbach’s alpha coefficient for the subscales ranged from 0.72 to 0.90 and Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) ranged from 0.71 to 0.98; well above acceptable thresholds. Conclusions The HOPE was found to be appropriate instrument for measuring health belief and self-regulation for prevention of osteoporosis. PMID:24581300

  6. Secondary osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Sheu, Angela; Diamond, Terry

    2016-06-01

    Secondary osteoporosis is less common than primary osteoporosis. It may be suspected in patients who present with a fragility fracture despite having no risk factors for osteoporosis. In addition, secondary osteoporosis should be considered if the bone density Z-score is -2.5 or less. Consider the fracture site and presence of other clinical clues to guide investigations for an underlying cause. The tests to use are those that are indicated for the suspected cause. Baseline investigations include tests for bone and mineral metabolism (calcium, phosphate, alkaline phosphatase, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, parathyroid hormone), liver and kidney function, full blood count and thyroid-stimulating hormone. More detailed testing may be required in patients with severe osteoporosis. PMID:27346916

  7. Secondary osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Sheu, Angela; Diamond, Terry

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Secondary osteoporosis is less common than primary osteoporosis. It may be suspected in patients who present with a fragility fracture despite having no risk factors for osteoporosis. In addition, secondary osteoporosis should be considered if the bone density Z-score is –2.5 or less. Consider the fracture site and presence of other clinical clues to guide investigations for an underlying cause. The tests to use are those that are indicated for the suspected cause. Baseline investigations include tests for bone and mineral metabolism (calcium, phosphate, alkaline phosphatase, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, parathyroid hormone), liver and kidney function, full blood count and thyroid-stimulating hormone. More detailed testing may be required in patients with severe osteoporosis. PMID:27346916

  8. Lycorine suppresses RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in vitro and prevents ovariectomy-induced osteoporosis and titanium particle-induced osteolysis in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shuai; Jin, Gu; Huang, Kang-Mao; Ma, Jian-Jun; Wang, Qiang; Ma, Yan; Tang, Xiao-Zhen; Zhou, Zhi-Jie; Hu, Zhi-Jun; Wang, Ji-Ying; Qin, An; Fan, Shun-Wu

    2015-01-01

    Osteoclasts play an important role in diseases involving bone loss. In this study, we assessed the effect of a plant-derived natural alkaloid (lycorine, or LY) on osteoclastogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Our in vitro study showed that receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclastogenesis could be inhibited by LY; this effect was due to inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling via MAP kinase kinases (MKKs). The MAPK agonist anisomycin could partially rescue the inhibitory effect of LY. Furthermore, LY also played a protective role in both a murine ovariectomy (OVX)-induced osteoporosis model and a titanium particle-induced osteolysis model. These results confirmed that LY was effective in preventing osteoclast-related diseases in vivo. In conclusion, our results show that LY is effective in suppressing osteoclastogenesis and therefore could be used to treat OVX-induced osteoporosis and wear particle-induced osteolysis. PMID:26238331

  9. Lycorine suppresses RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in vitro and prevents ovariectomy-induced osteoporosis and titanium particle-induced osteolysis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuai; Jin, Gu; Huang, Kang-Mao; Ma, Jian-Jun; Wang, Qiang; Ma, Yan; Tang, Xiao-Zhen; Zhou, Zhi-Jie; Hu, Zhi-Jun; Wang, Ji-Ying; Qin, An; Fan, Shun-Wu

    2015-01-01

    Osteoclasts play an important role in diseases involving bone loss. In this study, we assessed the effect of a plant-derived natural alkaloid (lycorine, or LY) on osteoclastogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Our in vitro study showed that receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclastogenesis could be inhibited by LY; this effect was due to inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling via MAP kinase kinases (MKKs). The MAPK agonist anisomycin could partially rescue the inhibitory effect of LY. Furthermore, LY also played a protective role in both a murine ovariectomy (OVX)-induced osteoporosis model and a titanium particle-induced osteolysis model. These results confirmed that LY was effective in preventing osteoclast-related diseases in vivo. In conclusion, our results show that LY is effective in suppressing osteoclastogenesis and therefore could be used to treat OVX-induced osteoporosis and wear particle-induced osteolysis. PMID:26238331

  10. Glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Briot, Karine; Roux, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Corticosteroid-induced osteoporosis is the most common form of secondary osteoporosis and the first cause in young people. Bone loss and increased rate of fractures occur early after the initiation of corticosteroid therapy, and are then related to dosage and treatment duration. The increase in fracture risk is not fully assessed by bone mineral density measurements, as it is also related to alteration of bone quality and increased risk of falls. In patients with rheumatoid arthritis, a treat-to-target strategy focusing on low disease activity including through the use of low dose of prednisone, is a key determinant of bone loss prevention. Bone loss magnitude is variable and there is no clearly identified predictor of the individual risk of fracture. Prevention or treatment of osteoporosis should be considered in all patients who receive prednisone. Bisphosphonates and the anabolic agent parathyroid hormone (1–34) have shown their efficacy in the treatment of corticosteroid-induced osteoporosis. Recent international guidelines are available and should guide management of corticosteroid-induced osteoporosis, which remains under-diagnosed and under-treated. Duration of antiosteoporotic treatment should be discussed at the individual level, depending on the subject's characteristics and on the underlying inflammation evolution. PMID:26509049

  11. Lifestyle and osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Kun; Prince, Richard L

    2015-02-01

    Osteoporosis is associated with a number of lifestyle factors, including nutritional factors such as intake of calcium, protein, dairy food, fruits and vegetables and vitamin D status, and behavioural factors such as physical activity, smoking and alcohol consumption. Ensuring adequate calcium intake and vitamin D status and having regular weight-bearing physical activity throughout life are important for bone health and the prevention of osteoporosis and related fractures. Studies have shown that smoking and excessive alcohol intake have adverse effects on bone health and increase the risk of fracture. There is evidence suggesting that adequate protein intake and higher intake of fruits and vegetables are beneficial to bone health. PMID:25416958

  12. MALE OSTEOPOROSIS

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Lindomar Guimarães; Guimarães, Mara Lucia Rassi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Population aging is a reality that is being faced worldwide, and Brazil is no different. Osteoporosis was considered to be a postmenopausal women's disease for many years. Men have many development and hormonal factors that differentiate their skeletal maturation, which affects the incidence of osteoporosis and fractures. An up-to-date review of the specific literature within the Medline system is presented. PMID:27022584

  13. [Epidemiology of osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Grazio, Simeon

    2006-01-01

    Osteoporosis represents a major and increasing public health problem with the aging of population. Major clinical consequences and economic burden of the disease are fractures. Many risk factors are associated with the fractures including low bone mass, hormonal disorders, personal and family history of fractures, low body weight, use of certain drugs (e.g. glucocorticoids), cigarette smoking, elevated intake of alchohol, low physical activity, insufficient level of vitamin D and low intake of calcium. This epidemiological review describes frequency, importance of risk factors and impact of osteoporosis and osteoporotic fractures. Objective measures of bone mineral density along with clinical assessment of risk factors can help identify patients who will benefit from prevention and intervention efforts and eventually reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with osteoporosis-related fractures. PMID:17580550

  14. A cluster-randomised, controlled trial to assess the impact of a workplace osteoporosis prevention intervention on the dietary and physical activity behaviours of working women: study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Osteoporosis is a debilitating disease and its risk can be reduced through adequate calcium consumption and physical activity. This protocol paper describes a workplace-based intervention targeting behaviour change in premenopausal women working in sedentary occupations. Method/Design A cluster-randomised design was used, comparing the efficacy of a tailored intervention to standard care. Workplaces were the clusters and units of randomisation and intervention. Sample size calculations incorporated the cluster design. Final number of clusters was determined to be 16, based on a cluster size of 20 and calcium intake parameters (effect size 250 mg, ICC 0.5 and standard deviation 290 mg) as it required the highest number of clusters. Sixteen workplaces were recruited from a pool of 97 workplaces and randomly assigned to intervention and control arms (eight in each). Women meeting specified inclusion criteria were then recruited to participate. Workplaces in the intervention arm received three participatory workshops and organisation wide educational activities. Workplaces in the control/standard care arm received print resources. Intervention workshops were guided by self-efficacy theory and included participatory activities such as goal setting, problem solving, local food sampling, exercise trials, group discussion and behaviour feedback. Outcomes measures were calcium intake (milligrams/day) and physical activity level (duration: minutes/week), measured at baseline, four weeks and six months post intervention. Discussion This study addresses the current lack of evidence for behaviour change interventions focussing on osteoporosis prevention. It addresses missed opportunities of using workplaces as a platform to target high-risk individuals with sedentary occupations. The intervention was designed to modify behaviour levels to bring about risk reduction. It is the first to address dietary and physical activity components each with unique intervention

  15. Application of the health belief model and social cognitive theory for osteoporosis preventive nutritional behaviors in a sample of Iranian women

    PubMed Central

    Jeihooni, Ali Khani; Hidarnia, Alireza; Kaveh, Mohammad Hossein; Hajizadeh, Ebrahim; Askari, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Osteoporosis is the most common metabolic bone disease. The purpose of this study is to investigate the health belief model (HBM) and social cognitive theory (SCT) for osteoporosis preventive nutritional behaviors in women. Materials and Methods: In this quasi-experimental study, 120 patients who were women and registered under the health centers in Fasa City, Fars Province, Iran were selected. A questionnaire consisting of HBM constructs and the constructs of self-regulation and social support from SCT was used to measure nutrition performance. Bone mineral density was recorded at the lumbar spine and femur. The intervention for the experimental group included 10 educational sessions of 55-60 min of speech, group discussion, questions and answers, as well as posters and educational pamphlets, film screenings, and PowerPoint displays. Data were analyzed using SPSS 19 via Chi-square test, independent t-test, and repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) at a significance level of 0.05. Results: After intervention, the experimental group showed a significant increase in the HBM constructs, self-regulation, social support, and nutrition performance, compared to the control group. Six months after the intervention, the value of lumbar spine bone mineral density (BMD) T-score increased to 0.127 in the experimental group, while it reduced to −0.043 in the control group. The value of the hip BMD T-score increased to 0.125 in the intervention group, but it decreased to −0.028 in the control group. Conclusions: This study showed the effectiveness of HBM and constructs of self-regulation and social support on adoption of nutrition behaviors and increase in the bone density to prevent osteoporosis. PMID:27095985

  16. Pomegranate seed oil prevents bone loss in a mice model of osteoporosis, through osteoblastic stimulation, osteoclastic inhibition and decreased inflammatory status.

    PubMed

    Spilmont, Mélanie; Léotoing, Laurent; Davicco, Marie-Jeanne; Lebecque, Patrice; Mercier, Sylvie; Miot-Noirault, Elisabeth; Pilet, Paul; Rios, Laurent; Wittrant, Yohann; Coxam, Véronique

    2013-11-01

    In the current context of longer life expectancy, the prevalence of osteoporosis is increasingly important. This is why development of new strategies of prevention is highly suitable. Pomegranate seed oil (PSO) and its major component, punicic acid (a conjugated linolenic acid), have potent anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative properties both in vitro and in vivo, two processes strongly involved in osteoporosis establishment. In this study, we demonstrated that PSO consumption (5% of the diet) improved significantly bone mineral density (240.24±11.85 vs. 203.04±34.19 mg/cm(3)) and prevented trabecular microarchitecture impairment in ovariectomized (OVX) mice C57BL/6J, compared to OVX control animals. Those findings are associated with transcriptional changes in bone tissue, suggesting involvement of both osteoclastogenesis inhibition and osteoblastogenesis improvement. In addition, thanks to an ex vivo experiment, we provided evidence that serum from mice fed PSO (5% by gavage) had the ability to significantly down-regulate the expression of specific osteoclast differentiation markers and RANK-RANKL downstream signaling targets in osteoclast-like cells (RAW264.7) (RANK: negative 0.49-fold vs. control conditions). Moreover, in osteoblast-like cells (MC3T3-E1), it elicited significant increase in alkaline phosphatase activity (+159% at day 7), matrix mineralization (+271% on day 21) and transcriptional levels of major osteoblast lineage markers involving the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways. Our data also reveal that PSO inhibited pro-inflammatory factors expression while stimulating anti-inflammatory ones. These results demonstrate that PSO is highly relevant regarding osteoporosis. Indeed, it offers promising alternatives in the design of new strategies in nutritional management of age-related bone complications. PMID:23953990

  17. [Status and issues of medical treatment for osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Mika; Sugimoto, Toshitsugu

    2015-10-01

    Although various osteoporosis medications have become available with proven effects for protecting against bone fracture, such osteoporosis treatment is only given to 20 to 25% of those eligible in Japan. The most urgent task at present is to increase the treatment rate. The guidelines for prevention and treatment of osteoporosis were revised in 2015 and now include criteria for commencing medical treatment. However, guidelines for management of osteoporosis, including the duration of medical treatment for osteoporosis, are still under discussion. PMID:26529921

  18. Animal models for osteoporosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, R. T.; Maran, A.; Lotinun, S.; Hefferan, T.; Evans, G. L.; Zhang, M.; Sibonga, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    Animal models will continue to be important tools in the quest to understand the contribution of specific genes to establishment of peak bone mass and optimal bone architecture, as well as the genetic basis for a predisposition toward accelerated bone loss in the presence of co-morbidity factors such as estrogen deficiency. Existing animal models will continue to be useful for modeling changes in bone metabolism and architecture induced by well-defined local and systemic factors. However, there is a critical unfulfilled need to develop and validate better animal models to allow fruitful investigation of the interaction of the multitude of factors which precipitate senile osteoporosis. Well characterized and validated animal models that can be recommended for investigation of the etiology, prevention and treatment of several forms of osteoporosis have been listed in Table 1. Also listed are models which are provisionally recommended. These latter models have potential but are inadequately characterized, deviate significantly from the human response, require careful choice of strain or age, or are not practical for most investigators to adopt. It cannot be stressed strongly enough that the enormous potential of laboratory animals as models for osteoporosis can only be realized if great care is taken in the choice of an appropriate species, age, experimental design, and measurements. Poor choices will results in misinterpretation of results which ultimately can bring harm to patients who suffer from osteoporosis by delaying advancement of knowledge.

  19. Animal models for osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Turner, R T; Maran, A; Lotinun, S; Hefferan, T; Evans, G L; Zhang, M; Sibonga, J D

    2001-01-01

    Animal models will continue to be important tools in the quest to understand the contribution of specific genes to establishment of peak bone mass and optimal bone architecture, as well as the genetic basis for a predisposition toward accelerated bone loss in the presence of co-morbidity factors such as estrogen deficiency. Existing animal models will continue to be useful for modeling changes in bone metabolism and architecture induced by well-defined local and systemic factors. However, there is a critical unfulfilled need to develop and validate better animal models to allow fruitful investigation of the interaction of the multitude of factors which precipitate senile osteoporosis. Well characterized and validated animal models that can be recommended for investigation of the etiology, prevention and treatment of several forms of osteoporosis have been listed in Table 1. Also listed are models which are provisionally recommended. These latter models have potential but are inadequately characterized, deviate significantly from the human response, require careful choice of strain or age, or are not practical for most investigators to adopt. It cannot be stressed strongly enough that the enormous potential of laboratory animals as models for osteoporosis can only be realized if great care is taken in the choice of an appropriate species, age, experimental design, and measurements. Poor choices will results in misinterpretation of results which ultimately can bring harm to patients who suffer from osteoporosis by delaying advancement of knowledge. PMID:11704974

  20. Electroacupuncture stimulation at CV4 prevents ovariectomy-induced osteoporosis in rats via Wnt-β-catenin signaling

    PubMed Central

    FAN, HUAILING; JI, FENG; LIN, YING; ZHANG, MULAN; QIN, WEI; ZHOU, QI; WU, QIANG

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effect of electroacupuncture stimulation at CV4 (also termed Guanyuan) on femoral osteocalcin also termed bone gla protein (BGP), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), bone mineral density (BMD) and biomechanics, as well as the Wnt-β-catenin signaling pathway in rats with postmenopausal osteoporosis. Female Sprague-Dawley rats (4.5-months old) were randomly divided into sham, Ovx, CV4 and mock groups (n=10/group). With the exception of those in the sham group, the rats were ovariectomized to induce postmenopausal osteoporosis. The rats in the CV4 and mock groups were given electroacupuncture at CV4 and non-acupoint, respectively. The rats in the Ovx model and sham groups underwent identical fixing procedures, but did not undergo electroacupuncture. Following treatment, hematoxylin and eosin staining was used to observe morphological changes in the left femoral trabecular bone, and a three-point-bending test was used to analyze femur biomechanics and determine the BMD. In addition, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to measure the serum levels of ALP/BGP and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used detect the expression levels of Wnt3a, β-catenin and Runx2. In the present study, it was demonstrated that electroacupuncture at CV4 significantly improved the osteoporotic morphological changes that occurred in the ovariectomized rats, increased serum ALP and BGP levels, enhanced the maximum and fracture loads, increased BMD (P<0.01), and activated the Wnt-β-catenin signaling pathway. These findings demonstrated that electroacupuncture stimulation at CV4 affected bone formation and promoted bone metabolism in rats with postmenopausal osteoporosis, possibly by activating the Wnt-β-catenin signaling pathway. PMID:26846191

  1. Osteoporosis Associated with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Reiko; Inoue, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Recent epidemiological studies have revealed that osteoporosis is closely associated with common chronic diseases including diabetes, hypertension, chronic kidney disorders, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). COPD is a chronic inflammatory airway disease but now well known to be associated with various systemic comorbidities including osteoporosis. Osteoporosis and osteoporotic fractures are extremely common in COPD patients, which have significant impacts on their quality of life (QOL), activities of daily life (ADL), respiratory function, and possibly their prognosis. COPD-associated osteoporosis is however extremely under-recognized, hence undertreated. Recent studies have suggested that both decreased bone mineral density (BMD) and impaired bone quality compromise bone strength causing fractures in COPD. In COPD patients, various general clinical risk factors for osteoporosis are present including smoking, older age, low body weight, and physical inactivity. In addition, disease-related risk factors such as decreased pulmonary function, inflammation, glucocorticoid use and vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency have been linked to the development of osteoporosis in COPD. Increased awareness of osteoporosis in COPD, especially that of high prevalence of vertebral fractures is called upon among general physicians as well as pulmonologists. Routine screening for osteoporosis and risk assessment of fractures will enable physicians to diagnose COPD patients with comorbid osteoporosis at an early stage. Timely prevention of developing osteoporosis together with appropriate treatment of established osteoporosis may improve QOL and ADL of the COPD patients, preserve their lung function and eventually result in better prognosis in these patients. PMID:27622174

  2. Osteoporosis Associated with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Ryo; Watanabe, Reiko; Inoue, Daisuke

    2016-08-01

    Recent epidemiological studies have revealed that osteoporosis is closely associated with common chronic diseases including diabetes, hypertension, chronic kidney disorders, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). COPD is a chronic inflammatory airway disease but now well known to be associated with various systemic comorbidities including osteoporosis. Osteoporosis and osteoporotic fractures are extremely common in COPD patients, which have significant impacts on their quality of life (QOL), activities of daily life (ADL), respiratory function, and possibly their prognosis. COPD-associated osteoporosis is however extremely under-recognized, hence undertreated. Recent studies have suggested that both decreased bone mineral density (BMD) and impaired bone quality compromise bone strength causing fractures in COPD. In COPD patients, various general clinical risk factors for osteoporosis are present including smoking, older age, low body weight, and physical inactivity. In addition, disease-related risk factors such as decreased pulmonary function, inflammation, glucocorticoid use and vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency have been linked to the development of osteoporosis in COPD. Increased awareness of osteoporosis in COPD, especially that of high prevalence of vertebral fractures is called upon among general physicians as well as pulmonologists. Routine screening for osteoporosis and risk assessment of fractures will enable physicians to diagnose COPD patients with comorbid osteoporosis at an early stage. Timely prevention of developing osteoporosis together with appropriate treatment of established osteoporosis may improve QOL and ADL of the COPD patients, preserve their lung function and eventually result in better prognosis in these patients. PMID:27622174

  3. Management of osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Lewiecki, E Michael

    2004-01-01

    Osteoporosis or osteopenia occurs in about 44 million Americans, resulting in 1.5 million fragility fractures per year. The consequences of these fractures include pain, disability, depression, loss of independence, and increased mortality. The burden to the healthcare system, in terms of cost and resources, is tremendous, with an estimated direct annual USA healthcare expenditure of about $17 billion. With longer life expectancy and the aging of the baby-boomer generation, the number of men and women with osteoporosis or low bone density is expected to rise to over 61 million by 2020. Osteoporosis is a silent disease that causes no symptoms until a fracture occurs. Any fragility fracture greatly increases the risk of future fractures. Most patients with osteoporosis are not being diagnosed or treated. Even those with previous fractures, who are at extremely high risk of future fractures, are often not being treated. It is preferable to diagnose osteoporosis by bone density testing of high risk individuals before the first fracture occurs. If osteoporosis or low bone density is identified, evaluation for contributing factors should be considered. Patients on long-term glucocorticoid therapy are at especially high risk for developing osteoporosis, and may sustain fractures at a lower bone density than those not taking glucocorticoids. All patients should be counseled on the importance of regular weight-bearing exercise and adequate daily intake of calcium and vitamin D. Exposure to medications that cause drowsiness or hypotension should be minimized. Non-pharmacologic therapy to reduce the non-skeletal risk factors for fracture should be considered. These include fall prevention through balance training and muscle strengthening, removal of fall hazards at home, and wearing hip protectors if the risk of falling remains high. Pharmacologic therapy can stabilize or increase bone density in most patients, and reduce fracture risk by about 50%. By selecting high risk

  4. Male Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Matthew T.; Khosla, Sundeep

    2013-01-01

    Synopsis Osteoporosis is now recognized as a major threat to health in aging men. Morbidity and mortality, particularly following hip fracture, are substantial. Whereas trabecular bone loss starts in early adulthood, loss of cortical bone only appears to occur from mid-life onwards. Declining bioavailable estradiol levels play an integral role in male age-associated bone loss. Both pharmacologic and supportive care interventions are important for optimal care in men at increased fracture risk. PMID:22877433

  5. Effect of Distributing an Evidence-Based Guideline for Prevention of Osteoporosis on Health Education Programs in Municipal Health Centers: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Nakatani, Yoshimi; Tamaki, Junko; Komatsu, Misa; Iki, Masayuki; Kajita, Etsuko

    2012-01-01

    Background Current health education programs for osteoporosis prevention are not strictly evidence-based. We assessed whether distribution of an evidence-based guideline improved such programs at municipal health centers. Methods This randomized controlled trial evaluated 100 municipal health centers throughout Japan that were randomly selected from those that planned to revise osteoporosis prevention programs. The implementation status of educational items recommended by the guideline was assessed before and after the intervention by evaluators blinded to the allocation. After the pre-intervention assessment, centers were randomly allocated in a 1:1 ratio to intervention and control groups by a minimization method defining region and city/town as stratification factors. Centers in the intervention group were given copies of the guideline; centers in the control group were instructed to use any information except the guideline. Analyses were performed on an intention-to-treat basis. Results The guideline was used by 50% of the intervention group. Before the intervention, there was no significant difference in the evidence-based status of health education between the groups. The post-intervention assessment showed that the implementation rates of health education on dietary calcium intake for postmenopausal women and exercise for elderly persons were higher in the intervention group. Specific advice on intakes of calcium and vitamin D and exercise became more evidence-based in the intervention group. Conclusions The findings suggest that the guideline helped healthcare professionals to improve health education programs by making them more evidence-based. However, the improvements seemed to be limited to items that the professionals felt prepared to improve. PMID:22214657

  6. The management of osteoporosis in children.

    PubMed

    Ward, L M; Konji, V N; Ma, J

    2016-07-01

    This article reviews the manifestations and risk factors associated with osteoporosis in childhood, the definition of osteoporosis and recommendations for monitoring and prevention. As well, this article discusses when a child should be considered a candidate for osteoporosis therapy, which agents should be prescribed, duration of therapy and side effects. There has been significant progress in our understanding of risk factors and the natural history of osteoporosis in children over the past number of years. This knowledge has fostered the development of logical approaches to the diagnosis, monitoring, and optimal timing of osteoporosis intervention in this setting. Current management strategies are predicated upon monitoring at-risk children to identify and then treat earlier rather than later signs of osteoporosis in those with limited potential for spontaneous recovery. On the other hand, trials addressing the prevention of the first-ever fracture are still needed for children who have both a high likelihood of developing fractures and less potential for recovery. This review focuses on the evidence that shapes the current approach to diagnosis, monitoring, and treatment of osteoporosis in childhood, with emphasis on the key pediatric-specific biological principles that are pivotal to the overall approach and on the main questions with which clinicians struggle on a daily basis. The scope of this article is to review the manifestations of and risk factors for primary and secondary osteoporosis in children, to discuss the definition of pediatric osteoporosis, and to summarize recommendations for monitoring and prevention of bone fragility. As well, this article reviews when a child is a candidate for osteoporosis therapy, which agents and doses should be prescribed, the duration of therapy, how the response to therapy is adjudicated, and the short- and long-term side effects. With this information, the bone health clinician will be poised to diagnose

  7. Breastfeeding and postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Grimes, Julia P; Wimalawansa, Sunil J

    2003-06-01

    Bone loss associated with osteoporosis occurs with high frequency among the elderly and often results in debilitating fractures. A combination of lifestyle behaviors, genetic predisposition, and disease processes contributes to bone metabolism. Therefore, any discussion regarding bone health must address these factors. The impact of menopause on bone turnover has been generally well studied and characterized. Breastfeeding places significant stress on calcium metabolism and, as a consequence, directly influences bone metabolism. The most significant factors affecting bone mineral density (BMD) and bone metabolism are the duration and frequency of lactation, the return of menses, and pre-pregnancy weight. Although transient, lactation is associated with bone loss. As clinical guidelines and public health policies are being formulated, there is a compelling need for further investigation into the relationship of lactation, BMD, and subsequent risk of osteoporosis. Better understanding of this relationship will provide new opportunities for early intervention and ultimately help in the prevention of bone loss in postmenopausal women. PMID:12734029

  8. [Biological therapy for osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Shinya; Tanaka, Sakae

    2014-06-01

    Osteoporosis is a disorder of bone formation and resorption balance. Advances in our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of bone formation and resorption led to promising therapeutic targets for osteoporosis. In the novel biological drugs, denosumab, a monoclonal antibody against receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL) has been clinically applied by positive effect on bone mineral density, negative effect on bone resorption, preventive effect on fragility fractures and safety. Odanacatib, a cathepsin K inhibitor is drawing attention as an antiresorptive drug which has lower bone resorption potency than bisphosphoneate. On the other hand, BHQ-880, an anti-Dickkopf-1 (Dkk-1) antibody and romosozumab (AMG-785) , an anti-sclerostin antibody which activate Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway are drawing attention as bone formation accelerators with no bone resorption acceleration. Clinical studies of these drugs are now ongoing and their clinical applications are expected. PMID:24870844

  9. Osteoporosis in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Mehler, Philip S; Cleary, Barbara S; Gaudiani, Jennifer L

    2011-01-01

    Osteoporosis is common in anorexia nervosa. It places these patients at increased lifetime risk for fractures. Bone loss may never recover completely even once weight is restored. The strongest predictors of osteoporosis include low body weight and amenorrhea. Loss of bone density can occur rapidly and very early in the course of anorexia nervosa. The etiology of bone loss in the patient with anorexia nervosa is multifactorial. In addition to reduced estrogen and progesterone, excess cortisol levels and low levels of insulin growth factor (IGF-1), a correlate for bone formation, are observed. Dual energy x-ray absorptiometry screening is important to assess bone density. However, successful treatments to reverse bone loss, in those with anorexia nervosa, are lacking. Early diagnosis and treatment of anorexia nervosa are paramount to prevent initial weight loss and subsequent loss of bone. PMID:21360368

  10. Restrictions in Means for Suicide: An Effective Tool in Preventing Suicide: The Danish Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordentoft, Merete; Qin, Ping; Helweg-Larsen, Karin

    2007-01-01

    Restriction of means for suicide is an important part of suicide preventive strategies in different countries. The effect on method-specific suicide rate and overall suicide rate of restrictions on availability of carbon monoxide, barbiturates, and dextropropoxyphene was examined. From 1970 to 2000, overall suicide mortality and method-specific…

  11. The risk-stratified osteoporosis strategy evaluation study (ROSE): a randomized prospective population-based study. Design and baseline characteristics.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Katrine Hass; Holmberg, Teresa; Rothmann, Mette Juel; Høiberg, Mikkel; Barkmann, Reinhard; Gram, Jeppe; Hermann, Anne Pernille; Bech, Mickael; Rasmussen, Ole; Glüer, Claus C; Brixen, Kim

    2015-02-01

    The risk-stratified osteoporosis strategy evaluation study (ROSE) is a randomized prospective population-based study investigating the effectiveness of a two-step screening program for osteoporosis in women. This paper reports the study design and baseline characteristics of the study population. 35,000 women aged 65-80 years were selected at random from the population in the Region of Southern Denmark and-before inclusion-randomized to either a screening group or a control group. As first step, a self-administered questionnaire regarding risk factors for osteoporosis based on FRAX(®) was issued to both groups. As second step, subjects in the screening group with a 10-year probability of major osteoporotic fractures ≥15% were offered a DXA scan. Patients diagnosed with osteoporosis from the DXA scan were advised to see their GP and discuss pharmaceutical treatment according to Danish National guidelines. The primary outcome is incident clinical fractures as evaluated through annual follow-up using the Danish National Patient Registry. The secondary outcomes are cost-effectiveness, participation rate, and patient preferences. 20,904 (60%) women participated and included in the baseline analyses (10,411 in screening and 10,949 in control group). The mean age was 71 years. As expected by randomization, the screening and control groups had similar baseline characteristics. Screening for osteoporosis is at present not evidence based according to the WHO screening criteria. The ROSE study is expected to provide knowledge of the effectiveness of a screening strategy that may be implemented in health care systems to prevent fractures. PMID:25578146

  12. Research Advances: Onions Battle Osteoporosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Angela G.

    2005-01-01

    Researchers at the University of Bern in Switzerland have identified a compound in the popular vegetable that appears to decrease bone loss in laboratory studies using rat bone cells. It is suggested that eating onions might help prevent bone loss and osteoporosis, a disease, which predominantly affects older women.

  13. Understanding osteoporosis.

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, R.

    1991-01-01

    Considerable progress has been achieved recently in our understanding of the normal process by which bone mass is regulated. Age-related trabecular bone loss is characterized not simply by a global loss of bone but also by cortical porosity and loss of trabecular connections. Because bone strength depends on architectural as well as material properties, bone quantity alone cannot define fracture risk with precision. Traditional therapies for osteoporosis increase bone mass, and estrogen therapy, in particular, profoundly decreases fracture risk. The pharmacologic restoration of bone quantity and quality, however, remains elusive. Modern biotechnology offers the hope that progress may come about through the development of growth factors and other osteotropic compounds for clinical use. Images PMID:1877231

  14. A review of osteoporosis management in younger premenopausal women.

    PubMed

    McLendon, Amber N; Woodis, C Brock

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to describe the available evidence for osteoporosis treatments in young and premenopausal women. A review of articles evaluating the treatment or prevention of osteoporosis in young (age less than 50 years) or premenopausal women was conducted. Several trials evaluating the treatment of anorexia nervosa and use of hormone therapy in those women, the use of bisphosphonates in women undergoing chemotherapy for breast cancer and the use of bisphosphonates, teriparatide and vitamin D in women with glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis are described. Limited data were found to support the treatment of osteoporosis in women with idiopathic osteoporosis or cystic fibrosis, or after kidney transplant. The evidence for treatment of osteoporosis in premenopausal women is not nearly as robust as that for postmenopausal osteoporosis. Although fracture risk in the premenopausal population is low, women with secondary osteoporosis may benefit from treatment with various agents, depending upon the condition. PMID:24328599

  15. Effects of an osteoporosis prevention training program on physical activity-related stages of change and self-efficacy among university students, Shiraz, Iran: a Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    KAVEH, MOHAMMAD HOSSIEN; GOLIJ, MONIRE; NAZARI, MAHIN; MAZLOOM, ZOHREH; REZAEIAN ZADEH, ABBAS

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Osteoporosis is a major problem in today's world, being characterized by decreased bone mass and bone change. Due to deficiency of theory-based studies in young population, especially in students, there are significant knowledge gaps of effective planning. Thepresent study was performed in response to this need. The present study investigated the effect of an empowerment program on physical activity related stages of change and self-efficacyin preventing osteoporosis among university students. Methods:In this randomized controlled trial (IRCT: IRCT201212016261N2), 152 female students of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences were selected through multi-stages cluster sampling and were randomly assigned to an experimental (n=76) and a control (n=76) group.The pre-and post-intervention data were collected using the Stages of Exercise Change Questionnaire (SECQ) of Marcos with Cronbach's alpha reliability of 0.89 and also the self-efficacy scale with a Cronbach's alpha reliability of 0.88 and Test-Retest Correlation Coefficient of 0.80. The educational intervention for the experimental group took place through problem-based learning method, small group discussion, and training manuals. In addition, training CDs and brochures were given to the subjects and short SMSs were sent to them. The data were analyzed throughSPSS, version 14, usingMann-Whitney test, Chi-square test, Wilcoxon and regression tests. Results:Pre-intervention findings showed that participants had behavioral constructs below the expected levels. The results showed that the experimental group received significant statisticalincrease after the intervention in stage of change. Before the intervention, the mean scores of stages of changes in the experimental groups was 2.28±0.86 but this rose to 3±0.84 in the first post-test and 3.22±0.84 in the second post-test. The control group showed a significant increase in stage of change without intervention (pre-test 2.04±0.82, first post

  16. FastStats: Osteoporosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Osteoporosis Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Data are ... men 50 years of age and over with osteoporosis of the femur neck or lumbar spine: 4% ...

  17. Osteoporosis: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, C. Conrad; Slemenda, Charles

    1987-01-01

    An overview of osteoporosis, its types, causes, diagnosis, and treatment is presented. Risk factors and bone mass measurement are also discussed. This article serves as an introduction to a symposium on osteoporosis containing five other articles in this issue. (MT)

  18. International Osteoporosis Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Websites IOF International IOF Latin America IOF Asia-Pacific IOF Microsites Capture the Fracture Osteoporosis Essentials course ... on FRAX CME accreditation confirmed for 6th Asia-Pacific Osteoporosis Meeting in Singapore Milk and other dairy ...

  19. Osteoporosis and Hispanic Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... for the elderly, visit: NIH Osteoporosis and Related Bone Diseases ~ National Resource Center Website: http://www.bones.nih. ... Pub. No. 15-7924 NIH Osteoporosis and Related Bone Diseases ~ National Resource Center 2 AMS Circle Bethesda, MD ...

  20. Exercise and Osteoporosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... My Go4Life Get Free Stuff Be a Partner Exercise and Osteoporosis Osteoporosis is a disease that weakens ... calcium and vitamin D. Include regular weight-bearing exercise in your lifestyle. Stop smoking. Limit how much ...

  1. Osteoporosis and Your Spine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Movement › Osteoporosis and Your Spine Osteoporosis and Your Spine Your spine is made up of small bones ... called kyphosis. Kyphosis and Bone Breaks in the Spine The bones in the spine are called vertebrae. ...

  2. Medicines for osteoporosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Raloxifene (Evista); Teriparatide (Forteo); Denosumab (Prolia); Low bone density - medicines; Osteoporosis - medicines ... to fracture (break). With osteoporosis, the bones lose density. Bone density measures the amount of bone tissue ...

  3. Studies on the pathophysiology and therapy of osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Ambrus, J L; Ambrus, J L; Robin, J C; Ambrus, C M; Kahn, E A

    1984-01-01

    Etiologic and pathologic factors in clinical osteoporosis are reviewed. Techniques were developed to determine total skeletal calcium content with in vivo neutron activation analysis and to induce osteoporosis (in about three months) with low calcium diet, corticosteroid or heparin treatment in experimental animals. Genetic influence was demonstrated: C3H/St (Ha) mice were more susceptible to osteoporosis by all three modalities than C57B1/6 (J) mice. Fluoride was ineffective in preventing osteoporosis induced by either of these three modalities. Heparin induced osteoporosis was prevented by conjugated estrogens, progestins or their combinations. Progestins were shown in other studies to inhibit estrogen induced metaplasia and neoplasia. Combining estrogens with progestin may result in an increased therapeutic index for the prevention of postmenopausal osteoporosis. Human and salmon calcitonin, Deca - Durabolin, an anabolic steroid, Mopidamole, a pyrimidopyrimidine derivative, Trental, a methylxanthine derivative, certain 2-thiophene carboxylic acid derivatives and imidazoquinazolines exhibited anti-osteoporotic effects. PMID:6396359

  4. Osteoporosis and Lifestyle.

    PubMed

    Ishimi, Yoshiko

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal tissue is formed during the first two decades of life; then a constant bone mass is maintained until 40 y of age. In the case of women, the bone mass is rapidly reduced at menopause at around 50 y of age. After that, bone mass slowly decreases in both men and women who have passed the 70-y-old mark. The National Institute of Health Consensus Conference adopted the definition of osteoporosis as a skeletal disorder that is characterized by compromised bone strength leading to a predisposition for and an increased risk of fracture. Since osteoporotic fractures are the third-highest cause for becoming bedridden, the maintenance of healthy bones is an important factor in extending a person's healthy lifespan. Bone mass is influenced by many factors, such as nutrition, physical activity, smoking and alcohol intake, as well as by genetic factors. Thus, a healthy diet providing balanced nutrients including calcium, vitamin D, vitamin K and protein, regular physical activity, and not smoking help maintain bone health and delay or prevent osteoporosis. Some functional foods containing soy isoflavones, milk basic protein and n-3 fatty acid may help promote bone health. PMID:26598829

  5. Novel therapies for osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Biskobing, Diane M

    2003-04-01

    Osteoporosis remains a significant clinical problem despite effective therapies. Many patients cannot or will not take currently available therapies. For this reason research continues in search of more effective and more tolerable agents. Anabolic agents offer a unique mechanism of action. The anabolic agents parathyroid hormone and strontium will be discussed. The investigational bisphosphonates ibandronate, minodronate and zoledronic acid may offer the advantage of less frequent dosing. Arzoxifene, bazedoxifene, lasofoxifene, MDL-103,323 and ospemifene are investigational selective oestrogen receptor modulators shown to be effective in animal studies and are now in clinical studies. Tibolone is a tissue-specific steroid that is currently used in Europe for prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. Multiple studies have shown efficacy in improving bone mineral density, but no fracture studies have been conducted to date. While studies of the effect of isoflavones on bone mineral density have been encouraging, a large, multi-centre study in Europe showed no effect of isoflavones on fractures. The newly described agent osteoprotegerin has been shown in early studies to inhibit bone turnover. Other agents with unique mechanisms of action in early development include cathepsin K inhibitors, integrin receptor inhibitors, nitrosylated non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents and Src inhibitors. The efficacy of statins in bone continues to be debated with no prospective, randomised studies yet to confirm the suggestion of benefit seen in epidemiological studies. PMID:12665416

  6. Osteoporosis in German men: a cost-of-illness study.

    PubMed

    Berghaus, Sabine; Müller, Dirk; Gandjour, Afschin; Civello, Daniele; Stock, Stephanie

    2015-06-01

    Costs of male osteoporosis may have increased due to population aging and change of treatment patterns. This cost-of-illness study provides a current estimate of the economic burden of male osteoporosis in Germany. Routine claims data from six German sickness funds were analyzed and extrapolated to the German statutory health insurance (SHI). For men above the age of 50 with at least one ICD-10 osteoporosis-related diagnosis or osteoporosis-related fracture in 2010, direct costs related to osteoporosis were considered based on a payer's perspective. Total direct costs attributable to osteoporosis amounted to €728 million in 2010. The majority of these costs (71%) resulted from inpatient treatment due to fractures. Patients aged 75 and older caused approximately 63% of costs. Male osteoporosis represents a non-negligible economic burden for the German health care system. Targeted prevention and promotion measures should be offered both to men and women. PMID:25495596

  7. Osteoporosis across chronic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Guarino, M; Loperto, I; Camera, S; Cossiga, V; Di Somma, C; Colao, A; Caporaso, N; Morisco, F

    2016-06-01

    Osteoporosis is a complication of chronic liver disease, with impact on morbidity, quality of life, and survival. The progress of medicine and the new therapies stretched the disease's natural history and improved the survival of patients with liver disease. So, it is fundamental to make better the quality of life and to prevent complications. Metabolic bone disorders are common complications of chronic liver disease (CLD). Patients with CLD have an increased risk of bone fractures, with significant impact on morbidity, quality of life, and even on survival. Bone diseases, including osteomalacia, osteoporosis, and osteopenia, are frequently observed in many types of liver disease. The pathogenesis of damage and the mechanisms of bone loss are different in relation to the specific liver disease. The relevance of these conditions induced many authors to create a new nosographic entity known as "hepatic osteodystrophy", although this term is rarely used anymore and it is now commonly referred to as osteopenia or osteoporosis associated with chronic liver disease. This review is based on the personal experiences of the authors and upon research done of the available literature on this subject matter. The authors searched the PubMed database for publications containing the term "liver disease" in combination with "bone disease", "hepatic osteodistrophy", "osteoporosis", "osteopenia", "osteomalacia", and "fractures". They selected publications from the past 10 years but did not exclude older seminal publications, especially for colestatic liver diseases. This review of literature shows that osteoporosis crosses all CLD. It is important to underline that the progress of medicine and the new therapies stretched the disease's natural history and improved the survival of patients with CLD. It is fundamental to make better the quality of life and it is mandatory to prevent complications and in particular the osteoporotic ones, especially fractures. PMID:26846777

  8. New therapeutics for osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Ng, Kong Wah; Martin, T John

    2014-06-01

    Two new approaches for the treatment of osteoporosis are summarized, each having arisen out of important new discoveries in bone biology. Odanacatib (ODN) inhibits the enzyme, cathepsin K, that is essential for the resorbing activity of osteoclasts. It is effective in preventing ovariectomy-induced bone loss in preclinical studies, and a phase II clinical study has shown inhibition of resorption sustained over five years. Outcome of a phase III study is awaited. The finding from mouse and human genetics that Wnt signaling is a powerful inducer of bone formation led to developments aimed at enhancing this pathway. Of the several approaches towards this, the most advanced is with a neutralizing antibody against sclerostin, the osteocyte-derived inhibitor of Wnt signaling. Preclinical studies show a powerful bone anabolic effect, and a clinical phase II study shows dose-dependent increases in bone formation and decreases in bone resorption markers. PMID:24699340

  9. Pathogenesis of Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Khosla, Sundeep

    2013-01-01

    As for most multifactorial disorders, the pathogenesis of osteoporosis is complex, and a different set of mechanisms may be operative in any given individual. However, there are certain common causes of bone loss and increased fracture risk with aging in most people. These include genetic factors contributing to the acquisition of peak bone mass, illnesses affecting skeletal growth and development, sex steroid deficiency following the menopause in women and with aging in men, and intrinsic, age-related changes in bone metabolism. Superimposed on these factors are specific secondary causes of bone loss, such as corticosteroid use or other illnesses affecting bone metabolism that may contribute to fracture risk in individuals exposed to these factors. The past decade has witnessed tremendous advances in our understanding of each of these various causes of bone loss, leading to the development of novel, mechanism-based therapeutic approaches to prevent and treat this important public health disorder. PMID:25243055

  10. Comparing Osteoporosis Drugs: The Bisphosphonates

    MedlinePlus

    Drugs to Treat Low Bone Density Comparing Osteoporosis Drugs: The Bisphosphonates What is osteoporosis (low bone density)? Osteoporosis is a condition in which the body does not build enough new bone. ...

  11. Osteoporosis: Build Up Your Bones!

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Osteoporosis Build Up Your Bones! Past Issues / Winter 2011 ... special needs of people with osteoporosis. A Complete Osteoporosis Program Remember, exercise is only one part of ...

  12. A Multidisciplinary Osteoporosis Service-Based Action Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehead, Dean; Keast, John; Montgomery, Val; Hayman, Sue

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate an existing Trust-based osteoporosis service's preventative activity, determine any issues and problems and use this data to reorganise the service, as part of a National Health Service Executive/Regional Office-commissioned and funded study. Setting: A UK Hospital Trust's Osteoporosis Service. Design & Method: A…

  13. Osteoporosis in paediatric patients with spina bifida

    PubMed Central

    Marreiros, Humberto Filipe; Loff, Clara; Calado, Eulalia

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence and morbidity associated with osteoporosis and fractures in patients with spina bifida (SB) highlight the importance of osteoporosis prevention and treatment in early childhood; however, the issue has received little attention. The method for the selection of appropriate patients for drug treatment has not been clarified. Objective To review the literature concerning fracture risks and low bone density in paediatric patients with SB. We looked for studies describing state-of-the-art treatments and for prevention of secondary osteoporosis. Methods Articles were identified through a search in the electronic database (PUBMED) supplemented with reviews of the reference lists of selected papers. The main outcome measures were incidence of fractures and risk factors for fracture, an association between bone mineral density (BMD) and occurrence of fracture, risk factors of low BMD, and effects of pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments on BMD and on the incidence of fractures. We considered as a secondary outcome the occurrence of fractures in relation to the mechanism of injury. Results Results indicated that patients with SB are at increased risk for fractures and low BMD. Risk factors that may predispose patients to fractures include higher levels of neurological involvement, non-ambulatory status, physical inactivity, hypercalciuria, higher body fat levels, contractures, and a previous spontaneous fracture. Limitations were observed in the number and quality of studies concerning osteoporosis prevention and treatment in paediatric patients with SB. The safety and efficiency of drugs to treat osteoporosis in adults have not been evaluated satisfactorily in children with SB. PMID:22330186

  14. Emerging Therapies for Osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    McClung, Michael R

    2015-12-01

    Although several effective therapies are available for the treatment of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women and older men, there remains a need for the development of even more effective and acceptable drugs. Several new drugs that are in late-stage clinical development will be discussed. Abaloparatide (recombinant parathyroid hormone related peptide [PTHrP] analogue) has anabolic activity like teriparatide. Recent data from the phase 3 fracture prevention trial demonstrate that this agent is effective in reducing fracture risk. Inhibiting cathepsin K reduces bone resorption without decreasing the numbers or activity of osteoclasts, thereby preserving or promoting osteoblast function. Progressive increases in bone mineral density (BMD) have been observed over 5 years. Early data suggest that odanacatib effectively reduces fracture risk. Lastly, inhibiting sclerostin with humanized antibodies promotes rapid, substantial but transient increases in bone formation while inhibiting bone resorption. Marked increases in BMD have been observed in phase 2 studies. Fracture prevention studies are underway. The new therapies with novel and unique mechanisms of action may, alone or in combination, provide more effective treatment options for our patients. PMID:26354487

  15. Emerging Therapies for Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Although several effective therapies are available for the treatment of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women and older men, there remains a need for the development of even more effective and acceptable drugs. Several new drugs that are in late-stage clinical development will be discussed. Abaloparatide (recombinant parathyroid hormone related peptide [PTHrP] analogue) has anabolic activity like teriparatide. Recent data from the phase 3 fracture prevention trial demonstrate that this agent is effective in reducing fracture risk. Inhibiting cathepsin K reduces bone resorption without decreasing the numbers or activity of osteoclasts, thereby preserving or promoting osteoblast function. Progressive increases in bone mineral density (BMD) have been observed over 5 years. Early data suggest that odanacatib effectively reduces fracture risk. Lastly, inhibiting sclerostin with humanized antibodies promotes rapid, substantial but transient increases in bone formation while inhibiting bone resorption. Marked increases in BMD have been observed in phase 2 studies. Fracture prevention studies are underway. The new therapies with novel and unique mechanisms of action may, alone or in combination, provide more effective treatment options for our patients. PMID:26354487

  16. Pituitary Disorders and Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Jawiarczyk-Przybyłowska, Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    Various hormonal disorders can influence bone metabolism and cause secondary osteoporosis. The consequence of this is a significant increase of fracture risk. Among pituitary disorders such effects are observed in patients with Cushing's disease, hyperprolactinemia, acromegaly, and hypopituitarism. Severe osteoporosis is the result of the coexistence of some of these disorders and hypogonadism at the same time, which is quite often. PMID:25873948

  17. The position of strontium ranelate in today's management of osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Reginster, J-Y; Brandi, M-L; Cannata-Andía, J; Cooper, C; Cortet, B; Feron, J-M; Genant, H; Palacios, S; Ringe, J D; Rizzoli, R

    2015-06-01

    Osteoporosis accounts for about 3 % of total European health-care spending. The low proportion of costs for the pharmacological prevention of osteoporotic fracture means that it is highly cost saving, especially in patient with severe osteoporosis or patients who cannot take certain osteoporosis medications due to issues of contraindications or tolerability. Following recent regulatory changes, strontium ranelate is now indicated in patients with severe osteoporosis for whom treatment with other osteoporosis treatments is not possible, and without contraindications including uncontrolled hypertension, established, current or past history of ischaemic heart disease, peripheral arterial disease, and/or cerebrovascular disease. We review here today's evidence for the safety and efficacy of strontium ranelate. The efficacy of strontium ranelate in patients complying with the new prescribing information (i.e. severe osteoporosis without contraindications) has been explored in a multivariate analysis of clinical trial data, which concluded that the antifracture efficacy of strontium ranelate is maintained in patients with severe osteoporosis without contraindications and also demonstrated how the new target population mitigates risk. Strontium ranelate is therefore an important alternative in today's management of osteoporosis, with a positive benefit-risk balance, provided that the revised indication and contraindications are followed and cardiovascular risk is monitored. The bone community should be reassured that there remain viable alternatives in patients in whom treatment with other agents is not possible and protection against the debilitating effects of fracture is still feasible in patients with severe osteoporosis. PMID:25868510

  18. Osteoporosis: What is the Role of Exercise?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munnings, Frances

    1992-01-01

    Research has not yet identified the best combination of estrogen replacement, calcium, and exercise for fighting osteoporosis, but clinical experience indicates all are needed to prevent the rapid bone loss that occurs in postmenopausal women. Physicians must encourage women to reduce their risk using all available options. (SM)

  19. What Is Osteoporosis?

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... easily. LAWRENCE RAISZ, M.D.: Osteoporosis and bone health have become enormous problems in the United States ... attention to. People ignore the issue of bone health-- they don't concern themselves about it until ...

  20. International Osteoporosis Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bosnia and Herzegovina - Brazil - Bulgaria - Cameroon - Canada - Chile - China - Colombia - Costa Rica - Croatia - Cuba - Cyprus - Czech Republic - ... warn of osteoporosis threat to Asia’s growing elderly population New drugs may help increase muscle strength and ...

  1. Diagnosis of Osteoporosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wahner, H. W.

    1987-01-01

    Early recognition of osteoporosis is difficult because symptoms are lacking and there are no distinct, readily accessible diagnostic features. This article reviews the standard approach, radiographic and laboratory diagnosis, bone mass measurement techniques, and interpretation of bone mineral data. (MT)

  2. Medicines for osteoporosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Evista); Teriparatide (Forteo); Denosumab (Prolia); Low bone density - medicines; Osteoporosis - medicines ... Your doctor may prescribe medicines to help lower your risk of fractures. These medicines make the bones in your hips, spine, and other areas denser. ...

  3. Osteoporosis in Men

    MedlinePlus

    ... formation. Because it requires daily injections and is expensive, doctors usually prescribe it only for men with ... wine, or a single measure of spirits) • Quit smoking. If you already have osteoporosis, you should take ...

  4. Osteoporosis in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Treasure, J; Serpell, L

    1999-07-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a disorder characterized by low body weight and amenorrhoea (in females). These features lead to a risk of osteoporosis, a condition in which bone loss leads to weakening of bone structure and increased fracture risk. PMID:10605537

  5. Osteoporosis in Men

    MedlinePlus

    ... talk to their doctor about having a bone mineral density (BMD) test. Men should also be tested ... tests. The doctor may also order a bone mineral density test. This test can identify osteoporosis, determine ...

  6. Secondary osteoporosis: pathophysiology & diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Emkey, Gregory R; Epstein, Sol

    2014-12-01

    Osteoporosis is a skeletal disease characterized by decreased bone mass and microarchitectural changes in bone tissue that increase the susceptibility to fracture. Secondary osteoporosis is loosely defined as low bone mineral density or increased risk of fragility fracture caused by any factor other than aging or postmenopausal status. The purpose of this review is to discuss the current understanding of the pathophysiology and contribution to fracture risk of many of the more common causes of secondary osteoporosis, as well as diagnostic considerations, outlined by organ system. While not comprehensive, included are a wide array of diseases, conditions, and medications that have been associated with bone loss and susceptibility to fractures. The hope is to highlight the importance to the general clinician of screening for and treating the osteoporosis in these patients, so to limit the resultant increased morbidity associated with fractures. PMID:25432361

  7. New Antiresorptive Therapies for Postmenopausal Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a systemic skeletal disease whose risk increases with age and it is common among postmenopausal women. Currently, almost all pharmacological agents for osteoporosis target the bone resorption component of bone remodeling activity. Current antiresorptive agents are effective, but the effectiveness of some agents is limited by real or perceived intolerance, longterm adverse events (AEs), coexisting comorbidities, and inadequate long-term adherence. New antiresorptive therapies that may expand options for the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis include denosumab, combination of conjugated estrogen/bazedoxifene and cathepsin K inhibitors. However, the long-term efficacy and AEs of these antiresorptive therapies need to be confirmed in studies with a longer follow-up period. PMID:26046031

  8. Osteoporosis in the at-risk asthmatic.

    PubMed

    Aljubran, S A; Whelan, G J; Glaum, M C; Lockey, R F

    2014-11-01

    The effect of inhaled glucocorticosteroids (ICS) on bone metabolism and subsequent osteoporosis is controversial. Explanations for this controversy include various study designs, duration of use, outcome measures, and population demographics of research studies with intranasal or inhalational ICS. Patients with poorly controlled asthma are at greatest risk of osteoporosis because they are commonly treated with intermittent or continuous systemic corticosteroids (SCS) or high-dose ICS. A 45-year-old Caucasian woman presents with moderate-to-severe asthma with frequent albuterol use and nighttime awakenings at least once weekly. She is on fluticasone/salmeterol 500/50 μg one inhalation twice daily and montelukast 10 mg/day. She requires prednisone 15 mg three times per day for 5 days up to three times a year. Is this patient at greater risk of osteopenia, characterized by a T-score between -1.0 and -2.5, and subsequent osteoporosis and an increased risk of fractures? If she has osteopenia, should she be treated with a bisphosphonate? The risk of osteoporosis and fracture increases significantly with frequent administration of SCS, and patients on such medications should undergo preventative measures and treatment. This study discuses factors that contribute to an increased risk of osteoporosis/osteopenia in patients with asthma and suggests recommendations based on the current literature. PMID:25039444

  9. Subcutaneous administration of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-II/IGF binding protein-2 complex stimulates bone formation and prevents loss of bone mineral density in a rat model of disuse osteoporosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conover, Cheryl A.; Johnstone, Edward W.; Turner, Russell T.; Evans, Glenda L.; John Ballard, F. John; Doran, Patrick M.; Khosla, Sundeep

    2002-01-01

    Elevated serum levels of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-2 (IGFBP-2) and a precursor form of IGF-II are associated with marked increases in bone formation and skeletal mass in patients with hepatitis C-associated osteosclerosis. In vitro studies indicate that IGF-II in complex with IGFBP-2 has high affinity for bone matrix and is able to stimulate osteoblast proliferation. The purpose of this study was to determine the ability of the IGF-II/IGFBP-2 complex to increase bone mass in vivo. Osteopenia of the femur was induced by unilateral sciatic neurectomy in rats. At the time of surgery, 14-day osmotic minipumps containing vehicle or 2 microg IGF-II+9 microg IGFBP-2/100g body weight/day were implanted subcutaneously in the neck. Bone mineral density (BMD) measurements were taken the day of surgery and 14 days later using a PIXImus small animal densitometer. Neurectomy of the right hindlimb resulted in a 9% decrease in right femur BMD (P<0.05 vs. baseline). This loss in BMD was completely prevented by treatment with IGF-II/IGFBP-2. On the control limb, there was no loss of BMD over the 14 days and IGF-II/IGFBP-2 treatment resulted in a 9% increase in left femur BMD (P<0.05). Bone histomorphometry indicated increases in endocortical and cancellous bone formation rates and in trabecular thickness. These results demonstrate that short-term administration of the IGF-II/IGFBP-2 complex can prevent loss of BMD associated with disuse osteoporosis and stimulate bone formation in adult rats. Furthermore, they provide proof of concept for a novel anabolic approach to increasing bone mass in humans with osteoporosis.

  10. The effect of metyrosine/prednisolone combination to oophorectomy-induced osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Salman, Suleyman; Kumbasar, Serkan; Hacimuftuoglu, Ahmet; Ozturk, Berna; Seven, Bedri; Polat, Beyzagul; Gundogdu, Cemal; Demirci, Elif; Yildirim, Kadir; Akcay, Fatih; Uslu, Turan; Tuncel Daloglu, Ferrah; Suleyman, Halis

    2012-01-01

    Background: Osteoporosis is a chronic disease characterized by a decrease in bone mineral density (BMD) and corruption of the microarchitectural structure of bone tissue. Objective: It was investigated whether methylprednisolone had a favorable effect on osteoporotic bone tissue in Oophorectomy induced osteoporotic rats whose endogenous adrenaline levels are suppressed with metyrosine. Materials and Methods: Bone Mineral Density, number of osteoblast-osteoclast, bone osteocalcin levels and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) measurements were performed. Obtained results were compared with that of alendronate. Results: Oophorectomy induced osteoporosis was exacerbated by methylprednisolone. Alentronate prevented ovariectomised induced osteoporosis, but it couldn’t prevent methylprednisolone +ovariectomised induced osteoporosis in rats. Conclusion: Combined treatment with methylprednisolon and metyrosine was the best treatment for preventing osteoporosis but metyrosine alone couldn’t prevent osteoporosis in ovariectomised rats. PMID:25246899

  11. Bisphosphonates for Osteoporosis: Benefits and Risks

    MedlinePlus

    ... o es sis : Benefits and Risks What is osteoporosis? Osteoporosis is a condition in which your bones become ... through menopause are especially at risk of developing osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is more common in women than in ...

  12. Medical treatment of vertebral osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Lippuner, K

    2003-10-01

    to conclude about efficacy (calcium, clodronate, etidronate, hormone replacement therapy, pamidronate, strontium, tiludronate, vitamin D). The low NNTs for the leading substances (ranges: 15-64 for alendronate, 8-26 for risedronate, 23 for calcitonin and 28-31 for raloxifene) confirm that effective and efficient drug interventions for treatment and prevention of osteoporotic vertebral fractures are available. Bisphosphonates have demonstrated similar efficacy in treatment and prevention of steroid-induced and male osteoporosis as in postmenopausal osteoporosis. The selection of the appropriate drug for treatment of vertebral osteoporosis from among a bisphosphonate (alendronate or risedronate), PTH, calcitonin or raloxifene will mainly depend on the efficacy, tolerability and safety profile, together with the patient's willingness to comply with a long-term treatment. Although reduction of vertebral fracture risk is an important criterion for decision making, drugs with proven additional fracture risk reduction at all clinically relevant sites (especially at the hip) should be the preferred options. PMID:13680313

  13. [Osteoporosis and stress].

    PubMed

    Kumano, Hiroaki

    2005-09-01

    There may be three ways of relationship between stress and osteoporosis. The first is that stress induces some physiological changes leading to osteoporosis. The second is that stress induces behavioral distortion of eating, drinking, exercise, and sleep habits, which leads to osteoporosis. The third is that osteoporosis, on the other hand, brings about anxiety, depression, loss of social roles, and social isolation, which leads to stress. The susceptible sex and age groups are postmenopausal women and young women. The abrupt decrease of estrogen in postmenopausal women promotes reabsorption of bone, and it was also reported that the increase of interleukin-6 (IL-6) that is downstream of estrogen was related to the production of osteoclast and to the development of disability of the aged. Regarding the association with stress, while it was reported that depression or depressive states directly increased inflammation-induced cytokines including IL-6, it was also pointed out that stress-induced easy infectious may produce chronic infection, which indirectly increases inflammation-induced cytokines. Anorexia Nervosa that is assumed to be associated with adolescent developmental stress is noteworthy in young women. Amenorrhea is always present in this disease, and in addition to bone reabsorption associated with estrogen deficiency, the decrease of bone formation associated with malnutrition may be related to the development of osteoporosis. PMID:16137956

  14. [Clinical characteristics of male osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Mika; Sugimoto, Toshitsugu

    2016-07-01

    As men are less likely than women to develop osteoporosis, male osteoporosis remains poorly understood. However, elderly men have a clearly reduced bone mineral density and increased risk for fractures. In Japan, one in four patients with osteoporosis is male. Male osteoporosis is associated with not only reduction in androgen, but also estrogen, and differs from postmenopausal osteoporosis in that decreased bone formation is involved and that age-related changes in cortical bone structure and perforation of the trabeculae of cancellous bone are unlikely to occur. The proportion of secondary osteoporosis is higher for men than women;therefore, differential diagnosis is important in the diagnosis of male osteoporosis. In addition, it is recommended that bone mineral density be measured at the femoral neck or total hip in men. Men have a worse prognosis following fractures than women, and management of male osteoporosis is highly important for extending healthy life expectancy. PMID:27346307

  15. Osteoporosis and Asian American Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... ligand (RANKL) inhibitor. Resources NIH Osteoporosis and Related Bone Diseases ~ National Resource Center Website: http://www.bones.nih. ... No. 15-7925-E NIH Osteoporosis and Related Bone Diseases ~ National Resource Center 2 AMS Circle Bethesda, MD ...

  16. Population-based osteoporosis education for older women.

    PubMed

    Curry, Linda C; Hogstel, Mildred O; Davis, Gail C; Frable, Pamela J

    2002-01-01

    With an increased focus on wellness and health promotion, there is a need for community-based strategies to complement traditional strategies aimed at improving individual and aggregate health. An educational program on the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of osteoporosis was provided for 188 women age 60 and older in three different community settings: churches, retirement homes, and senior citizen centers. The major purposes of the study were to determine whether a community-based program might (a) contribute to older women's knowledge about osteoporosis and (b) promote their intent to use this knowledge. Each participant completed a demographic profile, the Osteoporosis Risk Checklist, and the Osteoporosis Knowledge Questionnaire (OKQ), with the OKQ serving as a pre- and post-test. Before post-testing, a 30-min educational program was provided. Differences among the three groups were risk factors, prior knowledge about osteoporosis, and knowledge at the completion of the program. A majority of the clients indicated an intent to increase calcium in their diet, discuss osteoporosis with their health care provider, check their home environment for safety/falls, and discuss what they had learned with others. Nurses need to plan educational programs in all settings to teach older clients about the risk factors, prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of osteoporosis. PMID:12406180

  17. Male osteoporosis: A review

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Antonio; Lobo-Escolar, Antonio; Mateo, Jesús; Gil, Jorge; Ibarz, Elena; Gracia, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Osteoporosis in men is a heterogeneous disease that has received little attention. However, one third of worldwide hip fractures occur in the male population. This problem is more prevalent in people over 70 years of age. The etiology can be idiopathic or secondary to hypogonadism, vitamin D deficiency and inadequate calcium intake, hormonal treatments for prostate cancer, use of toxic and every disease or drug use that alters bone metabolism. Risk factors such as a previous history of fragility fracture should be assessed for the diagnosis. However, risk factors in men are very heterogeneous. There are significant differences in the pharmacological treatment of osteoporosis between men and women fundamentally due to the level of evidence in published trials supporting each treatment. New treatments will offer new therapeutic prospects. The goal of this work is a revision of the present status knowledge about male osteoporosis. PMID:23362466

  18. Immunologic aspects of osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Ershler, W B; Harman, S M; Keller, E T

    1997-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a major cause of morbidity in older people. There are a large number of risk factors for the development of osteoporosis. However, these risk factors eventually must mediate their effects through modulation of bone remodeling. A variety of compounds including hormones and nutrients modulate bone remodeling. In addition to these well-characterized substances, the immune system plays a role in bone remodeling through pro-inflammatory cytokines. Specifically, interleukin-1 (IL-1), IL-11, interferon-g are known to influence osteoclasts and osteoblasts. Recently, the cytokine IL-6 has joined ranks with these cytokines as a bone reactive agent. IL-6 has been shown to increase with age and menopause. Additionally, murine models suggest that IL-6 plays a central role in bone resorption. Finally, in vitro studies demonstrate that IL-6 induces osteoclast activity. In this review, we will discuss the pathogenesis of osteoporosis in the context of aging and IL-6. PMID:9463782

  19. New Horizons in Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Rachner, Tilman D.; Khosla, Sundeep; Hofbauer, Lorenz C.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Osteoporosis is a common disease characterised by a systemic impairment of bone mass and microarchitecture that results in fragility fractures. With an ageing population, the medical and socioeconomic impact of osteoporosis in general and postmenopausal osteoporosis in particular, will increase further. A detailed knowledge of bone biology with molecular insights into the communication between bone-forming osteoblasts and bone-resorbing osteoclasts and the orchestrating signalling network has led to the identification of novel therapeutic targets. Based on this, therapeutic strategies have been developed aimed at (I) inhibiting excessive bone resorption and by (II) increasing bone formation. The most promising novel treatments include denosumab, a monoclonal antibody against receptor activator of NF-κB ligand, a key osteoclast cytokine, odanacatib, a specific inhibitor of the osteoclast protease cathepsin K, and antibodies against the proteins sclerostin and dickkopf-1, two endogenous inhibitors of bone formation. This review provides an overview on these novel therapies and explains their underlying physiology. PMID:21450337

  20. Emerging therapies for osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Minisola, G; Iuliano, A; Prevete, I

    2014-01-01

    Currently available drugs for the treatment of osteoporosis can still be improved in terms of pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and management. New approaches for the development of innovative drugs are possible thanks to our increasing understanding of the bone tissue biology and the cellular and molecular processes that regulate it. One of the new anti-bone resorption agents, odanacatib, a selective cathepsin-K inhibitor, is in late phase III clinical research. Among new bone anabolic drugs, those that have an action on the Wnt signaling pathway appear to be particularly promising. The development of new compounds for the treatment of osteoporosis represents an excellent example of translational medicine efforts aimed to extend the range of treatment options for osteoporosis, a very common disease with a high social and economic impact, particularly when causing fractures. PMID:25069493

  1. Pathophysiology of immobilization osteoporosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, S. B.; DiCarlo, E. F.

    1995-01-01

    The reduction of gravity-related forces on the skeleton creates a type of osteoporosis that is unique because its severity is dependent on the mechanical stress bearing function of the skeleton as well as the length of time that the forces are absent or reduced. Bones that bear weight under normal conditions are more affected than bones that normally do not bear weight. The cytokine environment and the cells in the affected bones are altered in time so that stem cells produce fewer new cells and the differentiated cells tend to be less active. These alterations in the local environment of the affected parts appear to resemble those of age- and disease-associated systemic forms of osteoporosis. The osteoporosis produced as a result of the loss of normal activity however, appears to be at least partially reversible through remobilization, strenuous exercise, and--possibly in the future--cytokine therapy.

  2. Male osteoporosis: A review.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Antonio; Lobo-Escolar, Antonio; Mateo, Jesús; Gil, Jorge; Ibarz, Elena; Gracia, Luis

    2012-12-18

    Osteoporosis in men is a heterogeneous disease that has received little attention. However, one third of worldwide hip fractures occur in the male population. This problem is more prevalent in people over 70 years of age. The etiology can be idiopathic or secondary to hypogonadism, vitamin D deficiency and inadequate calcium intake, hormonal treatments for prostate cancer, use of toxic and every disease or drug use that alters bone metabolism.Risk factors such as a previous history of fragility fracture should be assessed for the diagnosis. However, risk factors in men are very heterogeneous. There are significant differences in the pharmacological treatment of osteoporosis between men and women fundamentally due to the level of evidence in published trials supporting each treatment. New treatments will offer new therapeutic prospects. The goal of this work is a revision of the present status knowledge about male osteoporosis. PMID:23362466

  3. New anabolic therapies in osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Mishaela R; Bilezikian, John P

    2003-03-01

    Anabolic agents represent an important new advance in the therapy of osteoporosis. Their potential might be substantially greater than the anti-resorptives. Because the anti-resorptives and anabolic agents work by completely distinct mechanisms of action, it is possible that the combination of agents could be significantly more potent than either agent alone. Recent evidence suggests that a plateau in BMD might occur after prolonged exposure to PTH. Anti-resorptive therapy during or after anabolic therapy might prevent this skeletal adaptation. Protocols to consider anabolic agents as intermittent recycling therapy would be of interest. Of all the anabolics, PTH is the most promising. However, there are unanswered questions about PTH. More studies are needed to document an anabolic effect on cortical bone. More large-scale studies are needed to further determine the reduction in nonvertebral fractures with PTH, especially at the hip. In the future, PTH is likely to be modified for easier and more targeted delivery. Oral or transdermal delivery systems may become available. Recently, Gowen et al have described an oral calcilytic molecule that antagonizes the parathyroid cell calcium receptor, thus stimulating the endogenous release of PTH. This approach could represent a novel endogenous delivery system for intermittent PTH administration. Rising expectations that anabolic therapies for osteoporosis will soon play a major role in treating this disease are likely to fuel further studies and the development of even more novel approaches to therapy. PMID:12699304

  4. Osteoporosis management in older patients who experienced a fracture

    PubMed Central

    Oertel, Mark J; Graves, Leland; Al-Hihi, Eyad; Leonardo, Vincent; Hopkins, Christina; DeSouza, Kristin; Bhattacharya, Rajib K

    2016-01-01

    Background Fractures in older patients are common, morbid, and associated with increased risk of subsequent fractures. Inpatient and outpatient management and treatment of fractures can be costly. With more emphasis placed on quality care for Medicare beneficiaries, we studied if patients were receiving proper screening for osteoporosis and treatment after diagnosis of fracture. This study aims to determine if adequate screening and treatment for osteoporosis occurs in the postfracture period. Methods A retrospective analysis of Medicare beneficiaries aged 67 years or older was gathered from a single institution in both inpatient and outpatient visits. Based on International Classification of Diseases ninth revision codes, primary diagnosis of fractures of neck and trunk, upper limb, and lower limb were obtained in addition to current procedural terminology codes for fracture procedures. We studied patients who had been screened for osteoporosis with a bone mineral study or received osteoporosis treatment after their fracture. Results Medicare beneficiaries totaling 1,375 patients were determined to have an inclusion fracture between June 1, 2013 and November 30, 2014. At the time of our analysis on December 1, 2014, 1,219 patients were living and included in the analysis. Of these patients, 256 (21.0%) either received osteoporosis testing with bone mineral density or received treatment for osteoporosis. On sex breakdown, 208/820 (25.4%) females received proper evaluation or treatment of osteoporosis in comparison to 48/399 (12.0%) males. This is in comparison to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services’ national average of 19.1% for osteoporosis management in females. Conclusion A minority of studied patients received evaluation or treatment for osteoporosis after their fracture. Postfracture investigation and treatment for osteoporosis in Medicare beneficiaries is inadequate. If improved, Medicare costs could be reduced by prevention of future fractures

  5. Osteoporosis: the emperor has no clothes

    PubMed Central

    Järvinen, T L N; Michaëlsson, K; Aspenberg, P; Sievänen, H

    2015-01-01

    Current prevention strategies for low-trauma fractures amongst older persons depend on the notions that fractures are mainly caused by osteoporosis (pathophysiology), that patients at high risk can be identified (screening) and that the risk is amenable to bone-targeted pharmacotherapy (treatment). However, all these three notions can be disputed. Pathophysiology Most fracture patients have fallen, but actually do not have osteoporosis. A high likelihood of falling, in turn, is attributable to an ageing-related decline in physical functioning and general frailty. Screening Currently available fracture risk prediction strategies including bone densitometry and multifactorial prediction tools are unable to identify a large proportion of patients who will sustain a fracture, whereas many of those with a high fracture risk score will not sustain a fracture. Treatment The evidence for the viability of bone-targeted pharmacotherapy in preventing hip fracture and other clinical fragility fractures is mainly limited to women aged 65–80 years with osteoporosis, whereas the proof of hip fracture-preventing efficacy in women over 80 years of age and in men at all ages is meagre or absent. Further, the antihip fracture efficacy shown in clinical trials is absent in real-life studies. Many drugs for the treatment of osteoporosis have also been associated with increased risks of serious adverse events. There are also considerable uncertainties related to the efficacy of drug therapy in preventing clinical vertebral fractures, whereas the efficacy for preventing other fractures (relative risk reductions of 20–25%) remains moderate, particularly in terms of the low absolute risk reduction in fractures with this treatment. PMID:25809279

  6. Inhibition of osteoporosis in rats fed with sugar cane wax.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Hajime; Man, Sun Li; Ohta, Yutaka; Katsuyama, Naofumi; Chinen, Isao

    2003-02-01

    Rats fed on a restricted, semi-purified diet containing a 50%-reduced level of carbohydrate and oil, but normal levels of protein, minerals and vitamins, exhibited osteoporosis. However, rats fed on this restricted diet, but containing sugar cane wax, did not exhibit this bone disease. Sugar cane wax, containing a long-chain carbohydrate with an OH radical, prevented the development of osteoporosis via a non-estrogenic mechanism. PMID:12729013

  7. SECONDARY OSTEOPOROSIS: PATHOPHYSIOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT

    PubMed Central

    Mirza, Faryal; Canalis, Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a skeletal disorder characterized by decreased bone mineral density and compromised bone strength predisposing to an increased risk of fractures. Although idiopathic osteoporosis is the most common form of osteoporosis, secondary factors may contribute to the bone loss and increased fracture risk in patients presenting with fragility fractures or osteoporosis. Several medical conditions and medications significantly increase the risk for bone loss and skeletal fragility. This review focuses on some of the common causes of osteoporosis, addressing the underlying mechanisms, diagnostic approach and treatment of low bone mass in the presence of these conditions. PMID:25971649

  8. Clinical Practice. Postmenopausal Osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Black, Dennis M; Rosen, Clifford J

    2016-01-21

    Key Clinical Points Postmenopausal Osteoporosis Fractures and osteoporosis are common, particularly among older women, and hip fractures can be devastating. Treatment is generally recommended in postmenopausal women who have a bone mineral density T score of -2.5 or less, a history of spine or hip fracture, or a Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX) score indicating increased fracture risk. Bisphosphonates (generic) and denosumab reduce the risk of hip, nonvertebral, and vertebral fractures; bisphosphonates are commonly used as first-line treatment in women who do not have contraindications. Teriparatide reduces the risk of nonvertebral and vertebral fractures. Osteonecrosis of the jaw and atypical femur fractures have been reported with treatment but are rare. The benefit-to-risk ratio for osteoporosis treatment is strongly positive for most women with osteoporosis. Because benefits are retained after discontinuation of alendronate or zoledronic acid, drug holidays after 5 years of alendronate therapy or 3 years of zoledronic acid therapy may be considered for patients at lower risk for fracture. PMID:26789873

  9. Genetics of osteoporosis

    SciTech Connect

    Urano, Tomohiko; Inoue, Satoshi

    2014-09-19

    Highlights: • Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with osteoporosis were identified. • SNPs mapped close to or within VDR and ESR1 are associated with bone mineral density. • WNT signaling pathway plays a pivotal role in regulating bone mineral density. • Genetic studies will be useful for identification of new therapeutic targets. - Abstract: Osteoporosis is a skeletal disease characterized by low bone mineral density (BMD) and microarchitectural deterioration of bone tissue, which increases susceptibility to fractures. BMD is a complex quantitative trait with normal distribution and seems to be genetically controlled (in 50–90% of the cases), according to studies on twins and families. Over the last 20 years, candidate gene approach and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with low BMD, osteoporosis, and osteoporotic fractures. These SNPs have been mapped close to or within genes including those encoding nuclear receptors and WNT-β-catenin signaling proteins. Understanding the genetics of osteoporosis will help identify novel candidates for diagnostic and therapeutic targets.

  10. Osteoporosis and Women's Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... down by the body (a process called bone turnover). Your highest bone mass (size and thickness) is reached between ages 20 and 25, and it declines after that. After menopause, however, women begin to lose bone at an even faster rate. Osteoporosis develops when your body cannot replace bone ...

  11. Teriparatide for postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    2004-12-01

    Teriparatide (Forsteo - Eli Lilly) is the first parathyroid hormone derivative to be licensed for the treatment of women with postmenopausal osteoporosis. It is described as a "bone-formation agent", in contrast to established treatments, such as bisphosphonates, raloxifene, calcitriol and calcitonin, which reduce bone resorption. Here we consider whether teriparatide offers any worthwhile advantages over these other options. PMID:15587764

  12. Management of beta-thalassemia-associated osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Giusti, Andrea; Pinto, Valeria; Forni, Gian Luca; Pilotto, Alberto

    2016-03-01

    Beta-Thalassemia-associated osteoporosis is a multifactorial and complex condition. Different acquired and genetic factors are involved in its pathogenesis. These factors produce an imbalance in bone remodeling by inhibiting osteoblast activity and increasing osteoclast function, leading to bone loss and increased fracture risk. The management of patients presenting with thalassemia-associated osteoporosis should consist of the implementation of general measures and the prescription of a specific pharmacological agent, with the aim of reducing fracture risk and preventing disability and deterioration of quality of life. General measures include control of anemia, adequate chelation therapy, healthy nutrition and lifestyle, regular exercise, adequate management of comorbid conditions, hormone replacement therapy in patients with hypogonadism, and vitamin D supplementation/therapy. Among the pharmacological agents currently available for the management of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women and men, bisphosphonates have been shown to improve bone mineral density, to reduce bone turnover, and to decrease bone/back pain in patients with thalassemia-associated osteoporosis, with a good profile of safety and tolerability. On the other hand, there are limited experiences with other pharmacological agents (e.g., denosumab or teriparatide). The complexity of this condition presents diagnostic and therapeutic challenges and underscores the importance of a comprehensive and multidisciplinary approach. PMID:27060977

  13. [New strategies for exercise training in osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Winkelmann, A; Schilling, S; Neuerburg, C; Mutschler, W; Böcker, W; Felsenberg, D; Stumpf, U

    2015-11-01

    In the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis, movement with muscle strengthening and proprioceptive training plays a major role. This was taken into consideration in the guidelines by the governing body on osteoporosis (Dachverband Osteoporose, DVO) from 2014 on prophylaxis, diagnosis and treatment of osteoporosis and in the DVO guidelines from 2008 on physiotherapy and exercise therapy for osteoporosis. Increases in lumbar bone density of between 0.5 % and 2.5 % can be achieved in women by strengthening exercises with high resistance. With this combination and strengthening of the quadriceps muscle a reduction of falls and hence the fracture risk could also be achieved. In traumatology, training for muscle strengthening is not always possible, especially for elderly patients. Practically relevant alternatives are regular walking and aquatraining, which may also lead to a significant increase in bone mineral density. Furthermore, large effects can be achieved with alternating side whole-body vibration (WBV) training with whole body vibration plates with only 3 days of training per week and with short training periods (15-20 min). Rates of increase in leg strength between 20 % and almost 40 % and in bone density between 0.5 % and 4 % in 6 months have been described. Whether and with what intensity whole body vibration therapy could be used for e.g. more rapid healing of fractures, is currently unclear. Initial positive results have been described in animal models. PMID:26467265

  14. Rodent models of osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Sophocleous, Antonia; Idris, Aymen I

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this protocol is to provide a detailed description of male and female rodent models of osteoporosis. In addition to indications on the methods of performing the surgical procedures, the choice of reliable and safe anaesthetics is also described. Post-operative care, including analgesia administration for pain management, is also discussed. Ovariectomy in rodents is a procedure where ovaries are surgically excised. Hormonal changes resulting from ovary removal lead to an oestrogen-deprived state, which enhances bone remodelling, causes bone loss and increases bone fracture risk. Therefore, ovariectomy has been considered as the most common preclinical model for understanding the pathophysiology of menopause-associated events and for developing new treatment strategies for tackling post-menopausal osteoporosis. This protocol also provides a detailed description of orchidectomy, a model for androgen-deficient osteoporosis in rodents. Endocrine changes following testes removal lead to hypogonadism, which results in accelerated bone loss, increasing osteoporosis risk. Orchidectomised rodent models have been proposed to mimic male osteoporosis and therefore remain a valuable tool for understanding androgen deficiency in aged men. Although it would have been particularly difficult to assemble an internationally acceptable description of surgical procedures, here we have attempted to provide a comprehensive guide for best practice in performing ovariectomy and orchidectomy in laboratory rodents. Research scientists are reminded that they should follow their own institution's interpretation of such guidelines. Ultimately, however, all animal procedures must be overseen by the local Animal Welfare and Ethical Review Body and conducted under licences approved by a regulatory ethics committee. PMID:25852854

  15. Epidemiology and treatment of osteoporosis in women: an Indian perspective

    PubMed Central

    Khadilkar, Anuradha V; Mandlik, Rubina M

    2015-01-01

    The number of women with osteoporosis, ie, with reduced bone mass and the disruption of bone architecture, is increasing in India. While data on prevalence of osteoporosis among women in India come from studies conducted in small groups spread across the country, estimates suggest that of the 230 million Indians expected to be over the age of 50 years in 2015, 20%, ie, ~46 million, are women with osteoporosis. Thus, osteoporosis is a major public health problem in Indian women. Low calcium intakes with extensive prevalence of vitamin D deficiency, increasing longevity, sex inequality, early menopause, genetic predisposition, lack of diagnostic facilities, and poor knowledge of bone health have contributed toward the high prevalence of osteoporosis. Bone health may be optimized by creating an environment to achieve peak bone mass during adolescence, maintenance of healthy bone throughout the life cycle, and prevention of bone loss postmenopausal. In Indian women, calcium, vitamin D, and bisphosphonates are the commonest first-line therapies used. The use of other drugs such as hormone replacement therapy, estrogen agonists, calcitonin, parathyroid hormone, and denosumab is decided as per the affordability and availability of treatment options. Major gaps still remain in the diagnosis and management of osteoporosis, thus highlighting the need for more structured research in this area. This review focuses on the epidemiology of osteoporosis in Indian women and available treatments. PMID:26527900

  16. COPD and osteoporosis: links, risks, and treatment challenges.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Daisuke; Watanabe, Reiko; Okazaki, Ryo

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a chronic inflammatory airway disease associated with various systemic comorbidities including osteoporosis. Osteoporosis and its related fractures are common and have significant impacts on quality of life and even respiratory function in patients with COPD. COPD-associated osteoporosis is however extremely undertreated. Recent studies have suggested that both decreased bone mineral density (BMD) and impaired bone quality contribute to bone fragility, causing fractures in COPD patients. Various clinical risk factors of osteoporosis in COPD patients, including older age, emaciation, physical inactivity, and vitamin D deficiency, have also been described. It is critically important for pulmonologists to be aware of the high prevalence of osteoporosis in COPD patients and evaluate them for such fracture risks. Routine screening for osteoporosis will enable physicians to diagnose COPD patients with comorbid osteoporosis at an early stage and give them appropriate treatment to prevent fracture, which may lead to improved quality of life as well as better long-term prognosis. PMID:27099481

  17. COPD and osteoporosis: links, risks, and treatment challenges

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Daisuke; Watanabe, Reiko; Okazaki, Ryo

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a chronic inflammatory airway disease associated with various systemic comorbidities including osteoporosis. Osteoporosis and its related fractures are common and have significant impacts on quality of life and even respiratory function in patients with COPD. COPD-associated osteoporosis is however extremely undertreated. Recent studies have suggested that both decreased bone mineral density (BMD) and impaired bone quality contribute to bone fragility, causing fractures in COPD patients. Various clinical risk factors of osteoporosis in COPD patients, including older age, emaciation, physical inactivity, and vitamin D deficiency, have also been described. It is critically important for pulmonologists to be aware of the high prevalence of osteoporosis in COPD patients and evaluate them for such fracture risks. Routine screening for osteoporosis will enable physicians to diagnose COPD patients with comorbid osteoporosis at an early stage and give them appropriate treatment to prevent fracture, which may lead to improved quality of life as well as better long-term prognosis. PMID:27099481

  18. Strontium fructose 1,6-diphosphate prevents bone loss in a rat model of postmenopausal osteoporosis via the OPG/RANKL/RANK pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Bo; Zhang, Qi; Wu, Di; Wang, Yong-lu; Hu, Ying-ying; Cheng, Yan-ping; Yang, Zhen-dong; Zheng, Ya-ya; Ying, Han-Jie

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the protective effects of strontium fructose 1,6-diphosphate (FDP-Sr), a novel strontium salt that combined fructose 1,6-diphosphate (FDP) with strontium, on bone in an ovariectomy-induced model of bone loss. Methods: Eighty female Sprague-Dawley rats were ovariectomized (OVX) or sham-operated. Three months later, the rats were assigned to six groups (10 for each): sham-operated, OVX control, OVX+FDP-Sr (110, 220, or 440 mg/kg), or OVX+strontium ranelate (SR, 180 mg/kg). Drugs were administered orally for 3 months. When the treatment was terminated, the following parameters were assessed: bone mineral density (BMD), the biomechanical properties of the femur and lumbar vertebrae, trabecular histomorphology, serum phosphorus, calcium, bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (B-ALP), tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b (TRACP5b), N-telopeptide of type I collagen (NTx) and a series of markers for oxidative stress. Receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) levels in serum were measured using ELISA and their gene expression levels in the bone were measured using R-T PCR. Results: Treatment with FDP-Sr (220 or 440 mg/kg) or SR (180 mg/kg) significantly increased the BMD and improved the bone microarchitecture and bone strength in OVX rats. The treatments also decreased in the levels of H2O2 and MDA, restored the CAT level in serum and bone marrow, increased the serum B-ALP and decreased NTx and TRACP 5b in OVX rats. Treatment with FDP-Sr decreased the RANKL level, and increased the OPG level in serum in a dose-dependent manner. It also significantly down-regulated the RANKL expression and up-regulated OPG expression in bone marrow. Conclusion: FDP-Sr may be an effectve treatment for postmenopausal osteoporosis that acts, in part, via a decrease in osteoclastogenesis through the OPG\\RANKL\\RANK pathway. PMID:22426695

  19. An outreach program improved osteoporosis management after a fracture.

    PubMed

    Feldstein, Adrianne C; Vollmer, William M; Smith, David H; Petrik, Amanda; Schneider, Jennifer; Glauber, Harry; Herson, Michael

    2007-09-01

    This longitudinal retrospective cohort study evaluated implementation of an intervention to improve management of osteoporosis after a fracture in a nonprofit group-model health maintenance organization (HMO) in the U.S. Pacific Northwest with 480,000 members and electronic medical record data. Participants were female HMO members aged 67 and older who sustained a qualifying clinical fracture(s) and who had not received a bone mineral density (BMD) measurement or osteoporosis treatment in the 12 months before the fracture (N=3,588). Phase 1 included outreach to clinicians and patients; Phase 2 added clinician and staff incentives. Primary outcome was "osteoporosis management"--receipt of a BMD measurement or osteoporosis medication in the 6 months after an index fracture. Before the intervention, 13.4% (95% confidence interval (CI)=12.0-14.8%) of patients had received osteoporosis management, and the time trend was not significant. Post-intervention, the probability of osteoporosis management increased on average 3.1% (95% CI=2.6-3.5%) every 2 months throughout both study phases without a significant added improvement in Phase 2. Improvement varied according to clinic and was less likely for patients with dementia. Overall, the probability of osteoporosis management increased from the baseline level of 13.4% to 44.0% (95% CI=40.0-48.0%) by the end of the study period (20 months post-intervention). The study found that an outreach program to primary care providers and patients improved the management of osteoporosis after a fracture. If widely implemented, this intervention could substantially improve the secondary prevention of osteoporosis. More-individualized interventions may be necessary for high-risk subgroups. PMID:17915345

  20. 26,27-Hexafluoro-1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (F6-1,25(OH)2D3) prevents osteoporosis induced by immobilization combined with ovariectomy in the rat.

    PubMed

    Okumura, H; Yamamuro, T; Higuchi, S; Harada, M; Takamura, T; Otomo, S; Aihara, H; Ikekawa, N; Kobayashi, T

    1990-05-01

    The effect of 26,27-hexafluoro-1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (F6-1,25(OH)2D3) on experimental osteoporosis in the rat induced by a combination of immobilization and ovariectomy was evaluated. F6-1,25(OH)2D3 increased the femur score and the photo-density. The administration of F6-1,25(OH)2D3 also significantly increased the dry weight, the ash weight and the ash content of the bone. Both F6-1,25(OH)2D3 and 1 alpha(OH)D3 showed a nearly dose-dependent effect and significant inhibition of the decrease of bone mass. Histomorphometry revealed a significant decrease of resorption by the administration of F6-1,25(OH)2D3. Bone formation rate in the F6-1,25(OH)2D3 treated group significantly decreased compared with the vehicle group. In conclusion, the pharmacological effective dose of F6-1,25(OH)2D3 was considered to prevent the osteoporotic decrease of bone mass by suppressing the elevated bone turnover. PMID:2350614

  1. Understanding the Female Athlete Triad: Eating Disorders, Amenorrhea, and Osteoporosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beals, Katherine A.; Brey, Rebecca A.; Gonyou, Julianna B.

    1999-01-01

    Examines three disorders that can affect female athletes who focus on succeeding athletically and achieving a prescribed body weight: disordered eating, amenorrhea, and osteoporosis. The paper presents prevention and treatment suggestions for athletes with eating disorders, focusing on primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention. Recommends that…

  2. [Osteoporosis in phlebology].

    PubMed

    van der Molen, H R; Overvelde, S

    1993-01-01

    Patient often think that the pains of their extremities (especially during the night) are caused by a plebo or an angiopathy whereas they are in fact due to a vertebral or lumbar discal affection. 84 patients with osteoporosis were treated by an intramuscular injection of deca-durabolin (25 mg/month) and calcium phosphate (tertiare). Results were satisfactory: six months later, 62 patients no longer suffered, 13 had felt improvement and 2 remained unchanged. PMID:8362009

  3. Osteoporosis and fragility fractures.

    PubMed

    Sànchez-Riera, Lídia; Wilson, Nicholas; Kamalaraj, Narainraj; Nolla, Joan M; Kok, Cindy; Li, Yang; Macara, Monique; Norman, Rosana; Chen, Jian Sheng; Smith, Emma U R; Sambrook, Philip N; Hernández, Carmen Santos; Woolf, Anthony; March, Lyn

    2010-12-01

    The prevalence of osteoporosis is expected to increase with the ageing of the world's population. This article reviews the epidemiology, risk factors and health burden of osteoporosis. In the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) Study 2005, osteoporosis is studied as a risk factor for fracture by considering the bone-mineral-density (BMD) measurement as the continuous exposure variable. We have performed a systematic review seeking population-based studies with BMD data measured by dual-X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). The femoral neck was selected as the unique location and all values were converted into Hologic(®) to enable inclusion of worldwide data for analysis. Provisional results on mean BMD values for different world regions are shown in age breakdowns for males and females 50 years or over, as well as mean T-scores using the young, white, female reference of National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) III. Results show remarkable geographical differences and a time trend towards improvement of the BMD values in Asian and European populations. PMID:21665127

  4. The societal burden of osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Becker, David J; Kilgore, Meredith L; Morrisey, Michael A

    2010-06-01

    Osteoporosis currently affects 10 million Americans and is responsible for more than 1.5 million fractures annually. The financial burden of osteoporosis is substantial, with annual direct medical costs estimated at 17 to 20 billion dollars. Most of these costs are related to the acute and rehabilitative care following osteoporotic fractures, particularly hip fractures. The societal burden of osteoporosis includes these direct medical costs and the monetary (eg, caregiver time) and nonmonetary costs of poor health. The aging of the US population is expected to increase the prevalence of osteoporosis and the number of osteoporotic fractures. Growth of the older adult population will pose significant challenges to Medicare and Medicaid, which bear most of the cost of osteoporosis. Efforts to address the looming financial burden must focus on reducing the prevalence of osteoporosis and the incidence of costly fragility fractures. PMID:20425518

  5. Spaceflight osteoporosis: current state and future perspective.

    PubMed

    Cappellesso, R; Nicole, L; Guido, A; Pizzol, D

    2015-10-01

    Osteoporosis is one of the established major consequences of long-duration spaceflights in astronauts seriously undermining their health after their returning on Earth. Indeed, astronauts typically lose more bone mass during one month than postmenopausal women on Earth lose in one year. To date, countermeasures mainly consist in exercise and supplementation while pharmacological treatment as those used in postmenopausal women are not routine. However, it is evident that exercise and supplementation alone are not enough to maintain bone homeostasis. In this paper we describe the current countermeasures for bone loss during long-term spaceflight, review the modern treatment which are successfully employed to prevent osteoporosis on Earth and that could be quickly used also for astronauts and finally focus on the recent cellular and molecular understanding of bone homeostasis which might provide the basis for the development of future targeted therapies. PMID:26494042

  6. Osteoporosis: the role of genetics and the environment.

    PubMed

    Ongphiphadhanakul, Boonsong

    2007-01-01

    Osteoporosis is partly genetically determined. The genetics of osteoporosis is polygenic in nature with multiple common polymorphic alleles interacting with each other and environmental factors to determine bone mass. A number of studies have attempted to dissect the genetic factors responsible for the pathogenesis of osteoporosis using genome-wide scanning and the candidate gene approach. However, the results of such studies among different populations have been mostly inconsistent, suggesting genetic heterogeneity of osteoporosis. It is likely that the cohort of genes indicating predisposition to the risk of osteoporosis may be different among populations with different ethnic backgrounds. The successful identification of susceptibility genes for osteoporosis should prove to be helpful in targeting preventive and therapeutic measures to individuals at higher risk and to render the effort more cost-effective. Information with regard to genetic variations is also likely to be useful in targeting preventive or therapeutic measures to subjects genetically determined to have better responsiveness. Intestinal calcium absorption is dependent on vitamin D receptor gene polymorphisms. Skeletal responsiveness to estrogen, particularly at lower doses, is related to polymorphisms in the estrogen receptor-alpha gene. Recently, circulating homocysteine levels have been shown to be associated with fracture risk. Folate and vitamin B supplements for reducing serum homocysteine and fractures in postmenopausal women have not been fully investigated. However, there is an interaction between folate status and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene polymorphism on bone phenotypes. Due to recent technological advances, whole-genome association study is becoming more feasible. Genomic information with regard to the susceptibility to osteoporosis and the responsiveness to preventive or therapeutic modalities should supplement rather than replace conventional clinical information

  7. The potential impact of new National Osteoporosis Foundation guidance on treatment patterns

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little information is available on prevalence of osteoporosis risk factors or proportions of U.S. men and women who are potential candidates for treatment. The prevalence of risk factors used in the new National Osteoporosis Foundation (NOF) FRAX (trademark) based Guide to the Prevention and Treatm...

  8. Exercise interventions: defusing the world's osteoporosis time bomb.

    PubMed Central

    Kai, Ming Chan; Anderson, Mary; Lau, Edith M. C.

    2003-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a major public health problem, affecting millions of people worldwide. The associated health care costs are growing in parallel with increases in elderly populations, and it is expected that the number of osteoporotic fractures will double over the next 50 years. The best way to address osteoporosis is prevention. Some interventions to maximize and preserve bone mass have multiple health benefits and are cost-effective. For example, modifications to diet and lifestyle can help to prevent osteoporosis, and could potentially lead to a significant decrease in fracture rates; and exercise is a valuable adjunct to programmes aimed at alleviating the risks and symptoms of osteoporosis. Practising exercise at a young age helps maximize the mineral density of bones while they are still growing and maturing, and continuing to excercise minimizes bone loss later in life. Not only does exercise improve bone health, it also increases muscle strength, coordination, balance, flexibility and leads to better overall health. Walking, aerobic exercise, and t'ai chi are the best forms of exercise to stimulate bone formation and strengthen the muscles that help support bones. Encouraging physical activity at all ages is therefore a top priority to prevent osteoporosis. PMID:14758410

  9. Whole-body vibration exercise in postmenopausal osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Mieszkowski, Jan; Niespodziński, Bartłomiej; Ciechanowska, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    The report of the World Health Organization (WHO) of 2008 defines osteoporosis as a disease characterized by low bone mass and an increased risk of fracture. Postmenopausal osteoporosis is connected to the decrease in estrogens concentration as a result of malfunction of endocrine ovarian function. Low estrogens concentration causes increase in bone demineralization and results in osteoporosis. Physical activity, as a component of therapy of patients with osteoporosis, has been used for a long time now. One of the forms of safe physical activity is the vibration training. Training is to maintain a static position or execution of specific exercises involving the appropriate muscles on a vibrating platform, the mechanical vibrations are transmitted to the body of the patient. According to the piezoelectric theory, pressure induces bone formation in the electrical potential difference, which acts as a stimulant of the process of bone formation. Whole body vibration increases the level of growth hormone and testosterone in serum, preventing sarcopenia and osteoporosis. The aim of this study was to review the literature on vibration exercise in patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis based on the PubMed and Medline database. While searching the database, the following key words were used ‘postmenopausal osteoporosis’ and ‘whole-body vibration exercise’. PMID:26327887

  10. Genetic Determinants of Osteoporosis: Common Bases to Cardiovascular Diseases?

    PubMed Central

    Marini, Francesca; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2010-01-01

    Osteoporosis is the most common and serious age-related skeletal disorder, characterized by a low bone mass and bone microarchitectural deterioration, with a consequent increase in bone fragility and susceptibility to spontaneous fractures, and it represents a major worldwide health care problem with important implications for health care costs, morbidity and mortality. Today is well accepted that osteoporosis is a multifactorial disorder caused by the interaction between environment and genes that singularly exert modest effects on bone mass and other aspects of bone strength and fracture risk. The individuation of genetic factors responsible for osteoporosis predisposition and development is fundamental for the disease prevention and for the setting of novel therapies, before fracture occurrence. In the last decades the interest of the Scientific Community has been concentrated in the understanding the genetic bases of this disease but with controversial and/or inconclusive results. This review tries to summarize data on the most representative osteoporosis candidate genes. Moreover, since recently osteoporosis and cardiovascular diseases have shown to share common physiopathological mechanisms, this review also provides information on the current understanding of osteoporosis and cardiovascular diseases common genetic bases. PMID:20948561

  11. Epidemiology of spinal osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Melton, L J

    1997-12-15

    Approximately 30% of postmenopausal white women in the United States have osteoporosis, and 16% have osteoporosis of the lumbar spine in particular. Bone density of the spine is positively associated with greater height and weight, older age at menopause, a history of arthritis, more physical activity, moderate use of alcoholic beverages, diuretic treatment, and current estrogen replacement therapy, whereas later age at menarche and a maternal history of fracture are associated with lower levels of density. Low bone density leads to an increased risk of osteoporotic fractures. Fracture risk also increase with age. Vertebral fractures affect approximately 25% of postmenopausal women, although the exact figure depends on the definition used. Recent data show that vertebral fracture rates are as great in men as in women but, because women live longer, the lifetime risk of a vertebral fracture from age 50 onward is 16% in white women and only 5% in white men. Fracture rates are less in most nonwhite populations, but vertebral fractures are as common in Asian women as in those of European heritage. Other risk factors for vertebral fractures are less clear but include hypogonadism and secondary osteoporosis; obesity is protective of fractures as it is of bone loss. Compared with hip fractures, vertebral fractures are less disabling and less expensive, costing approximately $746 million in the United States in 1995. However, they have a substantial negative impact on the patient's function and quality of life. The adverse effects of osteoporotic fractures are likely to increase in the future with the growing number of elderly people. PMID:9431638

  12. [Osteoporosis in males].

    PubMed

    Audran, M; Legrand, E; Chappard, D; Bigorgne, J C; Basle, M F

    2000-09-01

    A shorter life expectancy, a higher peak bone mass and the absence of distinct menopause equivalent explain the lower incidence of osteoporotic fractures in men. In contrast to women, osteoporosis in younger men is in most cases secondary. Causes such as prolonged glucocorticoid therapy, ethanol abuse, hypogonadism and gastrointestinal disorders are now well recognized. The impact of cigarette smoking, low calcium intake, vitamin D deficiency, hypercalciuria and thyrotoxicosis is more controversial but seems to constitute real risk factors for bone loss. Furthermore increased propensity to fall also plays a major role in fracture risk, particularly in alcoholic patients and in elderly men with neurologic disorders. PMID:11033475

  13. Male Osteoporosis in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    D'Amelio, Patrizia; Isaia, Giovanni Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis is now recognized as an important public health problem in elderly men as fragility fractures are complicated by increased morbidity, mortality, and social costs. This review comprises an overview of recent findings in pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of male osteoporosis, with particular regard to the old population. PMID:26457082

  14. Systematic review of the use of bone turnover markers for monitoring the response to osteoporosis treatment: the secondary prevention of fractures, and primary prevention of fractures in high-risk groups.

    PubMed Central

    Burch, Jane; Rice, Stephen; Yang, Huiqin; Neilson, Aileen; Stirk, Lisa; Francis, Roger; Holloway, Paul; Selby, Peter; Craig, Dawn

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND There is currently no standard practice for the monitoring of patients receiving treatment for osteoporosis. Repeated dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is commonly used for monitoring treatment response, but it has its limitations. Bone turnover markers have advantages over DXA as they are non-invasive, relatively cheap and can detect changes in bone turnover rates earlier. However, they do have disadvantages, particularly high within- and between-patient variability. The ability of bone turnover markers to identify treatment non-responders and predict future fracture risk has yet to be established. OBJECTIVES We aimed to determine the clinical effectiveness, test accuracy, reliability, reproducibility and cost-effectiveness of bone turnover markers for monitoring the response to osteoporosis treatment. DATA SOURCES We searched 12 electronic databases (including MEDLINE, EMBASE, The Cochrane Library and trials registries) without language restrictions from inception to March 2012. We hand-searched three relevant journals for the 12 months prior to May 2012, and websites of five test manufacturers and the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Reference lists of included studies and relevant reviews were also searched. REVIEW METHODS A systematic review of test accuracy, clinical utility, reliability and reproducibility, and cost-effectiveness of two formation and two resorption bone turnover markers, in patients being treated for osteoporosis with any of bisphosphonate [alendronate (Fosamax, MSD), risedronate (Actonel, Warner Chilcott Company), zolendronate (Zometa, Novartis)], raloxifene (Evista, Eli Lilly and Company Ltd), strontium ranelate (Protelos, Servier Laboratories Ltd), denosumab (Prolia, Amgen Ltd) or teriparatide (Forsteo, Eli Lilly and Company Ltd), was undertaken according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) guidelines. Given the breadth of the review question, a range of study designs

  15. Preventing Falls

    MedlinePlus

    ... from osteoporosis. Lower-body strength exercises and balance exercises can help you prevent falls and avoid the disability that may result from falling. Here are some fall prevention tips from Go4Life : l Have your eyes and hearing tested often. Always wear your glasses when you ...

  16. Osteoporosis: an increasing concern in pediatric dentistry.

    PubMed

    da Fonseca, Marcio A

    2011-01-01

    Increasing numbers of children are being affected by low bone density and osteoporosis. Bone fractures are the main reason for hospitalization between 10 and 14 years of age and, over the past 3 decades, there has been an increase in the incidence of fractures in children. Childhood factors such as lifestyle, diet, chronic illness, and medications have a vital short-term impact on bone health and a long-term effect on the achievement of peak bone mass, with the potential for morbidity in adulthood. The primary forms of osteoporosis consist of rare inherited conditions, but the secondary forms are becoming more common given that chronically ill children are surviving longer. This subject should be of interest to pediatric dentists, because low mineral density and osteoporosis, together with drugs used to treat them (eg, bisphosphonates), may cause adverse effects in the oral cavity. Furthermore, the pediatric dentist is an important health care professional to counsel patients about healthy lifestyles that can help prevent the condition from an early age. PMID:21703077

  17. Postmenopausal osteoporosis: microradiographic aspects.

    PubMed

    Dhem, A; Nyssen-Behets, C; Coppens, J

    1998-01-01

    A comparative microradiographic and histologic analysis of undecalcified bone samples was performed in men and women aged 18-98 years. These morphological methods showed that besides usual lamellar bone remodelling, all the so-called inert surfaces, namely both haversian and vascular canals as well as trabecular surfaces, were involved in weathering alterations of the superficial lamellae, resulting in eroded outlines devoid of osteoclast. These aspects, recorded in all pieces of our material, were visible from the earliest adult age and were randomly distributed. Except the grade of osteoporosis at a given age, the microradiographic and histologic aspects were similar in both aged men and women and did not allow sex distinction. These observations were consistent with the hypothesis of a particular destructive process affecting all the quiescent lamellar bone surfaces without osteoclast or cell participation. This kind of erosion, termed delitescence, could be at least partially responsible for the age-related and postmenopausal bone loss. In order to explain the increasing osteoporosis after menopause, it has been suggested that the estrogen deficiency could increase the percentage of dead osteocytes. Thereby the reduced cellular control on the bone surface could impair the remodeling process and fail to adapt the bone structure by repairing the microscopic lesions. PMID:11315966

  18. Osteoporosis, Fractures, and Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that osteoporosis and diabetes are prevalent diseases with significant associated morbidity and mortality. Patients with diabetes mellitus have an increased risk of bone fractures. In type 1 diabetes, the risk is increased by ∼6 times and is due to low bone mass. Despite increased bone mineral density (BMD), in patients with type 2 diabetes the risk is increased (which is about twice the risk in the general population) due to the inferior quality of bone. Bone fragility in type 2 diabetes, which is not reflected by bone mineral density, depends on bone quality deterioration rather than bone mass reduction. Thus, surrogate markers and examination methods are needed to replace the insensitivity of BMD in assessing fracture risks of T2DM patients. One of these methods can be trabecular bone score. The aim of the paper is to present the present state of scientific knowledge about the osteoporosis risk in diabetic patient. The review also discusses the possibility of problematic using the study conclusions in real clinical practice. PMID:25050121

  19. Novel therapies for osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Makras, Polyzois; Delaroudis, Sideris; Anastasilakis, Athanasios D

    2015-10-01

    Since the identification of osteoporosis as a major health issue in aging populations and the subsequent development of the first treatment modalities for its management, considerable progress has been made in our understanding of the mechanisms controlling bone turnover and disease pathophysiology, thus enabling the pinpointing of new targets for intervention. This progress, along with advances in biotechnology, has rendered possible the development of ever more sophisticated treatments employing novel mechanisms of action. Denosumab, a monoclonal antibody against RANKL, approved for the treatment of postmenopausal and male osteoporosis, significantly and continuously increases bone mineral density (BMD) and maintains a low risk of vertebral, non-vertebral, and hip fractures for up to 8 years. Currently available combinations of estrogens with selective estrogen receptor modulators moderately increase BMD without causing the extra-skeletal adverse effects of each compound alone. The cathepsin K inhibitor odanacatib has recently been shown to decrease vertebral, non-vertebral, and hip fracture rates and is nearing approval. Romosozumab, an anti-sclerosin antibody, and abaloparatide, a PTH-related peptide analog, are at present in advanced stages of clinical evaluation, so far demonstrating efficaciousness together with a favorable safety profile. Several other agents are currently in earlier clinical and preclinical phases of development, including dickkopf-1 antagonists, activin A antagonists, β-arrestin analogs, calcilytics, and Src tyrosine kinase inhibitors. PMID:26277199

  20. Clodronate news of efficacy in osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Nardi, Alfredo; Ventura, Lorenzo; Cozzi, Luisella; Tonini, Greta

    2016-01-01

    Summary Clodronate belongs to Bisphosphonates family and it has been studied especially for osteoporosis treatment, Paget’s disease, osteolytic metastases, hypercalcemia malignancy and some childhood skeletal diseases. Besides the osteoporosis treatment, it has been successfully used for treating tumoral osteolysis and for bone localization of multiple myeloma, hypercalcemia malignancy, primary hyperparathyroidism, Paget’s disease and algodystrophy. Filipponi study showed a statistically significant reduction of the incidence of vertebral fractures after 4 years of treatment with clodronate, intravenously administered at a dose of 200 mg every three weeks. Frediani study, published in 2003 on BONE, proved the clodronate efficacy in the prevention of fractures caused by glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis (GIO). Clodronate doses of 800 mg/day per os and 100 mg i.m./week are substantially equivalent, because the oral absorption is about 1,9%. A higher efficacy on BMD was documented in various works, especially in cohorts of patients with a greater fracture risk, using higher doses (1600 mg per os). This has led to the hypothesis of using clodronate 200 mg i.m. formulation. Clodronate is an osteoporosis drug that can be assumed in different doses (100 mg i.m./week, clodronate 200 mg i.m. every 2 weeks) considering the risk band, identified by algorithms (FRAX o DeFRA), by BMD and by the presence of at least one risk factor. That means that it is possible to envisage a differentiated use of clodronate adapting the doses to the fracture risk and to the severity of pain symptoms, thus promoting a greater adherence to the therapy. To conclude clodronate is helpful in reducing fracture risk, is safe, well tolerated, and has a good rate cost/effectiveness in patients with fracture risk over 7% established with FRAX. PMID:27252741

  1. Osteoporosis-related life habits and knowledge about osteoporosis among women in El Salvador: A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Rauda, Roberto; Martinez-Garcia, Sandra

    2004-01-01

    Background Osteoporosis is a systemic skeletal disorder, characterized by reduced bone mass, deterioration of bone structure, increased bone fragility, and increased fracture risk. It is more frequent to find among women than men at a 4:1 ratio. Evidence suggests that to adopt changes on some life habits can prevent or delay development of osteoporosis. Several osteoporosis-risk factors have been confirmed in the US and western Europe, but in El Salvador there are neither reliable epidemiological statistics about this skeletal disorder nor studies addressing osteoporosis-risk factors in women. The aim of this study was to determinate the extent of osteoporosis knowledge, the levels of both daily calcium intake and weight-bearing physical activity, and the influence of several osteoporosis-risk factors on these variables in three age groups of Salvadorean women. Methods In this exploratory cross-sectional study, an osteoporosis knowledge assessment questionnaire incluiding a food frequency and a physical activity record section were used to collect data and it was delivered through a face-to-face interview. A convenience sample (n = 197) comprised of three groups of women aged 25–35 years, 36–49 years, and over 49 years was taken. Among-group comparisons of means were analyzed by two-way ANOVA. To determinate the overall influence of osteoporosis-risk factors, the multivariate analysis was used. Results Study results indicated that better educated women had more knowledge about osteoporosis than women with a low education level, regardless of age, even though this knowledge was rather fair. Older women got more weight-bearing physical activity at home and less at place of employment than reported by the younger women; however, neither group performed sufficient high-intensity WBPA to improve bone mass. Regardless of age, the most women consumed 60% or less than the Dietary Reference Intake of calcium and depend on household income, lactose intolerance and coffee

  2. Osteoporosis screening is unjustifiably low in older African-American women.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Consuelo H.; Goldfeder, Jason S.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: More than one million Americans suffer osteoporotic fractures yearly, resulting in a marked increase in morbidity and mortality. Despite a decrease in bone mineral density with increasing age in all ethnic groups and both genders, preventative and therapeutics efforts in osteoporosis have been focused on caucasian and Asian women. This study assesses the osteoporosis screening practices and the frequency of low bone density in a primarily African-American population of older women. METHODS: Medical records of 252 women at risk for osteoporosis were reviewed for the diagnosis of osteoporosis, prior osteoporosis screening, prior breast cancer screening, and the use of calcium, vitamin D or estrogen. Subsequently, 128 women were assessed for risk factors for osteoporosis, and their bone mineral density was measured using a peripheral bone densitometer. RESULTS: Osteoporosis screening had been performed in 11.5% of the subjects. Of the women evaluated by peripheral bone densitometry, 44.5% of all women, 40.4% of African-American women, and 53.3% of caucasian women had abnormally low bone density measurements. The frequency of abnormal bone density increased with both increasing age and decreasing body mass index. CONCLUSIONS: Although few women in this population were previously screened for osteoporosis, low bone density occurred in African-American women at substantial rates. Increasing age and low body mass are important risk factors for low bone density in African-American women. Ethnicity should not be used as an exclusion criterion for screening for osteoporosis. PMID:15101666

  3. What the Research Says About Exercise and Osteoporosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Mary Kay; Rosenberg, Beth S.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of physical activity on the human skeleton are examined. Research studies are cited that indicate exercise may be beneficial in maintaining or increasing bone mineral content. Effects of exercise on the prevention or treatment of osteoporosis are uncertain. (DF)

  4. [Osteoporosis in thyroid diseases].

    PubMed

    Kosińska, Agnieszka; Syrenicz, Anhelli; Kosiński, Bogusław; Garanty-Bogacka, Barbara; Syrenicz, Małgorzata; Gromniak, Elwira

    2005-01-01

    Thyroid hormones play the essential role in the regulation of metabolism and bone remodeling in physiological conditions and in the course of thyroid dysfunction. Introduction of densitometry to the diagnostics of osteoporosis has made possible the evaluation of influence of both hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism and their treatment on bone mineral density. Moreover it became possible to estimate the influence of treatment with exogenous thyroid hormones on the skeletal system. Authors presented mechanisms of the thyroid hormones action on bone tissue and analysed current state of knowledge concerning the influence of the thyroxine treatment with replacement and suppressive doses on the bone mineral density. The influence of thyroid hormones on the skeletal system with respect to premenopausal and postmenopausal period was also discussed. Great discrepancies in literature data and its reasons were underlined. PMID:16335687

  5. Comparison in Adherence to Osteoporosis Guidelines according to Bone Health Status in Korean Adult

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hee-Sook; Kim, Soon-Kyung; Lee, Hae-Hyeog; Byun, Dong Won; Kim, Tae-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Background Osteoporosis one of the most serious disease to decrease the quality of life and cause economic loss. Thus, prevention of osteoporosis has become an important health concern. The study examined in adherence to osteoporosis guidelines and compared the levels of adherence to osteoporosis guidelines between bone health status in Korean adult. Methods This study used data from a nationally represented sample of Koreans (n=3,419) from 2008 to 2011 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. We were divided into three groups by T-score: normal, osteopenia and osteoporosis. Assessment of adherence level was based on 5 components of osteoporosis guidelines, considering intake of sodium, calcium and protein, smoking and regular exercise. Results The sex, body mass index, income and educational level did not significantly differ between three groups. Deficient intake of calcium was significantly associated with a threefold greater odds in osteoporosis group (OR 3.6; 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.52-5.22). Excessive protein intake was significantly increased the risk only in osteoporosis group compared to the normal group (OR 1.71; 95% CI 1.15-2.62). Smoking increased the risk in osteoporosis group compared to the normal group (OR 2.88; 95% CI 1.75-4.76), osteoporosis group compared to the osteopenia group (OR 2.69; 95% CI 1.61-4.55). Conclusions Nutritional factor (intake of calcium and protein) and lifestyle-related factor (smoking and exercise) must be accompanied the management for bone health. An adherence of guidelines is considered very important for the prevention of osteoporosis. PMID:27622178

  6. Instrumental diagnosis of osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Rossini, M; Viapiana, O; Adami, S

    1998-06-01

    Considerable progress in the development of methods for assessing the skeleton now makes it possible to detect osteoporosis non-invasively and early. There is a variety of techniques available at present: single-photon (SPA) and single X-ray absorptiometry (SXA), dual-photon (DPA) and dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), quantitative computed tomography (QCT), radiographic absorptiometry (RA), and quantitative ultrasound (QUS), and their development has certainly been driven by the need to overcome the inherent shortcomings of plain radiography for this purpose. Both SPA and SXA methods make a quantitative assessment of the bone mineral content (BMC) or density (BMD) at peripheral sites of the skeleton possible. Single energy measurements are not possible at sites with variable soft tissue thickness and composition, i.e., the axial skeleton. For these purposes, DPA and DXA techniques were introduced. The main advantages of an X-ray system over a radionuclide system are shortened examination time, greater accuracy and precision limited to higher resolution, and removal of errors due to source decay correction. Low radiation dose, availability, capacity to evaluate multiple sites, and ease of use have made DXA the most widely used technique for measuring bone mineral density. QCT can determine the true volumetric density of trabecular or cortical bone in three dimensions at any skeletal site. Recently developed new computer-assisted methods have improved RA precision, thus providing a simple and inexpensive technique for screening of bone mineral status of large populations. QUS was reported to provide information regarding the structural characteristics of bone, which may be relevant to the appearance of osteoporotic fractures; indeed, some studies suggest a relationship between QUS and bone strength beyond that which can be explained by BMD. Recent experimental studies suggested that magnetic resonance might also constitute a promising tool for assessing osteoporosis

  7. Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women and men from the age of 50 years in the UK.

    PubMed

    Compston, J; Cooper, A; Cooper, C; Francis, R; Kanis, J A; Marsh, D; McCloskey, E V; Reid, D M; Selby, P; Wilkins, M

    2009-02-20

    In 1999 and 2000 the Royal College of Physicians published guidelines for the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis [Royal College of Physicians. Osteoporosis: clinical guidelines for the prevention and treatment. London: Royal College of Physicians; 1999; Royal College of Physicians and Bone and Tooth Society of Great Britain. Update on pharmacological interventions and an algorithm for management. London, UK: Royal College of Physicians; 2000.; Royal College of Physicians. Glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis. Guidelines on prevention and treatment; Bone and Tooth Society of Great Britain, National Osteoporosis Society and Royal College of Physicians. London, UK: Royal College of Physicians; 2002]. Since then, there have been significant advances in the field of osteoporosis including the development of new techniques for measuring bone mineral density, improved methods of assessing fracture risk and new treatments that have been shown to significantly reduce the risk of fractures. Against this background, the National Osteoporosis Guideline Group (NOGG), in collaboration with many Societies in the UK, have updated the original guidelines [Royal College of Physicians, National Osteoporosis Guideline Group on behalf of the Bone Research Society, British Geriatrics Society, British Orthopaedic Association, British Society of Rheumatology, National Osteoporosis Society, Osteoporosis 2000, Osteoporosis Dorset, Primary Care Rheumatology Society, Society for Endocrinology. Osteoporosis. Clinical guideline for prevention and treatment, Executive Summary. University of Sheffield Press; 2008], a practical summary of which is detailed below. The management algorithms are underpinned by a health economic analysis applied to the epidemiology of fracture in the UK. PMID:19135323

  8. Medication-induced osteoporosis: screening and treatment strategies

    PubMed Central

    Panday, Keshav; Gona, Amitha

    2014-01-01

    Drug-induced osteoporosis is a significant health problem and many physicians are unaware that many commonly prescribed medications contribute to significant bone loss and fractures. In addition to glucocorticoids, proton pump inhibitors, selective serotonin receptor inhibitors, thiazolidinediones, anticonvulsants, medroxyprogesterone acetate, aromatase inhibitors, androgen deprivation therapy, heparin, calcineurin inhibitors, and some chemotherapies have deleterious effects on bone health. Furthermore, many patients are treated with combinations of these medications, possibly compounding the harmful effects of these drugs. Increasing physician awareness of these side effects will allow for monitoring of bone health and therapeutic interventions to prevent or treat drug-induced osteoporosis. PMID:25342997

  9. The worldwide problem of osteoporosis: insights afforded by epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Riggs, B L; Melton, L J

    1995-11-01

    Osteoporosis is one of the major problems facing women and older people of both sexes. The morbid event in osteoporosis is fracture. However, the definition of osteoporosis should not require the presence of fractures but only a decrease in bone mass that is associated with an unacceptably high risk of fracture. In the USA, approximately 1.5 million fractures annually are attributable to osteoporosis: these include 700,000 vertebral fractures, 250,000 distal forearm (Colles') fractures, 250,000 hip fractures, and 300,000 fractures of other limb sites. The lifetime risk of fractures of the spine (symptomatic), hip, and distal radius is 40% for white women and 13% for white men from 50 years of age onwards. Following a hip fracture, there is a 10%-20% mortality over the subsequent 6 months, 50% of sufferers will be unable to walk without assistance, and 25% will require long-term domiciliary care. Contrary to prevailing opinion, the morbidity and suffering associated with wrist and spine fractures are also considerable. The annual cost of osteoporosis to the US healthcare system is at least $5-$10 billion with similar incidence and cost in other developed countries. These already high costs will increase further with continued aging of the population. In addition, the population explosion in underdeveloped countries will change the demography of osteoporosis; for example, the incidence of hip fracture, and, presumably, other osteoporotic fractures will increase four-fold worldwide during the next 50 years and the attendant costs will threaten the viability of the healthcare systems of many countries. Unless decisive steps for preventive intervention are taken now, a catastrophic global epidemic of osteoporosis seems inevitable. PMID:8573428

  10. Dietary Patterns and Osteoporosis Risk in Postmenopausal Korean Women

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seon-Joo; Joo, Seong-Eun; Min, Haesook; Park, Jae Kyung; Kim, Yeonjung; Kim, Sung Soo; Ahn, Younjhin

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The prevalence of osteoporosis and related fractures has increased rapidly in Korean women. Proper nutrition intake is associated with the prevention of osteoporosis. We analyzed the association between dietary patterns and the risk of osteoporosis during a 4-year follow-up in postmenopausal Korean women. Methods Postmenopausal women (n = 1,725) who participated in the Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study were enrolled. Food intake was assessed using a validated semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire, and a quantitative ultrasound device was used to measure the speed of sound at the radius and tibia. Results Three major dietary patterns were identified using factor analysis based on baseline intake data: traditional (high intake of rice, kimchi, and vegetables), dairy (high intake of milk, dairy products, and green tea), and western (high intake of sugar, fat, and bread). Multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate relative risk for osteoporosis. An inverse association was detected between the dairy dietary pattern and the osteoporosis incidence [relative risk (RR): 0.63, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.42–0.93, p-trend=0.055 in radius; RR: 0.56, 95% CI: 0.35–0.90, p-trend=0.048 in tibia]. Individuals in the highest quintile for the traditional dietary pattern (p-trend = 0.009 in tibia) and western dietary pattern (p-trend = 0.043 in radius) demonstrated a higher risk of osteoporosis incidence than those in the lowest quintile. Conclusion These results suggested that high consumption of milk, dairy products, and green tea may reduce the risk of osteoporosis in postmenopausal Korean women. PMID:24159515