Science.gov

Sample records for data display systems

  1. Television Data Display System (TDDS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sendler, K.

    1972-01-01

    A television data display system at KSC is described which displays computer processed data derived from space vehicle launch and prelaunch tests. The general system capabilities and technical features are discussed in separate sections under the headings of: (1) operational use, (2) system description, (3) computer programs, (4) computer hardware, and (5) adaptability.

  2. Hydra 1 data display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodgkins, R. L.; Osgood, D. R.

    1968-01-01

    System, named Hydra, generates charts, graphs, and printed matter on slides or conventional negatives and positives, and combines these media with a capability of storage on magnetic tape for future updating to accommodate engineering changes or contract modifications to be readily added to basic data.

  3. Beacon data acquisition and display system

    DOEpatents

    Skogmo, D.G.; Black, B.D.

    1991-12-17

    A system for transmitting aircraft beacon information received by a secondary surveillance radar through telephone lines to a remote display includes a digitizer connected to the radar for preparing a serial file of data records containing position and identification information of the beacons detected by each sweep of the radar. This information is transmitted through the telephone lines to a remote computer where it is displayed. 6 figures.

  4. Beacon data acquisition and display system

    DOEpatents

    Skogmo, David G.; Black, Billy D.

    1991-01-01

    A system for transmitting aircraft beacon information received by a secondary surveillance radar through telephone lines to a remote display includes a digitizer connected to the radar for preparing a serial file of data records containing position and identification information of the beacons detected by each sweep of the radar. This information is transmitted through the telephone lines to a remote computer where it is displayed.

  5. Electronic data generation and display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wetekamm, Jules

    1988-01-01

    The Electronic Data Generation and Display System (EDGADS) is a field tested paperless technical manual system. The authoring provides subject matter experts the option of developing procedureware from digital or hardcopy inputs of technical information from text, graphics, pictures, and recorded media (video, audio, etc.). The display system provides multi-window presentations of graphics, pictures, animations, and action sequences with text and audio overlays on high resolution color CRT and monochrome portable displays. The database management system allows direct access via hierarchical menus, keyword name, ID number, voice command or touch of a screen pictoral of the item (ICON). It contains operations and maintenance technical information at three levels of intelligence for a total system.

  6. Spacesuit Data Display and Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, David G.; Sells, Aaron; Shah, Hemal

    2009-01-01

    A prototype embedded avionics system has been designed for the next generation of NASA extra-vehicular-activity (EVA) spacesuits. The system performs biomedical and other sensor monitoring, image capture, data display, and data transmission. An existing NASA Phase I and II award winning design for an embedded computing system (ZIN vMetrics - BioWATCH) has been modified. The unit has a reliable, compact form factor with flexible packaging options. These innovations are significant, because current state-of-the-art EVA spacesuits do not provide capability for data displays or embedded data acquisition and management. The Phase 1 effort achieved Technology Readiness Level 4 (high fidelity breadboard demonstration). The breadboard uses a commercial-grade field-programmable gate array (FPGA) with embedded processor core that can be upgraded to a space-rated device for future revisions.

  7. BASIC Data Manipulation And Display System (BDMADS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szuch, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    BDMADS, a BASIC Data Manipulation and Display System, is a collection of software programs that run on an Apple II Plus personal computer. BDMADS provides a user-friendly environment for the engineer in which to perform scientific data processing. The computer programs and their use are described. Jet engine performance calculations are used to illustrate the use of BDMADS. Source listings of the BDMADS programs are provided and should permit users to customize the programs for their particular applications.

  8. Transferability and data access issues. [decision information display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferreros, A. V.

    1981-01-01

    The evolution and current operational mode of the domestic information display system (DIDS) now known as the decision information display system are described. This minicomputer based system, developed from a NASA-generated image processing system, was designed to display federal statistical data for a variety of geographic areas in the form of choropleth maps. The application of DIDS in South Carolina is discussed as well as the progress made and issues that emerged in using the data base on a state and county level. The hardware base for the system, how this user friendly system works, and the possibility of transferring data to remote systems are examined.

  9. Interactive display/graphics systems for remote sensor data analysis.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eppler, W. G.; Loe, D. L.; Wilson, E. L.; Whitley, S. L.; Sachen, R. J.

    1971-01-01

    Using a color-television display system and interactive graphics equipment on-line to an IBM 360/44 computer, investigators at the Manned Spacecraft Center have developed a variety of interactive displays which aid in analyzing remote sensor data. This paper describes how such interactive displays are used to: (1) analyze data from a multispectral scanner, (2) develop automatic pattern recognition systems based on multispectral scanner measurements, and (3) analyze data from nonimaging sensors such as the infrared radiometer and microwave scatterometer.

  10. Multiple-Flat-Panel System Displays Multidimensional Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gundo, Daniel; Levit, Creon; Henze, Christopher; Sandstrom, Timothy; Ellsworth, David; Green, Bryan; Joly, Arthur

    2006-01-01

    The NASA Ames hyperwall is a display system designed to facilitate the visualization of sets of multivariate and multidimensional data like those generated in complex engineering and scientific computations. The hyperwall includes a 77 matrix of computer-driven flat-panel video display units, each presenting an image of 1,280 1,024 pixels. The term hyperwall reflects the fact that this system is a more capable successor to prior computer-driven multiple-flat-panel display systems known by names that include the generic term powerwall and the trade names PowerWall and Powerwall. Each of the 49 flat-panel displays is driven by a rack-mounted, dual-central-processing- unit, workstation-class personal computer equipped with a hig-hperformance graphical-display circuit card and with a hard-disk drive having a storage capacity of 100 GB. Each such computer is a slave node in a master/ slave computing/data-communication system (see Figure 1). The computer that acts as the master node is similar to the slave-node computers, except that it runs the master portion of the system software and is equipped with a keyboard and mouse for control by a human operator. The system utilizes commercially available master/slave software along with custom software that enables the human controller to interact simultaneously with any number of selected slave nodes. In a powerwall, a single rendering task is spread across multiple processors and then the multiple outputs are tiled into one seamless super-display. It must be noted that the hyperwall concept subsumes the powerwall concept in that a single scene could be rendered as a mosaic image on the hyperwall. However, the hyperwall offers a wider set of capabilities to serve a different purpose: The hyperwall concept is one of (1) simultaneously displaying multiple different but related images, and (2) providing means for composing and controlling such sets of images. In place of elaborate software or hardware crossbar switches, the

  11. MIRAGE: The data acquisition, analysis, and display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosser, Robert S.; Rahman, Hasan H.

    1993-01-01

    Developed for the NASA Johnson Space Center and Life Sciences Directorate by GE Government Services, the Microcomputer Integrated Real-time Acquisition Ground Equipment (MIRAGE) system is a portable ground support system for Spacelab life sciences experiments. The MIRAGE system can acquire digital or analog data. Digital data may be NRZ-formatted telemetry packets of packets from a network interface. Analog signal are digitized and stored in experimental packet format. Data packets from any acquisition source are archived to a disk as they are received. Meta-parameters are generated from the data packet parameters by applying mathematical and logical operators. Parameters are displayed in text and graphical form or output to analog devices. Experiment data packets may be retransmitted through the network interface. Data stream definition, experiment parameter format, parameter displays, and other variables are configured using spreadsheet database. A database can be developed to support virtually any data packet format. The user interface provides menu- and icon-driven program control. The MIRAGE system can be integrated with other workstations to perform a variety of functions. The generic capabilities, adaptability and ease of use make the MIRAGE a cost-effective solution to many experimental data processing requirements.

  12. Systems and methods for displaying data in split dimension levels

    DOEpatents

    Stolte, Chris; Hanrahan, Patrick

    2015-07-28

    Systems and methods for displaying data in split dimension levels are disclosed. In some implementations, a method includes: at a computer, obtaining a dimensional hierarchy associated with a dataset, wherein the dimensional hierarchy includes at least one dimension and a sub-dimension of the at least one dimension; and populating information representing data included in the dataset into a visual table having a first axis and a second axis, wherein the first axis corresponds to the at least one dimension and the second axis corresponds to the sub-dimension of the at least one dimension.

  13. Displaying Data As Movies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Judith G.

    1992-01-01

    NMSB Movie computer program displays large sets of data (more than million individual values). Presentation dynamic, rapidly displaying sequential image "frames" in main "movie" window. Any sequence of two-dimensional sets of data scaled between 0 and 255 (1-byte resolution) displayed as movie. Time- or slice-wise progression of data illustrated. Originally written to present data from three-dimensional ultrasonic scans of damaged aerospace composite materials, illustrates data acquired by thermal-analysis systems measuring rates of heating and cooling of various materials. Developed on Macintosh IIx computer with 8-bit color display adapter and 8 megabytes of memory using Symantec Corporation's Think C, version 4.0.

  14. Automated system for integration and display of physiological response data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The system analysis approach was applied in a study of physiological systems in both 1-g and weightlessness, for short and long term experiments. A whole body, algorithm developed as the first step in the construction of a total body simulation system is described and an advanced biomedical computer system concept including interactive display/command consoles is discussed. The documentation of the design specifications, design and development studies, and user's instructions (which include program listings) for these delivered end-terms; the reports on the results of many research and feasibility studies; and many subcontract reports are cited in the bibliography.

  15. Display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Story, A. W. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A situational display and a means for creating the display are disclosed. The display comprises a moving line or raster, on a cathode ray tube, which is disposed intermediate of two columns of lamps or intensifications on the cathode ray tube. The raster and lights are controlled in such a manner that pairs of lights define a line which is either tracked or chased by the raster in accordance with the relationship between the optimum and actual values of a monitored parameter.

  16. Severe storms measurement system real time data processing and displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeffreys, H. B.

    1980-01-01

    The objectives of the system are to provide the system operator with real time system performance check and to provide data recording of all SSMS data. Meteorologists are provided with real time indication of meteorological data measurements including aid for directing flight profiles in real time and aid for directing SSMS operations. A day-to-day feedback is provided to meteorologists, system operators, and flight crews for flight planning on subsequent flight tests days.

  17. The Development of Data Acquisition and Remote Real-Time Display System for EAST NBI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaodan; Hu, Chundong; Sheng, Peng; Zhao, Yuanzhe; Wu, Deyun; Cui, Qinglong

    2013-10-01

    The data acquisition and remote real-time display system for the neutral beam injectors (NBI) on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST) are described in this paper. Distributed computer systems including local data acquisition (DAQ) facility, remote data server (DS), real-time display terminal are adopted with Linux and Windows operating system. Experimental signals are gathered by DAQ device at local working field. On the one hand, these gathered data will be sent to DS which runs on remote server main control layer on EAST NBI control network for saving and processing; on the other hand, these data will be sent to real-time display terminal which runs on remote monitoring layer on EAST NBI for displaying and monitoring experimental signals real-timely. Another point needs to be mentioned is that the real-time display software can call back historical data from DS for querying. The software of data acquisition and DS are programmed by C language while the real-time display software is programmed by Labview flow chart. The hardware mainly includes DAQ cards, server, industrial personal computer and others auxiliary hardware. Now the system proved to be performed well through experiments on NBI testing bed.

  18. Advances in systems for interactive processing and display of meteorological data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasler, A. F.

    1983-01-01

    Advances in systems for interactive processing and display of meteorological data are reviewed, with particular attention given to developments in hardware and software, meteorological data base, analysis and display, and systems availability. These developments include inexpensive minicomputers which give the user almost instantaneous results for many types of jobs; image terminals with the capability to enhance, quantify, animate, and compare image and graphical data; accessibility of a large meteorological data base and the capability of merging different types of data; and sophisticated analysis and multidimensional display techniques. Critical problems still to be solved include getting quick access to historical and real time data bases from any system and making it easy to transport software from one system to another.

  19. The value of LAN/WAN based operational data display systems

    SciTech Connect

    Malinowski, J.H.; Ballance, J.W.

    1995-08-01

    The development of client/server personal computer networks allow electric utilities with such networks to make near real-time operating data available to any employee with network access. Sophisticated graphical displays and trending capability provides operations, planning and management personnel a high performance window into operations that could only be dreamed of a few years ago. This paper describes the benefits two California utilities have achieved from establishment of LAN/WAN based Operational Data Display Systems.

  20. System status display information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, L. G.; Erickson, J. B.

    1984-01-01

    The system Status Display is an electronic display system which provides the flight crew with enhanced capabilities for monitoring and managing aircraft systems. Guidelines for the design of the electronic system displays were established. The technical approach involved the application of a system engineering approach to the design of candidate displays and the evaluation of a Hernative concepts by part-task simulation. The system engineering and selection of candidate displays are covered.

  1. Traveling-wave maser closed-cycle refrigerator data acquisition and display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fowler, L.; Britcliffe, M.

    1987-01-01

    A data acquisition and display system that automatically monitors the performance of the 4.5-K closed-cycle refrigerators used to cryogenically cool traveling-wave masers is described. The system displays and stores operating parameters for the purpose of providing status information, failure prediction, and analysis. A prototype of this system will be installed at Deep Space Network 12 in the near future. The advantages of using commercial data acquisition hardware with installed operating systems and BASIC programs for this application are discussed.

  2. Interface of the transport systems research vehicle monochrome display system to the digital autonomous terminal access communication data bus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Easley, W. C.; Tanguy, J. S.

    1986-01-01

    An upgrade of the transport systems research vehicle (TSRV) experimental flight system retained the original monochrome display system. The original host computer was replaced with a Norden 11/70, a new digital autonomous terminal access communication (DATAC) data bus was installed for data transfer between display system and host, while a new data interface method was required. The new display data interface uses four split phase bipolar (SPBP) serial busses. The DATAC bus uses a shared interface ram (SIR) for intermediate storage of its data transfer. A display interface unit (DIU) was designed and configured to read from and write to the SIR to properly convert the data from parallel to SPBP serial and vice versa. It is found that separation of data for use by each SPBP bus and synchronization of data tranfer throughout the entire experimental flight system are major problems which require solution in DIU design. The techniques used to accomplish these new data interface requirements are described.

  3. IDIMS/GEOPAK: Users manual for a geophysical data display and analysis system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Libert, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    The application of an existing image analysis system to the display and analysis of geophysical data is described, the potential for expanding the capabilities of such a system toward more advanced computer analytic and modeling functions is investigated. The major features of the IDIMS (Interactive Display and Image Manipulation System) and its applicability for image type analysis of geophysical data are described. Development of a basic geophysical data processing system to permit the image representation, coloring, interdisplay and comparison of geophysical data sets using existing IDIMS functions and to provide for the production of hard copies of processed images was described. An instruction manual and documentation for the GEOPAK subsystem was produced. A training course for personnel in the use of the IDIMS/GEOPAK was conducted. The effectiveness of the current IDIMS/GEOPAK system for geophysical data analysis was evaluated.

  4. Apollo experience report: Flight-control data needs, terminal display devices, and ground system configuration requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, R. A.

    1974-01-01

    The development of flight-control facilities for the Apollo program is reviewed from the viewpoint of the user organization. These facilities are treated in three categories: data systems, ground-based display and control systems, and configuration management. The effects of certain Apollo program factors on the selection, sizing, and configuration management of these systems are discussed. Recommendations are made regarding improvement of the systems and the reduction of system sensitivity to the program factors.

  5. Graphic Server: A real time system for displaying and monitoring telemetry data of several satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douard, Stephane

    1994-01-01

    Known as a Graphic Server, the system presented was designed for the control ground segment of the Telecom 2 satellites. It is a tool used to dynamically display telemetry data within graphic pages, also known as views. The views are created off-line through various utilities and then, on the operator's request, displayed and animated in real time as data is received. The system was designed as an independent component, and is installed in different Telecom 2 operational control centers. It enables operators to monitor changes in the platform and satellite payloads in real time. It has been in operation since December 1991.

  6. Escort: A data acquisition and display system to support research testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    Primarily designed to acquire data at steady state test conditions, the system can also monitor slow transients such as those generated in moving to a new test condition. The system configuration makes use of a microcomputer at the test site which acts as a communications multiplexer between the measurement and display devices and a centrally located minicomputer. A variety of measurement and display devices are supported using a modular approach. This allows each system to be configured with the proper combination of devices to meet the specific test requirements, while still leaving the option to add special interfaces when needed. Centralization of the minicomputer improves utilization through sharing. The creation of a pool of minis to provide data acquisition and display services to a variable number of running tests also offers other important advantages.

  7. Environmental data display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussey, K. J.; Blackwell, R. J.; Mcrae, G. J.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    1983-01-01

    Methods for using a combination of computer-generated color graphics and image processing techniques to display a large data base of environment information are described. The data source can be either field data or mathematical models, reduced to summary statistics that characterize the data field as a whole. Sharp gradients are plotted into contour plots, which can also feature shades, degree of brightness, and saturation levels for fine-tuning the image. The basic concepts of digital image processing are reviewed, including location of the pixels, intensity mapping operations, pseudocolor enhancements, neighborhood averaging, and smoothing. Sample applications are presented in terms of emissions and air quality distributions over the south coast air basin of southern California.

  8. Data base management system and display software for the National Geophysical Data Center geomagnetic CD-ROM's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papitashvili, N. E.; Papitashvili, V. O.; Allen, J. H.; Morris, L. D.

    1995-01-01

    The National Geophysical Data Center has the largest collection of geomagnetic data from the worldwide network of magnetic observatories. The data base management system and retrieval/display software have been developed for the archived geomagnetic data (annual means, monthly, daily, hourly, and 1-minute values) and placed on the center's CD-ROM's to provide users with 'user-oriented' and 'user-friendly' support. This system is described in this paper with a brief outline of provided options.

  9. System status display evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, Leland G.

    1988-01-01

    The System Status Display is an electronic display system which provides the crew with an enhanced capability for monitoring and managing the aircraft systems. A flight simulation in a fixed base cockpit simulator was used to evaluate alternative design concepts for this display system. The alternative concepts included pictorial versus alphanumeric text formats, multifunction versus dedicated controls, and integration of the procedures with the system status information versus paper checklists. Twelve pilots manually flew approach patterns with the different concepts. System malfunctions occurred which required the pilots to respond to the alert by reconfiguring the system. The pictorial display, the multifunction control interfaces collocated with the system display, and the procedures integrated with the status information all had shorter event processing times and lower subjective workloads.

  10. Real-time Data Display System of the Korean Neonatal Network

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byong Sop; Moon, Wi Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Real-time data reporting in clinical research networks can provide network members through interim analyses of the registered data, which can facilitate further studies and quality improvement activities. The aim of this report was to describe the building process of the data display system (DDS) of the Korean Neonatal Network (KNN) and its basic structure. After member verification at the KNN member's site, users can choose a variable of interest that is listed in the in-hospital data statistics (for 90 variables) or in the follow-up data statistics (for 54 variables). The statistical results of the outcome variables are displayed on the HyperText Markup Language 5-based chart graphs and tables. Participating hospitals can compare their performance to those of KNN as a whole and identify the trends over time. Ranking of each participating hospital is also displayed in terms of key outcome variables such as mortality and major neonatal morbidities with the names of other centers blinded. The most powerful function of the DDS is the ability to perform 'conditional filtering' which allows users to exclusively review the records of interest. Further collaboration is needed to upgrade the DDS to a more sophisticated analytical system and to provide a more user-friendly interface. PMID:26566352

  11. Real-time Data Display System of the Korean Neonatal Network.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byong Sop; Moon, Wi Hwan; Park, Eun Ae

    2015-10-01

    Real-time data reporting in clinical research networks can provide network members through interim analyses of the registered data, which can facilitate further studies and quality improvement activities. The aim of this report was to describe the building process of the data display system (DDS) of the Korean Neonatal Network (KNN) and its basic structure. After member verification at the KNN member's site, users can choose a variable of interest that is listed in the in-hospital data statistics (for 90 variables) or in the follow-up data statistics (for 54 variables). The statistical results of the outcome variables are displayed on the HyperText Markup Language 5-based chart graphs and tables. Participating hospitals can compare their performance to those of KNN as a whole and identify the trends over time. Ranking of each participating hospital is also displayed in terms of key outcome variables such as mortality and major neonatal morbidities with the names of other centers blinded. The most powerful function of the DDS is the ability to perform 'conditional filtering' which allows users to exclusively review the records of interest. Further collaboration is needed to upgrade the DDS to a more sophisticated analytical system and to provide a more user-friendly interface. PMID:26566352

  12. Geophysical data analysis and visualization using the Grid Analysis and Display System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, Brian E.; Kinter, James L., III

    1995-01-01

    Several problems posed by the rapidly growing volume of geophysical data are described, and a selected set of existing solutions to these problems is outlined. A recently developed desktop software tool called the Grid Analysis and Display System (GrADS) is presented. The GrADS' user interface is a natural extension of the standard procedures scientists apply to their geophysical data analysis problems. The basic GrADS operations have defaults that naturally map to data analysis actions, and there is a programmable interface for customizing data access and manipulation. The fundamental concept of the GrADS' dimension environment, which defines both the space in which the geophysical data reside and the 'slice' of data which is being analyzed at a given time, is expressed The GrADS' data storage and access model is described. An argument is made in favor of describable data formats rather than standard data formats. The manner in which GrADS users may perform operations on their data and display the results is also described. It is argued that two-dimensional graphics provides a powerful quantitative data analysis tool whose value is underestimated in the current development environment which emphasizes three dimensional structure modeling.

  13. Design specification for a general purpose Data Integration and Display System (DIDS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The capability for any program written in FORTRAN or XSYMBOL to display its output is provided. Displays are presented on the Biomed Console CRT, the COMPLOT X-Y plotter or both. The display of data stored on magnetic tape is accomplished without the necessity of coding a program. The keyboard on the Biomed Console or the teletype was designed to be the user's interface with DIDS to call displays stored on magnetic tape.

  14. Workshop on data-acquisition and -display systems: directions after TMI. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-11-01

    The accident at Three Mile Island Unit-2 raised questions as to the adequacy of data acquisition and display systems in commercial nuclear power plants. A series of recommendations have developed from the various groups that have analyzed the accident in order to improve the oprator's overview of the plant safety conditions and to facilitate information transfer to technical support centers in emergency situations. This report is the result of an NSAC-sponsored workshop, where the various recommendations and emerging regulatory requirements were reviewed in an attempt to provide an integrated basis for their implementation.

  15. NASA transport systems research vehicle B-737 data link system and display formats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knox, Charles E.; Scanlon, Charles H.

    1990-01-01

    A data link system was designed to support flight tests in the NASA Transport Systems Research Vehicle B-737 airplane. The purpose of the flight tests was to evaluate pilot acceptance of using data link as the primary source of communications for strategic and tactical air traffic control clearances, weather information, and company messages. The airborne functional operations of the data link system flight tested in 1990 are described.

  16. Real-Time Data Display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedings, Marc

    2007-01-01

    RT-Display is a MATLAB-based data acquisition environment designed to use a variety of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) hardware to digitize analog signals to a standard data format usable by other post-acquisition data analysis tools. This software presents the acquired data in real time using a variety of signal-processing algorithms. The acquired data is stored in a standard Operator Interactive Signal Processing Software (OISPS) data-formatted file. RT-Display is primarily configured to use the Agilent VXI (or equivalent) data acquisition boards used in such systems as MIDDAS (Multi-channel Integrated Dynamic Data Acquisition System). The software is generalized and deployable in almost any testing environment, without limitations or proprietary configuration for a specific test program or project. With the Agilent hardware configured and in place, users can start the program and, in one step, immediately begin digitizing multiple channels of data. Once the acquisition is completed, data is converted into a common binary format that also can be translated to specific formats used by external analysis software, such as OISPS and PC-Signal (product of AI Signal Research Inc.). RT-Display at the time of this reporting was certified on Agilent hardware capable of acquisition up to 196,608 samples per second. Data signals are presented to the user on-screen simultaneously for 16 channels. Each channel can be viewed individually, with a maximum capability of 160 signal channels (depending on hardware configuration). Current signal presentations include: time data, fast Fourier transforms (FFT), and power spectral density plots (PSD). Additional processing algorithms can be easily incorporated into this environment.

  17. Information retrieval and display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groover, J. L.; King, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    Versatile command-driven data management system offers users, through simplified command language, a means of storing and searching data files, sorting data files into specified orders, performing simple or complex computations, effecting file updates, and printing or displaying output data. Commands are simple to use and flexible enough to meet most data management requirements.

  18. Multifunction display system, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The design and construction of a multifunction display man/machine interface for use with a 4 pi IBM-360 System are described. The system is capable of displaying superimposed volatile alphanumeric and graphical data on a 512 x 512 element plasma panel, and holographically stored multicolor archival information. The volatile data may be entered from a keyboard or by means of an I/O interface to the 360 system. A 2-page memory local to the display is provided for storing the entered data. The archival data is stored as a phase hologram on a vinyl tape strip. This data is accessible by means of a rapid transport system which responds to inputs provided by the I/O channel on the keyboard. As many as 500 frames may be stored on a tape strip for access in under 6 seconds.

  19. Drivers license display system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokoski, Francine J.

    1997-01-01

    Carjackings are only one of a growing class of law enforcement problems associated with increasingly violent crimes and accidents involving automobiles plays weapons, drugs and alcohol. Police traffic stops have become increasingly dangerous, with an officer having no information about a vehicle's potentially armed driver until approaching him. There are 15 million alcoholics in the US and 90 percent of them have drivers licenses. Many of them continue driving even after their licenses have ben revoked or suspended. There are thousands of unlicensed truck drivers in the country, and also thousands who routinely exceed safe operating periods without rest; often using drugs in an attempt to stay alert. MIKOS has developed the Drivers License Display Systems to reduce these and other related risks. Although every state requires the continuous display of vehicle registration information on every vehicle using public roads, no state yet requires the display of driver license information. The technology exists to provide that feature as an add-on to current vehicles for nominal cost. An initial voluntary market is expected to include: municipal, rental, and high value vehicles which are most likely to be mis-appropriated. It is anticipated that state regulations will eventually require such systems in the future, beginning with commercial vehicles, and then extending to high risk drivers and eventually all vehicles. The MIKOS system offers a dual-display approach which can be deployed now, and which will utilize all existing state licenses without requiring standardization.

  20. Seamless tiled display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubin, Matthew B. (Inventor); Larson, Brent D. (Inventor); Kolosowsky, Aleksandra (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A modular and scalable seamless tiled display apparatus includes multiple display devices, a screen, and multiple lens assemblies. Each display device is subdivided into multiple sections, and each section is configured to display a sectional image. One of the lens assemblies is optically coupled to each of the sections of each of the display devices to project the sectional image displayed on that section onto the screen. The multiple lens assemblies are configured to merge the projected sectional images to form a single tiled image. The projected sectional images may be merged on the screen by magnifying and shifting the images in an appropriate manner. The magnification and shifting of these images eliminates any visual effect on the tiled display that may result from dead-band regions defined between each pair of adjacent sections on each display device, and due to gaps between multiple display devices.

  1. Cytoplasmic bacteriophage display system

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F.W.; Rosenberg, A.H.

    1998-06-16

    Disclosed are display vectors comprising DNA encoding a portion of a structural protein from a cytoplasmic bacteriophage, joined covalently to a protein or peptide of interest. Exemplified are display vectors wherein the structural protein is the T7 bacteriophage capsid protein. More specifically, in the exemplified display vectors the C-terminal amino acid residue of the portion of the capsid protein is joined to the N-terminal residue of the protein or peptide of interest. The portion of the T7 capsid protein exemplified comprises an N-terminal portion corresponding to form 10B of the T7 capsid protein. The display vectors are useful for high copy number display or lower copy number display (with larger fusion). Compositions of the type described herein are useful in connection with methods for producing a virus displaying a protein or peptide of interest. 1 fig.

  2. Cytoplasmic bacteriophage display system

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F. William; Rosenberg, Alan H.

    1998-06-16

    Disclosed are display vectors comprising DNA encoding a portion of a structural protein from a cytoplasmic bacteriophage, joined covalently to a protein or peptide of interest. Exemplified are display vectors wherein the structural protein is the T7 bacteriophage capsid protein. More specifically, in the exemplified display vectors the C-terminal amino acid residue of the portion of the capsid protein is joined to the N-terminal residue of the protein or peptide of interest. The portion of the T7 capsid protein exemplified comprises an N-terminal portion corresponding to form 10B of the T7 capsid protein. The display vectors are useful for high copy number display or lower copy number display (with larger fusion). Compositions of the type described herein are useful in connection with methods for producing a virus displaying a protein or peptide of interest.

  3. An intelligent system and a relational data base for codifying helmet-mounted display symbology design requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Steven P.; Hamilton, David B.

    1994-06-01

    To employ the most readily comprehensible presentation methods and symbology with helmet-mounted displays (HMDs), it is critical to identify the information elements needed to perform each pilot function and to analytically determine the attributes of these elements. The extensive analyses of mission requirements currently performed for pilot-vehicle interface design can be aided and improved by the new capabilities of intelligent systems and relational databases. An intelligent system, named ACIDTEST, has been developed specifically for organizing and applying rules to identify the best display modalities, locations, and formats. The primary objectives of the ACIDTEST system are to provide rapid accessibility to pertinent display research data, to integrate guidelines from many disciplines and identify conflicts among these guidelines, to force a consistent display approach among the design team members, and to serve as an 'audit trail' of design decisions and justifications. A powerful relational database called TAWL ORDIR has been developed to document information requirements and attributes for use by ACIDTEST as well as to greatly augment the applicability of mission analysis data. TAWL ORDIR can be used to rapidly reorganize mission analysis data components for study, perform commonality analyses for groups of tasks, determine the information content requirement for tailored display modes, and identify symbology integration opportunities.

  4. Vortex information display system program description manual. [data acquisition from laser Doppler velocimeters and real time operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, R.; Matuck, G. N.; Roe, J. M.; Taylor, J.; Turner, A.

    1975-01-01

    A vortex information display system is described which provides flexible control through system-user interaction for collecting wing-tip-trailing vortex data, processing this data in real time, displaying the processed data, storing raw data on magnetic tape, and post processing raw data. The data is received from two asynchronous laser Doppler velocimeters (LDV's) and includes position, velocity, and intensity information. The raw data is written onto magnetic tape for permanent storage and is also processed in real time to locate vortices and plot their positions as a function of time. The interactive capability enables the user to make real time adjustments in processing data and provides a better definition of vortex behavior. Displaying the vortex information in real time produces a feedback capability to the LDV system operator allowing adjustments to be made in the collection of raw data. Both raw data and processing can be continually upgraded during flyby testing to improve vortex behavior studies. The post-analysis capability permits the analyst to perform in-depth studies of test data and to modify vortex behavior models to improve transport predictions.

  5. Development of Land Analysis System display modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Douglas; Hollaren, Douglas; Huewe, Laurie

    1986-01-01

    The Land Analysis System (LAS) display modules were developed to allow a user to interactively display, manipulate, and store image and image related data. To help accomplish this task, these modules utilize the Transportable Applications Executive and the Display Management System software to interact with the user and the display device. The basic characteristics of a display are outlined and some of the major modifications and additions made to the display management software are discussed. Finally, all available LAS display modules are listed along with a short description of each.

  6. Extraction and Analysis of Display Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Land, Chris; Moye, Kathryn

    2008-01-01

    The Display Audit Suite is an integrated package of software tools that partly automates the detection of Portable Computer System (PCS) Display errors. [PCS is a lap top computer used onboard the International Space Station (ISS).] The need for automation stems from the large quantity of PCS displays (6,000+, with 1,000,000+ lines of command and telemetry data). The Display Audit Suite includes data-extraction tools, automatic error detection tools, and database tools for generating analysis spread sheets. These spread sheets allow engineers to more easily identify many different kinds of possible errors. The Suite supports over 40 independent analyses, 16 NASA Tech Briefs, November 2008 and complements formal testing by being comprehensive (all displays can be checked) and by revealing errors that are difficult to detect via test. In addition, the Suite can be run early in the development cycle to find and correct errors in advance of testing.

  7. Graphical Display of Clinical and Laboratory Data Using a Desktop Computer Interfaced with a Hospital Information System

    PubMed Central

    Cimino, J. J.; Munson, P. J.; Lewis, T.; Rodbard, D.

    1981-01-01

    A desktop computer has been used successfully to provide high quality graphical display of clinical data (e.g. vital signs) and laboratory data in conjunction with a hospital information system (Technicon MIS). This approach offers several advantages: 1) ease and speed of operation for physician with a pushbutton, menu-driven program; 2) ease and speed of system development; 3) versatility and flexibility. This approach also encourages use of the computer by physicians for a wide range of other applications. ImagesFigure 1

  8. Using 3D Glyph Visualization to Explore Real-time Seismic Data on Immersive and High-resolution Display Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, A. M.; Lindquist, K.; Kilb, D.; Newman, R.; Vernon, F.; Leigh, J.; Johnson, A.; Renambot, L.

    2003-12-01

    The study of time-dependent, three-dimensional natural phenomena like earthquakes can be enhanced with innovative and pertinent 3D computer graphics. Here we display seismic data as 3D glyphs (graphics primitives or symbols with various geometric and color attributes), allowing us to visualize the measured, time-dependent, 3D wave field from an earthquake recorded by a certain seismic network. In addition to providing a powerful state-of-health diagnostic of the seismic network, the graphical result presents an intuitive understanding of the real-time wave field that is hard to achieve with traditional 2D visualization methods. We have named these 3D icons `seismoglyphs' to suggest visual objects built from three components of ground motion data (north-south, east-west, vertical) recorded by a seismic sensor. A seismoglyph changes color with time, spanning the spectrum, to indicate when the seismic amplitude is largest. The spatial extent of the glyph indicates the polarization of the wave field as it arrives at the recording station. We compose seismoglyphs using the real time ANZA broadband data (http://www.eqinfo.ucsd.edu) to understand the 3D behavior of a seismic wave field in Southern California. Fifteen seismoglyphs are drawn simultaneously with a 3D topography map of Southern California, as real time data is piped into the graphics software using the Antelope system. At each station location, the seismoglyph evolves with time and this graphical display allows a scientist to observe patterns and anomalies in the data. The display also provides visual clues to indicate wave arrivals and ~real-time earthquake detection. Future work will involve adding phase detections, network triggers and near real-time 2D surface shaking estimates. The visuals can be displayed in an immersive environment using the passive stereoscopic Geowall (http://www.geowall.org). The stereographic projection allows for a better understanding of attenuation due to distance and earth

  9. PSIDD (2): A Prototype Post-Scan Interactive Data Display System for Detailed Analysis of Ultrasonic Scans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cao, Wei; Roth, Don J.

    1997-01-01

    This article presents the description of PSIDD(2), a post-scan interactive data display system for ultrasonic contact scan and single measurement analysis. PSIDD(2) was developed in conjunction with ASTM standards for ultrasonic velocity and attenuation coefficient contact measurements. This system has been upgraded from its original version PSIDD(1) and improvements are described in this article. PSIDD(2) implements a comparison mode where the display of time domain waveforms and ultrasonic properties versus frequency can be shown for up to five scan points on one plot. This allows the rapid contrasting of sample areas exhibiting different ultrasonic properties as initially indicated by the ultrasonic contact scan image. This improvement plus additional features to be described in the article greatly facilitate material microstructural appraisal.

  10. Ultrasonic Data Display and Analysis System Developed (Including Fuzzy Logic Analysis) for the Windows-Based PC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovelace, Jeffrey J.; Cios, Kryzsztof J.; Roth, Don J.; cAO, wEI n.

    2001-01-01

    Post-Scan Interactive Data Display (PSIDD) III is a user-oriented Windows-based system that facilitates the display and comparison of ultrasonic contact measurement data obtained at NASA Glenn Research Center's Ultrasonic Nondestructive Evaluation measurement facility. The system is optimized to compare ultrasonic measurements made at different locations within a material or at different stages of material degradation. PSIDD III provides complete analysis of the primary waveforms in the time and frequency domains along with the calculation of several frequency-dependent properties including phase velocity and attenuation coefficient and several frequency-independent properties, like the cross correlation velocity. The system allows image generation on all the frequency-dependent properties at any available frequency (limited by the bandwidth used in the scans) and on any of the frequency-independent properties. From ultrasonic contact scans, areas of interest on an image can be studied with regard to underlying raw waveforms and derived ultrasonic properties by simply selecting the point on the image. The system offers various modes of indepth comparison between scan points. Up to five scan points can be selected for comparative analysis at once. The system was developed with Borland Delphi software (Visual Pascal) and is based on an SQL data base. It is ideal for the classification of material properties or the location of microstructure variations in materials. Along with the ultrasonic contact measurement software that it is partnered with, this system is technology ready and can be transferred to users worldwide.

  11. Development of real time monitor system displaying seismic waveform data observed at seafloor seismic network, DONET, for disaster management information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horikawa, H.; Takaesu, M.; Sueki, K.; Takahashi, N.; Sonoda, A.; Miura, S.; Tsuboi, S.

    2014-12-01

    Mega-thrust earthquakes are anticipated to occur in the Nankai Trough in southwest Japan. In the source areas, we have deployed seafloor seismic network, DONET (Dense Ocean-floor Network System for Earthquake and Tsunamis), in 2010 in order to monitor seismicity, crustal deformations, and tsunamis. DONET system consists of totally 20 stations, which is composed of six kinds of sensors, including strong-motion seismometers and quartz pressure gauges. Those stations are densely distributed with an average spatial interval of 15-20 km and cover near the trench axis to coastal areas. Observed data are transferred to a land station through a fiber-optical cable and then to JAMSTEC (Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology) data management center through a private network in real time. After 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku Earthquake, each local government close to Nankai Trough try to plan disaster prevention scheme. JAMSTEC will disseminate DONET data combined with research accomplishment so that they will be widely recognized as important earthquake information. In order to open DONET data observed for research to local government, we have developed a web application system, REIS (Real-time Earthquake Information System). REIS is providing seismic waveform data to some local governments close to Nankai Trough as a pilot study. As soon as operation of DONET is ready, REIS will start full-scale operation. REIS can display seismic waveform data of DONET in real-time, users can select strong motion and pressure data, and configure the options of trace view arrangement, time scale, and amplitude. In addition to real-time monitoring, REIS can display past seismic waveform data and show earthquake epicenters on the map. In this presentation, we briefly introduce DONET system and then show our web application system. We also discuss our future plans for further developments of REIS.

  12. Development of a data mining and imaging informatics display tool for a multiple sclerosis e-folder system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Margaret; Loo, Jerry; Ma, Kevin; Liu, Brent

    2011-03-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a debilitating autoimmune disease of the central nervous system that damages axonal pathways through inflammation and demyelination. In order to address the need for a centralized application to manage and study MS patients, the MS e-Folder - a web-based, disease-specific electronic medical record system - was developed. The e-Folder has a PHP and MySQL based graphical user interface (GUI) that can serve as both a tool for clinician decision support and a data mining tool for researchers. This web-based GUI gives the e-Folder a user friendly interface that can be securely accessed through the internet and requires minimal software installation on the client side. The e-Folder GUI displays and queries patient medical records--including demographic data, social history, past medical history, and past MS history. In addition, DICOM format imaging data, and computer aided detection (CAD) results from a lesion load algorithm are also displayed. The GUI interface is dynamic and allows manipulation of the DICOM images, such as zoom, pan, and scrolling, and the ability to rotate 3D images. Given the complexity of clinical management and the need to bolster research in MS, the MS e-Folder system will improve patient care and provide MS researchers with a function-rich patient data hub.

  13. PSIDD3: Post-Scan Ultrasonic Data Display System for the Windows-Based PC Including Fuzzy Logic Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovelace, Jeffrey J.; Cios, Krzysztof J.; Roth, Don J.; Cao, Wei

    2000-01-01

    Post-Scan Interactive Data Display (PSIDD) III is a user-oriented Windows-based system that facilitates the display and comparison of ultrasonic contact data. The system is optimized to compare ultrasonic measurements made at different locations within a material or at different stages of material degradation. PSIDD III provides complete analysis of the primary wave forms in the time and frequency domains along with the calculation of several frequency dependent properties including Phase Velocity and Attenuation Coefficient and several frequency independent properties, like the Cross Correlation Velocity. The system allows image generation on all of the frequency dependent properties at any available frequency (limited by the bandwidth used in the scans) and on any of the frequency independent properties. From ultrasonic contact scans, areas of interest on an image can be studied with regard to underlying raw waveforms and derived ultrasonic properties by simply selecting the point on the image. The system offers various modes of in-depth comparison between scan points. Up to five scan points can be selected for comparative analysis at once. The system was developed with Borland Delphi software (Visual Pascal) and is based on a SQL database. It is ideal for classification of material properties, or location of microstructure variations in materials.

  14. Force/Torque Display For Telerobotic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, Marion A.

    1989-01-01

    Pictorial cathode-ray-tube (CRT) display of force and/or torque (F/T) data for telerobotic systems used as output monitor from multiaxis sensor or as command display. Relative positions of two circles represent forces and torques acting on object, derived from signals from F/T sensor composed of strain gauges. Graphical presentation generated on two different graphics systems, one in color and one in black and white. High-level programming facilitates use of additional convenient features in software extending usefulness of sensor data and display. Useful in laboratory experiments, monitoring performance of automated system and for present data on status of system to operator at control station.

  15. A lattice model for data display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hibbard, William L.; Dyer, Charles R.; Paul, Brian E.

    1994-01-01

    In order to develop a foundation for visualization, we develop lattice models for data objects and displays that focus on the fact that data objects are approximations to mathematical objects and real displays are approximations to ideal displays. These lattice models give us a way to quantize the information content of data and displays and to define conditions on the visualization mappings from data to displays. Mappings satisfy these conditions if and only if they are lattice isomorphisms. We show how to apply this result to scientific data and display models, and discuss how it might be applied to recursively defined data types appropriate for complex information processing.

  16. Improved data display for milling machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surrency, W. M.; Moravek, P. S.

    1976-01-01

    Axis position and sequence number indicator system is designed to work in conjunction with numerical tape controller. Visual display of coordinate-axis position to nearest 0.0001 inch and sequential blocks of input data up to maximum of 999 are provided.

  17. Large TV display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Hua-Kuang (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A relatively small and low cost system is provided for projecting a large and bright television image onto a screen. A miniature liquid crystal array is driven by video circuitry to produce a pattern of transparencies in the array corresponding to a television image. Light is directed against the rear surface of the array to illuminate it, while a projection lens lies in front of the array to project the image of the array onto a large screen. Grid lines in the liquid crystal array are eliminated by a spacial filter which comprises a negative of the Fourier transform of the grid.

  18. Application of AI techniques to a voice-actuated computer system for reconstructing and displaying magnetic resonance imaging data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherley, Patrick L.; Pujol, Alfonso, Jr.; Meadow, John S.

    1990-07-01

    To provide a means of rendering complex computer architectures languages and input/output modalities transparent to experienced and inexperienced users research is being conducted to develop a voice driven/voice response computer graphics imaging system. The system will be used for reconstructing and displaying computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scan data. In conjunction with this study an artificial intelligence (Al) control strategy was developed to interface the voice components and support software to the computer graphics functions implemented on the Sun Microsystems 4/280 color graphics workstation. Based on generated text and converted renditions of verbal utterances by the user the Al control strategy determines the user''s intent and develops and validates a plan. The program type and parameters within the plan are used as input to the graphics system for reconstructing and displaying medical image data corresponding to that perceived intent. If the plan is not valid the control strategy queries the user for additional information. The control strategy operates in a conversation mode and vocally provides system status reports. A detailed examination of the various AT techniques is presented with major emphasis being placed on their specific roles within the total control strategy structure. 1.

  19. DSPOBJ - System for display of multiple sets of three-dimensional data. [Fortran subroutine for computer graphics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashbaugh, J. B.; Roland, D. P.; Laird, L. F.

    1978-01-01

    DSPOBJ is a FORTRAN subroutine to control the display of three-dimensional line networks on a stand-alone, general-purpose, interactive computer graphics system. The program controls the creation and manipulation of transformation matrices for the display and control of multiple sets of line networks. It provides advanced graphics features such as independent and global scaling, rotation and translation, cross-sectioning, reflection, and simultaneous display of four views.

  20. Blood pressure measurement and display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farkas, A. J.

    1972-01-01

    System is described that employs solid state circuitry to transmit visual display of patient's blood pressure. Response of sphygmomanometer cuff and microphone provide input signals. Signals and their amplitudes, from turn-on time to turn-off time, are continuously fed to data transmitter which transmits to display device.

  1. Wind information display system user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roe, J.; Smith, G.

    1977-01-01

    The Wind Information Display System (WINDS) provides flexible control through system-user interaction for collecting wind shear data, processing this data in real time, displaying the processed data, storing raw data on magnetic tapes, and post-processing raw data. The data are received from two asynchronous laser Doppler velocimeters (LDV's) and include position, velocity and intensity information. The raw data is written onto magnetic tape for permanent storage and is also processed in real time to depict wind velocities in a given spacial region.

  2. Spatial Reasoning and Data Displays.

    PubMed

    VanderPlas, Susan; Hofmann, Heike

    2016-01-01

    Graphics convey numerical information very efficiently, but rely on a different set of mental processes than tabular displays. Here, we present a study relating demographic characteristics and visual skills to perception of graphical lineups. We conclude that lineups are essentially a classification test in a visual domain, and that performance on the lineup protocol is associated with general aptitude, rather than specific tasks such as card rotation and spatial manipulation. We also examine the possibility that specific graphical tasks may be associated with certain visual skills and conclude that more research is necessary to understand which visual skills are required in order to understand certain plot types. PMID:26390492

  3. Developing tiled projection display systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hereld, M.; Judson, I. R.; Paris, J.; Stevens, R. L.

    2000-06-08

    Tiled displays are an emerging technology for constructing high-resolution semi-immersive visualization environments capable of presenting high-resolution images from scientific simulation [EVL, PowerWall]. In this way, they complement other technologies such as the CAVE [Cruz-Niera92] or ImmersaDesk, [Czernuszenko97], which by design give up pure resolution in favor of width of view and stereo. However, the largest impact may well be in using large-format tiled displays as one of possibly multiple displays in building ''information'' or ''active'' spaces that surround the user with diverse ways of interacting with data and multimedia information flows [IPSI, Childers00, Raskar98, ROME, Stanford, UNC]. These environments may prove to be the ultimate successor of the desktop metaphor for information technology work.

  4. Muscle Biopsy Data Acquisition and Display

    PubMed Central

    Dudley, Alden W.; Dayhoff, Ruth E.; Ledley, Robert S.

    1983-01-01

    Contemporary analysis of human or experimental muscle biopsies includes documentation of muscle fiber size for each fiber type. A semi-automated system has been devised to classify fibers, measure diameters, and display results. Special stains convert different fiber types to specific shades of gray. The microscope image is transmitted by a TV camera to a picture-processing computer. Muscle cells are recognized, classified, and measured for their minimum diameter. Data on consecutive fibers are summed and displayed as lists, histograms, or graphs according to each fiber type. Interpretation of the results is provided by the neuropathologist based on an awareness of probabilities associated with prior comparable results. Data on all patients is accumulated in categories according to disease, sex, age, and site. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 4

  5. Graphic displays of vector magnetograph data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabin, D. M.; West, E. A.

    1985-01-01

    Graphic displays that have proved useful in dealing with vector magnetograph data are summarized in three settings: real-time control, analysis, and final presentation. Among the topics discussed are: flexible, implicit data-scaling; geometrical transformations; methods of comparing fields (e.g., transverse vs. longitudinal; observed vs. computed; one time vs. another); displaying the magnitude and direction of the transverse field; minimizing the display time of serial graphics devices; graphic file structure; and graphic interaction with operators and observers.

  6. WISP information display system user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alley, P. L.; Smith, G. R.

    1978-01-01

    The wind shears program (WISP) supports the collection of data on magnetic tape for permanent storage or analysis. The document structure provides: (1) the hardware and software configuration required to execute the WISP system and start up procedure from a power down condition; (2) data collection task, calculations performed on the incoming data, and a description of the magnetic tape format; (3) the data display task and examples of displays obtained from execution of the real time simulation program; and (4) the raw data dump task and examples of operator actions required to obtained the desired format. The procedures outlines herein will allow continuous data collection at the expense of real time visual displays.

  7. On the development of an interactive resource information management system for analysis and display of spatiotemporal data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schell, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    The recent availability of timely synoptic earth imagery from the Earth Resources Technology Satellites (ERTS) provides a wealth of information for the monitoring and management of vital natural resources. Formal language definitions and syntax interpretation algorithms were adapted to provide a flexible, computer information system for the maintenance of resource interpretation of imagery. These techniques are incorporated, together with image analysis functions, into an Interactive Resource Information Management and Analysis System, IRIMAS, which is implemented on a Texas Instruments 980A minicomputer system augmented with a dynamic color display for image presentation. A demonstration of system usage and recommendations for further system development are also included.

  8. F-22 cockpit display system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, David C.

    1994-06-01

    The F-22 is the first exclusively glass cockpit where all instrumentation has been replaced by displays. The F-22 Engineering and Manufacturing Development Program is implementing the display technology proven during the Advanced Tactical Fighter Demonstration and Validation program. This paper will describe how the F-22 goals have been met and some of the tradeoffs that resulted in the current display design.

  9. The staging system: Display and edit module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, E.; Bernier, L.

    1976-01-01

    The Display and Edit (D and E) Module described is one of six major modules being developed for the STAGING (STructural Analysis through Generalized INteractive Graphics) System. Several remarks are included concerning the computer environment and the architecture of the data base. The utility of this module is emphasized.

  10. Simplified Night Sky Display System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castellano, Timothy P.

    2010-01-01

    A document describes a simple night sky display system that is portable, lightweight, and includes, at most, four components in its simplest configuration. The total volume of this system is no more than 10(sup 6) cm(sup 3) in a disassembled state, and weighs no more than 20 kilograms. The four basic components are a computer, a projector, a spherical light-reflecting first surface and mount, and a spherical second surface for display. The computer has temporary or permanent memory that contains at least one signal representing one or more images of a portion of the sky when viewed from an arbitrary position, and at a selected time. The first surface reflector is spherical and receives and reflects the image from the projector onto the second surface, which is shaped like a hemisphere. This system may be used to simulate selected portions of the night sky, preserving the appearance and kinesthetic sense of the celestial sphere surrounding the Earth or any other point in space. These points will then show motions of planets, stars, galaxies, nebulae, and comets that are visible from that position. The images may be motionless, or move with the passage of time. The array of images presented, and vantage points in space, are limited only by the computer software that is available, or can be developed. An optional approach is to have the screen (second surface) self-inflate by means of gas within the enclosed volume, and then self-regulate that gas in order to support itself without any other mechanical support.

  11. Menu-Driven Program Displays Data In Real Time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckeeman, John C.; Sylvester, William R., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    JPL/VIEW is menu-driven program retrieving and displaying incoming propagation data as they reach hard disk of data-acquisition-and-storage system. Real-time display enables operator to monitor progress of events and respond swiftly to errors during experiment or trial operation. Written in Microsoft C.

  12. Status tree monitoring and display system

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, C.D.; Eastman, M.C.; Woods, D.D.; Carrera, J.P.; Easter, J.R.; Lipner, M.H.; Elm, W.C.; Mundy, A.D.

    1990-02-20

    This patent describes an apparatus for producing a discrete state display for a pressurized water nuclear reactor process. It comprises: data acquisition and status tree computation means for sampling process control data, determining a value of a discrete process parameter and creating first through third accessible displays in dependence on the parameter value; and display means for displaying the first through third displays independence upon the parameter and an operator request.

  13. Six-Message Electromechanical Display System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Richard T.

    2007-01-01

    A proposed electromechanical display system would be capable of presenting as many as six distinct messages. In the proposed system, each display element would include a cylinder having a regular hexagonal cross section.

  14. Software for Displaying Data from Planetary Rovers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Mark; Backers, Paul; Norris, Jeffrey; Vona, Marsette; Steinke, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Science Activity Planner (SAP) DownlinkBrowser is a computer program that assists in the visualization of processed telemetric data [principally images, image cubes (that is, multispectral images), and spectra] that have been transmitted to Earth from exploratory robotic vehicles (rovers) on remote planets. It is undergoing adaptation to (1) the Field Integrated Design and Operations (FIDO) rover (a prototype Mars-exploration rover operated on Earth as a test bed) and (2) the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) mission. This program has evolved from its predecessor - the Web Interface for Telescience (WITS) software - and surpasses WITS in the processing, organization, and plotting of data. SAP DownlinkBrowser creates Extensible Markup Language (XML) files that organize data files, on the basis of content, into a sortable, searchable product database, without the overhead of a relational database. The data-display components of SAP DownlinkBrowser (descriptively named ImageView, 3DView, OrbitalView, PanoramaView, ImageCubeView, and SpectrumView) are designed to run in a memory footprint of at least 256MB on computers that utilize the Windows, Linux, and Solaris operating systems.

  15. Monitor-driven data visualization: SmartDisplay.

    PubMed Central

    Fackler, J.; Kohane, I.

    1994-01-01

    Exhaustive display of all available clinical data, particular in data-rich environments like the intensive care unit, can easily overwhelm the ability of clinicians to comprehend the clinical status and evolution of their patients and may reduce their ability to detect pathological trends in a reliable and timely manner. SmartDisplay is a system we have designed that restricts the data sets displayed to time-lines of those parameters that are relevant to the patient context and to the particular care provider. The relevance criteria are provided by monitoring programs which may range in complexity from simple threshold alarms to full-fledged diagnostic engines. SmartDisplay can specify which parameters to display and the time intervals during which they should be displayed. PMID:7950062

  16. Free software helps map and display data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessel, Paul; Smith, Walter H. F.

    When creating camera-ready figures, most scientists are familiar with the sequence of raw data → processing → final illustration and with the spending of large sums of money to finalize papers for submission to scientific journals, prepare proposals, and create overheads and slides for various presentations. This process can be tedious and is often done manually, since available commercial or in-house software usually can do only part of the job.To expedite this process, we introduce the Generic Mapping Tools (GMT), which is a free, public domain software package that can be used to manipulate columns of tabular data, time series, and gridded data sets and to display these data in a variety of forms ranging from simple x-y plots to maps and color, perspective, and shaded-relief illustrations. GMT uses the PostScript page description language, which can create arbitrarily complex images in gray tones or 24-bit true color by superimposing multiple plot files. Line drawings, bitmapped images, and text can be easily combined in one illustration. PostScript plot files are device-independent, meaning the same file can be printed at 300 dots per inch (dpi) on an ordinary laserwriter or at 2470 dpi on a phototypesetter when ultimate quality is needed. GMT software is written as a set of UNIX tools and is totally self contained and fully documented. The system is offered free of charge to federal agencies and nonprofit educational organizations worldwide and is distributed over the computer network Internet.

  17. An electronic pressure profile display system for aeronautic test facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woike, Mark R.

    1990-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center has installed an Electronic Pressure Profile Display system. This system provides for the real-time display of pressure readings on high resolution graphics monitors. The Electronic Pressure Profile Display system will replace manometer banks currently used in aeronautic test facilities. The Electronic Pressure Profile Display system consists of an industrial type Digital Pressure Transmitter (DPT) unit which interfaces with a host computer. The host computer collects the pressure data from the DPT unit, converts it into engineering units, and displays the readings on a high resolution graphics monitor in bar graph format. Software was developed to accomplish the above tasks and also draw facility diagrams as background information on the displays. Data transfer between host computer and DPT unit is done with serial communications. Up to 64 channels are displayed with one second update time. This paper describes the system configuration, its features, and its advantages over existing systems.

  18. An Electronic Pressure Profile Display system for aeronautic test facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woike, Mark R.

    1990-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center has installed an Electronic Pressure Profile Display system. This system provides for the real-time display of pressure readings on high resolution graphics monitors. The Electronic Pressure Profile Display system will replace manometer banks currently used in aeronautic test facilities. The Electronic Pressure Profile Display system consists of an industrial type Digital Pressure Transmitter (DPI) unit which interfaces with a host computer. The host computer collects the pressure data from the DPI unit, converts it into engineering units, and displays the readings on a high resolution graphics monitor in bar graph format. Software was developed to accomplish the above tasks and also draw facility diagrams as background information on the displays. Data transfer between host computer and DPT unit is done with serial communications. Up to 64 channels are displayed with one second update time. This paper describes the system configuration, its features, and its advantages over existing systems.

  19. Display system for imaging scientific telemetric information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zabiyakin, G. I.; Rykovanov, S. N.

    1979-01-01

    A system for imaging scientific telemetric information, based on the M-6000 minicomputer and the SIGD graphic display, is described. Two dimensional graphic display of telemetric information and interaction with the computer, in analysis and processing of telemetric parameters displayed on the screen is provided. The running parameter information output method is presented. User capabilities in the analysis and processing of telemetric information imaged on the display screen and the user language are discussed and illustrated.

  20. Simplified night sky display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castellano, Timothy P. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A portable structure, simply constructed with inexpensive and generally lightweight materials, for displaying a selected portion of the night sky and selected planets, satellites, comets and other astronomically observable objects that are visually perceptible within that portion of the night sky. The structure includes a computer having stored signals representing the observable objects, an image projector that converts and projects the stored signals as visually perceptible images, a first curvilinear light-reflecting surface to receive and reflect the visually perceptible images, and a second curvilinear surface to receive and display the visually perceptible images reflected from the first surface. The images may be motionless or may move with passage of time. In one embodiment, the structure includes an inflatable screen surface that receives gas in an enclosed volume, supports itself without further mechanical support, and optionally self-regulates pressure of the received gas within the enclosed volume.

  1. The virtual environment display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgreevy, Michael W.

    1991-01-01

    Virtual environment technology is a display and control technology that can surround a person in an interactive computer generated or computer mediated virtual environment. It has evolved at NASA-Ames since 1984 to serve NASA's missions and goals. The exciting potential of this technology, sometimes called Virtual Reality, Artificial Reality, or Cyberspace, has been recognized recently by the popular media, industry, academia, and government organizations. Much research and development will be necessary to bring it to fruition.

  2. Real-time flight test data distribution and display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesel, Michael C.; Hammons, Kevin R.

    1988-01-01

    Enhancements to the real-time processing and display systems of the NASA Western Aeronautical Test Range are described. Display processing has been moved out of the telemetry and radar acquisition processing systems super-minicomputers into user/client interactive graphic workstations. Real-time data is provided to the workstations by way of Ethernet. Future enhancement plans include use of fiber optic cable to replace the Ethernet.

  3. Global positioning system supported pilot's display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Marshall M., Jr.; Erdogan, Temel; Schwalb, Andrew P.; Curley, Charles H.

    1991-01-01

    The hardware, software, and operation of the Microwave Scanning Beam Landing System (MSBLS) Flight Inspection System Pilot's Display is discussed. The Pilot's Display is used in conjunction with flight inspection tests that certify the Microwave Scanning Beam Landing System used at Space Shuttle landing facilities throughout the world. The Pilot's Display was developed for the pilot of test aircraft to set up and fly a given test flight path determined by the flight inspection test engineers. This display also aids the aircraft pilot when hazy or cloud cover conditions exist that limit the pilot's visibility of the Shuttle runway during the flight inspection. The aircraft position is calculated using the Global Positioning System and displayed in the cockpit on a graphical display.

  4. Dual use display systems for telerobotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massimino, Michael J.; Meschler, Michael F.; Rodriguez, Alberto A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes a telerobotics display system, the Multi-mode Manipulator Display System (MMDS), that has applications for a variety of remotely controlled tasks. Designed primarily to assist astronauts with the control of space robotics systems, the MMDS has applications for ground control of space robotics as well as for toxic waste cleanup, undersea, remotely operated vehicles, and other environments which require remote operations. The MMDS has three modes: (1) Manipulator Position Display (MPD) mode, (2) Joint Angle Display (JAD) mode, and (3) Sensory Substitution (SS) mode. These three modes are discussed in the paper.

  5. Split-screen display system and standardized methods for ultrasound image acquisition and multi-frame data processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selzer, Robert H. (Inventor); Hodis, Howard N. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A standardized acquisition methodology assists operators to accurately replicate high resolution B-mode ultrasound images obtained over several spaced-apart examinations utilizing a split-screen display in which the arterial ultrasound image from an earlier examination is displayed on one side of the screen while a real-time "live" ultrasound image from a current examination is displayed next to the earlier image on the opposite side of the screen. By viewing both images, whether simultaneously or alternately, while manually adjusting the ultrasound transducer, an operator is able to bring into view the real-time image that best matches a selected image from the earlier ultrasound examination. Utilizing this methodology, dynamic material properties of arterial structures, such as IMT and diameter, are measured in a standard region over successive image frames. Each frame of the sequence has its echo edge boundaries automatically determined by using the immediately prior frame's true echo edge coordinates as initial boundary conditions. Computerized echo edge recognition and tracking over multiple successive image frames enhances measurement of arterial diameter and IMT and allows for improved vascular dimension measurements, including vascular stiffness and IMT determinations.

  6. Augmented reality system using lidar point cloud data for displaying dimensional information of objects on mobile phones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, S.; Lohani, B.

    2014-05-01

    Mobile augmented reality system is the next generation technology to visualise 3D real world intelligently. The technology is expanding at a fast pace to upgrade the status of a smart phone to an intelligent device. The research problem identified and presented in the current work is to view actual dimensions of various objects that are captured by a smart phone in real time. The methodology proposed first establishes correspondence between LiDAR point cloud, that are stored in a server, and the image t hat is captured by a mobile. This correspondence is established using the exterior and interior orientation parameters of the mobile camera and the coordinates of LiDAR data points which lie in the viewshed of the mobile camera. A pseudo intensity image is generated using LiDAR points and their intensity. Mobile image and pseudo intensity image are then registered using image registration method SIFT thereby generating a pipeline to locate a point in point cloud corresponding to a point (pixel) on the mobile image. The second part of the method uses point cloud data for computing dimensional information corresponding to the pairs of points selected on mobile image and fetch the dimensions on top of the image. This paper describes all steps of the proposed method. The paper uses an experimental setup to mimic the mobile phone and server system and presents some initial but encouraging results

  7. High-bandwidth remote flat panel display interconnect system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Darrel G.

    1999-08-01

    High performance electronic displays (CRT, AMLCD, TFEL, plasma, etc.) require wide bandwidth electrical drive signals to produce the desired display images. When the image generation and/or image processing circuitry is located within the same line replaceable unit (LRU) as the display media, the transmission of the display drive signals to the display media presents no unusual design problems. However, many aircraft cockpits are severely constrained for available space behind the instrument panel. This often forces the system designer to specify that only the display media and its immediate support circuitry are to be mounted in the instrument panel. A wide bandwidth interconnect system is then required to transfer image data from the display generation circuitry to the display unit. Image data transfer rates of nearly 1.5 Gbits/second may be required when displaying full motion video at a 60 Hz field rate. In addition to wide bandwidth, this interconnect system must exhibit several additional key characteristics: (1) Lossless transmission of image data; (2) High reliability and high integrity; (3) Ease of installation and field maintenance; (4) High immunity to HIRF and electrical noise; (5) Low EMI emissions; (6) Long term supportability; and (7) Low acquisition and maintenance cost. Rockwell Collins has developed an avionics grade remote display interconnect system based on the American National Standards Institute Fibre Channel standard which meets these requirements. Readily available low cost commercial off the shelf (COTS) components are utilized, and qualification tests have confirmed system performance.

  8. Groundwater Visualisation System (GVS): A software framework for integrated display and interrogation of conceptual hydrogeological models, data and time-series animation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Malcolm E.; James, Allan; Hawke, Amy; Raiber, Matthias

    2013-05-01

    Management of groundwater systems requires realistic conceptual hydrogeological models as a framework for numerical simulation modelling, but also for system understanding and communicating this to stakeholders and the broader community. To help overcome these challenges we developed GVS (Groundwater Visualisation System), a stand-alone desktop software package that uses interactive 3D visualisation and animation techniques. The goal was a user-friendly groundwater management tool that could support a range of existing real-world and pre-processed data, both surface and subsurface, including geology and various types of temporal hydrological information. GVS allows these data to be integrated into a single conceptual hydrogeological model. In addition, 3D geological models produced externally using other software packages, can readily be imported into GVS models, as can outputs of simulations (e.g. piezometric surfaces) produced by software such as MODFLOW or FEFLOW. Boreholes can be integrated, showing any down-hole data and properties, including screen information, intersected geology, water level data and water chemistry. Animation is used to display spatial and temporal changes, with time-series data such as rainfall, standing water levels and electrical conductivity, displaying dynamic processes. Time and space variations can be presented using a range of contouring and colour mapping techniques, in addition to interactive plots of time-series parameters. Other types of data, for example, demographics and cultural information, can also be readily incorporated. The GVS software can execute on a standard Windows or Linux-based PC with a minimum of 2 GB RAM, and the model output is easy and inexpensive to distribute, by download or via USB/DVD/CD. Example models are described here for three groundwater systems in Queensland, northeastern Australia: two unconfined alluvial groundwater systems with intensive irrigation, the Lockyer Valley and the upper Condamine

  9. Introduction to building projection-based tiled display systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Hereld, M.; Judson, I. R.; Stevens, R.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Univ. of Chicago

    2000-07-01

    This tutorial introduces the concepts and technologies needed to build projector-based display systems. Tiled displays offer scalability, high resolution, and large formats for various applications. Tiled displays are an emerging technology for constructing semi-immersive visualization environments capable of presenting high-resolution images from scientific simulation. The largest impact may well arise from using large-format tiled displays as one of possibly multiple displays in building information or active spaces that surround the user with diverse ways of interacting with data and multimedia information flows. These environments may prove the ultimate successor to the desktop metaphor for information technology work. Several fundamental technological problems must be addressed to make tiled displays practical. These include: the choice of screen materials and support structures; choice of projectors, projector supports, and optional fine positioners; techniques for integrating image tiles into a seamless whole; interface devices for interaction with applications; display generators and interfaces; and the display software environment.

  10. Three-dimensional hologram display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mintz, Frederick (Inventor); Chao, Tien-Hsin (Inventor); Bryant, Nevin (Inventor); Tsou, Peter (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention relates to a three-dimensional (3D) hologram display system. The 3D hologram display system includes a projector device for projecting an image upon a display medium to form a 3D hologram. The 3D hologram is formed such that a viewer can view the holographic image from multiple angles up to 360 degrees. Multiple display media are described, namely a spinning diffusive screen, a circular diffuser screen, and an aerogel. The spinning diffusive screen utilizes spatial light modulators to control the image such that the 3D image is displayed on the rotating screen in a time-multiplexing manner. The circular diffuser screen includes multiple, simultaneously-operated projectors to project the image onto the circular diffuser screen from a plurality of locations, thereby forming the 3D image. The aerogel can use the projection device described as applicable to either the spinning diffusive screen or the circular diffuser screen.

  11. [Review of visual display system in flight simulator].

    PubMed

    Xie, Guang-hui; Wei, Shao-ning

    2003-06-01

    Visual display system is the key part and plays a very important role in flight simulators and flight training devices. The developing history of visual display system is recalled and the principle and characters of some visual display systems including collimated display systems and back-projected collimated display systems are described. The future directions of visual display systems are analyzed. PMID:12934618

  12. [Odor sensing system and olfactory display].

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Takamichi

    2014-01-01

    In this review, an odor sensing system and an olfactory display are introduced into people in pharmacy. An odor sensing system consists of an array of sensors with partially overlapping specificities and pattern recognition technique. One of examples of odor sensing systems is a halitosis sensor which quantifies the mixture composition of three volatile sulfide compounds. A halitosis sensor was realized using a preconcentrator to raise sensitivity and an electrochemical sensor array to suppress the influence of humidity. Partial least squares (PLS) method was used to quantify the mixture composition. The experiment reveals that the sufficient accuracy was obtained. Moreover, the olfactory display, which present scents to human noses, is explained. A multi-component olfactory display enables the presentation of a variety of smells. The two types of multi-component olfactory display are described. The first one uses many solenoid valves with high speed switching. The valve ON frequency determines the concentration of the corresponding odor component. The latter one consists of miniaturized liquid pumps and a surface acoustic wave (SAW) atomizer. It enables the wearable olfactory display without smell persistence. Finally, the application of the olfactory display is demonstrated. Virtual ice cream shop with scents was made as a content of interactive art. People can enjoy harmony among vision, audition and olfaction. In conclusion, both odor sensing system and olfactory display can contribute to the field of human health care. PMID:24584010

  13. Using a Classroom Response System for Real-Time Data Display and Analysis in Introductory Biology Labs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Allison; Rulfs, Jill; Caron, Jessica Marie; Buckholt, Michael Allan

    2010-01-01

    Clickers were used for real-time data collection in two introductory biology laboratory courses so that students could perform statistical analysis on large data sets. Student attitudes toward this use of clickers were surveyed and students were administered a pre- and posttest on statistical content. Capture of large data sets allowed instructors…

  14. INFORMATION DISPLAY: CONSIDERATIONS FOR DESIGNING COMPUTER-BASED DISPLAY SYSTEMS.

    SciTech Connect

    O'HARA,J.M.; PIRUS,D.; BELTRATCCHI,L.

    2004-09-19

    This paper discussed the presentation of information in computer-based control rooms. Issues associated with the typical displays currently in use are discussed. It is concluded that these displays should be augmented with new displays designed to better meet the information needs of plant personnel and to minimize the need for interface management tasks (the activities personnel have to do to access and organize the information they need). Several approaches to information design are discussed, specifically addressing: (1) monitoring, detection, and situation assessment; (2) routine task performance; and (3) teamwork, crew coordination, collaborative work.

  15. Real-Time Acquisition and Display of Data and Video

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachnak, Rafic; Chakinarapu, Ramya; Garcia, Mario; Kar, Dulal; Nguyen, Tien

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a prototype that takes in an analog National Television System Committee (NTSC) video signal generated by a video camera and data acquired by a microcontroller and display them in real-time on a digital panel. An 8051 microcontroller is used to acquire power dissipation by the display panel, room temperature, and camera zoom level. The paper describes the major hardware components and shows how they are interfaced into a functional prototype. Test data results are presented and discussed.

  16. Information Display System for Atypical Flight Phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statler, Irving C. (Inventor); Ferryman, Thomas A. (Inventor); Amidan, Brett G. (Inventor); Whitney, Paul D. (Inventor); White, Amanda M. (Inventor); Willse, Alan R. (Inventor); Cooley, Scott K. (Inventor); Jay, Joseph Griffith (Inventor); Lawrence, Robert E. (Inventor); Mosbrucker, Chris J. (Inventor); Rosenthal, Loren J. (Inventor); Lynch, Robert E. (Inventor); Chidester, Thomas R. (Inventor); Prothero, Gary L. (Inventor); Andrei, Adi (Inventor); Romanowski, Timothy P. (Inventor); Robin, Daniel E. (Inventor); Prothero, Jason W. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Method and system for displaying information on one or more aircraft flights, where at least one flight is determined to have at least one atypical flight phase according to specified criteria. A flight parameter trace for an atypical phase is displayed and compared graphically with a group of traces, for the corresponding flight phase and corresponding flight parameter, for flights that do not manifest atypicality in that phase.

  17. Evolution Of Map Display Optical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boot, Alan

    1983-06-01

    It is now over 20 years since Ferranti plc introduced optically projected map displays into operational aircraft navigation systems. Then, as now, it was the function of the display to present an image of a topographical map to a pilot or navigator with his present position clearly identified. Then, as now, the map image was projected from a reduced image stored on colour micro film. Then, as now, the fundamental design problems are the same.In the exposed environment of an aircraft cockpit where brightness levels may vary from those associated with direct sunlight on the one hand, to starlight on the other, how does one design an optical system with sufficient luminance, contrast and resolution where in the daytime sunlight may fall on the display or in the pilot's eyes, and at night time the display luminance must not detract from the pilot's ability to pick up external clues? This paper traces the development of Ferranti plc optically projected map displays from the early V Bomber and the ill-fated TSR2 displays to the Harrier and Concorde displays. It then goes on to the development of combined map and electronic displays (COMED), showing how an earlier design, as fitted to Tornado, has been developed into the current COMED design which is fitted to the F-18 and Jaguar aircraft. In each of the above display systems particular features of optical design interest are identified and their impact on the design as a whole are discussed. The use of prisms both for optical rotation and translation, techniques for the maximisation of luminance, the problems associated with contrast enhancement, particularly with polarising filters in the presence of optically active materials, the use of aerial image combining systems and the impact of the pilot interface on the system parameter are all included.Perhaps the most interesting result in considering the evolution of map displays has not been so much the designer's solutions in overcoming the various design problems but

  18. Schematic displays for the Space Shuttle Orbiter multifunction cathode-ray-tube display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, W.

    1979-01-01

    A standardized procedure for developing cathode ray tube displayed schematic diagrams. The displaying of Spacelab information on the space shuttle orbiter multifunction cathode ray tube display system is used to illustrate this procedure. Schematic displays with the equivalent tabular displays are compared.

  19. Performance specification for control tower display systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleva, Denise L.; Meyer, Frederick M.

    2003-09-01

    Personnel in airport control towers monitor and direct the takeoff of outgoing aircraft, landing of incoming aircraft and all movements of aircraft on the ground. Although the primary source of information for the Local Controller, Assistant Local Controller and the Ground Controller is the real world viewed through the windows of the control tower, electronic displays are also used to provide situation awareness. Due to the criticality of the work to be performed by the controllers and the rather unique environment of the air traffic control tower, display hardware standards, which have been developed for general use, are not directly applicable. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) requested assistance of Air Force Research Laboratory Human Effectiveness Directorate in producing a document which can be adopted as a Tower Display Standard usable by display engineers, human factors practitioners and system integrators. Particular emphasis was placed on human factors issues applicable to the control tower environment and controller task demands.

  20. History data collection, retrieving and display in the NSLS control

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Y.N.; Smith, J.D.

    1995-05-01

    This paper presents the history data collection, retrieve and presentation subsystem of our control system. We made every effort to make the software friendly, convenient and robust. It is widely used and has become a very valuable diagnostic tool. Anyone may start and stop his own history at any data rate up to 20 Hz. The data can be periodically written to disk files or stored in a cyclic ring buffer and dumped to a disk file upon request. All the history data files use the self-contained and self-explanatory standard format. One graphical display program displays all the history data files because of their standard format. In addition to the standard features of a plot program, this display program can display up to 16 devices on both axis, take differences with a reference point, browse the data file by pages or a scroll bar, zoom-in and zoom-out any portion of the plot, do many types of analyses, etc.

  1. Image enhancement system for mobile displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkkinen, Jaana; Nenonen, Petri

    2005-02-01

    In this paper, we present a system for enhancing digital photography on mobile displays. The system is using adaptive filtering and display specific methods for maximizing the subjective quality of images. Because mobile platforms have a limited amount of memory and processing power, we describe computationally efficient scaling and enhancement algorithms that are especially suitable for mobile devices and displays. We also show how a proper arrangement of these algorithms forms an image processing chain that is optimized for mobile use. The developed image enhancement system has been implemented using the Nokia Series60 platform and tested on imaging phones. Tests and results show that significant improvement of quality can be achieved with this solution within the processing power and memory limitations that mobile platforms set.

  2. Wide angle holographic display system with spatiotemporal multiplexing.

    PubMed

    Kozacki, Tomasz; Finke, Grzegorz; Garbat, Piotr; Zaperty, Weronika; Kujawińska, Małgorzata

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents a wide angle holographic display system with extended viewing angle in both horizontal and vertical directions. The display is constructed from six spatial light modulators (SLM) arranged on a circle and an additional SLM used for spatiotemporal multiplexing and a viewing angle extension in two perpendicular directions. The additional SLM, that is synchronized with the SLMs on the circle is placed in the image space. This method increases effective space bandwidth product of display system data from 12.4 to 50 megapixels. The software solution based on three Nvidia graphic cards is developed and implemented in order to achieve fast and synchronized displaying. The experiments presented for both synthetic and real 3D data prove the possibility to view binocularly having good quality images reconstructed in full FoV of the display. PMID:23262697

  3. Advanced rotorcraft helmet display sighting system optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raynal, Francois; Chen, Muh-Fa

    2002-08-01

    Kaiser Electronics' Advanced Rotorcraft Helmet Display Sighting System is a Biocular Helmet Mounted Display (HMD) for Rotary Wing Aviators. Advanced Rotorcraft HMDs requires low head supported weight, low center of mass offsets, low peripheral obstructions of the visual field, large exit pupils, large eye relief, wide field of view (FOV), high resolution, low luning, sun light readability with high contrast and low prismatic deviations. Compliance with these safety, user acceptance and optical performance requirements is challenging. The optical design presented in this paper provides an excellent balance of these different and conflicting requirements. The Advanced Rotorcraft HMD optical design is a pupil forming off axis catadioptric system that incorporates a transmissive SXGA Active Matrix liquid Crystal Display (AMLCD), an LED array backlight and a diopter adjustment mechanism.

  4. Advanced Three-Dimensional Display System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geng, Jason

    2005-01-01

    A desktop-scale, computer-controlled display system, initially developed for NASA and now known as the VolumeViewer(TradeMark), generates three-dimensional (3D) images of 3D objects in a display volume. This system differs fundamentally from stereoscopic and holographic display systems: The images generated by this system are truly 3D in that they can be viewed from almost any angle, without the aid of special eyeglasses. It is possible to walk around the system while gazing at its display volume to see a displayed object from a changing perspective, and multiple observers standing at different positions around the display can view the object simultaneously from their individual perspectives, as though the displayed object were a real 3D object. At the time of writing this article, only partial information on the design and principle of operation of the system was available. It is known that the system includes a high-speed, silicon-backplane, ferroelectric-liquid-crystal spatial light modulator (SLM), multiple high-power lasers for projecting images in multiple colors, a rotating helix that serves as a moving screen for displaying voxels [volume cells or volume elements, in analogy to pixels (picture cells or picture elements) in two-dimensional (2D) images], and a host computer. The rotating helix and its motor drive are the only moving parts. Under control by the host computer, a stream of 2D image patterns is generated on the SLM and projected through optics onto the surface of the rotating helix. The system utilizes a parallel pixel/voxel-addressing scheme: All the pixels of the 2D pattern on the SLM are addressed simultaneously by laser beams. This parallel addressing scheme overcomes the difficulty of achieving both high resolution and a high frame rate in a raster scanning or serial addressing scheme. It has been reported that the structure of the system is simple and easy to build, that the optical design and alignment are not difficult, and that the

  5. Interactive display of molecular models using a microcomputer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egan, J. T.; Macelroy, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    A simple, microcomputer-based, interactive graphics display system has been developed for the presentation of perspective views of wire frame molecular models. The display system is based on a TERAK 8510a graphics computer system with a display unit consisting of microprocessor, television display and keyboard subsystems. The operating system includes a screen editor, file manager, PASCAL and BASIC compilers and command options for linking and executing programs. The graphics program, written in USCD PASCAL, involves the centering of the coordinate system, the transformation of centered model coordinates into homogeneous coordinates, the construction of a viewing transformation matrix to operate on the coordinates, clipping invisible points, perspective transformation and scaling to screen coordinates; commands available include ZOOM, ROTATE, RESET, and CHANGEVIEW. Data file structure was chosen to minimize the amount of disk storage space. Despite the inherent slowness of the system, its low cost and flexibility suggests general applicability.

  6. Paradigm for expert display systems in nuclear plant and elsewhere

    SciTech Connect

    Gabriel, J.R.

    1986-02-01

    Display of relevant data concerning plant operation has been a concern of the nuclear industry from its beginnings. Since the incident at Three Mile Island, this matter has had much careful scrutiny. L. Beltracchi, in particular, has originated a sequence of important steps to improve the operator's ability to recognize plant states and their changes. In the early 1980's, Beltracchi (1983, 1984) proposed a display based on the Rankine cycle for light water reactors. More recently, in an unpublished work (1986b), he described an extension that includes a small, rule-based system in the display program, drawing inferences about plant operation from sensor readings, and displaying those inferences on the Rankine display. Our paper examines Beltracchi's rule-based display from the perspective of knowledge bases. Earlier (Gabriel, 1983) we noted that analytical models of system behavior are just as much a knowledge base as are the rules of a conventional expert system. The problem of finding useful displays for a complex plant is discussed from this perspective. We then present a paradigm for developing designs with properties similar to those in Beltracchi's Rankine cycle display. Finally, to clarify the issue, we give a small example from an imaginary plant.

  7. Software Displays Data on Active Regions of the Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golightly, Mike; Weyland, Mark; Raben, Vern

    2011-01-01

    The Solar Active Region Display System is a computer program that generates, in near real time, a graphical display of parameters indicative of the spatial and temporal variations of activity on the Sun. These parameters include histories and distributions of solar flares, active region growth, coronal mass ejections, size, and magnetic configuration. By presenting solar-activity data in graphical form, this program accelerates, facilitates, and partly automates what had previously been a time-consuming mental process of interpretation of solar-activity data presented in tabular and textual formats. Intended for original use in predicting space weather in order to minimize the exposure of astronauts to ionizing radiation, the program might also be useful on Earth for predicting solar-wind-induced ionospheric effects, electric currents, and potentials that could affect radio-communication systems, navigation systems, pipelines, and long electric-power lines. Raw data for the display are obtained automatically from the Space Environment Center (SEC) of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Other data must be obtained from the NOAA SEC by verbal communication and entered manually. The Solar Active Region Display System automatically accounts for the latitude dependence of the rate of rotation of the Sun, by use of a mathematical model that is corrected with NOAA SEC active-region position data once every 24 hours. The display includes the date, time, and an image of the Sun in H light overlaid with latitude and longitude coordinate lines, dots that mark locations of active regions identified by NOAA, identifying numbers assigned by NOAA to such regions, and solar-region visual summary (SRVS) indicators associated with some of the active regions. Each SRVS indicator is a small pie chart containing five equal sectors, each of which is color-coded to provide a semiquantitative indication of the degree of hazard posed by one aspect of the activity at

  8. Data synthesis and display programs for wave distribution function analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storey, L. R. O.; Yeh, K. J.

    1992-01-01

    At the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) software was written to synthesize and display artificial data for use in developing the methodology of wave distribution analysis. The software comprises two separate interactive programs, one for data synthesis and the other for data display.

  9. Data Images and Other Graphical Displays for Directional Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morphet, Bill; Symanzik, Juergen

    2005-01-01

    Vectors, axes, and periodic phenomena have direction. Directional variation can be expressed as points on a unit circle and is the subject of circular statistics, a relatively new application of statistics. An overview of existing methods for the display of directional data is given. The data image for linear variables is reviewed, then extended to directional variables by displaying direction using a color scale composed of a sequence of four or more color gradients with continuity between sequences and ordered intuitively in a color wheel such that the color of the 0deg angle is the same as the color of the 360deg angle. Cross over, which arose in automating the summarization of historical wind data, and color discontinuity resulting from the use a single color gradient in computational fluid dynamics visualization are eliminated. The new method provides for simultaneous resolution of detail on a small scale and overall structure on a large scale. Example circular data images are given of a global view of average wind direction of El Nino periods, computed rocket motor internal combustion flow, a global view of direction of the horizontal component of earth's main magnetic field on 9/15/2004, and Space Shuttle solid rocket motor nozzle vectoring.

  10. 14 CFR 23.1311 - Electronic display instrument systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Electronic display instrument systems. 23... Equipment Instruments: Installation § 23.1311 Electronic display instrument systems. (a) Electronic display..., considering the expected electronic display brightness level at the end of an electronic display...

  11. 14 CFR 23.1311 - Electronic display instrument systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Electronic display instrument systems. 23... Equipment Instruments: Installation § 23.1311 Electronic display instrument systems. (a) Electronic display..., considering the expected electronic display brightness level at the end of an electronic display...

  12. 14 CFR 23.1311 - Electronic display instrument systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Electronic display instrument systems. 23... Equipment Instruments: Installation § 23.1311 Electronic display instrument systems. (a) Electronic display..., considering the expected electronic display brightness level at the end of an electronic display...

  13. An Exercise in Data Collection and Display

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawcroft, David

    2007-01-01

    It is common to find students believing that they have a high skill level in computer use yet this does not normally include proficiency in the use of computer packages for data presentation. This exercise develops team work in data collection, requires the production of a simple spreadsheet, and the exporting of the data from that into one or…

  14. Advanced alarm systems: Display and processing issues

    SciTech Connect

    O`Hara, J.M.; Wachtel, J.; Perensky, J.

    1995-05-01

    This paper describes a research program sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to address the human factors engineering (HFE) deficiencies associated with nuclear power plant alarm systems. The overall objective of the study is to develop HFE review guidance for alarm systems. In support of this objective, human performance issues needing additional research were identified. Among the important issues were alarm processing strategies and alarm display techniques. This paper will discuss these issues and briefly describe our current research plan to address them.

  15. Computer Programs to Display and Modify Data in Geographic Coordinates and Methods to Transfer Positions to and from Maps, with Applications to Gravity Data Processing, Global Positioning Systems, and 30-Meter Digital Elevation Models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plouff, Donald

    1998-01-01

    Computer programs were written in the Fortran language to process and display gravity data with locations expressed in geographic coordinates. The programs and associated processes have been tested for gravity data in an area of about 125,000 square kilometers in northwest Nevada, southeast Oregon, and northeast California. This report discusses the geographic aspects of data processing. Utilization of the programs begins with application of a template (printed in PostScript format) to transfer locations obtained with Global Positioning Systems to and from field maps and includes a 5-digit geographic-based map naming convention for field maps. Computer programs, with source codes that can be copied, are used to display data values (printed in PostScript format) and data coverage, insert data into files, extract data from files, shift locations, test for redundancy, and organize data by map quadrangles. It is suggested that 30-meter Digital Elevation Models needed for gravity terrain corrections and other applications should be accessed in a file search by using the USGS 7.5-minute map name as a file name, for example, file '40117_B8.DEM' contains elevation data for the map with a southeast corner at lat 40? 07' 30' N. and lon 117? 52' 30' W.

  16. Integrated Display System for Low Visibility Landing and Surface Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beskenis, Sharon Otero; Green, David F., Jr.; Hyer, Paul V.; Johnson, Edward J., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    This report summarizes the software products and system architectures developed by Lockheed Martin in support of the Low Visibility Landing and Surface Operations (LVLASO) program at NASA Langley Research Center. It presents an overview of the technical aspects, capabilities, and system integration issues associated with an integrated display system (IDS) that collects, processes and presents information to an aircraft flight crew during all phases of landing, roll-out, turn-off, inbound taxi, outbound taxi and takeoff. Communications hardware, drivers, and software provide continuous real-time data at varying rates and from many different sources to the display programs for presentation on a head-down display (HDD) and/or a head-up display (HUD). An electronic moving map of the airport surface is implemented on the HDD which includes the taxi route assigned by air traffic control, a text messaging system, and surface traffic and runway status information. Typical HUD symbology for navigation and control of the aircraft is augmented to provide aircraft deceleration guidance after touchdown to a pilot selected exit and taxi guidance along the route assigned by ATC. HUD displays include scene-linked symbolic runways, runway exits and taxiways that are conformal with the actual locations on the airport surface. Display formats, system architectures, and the various IDS programs are discussed.

  17. Processing and display of atmospheric phenomen data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatom, F. B.; Garst, R. A.; Purser, L. R.

    1984-10-01

    A series of technical efforts dealing with various atmospheric phenomena is described. Refinements to the Potential in an Electrostatic Cloud (PEC) model are discussed. The development of an Apple III graphics program, the NSSL Lightning Data Program and a description of data reduction procedures are examined. Several utility programs are also discussed.

  18. Processing and display of atmospheric phenomenaa data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tatom, F. B.; Garst, R. A.; Purser, L. R.

    1984-01-01

    A series of technical efforts dealing with various atmospheric phenomena is described. Refinements to the Potential in an Electrostatic Cloud (PEC) model are discussed. The development of an Apple III graphics program, the NSSL Lightning Data Program and a description of data reduction procedures are examined. Several utility programs are also discussed.

  19. Marshall information retrieval and display system (MIRADS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groover, J. L.; Jones, S. C.; King, W. L.

    1974-01-01

    Program for data management system allows sophisticated inquiries while utilizing simplified language. Online system is composed of several programs. System is written primarily in COBOL with routines in ASSEMBLER and FORTRAN V.

  20. Integrating cockpit display and video recorder systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, David C.; Jones, Romie; Testerman, David

    1995-06-01

    A pair of flight data recording and playback systems are described for the F-22 and F-15. These systems employ multiplexing techniques to expand the amount of data recorded and inherent benefit therefrom. Variations between the system accommodate the different avionics architecture of each aircraft.

  1. Synoptic Displays for HBESL and the Laser Lab System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muvandimwe, Didier; Ruan, Jinhao

    2013-04-01

    This project aimed to produce synoptic displays for two experiments: HBESL, the High Brightness Electron Source Laboratory and NML Laser experiment in order to assist the control of these facilities in the accelerator control network of Fermilab. Both displays were successfully produced and added on the ACNET (Accelerator Control Network) page. Synoptic is a system for graphical representation of real-time data in the accelerator control system of Fermilab. It creates diagrams representing a certain machine or process along with actual reading from the control system indicating its current state as well as supporting the ability to set data back from the control system. In this research, I learned how to use this software, and was able to use it in order to build these two synoptic displays for these two experiments: HBESL, and the laser lab. Both displays for HBESL and the laser experiment were successfully produced and added on the ACNET console under the NML page. Having these displays allow both users and scientists to be able to constantly control their experiments anywhere at any time. Being able to read out and set experimental parameters help users to protect the efficiency of experiments as well as avoiding extreme inaccuracy and inadequate conditions of experiments.

  2. Vision based flight procedure stereo display system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xiaoyun; Wan, Di; Ma, Lan; He, Yuncheng

    2008-03-01

    A virtual reality flight procedure vision system is introduced in this paper. The digital flight map database is established based on the Geographic Information System (GIS) and high definitions satellite remote sensing photos. The flight approaching area database is established through computer 3D modeling system and GIS. The area texture is generated from the remote sensing photos and aerial photographs in various level of detail. According to the flight approaching procedure, the flight navigation information is linked to the database. The flight approaching area vision can be dynamic displayed according to the designed flight procedure. The flight approaching area images are rendered in 2 channels, one for left eye images and the others for right eye images. Through the polarized stereoscopic projection system, the pilots and aircrew can get the vivid 3D vision of the flight destination approaching area. Take the use of this system in pilots preflight preparation procedure, the aircrew can get more vivid information along the flight destination approaching area. This system can improve the aviator's self-confidence before he carries out the flight mission, accordingly, the flight safety is improved. This system is also useful in validate the visual flight procedure design, and it helps to the flight procedure design.

  3. A Comprehensive Process for Display Systems Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simcox, William A.

    A comprehensive development process for display design, focusing on computer-generated cathode ray tube (CRT) displays is presented. A framework is created for breaking the display into its component parts, used to guide the design process. The objective is to design or select the most cost effective graphics solution (hardware and software) to…

  4. Improved memory loading techniques for the TSRV display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Easley, W. C.; Lynn, W. A.; Mcluer, D. G.

    1986-01-01

    A recent upgrade of the TSRV research flight system at NASA Langley Research Center retained the original monochrome display system. However, the display memory loading equipment was replaced requiring design and development of new methods of performing this task. This paper describes the new techniques developed to load memory in the display system. An outdated paper tape method for loading the BOOTSTRAP control program was replaced by EPROM storage of the characters contained on the tape. Rather than move a tape past an optical reader, a counter was implemented which steps sequentially through EPROM addresses and presents the same data to the loader circuitry. A cumbersome cassette tape method for loading the applications software was replaced with a floppy disk method using a microprocessor terminal installed as part of the upgrade. The cassette memory image was transferred to disk and a specific software loader was written for the terminal which duplicates the function of the cassette loader.

  5. Tonopah Test Range EGS graphics tracking display system: HP370

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, R.H.; Bauhs, K.C.

    1994-08-01

    This report describes the HP370 component of the Enhanced Graphics System (EGS) used at Tonopah Test Range (TTR). Selected Radar data is fed into the computer systems and the resulting tracking symbols are displayed on high-resolution video monitors in real time. These tracking symbols overlay background maps and are used for monitoring/controlling various flight vehicles. This report discusses both the operational aspects and the internal configuration of the HP370 Workstation portion of the EGS system.

  6. An introduction to the Marshall information retrieval and display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    An on-line terminal oriented data storage and retrieval system is presented which allows a user to extract and process information from stored data bases. The use of on-line terminals for extracting and displaying data from the data bases provides a fast and responsive method for obtaining needed information. The system consists of general purpose computer programs that provide the overall capabilities of the total system. The system can process any number of data files via a Dictionary (one for each file) which describes the data format to the system. New files may be added to the system at any time, and reprogramming is not required. Illustrations of the system are shown, and sample inquiries and responses are given.

  7. Management and display of four-dimensional environmental data sets using McIDAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hibbard, William L.; Santek, David; Suomi, Verner E.

    1990-01-01

    Over the past four years, great strides have been made in the areas of data management and display of 4-D meteorological data sets. A survey was conducted of available and planned 4-D meteorological data sources. The data types were evaluated for their impact on the data management and display system. The requirements were analyzed for data base management generated by the 4-D data display system. The suitability of the existing data base management procedures and file structure were evaluated in light of the new requirements. Where needed, new data base management tools and file procedures were designed and implemented. The quality of the basic 4-D data sets was assured. The interpolation and extrapolation techniques of the 4-D data were investigated. The 4-D data from various sources were combined to make a uniform and consistent data set for display purposes. Data display software was designed to create abstract line graphic 3-D displays. Realistic shaded 3-D displays were created. Animation routines for these displays were developed in order to produce a dynamic 4-D presentation. A prototype dynamic color stereo workstation was implemented. A computer functional design specification was produced based on interactive studies and user feedback.

  8. Multimodal Geographic Information Systems: Adding Haptic and Auditory Display.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeong, Wooseob; Gluck, Myke

    2003-01-01

    Investigated the feasibility of adding haptic and auditory displays to traditional visual geographic information systems (GISs). Explored differences in user performance, including task completion time and accuracy, and user satisfaction with a multimodal GIS which was implemented with a haptic display, auditory display, and combined display.…

  9. Head Worn Display System for Equivalent Visual Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cupero, Frank; Valimont, Brian; Wise, John; Best. Carl; DeMers, Bob

    2009-01-01

    Head-Worn Displays or so-called, near-to-eye displays have potentially significant advantages in terms of cost, overcoming cockpit space constraints, and for the display of spatially-integrated information. However, many technical issues need to be overcome before these technologies can be successfully introduced into commercial aircraft cockpits. The results of three activities are reported. First, the near-to-eye display design, technological, and human factors issues are described and a literature review is presented. Second, the results of a fixed-base piloted simulation, investigating the impact of near to eye displays on both operational and visual performance is reported. Straight-in approaches were flown in simulated visual and instrument conditions while using either a biocular or a monocular display placed on either the dominant or non-dominant eye. The pilot's flight performance, visual acuity, and ability to detect unsafe conditions on the runway were tested. The data generally supports a monocular design with minimal impact due to eye dominance. Finally, a method for head tracker system latency measurement is developed and used to compare two different devices.

  10. Roll-Out and Turn-Off Display Software for Integrated Display System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Edward J., Jr.; Hyer, Paul V.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes the software products, system architectures and operational procedures developed by Lockheed-Martin in support of the Roll-Out and Turn-Off (ROTO) sub-element of the Low Visibility Landing and Surface Operations (LVLASO) program at the NASA Langley Research Center. The ROTO portion of this program focuses on developing technologies that aid pilots in the task of managing the deceleration of an aircraft to a pre-selected exit taxiway. This report focuses on software that produces a system of redundant deceleration cues for a pilot during the landing roll-out, and presents these cues on a head up display (HUD). The software also produces symbology for aircraft operational phases involving cruise flight, approach, takeoff, and go-around. The algorithms and data sources used to compute the deceleration guidance and generate the displays are discussed. Examples of the display formats and symbology options are presented. Logic diagrams describing the design of the ROTO software module are also given.

  11. Apollo experience report: Real-time display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, C. J.; Burbank, L. W.

    1976-01-01

    The real time display system used in the Apollo Program is described; the systematic organization of the system, which resulted from hardware/software trade-offs and the establishment of system criteria, is emphasized. Each basic requirement of the real time display system was met by a separate subsystem. The computer input multiplexer subsystem, the plotting display subsystem, the digital display subsystem, and the digital television subsystem are described. Also described are the automated display design and the generation of precision photographic reference slides required for the three display subsystems.

  12. High-resolution display system for mammograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskowitz, Michael J.; Huang, H. K.; Wang, Jun; Allen, Jeffrey; Sickles, Edward A.; Giles, Anthony

    1995-04-01

    A high resolution mammographic display station is implemented for clinical diagnosis and for a digital teaching file. The display consists of a specially designed, high resolution mammographic station which contains a connection to a 50 micron (variable spot size) laser film digitizer, two 2 K X 2.5 K display monitors, an image processor, a host computer, and a disk array for high speed image transfer to the display monitors. After digitization on a separate host computer, the files are immediately transferred to the display station and post- processed for viewing. The algorithm for post-processing of the digitized image applies a non- linear LUT to mimic the original film characteristics while taking into account the luminosity of the display monitors in an attempt to produce the highest digital image quality possible. Image processing functions for enhancing calcification and soft tissue are also available to assist the human observer in classification of objects within the image. Windowing and level controls are seamlessly integrated for each monitor, as well as magnification capabilities. For an image display at its full resolution (e.g., digitized at 100 microns), the magnification is accomplished with a roaming window utilizing simple 2X pixel replication. This has been found to be acceptable in preliminary tests with clinicians. Measurements of features on the 2 k displays are possible, as well. The display format accurately simulates mammographic viewing arrangements with automatic side-by-side historical, current, left and right craniocaudal, mediolateral, etc., view comparisons. This high resolution mammographic display is found to be essential for fast and accurate display of high resolution digitized mammograms. A digital mammographic teaching file has been designed and tested using this display architecture. The teaching file presents the case questions on the host display monitor, and the related images for each question are presented on the high

  13. Volumetric image display for complex 3D data visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsao, Che-Chih; Chen, Jyh Shing

    2000-05-01

    A volumetric image display is a new display technology capable of displaying computer generated 3D images in a volumetric space. Many viewers can walk around the display and see the image from omni-directions simultaneously without wearing any glasses. The image is real and possesses all major elements in both physiological and psychological depth cues. Due to the volumetric nature of its image, the VID can provide the most natural human-machine interface in operations involving 3D data manipulation and 3D targets monitoring. The technology creates volumetric 3D images by projecting a series of profiling images distributed in the space form a volumetric image because of the after-image effect of human eyes. Exemplary applications in biomedical image visualization were tested on a prototype display, using different methods to display a data set from Ct-scans. The features of this display technology make it most suitable for applications that require quick understanding of the 3D relations, need frequent spatial interactions with the 3D images, or involve time-varying 3D data. It can also be useful for group discussion and decision making.

  14. Motion parallax in immersive cylindrical display systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filliard, N.; Reymond, G.; Kemeny, A.; Berthoz, A.

    2012-03-01

    Motion parallax is a crucial visual cue produced by translations of the observer for the perception of depth and selfmotion. Therefore, tracking the observer viewpoint has become inevitable in immersive virtual (VR) reality systems (cylindrical screens, CAVE, head mounted displays) used e.g. in automotive industry (style reviews, architecture design, ergonomics studies) or in scientific studies of visual perception. The perception of a stable and rigid world requires that this visual cue be coherent with other extra-retinal (e.g. vestibular, kinesthetic) cues signaling ego-motion. Although world stability is never questioned in real world, rendering head coupled viewpoint in VR can lead to the perception of an illusory perception of unstable environments, unless a non-unity scale factor is applied on recorded head movements. Besides, cylindrical screens are usually used with static observers due to image distortions when rendering image for viewpoints different from a sweet spot. We developed a technique to compensate in real-time these non-linear visual distortions, in an industrial VR setup, based on a cylindrical screen projection system. Additionally, to evaluate the amount of discrepancies tolerated without perceptual distortions between visual and extraretinal cues, a "motion parallax gain" between the velocity of the observer's head and that of the virtual camera was introduced in this system. The influence of this artificial gain was measured on the gait stability of free-standing participants. Results indicate that, below unity, gains significantly alter postural control. Conversely, the influence of higher gains remains limited, suggesting a certain tolerance of observers to these conditions. Parallax gain amplification is therefore proposed as a possible solution to provide a wider exploration of space to users of immersive virtual reality systems.

  15. Visual display principles for C3I system tasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, William C.; Lane, David M.; Laux, Lila F.; Anderson, Loy A.; Holden, Kritina L.

    1993-06-01

    Modern C3I systems are best described as semi-automated data management and decision systems over which human operators exercise supervisory control. The effectiveness of such systems is heavily dependent on the design for human-computer interaction (HCI), an important aspect of which is the visual display interface. Current Department of Defense policy mandates consideration of such human factors issues at an early stage in the design process. Comprehensive guidelines are available for display design applications after the general system parameters have been specified. Some recommendations are general, others are specific. This report offers a set of design principles at an intermediate (conceptual) level of abstraction as a complement to existing guidelines. The purpose is to synthesize current knowledge of human cognition into a form that will be applicable to the earliest stages of display design ('cognitive' functions being the most salient and critical of those remaining for the operator in advanced C3I systems). The principles are derived from a review of the literatures on human cognition, HCI, and display design, some original research, and liberal interpretation by the authors. They are organized according to operations performed on specific categories of information in possible C3I task configurations.

  16. A variable-collimation display system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batchko, Robert; Robinson, Sam; Schmidt, Jack; Graniela, Benito

    2014-03-01

    Two important human depth cues are accommodation and vergence. Normally, the eyes accommodate and converge or diverge in tandem; changes in viewing distance cause the eyes to simultaneously adjust both focus and orientation. However, ambiguity between accommodation and vergence cues is a well-known limitation in many stereoscopic display technologies. This limitation also arises in state-of-the-art full-flight simulator displays. In current full-flight simulators, the out-the-window (OTW) display (i.e., the front cockpit window display) employs a fixed collimated display technology which allows the pilot and copilot to perceive the OTW training scene without angular errors or distortions; however, accommodation and vergence cues are limited to fixed ranges (e.g., ~ 20 m). While this approach works well for long-range, the ambiguity of depth cues at shorter range hinders the pilot's ability to gauge distances in critical maneuvers such as vertical take-off and landing (VTOL). This is the first in a series of papers on a novel, variable-collimation display (VCD) technology that is being developed under NAVY SBIR Topic N121-041 funding. The proposed VCD will integrate with rotary-wing and vertical take-off and landing simulators and provide accurate accommodation and vergence cues for distances ranging from approximately 3 m outside the chin window to ~ 20 m. A display that offers dynamic accommodation and vergence could improve pilot safety and training, and impact other applications presently limited by lack of these depth cues.

  17. Combining high performance simulation, data acquisition, and graphics display computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickman, Robert J.

    1989-01-01

    Issues involved in the continuing development of an advanced simulation complex are discussed. This approach provides the capability to perform the majority of tests on advanced systems, non-destructively. The controlled test environments can be replicated to examine the response of the systems under test to alternative treatments of the system control design, or test the function and qualification of specific hardware. Field tests verify that the elements simulated in the laboratories are sufficient. The digital computer is hosted by a Digital Equipment Corp. MicroVAX computer with an Aptec Computer Systems Model 24 I/O computer performing the communication function. An Applied Dynamics International AD100 performs the high speed simulation computing and an Evans and Sutherland PS350 performs on-line graphics display. A Scientific Computer Systems SCS40 acts as a high performance FORTRAN program processor to support the complex, by generating numerous large files from programs coded in FORTRAN that are required for the real time processing. Four programming languages are involved in the process, FORTRAN, ADSIM, ADRIO, and STAPLE. FORTRAN is employed on the MicroVAX host to initialize and terminate the simulation runs on the system. The generation of the data files on the SCS40 also is performed with FORTRAN programs. ADSIM and ADIRO are used to program the processing elements of the AD100 and its IOCP processor. STAPLE is used to program the Aptec DIP and DIA processors.

  18. Transport systems research vehicle color display system operations manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Easley, Wesley C.; Johnson, Larry E.

    1989-01-01

    A recent upgrade of the Transport Systems Research Vehicle operated by the Advanced Transport Operating Systems Program Office at the NASA Langley Research Center has resulted in an all-glass panel in the research flight deck. Eight ARINC-D size CRT color displays make up the panel. A major goal of the display upgrade effort was ease of operation and maintenance of the hardware while maintaining versatility needed for flight research. Software is the key to this required versatility and will be the area demanding the most detailed technical design expertise. This document is is intended to serve as a single source of quick reference information needed for routine operation and system level maintenance. Detailed maintenance and modification of the display system will require specific design documentation and must be accomplished by individuals with specialized knowledge and experience.

  19. Digital map databases in support of avionic display systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trenchard, Michael E.; Lohrenz, Maura C.; Rosche, Henry, III; Wischow, Perry B.

    1991-08-01

    The emergence of computerized mission planning systems (MPS) and airborne digital moving map systems (DMS) has necessitated the development of a global database of raster aeronautical chart data specifically designed for input to these systems. The Naval Oceanographic and Atmospheric Research Laboratory''s (NOARL) Map Data Formatting Facility (MDFF) is presently dedicated to supporting these avionic display systems with the development of the Compressed Aeronautical Chart (CAC) database on Compact Disk Read Only Memory (CDROM) optical discs. The MDFF is also developing a series of aircraft-specific Write-Once Read Many (WORM) optical discs. NOARL has initiated a comprehensive research program aimed at improving the pilots'' moving map displays current research efforts include the development of an alternate image compression technique and generation of a standard set of color palettes. The CAC database will provide digital aeronautical chart data in six different scales. CAC is derived from the Defense Mapping Agency''s (DMA) Equal Arc-second (ARC) Digitized Raster Graphics (ADRG) a series of scanned aeronautical charts. NOARL processes ADRG to tailor the chart image resolution to that of the DMS display while reducing storage requirements through image compression techniques. CAC is being distributed by DMA as a library of CDROMs.

  20. Video processing for DLP display systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markandey, Vishal; Clatanoff, Todd; Pettitt, Greg

    1996-03-01

    Texas Instruments' Digital Light Processing TM (DLPTM) technology provides all- digital projection displays that offer superior picture quality in terms of resolution, brightness, contrast, and color fidelity. This paper provides an overview of the digital video processing solutions that have been developed by Texas Instruments for the all-digital display. The video processing solutions include: progressive scan conversion, digital video resampling, picture enhancements, color processing, and gamma processing. The real-time implementation of the digital video processing is also discussed, highlighting the use of the scanline video processor (SVP) and the development of custom ASIC solutions.

  1. Stereoscopic Displays And The Human Dual Visual System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clapp, Robert E.

    1986-05-01

    There is only one real world. We "see" that world as extending into three dimensions because we look at it with two visual systems and with two eyes. We are not presented with two "pictures" of the real world, but with two separate sets of inputs into two separate systems. The analog of the eye as a camera has been a constant problem in the visualization of the "seeing" process. Overcoming the persistence of such an approach is the first requirement in developing a true stereoscopic display system. The eye is a dynamic sensing apparatus and supplies the brain with visual inputs. The brain constructs the scene we "see", and is responsible for our perceptions of the visual world. The sensory inputs from the human dual visual system (Ambient - wide FOV, Focal - detail FOV) are combined with other body senses in this perceptual process. Indeed, other body senses, in some degree, direct and control where and at what our eyes look. This process of conceptualization of the "real" world as perceived by ourselves can be related only within limits to the "real" world as perceived by others.. This paper addresses the processes by which our minds (with sensor inputs) work to form our stereoscopic perceptual concepts of the world, real or simulated, and the advantages (and problems) caused by our egocentric reduction of those data inputs. Discussion and evaluation of stereoscopic display systems compares current and future display systems.

  2. Information Display: Considerations for Designing Modern Computer-Based Display Systems

    SciTech Connect

    J.O'Hara, D.Pirus, L.Beltracchi

    2003-10-01

    OAK- B135 To help nuclear utilities and suppliers design and implement plant information management systems and displays that provide accurate and timely information and require minimal navigation and interface management.

  3. Video integrated measurement system. [Diagnostic display devices

    SciTech Connect

    Spector, B.; Eilbert, L.; Finando, S.; Fukuda, F.

    1982-06-01

    A Video Integrated Measurement (VIM) System is described which incorporates the use of various noninvasive diagnostic procedures (moire contourography, electromyography, posturometry, infrared thermography, etc.), used individually or in combination, for the evaluation of neuromusculoskeletal and other disorders and their management with biofeedback and other therapeutic procedures. The system provides for measuring individual diagnostic and therapeutic modes, or multiple modes by split screen superimposition, of real time (actual) images of the patient and idealized (ideal-normal) models on a video monitor, along with analog and digital data, graphics, color, and other transduced symbolic information. It is concluded that this system provides an innovative and efficient method by which the therapist and patient can interact in biofeedback training/learning processes and holds considerable promise for more effective measurement and treatment of a wide variety of physical and behavioral disorders.

  4. Computer based human-centered display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Still, David L. (Inventor); Temme, Leonard A. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A human centered informational display is disclosed that can be used with vehicles (e.g. aircraft) and in other operational environments where rapid human centered comprehension of an operational environment is required. The informational display integrates all cockpit information into a single display in such a way that the pilot can clearly understand with a glance, his or her spatial orientation, flight performance, engine status and power management issues, radio aids, and the location of other air traffic, runways, weather, and terrain features. With OZ the information is presented as an integrated whole, the pilot instantaneously recognizes flight path deviations, and is instinctively drawn to the corrective maneuvers. Our laboratory studies indicate that OZ transfers to the pilot all of the integrated display information in less than 200 milliseconds. The reacquisition of scan can be accomplished just as quickly. Thus, the time constants for forming a mental model are near instantaneous. The pilot's ability to keep up with rapidly changing and threatening environments is tremendously enhanced. OZ is most easily compatible with aircraft that has flight path information coded electronically. With the correct sensors (which are currently available) OZ can be installed in essentially all current aircraft.

  5. Cockpit data link displays - An evaluation of textual formats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgann, Alison; Lozito, Sandra; Corker, Kevin

    1992-01-01

    Data link technologies are being investigated for air/ground information transfer for commercial aircraft operation. This study was designed to measure which of four alpha-numeric display formats for display of data link information would lead to the quickest and most accurate memory retrieval in a part-task simulation environment. Pilots viewed a clearance for 10-15 seconds and were subsequently queried about the content of that clearance. Speed and accuracy of responses were measured across three retention tasks. The three retention tasks included free recall of a particular clearance. recognition of a previous clearance, and the comparison of element values between a previously displayed and current clearance. Each format was tested with and without a distraction task. Subjective ratings of each format were also collected. The analyses revealed no significant differences for reaction time or accuracy among the four formats. Explanations for these results as well as alternative methodologies are discussed.

  6. Automated system function allocation and display format: Task information processing requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czerwinski, Mary P.

    1993-01-01

    An important consideration when designing the interface to an intelligent system concerns function allocation between the system and the user. The display of information could be held constant, or 'fixed', leaving the user with the task of searching through all of the available information, integrating it, and classifying the data into a known system state. On the other hand, the system, based on its own intelligent diagnosis, could display only relevant information in order to reduce the user's search set. The user would still be left the task of perceiving and integrating the data and classifying it into the appropriate system state. Finally, the system could display the patterns of data. In this scenario, the task of integrating the data is carried out by the system, and the user's information processing load is reduced, leaving only the tasks of perception and classification of the patterns of data. Humans are especially adept at this form of display processing. Although others have examined the relative effectiveness of alphanumeric and graphical display formats, it is interesting to reexamine this issue together with the function allocation problem. Currently, Johnson Space Center is the test site for an intelligent Thermal Control System (TCS), TEXSYS, being tested for use with Space Station Freedom. Expert TCS engineers, as well as novices, were asked to classify several displays of TEXSYS data into various system states (including nominal and anomalous states). Three different display formats were used: fixed, subset, and graphical. The hypothesis tested was that the graphical displays would provide for fewer errors and faster classification times by both experts and novices, regardless of the kind of system state represented within the display. The subset displays were hypothesized to be the second most effective display format/function allocation condition, based on the fact that the search set is reduced in these displays. Both the subset and the

  7. Panoramic, large-screen, 3-D flight display system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, Henry; Larson, Brent; Johnson, Michael; Droessler, Justin; Reinhart, William F.

    1995-01-01

    The report documents and summarizes the results of the required evaluations specified in the SOW and the design specifications for the selected display system hardware. Also included are the proposed development plan and schedule as well as the estimated rough order of magnitude (ROM) cost to design, fabricate, and demonstrate a flyable prototype research flight display system. The thrust of the effort was development of a complete understanding of the user/system requirements for a panoramic, collimated, 3-D flyable avionic display system and the translation of the requirements into an acceptable system design for fabrication and demonstration of a prototype display in the early 1997 time frame. Eleven display system design concepts were presented to NASA LaRC during the program, one of which was down-selected to a preferred display system concept. A set of preliminary display requirements was formulated. The state of the art in image source technology, 3-D methods, collimation methods, and interaction methods for a panoramic, 3-D flight display system were reviewed in depth and evaluated. Display technology improvements and risk reductions associated with maturity of the technologies for the preferred display system design concept were identified.

  8. Can Effective Synthetic Vision System Displays be Implemented on Limited Size Display Spaces?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comstock, J. Raymond, Jr.; Glaab, Lou J.; Prinzel, Lance J.; Elliott, Dawn M.

    2004-01-01

    The Synthetic Vision Systems (SVS) element of the NASA Aviation Safety Program is striving to eliminate poor visibility as a causal factor in aircraft accidents, and to enhance operational capabilities of all types or aircraft. To accomplish these safety and situation awareness improvements, the SVS concepts are designed to provide a clear view of the world ahead through the display of computer generated imagery derived from an onboard database of terrain, obstacle and airport information. An important issue for the SVS concept is whether useful and effective Synthetic Vision System (SVS) displays can be implemented on limited size display spaces as would be required to implement this technology on older aircraft with physically smaller instrument spaces. In this study, prototype SVS displays were put on the following display sizes: (a) size "A' (e.g. 757 EADI), (b) form factor "D" (e.g. 777 PFD), and (c) new size "X" (Rectangular flat-panel, approximately 20 x 25 cm). Testing was conducted in a high-resolution graphics simulation facility at NASA Langley Research Center. Specific issues under test included the display size as noted above, the field-of-view (FOV) to be shown on the display and directly related to FOV is the degree of minification of the displayed image or picture. Using simulated approaches with display size and FOV conditions held constant no significant differences by these factors were found. Preferred FOV based on performance was determined by using approaches during which pilots could select FOV. Mean preference ratings for FOV were in the following order: (1) 30 deg., (2) Unity, (3) 60 deg., and (4) 90 deg., and held true for all display sizes tested. Limitations of the present study and future research directions are discussed.

  9. Pilot study of the domestic information display system in state and local government

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    An interactive computer based system that can retrieve a wide range of data (demographic, environmental, socio-economic, etc.,) from a large data base and display these data for different geographic units in the form of choropleth maps was developed. The system was designed to display statistical information in a geographic format for national policy makers.

  10. Data processing and display of laser Doppler experimental results, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashmore, B. R.; Kimura, A.; Skeith, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    Contract activities performed in developing a laser Doppler system for detecting, tracking, and measuring aircraft wake vortices are summarized. The computer program for processing and displaying the Dust Devil experimental data is presented. Program listings are included in the appendix.

  11. Method To Display Data On A Face Mask

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Kevin-Duron

    1995-01-01

    Proposed electronic instrument displays information on diver's or firefighter's face mask. Includes mask, prism, electronic readouts, transceiver and control electronics. Mounted at periphery of diver's field of view to provide data on elapsed time, depth, pressure, and temperature. Provides greater safety and convenience to user.

  12. Virtual surgical operation system using volume scanning display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameyama, Ken-ichi; Ohtomi, Koichi; Ohhashi, Akinami; Iseki, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Naotoshi; Takakura, Kintomo

    1994-05-01

    This paper describes an interactive 3-D display system for supporting image-guided surgery. Different from conventional CRT-based medical display systems, this one can provide true 3- D images of the patient's anatomical structures in a physical 3-D space. Furthermore, various tools for view control, target definition, and simple treatment simulation, have been developed and can be used for directly manipulating these images. This feature is very useful for a surgeon to intuitively recognize the precise position of a lesion and other structures and to plan a more accurate treatment. The hardware system is composed of a volume scanning 3-D display for 3-D real image presentation, a 3-D wireless mouse for direct manipulation in a 3-D space, and a workstation for the data control of these devices. The software is for analyzing X-CT, MRI, or SPECT images and for organizing the tools for treatment planning. The system is currently aimed at being used for stereotactic neurosurgical operations.

  13. Volumetric three-dimensional display system with rasterization hardware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favalora, Gregg E.; Dorval, Rick K.; Hall, Deirdre M.; Giovinco, Michael; Napoli, Joshua

    2001-06-01

    An 8-color multiplanar volumetric display is being developed by Actuality Systems, Inc. It will be capable of utilizing an image volume greater than 90 million voxels, which we believe is the greatest utilizable voxel set of any volumetric display constructed to date. The display is designed to be used for molecular visualization, mechanical CAD, e-commerce, entertainment, and medical imaging. As such, it contains a new graphics processing architecture, novel high-performance line- drawing algorithms, and an API similar to a current standard. Three-dimensional imagery is created by projecting a series of 2-D bitmaps ('image slices') onto a diffuse screen that rotates at 600 rpm. Persistence of vision fuses the slices into a volume-filling 3-D image. A modified three-panel Texas Instruments projector provides slices at approximately 4 kHz, resulting in 8-color 3-D imagery comprised of roughly 200 radially-disposed slices which are updated at 20 Hz. Each slice has a resolution of 768 by 768 pixels, subtending 10 inches. An unusual off-axis projection scheme incorporating tilted rotating optics is used to maintain good focus across the projection screen. The display electronics includes a custom rasterization architecture which converts the user's 3- D geometry data into image slices, as well as 6 Gbits of DDR SDRAM graphics memory.

  14. HTML 5 Displays for On-Board Flight Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Chandika

    2016-01-01

    During my Internship at NASA in the summer of 2016, I was assigned to a project which dealt with developing a web-server that would display telemetry and other system data using HTML 5, JavaScript, and CSS. By doing this, it would be possible to view the data across a variety of screen sizes, and establish a standard that could be used to simplify communication and software development between NASA and other countries. Utilizing a web- approach allowed us to add in more functionality, as well as make the displays more aesthetically pleasing for the users. When I was assigned to this project my main task was to first establish communication with the current display server. This display server would output data from the on-board systems in XML format. Once communication was established I was then asked to create a dynamic telemetry table web page that would update its header and change as new information came in. After this was completed, certain minor functionalities were added to the table such as a hide column and filter by system option. This was more for the purpose of making the table more useful for the users, as they can now filter and view relevant data. Finally my last task was to create a graphical system display for all the systems on the space craft. This was by far the most challenging part of my internship as finding a JavaScript library that was both free and contained useful functions to assist me in my task was difficult. In the end I was able to use the JointJs library and accomplish the task. With the help of my mentor and the HIVE lab team, we were able to establish stable communication with the display server. We also succeeded in creating a fully dynamic telemetry table and in developing a graphical system display for the advanced modular power system. Working in JSC for this internship has taught me a lot about coding in JavaScript and HTML 5. I was also introduced to the concept of developing software as a team, and exposed to the different

  15. High-brightness displays in integrated weapon sight systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Tim; Hogan, Tim

    2014-06-01

    In the past several years Kopin has demonstrated the ability to provide ultra-high brightness, low power display solutions in VGA, SVGA, SXGA and 2k x 2k display formats. This paper will review various approaches for integrating high brightness overlay displays with existing direct view rifle sights and augmenting their precision aiming and targeting capability. Examples of overlay display systems solutions will be presented and discussed. This paper will review significant capability enhancements that are possible when augmenting the real-world as seen through a rifle sight with other soldier system equipment including laser range finders, ballistic computers and sensor systems.

  16. Acceleration display system for aircraft zero-gravity research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millis, Marc G.

    1987-01-01

    The features, design, calibration, and testing of Lewis Research Center's acceleration display system for aircraft zero-gravity research are described. Specific circuit schematics and system specifications are included as well as representative data traces from flown trajectories. Other observations learned from developing and using this system are mentioned where appropriate. The system, now a permanent part of the Lewis Learjet zero-gravity program, provides legible, concise, and necessary guidance information enabling pilots to routinely fly accurate zero-gravity trajectories. Regular use of this system resulted in improvements of the Learjet zero-gravity flight techniques, including a technique to minimize later accelerations. Lewis Gates Learjet trajectory data show that accelerations can be reliably sustained within 0.01 g for 5 consecutive seconds, within 0.02 g for 7 consecutive seconds, and within 0.04 g for up to 20 second. Lewis followed the past practices of acceleration measurement, yet focussed on the acceleration displays. Refinements based on flight experience included evolving the ranges, resolutions, and frequency responses to fit the pilot and the Learjet responses.

  17. A Handheld, Free Roaming, Data Display for DIII-D Diagnostic Data

    SciTech Connect

    Broesch, J.D.; Phillips, J.C.; Petersen, P.I.; Hansink, M.J.

    1999-07-01

    Standard handheld test instruments such as voltmeters and portable oscilloscopes are useful for making basic measurements necessary for the operation and maintenance of large experiments such as the DIII-D magnetic fusion research facility. Some critical diagnostic information, however, is available only on system computers. Often this diagnostic information is located in computer databases and requires synthesis via computational algorithms to be of practical use to the technician. Unfortunately, this means the data is typically only available via computer screens located at fixed locations. One common way to provide mobile information is to have one operator sit at a console and read the data to the mobile technician via radio. This is inefficient in as much as it requires two people. Even more importantly the operator-to-technician voice link introduces significant delays and errors that may hinder response times. To address these concerns of personnel utilization and efficiency, we have developed a remote display based on an rf-data link that can be carried with a technician as he moves about the facility. This display can provide the technician with any information needed from the stationary database. This paper will discuss the overall architecture as well as the individual modules for the mobile data display. Lessons learned, as well as techniques for improving the usefulness of such systems, will be presented.

  18. Synchronized voltage contrast display analysis system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, M. F.; Shumka, A.; Miller, E.; Evans, K. C. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    An apparatus and method for comparing internal voltage potentials of first and second operating electronic components such as large scale integrated circuits (LSI's) in which voltage differentials are visually identified via an appropriate display means are described. More particularly, in a first embodiment of the invention a first and second scanning electron microscope (SEM) are configured to scan a first and second operating electronic component respectively. The scan pattern of the second SEM is synchronized to that of the first SEM so that both simultaneously scan corresponding portions of the two operating electronic components. Video signals from each SEM corresponding to secondary electron signals generated as a result of a primary electron beam intersecting each operating electronic component in accordance with a predetermined scan pattern are provided to a video mixer and color encoder.

  19. Face detection for interactive tabletop viewscreen system using olfactory display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Kunio; Kanazawa, Fumihiro

    2009-10-01

    An olfactory display is a device that delivers smells to the nose. It provides us with special effects, for example to emit smell as if you were there or to give a trigger for reminding us of memories. The authors have developed a tabletop display system connected with the olfactory display. For delivering a flavor to user's nose, the system needs to recognition and measure positions of user's face and nose. In this paper, the authors describe an olfactory display which enables to detect the nose position for an effective delivery.

  20. A top-down hierarchical approach to the display and analysis of seismic data

    SciTech Connect

    Young, C.J.; Pavlakos, C.; Edwards, T.L.

    1995-08-01

    Seismic monitoring of a CTBT (Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty) will require analysts to review tens of events per hour recorded by networks of more than a hundred stations. Use of the traditional waveform display as the primary data display tool is incompatible with this requirement; traditional waveform displays are inefficient in their presentation of relevant data and place high demands on computer resources. Drawing on resident data visualization expertise and on our hands-on experience with the design and implementation of the ADSN (AFRAC Distributed Subsurface Network) system at AFTAC, we have designed a new system consisting of a hierarchical series of displays which present Televant information to the analyst in a more efficient manner. The displays are designed to be used in a top-down manner with the analyst starting with the most general display and proceeding to the most specific (the waveform display) only when it is needed. Testing to date has focussed on data from the GSETT2 (Group of Scientific Experts Technical Test {number_sign}2) in 1991. Future efforts will be directed towards improved data sets from the ongoing GSETT3.

  1. MRNIDX - Marine Data Index: Database Description, Operation, Retrieval, and Display

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paskevich, Valerie F.

    1982-01-01

    A database referencing the location and content of data stored on magnetic medium was designed to assist in the indexing of time-series and spatially dependent marine geophysical data collected or processed by the U. S. Geological Survey. The database was designed and created for input to the Geologic Retrieval and Synopsis Program (GRASP) to allow selective retrievals of information pertaining to location of data, data format, cruise, geographical bounds and collection dates of data. This information is then used to locate the stored data for administrative purposes or further processing. Database utilization is divided into three distinct operations. The first is the inventorying of the data and the updating of the database, the second is the retrieval of information from the database, and the third is the graphic display of the geographical boundaries to which the retrieved information pertains.

  2. RAPID: A random access picture digitizer, display, and memory system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yakimovsky, Y.; Rayfield, M.; Eskenazi, R.

    1976-01-01

    RAPID is a system capable of providing convenient digital analysis of video data in real-time. It has two modes of operation. The first allows for continuous digitization of an EIA RS-170 video signal. Each frame in the video signal is digitized and written in 1/30 of a second into RAPID's internal memory. The second mode leaves the content of the internal memory independent of the current input video. In both modes of operation the image contained in the memory is used to generate an EIA RS-170 composite video output signal representing the digitized image in the memory so that it can be displayed on a monitor.

  3. Acquisition and display systems of FTV (free-viewpoint television)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Toshiaki; Tanimoto, Masayuki

    2003-11-01

    Free-viewpoint TeleVision (FTV) is a next generation television where users can move their viewpoints freely. In the previous paper, we reported an FTV system based on the Ray-Space representation. In this paper, we focus on acquisition and display system for the FTV. As an acquisition system, we investigated two configurations: (1) multiple cameras with interpolation, and (2) a single high-speed camera with optical scanning system. As a display system, we developed a display with head tracking, where the position of a user is detected by image processing.

  4. Visually Coupled Systems (VCS): The Virtual Panoramic Display (VPD) System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kocian, Dean F.

    1992-01-01

    The development and impact is described of new visually coupled system (VCS) equipment designed to support engineering and human factors research in the military aircraft cockpit environment. VCS represents an advanced man-machine interface (MMI). Its potential to improve aircrew situational awareness seems enormous, but its superiority over the conventional cockpit MMI has not been established in a conclusive and rigorous fashion. What has been missing is a 'systems' approach to technology advancement that is comprehensive enough to produce conclusive results concerning the operational viability of the VCS concept and verify any risk factors that might be involved with its general use in the cockpit. The advanced VCS configuration described here, was ruggedized for use in military aircraft environments and was dubbed the Virtual Panoramic Display (VPD). It was designed to answer the VCS portion of the systems problem, and is implemented as a modular system whose performance can be tailored to specific application requirements. The overall system concept and the design of the two most important electronic subsystems that support the helmet mounted parts, a new militarized version of the magnetic helmet mounted sight and correspondingly similar helmet display electronics, are discussed in detail. Significant emphasis is given to illustrating how particular design features in the hardware improve overall system performance and support research activities.

  5. Cockpit display of ground-based weather data during thunderstorm research flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Bruce D.; Brown, Philip W.; Wunschel, Alfred J., Jr.; Stickle, Joseph W.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes an integrated system for providing ground-based cockpit display, transmitting to an aircraft, upon request via VHF radio, important ground-based thunderstorm data such as radar precipitation reflectivity contours, aircraft ground track, and cloud-to-ground lightning locations. Examples of the airborne X-band weather radar display and the ground-based display are presented for two different missions during the NASA Storm Hazards Program. In spite of some limitation, the system was found to be helpful in the selection of the route of flight, the general ground track to be used, and, occasionally, in clarifying the location of a specific cell of interest.

  6. Using side scan sonar data in a geographic information system to locate and display lake trout spawning habitat in the Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, Charles L.; Edsall, Thomas A.; Waltermire, Robert G.; White, Barbara

    1988-01-01

    The National Fisheries Research Center-Great Lakes of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has extensively used a side scan sonar to survey and pinpoint lake trout spawning grounds in the Great Lakes. The Geographic Information System (GIS) of the National Ecology Research Center produced maps from the side scan sonar data showing the exact location of the spawning grounds; this will enable current stocking programs to be carried out at those locations. These maps show the geographic position (latitude and longitude) of both the color-coded primary substrate types and the secondary substrate types, which are denoted by overstrikes. The maps must be supplemented with a Loran-C navigation grid for field use. The maps are proving useful to fishery managers by locating lake trout stocking areas in Lakes Michigan and Huron, as well as to researchers who investigate habitat quality on lake trout spawning grounds.

  7. A rule-based expert system for generating control displays at the Advanced Photon Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulter, Karen J.

    1994-12-01

    The integration of a rule-based expert system for generating screen displays for controlling and monitoring instrumentation under the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) is presented. The expert system is implemented using CLIPS, an expert system shell from the Software Technology Branch at Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center. The user selects the hardware input and output to be displayed and the expert system constructs a graphical control screen appropriate for the data. Such a system provides a method for implementing a common look and feel for displays created by several different users and reduces the amount of time required to create displays for new hardware configurations. Users are able to modify the displays as needed using the EPICS display editor tool.

  8. A rule-based expert system for generating control displays at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Coulter, K.J.

    1993-11-01

    The integration of a rule-based expert system for generating screen displays for controlling and monitoring instrumentation under the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) is presented. The expert system is implemented using CLIPS, an expert system shell from the Software Technology Branch at Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center. The user selects the hardware input and output to be displayed and the expert system constructs a graphical control screen appropriate for the data. Such a system provides a method for implementing a common look and feel for displays created by several different users and reduces the amount of time required to create displays for new hardware configurations. Users are able to modify the displays as needed using the EPICS display editor tool.

  9. A flexible flight display research system using a ground-based interactive graphics terminal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatfield, J. J.; Elkins, H. C.; Batson, V. M.; Poole, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    Requirements and research areas for the air transportation system of the 1980 to 1990's were reviewed briefly to establish the need for a flexible flight display generation research tool. Specific display capabilities required by aeronautical researchers are listed and a conceptual system for providing these capabilities is described. The conceptual system uses a ground-based interactive graphics terminal driven by real-time radar and telemetry data to generate dynamic, experimental flight displays. These displays are scan converted to television format, processed, and transmitted to the cockpits of evaluation aircraft. The attendant advantages of a Flight Display Research System (FDRS) designed to employ this concept are presented. The detailed implementation of an FDRS is described. The basic characteristics of the interactive graphics terminal and supporting display electronic subsystems are presented and the resulting system capability is summarized. Finally, the system status and utilization are reviewed.

  10. Health monitoring display system for a complex plant

    DOEpatents

    Ridolfo, Charles F.; Harmon, Daryl L.; Colin, Dreyfuss

    2006-08-08

    A single page enterprise wide level display provides a comprehensive readily understood representation of the overall health status of a complex plant. Color coded failure domains allow rapid intuitive recognition of component failure status. A three-tier hierarchy of displays provide details on the health status of the components and systems displayed on the enterprise wide level display in a manner that supports a logical drill down to the health status of sub-components on Tier 1 to expected faults of the sub-components on Tier 2 to specific information relative to expected sub-component failures on Tier 3.

  11. Portable Runway Intersection Display and Monitoring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dabney, Richard W. (Inventor); Elrod, Susan Vinz (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Systems, methods and apparatus are provided through which an apparatus located on an airfield provides information to pilots in aircraft on the ground and simultaneously gathers information on the motion and position of the aircraft for controllers.

  12. Holographic display system for restoration of sight to the blind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetz, G. A.; Mandel, Y.; Manivanh, R.; Palanker, D. V.; Čižmár, T.

    2013-10-01

    Objective. We present a holographic near-the-eye display system enabling optical approaches for sight restoration to the blind, such as photovoltaic retinal prosthesis, optogenetic and other photoactivation techniques. We compare it with conventional liquid crystal displays (LCD) or digital light processing (DLP)-based displays in terms of image quality, field of view, optical efficiency and safety. Approach. We detail the optical configuration of the holographic display system and its characterization using a phase-only spatial light modulator. Main results. We describe approaches to controlling the zero diffraction order and speckle related issues in holographic display systems and assess the image quality of such systems. We show that holographic techniques offer significant advantages in terms of peak irradiance and power efficiency, and enable designs that are inherently safer than LCD or DLP-based systems. We demonstrate the performance of our holographic display system in the assessment of cortical response to alternating gratings projected onto the retinas of rats. Significance. We address the issues associated with the design of high brightness, near-the-eye display systems and propose solutions to the efficiency and safety challenges with an optical design which could be miniaturized and mounted onto goggles.

  13. Triple redundant computer system/display and keyboard subsystem interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulde, F. J.

    1973-01-01

    Interfacing of the redundant display and keyboard subsystem with the triple redundant computer system is defined according to space shuttle design. The study is performed in three phases: (1) TRCS configuration and characteristics identification; (2) display and keyboard subsystem configuration and characteristics identification, and (3) interface approach definition.

  14. Multimodal Geographic Information Systems: Adding Haptic and Auditory Displays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeong, Wooseob

    2001-01-01

    This study consists of two experiments. Pitch, volume, and tempo in auditory-haptic geographic information systems were compared in terms of effectiveness for multimodal interface; volume was determined to be better. Auditory display with volume and haptic display with vibration were compared and the results showed that, in more complex geographic…

  15. Pilot climate data system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    A usable data base, the Pilot climate Data System (PCDS) is described. The PCDS is designed to be an interactive, easy-to-use, on-line generalized scientific information system. It efficiently provides uniform data catalogs; inventories, and access method, as well as manipulation and display tools for a large assortment of Earth, ocean and atmospheric data for the climate-related research community. Researchers can employ the PCDS to scan, manipulate, compare, display, and study climate parameters from diverse data sets. Software features, and applications of the PCDS are highlighted.

  16. A multi-mode manipulator display system for controlling remote robotic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massimino, Michael J.; Meschler, Michael F.; Rodriguez, Alberto A.

    1994-01-01

    The objective and contribution of the research presented in this paper is to provide a Multi-Mode Manipulator Display System (MMDS) to assist a human operator with the control of remote manipulator systems. Such systems include space based manipulators such as the space shuttle remote manipulator system (SRMS) and future ground controlled teleoperated and telescience space systems. The MMDS contains a number of display modes and submodes which display position control cues position data in graphical formats, based primarily on manipulator position and joint angle data. Therefore the MMDS is not dependent on visual information for input and can assist the operator especially when visual feedback is inadequate. This paper provides descriptions of the new modes and experiment results to date.

  17. Accelerometer recorder and display system for ambulatory patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berka, Martin; Żyliński, Marek; Niewiadomski, Wiktor; Cybulski, Gerard

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents the design of a compact, wearable, rechargeable acceleration recorder to support long-term monitoring of ambulatory patients with motor disorders, and of software to display and analyze its output. The device consists of a microcontroller, operational amplifier, accelerometer, SD card, indicator LED, rechargeable battery, and associated minor components. It can operate for over a day without charging and can continuously collect data for three weeks without downloading to an outside system, as currently configured. With slight modifications, this period could be extended to several months. The accompanying software provides flexible visualization of the acceleration data over long periods, basic file operations and compression for easier archiving, annotation of segments of interest, and functions for calculation of various parameters and detection of immobility and vibration frequencies. Applications in analysis of gait and other movements are discussed.

  18. Advanced Technology Display House. Volume 2: Energy system design concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maund, D. H.

    1981-01-01

    The preliminary design concept for the energy systems in the Advanced Technology Display House is analyzed. Residential energy demand, energy conservation, and energy concepts are included. Photovoltaic arrays and REDOX (reduction oxidation) sizes are discussed.

  19. ADGS-2100 Adaptive Display and Guidance System Window Manager Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, Mike W.; Innis, John D.; Miller, Steven P.; Wagner, Lucas G.

    2006-01-01

    Recent advances in modeling languages have made it feasible to formally specify and analyze the behavior of large system components. Synchronous data flow languages, such as Lustre, SCR, and RSML-e are particularly well suited to this task, and commercial versions of these tools such as SCADE and Simulink are growing in popularity among designers of safety critical systems, largely due to their ability to automatically generate code from the models. At the same time, advances in formal analysis tools have made it practical to formally verify important properties of these models to ensure that design defects are identified and corrected early in the lifecycle. This report describes how these tools have been applied to the ADGS-2100 Adaptive Display and Guidance Window Manager being developed by Rockwell Collins Inc. This work demonstrates how formal methods can be easily and cost-efficiently used to remove defects early in the design cycle.

  20. Holographic display system for restoration of sight to the blind

    PubMed Central

    Goetz, G A; Mandel, Y; Manivanh, R; Palanker, D V; Čižmár, T

    2013-01-01

    Objective We present a holographic near-the-eye display system enabling optical approaches for sight restoration to the blind, such as photovoltaic retinal prosthesis, optogenetic and other photoactivation techniques. We compare it with conventional LCD or DLP-based displays in terms of image quality, field of view, optical efficiency and safety. Approach We detail the optical configuration of the holographic display system and its characterization using a phase-only spatial light modulator. Main results We describe approaches to controlling the zero diffraction order and speckle related issues in holographic display systems and assess the image quality of such systems. We show that holographic techniques offer significant advantages in terms of peak irradiance and power efficiency, and enable designs that are inherently safer than LCD or DLP-based systems. We demonstrate the performance of our holographic display system in the assessment of cortical response to alternating gratings projected onto the retinas of rats. Significance We address the issues associated with the design of high brightness, near-the-eye display systems and propose solutions to the efficiency and safety challenges with an optical design which could be miniaturized and mounted onto goggles. PMID:24045579

  1. Advances in Proteomics Data Analysis and Display Using an Accurate Mass and Time Tag Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmer, Jennifer S.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-01-20

    Proteomics, and the larger field of systems biology, have recently demonstrated utility in both the understanding of cellular processes on the molecular level and the identification of potential biomarkers of various disease states. The large amount of data generated by utilizing high mass accuracy mass spectrometry for high-throughput proteomics analyses presents a challenge in data processing, analysis and display. This review focuses on recent advances in nanoLC-FTICR-MS-based proteomics analysis and the accompanying data processing tools that have been developed in order to interpret and display the large volumes of data produced.

  2. Advances in Proteomics Data Analysis and Display Using an Accurate Mass and Time Tag Approach

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Jennifer S.D.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Qian, Wei-Jun; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-01-01

    Proteomics has recently demonstrated utility in understanding cellular processes on the molecular level as a component of systems biology approaches and for identifying potential biomarkers of various disease states. The large amount of data generated by utilizing high efficiency (e.g., chromatographic) separations coupled to high mass accuracy mass spectrometry for high-throughput proteomics analyses presents challenges related to data processing, analysis, and display. This review focuses on recent advances in nanoLC-FTICR-MS-based proteomics approaches and the accompanying data processing tools that have been developed to display and interpret the large volumes of data being produced. PMID:16429408

  3. Crew and Display Concepts Evaluation for Synthetic / Enhanced Vision Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Randall E.; Kramer, Lynda J.; Prinzel, Lawrence J., III

    2006-01-01

    NASA s Synthetic Vision Systems (SVS) project is developing technologies with practical applications that strive to eliminate low-visibility conditions as a causal factor to civil aircraft accidents and replicate the operational benefits of clear day flight operations, regardless of the actual outside visibility condition. Enhanced Vision System (EVS) technologies are analogous and complementary in many respects to SVS, with the principle difference being that EVS is an imaging sensor presentation, as opposed to a database-derived image. The use of EVS in civil aircraft is projected to increase rapidly as the Federal Aviation Administration recently changed the aircraft operating rules under Part 91, revising the flight visibility requirements for conducting operations to civil airports. Operators conducting straight-in instrument approach procedures may now operate below the published approach minimums when using an approved EVS that shows the required visual references on the pilot s Head-Up Display. An experiment was conducted to evaluate the complementary use of SVS and EVS technologies, specifically focusing on new techniques for integration and/or fusion of synthetic and enhanced vision technologies and crew resource management while operating under the newly adopted FAA rules which provide operating credit for EVS. Overall, the experimental data showed that significant improvements in SA without concomitant increases in workload and display clutter could be provided by the integration and/or fusion of synthetic and enhanced vision technologies for the pilot-flying and the pilot-not-flying.

  4. Interactive display system having a digital micromirror imaging device

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.; DeSanto, Leonard; Kaull, Lisa; Brewster, Calvin

    2006-04-11

    A display system includes a waveguide optical panel having an inlet face and an opposite outlet face. A projector cooperates with a digital imaging device, e.g. a digital micromirror imaging device, for projecting an image through the panel for display on the outlet face. The imaging device includes an array of mirrors tiltable between opposite display and divert positions. The display positions reflect an image light beam from the projector through the panel for display on the outlet face. The divert positions divert the image light beam away from the panel, and are additionally used for reflecting a probe light beam through the panel toward the outlet face. Covering a spot on the panel, e.g. with a finger, reflects the probe light beam back through the panel toward the inlet face for detection thereat and providing interactive capability.

  5. Head-mounted display systems and the special operations soldier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loyd, Rodney B.

    1998-08-01

    In 1997, the Boeing Company, working with DARPA under the Smart Modules program and the US Army Soldier Systems Command, embarked on an advanced research and development program to develop a wearable computer system tailored for use with soldiers of the US Special Operations Command. The 'special operations combat management system' is a rugged advanced wearable tactical computer, designed to provide the special operations soldier with enhanced situation awareness and battlefield information capabilities. Many issues must be considered during the design of wearable computers for a combat soldier, including the system weight, placement on the body with respect to other equipment, user interfaces and display system characteristics. During the initial feasibility study for the system, the operational environment was examined and potential users were interviewed to establish the proper display solution for the system. Many display system requirements resulted, such as head or helmet mounting, Night Vision Goggle compatibility, minimal visible light emissions, environmental performance and even the need for handheld or other 'off the head' type display systems. This paper will address these issues and other end user requirements for display systems for applications in the harsh and demanding environment of the Special Operations soldier.

  6. Developing of operational hydro-meteorological simulating and displaying system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Shih, D.; Chen, C.

    2010-12-01

    Hydrological hazards, which often occur in conjunction with extreme precipitation events, are the most frequent type of natural disaster in Taiwan. Hence, the researchers at the Taiwan Typhoon and Flood Research Institute (TTFRI) are devoted to analyzing and gaining a better understanding of the causes and effects of natural disasters, and in particular, typhoons and floods. The long-term goal of the TTFRI is to develop a unified weather-hydrological-oceanic model suitable for simulations with local parameterizations in Taiwan. The development of a fully coupled weather-hydrology interaction model is not yet completed but some operational hydro-meteorological simulations are presented as a step in the direction of completing a full model. The predicted rainfall data from Weather Research Forecasting (WRF) are used as our meteorological forcing on watershed modeling. The hydrology and hydraulic modeling are conducted by WASH123D numerical model. And the WRF/WASH123D coupled system is applied to simulate floods during the typhoon landfall periods. The daily operational runs start at 04UTC, 10UTC, 16UTC and 22UTC, about 4 hours after data downloaded from NCEP GFS. This system will execute 72-hr weather forecasts. The simulation of WASH123D will sequentially trigger after receiving WRF rainfall data. This study presents the preliminary framework of establishing this system, and our goal is to build this earlier warning system to alert the public form dangerous. The simulation results are further display by a 3D GIS web service system. This system is established following the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) standardization process for GIS web service, such as Web Map Service (WMS) and Web Feature Service (WFS). The traditional 2D GIS data, such as high resolution aerial photomaps and satellite images are integrated into 3D landscape model. The simulated flooding and inundation area can be dynamically mapped on Wed 3D world. The final goal of this system is to real

  7. Design and implementation of multimedia display system for electronic cardiovascular conferences with radiological consultation services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianguo; Stahl, Johannes N.; Li, Gaoping; Huang, H. K.; Liu, Jun; Li, Jian; Zhou, Peng

    2000-04-01

    We present a networked multimedia display system based on component technologies for the electronic cardiovascular conferences with radiological consultation services. The system consists of two parts: a data acquisition gateway and a multimedia display workstation. The acquisition gateway is used to collect digital data from difference modalities and authorize them in different sessions for conference presentation. The display workstation is used to display static/dynamic radiographic images, or video sequences, ECG and other text information. The display program is designed with functions of image processing, multimedia data manipulation and visualization. In addition, the workstation also integrates with a real time tele-consultation component for the necessary consultation between cardiologists and remote radiologists equipped with a tele-consultation workstation. Finally, we discuss the system clinical performance and the applications.

  8. Multimodality monitoring: informatics, integration data display and analysis.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, J Michael; De Georgia, Michael

    2014-12-01

    The goal of multimodality neuromonitoring is to provide continuous, real-time assessment of brain physiology to prevent, detect, and attenuate secondary brain injury. Clinical informatics deals with biomedical data, information, and knowledge including their acquisition, storage, retrieval, and optimal use for clinical decision-making. An electronic literature search was conducted for English language articles describing the use of informatics in the intensive care unit setting from January 1990 to August 2013. A total of 64 studies were included in this review. Clinical informatics infrastructure should be adopted that enables a wide range of linear and nonlinear analytical methods be applied to patient data. Specific time epochs of clinical interest should be reviewable. Analysis strategies of monitor alarms may help address alarm fatigue. Ergonomic data display that present results from analyses with clinical information in a sensible uncomplicated manner improve clinical decision-making. Collecting and archiving the highest resolution physiologic and phenotypic data in a comprehensive open format data warehouse is a crucial first step toward information management and two-way translational research for multimodality monitoring. The infrastructure required is largely the same as that needed for telemedicine intensive care applications, which under the right circumstances improves care quality while reducing cost. PMID:25208675

  9. Integrated clinical workstations for image and text data capture, display, and teleconsultation.

    PubMed Central

    Dayhoff, R.; Kuzmak, P. M.; Kirin, G.

    1994-01-01

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) DHCP Imaging System digitally records clinically significant diagnostic images selected by medical specialists in a variety of hospital departments, including radiology, cardiology, gastroenterology, pathology, dermatology, hematology, surgery, podiatry, dental clinic, and emergency room. These images, which include true color and gray scale images, scanned documents, and electrocardiogram waveforms, are stored on network file servers and displayed on workstations located throughout a medical center. All images are managed by the VA's hospital information system (HIS), allowing integrated displays of text and image data from all medical specialties. Two VA medical centers currently have DHCP Imaging Systems installed, and other installations are underway. PMID:7949899

  10. The Grid Analysis and Display System (GrADS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinter, James L., III

    1994-01-01

    During the period 1 September 1993 - 31 August 1994, further development of the Grid Analysis and Display System (GrADS) was conducted at the Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Studies (COLA) of the Institute of Global Environment and Society, Inc. (IGES) under subcontract 5555-31 from the University Space Research Association (USRA) administered by The Center of Excellence in Space Data and Information Sciences (CESDIS). This final report documents progress made under this subcontract and provides directions on how to access the software and documentation developed therein. A short description of GrADS is provided followed by summary of progress completed and a summary of the distribution of the software to date and the establishment of research collaborations.

  11. Interactive display system having a matrix optical detector

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.; DeSanto, Leonard

    2007-01-23

    A display system includes a waveguide optical panel having an inlet face and an opposite outlet face. An image beam is projected across the inlet face laterally and transversely for display on the outlet face. An optical detector including a matrix of detector elements is optically aligned with the inlet face for detecting a corresponding lateral and transverse position of an inbound light spot on the outlet face.

  12. Status of display systems in the A-10A aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wodke, Kenneth E.; Hopper, Darrel G.

    2001-09-01

    The report scope covers the displays and controls at the pilot's crewstation on the current model Air Force A-10A and OA-10A aircraft. A description of an electronic display and an electronic control panel that have come to be of concern to the Air Force Air Combat Command (ACC) are included in the Funded Display Replacement Programs discussion. The display, which is a monochrome cathode ray tube (CRT), and the control panel were designed some 30 years ago. Thus, it is necessary to insert new technologies to maintain the capability heretofore provided by those now out of favor with the commercial sector. With this paper we begin a look at the status of displays in the A-10, which may remain in inventory until about 2030 according to current plans. From a component electronics technology perspective, such as displays, the A-10 provides several 10-year life cycle cost (LCC) planning cycles to consider multiple upgrades. Lessons learned from these projects can be applied both to other displays in the A-10 and other aging Department of Defense (DoD) weapon systems.

  13. Grid Analysis and Display System (GrADS): A practical tool for earth science visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinter, James L., III; Doty, Brian E.

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs on grid analysis and display system (GrADS): a practical tool for earth science visualization are presented. Topics covered include: GrADS design goals; data sets; and temperature profiles.

  14. Virtual vision system with actual flavor by olfactory display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Kunio; Kanazawa, Fumihiro

    2010-11-01

    The authors have researched multimedia system and support system for nursing studies on and practices of reminiscence therapy and life review therapy. The concept of the life review is presented by Butler in 1963. The process of thinking back on one's life and communicating about one's life to another person is called life review. There is a famous episode concerning the memory. It is called as Proustian effects. This effect is mentioned on the Proust's novel as an episode that a story teller reminds his old memory when he dipped a madeleine in tea. So many scientists research why smells trigger the memory. The authors pay attention to the relation between smells and memory although the reason is not evident yet. Then we have tried to add an olfactory display to the multimedia system so that the smells become a trigger of reminding buried memories. An olfactory display is a device that delivers smells to the nose. It provides us with special effects, for example to emit smell as if you were there or to give a trigger for reminding us of memories. The authors have developed a tabletop display system connected with the olfactory display. For delivering a flavor to user's nose, the system needs to recognition and measure positions of user's face and nose. In this paper, the authors describe an olfactory display which enables to detect the nose position for an effective delivery.

  15. Tangible display systems: bringing virtual surfaces into the real world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferwerda, James A.

    2012-03-01

    We are developing tangible display systems that enable natural interaction with virtual surfaces. Tangible display systems are based on modern mobile devices that incorporate electronic image displays, graphics hardware, tracking systems, and digital cameras. Custom software allows the orientation of a device and the position of the observer to be tracked in real-time. Using this information, realistic images of surfaces with complex textures and material properties illuminated by environment-mapped lighting, can be rendered to the screen at interactive rates. Tilting or moving in front of the device produces realistic changes in surface lighting and material appearance. In this way, tangible displays allow virtual surfaces to be observed and manipulated as naturally as real ones, with the added benefit that surface geometry and material properties can be modified in real-time. We demonstrate the utility of tangible display systems in four application areas: material appearance research; computer-aided appearance design; enhanced access to digital library and museum collections; and new tools for digital artists.

  16. Collaborative data analysis using large visual display screens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Bethan; Blower, Jonathan; Clifford, Debbie

    2013-04-01

    This talk outlines investigations into the potential for videowall technology to enhance the scientific data analysis process. The talk is based on experiences gained at workshops focusing on a videowall in Harwell, England, supported by the International Space Innovation Centre. The videowall is 7.2m wide, 2.3m tall and consists of 28 individual screens, each with a resolution of 30 mega pixels. The videowall is driven by a cluster of 28 servers, one for each screen, comprising 1 intel Xeon E5620 processor, 12GB RAM and an NVIDIA Quadro 5000 graphics card. This huge capacity for processing graphics and the high definition of the screens enables the ISIC videowall to display very large amounts of data with relative ease, making use of emerging bespoke visualisation software. The videowall is ideally suited to working with large geophysical datasets. In this talk we discuss the capacity of the videowall as a collaborative data analysis tool. Collaborative data analysis is integral to the scientific process and often comes in the form of printed plots taken to meetings or impromptu gatherings around PC monitors. It is our suggestion that the videowall can better facilitate the types of discussions which happen in these settings by removing the barriers of non-interactive (printed) visualizations, or simply of physical space in an office. In a recent workshop, we trialled the application of the videowall as a scientific collaborative tool. Attendees were "friendly" users from a variety of scientific backgrounds and the software used on the wall was still in development. Despite these limitations, there was a positive response to using the videowall in this way and a broad consensus that further development would be worthwhile. One feature of the videowall which was universally praised was the ability to show many high resolution visualizations of data side by side and to navigate through them simultaneously; thus allows the users to make quick comparisons between very

  17. Map-based hypermedia display of remote-sensing data

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, T.; Lanz, K.; Lyon, R.J.P.; McKnight, C. )

    1990-05-01

    The authors present an interactive, map-based search program to help geologists find out what remote-sensing data exists in institutional data files, to provide full details of the image quality (location of clouds, etc.), and to present selected frames in black and white or color on an adjacent high-resolution monitor. A series of maps is presented in a hierarchical sequence-from global, continental, national, and regional down to district and play levels - by which the user can pinpoint the location desired using a familiar map-based point-and-click strategy. When the desired region has been chosen, a secondary menu offers the choice of image type: Landsat MSS, TM, SPOT, radar, aircraft scanner, or aerial photography coverage. Using the selected image type, the user is then presented with the primary level of detail: date, percent cloud cover, spectral bands, etc. Additional requests from a tertiary menu allow more complete details to be shown, together with the location of the imagery within the institution's files. Additionally, nonimaging remotely sensed data such as spectral measurements, other geophysical coverage such as seismic and gravity surveys, and geochemical survey locations can be similarly indexed, located and presented on the color monitor, either as map overlays (GIS) or as spot locations. A Macintosh Plus, SE/30, or Mac II using Hypercard is used to activate an IBM PC/AT-based image processor card and a high-resolution color RGB monitor. The image data are stored at the IBM PC/AT on a WORM optical disk, from which the images and other bit-mapped data are displayed.

  18. Display techniques for dynamic network data in transportation GIS

    SciTech Connect

    Ganter, J.H.; Cashwell, J.W.

    1994-05-01

    Interest in the characteristics of urban street networks is increasing at the same time new monitoring technologies are delivering detailed traffic data. These emerging streams of data may lead to the dilemma that airborne remote sensing has faced: how to select and access the data, and what meaning is hidden in them? computer-assisted visualization techniques are needed to portray these dynamic data. Of equal importance are controls that let the user filter, symbolize, and replay the data to reveal patterns and trends over varying time spans. We discuss a prototype software system that addresses these requirements.

  19. Volumetric 3D Display System with Static Screen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geng, Jason

    2011-01-01

    Current display technology has relied on flat, 2D screens that cannot truly convey the third dimension of visual information: depth. In contrast to conventional visualization that is primarily based on 2D flat screens, the volumetric 3D display possesses a true 3D display volume, and places physically each 3D voxel in displayed 3D images at the true 3D (x,y,z) spatial position. Each voxel, analogous to a pixel in a 2D image, emits light from that position to form a real 3D image in the eyes of the viewers. Such true volumetric 3D display technology provides both physiological (accommodation, convergence, binocular disparity, and motion parallax) and psychological (image size, linear perspective, shading, brightness, etc.) depth cues to human visual systems to help in the perception of 3D objects. In a volumetric 3D display, viewers can watch the displayed 3D images from a completely 360 view without using any special eyewear. The volumetric 3D display techniques may lead to a quantum leap in information display technology and can dramatically change the ways humans interact with computers, which can lead to significant improvements in the efficiency of learning and knowledge management processes. Within a block of glass, a large amount of tiny dots of voxels are created by using a recently available machining technique called laser subsurface engraving (LSE). The LSE is able to produce tiny physical crack points (as small as 0.05 mm in diameter) at any (x,y,z) location within the cube of transparent material. The crack dots, when illuminated by a light source, scatter the light around and form visible voxels within the 3D volume. The locations of these tiny voxels are strategically determined such that each can be illuminated by a light ray from a high-resolution digital mirror device (DMD) light engine. The distribution of these voxels occupies the full display volume within the static 3D glass screen. This design eliminates any moving screen seen in previous

  20. Environmental fog/rain visual display system for aircraft simulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chase, W. D. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    An environmental fog/rain visual display system for aircraft simulators is described. The electronic elements of the system include a real time digital computer, a caligraphic color display which simulates landing lights of selective intensity, and a color television camera for producing a moving color display of the airport runway as depicted on a model terrain board. The mechanical simulation elements of the system include an environmental chamber which can produce natural fog, nonhomogeneous fog, rain and fog combined, or rain only. A pilot looking through the aircraft wind screen will look through the fog and/or rain generated in the environmental chamber onto a viewing screen with the simulated color image of the airport runway thereon, and observe a very real simulation of actual conditions of a runway as it would appear through actual fog and/or rain.

  1. Techniques for optimizing human-machine information transfer related to real-time interactive display systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Granaas, Michael M.; Rhea, Donald C.

    1989-01-01

    In recent years the needs of ground-based researcher-analysts to access real-time engineering data in the form of processed information has expanded rapidly. Fortunately, the capacity to deliver that information has also expanded. The development of advanced display systems is essential to the success of a research test activity. Those developed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR), range from simple alphanumerics to interactive mapping and graphics. These unique display systems are designed not only to meet basic information display requirements of the user, but also to take advantage of techniques for optimizing information display. Future ground-based display systems will rely heavily not only on new technologies, but also on interaction with the human user and the associated productivity with that interaction. The psychological abilities and limitations of the user will become even more important in defining the difference between a usable and a useful display system. This paper reviews the requirements for development of real-time displays; the psychological aspects of design such as the layout, color selection, real-time response rate, and interactivity of displays; and an analysis of some existing WATR displays.

  2. The Design and Evaluation of the Lighting Imaging Sensor Data Applications Display (LISDAD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boldi, B.; Hodanish, S.; Sharp, D.; Williams, E.; Goodman, Steven; Raghavan, R.; Matlin, A.; Weber, M.

    1998-01-01

    The design and evaluation of the Lightning Imaging Sensor Data Applications Display (LISDAD). The ultimate goal of the LISDAD system is to quantify the utility of total lightning information in short-term, severe-weather forecasting operations. To this end, scientists from NASA, NWS, and MIT organized an effort to study the relationship of lightning and severe-weather on a storm-by-storm, and even cell-by-cell basis for as many storms as possible near Melbourne, Florida. Melbourne was chosen as it offers a unique combination of high probability of severe weather and proximity to major relevant sensors - specifically: NASA's total lightning mapping system at Kennedy Space Center (the LDAR system at KSC); a NWS/NEXRAD radar (at Melbourne); and a prototype Integrated Terminal Weather System (ITWS, at Orlando), which obtains cloud-to-ground lightning Information from the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN), and also uses NSSL's Severe Storm Algorithm (NSSL/SSAP) to obtain information about various storm-cell parameters. To assist in realizing this project's goal, an interactive, real-time data processing system (the LISDAD system) has been developed that supports both operational short-term weather forecasting and post facto severe-storm research. Suggestions have been drawn from the operational users (NWS/Melbourne) in the design of the data display and its salient behavior. The initial concept for the users Graphical Situation Display (GSD) was simply to overlay radar data with lightning data, but as the association between rapid upward trends in the total lightning rate and severe weather became evident, the display was significantly redesigned. The focus changed to support the display of time series of storm-parameter data and the automatic recognition of cells that display rapid changes in the total-lightning flash rate. The latter is calculated by grouping discrete LDAR radiation sources into lightning flashes using a time-space association algorithm

  3. Advanced Transport Operating System (ATOPS) control display unit software description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slominski, Christopher J.; Parks, Mark A.; Debure, Kelly R.; Heaphy, William J.

    1992-01-01

    The software created for the Control Display Units (CDUs), used for the Advanced Transport Operating Systems (ATOPS) project, on the Transport Systems Research Vehicle (TSRV) is described. Module descriptions are presented in a standardized format which contains module purpose, calling sequence, a detailed description, and global references. The global reference section includes subroutines, functions, and common variables referenced by a particular module. The CDUs, one for the pilot and one for the copilot, are used for flight management purposes. Operations performed with the CDU affects the aircraft's guidance, navigation, and display software.

  4. Calibration and display of distributed aperture sensor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dale, Jason; Dwyer, David

    2007-04-01

    Distributed aperture sensor (DAS) systems can enhance the situational awareness of operators in both manned and unmanned platforms. In such a system, images from multiple sensors must be registered and fused into a seamless panoramic mosaic in real time, whilst being displayed with very low latency to an operator. This paper describes an algorithm for solving the multiple-image alignment problem and an architecture that leverages the power of consumer graphics processing units (GPU) to provide a live panoramic mosaic display. We also describe other developments aimed at integrating high resolution imagery from an independently steerable fused TV/IR sensor into the mosaic, panorama stabilisation and automatic target detection.

  5. A baculoviral display system to assay viral entry.

    PubMed

    Iida, Manami; Yoshida, Takeshi; Watari, Akihiro; Yagi, Kiyohito; Hamakubo, Takao; Kondoh, Masuo

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated a baculoviral display system for analysis of viral entry by using a recombinant adenovirus (Ad) carrying a luciferase gene and budded baculovirus (BV) that displays the adenoviral receptor, coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR). CAR-expressing B16 cells (B16-CAR cells) were infected with luciferase-expressing Ad vector in the presence of BV that expressed or lacked CAR (CAR-BV and mock-BV, respectively). Treatment with mock-BV even at doses as high as 5 µg/mL failed to attenuate the luciferase activity of B16-CAR cells. In contrast, treatment with CAR-BV with doses as low as 0.5 µg/mL significantly decreased the luciferase activity of infected cells, which reached 65% reduction at 5 µg/mL. These findings suggest that a receptor-displaying BV system could be used to evaluate viral infection. PMID:24189431

  6. Microcomputer based system for intrusion detection display and assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Weissman, S.J.

    1981-01-01

    A system has been developed to aid in assessing intrusion alarms. Capabilities include color graphic and text displays, prioritized alarms, a high-speed dual loop communications system, a customized function keyboard for operator input and microprocessor controlled Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) and videodisc recording subsytems. The system, which is implemented on a DEC LSI-11/23 utilizing RSX-11S, is designed for use by an operator with no knowledge of computers. Most of the assessment functions can be performed with single keystrokes. During multi-alarm situations, the system manages the display, presenting information about the highest priority alarms to aid in operator assessment. Although the system prioritizes alarms, the operator is free to assess alarms in any order. The system supports multicenter operations. One center is responsible for assessing all alarms and is monitored and backed up by another center.

  7. Open control/display system for a telerobotics work station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keslowitz, Saul

    1987-01-01

    A working Advanced Space Cockpit was developed that integrated advanced control and display devices into a state-of-the-art multimicroprocessor hardware configuration, using window graphics and running under an object-oriented, multitasking real-time operating system environment. This Open Control/Display System supports the idea that the operator should be able to interactively monitor, select, control, and display information about many payloads aboard the Space Station using sets of I/O devices with a single, software-reconfigurable workstation. This is done while maintaining system consistency, yet the system is completely open to accept new additions and advances in hardware and software. The Advanced Space Cockpit, linked to Grumman's Hybrid Computing Facility and Large Amplitude Space Simulator (LASS), was used to test the Open Control/Display System via full-scale simulation of the following tasks: telerobotic truss assembly, RCS and thermal bus servicing, CMG changeout, RMS constrained motion and space constructible radiator assembly, HPA coordinated control, and OMV docking and tumbling satellite retrieval. The proposed man-machine interface standard discussed has evolved through many iterations of the tasks, and is based on feedback from NASA and Air Force personnel who performed those tasks in the LASS.

  8. Producing EGS4 shower displays with the Unified Graphics System

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, R.F. . Lab. for Nuclear Science); Nelson, W.R. )

    1990-08-16

    The EGS4 Code System has been coupled with the SLAC Unified Graphics System in such a manner as to provide a means for displaying showers on UGS77-supported devices. This is most easily accomplished by attaching an auxiliary subprogram package (SHOWGRAF) to existing EGS4 User Codes and making use of a graphics display or a post-processor code called EGS4PL. SHOWGRAF may be used to create shower displays directly on interactive IBM 5080 color display devices, supporting three-dimensional rotations, translations, and zoom features, and providing illustration of particle types and energies by color and/or intensity. Alternatively, SHOWGRAF may be used to record a two-dimensional projection of the shower in a device-independent graphics file. The EGS4PL post-processor may then be used to convert this file into device-dependent graphics code for any UGS77-supported device. Options exist within EGS4PL that allow for two-dimensional translations and zoom, for creating line structure to indicate particle types and energies, and for optional display of particles by type. All of this is facilitated by means of the command processor EGS4PL EXEC together with new options (5080 and PDEV) with the standard EGS4IN EXEC routine for running EGS4 interactively under VM/SP. 6 refs.

  9. Step barrier system multiview glassless 3D display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashitani, Ken; Hamagishi, Goro; Higashino, Masahiro; Ando, Takahisa; Takemoto, Satoshi

    2004-05-01

    The step barrier technology with multiple parallax images has overcome the problem of conventional parallax barrier system that the image quality of each image deteriorates only in the horizontal direction. The step barrier distributes the resolution problem both to the horizontal and the vertical directions. The system has a simple structure, which consists of a flat-panel display and a step barrier. The apertures of the step barrier are not stripes but tiny rectangles that are arranged in the shape of stairs, and the sub-pixels of each image have the same arrangement. And three image processes for the system applicable to computer graphics and real image have been proposed. Then, two types of 3-D displays were developed, 22-inch model and 50-inch model. The 22-inch model employs a very high-definition liquid crystal display of 3840 x 2400 pixels. The number of parallax images is seven and the resolution of one image is 1646 x 800. The 50-inch model has four viewing points on the plasma display panel of 1280 x 768 pixels. It can provide stereoscopic animations and the resolution of one image is 960 x 256 pixels. Moreover, the structural or electric 2-D 3-D compatible system was developed.

  10. 14 CFR 23.1311 - Electronic display instrument systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Electronic display instrument systems. 23.1311 Section 23.1311 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment Instruments: Installation §...

  11. 14 CFR 23.1311 - Electronic display instrument systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Electronic display instrument systems. 23.1311 Section 23.1311 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment Instruments: Installation §...

  12. Interactive display system having a scaled virtual target zone

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.; DeSanto, Leonard

    2006-06-13

    A display system includes a waveguide optical panel having an inlet face and an opposite outlet face. A projector and imaging device cooperate with the panel for projecting a video image thereon. An optical detector bridges at least a portion of the waveguides for detecting a location on the outlet face within a target zone of an inbound light spot. A controller is operatively coupled to the imaging device and detector for displaying a cursor on the outlet face corresponding with the detected location of the spot within the target zone.

  13. Aberration analysis of a wedge-plate display system.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yi-Kai; Chung, Sen-Nien; Chern, Jyh-Long

    2007-08-01

    The aberration characteristics of a wedge-plate display optical system are analyzed. The study shows that a kink-like feature is inherent in the ray-intercept curve due to either the onset of the dark zone in imaging or the coincidence of the ray direction with the vertex. Third-order aberration coefficients are deduced, and the total amount of aberration is investigated to illustrate the basic limitations of image quality in this type of display. The issue of design optimization is also investigated based on the aberration characteristics. A numerical example of a 50 in. display with a 1:10 thickness and a diagonal screen length ratio is also provided. PMID:17621338

  14. Three-dimensional (3D) GIS-based coastline change analysis and display using LIDAR series data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, G.

    This paper presents a method to visualize and analyze topography and topographic changes on coastline area. The study area, Assantage Island Nation Seashore (AINS), is located along a 37-mile stretch of Assateague Island National Seashore in Eastern Shore, VA. The DEMS data sets from 1996 through 2000 for various time intervals, e.g., year-to-year, season-to-season, date-to-date, and a four year (1996-2000) are created. The spatial patterns and volumetric amounts of erosion and deposition of each part on a cell-by-cell basis were calculated. A 3D dynamic display system using ArcView Avenue for visualizing dynamic coastal landforms has been developed. The system was developed into five functional modules: Dynamic Display, Analysis, Chart analysis, Output, and Help. The Display module includes five types of displays: Shoreline display, Shore Topographic Profile, Shore Erosion Display, Surface TIN Display, and 3D Scene Display. Visualized data include rectified and co-registered multispectral Landsat digital image and NOAA/NASA ATM LIDAR data. The system is demonstrated using multitemporal digital satellite and LIDAR data for displaying changes on the Assateague Island National Seashore, Virginia. The analyzed results demonstrated that a further understanding to the study and comparison of the complex morphological changes that occur naturally or human-induced on barrier islands is required.

  15. Real time display Fourier-domain OCT using multi-thread parallel computing with data vectorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eom, Tae Joong; Kim, Hoon Seop; Kim, Chul Min; Lee, Yeung Lak; Choi, Eun-Seo

    2011-03-01

    We demonstrate a real-time display of processed OCT images using multi-thread parallel computing with a quad-core CPU of a personal computer. The data of each A-line are treated as one vector to maximize the data translation rate between the cores of the CPU and RAM stored image data. A display rate of 29.9 frames/sec for processed OCT data (4096 FFT-size x 500 A-scans) is achieved in our system using a wavelength swept source with 52-kHz swept frequency. The data processing times of the OCT image and a Doppler OCT image with a 4-time average are 23.8 msec and 91.4 msec.

  16. Integration of multiple view plus depth data for free viewpoint 3D display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Kazuyoshi; Yoshida, Yuko; Kawamoto, Tetsuya; Fujii, Toshiaki; Mase, Kenji

    2014-03-01

    This paper proposes a method for constructing a reasonable scale of end-to-end free-viewpoint video system that captures multiple view and depth data, reconstructs three-dimensional polygon models of objects, and display them on virtual 3D CG spaces. This system consists of a desktop PC and four Kinect sensors. First, multiple view plus depth data at four viewpoints are captured by Kinect sensors simultaneously. Then, the captured data are integrated to point cloud data by using camera parameters. The obtained point cloud data are sampled to volume data that consists of voxels. Since volume data that are generated from point cloud data are sparse, those data are made dense by using global optimization algorithm. Final step is to reconstruct surfaces on dense volume data by discrete marching cubes method. Since accuracy of depth maps affects to the quality of 3D polygon model, a simple inpainting method for improving depth maps is also presented.

  17. Methods and apparatus for integrating, organizing, and accessing flight planning and other data on multifunction cockpit displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbs, Michael J. (Inventor); Van Omen, Debi (Inventor); Adams, Michael B. (Inventor); Chase, Karl L. (Inventor); Lewis, Daniel E. (Inventor); McCrobie, Daniel E. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A method and system for displaying a flight plan such that an entire flight plan is viewable through the use of scrolling devices is disclosed. The flight plan display may also include a method and system for collapsing and expanding a flight plan display, have provisions for the conspicuous marking of changes to a flight plan, the use of tabs to switch between various displays of data, and access to a navigation database that allows a user to view information about various navigational aids. The database may also the access to the information about the navigational aids to be prioritized based on proximity to the current position of the aircraft.

  18. The display of molecular models with the Ames Interactive Modeling System (AIMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egan, J. T.; Hart, J.; Burt, S. K.; Macelroy, R. D.

    1982-01-01

    A visualization of molecular models can lead to a clearer understanding of the models. Sophisticated graphics devices supported by minicomputers make it possible for the chemist to interact with the display of a very large model, altering its structure. In addition to user interaction, the need arises also for other ways of displaying information. These include the production of viewgraphs, film presentation, as well as publication quality prints of various models. To satisfy these needs, the display capability of the Ames Interactive Modeling System (AIMS) has been enhanced to provide a wide range of graphics and plotting capabilities. Attention is given to an overview of the AIMS system, graphics hardware used by the AIMS display subsystem, a comparison of graphics hardware, the representation of molecular models, graphics software used by the AIMS display subsystem, the display of a model obtained from data stored in molecule data base, a graphics feature for obtaining single frame permanent copy displays, and a feature for producing multiple frame displays.

  19. Scientific Analysis and Display of Planetary Data with McIDAS-eXplorer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, R. S.; Limaye, S. S.; Krauss, R.

    1996-03-01

    The Planetary Data System (PDS) has now published extensive Mars Galileo missions as well as for the outer planets and their satellites from the Voyager missions. The compilation of radar observations of the Venus surface from the Magellan mission data has resulted in over 70 gigabytes of radar reflectivity (MIDRs and FMAPs) and radiometry images (GxDR's) and altimetry profiles (ARCDRs) covering over 98% of the surface of Venus. To facilitate access, analysis and display of these data, a software environment, McIDAS-eXplorer is now available. This planetary image access, display and analysis environment is based on a mature system that is used for weather operations, research and education at many sites around the world. The eXplorer extensions now allow analysis of most solar system targets for which spacecraft and ground based telescopic data are available in a recognizable format such as the PDS or FITS. Navigation, registration and calibration of the planetary data are an integral part of the environment. Designed to run on most UNIX workstations supporting X-windows, the environment is user extensible allowing addition of user developed applications and includes both a Graphical User Interface and a command line interface, multi-frame display and animation capability and tools for most image analysis applications such as digital enhancements, filters, cartographic projections, graphical overlays, and color composites and image classification.

  20. A virtual display system for conveying three-dimensional acoustic information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.; Wightman, Frederic L.; Foster, Scott H.

    1988-01-01

    The development of a three-dimensional auditory display system is discussed. Theories of human sound localization and techniques for synthesizing various features of auditory spatial perceptions are examined. Psychophysical data validating the system are presented. The human factors applications of the system are considered.

  1. Advanced Transport Operating System (ATOPS) color displays software description microprocessor system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slominski, Christopher J.; Plyler, Valerie E.; Dickson, Richard W.

    1992-01-01

    This document describes the software created for the Sperry Microprocessor Color Display System used for the Advanced Transport Operating Systems (ATOPS) project on the Transport Systems Research Vehicle (TSRV). The software delivery known as the 'baseline display system', is the one described in this document. Throughout this publication, module descriptions are presented in a standardized format which contains module purpose, calling sequence, detailed description, and global references. The global reference section includes procedures and common variables referenced by a particular module. The system described supports the Research Flight Deck (RFD) of the TSRV. The RFD contains eight cathode ray tubes (CRTs) which depict a Primary Flight Display, Navigation Display, System Warning Display, Takeoff Performance Monitoring System Display, and Engine Display.

  2. 78 FR 68861 - Certain Navigation Products, Including GPS Devices, Navigation and Display Systems, Radar Systems...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-15

    ..., Navigational Aids, Mapping Systems and Related Software; Institution of Investigation Pursuant to 19 U.S.C... and display systems, radar systems, navigational aids, mapping systems and related software by reason... products, including GPS devices, navigation and display systems, radar systems, navigational aids,...

  3. Projection display systems based on the Digital Micromirror Device (DMD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Younse, Jack M.

    1995-09-01

    The DMD is a semiconductor light switch which is making an impact in digital light processingTM (DLP) applications. It is the world's largest micro-electro-mechanical structures (MEMS) device with chips ranging from 442-thousand to 2.3 million moving mirrors. The DMD operates in a bistable (binary) mode and fully supports the movement to all-digital display systems. Currently, DMD devices are being used to develop a family of projection display products. An overview of digital light processing systems will be given with emphasis on the performance of the first prototypes using this technology, including their value propositions. Finally, the general markets served by this technology, along with the advantages DMD technology offers, will be discussed.

  4. High-definition displays for realistic simulator and trainer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, Reginald; Hopper, Darrel G.; Beyer, Steve; Peppler, Philipp W.

    1998-09-01

    Current flight simulators and trainers do not provide acceptable levels of visual display performance (performance that would allow ground based trainers to economically replace aircraft flying training) for many air-to-air and air-to- ground training scenarios. Ground training for pilots could be made significantly more realistic, allowing the ground-based curricula to be enlarged. The enhanced ground based training could then more readily augment actual aircraft flying (training) time. This paper presents the technology need and opportunity to create a new class of immersive simulator- trainer systems having some 210 million pixels characterized especially by a 20-20 visual acuity synthetic vision system having some 150 million pixels. The same new display technology base is needed for planned crew stations for uninhabited combat air vehicles (UCAV), advanced aircraft cockpits and mission crewstations, and for the space plane.

  5. Advanced Transport Operating System (ATOPS) color displays software description: MicroVAX system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slominski, Christopher J.; Plyler, Valerie E.; Dickson, Richard W.

    1992-01-01

    This document describes the software created for the Display MicroVAX computer used for the Advanced Transport Operating Systems (ATOPS) project on the Transport Systems Research Vehicle (TSRV). The software delivery of February 27, 1991, known as the 'baseline display system', is the one described in this document. Throughout this publication, module descriptions are presented in a standardized format which contains module purpose, calling sequence, detailed description, and global references. The global references section includes subroutines, functions, and common variables referenced by a particular module. The system described supports the Research Flight Deck (RFD) of the TSRV. The RFD contains eight Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) which depict a Primary Flight Display, Navigation Display, System Warning Display, Takeoff Performance Monitoring System Display, and Engine Display.

  6. Designing visual displays and system models for safe reactor operations

    SciTech Connect

    Brown-VanHoozer, S.A.

    1995-12-31

    The material presented in this paper is based on two studies involving the design of visual displays and the user`s prospective model of a system. The studies involve a methodology known as Neuro-Linguistic Programming and its use in expanding design choices from the operator`s perspective image. The contents of this paper focuses on the studies and how they are applicable to the safety of operating reactors.

  7. Projection system for display of parallax and perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, R. L. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A projection system for the display of parallax and perspective of a real image from a hologram is presented. A reference beam was projected in a sequence of several projections at selected angles of perspective through the hologram, this sequence being rapidly performed. The resulting angular spaced images emitting from the hologram were directed onto a mirror which was coordinately tilted to reflect all of the resulting images to register onto a screen where they appeared as a single three dimensional image.

  8. Design principle of the peripheral vision display system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiaowei; Wang, Yuefeng; Niu, Yanxiong; Yu, Lishen; Liu, Shen H.

    1996-09-01

    The peripheral vision display system (PVDS) presents the pilot with a gyro stabilized artificial horizon projected onto the instrument panel by means of a red laser light source. The pilot can detect changes to aircraft attitude without continuously referring back to his flight instruments. The PVDS effectively applies the peripheral vision of the pilot to overcome disorientation. This paper gives the principles of the PVDS, according to which, we have designed the PVDS and used it for aviation medicine.

  9. Design of virtual display and testing system for moving mass electromechanical actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhigang; Geng, Keda; Zhou, Jun; Li, Peng

    2015-12-01

    Aiming at the problem of control, measurement and movement virtual display of moving mass electromechanical actuator(MMEA), the virtual testing system of MMEA was developed based on the PC-DAQ architecture and the software platform of LabVIEW, and the comprehensive test task such as drive control of MMEA, tests of kinematic parameter, measurement of centroid position and virtual display of movement could be accomplished. The system could solve the alignment for acquisition time between multiple measurement channels in different DAQ cards, then on this basis, the researches were focused on the dynamic 3D virtual display by the LabVIEW, and the virtual display of MMEA were realized by the method of calling DLL and the method of 3D graph drawing controls. Considering the collaboration with the virtual testing system, including the hardware drive, the measurement software of data acquisition, and the 3D graph drawing controls method was selected, which could obtained the synchronization measurement, control and display. The system can measure dynamic centroid position and kinematic position of movable mass block while controlling the MMEA, and the interface of 3D virtual display has realistic effect and motion smooth, which can solve the problem of display and playback about MMEA in the closed shell.

  10. Recent innovations in using Web Map Services to display gridded and non-gridded ocean data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, Guy; Blower, Jon; López, Alejandro; Polo, Isabel; Romero, Laia; Loubrieu, Thomas; Brégent, Sophie

    2014-05-01

    The University of Reading has in developed techniques for fast visualisation of gridded data, such that they can be used in a WMS (web-map server) system. The aim is to provide data visualisation which is quick enough to be used interactively (e.g. on a website) even with very large underlying datasets. The two main tools which have come out of this effort are ncWMS (a WMS server for displaying NetCDF data) and its accompanying web client, Godiva2. This software is very widely used by oceanographic (and other) institutions and this presentation describes some of the most recent advances, together with plans for the future. For the MyOcean View Service, the University of Reading has extended ncWMS to allow it to display in situ measurement data. This accesses a supporting system, Oceanotron, created by Ifremer, which performs spatial indexing to retrieve observations from a database. By incorporating Oceanotron into the widely-used ncWMS software, map images of such point data can be accessed in a manner consistent with open standards. Intelligent grouping of variables combined with use of the WMS standard GetFeatureInfo request allows the display of in-situ measurements in a way that makes it simple to investigate the parameters required, when each single point may contain a lot of information. By providing various request parameters, the vertical or time dimensions of the data can be selected on in a straightforward manner. Combined with extensions to Godiva, this allows for in-situ (e.g. buoy) data to be easily visualised and explored in a web browser, alongside other data sources such as model data. Using these tools, Altamira has developed extended functionalities for ocean data visualization in operational portals. These include the visualization of multiple layers of data simultaneously, integration with authentication and authorization systems (in order to display different data depending on user rights, a key requirement for many operational systems) and

  11. Three Dimensional Spherical Display Systems and McIDAS: Tools for Science, Education and Outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohrs, R.; Mooney, M. E.

    2010-12-01

    The Space Science and Engineering Center (SSEC) and Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies (CIMSS) at the University of Wisconsin are now using a 3D spherical display system and their Man computer Data Access System (McIDAS)-X and McIDAS-V as outreach tools to demonstrate how scientists and forecasters utilize satellite imagery to monitor weather and climate. Our outreach program displays orbits and data coverage of geostationary and polar satellites and demonstrates how each is beneficial for the remote sensing of Earth. Global composites of visible, infrared and water vapor images illustrate how satellite instruments collect data from different bands of the electromagnetic spectrum to monitor global weather patterns 24 hours a day. Captivating animations on spherical display systems are proving to be much more intuitive than traditional 2D displays, enabling audiences to view satellites orbiting above real-time weather systems circulating the entire globe. Complimenting the 3D spherical display system are the UNIX-based McIDAS-X and Java-based McIDAS-V software packages. McIDAS is used to composite the real-time global satellite data and create other weather related derived products. Client and server techniques used by these software packages provide the opportunity to continually update the real-time content on our globe. The enhanced functionality of McIDAS-V extends our outreach program by allowing in-depth interactive 4-dimensional views of the imagery previously viewed on the 3D spherical display system. An important goal of our outreach program is the promotion of remote sensing research and technology at SSEC and CIMSS. The 3D spherical display system has quickly become a popular tool to convey societal benefits of these endeavors. Audiences of all ages instinctively relate to recent weather events which keeps them engaged in spherical display presentations. McIDAS facilitates further exploration of the science behind the weather

  12. Spatial Data Management System (SDMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchison, Mark W.

    1994-01-01

    The Spatial Data Management System (SDMS) is a testbed for retrieval and display of spatially related material. SDMS permits the linkage of large graphical display objects with detail displays and explanations of its smaller components. SDMS combines UNIX workstations, MIT's X Window system, TCP/IP and WAIS information retrieval technology to prototype a means of associating aggregate data linked via spatial orientation. SDMS capitalizes upon and extends previous accomplishments of the Software Technology Branch in the area of Virtual Reality and Automated Library Systems.

  13. The Grid Analysis and Display System (GRADS): A practical tool for Earth science visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinter, James L., III

    1992-01-01

    We propose to develop and enhance a workstation based grid analysis and display software system for Earth science data set browsing, sampling and manipulation. The system will be coupled to a super computer in a distributed computing environment for near real-time interaction between scientists and computational results.

  14. An operational monitoring and display system for phenological observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheifinger, Helfried; Koch, Elisabeth

    2013-04-01

    Some national weather services operate a special web interface, where citizens can enter their phenological observations. Such a system opens the opportunity to immediately display the current state of the seasonal vegetation development. Here a few simple tools are introduced to evaluate and display near real time phenological observations with respect to the interannual variability and trends over the last decades. For many phenological phases continuous time series since 1946 are available in Austria, which is a time period sufficiently long to study the climate impact on phenology. Phenological observations can be entered in near real time via the ZAMG web - portal or be digitised after the season from the observer sheets with a considerable time lag. About 30% to 50% of the total phenological data stem from the near real time system, which can be used for near real time monitoring of the phenological season. The minimum number of observations, which must be available for inclusion in the procedure has arbitrarily been set to 12 in order to allow a reasonable height regression. The system installed at the ZAMG produces a nightly update of the statistical analysis and figures, which can then for instance be summarised for a news release. At the moment there is no spatial differentiation possible. All conclusions and figures are based on phenological entry dates over all Austrian observations, which have been standardised to an arbitrary station elevation of 200 m above sea level via height regression. The 2012 Austrian phenological season in relation to 1946 - 2011 The cold period from end of January to beginning of February 2012 in Austria has also left its marks on the phenological season. The early phases like beginning of flowering of snow drop, hazel or willow are to be found in the median position of rank 32 of 67 years since 1946. The remainder of the 2012 season generally shows rather early entry dates. On average the phenological entry dates range at

  15. A computer graphics display and data compression technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teague, M. J.; Meyer, H. G.; Levenson, L. (Editor)

    1974-01-01

    The computer program discussed is intended for the graphical presentation of a general dependent variable X that is a function of two independent variables, U and V. The required input to the program is the variation of the dependent variable with one of the independent variables for various fixed values of the other. The computer program is named CRP, and the output is provided by the SD 4060 plotter. Program CRP is an extremely flexible program that offers the user a wide variety of options. The dependent variable may be presented in either a linear or a logarithmic manner. Automatic centering of the plot is provided in the ordinate direction, and the abscissa is scaled automatically for a logarithmic plot. A description of the carpet plot technique is given along with the coordinates system used in the program. Various aspects of the program logic are discussed and detailed documentation of the data card format is presented.

  16. Prism-based single-camera system for stereo display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yue; Cui, Xiaoyu; Wang, Zhiguo; Chen, Hongsheng; Fan, Heyu; Wu, Teresa

    2016-06-01

    This paper combines the prism and single camera and puts forward a method of stereo imaging with low cost. First of all, according to the principle of geometrical optics, we can deduce the relationship between the prism single-camera system and dual-camera system, and according to the principle of binocular vision we can deduce the relationship between binoculars and dual camera. Thus we can establish the relationship between the prism single-camera system and binoculars and get the positional relation of prism, camera, and object with the best effect of stereo display. Finally, using the active shutter stereo glasses of NVIDIA Company, we can realize the three-dimensional (3-D) display of the object. The experimental results show that the proposed approach can make use of the prism single-camera system to simulate the various observation manners of eyes. The stereo imaging system, which is designed by the method proposed by this paper, can restore the 3-D shape of the object being photographed factually.

  17. ATS displays: A reasoning visualization tool for expert systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selig, William John; Johannes, James D.

    1990-01-01

    Reasoning visualization is a useful tool that can help users better understand the inherently non-sequential logic of an expert system. While this is desirable in most all expert system applications, it is especially so for such critical systems as those destined for space-based operations. A hierarchical view of the expert system reasoning process and some characteristics of these various levels is presented. Also presented are Abstract Time Slice (ATS) displays, a tool to visualize the plethora of interrelated information available at the host inferencing language level of reasoning. The usefulness of this tool is illustrated with some examples from a prototype potable water expert system for possible use aboard Space Station Freedom.

  18. Connecting Science and Mathematics: Using Inquiry Investigations to Learn about Data Collection, Analysis, and Display

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Judith; McDuffie, Amy Roth

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of providing preservice teachers the opportunity to collect real data in a science methods inquiry investigation and using the data, design data displays in their mathematics methods course. The research questions focused on how preservice teachers' understandings of data displays, research…

  19. A practical definition of eye-limited display system resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Charles J.; Winterbottom, M.; Gaska, J.; Williams, L.

    2015-05-01

    Over the past few decades the term "eye-limited resolution" has seen significant use. However, several variations in the definition of the term have been employed and estimates of the display pixel pitch required to achieve it differ significantly. This paper summarizes the results of published evaluations and experiments conducted in our laboratories relating to resolution requirements. The results of several evaluations employing displays with sufficient antialiasing indicate a pixel pitch of 0.5 to 0.93 arcmin will produce 90% of peak performance for observers with 20/20 or better acuity for a variety of visual tasks. If insufficient antialiasing is employed, spurious results can indicate that a finer pixel pitch is required due to the presence of sampling artifacts. The paper reconciles these findings with hyperacuity task performance which a number of authors have suggested may require a much finer pixel pitch. The empirical data provided in this paper show that hyperacuity task performance does not appear to be a driver of eye-limited resolution. Asymptotic visual performance is recommended as the basis of eye-limited resolution because it provides the most stable estimates and is well aligned with the needs of the display design and acquisition communities.

  20. Orion Entry Display Feeder and Interactions with the Entry Monitor System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, Darren; Bernatovich, Mike; Gillespie, Ellen; Kadwa, Binaifer; Matthews, Dave; Penny, Wes; Zak, Tim; Grant, Mike; Bihari, Brian

    2010-01-01

    The Orion spacecraft is designed to return astronauts to a landing within 10 km of the intended landing target from low Earth orbit, lunar direct-entry, and lunar skip-entry trajectories. Al pile the landing is nominally controlled autonomously, the crew can fly precision entries manually in the event of an anomaly. The onboard entry displays will be used by the crew to monitor and manually fly the entry, descent, and landing, while the Entry Monitor System (EMS) will be used to monitor the health and status of the onboard guidance and the trajectory. The entry displays are driven by the entry display feeder, part of the Entry Monitor System (EMS). The entry re-targeting module, also part of the EMS, provides all the data required to generate the capability footprint of the vehicle at any point in the trajectory, which is shown on the Primary Flight Display (PFD). It also provides caution and warning data and recommends the safest possible re-designated landing site when the nominal landing site is no longer within the capability of the vehicle. The PFD and the EMS allow the crew to manually fly an entry trajectory profile from entry interface until parachute deploy having the flexibility to manually steer the vehicle to a selected landing site that best satisfies the priorities of the crew. The entry display feeder provides data from the ENIS and other components of the GNC flight software to the displays at the proper rate and in the proper units. It also performs calculations that are specific to the entry displays and which are not made in any other component of the flight software. In some instances, it performs calculations identical to those performed by the onboard primary guidance algorithm to protect against a guidance system failure. These functions and the interactions between the entry display feeder and the other components of the EMS are described.

  1. The Cobra helmet mounted display system for Gripen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, Jörgen; Blomqvist, Tommy

    2008-04-01

    Selected to meet the stringent requirements of the Gripen swing-role combat aircraft, the Cobra Helmet Mounted Display System, has been integrated as a key component to the Gripen weapon delivery system. Saab Aerosystems has since 2003 together with BAE System been developing the Cobra HMD and in parallel integrating the system in Gripen for South Africa. Work is currently done to prepare other customer for the Cobra HMDS. This paper will highlight some technical challenges and experiences with integrating a HMDS in a small cockpit environment as in Gripen and present an overview of the Cobra HMD design and installation. Furthermore the paper will discuss the importance of having the pilots and users involved during the design phase and throughout the development.

  2. Orbit IMU alinement interpretation of onboard display data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corson, R.

    1978-01-01

    The space shuttle inertial measurement unit (IMU) alinement algorith was examined to determine the most important alinement starpair selection criterion. Three crew displayed parameters were considered: (1) the results of the separation angle difference (SAD) check for each starpair; (2) the separation angle of each starpair; and (3) the age of each star measurement. It was determined that the SAD for each pair cannot be used to predict the IMu alinement accuracy. If the age of each star measurement is less than approximately 30 minutes, time is a relatively unimportant factor and the most important alinement pair selection criterion is the starpair separation angle. Therefore, when there are three available alinement starpairs and all measurements were taken within the last 30 minutes, the pair with the separation angle closest to 90 degrees should be selected for IMU alinement.

  3. A knowledge based application of the extended aircraft interrogation and display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glover, Richard D.; Larson, Richard R.

    1991-01-01

    A family of multiple-processor ground support test equipment was used to test digital flight-control systems on high-performance research aircraft. A unit recently built for the F-18 high alpha research vehicle project is the latest model in a series called the extended aircraft interrogation and display system. The primary feature emphasized monitors the aircraft MIL-STD-1553B data buses and provides real-time engineering units displays of flight-control parameters. A customized software package was developed to provide real-time data interpretation based on rules embodied in a highly structured knowledge database. The configuration of this extended aircraft interrogation and display system is briefly described, and the evolution of the rule based package and its application to failure modes and effects testing on the F-18 high alpha research vehicle is discussed.

  4. Development of an interactive real-time graphics system for the display of vehicle space positioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comperini, Robert; Rhea, Donald C.

    1988-01-01

    Outlined is a new approach taken by the NASA Western Aeronautical Test Range to display real-time space positioning data using computer-generated images that produce a graphic representation of an area map integrated with the research flight test aircraft track. This display system supports research flight test requirements of research projects such as the advanced fighter technology integration (AFTI) F-16, F-18 high alpha research vehicle (HARV), AFTI F-111 mission adaptive wing (MAW), F-15, and X-29A forward-swept wing. This paper will discuss the requirements, system configuration and capability, and future system applications.

  5. Development of an interactive real-time graphics system for the display of vehicle space positioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comperini, Robert; Rhea, Donald C.

    1988-01-01

    This paper will outline a new approach taken by the NASA Western Aeronautical Test Range to display real-time space positioning data using computer-generated images that produce a graphic representation of an area map integrated with the research flight test aircraft track. This display system supports research flight test requirements of research projects such as the advanced fighter technology integration (AFTI) F-16, F-18 high alpha research vehicle (HARV), AFTI F-111 mission adaptive wing (MAW), F-15, and X-29A forward-swept wing. This paper will discuss the requirements, system configuration and capability, and future system applications.

  6. A distributed system of wireless signs using Gyricon electronic paper displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprague, Robert A.

    2006-04-01

    The proliferation of digital information is leading to a wide range of applications which make it desirable to display data easily in many locations, all changeable and updateable. The difficulty in achieving such ubiquitous displays is the cost of signage, the cost of installation, and the software and systems to control the information being sent to each of these signs. In this paper we will talk about a networked system of such signs which are made from gyricon electronic paper. Gyricon electronic paper is a reflective, bistable display which can be made in large web sheets at a reasonable price. Since it does not require a backlight nor does it require power to refresh the display image, such technology is ideal for making signs which can be run on batteries with extremely long battery life, often not needing replacement for years. The display also has a very broad illumination scattering profile which makes it readily viewable from any angle. The basic operating mechanism of the display, its manufacturing technique, and achieved performance will be described, along with the description of a networked solution using many such signs controlled with system software to identify speakers and meetings in conference rooms, hospitality suites, or classrooms in universities. Systems will also be shown which are adapted to retail pricing signage and others which can be used for large format outdoor billboards.

  7. Primary display latency criteria based on flying qualities and performance data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funk, John D., Jr.; Beck, Corin P.; Johns, John B.

    1993-01-01

    With a pilots' increasing use of visual cue augmentation, much requiring extensive pre-processing, there is a need to establish criteria for new avionics/display design. The timeliness and synchronization of the augmented cues is vital to ensure the performance quality required for precision mission task elements (MTEs) where augmented cues are the primary source of information to the pilot. Processing delays incurred while transforming sensor-supplied flight information into visual cues are unavoidable. Relationships between maximum control system delays and associated flying qualities levels are documented in MIL-F-83300 and MIL-F-8785. While cues representing aircraft status may be just as vital to the pilot as prompt control response for operations in instrument meteorological conditions, presently, there are no specification requirements on avionics system latency. To produce data relating avionics system latency to degradations in flying qualities, the Navy conducted two simulation investigations. During the investigations, flying qualities and performance data were recorded as simulated avionics system latency was varied. Correlated results of the investigation indicates that there is a detrimental impact of latency on flying qualities. Analysis of these results and consideration of key factors influencing their application indicate that: (1) Task performance degrades and pilot workload increases as latency is increased. Inconsistency in task performance increases as latency increases. (2) Latency reduces the probability of achieving Level 1 handling qualities with avionics system latency as low as 70 ms. (3) The data suggest that the achievement of desired performance will be ensured only at display latency values below 120 ms. (4) These data also suggest that avoidance of inadequate performance will be ensured only at display latency values below 150 ms.

  8. Humanization of work circumstances in dialog communication using data display devices, volume 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graunke, H.; Julich, H.; Petersen, H. C.; Schaefer, H.; Strupp, K.

    1982-11-01

    Human factors engineering in working conditions on data display devices communication in the automotive industry was studied. Work environments designs and areas with data display devices are outlined. The Psychosocial organization development project for humanizing the data recording routine in the automotive industry is examined.

  9. Human system integration considerations for tactical head-mounted displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnett, Gregory M.; Hoover, Jeffery L.; Racine, Matthew S.; Sedillo, Michael R.

    2010-04-01

    As computer-use propagates across the battlefield, the necessity to effectively integrate such system components challenges the system developer to find a balance between added functionality and system usability. The most significant challenge is ruggedizing and integrating these technologies in an acceptable manner that does not impede the users' combat capability, but instead significantly enhances it . In this paper, researchers at the Air Force Research Laboratory's Battlespace Acoustics Branch explored alternative Head Mounted Display (HMD) concepts, investigating field of view as well as ease of use concerns. Special Operations personnel prosecute mission objectives in dynamic environments requiring an agile integration solution that is equally accommodating. This report describes the research process as well as the unique concerns and results of integrating tactical HMDs for special operation forces. Issues involving variable use-cases, as well as cable management are also addressed.

  10. Cognitive debiasing through sparklines in clinical data displays.

    PubMed

    Radecki, Ryan P; Medow, Mitchell A

    2007-01-01

    Sparklines, embedded contextual information graphics, can help reduce diagnostic errors by highlighting trends in data, simplifying cognitive tasks and providing context for decision making. Examples applied to heparin induced thrombocytopenia, cardiac catheterization and pediatric viral illness illustrate the concept. Sparklines are ideal in situations where the limited textual data representations obfuscate interpretation, the graphic aids interpretation of the data, or the graphic guides decision making. PMID:18694183