Science.gov

Sample records for day culture period

  1. 12 CFR 329.104 - Ten-day grace period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ten-day grace period. 329.104 Section 329.104 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY INTEREST ON DEPOSITS 329.104 Ten-day grace period. This interpretive rule provides for 10-day...

  2. 12 CFR 329.104 - Ten-day grace period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Ten-day grace period. 329.104 Section 329.104 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY INTEREST ON DEPOSITS 329.104 Ten-day grace period. This interpretive rule provides for 10-day...

  3. Solar variability for periods of days to months

    SciTech Connect

    Froehlich, C.

    1984-01-01

    The time series of total solar-irradiance determinations from ACRIM on the solar maximum mission satellite of 270 days and from the ERB experiment on NIMBUS 7 of 1445 days are analyzed for periods greater than a few days. Comparison of the spectra of both with the spectrum of projected sunspot area over the corresponding time periods show high coherence for periods of 7 to about 25 days and for periods longer than about 30 to 35 days. In the vicinity and at the 27-day rotational period of the sun, however, the coherence between sunspot area and irradiance is small, although both spectra show significant power at and around this period. This means that there is a signal in the irradiance which cannot be due to the sunspot area and the assumption of a straight-forward sunspot blocking seems to be over simplified. This irradiance signal at 27 days has an amplitude of about + or - 0.012 per cent and is an enhancement. 9 references.

  4. Aim for 55-Day Dry Period for Top Production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The research cited in this article determined the optimal dry period length (the number of days between lactations when a cow is not being milked) for US Jersey cows using traits such as milk, fat, and protein yield, fat and protein percentages, somatic cell score, and days open. This was accomplis...

  5. A 50 day periodicity in the cosmic ray anisotropy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fillius, W.; Ip, W.-H.; Axford, I.

    1983-01-01

    A modulation of the anisotropy of relativistic interplanetary particles with a period of approximately 50 days is discussed. Even though it is not unusual for cosmic ray data to reflect the solar rotation frequency and its harmonics with periods of 25/n days (n being 1, 2, 3, . . .), it is not known how a periodicity of 50 days, which would be a subharmonic, is generated. Since the Cerenkov counter responds to all kinds of relativistic particles, it does not identify the particles that cause the 50 day east-west modulation. Jovian electrons are considered unlikely in that they are most abundant near their source, whereas the modulation has never been reported for ground-based neutron monitors. It is pointed out that since the Cerenkov threshold is somewhat lower than typical neutron monitor cutoffs, it is conceivable that the modulation affects nucleons just in this energy gap. It is also thought that there might be a uniformly distributed component of interplanetary electrons which undergo this peculiar modulation.

  6. Cultural Support Workers and Long Day Care Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Melinda G.; Knowles, Meg; Grieshaber, Susan

    2011-01-01

    In Australia, eligible long day care services may apply for support at the state level to assist with the transition of children from culturally or linguistically diverse backgrounds into childcare settings. For staff in childcare services, this support comes in the form of a cultural support worker (CSW). The primary role of a CSW is to build…

  7. Cultural Support Workers and Long Day Care Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Melinda G.; Knowles, Meg; Grieshaber, Susan

    2011-01-01

    In Australia, eligible long day care services may apply for support at the state level to assist with the transition of children from culturally or linguistically diverse backgrounds into childcare settings. For staff in childcare services, this support comes in the form of a cultural support worker (CSW). The primary role of a CSW is to build

  8. Automating Partial Period Bond Valuation with Excel's Day Counting Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vicknair, David; Spruell, James

    2009-01-01

    An Excel model for calculating the actual price of bonds under a 30 day/month, 360 day/year day counting assumption by nesting the DAYS360 function within the PV function is developed. When programmed into an Excel spreadsheet, the model can accommodate annual and semiannual payment bonds sold on or between interest dates using six fundamental

  9. Automating Partial Period Bond Valuation with Excel's Day Counting Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vicknair, David; Spruell, James

    2009-01-01

    An Excel model for calculating the actual price of bonds under a 30 day/month, 360 day/year day counting assumption by nesting the DAYS360 function within the PV function is developed. When programmed into an Excel spreadsheet, the model can accommodate annual and semiannual payment bonds sold on or between interest dates using six fundamental…

  10. Sun-Earth Day Connects History, Culture and Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cline, T.; Thieman, J.

    2003-12-01

    The NASA Sun-Earth Connection Education forum annually promotes and event called Sun-Earth Day: a national celebration of the Sun, the space around the Earth (geospace), and how all of it affects life on our planet. For the past 3 years this event has provided a venue by which classrooms, museums, planetaria, and at NASA centers have had a sensational time sharing stories, images, and activities related to the Sun-Earth connections and the views o fthe Sun from Earth. Each year we select a different theme by which NASA Space Science can be further related to cross-curricular activities. Sun-Earth Day 2002, "Celebrate the Equinox", drew parallels between Native American Cultures and NASA's Sun-Earth Connection research via cultural stories, interviews, web links, activities and Native American participation. Sun-Earth Day 2003, "Live From the Aurora", shared the beauty of the Aurora through a variety of activities and stories related to perspectives of Northern Peoples. Sun-Earth Day 2004 will share the excitement of the transit of Venus through comparisons of Venus with Earth and Mars, calculations of the distances to nearby stars, and the use of transits to identify extra-solar planets. Finally, Sun-Earth Day 2005 will bring several of these themes together by turning our focus to the history and culture surrounding ancient observatories such as Chaco Canyon, Machu Picchu, and Chichen Itza.

  11. 26 CFR 54.9815-2708 - Prohibition on waiting periods that exceed 90 days.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... cases in which a waiting period that exceeds 90 days is imposed in addition to a measurement period, the...-time employee after a measurement period of 12 months that begins on the employee's start date... enrollment forms are received. E's 12-month measurement period ends November 25 of Year 2. E is determined...

  12. Periodic CO2 Dosing Strategy for Dunaliella salina Batch Culture.

    PubMed

    Ying, Kezhen; Gilmour, D James; Zimmerman, William B

    2015-01-01

    A periodic CO2 dosing strategy for D. salina 19/30 batch culture is proposed. A model of periodic CO2 dosing including dosing time calculation, dosing interval estimation and final chlorophyll yield prediction was established. In experiments, 5% CO2/95% N2 gas was periodically dosed into D. salina culture. Two different gas dosing flow rates were tested. The corresponding dosing time for each flow rate was estimated via the model (10 mind-1 for 0.7 Lmin-1 and 36 mind-1 for 0.3 Lmin-1). Daily pH measurements showed that the pH of these cultures dosed periodically was always kept between 7.5 and 9.5, which highlights that periodic gas supply can maintain a suitable range of pH for microalgal growth without expensive buffers. Notably the culture dosed for set daily intervals was seen to have similar growth to the culture supplied constantly, but with much higher CO2 capture efficiency (11%-18%) compared to continuous dosing (0.25%). It shows great potential for using periodic gas supply to reduce cost, wasted gas and energy use. PMID:25997005

  13. Periodic CO2 Dosing Strategy for Dunaliella salina Batch Culture

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Kezhen; Gilmour, D. James; Zimmerman, William B.

    2015-01-01

    A periodic CO2 dosing strategy for D. salina 19/30 batch culture is proposed. A model of periodic CO2 dosing including dosing time calculation, dosing interval estimation and final chlorophyll yield prediction was established. In experiments, 5% CO2/95% N2 gas was periodically dosed into D. salina culture. Two different gas dosing flow rates were tested. The corresponding dosing time for each flow rate was estimated via the model (10 mind?1 for 0.7 Lmin?1 and 36 mind?1 for 0.3 Lmin?1). Daily pH measurements showed that the pH of these cultures dosed periodically was always kept between 7.5 and 9.5, which highlights that periodic gas supply can maintain a suitable range of pH for microalgal growth without expensive buffers. Notably the culture dosed for set daily intervals was seen to have similar growth to the culture supplied constantly, but with much higher CO2 capture efficiency (11%18%) compared to continuous dosing (0.25%). It shows great potential for using periodic gas supply to reduce cost, wasted gas and energy use. PMID:25997005

  14. Novel three dimensional human endocervix cultures respond to 28-day hormone treatment.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Sevim Yildiz; Yu, Yanni; Burdette, Joanne E; Pavone, Mary Ellen; Hope, Thomas J; Woodruff, Teresa K; Kim, J Julie

    2015-04-01

    The endocervix has both anatomical and biological functions that participate in the delicate balance between tolerance necessary for conception and protection from pathogens. Our goal was to develop a robust 3-dimensional (3D) endocervix model that was a reliable representation of the in vivo tissues and to identify the physiological responses to changing levels of steroid hormones during a 28-day time period. Human endocervical cells were grown on polystyrene scaffolds, and the morphologic and hormonal responses of cultured cells were assessed in response to fluctuating levels of estradiol (E2) or progesterone (P4). Morphologically, the 3D cultures were composed of a mixed population of cells, including epithelial and stromal cells. Treatment with E2 and P4 (d 28) increased cell growth and proliferation as compared with no treatment control. Cells expressed estrogen receptor and P4 receptor and produced both neutral and acidic mucins, including Mucin 16. In addition, a 45-plex Luminex assay identified numerous factors secreted and regulated by hormones. Specifically, IL-1β and leukemia inhibitory factor significantly decreased in the presence of E2 and P4 as compared with the no hormone control at day 26. Cotreatment with RU486 (mifepristone) attenuated the inhibition of IL-1β and leukemia inhibitory factor secretion. In summary, a robust, novel 3D endocervical culture was developed, and physiologic responses to the menstrual cycle mimic of E2 and P4 levels for a period of 28 days were identified. PMID:25635622

  15. Teaching Culture in a North American Context: Mother's Day/Father's Day.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mollica, Anthony; Sterling, Tania

    1994-01-01

    Presents activities for teaching students about Mother's Day and Father's Day. Includes a fictional interview with Anna Jarvis, who helped start the Mother's Day holiday in the early 20th century. (MDM)

  16. 77 FR 64759 - Rescission of 10-Day Agency Discretionary Period in Assigning Unsatisfactory Safety Ratings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-23

    ...The FMCSA amends the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations to remove the provision indicating that the Agency will consider a 10- day extension of the 45-day period after which passenger and hazardous materials carriers must cease operation after receiving a proposed unsatisfactory safety rating. The Agency previously discontinued this practice as a matter of policy and now amends the......

  17. 26 CFR 301.6332-3 - The 21-day holding period applicable to property held by banks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... deposits at the end of the 21-day holding period (or at the end of any longer period that has been... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false The 21-day holding period applicable to... Property for Collection of Taxes 301.6332-3 The 21-day holding period applicable to property held...

  18. Differential success in sampling of Atlantic Forest amphibians among different periods of the day.

    PubMed

    Rocha, C F D; Siqueira, C C; Ariani, C V; Vrcibradic, D; Guedes, D M; Kiefer, M C; Almeida-Gomes, M; Goyannes-Arajo, P; Borges-Jnior, V N T; Van Sluys, M

    2015-05-01

    In general, anurans tend to be nocturnal, though diurnal activity is characteristic of some groups. Studies show that frog activity may be inferred based on the number of individuals collected at different periods of the day, during large-scale field surveys. We investigated the best period of the day to conduct amphibian sampling in nine Atlantic Rainforest areas in southeastern Brazil, based on intensive field surveys. At each locality we employed similar sampling effort during diurnal, crepuscular and nocturnal searches (totaling 704.5 sampling hours). We pooled data from all localities for each period and estimated the proportion of frogs of each species active at each period based on the total number of individuals and on the number of species found during all surveys for that period. We recorded a total of 817 individual frogs from 69 species. Species richness was highest at night (median = 12 species), intermediate at dusk (median = 8), and lowest during the day (median = 4). The percentage of the total number of individual frogs found (pooled species) was highest during the night (ca. 53%) and lowest during the day (ca. 14%). Analyzing each species separately, the number of individuals recorded was consistently higher at dusk and night for most species. Our study evidences a trend for nocturnal activity for most Atlantic Rainforest frogs, with few species having primarily diurnal habits. Those results may favor future studies and conservation efforts for amphibian species. PMID:26132005

  19. The "Approximate 150 Day Quasi-Periodicity" in Interplanetary and Solar Phenomena During Cycle 23

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, I. G.; Cane, H. V.

    2004-01-01

    A"quasi-periodicity" of approx. 150 days in various solar and interplanetary phenomena has been reported in earlier solar cycles. We suggest that variations in the occurrence of solar energetic particle events, inter-planetary coronal mass ejections, and geomagnetic storm sudden commenceents during solar cycle 23 show evidence of this quasi-periodicity, which is also present in the sunspot number, in particular in the northern solar hemisphere. It is not, however, prominent in the interplanetary magnetic field strength.

  20. The 155-day solar period in the sixteenth century and later

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverman, S. M.

    1990-01-01

    Recent interest in short solar periods has been stimulated by the discovery of a peak period of about 150-160 days in very energetic solar flares and hard X-ray flares. Auroral data are used here as a proxy for solar activity to show the presence of the peak in data from 1570 to 1573 and in some other time periods. The data are also used to show the absence or lack of prominence of this peak at other times in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

  1. 78 FR 36560 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: FHA Lender Approval, Annual Renewal, Periodic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: FHA Lender Approval, Annual Renewal...: Colette Pollard, Reports Management Officer, QDAM, Department of Housing and Urban Development, 451 7th... Title of Information Collection: FHA Lender Approval, Annual Renewal, Periodic Updates and...

  2. 19 CFR 141.82 - Invoice for installment shipments arriving within a period of 10 days.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Invoice for installment shipments arriving within a period of 10 days. 141.82 Section 141.82 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ENTRY OF MERCHANDISE Invoices 141.82 Invoice for installment shipments...

  3. The power spectrum of the solar wind speed for periods greater than 10 days

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fenimore, E. E.; Asbridge, J. R.; Bame, S. J.; Feldman, W. C.; Gosling, J. T.

    1978-01-01

    The use of the more than 11 years of solar wind speed data obtained by Vela 2-6 and Imp 6-8 to study the power spectrum of speed variations in the range near the solar rotational frequency is discussed. The broad bands of power near periods of 27 days (corresponding to the rotational period of the sun), 13.5 days, and higher harmonics are characterized, and it is suggested that the described individual peaks in both the solar wind and the geomagnetic spectra are probably not due to differential rotation. The alternate explanation is that the multipeak nature of the power spectra are explained by a wave packet concept in which recurring highspeed streams are described as a series of pulses (separated by a constant period) that last for a varying number of solar rotations.

  4. Cultural interaction and biological distance in postclassic period Mexico.

    PubMed

    Ragsdale, Corey S; Edgar, Heather J H

    2015-05-01

    Economic, political, and cultural relationships connected virtually every population throughout Mexico during Postclassic period (AD 900-1520). Much of what is known about population interaction in prehistoric Mexico is based on archaeological or ethnohistoric data. What is unclear, especially for the Postclassic period, is how these data correlate with biological population structure. We address this by assessing biological (phenotypic) distances among 28 samples based upon a comparison of dental morphology trait frequencies, which serve as a proxy for genetic variation, from 810 individuals. These distances were compared with models representing geographic and cultural relationships among the same groups. Results of Mantel and partial Mantel matrix correlation tests show that shared migration and trade are correlated with biological distances, but geographic distance is not. Trade and political interaction are also correlated with biological distance when combined in a single matrix. These results indicate that trade and political relationships affected population structure among Postclassic Mexican populations. We suggest that trade likely played a major role in shaping patterns of interaction between populations. This study also shows that the biological distance data support the migration histories described in ethnohistoric sources. PMID:25599818

  5. Inflammatory and genotoxic responses during 30-day welding-fume exposure period.

    PubMed

    Yu, Il Je; Song, Kyung Seuk; Maeng, Seung Hee; Kim, Soo Jin; Sung, Jae Hyuck; Han, Jeong Hee; Chung, Yong Hyun; Cho, Myung Haing; Chung, Kyu Hyuck; Han, Kuy Tae; Hyun, Jin Sook; Kim, Kwang Jong

    2004-12-01

    Welder's pneumoconiosis has generally been determined to be benign and unassociated with respiratory symptoms based on the absence of pulmonary-function abnormalities in welders with marked radiographic abnormalities. In previous studies, the current authors suggested a three-phase lung fibrosis process to study the pathological process of lung fibrosis and found that the critical point for recovery was after 30 days of welding-fume exposure at a high dose, at which point early and delicate fibrosis was observed in the perivascular and peribronchiolar regions. Accordingly, the current study investigated the inflammatory and genotoxic responses during a 30-day period of welding-fume exposure to elucidate the process of fibrosis. As such, rats were exposed to manual metal arc-stainless steel (MMA-SS) welding fumes at concentrations of 65.6 +/- 2.9 (low dose) and 116.8 +/- 3.9 mg/m3 (high dose) total suspended particulate for 2 h per day in an inhalation chamber for 30 days. Animals were sacrificed after the initial 2 h exposure, and after 15 and 30 days of exposure. The rats exposed to the welding fumes exhibited a statistically significant (P < 0.05) decrease in body weight when compared to the control during the 30-day exposure period, yet an elevated cellular differential count and higher levels of albumin, LDH, and beta-NAG, but not elevated TNF-alpha, and IL-1beta in the acellular bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. In addition, the DNA damage resulting from 30 days of welding-fume exposure was confirmed by a comet assay and the inmmunohistochemistry for 8-hydroxydeoxyguanine (8-OH-dG). Consequently, the elevated inflammatory and genotoxic indicators confirmed the lung injury and inflammation caused by the MMA-SS welding-fume exposure. PMID:15475184

  6. Search for evidence of a clock related to the solar 154 day complex of periodicities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturrock, P. A.; Bai, T.

    1992-01-01

    Evidence indicates that the 154-day periodicity in solar activity may be part of a complex of periodicities that are approximate multiples of 25.8 d, which suggests that the sun contains a 'clock' with frequency in the range 440-463 nHz. To search for evidence of this clock, the daily Greenwich sunspot areas and daily Zurich sunspot numbers have been Fourier-analyzed. The Zurich data show a strong peak that may clearly be identified with the fundamental frequency, while the Greenwich data show a peak that may be the harmonic of the fundamental frequency. A model is discussed which provides a kinematical interpretation of the sunspot spectrum.

  7. Growth of mallards fed phosphamidon for 13-day periods during three different developmental stages

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haseltine, S.; Hensler, G.L.

    1981-01-01

    Mallard ducklings (Anas platyrhynchos) were exposed to a 13-day dietary treatment of O, 0.5, or 5.0 ppm phosphamidon at one of three successive age intervals (5-17 days, 18-30 days, or 31-43 days) during a 10-week growth period. Weekly measurements of body weight, wing length, primary feather length, and bill length revealed slower development of primary feathers in those birds treated from 5 to 17 days; treatment effects on body weight and wing length from 6 to 8 weeks of age were observed among those birds treated from 18 to 30 days of age. Some differences in growth patterns among birds treated with the same phosphamidon level, but at different growth stages, were attributed to the varying size of the group with which a duckling was housed at different times in the growth process. No brain cholinesterase depression was observed in any group either 24 h after phosphamidon treatment was terminated or at 10 weeks of age.

  8. Long-Period Cultural Noise: The Panama Canal Seiche

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, D. E.; Hutt, C. R.; Ringler, A.; Gee, L. S.

    2009-12-01

    Traditionally, the spectral composition of human generated or cultural seismic noise is dominated by short-period (SP) energy (<1s). In this study, we present evidence for long-period (LP) cultural noise (100-200s) at the USGS Global Seismographic Network (GSN) station CU.BCIP, located at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) on Barro Colorado Island (BCI) in the Panama Canal. The LP seismic energy has a strong diurnal signal, with highest power during the daytime when traffic through the Panama Canal is the heaviest, ~1 ship every 10 minutes. The lowest power occurs during the late-night/early-morning hours, when container ship traffic slows to ~1 ship every hour. Spectral power observations are corroborated with data recorded by a water-level meter located approximately 80m from the seismic station, indicating that water waves are the primary source of the LP seismic signal. We show that the observed water waves are a seiche induced by the wakes of container ship traffic in the canal. As passing ships disturb the water surface, standing waves are induced by the summation of propagating waves, traveling in opposite directions, due to reflections off the opposite shorelines of the Panama Canal. Vertical harmonic motion results as gravity seeks to restore the horizontal surface of the body of water to a state of hydrostatic equilibrium. The longest natural-period of a seiche in an enclosed body of water is a function of basin depth and length and can be computed by a common oceanographic relationship, known as the Merian formula. For a reasonable range of Panama Canal dimensions in the vicinity of BCI, (depths from 15 to 30m and lengths from 700 to 1500m), the predicted dominant period of a seiche is between 100-200s, consistent with our seismic spectral power observations. Small rhythmic seiches are always present in disturbed enclosed bodies of water and are most often caused by either meteorological effects (wind and atmospheric pressure variations), and/or seismic activity (earthquakes, tsunamis). Historical accounts of anomalously large seiches in enclosed bodies of water such as harbors (Galveston, TX), lakes (Great Lakes, Lake Baikal), and inland seas (Adriatic Sea, Baltic Sea, North Sea) demonstrate the existence of significant flooding hazard to adjacent coastal communities. We present a possible new passive-seismic method for seiche monitoring.

  9. Pulsations of the sun and a beat period of 399 days

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotov, V. A.; Khaneichuk, V. I.

    2011-06-01

    Measurements of the Doppler effect of the solar photosphere have been carried out at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory for 37 years, beginning in 1974 (in total, 2188 days or 13 247 h). The measurements use the differential center-to-limb method of registration of line-of-sight velocity with a solar magnetograph (in the iron absorption line ?512.4 nm). As a result of the experiment, two global pulsations of the sun with periods P 0 = 9600.606(12) and P 1 = 9597.936(16) s have been discovered. The nature of the periods is unknown. The first pulsation was detected in 1974-1982; the second, during nearly all the 37 years. The 2008-2010 data confirm the stability of the initial phase of the P 1 pulsation with a mean (differential) amplitude of 0.25 m/s. The fact that the beat period of the two pulsations coincides with the synodic period of Jupiter's orbital revolution, i.e., 399 days, raises a new, complex problem for solar physics and cosmogony.

  10. The physical properties of giant exoplanets within 400 days of period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santerne, Alexandre

    2015-12-01

    At a time when small planets in the habitable zone are found, not all the questions about giant planets have been answered. For example, their formation, migration and evolution are far from being fully understood. In this context, the Kepler space mission is providing unprecedented constraints to theories by probing transiting giant planets in a wide range of orbital periods. In this talk, we will present the results of a 6-year spectroscopic survey with the SOPHIE spectrograph of the transiting giant-planet candidates detected by Kepler within 400 days of period. First, we will describe the giant-planet candidate sample from the Kepler catalog and our spectroscopic observations which allowed us to screen out more than half of the candidates as false positives. Then, we will present the occurrence rate of giant planets, based on our sample cleaned from fake transiting planets, and compare it with other surveys. Finally, we will discuss the physical properties of the giant transiting planets within 400 days of period and compare them with predictions from planet-synthesis models.

  11. Regulation of period 1 expression in cultured rat pineal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fukuhara, Chiaki; Dirden, James C.; Tosini, Gianluca

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the in vitro expression of Period 1 (Per1), Period 2 (Per2) and arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AA-NAT) genes in the rat pineal gland to understand the mechanism(s) regulating the expression of these genes in this organ. Pineals, when maintained in vitro for 5 days, did not show circadian rhythmicity in the expression of any of the three genes monitored. Norepinephrine (NE) induced AA-NAT and Per1, whereas its effect on Per2 was negligible. Contrary to what was observed in other systems, NE stimulation did not induce circadian expression of Per1. The effect of NE on Per1 level was dose- and receptor subtype-dependent, and both cAMP and cGMP induced Per1. Per1 was not induced by repeated NE - or forskolin - stimulation. Protein synthesis was not necessary for NE-induced Per1, but it was for reduction of Per1 following NE stimulation. Per1 transcription in pinealocytes was activated by BMAL1/CLOCK. Our results indicate that important differences are present in the regulation of these genes in the mammalian pineal. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. WASP-117b: a 10-day-period Saturn in an eccentric and misaligned orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lendl, M.; Triaud, A. H. M. J.; Anderson, D. R.; Collier Cameron, A.; Delrez, L.; Doyle, A. P.; Gillon, M.; Hellier, C.; Jehin, E.; Maxted, P. F. L.; Neveu-VanMalle, M.; Pepe, F.; Pollacco, D.; Queloz, D.; Sgransan, D.; Smalley, B.; Smith, A. M. S.; Udry, S.; Van Grootel, V.; West, R. G.

    2014-08-01

    We report the discovery of WASP-117b, the first planet with a period beyond 10 days found by the WASP survey. The planet has a mass of Mp = 0.2755 0.0089 MJ, a radius of Rp= 1.021_{-0.065+0.076 Rjup} and is in an eccentric (e = 0.302 0.023), 10.02165 0.00055 d orbit around a main-sequence F9 star. The host star's brightness (V = 10.15 mag) makes WASP-117 a good target for follow-up observations, and with a periastron planetary equilibrium temperature of Teq= 1225_{-39+36} K and a low planetary mean density (?p= 0.259_{-0.048+0.054 ?jup}) it is one of the best targets for transmission spectroscopy among planets with periods around 10 days. From a measurement of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect, we infer a projected angle between the planetary orbit and stellar spin axes of ? = -44 11 deg, and we further derive an orbital obliquity of ? = 69.6 +4.7-4.1 deg. Owing to the large orbital separation, tidal forces causing orbital circularization and realignment of the planetary orbit with the stellar plane are weak, having had little impact on the planetary orbit over the system lifetime. WASP-117b joins a small sample of transiting giant planets with well characterized orbits at periods above 8 days. Based on data obtained with WASP-South, CORALIE and EulerCam at the Euler-Swiss telescope, TRAPPIST, and HARPS at the ESO 3.6 m telescope (Prog. IDs 087.C-0649, 089.C-0151, 090.C-0540)Photometric and radial velocities are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/568/A81

  13. Cytoreductive nephrectomy and its role in the present-day period of targeted therapy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The beneficial effect of cytoreductive nephrectomy on survival of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma in the immunotherapy era was based on two prospective randomized trials. Unfortunately, such evidence does not yet exist in the present-day period of targeted therapy. Despite this, cytoreductive nephrectomy remains integral in the multimodal management of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Multiple retrospective studies as well as data from prospective studies examining targeted therapy support the continued use of cytoreductive nephrectomy in the properly selected patient. Ongoing studies will hopefully fine-tune the role and timing of cytoreductive nephrectomy in the context of targeted therapy. PMID:26425142

  14. Observations of 20-day period meridional current oscillations in the upper ocean along the Pacific Equator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, David; Knox, Robert A.; Luther, Douglas S.

    1988-01-01

    Prominent oscillations of the meridional current, with a mean period of approximately 20 days, is observed in the upper ocean from May 1979 to October 1985 using moored current measurements along the Pacific equator at 95, 110, 124, 140, and 152 deg W, as well as off (but near) the equator at 110 and 140 deg W. The fluctuations are relatively narrowband in frequency. A 95 percent statistically significant peak in the power spectra of the meridional current occurs at 110, 124, and 140 deg W, but not at 95 and 152 deg W where the spectral peaks are smaller. The dominant wave period decreases by about 4 percent from 110 to 140 deg W. The wave amplitude decreases with depth, and the wave is essentially confined to the upper 80 m. The penetration depth of the oscillation is greatest at 110 deg W and least at 140 deg W.

  15. XO-5b: A Transiting Jupiter-sized Planet with a 4 day Period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Christopher J.; McCullough, P. R.; Valenti, Jeff A.; Long, Doug; Johns-Krull, Christopher M.; Machalek, P.; Janes, Kenneth A.; Taylor, B.; Fleenor, Michael L.; Foote, C. N.; Gary, Bruce L.; Garca-Melendo, Enrique; Gregorio, J.; Vanmunster, T.

    2008-10-01

    The star XO-5 (GSC 02959-00729, V=12.1, G8 V) hosts a Jupiter-sized, Rp=1.15+/-0.12 RJ, transiting extrasolar planet, XO-5b, with an orbital period of 4.2 days. The planet's mass, Mp=1.15+/-0.08 MJ, and surface gravity, gp=22+/-5 m s-2, are large for its orbital period compared to most other transiting planets. However, the deviation from the Mp-P relationship for XO-5b is not as large as for GJ 436b, HAT-P-2b, and XO-3b. By coincidence, XO-5 overlies the extreme H I plume that emanates from the interacting galaxy pair NGC 2444/NGC 2445 (Arp 143).

  16. Russian Reading in a Period of Social and Cultural Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stelmakh, V. D.

    1995-01-01

    Addresses social and cultural changes of reading in Russia: (1) changes in cultural hierarchy; (2) changes in reader behavior; (3) declining importance of classic literature; and (4) rise of mass culture and its effects. Tables present information on the genre of books that were best sellers and books borrowed from Russian libraries. (JMV)

  17. Search for evidence of a clock related to the solar 154 day complex of periodicities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturrock, P. A.; Bai, T.

    1992-01-01

    Evidence that has recently been compiled (Bai and Sturrock 1991) indicates that the enigmatic 154-day periodicity in solar activity may be viewed as part of a complex of periodicities that are approximate multiples of 25.8 days, suggesting that the Sun contains a 'clock' with frequency in the range 440 to 463 nano Hz. The clock may comprise either an oscillator or a rotator, each of which may be either real or virtual. We have reconsidered a previous spectrum analysis of the Zurich sunspot-number sequence by Knight, Schatten, and Sturrock (1979) which revealed a sharp, persistent and significant periodicity with a period of 12.072 days, corresponding to a frequency of about 958.8 nano Hz. This periodicity may be regarded as the (second) upper sideband of the second harmonic (2nu(sub R) + 2nu(sub E)) of a fundamental frequency of 447.7 nano Hz that is clearly within the search band. In this expression, nu(sub R) is the sidereal frequency of the hypothetical rotator and nu(sub E) is the frequency (31.69 nano Hz) of the Earth in its orbital motion around the Sun. In analyzing sunspot area data derived from the Greenwich data set, and on noting that any frequency is defined only to within the Nyquist frequency, we find clear evidence not only for the upper sideband of the second harmonic, but also for the second harmonic (2nu(sub R)) and the lower sideband of the second harmonic (2nu(sub R) - 2nu(sub E)). There is no strong peak at the fundamental frequency in the Greenwich data, but there is in the Zurich sunspot data. The effect of a linear oscillator is, to the lowest order in the amplitude, the same as the combined effect of two rotators of opposite polarities. A rotator that has arbitrary orientation with respect to the ecliptic may influence the outer layers of the Sun and thereby modulate the occurrence of solar activity such as sunspots. By analyzing a simple model, we find that such a rotator would influence surface activity in such a way that the spectrum of a 'signal' (such as the record of sunspots), as seen from the Earth, would contain components with frequencies that are certain integral combinations of nu(sub R) and nu(sub E). The amplitudes of the various components depend sensitively on theta, the angle between the axis of the rotator and the axis of the Earth's orbital motion. This simple model therefore offers a kinematical (but not dynamical) interpretation of the sunspot spectrum. The present analysis, while offering support of our conjectures that the Sun contains a clock that regulates the 154-day complex of periodicities, cannot distinguish between an osillator or a rotator (that might be a traveling wave), nor between a real rotator or a virtual rotator (that might be an apparent traveling wave due to the aliasing effect of an oscillator in a rotating system). Further analysis of sunspot and other data sets will be required to confirm the existence of such clock and (if it is real) to determine its physical nature.

  18. Erratum: The 2.27 day period of WR-134 (HD 191765)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCandliss, Stephan R.; Bohannan, Bruce; Robert, Carmelle; Moffat, Anthony F. J.

    1994-11-01

    The original temporal analysis of a 12 night spectral timeseries of Wolf-Rayet (WR)-134 has been found to be flawed and a re-analysis shows that the line profile variations are indeed periodic. When combined with a 4 night timeseries taken 45 days earlier, a period near 2.27 d is found in periodograms of the He II lambda 5412 line centroid, rms line width, and line skew variations. When the emission line residuals are ordered as a function of phase, a sinuous feature appears to 'snake' about the line center with an amplitude of +/-500 km/s. This is approximately equal to 20 larger than the line centroid amplitude; the calculation of which is heavily weighted by static portions of the line profile. In addition to the 'snake,' emission residuals appear that move away from line center on unbound trajectories and are thought to result from the interaction of a periodic driver with the unstable flow of the radiation driven wind.

  19. Erratum: The 2.27 day period of WR-134 (HD 191765)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccandliss, Stephan R.; Bohannan, Bruce; Robert, Carmelle; Moffat, Anthony F. J.

    1994-01-01

    The original temporal analysis of a 12 night spectral timeseries of Wolf-Rayet (WR)-134 has been found to be flawed and a re-analysis shows that the line profile variations are indeed periodic. When combined with a 4 night timeseries taken 45 days earlier, a period near 2.27 d is found in periodograms of the He II lambda 5412 line centroid, rms line width, and line skew variations. When the emission line residuals are ordered as a function of phase, a sinuous feature appears to 'snake' about the line center with an amplitude of +/-500 km/s. This is approximately equal to 20 larger than the line centroid amplitude; the calculation of which is heavily weighted by static portions of the line profile. In addition to the 'snake,' emission residuals appear that move away from line center on unbound trajectories and are thought to result from the interaction of a periodic driver with the unstable flow of the radiation driven wind.

  20. A seven day running training period increases basal urinary hepcidin levels as compared to cycling

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This investigation compared the effects of an extended period of weight-bearing (running) vs. non-weight-bearing (cycling) exercise on hepcidin production and its implications for iron status. Methods Ten active males performed two separate exercise training blocks with either running (RTB) or cycling (CTB) as the exercise mode. Each block consisted of five training sessions (Day 1, 2, 4, 5, 6) performed over a seven day period that were matched for exercise intensity. Basal venous blood samples were obtained on Day 1 (D1), and on Recovery Days 3 (R3) and 7 (R7) to assess iron status, while basal and 3 h post-exercise urinary hepcidin levels were measured on D1, D2, D6, as well as R3 and R7 (basal levels only) for each condition. Results Basal urinary hepcidin levels were significantly elevated (p ≤ 0.05) at D2, R3 and R7 as compared to D1 in RTB. Furthermore, 3 h post-exercise urinary hepcidin levels on D1 were also significantly higher in RTB compared to CTB (p ≤ 0.05). In CTB, urinary hepcidin levels were not statistically different on D1 as compared to R7. Iron parameters were not significantly different at D1 compared to R3 and R7 during both conditions. Conclusions These results suggest that basal hepcidin levels may increase over the course of an extended training program, especially if a weight-bearing exercise modality is undertaken. However, despite any variations in hepcidin production, serum iron parameters in both RTB and CTB were unaffected, possibly due to the short duration of each training block. In comparing running to cycling, non-weight-bearing activity may require more training sessions, or sessions of extended duration, before any significant changes in basal hepcidin levels appear. Chronic elevations in hepcidin levels may help to explain the high incidence of iron deficiency in athletes. PMID:24716892

  1. PCR-Based Quantification of Borrelia burgdorferi Organisms in Canine Tissues over a 500-Day Postinfection Period

    PubMed Central

    Straubinger, Reinhard K.

    2000-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi infection in beagle dogs was studied quantitatively with skin punch biopsy samples and blood samples collected at 4- and 2-week intervals, respectively, over a 500-day period. Thereafter, 25 tissue samples of each dog were collected for further analysis. Starting at day 120 after tick challenge, 12 dogs were treated with antibiotics (azithromycin, ceftriaxone, or doxycycline) for 30 consecutive days. Four dogs received no antibiotic therapy. Quantification of B. burgdorferi DNA was done with an ABI Prism 7700 Sequence Detection System with oligonucleotide primers and a fluorescence-labeled probe designed to specifically amplify a fragment of the ospA gene of B. burgdorferi strain N40. All 16 dogs became infected with B. burgdorferi after tick challenge. In skin biopsy samples, spirochete numbers peaked at day 60 postinfection (<1.5 × 106 organisms per 100 μg of extracted DNA), at the same time when clinical signs of arthritis developed in 11 of 16 dogs, and decreased to almost undetectable levels during the following 6 months. The number of B. burgdorferi organisms detected in skin biopsy samples was inversely correlated with the antibody levels measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Antibiotic treatment reduced the amount of detectable spirochete DNA in skin tissue by a factor of 1,000 or more. At the end of the experiment, B. burgdorferi DNA was detectable at low levels (102 to 104 organisms per 100 μg of extracted DNA) in multiple tissue samples regardless of treatment. However, more tissue samples of untreated dogs than of antibiotic-treated dogs were positive, and tissue samples of untreated dogs also were positive by culture. Only 1.6% of 576 blood samples of all dogs were positive for B. burgdorferi by PCR. PMID:10834975

  2. Case studies of multi-day 3He-rich solar energetic particle periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Nai-hwa; Bu?k, Radoslav; Innes, Davina E.; Mason, Glenn M.

    2015-08-01

    Context. Impulsive solar energetic particle events in the inner heliosphere show the long-lasting enrichment of 3He. Aims: We study the source regions of long-lasting 3He-rich solar energetic particle (SEP) events Methods: We located the responsible open magnetic field regions, we combined potential field source surface extrapolations with the Parker spiral, and compared the magnetic field of the identified source regions with in situ magnetic fields. The candidate open field regions are active region plages. The activity was examined by using extreme ultraviolet images from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and STEREO together with radio observations from STEREO and WIND. Results: Multi-day periods of 3He-rich SEP events are associated with ion production in single active region. Small flares or coronal jets are their responsible solar sources. We also find that the 3He enrichment may depend on the occurrence rate of coronal jets.

  3. Search for the 531 day-period wobble signal in the polar motion based on EEMD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, H.; Shen, W. B.

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we use a nonlinear and non-stationary time series analysis method, the ensemble empirical mode decomposition method (EEMD), to analyze the polar motion (PM) time series (EOP C04 series from 1962 to 2013) to find a 531 day-period wobble (531 dW) signal. The 531 dW signal has been found in the early PM seires (1962-1977) while cannot be found in the recent PM seires (1978-2013) using conventional analysis approaches. By the virtue of the demodulation feature of EEMD, the 531 dW can be confirmed to be present in PM based on the differences of the amplitudes and phases between different intrinsic mode functions. Results from three sub-series divided from the EOP C04 series show that the period of the 531 dW is subject to variations, in the range of 530.9-524 d, and its amplitude is also time-dependent (about 2-11 mas). Synthetic tests are carried out to explain why the 531 dW can only be observed in recent 30-years PM time series after using EEMD. The 531 dW is also detected in two longest available superconducting gravimeter (SG) records, which further confirms the presence of the 531 dW. The confirmation of 531 dW existence could be significant in establishing a more reasonable Earth rotation model and may effectively contribute to the prediction of the PM and its mechanism interpretation.

  4. Geopathology on May Day: Expressions of Culture on Hawai'i's Elementary School Stages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Jamie Simpson

    2013-01-01

    In Hawai'i's elementary schools, May Day programs feature children adorned with flower leis, singing and dancing hula about Hawaiian culture and performing traditions from major ethnic groups who settled the islands. Using the lens of geopathology, this research questions how various groups of residents long for belonging and struggle for

  5. GENE EXPRESSION PATTERNS OF CD-1 DAY-8 EMBRYO CULTURES EXPOSED TO BROMOCHLORO ACETIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gene expression patterns of CD-1 day-8 embryo cultures exposed to bromochloro acetic acid

    Edward D. Karoly?*, Judith E. Schmid* and E. Sidney Hunter III*
    ?Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina and *Reproductiv...

  6. Geopathology on May Day: Expressions of Culture on Hawai'i's Elementary School Stages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Jamie Simpson

    2013-01-01

    In Hawai'i's elementary schools, May Day programs feature children adorned with flower leis, singing and dancing hula about Hawaiian culture and performing traditions from major ethnic groups who settled the islands. Using the lens of geopathology, this research questions how various groups of residents long for belonging and struggle for…

  7. Periodic Heat Shock Accelerated the Chondrogenic Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Pellet Culture

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sihong

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of diseases that seriously affect elderly people's quality of life. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) offer a potential promise for the joint repair in OA patients. However, chondrogenic differentiation from hMSCs in vitro takes a long time (?6 weeks) and differentiated cells are still not as functionally mature as primary isolated chondrocytes, though chemical stimulations and mechanical loading have been intensively studied to enhance the hMSC differentiation. On the other hand, thermal stimulations of hMSC chondrogenesis have not been well explored. In this study, the direct effects of mild heat shock (HS) on the differentiation of hMSCs into chondrocytes in 3D pellet culture were investigated. Periodic HS at 41C for 1 hr significantly increased sulfated glycosaminoglycan in 3D pellet culture at Day 10 of chondrogenesis. Immunohistochemical and Western Blot analyses revealed an increased expression of collagen type II and aggrecan in heat-shocked pellets than non heat-shocked pellets on Day 17 of chondrogenesis. In addition, HS also upregulated the expression of collagen type I and X as well as heat shock protein 70 on Day 17 and 24 of differentiation. These results demonstrate that HS accelerated the chondrogenic differentiation of hMSCs and induced an early maturation of chondrocytes differentiated from hMSCs. The results of this study will guide the design of future protocols using thermal treatments to facilitate cartilage regeneration with human mesenchymal stem cells. PMID:24632670

  8. The First 90 Days of the New Middle School Principal in a Turnaround School: In-Depth Case Study of the Transition Period (First 90 Days)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baeza, Marco A.

    2010-01-01

    This study analyzed skills, strategies, and theories that new middle school principals used to be successful during their transition period (the first 90 days) in turnaround schools. Based on research on transitions, three research questions guided the study: 1. Do middle school principals in a turnaround school situation find the transition

  9. 45 CFR 147.116 - Prohibition on waiting periods that exceed 90 days.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... is imposed in addition to a measurement period, the time period for determining whether such an... to enroll in the plan if they are determined to be a full-time employee after a measurement period of... measurement period ends November 25 of Year 2. E is determined to be a full-time employee and is notified of...

  10. 29 CFR 2590.715-2708 - Prohibition on waiting periods that exceed 90 days.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... is imposed in addition to a measurement period, the time period for determining whether such an... to enroll in the plan if they are determined to be a full-time employee after a measurement period of... measurement period ends November 25 of Year 2. E is determined to be a full-time employee and is notified of...

  11. 76 FR 6794 - 30-Day Submission Period for Requests for ONC-Approved Accreditor (ONC-AA) Status

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-08

    ... Program for Health Information Technology, 76 FR 1262 (Jan. 7, 2011) (the ``Permanent Certification... HUMAN SERVICES 30-Day Submission Period for Requests for ONC-Approved Accreditor (ONC-AA) Status AGENCY... ONC-Approved Accreditor (ONC-AA) status. Authority: 42 U.S.C. 300jj-11. DATES: The 30-day...

  12. 42 CFR 409.63 - Reduction of inpatient psychiatric benefit days available in the initial benefit period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Reduction of inpatient psychiatric benefit days... Hospital Insurance Benefits 409.63 Reduction of inpatient psychiatric benefit days available in the initial benefit period. (a) Reduction rule. (1) If the individual was an inpatient in a...

  13. 42 CFR 409.63 - Reduction of inpatient psychiatric benefit days available in the initial benefit period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Reduction of inpatient psychiatric benefit days... Hospital Insurance Benefits 409.63 Reduction of inpatient psychiatric benefit days available in the initial benefit period. (a) Reduction rule. (1) If the individual was an inpatient in a...

  14. 42 CFR 409.63 - Reduction of inpatient psychiatric benefit days available in the initial benefit period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Reduction of inpatient psychiatric benefit days... Hospital Insurance Benefits 409.63 Reduction of inpatient psychiatric benefit days available in the initial benefit period. (a) Reduction rule. (1) If the individual was an inpatient in a...

  15. 42 CFR 409.63 - Reduction of inpatient psychiatric benefit days available in the initial benefit period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Reduction of inpatient psychiatric benefit days... Hospital Insurance Benefits 409.63 Reduction of inpatient psychiatric benefit days available in the initial benefit period. (a) Reduction rule. (1) If the individual was an inpatient in a...

  16. 42 CFR 409.63 - Reduction of inpatient psychiatric benefit days available in the initial benefit period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Reduction of inpatient psychiatric benefit days... Hospital Insurance Benefits 409.63 Reduction of inpatient psychiatric benefit days available in the initial benefit period. (a) Reduction rule. (1) If the individual was an inpatient in a...

  17. CTEPP DATA COLLECTION FORM 10 (PERIODS 1-3): DAY CARE CENTER CHILD ACTIVITY DIARY AND FOOD SURVEY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data collection form collects information on the child's activities at the day care center over the 48-hr monitoring period. The diary is divided into three time periods over the 48-monitoring interval. The Food Survey collects information on the frequency and types of frui...

  18. CTEPP NC DATA COLLECTED ON FORM 10 (PERIODS 1-3): DAY CARE CENTER CHILD ACTIVITY DIARY AND FOOD SURVEY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set contains data concerning the childs activities at the day care center over the 48-h monitoring period. The diary was divided into three time periods over the 48-h monitoring interval. The Food Survey collected information on the frequency and types of fruits, veget...

  19. CTEPP NC DATA COLLECTED ON FORM 10 (PERIODS 1-3): DAY CARE CENTER CHILD ACTIVITY DIARY AND FOOD SURVEY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set contains data concerning the child’s activities at the day care center over the 48-h monitoring period. The diary was divided into three time periods over the 48-h monitoring interval. The Food Survey collected information on the frequency and types of fruits, veget...

  20. Sensitive Periods in the Development of Attachment and the Age of Entry into Day Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varin, Dario; Crugnola, Cristina Riva; Molina, Paola; Ripamonti, Chiara

    1996-01-01

    Investigates how the age of entry into regular group day care influences short-term behaviors expressing well-being or discomfort in the day care environment. Finds that children entered at two particular ages displayed difficult reunions with their mothers and were less resistant to frustration; children entered at another age showed lower

  1. Comparison of four media types during 3-day human IVF embryo culture.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Vincent W; Wilcox, Aaron L; Peterson, C Matthew; Parker-Jones, Kirtly; Hatasaka, Harry H; Gibson, Mark; Huang, Ivan; Carrell, Douglas T

    2005-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of human tubal fluid (HTF), G1.2, Sage Cleavage and Life Global media for IVF outcome during 3-day culture of human embryos. A three-phase auto-controlled study was conducted in which IVF outcome was compared between (1) HTF and G1.2, (2) HTF and Cleavage, and (3) Cleavage and Life Global. In phase 1, no differences in embryo quality were observed between HTF and G1.2. However, embryos derived from intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) displayed significantly improved quality when grown in HTF versus G1.2. No differences in pregnancy and implantation rates were observed in cases where embryos transferred were grown exclusively in HTF or G1.2 media. In phase 2, embryo quality was significantly improved for embryos cultured in Cleavage versus HTF media (P < 0.001). However, pregnancy, implantation and spontaneous abortion rates were similar between the two media. In phase 3, there were no differences in embryo quality, pregnancy, implantation, and spontaneous abortion rates between Cleavage and Life Global media. Overall, the data indicate that Life Global and Cleavage media yield similar results in a 3-day IVF culture programme. Cleavage medium is superior to HTF, as evidenced by significantly improved embryo quality (P < 0.001). Meanwhile, HTF medium is superior to G1.2 for ICSI cases. PMID:15949217

  2. The effects of firocoxib (Previcox) in geriatric dogs over a period of 90 days.

    PubMed

    Joubert, K E

    2009-09-01

    The long-term use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents in geriatric dogs with osteoarthritis has not been well studied in veterinary medicine. This study evaluated the effects of firocoxib administered to dogs over 7 years of age for 90 days. Pain and lameness scores were evaluated by the owner weekly for the 1st month and then biweekly through to the end of the study, the veterinarian evaluated the dogs monthly. Serum chemistry, including urea, creatinine, alanine transferase, aspartate transaminase, bile acids and bilirubin, urine specific gravity and a urine dipstick, were performed at monthly intervals. Forty-five dogs were enrolled into the treatment group and 9 into the control group. A total of 33 dogs completed the trial in the treatment group and 8 in the control group. Lameness and pain scores were found to be significantly lower in the treated group from day 30 for most parameters evaluated. Bile acids (although not comparable to controls, with higher mean value and a high standard deviation in the control group; in addition the control group had increased bile acids at day 0) and urea (within normal reference range provided (WNL)) were significantly different in the treatment group between days 0 and 90. Urea (WNL) on days 30 and 90 and creatinine (WNL) on day 90 were significantly different between the control group and the treatment group. The most common adverse events reported were diarrhoea, vomition, dark faeces and anorexia. This study showed that firocoxib was effective in managing pain associated with osteoarthritis for 90 days. Despite the geriatric high-risk population used for this study, minimal biochemical changes were seen and adverse drug events seen were in agreement with those previously reported. PMID:20169752

  3. The Two Complexes of Activity Observed in the Northern Hemisphere during 1982 and the 24-Day Periodicity of Flare Occurrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruždjak, V.; Ruždjak, D.; Brajša, R.; Temmer, M.; Hanslmeier, A.

    Daily numbers of solar Hα flares of importance classes ≥ 1 for the northern solar hemisphere in 1982 are studied applying wavelet power spectra (WPS). Special attention is paid to the occurrence of a 24-day period in the WPS. The wavelet power spectra method is combined with synoptic maps of the magnetic fields. Separately, flare indices of two activity complexes mainly contributing to flare occrrence in this period are examined. It is found that the detected 24-day signal in the WPS is mainly a consequence of the presence of the two flare activity complexes separated by about 45° in longitude during several succesive Carrington rotations.

  4. Discovery of a 30. 5 day periodicity in LMC X-4

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, F.L.; Levine, A.M.; Bautz, M.; Hauskins, S.; Howe, S.; Primini, F.A.; Lewin, W.H.G.; Baity, W.A.; Knight, F.K.; Rothschild, R.E.; Petterson, J.A.

    1981-05-15

    Observations covering a 500/sup d/ time span made with High-Energy X-ray and Low-Energy Gamma-Ray Instrument on HEAO 1 reveal a 30./sup d/48 +- 0./sup d/06 peroidic variability in the approx.13 to approx.80 keV flux from LMC X-4. The source intensity is modulated by at least a factor of 5 through the 30./sup d/5 cycle and is low for approx.40% of the cycle. A value of the orbital period P = 1./sup d/40839 +- 0./sup d/00010 is determined from the observations. Possible origins of the 30./sup d/5 period are discussed.

  5. 75 FR 1656 - Draft Safety Culture Policy Statement: Request for Public Comments; Extension of Comment Period

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-12

    ..., 2009, (74 FR 57525) (ML093030375), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published for public comment... COMMISSION Draft Safety Culture Policy Statement: Request for Public Comments; Extension of Comment Period AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). ACTION: Issuance of draft safety culture policy...

  6. A degree-day model for the latent period of stagonospora nodorum blotch in winter wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stagonospora nodorum blotch (SNB), which is caused by Stagonospora nodorum, occurs frequently in the southeastern United States and severe epidemics can lead to substantial economic losses. To establish a model for the development of SNB based on the effects of temperature on the latent period of th...

  7. Responses of primary cultured haemocytes from the marine gastropod Haliotis tuberculata under 10-day exposure to cadmium chloride.

    PubMed

    Latire, Thomas; Le Pabic, Charles; Mottin, Elmina; Mottier, Antoine; Costil, Katherine; Koueta, Noussithé; Lebel, Jean-Marc; Serpentini, Antoine

    2012-03-01

    Among metals, cadmium, a non-essential element, is an important pollutant that is released into aquatic environments. Due to its persistence and bioaccumulation, this metal has been shown to exert immunological effects on organisms. The objective of the present study was to investigate the in vitro effects of cadmium chloride using a haemocyte primary culture from the European abalone, Haliotis tuberculata. Most studies have maintained viable haemocytes in vitro for periods ranging from several hours to several days during acute exposures. Few investigations have reported the effects of metals using longer in vitro exposures, which are more realistic with regard to mimicking environmental conditions. In this study, we exposed abalone haemocytes to concentrations from 0.5 to 50,000 μgL(-1) of CdCl2 for 10 days. The effects of cadmium chloride were reflected in a significant decrease in the number of viable cells and morphological modifications in a concentration-dependent manner beginning at a concentration of 500 μgL(-1) as well as in some physiological processes, such as phagocytotic activity and the number of lysosome-positive cells. In contrast, phenoloxidase (PO) activity and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production were increased beginning at a concentration of 5 μgL(-1), which is consistent with environmental concentrations in polluted sites. For PO activity and ROS production, maximally 9-fold and 130% inductions, respectively, were recorded under the highest dose. These results thus indicate that cadmium chloride alters immune parameters of abalone haemocytes and that the long-term (10 days) primary culture system used here represents a suitable, sensitive in vitro model for assessing cytotoxic responses. PMID:22018399

  8. The 54-day orbital period of AX J1820.5-1434 unveiled by Swift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segreto, A.; La Parola, V.; Cusumano, G.; D'Aì, A.; Masetti, N.; Campana, S.

    2013-10-01

    Context. The hard X-ray survey that Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) has been performing since late 2004 provides a considerable database for a large number of sources, whose hard X-ray emission are poorly known. Aims: We exploit the BAT survey archive to improve the temporal and spectral characterization of the Galactic hard-X-ray sources. We focus here on the study of the high mass X-ray binary AX J1820.5-1434. Methods: All the data relevant to AX J1820.5-1434 were extracted from the BAT survey archive and analyzed using a folding technique to search for periodical modulations. A broad-band spectral analysis was also performed, complementing the BAT spectrum with the available Swift X-Ray Telescope (XRT) and XMM-Newton pointed observations. Results: A timing analysis revealed the detection of a coherent signal at P0 = 54.0 ± 0.4 d, which we interpret as the orbital period of the binary system. When folded with a period of P0, the light curve shows an asymmetric profile with a minimum roughly consistent with zero intensity. The broadband spectral analysis coupling Swift-XRT, XMM-Newton, and Swift-BAT spectra confirms that the source emission is well modeled with a strongly absorbed power law with no evidence of a high energy exponential cutoff.

  9. A 154-day periodicity in the occurrence of hard solar flares?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rieger, E.; Kanbach, G.; Reppin, C.; Share, G. H.; Forrest, D. J.; Chupp, E. L.

    1984-01-01

    An analysis of the temporal distribution of 139 solar flares monitored by the Gamma Ray Spectrometer aboard the Solar Maximum Mission is reported. It is found that, instead of being randomly distributed in time, these events have a tendency to occur in groups with a mean spacing of about 154 days (75 nHz) over the observing interval. A larger sample of flares with an X-ray classification of M 2.5 or larger recorded by the GOES satellite showed a similar regularity.

  10. Finding a 24 Day Orbital Period for the X-Ray Binary 1A 1118-616

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staubert, R.; Pottschmidt, K.; Doroshenko, V.; Wilms, J.; Suchy, S.; Rothschild, R.; Santangelo, A.

    2010-01-01

    We report the first determination of the binary period and the orbital ephemeris of the Be X-ray binary containing the pulsar IA 1118-616 (35 years after the discovery of the source). The orbital period is found to be P(sub orb) = 24.0+/-0.4 days. The source was observed by RXTE during its last big X-ray outburst in January 2009, peaking at MJD 54845.4. This outburst was sampled by taking short observations every few days, covering an elapsed time comparable to the orbital period. Using the phase connection technique, pulse arrival time delays could be measured and an orbital solution determined. The data are consistent with a circular orbit, the time of 90 degrees longitude was found to be T,/2 = MJD 54845.37(10), coincident with the peak X-ray flux.

  11. Comparison of SAFER behavior assessment results in shelter dogs at intake and after a 3-day acclimation period.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Sara L; Weng, Hsin-Yi; Walker, Sheryl L; Placer, Margaret; Litster, Annette

    2015-01-01

    In this study, it was hypothesized that different results would be obtained by canine behavior assessments performed within 24 hr of shelter intake (Day 0) and after a 3-day acclimation period (Day 3). Safety Assessment for Evaluating Rehoming assessments were performed on 33 dogs at 2 municipal shelters. Agreements between Day 0 and Day 3 varied among subtests, and no consistent temporal patterns were observed. Weighted kappa statistics for each subtest ranged from .28 to .78, and percentage discordance was 0% to 18%. In a 2nd analysis, subtests skipped due to serious aggression were replaced with scores corresponding to serious aggression, and missing values for the Food subtest were replaced with scores for no aggression if the dog did not eat. For subtests skipped due to severe aggression, more than 50% of the dogs had scores indicating low aggression on the other assessment. Eight of 16 dogs who did not eat on Day 0 ate on Day 3; 2 showed aggression. Until the ideal time to test can be identified, it should be based on the individual dog's welfare status, and testing of dogs showing severe stress should be avoided. PMID:25603466

  12. An estimate of equatorial wave energy flux at 9- to 90-day periods in the Central Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eriksen, Charles C.; Richman, James G.

    1988-01-01

    Deep fluctuations in current along the equator in the Central Pacific are dominated by coherent structures which correspond closely to narrow-band propagating equatorial waves. Currents were measured roughly at 1500 and 3000 m depths at five moorings between 144 and 148 deg W from January 1981 to March 1983, as part of the Pacific Equatorial Ocean Dynamics program. In each frequency band resolved, a single complex empirical orthogonal function accounts for half to three quarters of the observed variance in either zonal or meridional current. Dispersion for equatorial first meridional Rossby and Rossby gravity waves is consistent with the observed vertical-zonal coherence structure. The observations indicate that energy flux is westward and downward in long first meridional mode Rossby waves at periods 45 days and longer, and eastward and downward in short first meridional mode Rossby waves and Rossby-gravity waves at periods 30 days and shorter. A local minimum in energy flux occurs at periods corresponding to a maximum in upper-ocean meridional current energy contributed by tropical instability waves. Total vertical flux across the 9- to 90-day period range is 2.5 kW/m.

  13. Clouds in North Polar Region Tracked by MOC Over Five Day Period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    It is mid-summer in the northern hemisphere of Mars--a time of enhanced heating that leads to the release of water vapor into the atmosphere. In the north polar region, temperature differences between bright areas of year-round ice and dark areas of sand and rock create strong winds that mix the atmosphere and create waves of clouds that swirl around the polar cap. Sometimes, as seen during the Viking mission, these winds form tight cyclones; other times, they weave an intricate pattern reflecting the turbulence of the circulation of the atmosphere.

    This animation shows four days of observations of a representative portion of the northern hemisphere. Five Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) wide angle image pairs(red/blue filters) were combined. These image pairs were warped to create a polar stereographic map projection, which is used by cartographers to present polar areas as if viewed from above. The edges of the pictures move back and forth because of the slightly different path taken by the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft on each of the five orbits used in this sequence. Seen in the right-hand side of the image is the permanent ice cap and the dark areas that surround it.

    The motion of the clouds viewed in this image is typical for this season on Mars, and shows forms often seen on Earth. Waves of clouds are moving from the upper portion of the frame towards the bottom (towards the east northeast). This motion is most likely the movement of a moister portion of the martian atmosphere under the influence of circumpolar winds. Early in the sequence, a prominent circular band of clouds moves almost due east, rotating slightly counter-clockwise. Towards the end of the sequence, the circle dissipates and a linear set of clouds propagates towards the bottom of the frame. Linear cloud speeds vary from day today, averaging about 16 km/hr (10 miles/hr); rotational rates appear to have been less than 10 km/hr (6 miles/hr).

    Malin Space Science Systems and the California Institute of Technology built the MOC using spare hardware from the Mars Observer mission. MSSS operates the camera from its facilities in San Diego, CA. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO.

  14. "A Day in the Life": Advancing a Methodology for the Cultural Study of Development and Learning in Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillen, Julia; Cameron, Catherine Ann; Tapanya, Sombat; Pinto, Giuliana; Hancock, Roger; Young, Susan; Gamannossi, Beatrice Accorti

    2007-01-01

    This paper explores the methodology of an ecological investigation of aspects of culture in the interactional construction of early childhood in diverse global communities: Peru, Italy, Canada, Thailand, and the United Kingdom. Regarding culture as a dynamic dimension of the child's socialisation, the approach taken was to film a "day in the life"

  15. "A Day in the Life": Advancing a Methodology for the Cultural Study of Development and Learning in Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillen, Julia; Cameron, Catherine Ann; Tapanya, Sombat; Pinto, Giuliana; Hancock, Roger; Young, Susan; Gamannossi, Beatrice Accorti

    2007-01-01

    This paper explores the methodology of an ecological investigation of aspects of culture in the interactional construction of early childhood in diverse global communities: Peru, Italy, Canada, Thailand, and the United Kingdom. Regarding culture as a dynamic dimension of the child's socialisation, the approach taken was to film a "day in the life"…

  16. Validation of shortened 2-day sterility testing of mesenchymal stem cell-based therapeutic preparation on an automated culture system.

    PubMed

    Lysák, Daniel; Holubová, Monika; Bergerová, Tamara; Vávrová, Monika; Cangemi, Giuseppina Cristina; Ciccocioppo, Rachele; Kruzliak, Peter; Jindra, Pavel

    2016-03-01

    Cell therapy products represent a new trend of treatment in the field of immunotherapy and regenerative medicine. Their biological nature and multistep preparation procedure require the application of complex release criteria and quality control. Microbial contamination of cell therapy products is a potential source of morbidity in recipients. The automated blood culture systems are widely used for the detection of microorganisms in cell therapy products. However the standard 2-week cultivation period is too long for some cell-based treatments and alternative methods have to be devised. We tried to verify whether a shortened cultivation of the supernatant from the mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) culture obtained 2 days before the cell harvest could sufficiently detect microbial growth and allow the release of MSC for clinical application. We compared the standard Ph. Eur. cultivation method and the automated blood culture system BACTEC (Becton Dickinson). The time to detection (TTD) and the detection limit were analyzed for three bacterial and two fungal strains. The Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were recognized within 24 h with both methods (detection limit ~10 CFU). The time required for the detection of Bacillus subtilis was shorter with the automated method (TTD 10.3 vs. 60 h for 10-100 CFU). The BACTEC system reached significantly shorter times to the detection of Candida albicans and Aspergillus brasiliensis growth compared to the classical method (15.5 vs. 48 and 31.5 vs. 48 h, respectively; 10-100 CFU). The positivity was demonstrated within 48 h in all bottles, regardless of the size of the inoculum. This study validated the automated cultivation system as a method able to detect all tested microorganisms within a 48-h period with a detection limit of ~10 CFU. Only in case of B. subtilis, the lowest inoculum (~10 CFU) was not recognized. The 2-day cultivation technique is then capable of confirming the microbiological safety of MSC and allows their timely release for clinical application. PMID:26143146

  17. PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF THE 0.94-DAY PERIOD TRANSITING PLANETARY SYSTEM WASP-18

    SciTech Connect

    Southworth, John; Anderson, D. R.; Maxted, P. F. L.; Hinse, T. C.; Dominik, M.; Mathiasen, M.; Browne, P.; Glitrup, M.; Joergensen, U. G.; Harpsoee, K.; Liebig, C.; Maier, G.; Bozza, V.; Calchi Novati, S.; Mancini, L.; Burgdorf, M.; Dreizler, S.; Hessman, F.; Hundertmark, M.; Finet, F.

    2009-12-10

    We present high-precision photometry of five consecutive transits of WASP-18, an extrasolar planetary system with one of the shortest orbital periods known. Through the use of telescope defocusing we achieve a photometric precision of 0.47-0.83 mmag per observation over complete transit events. The data are analyzed using the JKTEBOP code and three different sets of stellar evolutionary models. We find the mass and radius of the planet to be M {sub b} = 10.43 +- 0.30 +- 0.24 M {sub Jup} and R {sub b} = 1.165 +- 0.055 +- 0.014 R {sub Jup} (statistical and systematic errors), respectively. The systematic errors in the orbital separation and the stellar and planetary masses, arising from the use of theoretical predictions, are of a similar size to the statistical errors and set a limit on our understanding of the WASP-18 system. We point out that seven of the nine known massive transiting planets (M {sub b} > 3 M {sub Jup}) have eccentric orbits, whereas significant orbital eccentricity has been detected for only four of the 46 less-massive planets. This may indicate that there are two different populations of transiting planets, but could also be explained by observational biases. Further radial velocity observations of low-mass planets will make it possible to choose between these two scenarios.

  18. Spin-orbit alignment for 110 day period KOI368.01 from gravity darkening

    SciTech Connect

    Ahlers, John P.; Seubert, Shayne A.; Barnes, Jason W.

    2014-05-10

    We fit the Kepler photometric light curve of the KOI-368 system using an oblate, gravity-darkened stellar model in order to constrain its spin-orbit alignment. We find that the system is relatively well-aligned with a sky-projected spin-orbit alignment of λ = 10° ± 2°, a stellar obliquity of ψ = 3° ± 7°, and a true spin-orbit alignment of ψ = 11° ± 3°. Although our measurement differs significantly from zero, the low value for ψ is consistent with spin-orbit alignment. We also measure various transit parameters of the KOI-368 system: R {sub KOI-368} = 2.28 ± 0.02 R {sub ☉}, R{sub p} = 1.83 ± 0.02 R {sub jup}, and i = 89.°221 ± 0.°013. This work shows that our gravity-darkened model can constrain long-period, well-aligned planets and M-class stars orbiting fast-rotators, allowing for measurement of a new subcategory of transiting bodies.

  19. 20 CFR 1002.196 - What is the employee's reemployment position if the period of service was less than 91 days?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... if the period of service was less than 91 days? 1002.196 Section 1002.196 Employees' Benefits OFFICE... period of service was less than 91 days? Following a period of service in the uniformed services of less... he or she was employed on the date that the period of service began. The employee must be...

  20. 20 CFR 1002.196 - What is the employee's reemployment position if the period of service was less than 91 days?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... if the period of service was less than 91 days? 1002.196 Section 1002.196 Employees' Benefits OFFICE... period of service was less than 91 days? Following a period of service in the uniformed services of less... he or she was employed on the date that the period of service began. The employee must be...

  1. 20 CFR 1002.196 - What is the employee's reemployment position if the period of service was less than 91 days?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... if the period of service was less than 91 days? 1002.196 Section 1002.196 Employees' Benefits OFFICE... period of service was less than 91 days? Following a period of service in the uniformed services of less... he or she was employed on the date that the period of service began. The employee must be...

  2. 20 CFR 1002.196 - What is the employee's reemployment position if the period of service was less than 91 days?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... if the period of service was less than 91 days? 1002.196 Section 1002.196 Employees' Benefits OFFICE... period of service was less than 91 days? Following a period of service in the uniformed services of less... he or she was employed on the date that the period of service began. The employee must be...

  3. 20 CFR 1002.196 - What is the employee's reemployment position if the period of service was less than 91 days?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... if the period of service was less than 91 days? 1002.196 Section 1002.196 Employees' Benefits OFFICE... period of service was less than 91 days? Following a period of service in the uniformed services of less... he or she was employed on the date that the period of service began. The employee must be...

  4. 76 FR 16031 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-22

    ... and Evaluation, Evaluation Division: Sports & Culture Evaluation Kennedy Center Visitors Survey, OMB... Policy and Evaluation, Evaluation Division: Sports & Culture Evaluation Kennedy Center Visitors Survey... larger Sports and Culture Evaluation to conduct a survey of exchange participants who participated in...

  5. 76 FR 33395 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collections: ECA Sports & Culture Evaluation Surveys

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-08

    ... Notice of Proposed Information Collections: ECA Sports & Culture Evaluation Surveys ACTION: Notice of... Information Collection: Sports & Culture Evaluation, Between the Lines (BTL) Survey. OMB Control Number: None... Respond: Voluntary. Title of Information Collection: Sports & Culture Evaluation, Sports Envoys...

  6. INTERPRETATION OF THE 115 DAY PERIODIC MODULATION IN THE X-RAY FLUX OF NGC 5408 X-1

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, D. L.; Charles, P. A.; Holley-Bockelmann, K.

    2010-12-20

    We comment on the recent observation of a 115 day modulation in the X-ray flux of the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) NGC 5408 X-1, and in particular, the interpretation of this modulation as the orbital period. We suggest that this modulation may instead be due to a precessing jet, and is thus superorbital in nature. Comparing the properties of this ULX with those of the prototypical micro-quasar SS 433, we argue that NGC 5408 X-1 is very similar to SS 433: a hyper-accreting stellar-mass black hole in a shorter-period binary. If the analogy holds, the 115 day modulation is best explained by the still poorly understood physics of inner-disk/jet precession and a longer observing baseline would be able to reveal an intrinsic phase jitter that is associated with such a precession.

  7. Expression of fetal-type intermediate filaments by 17-day-old rat Sertoli cells cultured on reconstituted basement membrane.

    PubMed

    Guillou, F; Monet-Kuntz, C; Fontaine, I; Flechon, J E

    1990-05-01

    The expression of cytokeratin- and vimentin-type intermediate filaments was studied by means of immunohistochemistry in Sertoli cells cultured on two types of reconstituted basement membrane in two-compartment culture chambers. In situ, the Sertoli cells of 17-day-old rats contained only vimentin intermediate filaments. During culture, a gradual reorganization of intermediate filaments accompanied by an increased cytokeratin immunoreactivity was observed. After 6 days, Sertoli cells contained both cytokeratin and vimentin, and the same cytokeratin type as in fetal and newborn testis was revealed by electrophoresis and immunoblotting. The present study shows that the isolation and culture of Sertoli cells causes, even in an improved culture system, qualitative changes in the expression of intermediate filament proteins. PMID:1694107

  8. Period trends in rate of suicide in first 28 days after discharge from psychiatric hospital in Scotland, 1968-92.

    PubMed Central

    Geddes, J. R.; Juszczak, E.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To examine period trends in the rate of suicide in the first 28 days after discharge from psychiatric hospital. DESIGN--Cohort study of patients discharged from psychiatric hospital. SETTING--Scotland. SUBJECTS--All patients aged 15-84 who were discharged from Scottish psychiatric hospitals during 1968 to 1992. OUTCOME MEASURE--The rate of suicide (classified as codes E950-9 and E980-9 according to the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision) within 28 days of discharge per 100,000 person years at risk for five year periods during 1968 to 1992. Crude, within cohort rates and externally standardised rates were calculated. RESULTS--Overall, 196 male patients committed suicide in 20,520 person years at risk, and 171 female patients committed suicide in 24,114 person years at risk. A significant linear trend was seen in period effect on externally standardised mortality ratios in both sexes: a decrease in male patients (P = 0.008) and an increase in female patients (P = 0.0001). The adjusted standardised mortality ratio in 1988-92 compared with 1968-72 was 0.62 (95% confidence interval 0.39 to 0.98) in male patients and 2.73 (1.64 to 4.56) in female patients. CONCLUSION--The increase in the rate of suicide in the 28 days after discharge in female psychiatric patients makes this an increasingly important period to target. The rise has occurred against the background of a reduction of 60% in the number of psychiatric beds for adults. PMID:7640540

  9. Global Characteristics of the Correlation and Time Lag Between Solar and Ionospheric Parameters in the 27-day Period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Choon-Ki; Han, Shin-Chan; Dieter,Bilitza; Ki-Weon,Seo

    2012-01-01

    The 27-day variations of topside ionosphere are investigated using the in-situ electron density measurements from the CHAMP planar Langmuir probe and GRACE K-band ranging system. As the two satellite systems orbit at the altitudes of approx. 370 km and approx. 480 km, respectively, the satellite data sets are greatly valuable for examining the electron density variations in the vicinity of F2-peak. In a 27-day period, the electron density measurements from the satellites are in good agreements with the solar flux, except during the solar minimum period. The time delays are mostly 1-2 day and represent the hemispherical asymmetry. The globally-estimated spatial patterns of the correlation between solar flux and in-situ satellite measurements show poor correlations in the (magnetic) equatorial region, which are not found from the ground measurements of vertically-integrated electron content. We suggest that the most plausible cause for the poor correlation is the vertical movement of ionization due to atmospheric dynamic processes that is not controlled by the solar extreme ultraviolet radiation.

  10. 75 FR 60490 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-30

    ...: Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, Office of Policy and Evaluation, Evaluation Division Survey.... Originating Office: Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, Office of Policy and Evaluation, Evaluation... Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, Office of...

  11. 76 FR 16029 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-22

    ... and Evaluation, Evaluation Division: Sports & Culture Evaluation Envoys Survey, OMB Control Number... Evaluation, Evaluation Division: Sports & Culture Evaluation Envoys Survey OMB Control Number: None Type of... collection clearance will allow ECA/P/V as part of their larger Sports and Culture Evaluation to conduct...

  12. 76 FR 16033 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-22

    ... and Evaluation, Evaluation Division: Sports & Culture Evaluation BTL Survey, OMB Control Number 1405..., Evaluation Division: Sports & Culture Evaluation BTL Survey. OMB Control Number: None. Type of Request: New... collection clearance will allow ECA/P/V as part of their larger Sports and Culture Evaluation to conduct...

  13. 76 FR 16033 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-22

    ... and Evaluation, Evaluation Division: Sports & Culture Evaluation IVLP Survey, OMB Control Number 1405..., Evaluation Division: Sports & Culture Evaluation IVLP Survey. OMB Control Number: None. Type of Request: New... larger Sports and Culture Evaluation to conduct a survey of exchange participants who participated...

  14. 76 FR 16032 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-22

    ... and Evaluation, Evaluation Division: Sports & Culture Evaluation IWP Survey, OMB Control Number 1405..., Evaluation Division: Sports & Culture Evaluation IWP Survey. OMB Control Number: None. Type of Request: New... collection clearance will allow ECA/P/V as part of their larger Sports and Culture Evaluation to conduct...

  15. 76 FR 16031 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-22

    ... and Evaluation, Evaluation Division: Sports & Culture Evaluation Sports Surveys, OMB Control Number... Evaluation, Evaluation Division: Sports & Culture Evaluation Sports Surveys. OMB Control Number: None. Type... collection clearance will allow ECA/P/V as part of their larger Sports and Culture Evaluation to conduct...

  16. The Metabolomic Profile of Spent Culture Media from Day-3 Human Embryos Cultured under Low Oxygen Tension.

    PubMed

    de Los Santos, Maria José; Gámiz, Pilar; de Los Santos, José María; Romero, Josep Lluís; Prados, Nicolás; Alonso, Cristina; Remohí, José; Dominguez, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Despite efforts made to improve the in vitro embryo culture conditions used during assisted reproduction procedures, human embryos must adapt to different in vitro oxygen concentrations and the new metabolic milieu provided by the diverse culture media used for such protocols. It has been shown that the embryo culture environment can affect not only cellular metabolism, but also gene expression in different species of mammalian embryos. Therefore we wanted to compare the metabolic footprint left by human cleavage-stage embryos under two types of oxygen atmospheric culture conditions (6% and 20% O2). The spent culture media from 39 transferred and implanted embryos from a total of 22 patients undergoing egg donation treatment was analyzed; 23 embryos came from 13 patients in the 6% oxygen concentration group, and 16 embryos from 9 patients were used in the 20% oxygen concentration group. The multivariate statistics we used in our analysis showed that human cleavage-stage embryos grown under both types of oxygen concentration left a similar metabolic fingerprint. We failed to observe any change in the net depletion or release of relevant analytes, such as glucose and especially fatty acids, by human cleavage-stage embryos under either type of culture condition. Therefore it seems that low oxygen tension during embryo culture does not alter the global metabolism of human cleavage-stage embryos. PMID:26562014

  17. The Metabolomic Profile of Spent Culture Media from Day-3 Human Embryos Cultured under Low Oxygen Tension

    PubMed Central

    de los Santos, Maria José; Gámiz, Pilar; de los Santos, José María; Romero, Josep Lluís; Prados, Nicolás; Alonso, Cristina; Remohí, José; Dominguez, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Despite efforts made to improve the in vitro embryo culture conditions used during assisted reproduction procedures, human embryos must adapt to different in vitro oxygen concentrations and the new metabolic milieu provided by the diverse culture media used for such protocols. It has been shown that the embryo culture environment can affect not only cellular metabolism, but also gene expression in different species of mammalian embryos. Therefore we wanted to compare the metabolic footprint left by human cleavage-stage embryos under two types of oxygen atmospheric culture conditions (6% and 20% O2). The spent culture media from 39 transferred and implanted embryos from a total of 22 patients undergoing egg donation treatment was analyzed; 23 embryos came from 13 patients in the 6% oxygen concentration group, and 16 embryos from 9 patients were used in the 20% oxygen concentration group. The multivariate statistics we used in our analysis showed that human cleavage-stage embryos grown under both types of oxygen concentration left a similar metabolic fingerprint. We failed to observe any change in the net depletion or release of relevant analytes, such as glucose and especially fatty acids, by human cleavage-stage embryos under either type of culture condition. Therefore it seems that low oxygen tension during embryo culture does not alter the global metabolism of human cleavage-stage embryos. PMID:26562014

  18. The October-November, 2003 Solar Activity and its Relationship to the "approx. 155 day" Solar Periodicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, I. G.; Cane, H. V.

    2004-01-01

    Periodicities of approx. 155 days in various solar and interplanetary phenomena were first discovered during solar cycle 21 and have been shown to be intermittently present in other solar cycles. In the current solar cycle (23), they have been reported in solar energetic particle events and interplanetary coronal mass ejections. We assess whether the "unexpected" October - November 2003 burst of solar activity during the late declining phase of the cycle may have been a manifestation of such a periodic behavior, and hence might have been to some extent "predictable". If the pattern were to continue, episodes of enhanced activity might be expected around April - May and October, 2004. There was a modest increase activity increase in mid-April, 2004 which may conform to this pattern.

  19. The October-November, 2003 Solar Activity and its Relationship to the "approximately 155 day" Solar Periodicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, I. G.; Cane, H. V.

    2005-01-01

    Periodicities of - 155 days in various solar and interplanetary phenomena were first discovered during solar cycle 21 and have been shown t o be intermittently present in other solar cycles. In the current solar cycle (23), they have been reported in solar energetic particle events and interplanetary coronal maSS ejections. We assess whether the "unexpected" October - November 2003 burst of solar activity during the late declining phase of the cycle may have been a manifestation of such a periodic behavior, and hence might have been to =me extent "predictable". If the pattern were to continue, episodes of enhanced activity might be expected around April - May and October, 2004. There was a mod- est increase activity increase in mid-April, 2004 which may conform to this pattern.

  20. Antimicrobial use over a four-year period using days of therapy measurement at a Canadian pediatric acute care hospital

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Bruce R; MacTavish, Sandra J; Bresee, Lauren C; Rajapakse, Nipunie; Vanderkooi, Otto; Vayalumkal, Joseph; Conly, John

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Antimicrobial resistance is a concern that is challenging the ability to treat common infections. Surveillance of antimicrobial use in pediatric acute care institutions is complicated because the common metric unit, the defined daily dose, is problematic for this population. OBJECTIVE: During a four-year period in which no specific antimicrobial stewardship initiatives were conducted, pediatric antimicrobial use was quantified using days of therapy (DOT) per 100 patient days (PD) (DOT/100 PD) at the Alberta Childrens Hospital (Calgary, Alberta) for benchmarking purposes. METHODS: Drug use data for systemic antimicrobials administered on wards at the Alberta Childrens Hospital were collected from electronic medication administration records. DOT were calculated and rates were determined using 100 PD as the denominator. Changes over the surveillance period and subgroup proportions were represented graphically and assessed using linear regression. RESULTS: Total antimicrobial use decreased from 93.6 DOT/100 PD to 75.7 DOT/100 PD (19.1%) over the 2010/2011 through to the 2013/2014 fiscal years. During this period, a 20.0% increase in PD and an essentially stable absolute count of DOT (2.9% decrease) were observed. Overall, antimicrobial use was highest in the pediatric intensive care and oncology units. DISCUSSION: The exact changes in prescribing patterns that led to the observed reduction in DOT/100 PD with associated increased PD are unclear, but may be a topic for future investigations. CONCLUSION: Antimicrobial use data from a Canadian acute care pediatric hospital reported in DOT/100 PD were compiled for a four-year time period. These data may be useful for benchmarking purposes. PMID:26600813

  1. SOPHIE velocimetry of Kepler transit candidates. XVII. The physical properties of giant exoplanets within 400 days of period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santerne, A.; Moutou, C.; Tsantaki, M.; Bouchy, F.; Hébrard, G.; Adibekyan, V.; Almenara, J.-M.; Amard, L.; Barros, S. C. C.; Boisse, I.; Bonomo, A. S.; Bruno, G.; Courcol, B.; Deleuil, M.; Demangeon, O.; Díaz, R. F.; Guillot, T.; Havel, M.; Montagnier, G.; Rajpurohit, A. S.; Rey, J.; Santos, N. C.

    2016-03-01

    While giant extrasolar planets have been studied for more than two decades now, there are still some open questions as to their dominant formation and migration processes, as well as to their atmospheric evolution in different stellar environments. In this paper, we study a sample of giant transiting exoplanets detected by the Kepler telescope with orbital periods up to 400 days. We first defined a sample of 129 giant-planet candidates that we followed up with the SOPHIE spectrograph (OHP, France) in a 6-year radial velocity campaign. This allowed us to unveil the nature of these candidates and to measure a false-positive rate of 54.6 ± 6.5% for giant-planet candidates orbiting within 400 days of period. Based on a sample of confirmed or likely planets, we then derived the occurrence rates of giant planets in different ranges of orbital periods. The overall occurrence rate of giant planets within 400 days is 4.6 ± 0.6%. We recovered, for the first time in the Kepler data, the different populations of giant planets reported by radial velocity surveys. Comparing these rates with other yields, we find that the occurrence rate of giant planets is lower only for hot Jupiters but not for the longer-period planets. We also derive a first measurement of the occurrence rate of brown dwarfs in the brown-dwarf desert with a value of 0.29 ± 0.17%. Finally, we discuss the physical properties of the giant planets in our sample. We confirm that giant planets receiving moderate irradiation are not inflated, but we find that they are on average smaller than predicted by formation and evolution models. In this regime of low-irradiated giant planets, we find a possible correlation between their bulk density and the iron abundance of the host star, which needs more detections to be confirmed. Based on observations made with SOPHIE on the 1.93 m telescope at Observatoire de Haute-Provence (CNRS), France.RV data (Appendices C and D) are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/587/A64

  2. The role of 3D microenvironmental organization in MCF-7 epithelial–mesenchymal transition after 7 culture days

    SciTech Connect

    Foroni, Laura; Vasuri, Francesco; Valente, Sabrina; Gualandi, Chiara; Focarete, Maria Letizia; Caprara, Giacomo; Scandola, Mariastella; D'Errico-Grigioni, Antonia; Pasquinelli, Gianandrea

    2013-06-10

    We present a multi-technique study on in vitro epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) in human MCF-7 cells cultured on electrospun scaffolds of poly(L-lactic acid) (PLA), with random and aligned fiber orientations. Our aim is to investigate the morphological and genetic characteristics induced by extracellular matrix in tumor cells cultured in different 3D environments, and at different time points. Cell vitality was assessed with AlamarBlue at days 1, 3, 5 and 7. Scanning electron microscopy was performed at culture days 3 and 7. Immunohistochemistry (for E-cadherin, β-catenin, cytokeratins, nucleophosmin, tubulin, Ki-67 and vimentin), immunofluorescence (for F-actin) western blot (for E-cadherin, β-catenin and vimentin) and transmission electron microscopy were carried out at day 7. An EMT gene array followed by PCR analysis confirmed the regulation of selected genes. At day 7, scanning electron microscopy on aligned-PLA revealed spindle-shaped cells gathered in buds and ribbon-like structures, with a higher nucleolar/nuclear ratio and a loss in E-cadherin and β-catenin at immunohistochemistry and western blot. An up-regulation of SMAD2, TGF-β2, TFPI2 and SOX10 was found in aligned-PLA compared to random-PLA cultured cells. The topography of the extracellular matrix has a role in tumor EMT, and a more aggressive phenotype characterizes MCF-7 cells cultured on aligned-PLA scaffold. -- Highlights: • After 7 culture days an aligned-PLA scaffold induces a spindle shape to MCF-7 cells. • Despite these changes, the aligned MCF-7 cells keep an epithelial phenotype. • The extracellular environment alone influences the E-cadherin/β-catenin axis. • The extracellular environment can promote the epithelial–mesenchymal transition.

  3. Impact of Magnet Culture in Maintaining Quality Outcomes During Periods of Organizational Transition.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Judith F Zedreck; Wolf, Gail; Dudjak, Linda; Jordan, Bernadette

    2015-01-01

    Organizational transition presents substantial risk to maintaining quality outcomes. The leadership style and culture present during periods of change and transition empower the frontline staff to react quickly and identify opportunities. The culture of Magnet develops the skill set that enables staff to be leaders in problem solving and identifying creative care delivery approaches. Objectives of this study were to analyze the impact of organizational transition on patient and staff satisfaction, quality, and safety in a Magnet-designated hospital and determine key factors contributing to these outcomes. PMID:25768059

  4. Block training periodization in alpine skiing: effects of 11-day HIT on VO2max and performance.

    PubMed

    Breil, Fabio A; Weber, Simone N; Koller, Stefan; Hoppeler, Hans; Vogt, Michael

    2010-08-01

    Attempting to achieve the high diversity of training goals in modern competitive alpine skiing simultaneously can be difficult and may lead to compromised overall adaptation. Therefore, we investigated the effect of block training periodization on maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) and parameters of exercise performance in elite junior alpine skiers. Six female and 15 male athletes were assigned to high-intensity interval (IT, N = 13) or control training groups (CT, N = 8). IT performed 15 high-intensity aerobic interval (HIT) sessions in 11 days. Sessions were 4 x 4 min at 90-95% of maximal heart rate separated by 3-min recovery periods. CT continued their conventionally mixed training, containing endurance and strength sessions. Before and 7 days after training, subjects performed a ramp incremental test followed by a high-intensity time-to-exhaustion (tlim) test both on a cycle ergometer, a 90-s high-box jump test as well as countermovement (CMJ) and squat jumps (SJ) on a force plate. IT significantly improved relative VO2max by 6.0% (P < 0.01; male +7.5%, female +2.1%), relative peak power output by 5.5% (P < 0.01) and power output at ventilatory threshold 2 by 9.6% (P < 0.01). No changes occurred for these measures in CT. tlim remained unchanged in both groups. High-box jump performance was significantly improved in males of IT only (4.9%, P < 0.05). Jump peak power (CMJ -4.8%, SJ -4.1%; P < 0.01), but not height decreased in IT only. For competitive alpine skiers, block periodization of HIT offers a promising way to efficiently improve VO2max and performance. Compromised explosive jump performance might be associated with persisting muscle fatigue. PMID:20364385

  5. Physical and Behavioral Measures that Predict Cats Socialization in an Animal Shelter Environment during a Three Day Period

    PubMed Central

    Slater, Margaret; Garrison, Laurie; Miller, Katherine; Weiss, Emily; Drain, Natasha; Makolinski, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    Simple Summary Information from surveys completed by the cats caregivers provided a score for the level of socialization of cats. We examined the effectiveness of structured assessments and measures in their ability to distinguish More and Less Socialized cats in a shelter-like setting over a three day period. Statistical models were developed that best predicted More and Less Socialized cats. Measures from these models were used to calculate a point system where more points indicated more socialization. In combination with key socialized behaviors, these points were able to fairly accurately distinguish More Socialized from Less Socialized cats. Abstract Animal welfare organizations typically take in cats with unknown levels of socialization towards humans, ranging from unsocialized cats well-socialized but lost pets. Agencies typically determine the socialization status and disposition options of cats within three days, when even a well-socialized pet may be too frightened of the unfamiliar surroundings to display its typical behavior. This is the third part of a three-phase project to develop and evaluate a reliable and valid tool to predict cats socialization levels. We recruited cats from the full spectrum of socialization and, using information from the cats caregivers regarding typical behavior toward familiar and unfamiliar people, assigned each cat to a Socialization Category. This information was compared to the cats behavior during three days of structured assessments conducted in a shelter-like setting. The results of logistic regression modeling generated two models using assessments from the mornings of the second and third day, focusing on predicting shyer or more aloof but socialized cats. Using the coefficients from each of these models, two sets of points were calculated which were useful in differentiating More and Less Socialized cats. In combination with key socialized behaviors, these points were able to fairly accurately identify More and Less Socialized cats. PMID:26479759

  6. Scale-up and optimization of an acoustic filter for 200 L/day perfusion of a CHO cell culture.

    PubMed

    Gorenflo, Volker M; Smith, Laura; Dedinsky, Bob; Persson, Bo; Piret, James M

    2002-11-20

    Acoustic cell retention devices have provided a practical alternative for up to 50 L/day perfusion cultures but further scale-up has been limited. A novel temperature-controlled and larger-scale acoustic separator was evaluated at up to 400 L/day for a 10(7) CHO cell/mL perfusion culture using a 100-L bioreactor that produced up to 34 g/day recombinant protein. The increased active volume of this scaled-up separator was divided into four parallel compartments for improved fluid dynamics. Operational settings of the acoustic separator were optimized and the limits of robust operations explored. The performance was not influenced over wide ranges of duty cycle stop and run times. The maximum performance of 96% separation efficiency at 200 L/day was obtained by setting the separator temperature to 35.1 degrees C, the recirculation rate to three times the harvest rate, and the power to 90 W. While there was no detectable effect on culture viability, viable cells were selectively retained, especially at 50 L/day, where there was a 5-fold higher nonviable washout efficiency. Overall, the new temperature-controlled and scaled-up separator design performed reliably in a way similar to smaller-scale acoustic separators. These results provide strong support for the feasibility of much greater scale-up of acoustic separations. PMID:12325152

  7. 25 CFR 291.9 - What must the Secretary do at the end of the 60-day comment period if the State offers an...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What must the Secretary do at the end of the 60-day comment period if the State offers an alternative proposal for Class III gaming procedures? 291.9 Section... GAMING PROCEDURES 291.9 What must the Secretary do at the end of the 60-day comment period if the...

  8. 25 CFR 291.9 - What must the Secretary do at the end of the 60-day comment period if the State offers an...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What must the Secretary do at the end of the 60-day comment period if the State offers an alternative proposal for Class III gaming procedures? 291.9 Section... GAMING PROCEDURES 291.9 What must the Secretary do at the end of the 60-day comment period if the...

  9. 25 CFR 291.9 - What must the Secretary do at the end of the 60-day comment period if the State offers an...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What must the Secretary do at the end of the 60-day comment period if the State offers an alternative proposal for Class III gaming procedures? 291.9 Section... GAMING PROCEDURES 291.9 What must the Secretary do at the end of the 60-day comment period if the...

  10. 25 CFR 291.9 - What must the Secretary do at the end of the 60-day comment period if the State offers an...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true What must the Secretary do at the end of the 60-day comment period if the State offers an alternative proposal for Class III gaming procedures? 291.9 Section... GAMING PROCEDURES 291.9 What must the Secretary do at the end of the 60-day comment period if the...

  11. Planktonic and biofilm community characterization and Salmonella resistance of 14-day old chicken cecal microflora derived continuous-flow cultures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    These studies were initiated to compare the composition of GIT bacterial communities in birds during the transition period in age where their susceptibility to Salmonella shifts to resistance. One of the challenges to developing probiotics is to develop an efficacious culture of minimal diversity, ...

  12. Periodization

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Daniel S.; Reiman, Michael P.; Walker, John C.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Clinicians are constantly faced with the challenge of designing training programs for injured and noninjured athletes that maximize healing and optimize performance. Periodization is a concept of systematic progressionthat is, resistance training programs that follow predictable patterns of change in training variables. The strength training literature is abundant with studies comparing periodization schemes on uninjured, trained, and untrained athletes. The rehabilitation literature, however, is scarce with information about how to optimally design resistance training programs based on periodization principles for injured athletes. The purpose of this review is to discuss relevant training variables and methods of periodization, as well as periodization program outcomes. A secondary purpose is to provide an anecdotal framework regarding implementation of periodization principles into rehabilitation programs. Evidence Acquisition: A Medline search from 1979 to 2009 was implemented with the keywords periodization, strength training, rehabilitation, endurance, power, hypertrophy, and resistance training with the Boolean term AND in all possible combinations in the English language. Each author also undertook independent hand searching of article references used in this review. Results: Based on the studies researched, periodized strength training regimens demonstrate improved outcomes as compared to nonperiodized programs. Conclusions: Despite the evidence in the strength training literature supporting periodization programs, there is a considerable lack of data in the rehabilitation literature about program design and successful implementation of periodization into rehabilitation programs. PMID:23015982

  13. A HIGHLY INCLINED ORBIT FOR THE 110 DAY PERIOD M-DWARF COMPANION KOI-368.01

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, George; Huang, Chelsea X.

    2013-10-20

    We report the detection of asymmetry in the transit light curves of the 110 day period companion to KOI-368, a rapidly rotating A-dwarf. The significant distortion in the transit light curve is attributed to spin-orbit misalignment between the transiting companion and the gravity darkened host star. Our analysis was based on 11 long cadence and 2 short cadence transits of KOI-368.01 from the Kepler mission, as well as stellar parameters determined from our follow-up spectroscopic observation. We measured the true obliquity between the orbit normal and the stellar rotation axis to be 69{sub -10}{sup +9o}. We also find a secondary eclipse event with depth 29 3 ppm at phase 0.59, from which the temperature of the companion is constrained to 3060 50 K, indicating that KOI-368.01 is a late M-dwarf. The eccentricity is also calculated from the eclipse to be 0.1429 0.0007. The long period, high obliquity, and low eccentricity of KOI-368.01 allow us to limit a number of proposed theories for the misalignment of binary systems.

  14. Postnatal Day 2 to 11 Constitutes a 5-HT-Sensitive Period Impacting Adult mPFC Function

    PubMed Central

    Rebello, Tahilia J.; Yu, Qinghui; Goodfellow, Nathalie M.; Caffrey Cagliostro, Martha K.; Teissier, Anne; Morelli, Emanuela; Demireva, Elena Y.; Chemiakine, Alexei; Rosoklija, Gorazd B.; Dwork, Andrew J.; Lambe, Evelyn K.; Ansorge, Mark S.

    2014-01-01

    Early-life serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] signaling modulates brain development, which impacts adult behavior, but 5-HT-sensitive periods, neural substrates, and behavioral consequences remain poorly understood. Here we identify the period ranging from postnatal day 2 (P2) to P11 as 5-HT sensitive, with 5-HT transporter (5-HTT) blockade increasing anxiety- and depression-like behavior, and impairing fear extinction learning and memory in adult mice. Concomitantly, P2–P11 5-HTT blockade causes dendritic hypotrophy and reduced excitability of infralimbic (IL) cortex pyramidal neurons that normally promote fear extinction. By contrast, the neighboring prelimbic (PL) pyramidal neurons, which normally inhibit fear extinction, become more excitable. Excitotoxic IL but not PL lesions in adult control mice reproduce the anxiety-related phenotypes. These findings suggest that increased 5-HT signaling during P2–P11 alters adult mPFC function to increase anxiety and impair fear extinction, and imply a differential role for IL and PL neurons in regulating affective behaviors. Together, our results support a developmental mechanism for the etiology and pathophysiology of affective disorders and fear-related behaviors. PMID:25209278

  15. Cultural/Favorite Recipe Day: Strengthening Approaches to Increase Culturally Diverse Foods Served in Head Start Meals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Jessica A.; Agrawal, Tara; Carter, Sonia; Grinder, AnnMarie; Castaneda-Sceppa, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    One approach to halting the childhood obesity epidemic has been the modification of foods available to children during the school day. In recent years there has been an increased focus on obesity prevention efforts among children ages birth to 5 and the role of child care settings in prevention efforts. Head Start serves as an important venue for

  16. Cultural/Favorite Recipe Day: Strengthening Approaches to Increase Culturally Diverse Foods Served in Head Start Meals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Jessica A.; Agrawal, Tara; Carter, Sonia; Grinder, AnnMarie; Castaneda-Sceppa, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    One approach to halting the childhood obesity epidemic has been the modification of foods available to children during the school day. In recent years there has been an increased focus on obesity prevention efforts among children ages birth to 5 and the role of child care settings in prevention efforts. Head Start serves as an important venue for…

  17. Multiparametric temporal analysis of the Caco-2/TC7 demonstrated functional and differentiated monolayers as early as 14 days of culture.

    PubMed

    Zeller, Perrine; Bricks, Thibault; Vidal, Guillaume; Jacques, Sébastien; Anton, Pauline M; Leclerc, Eric

    2015-05-25

    Reducing the differentiation period for obtaining an in vitro intestinal barrier model is required to reduce the duration and cost for drug screening assays. In this frame, the Caco-2/TC7 subclone differentiation state was investigated from day 0 (D0) to day 32 (D32). As such, the expression of 45 genes (including cell junction, cell polarization, cell functionality, drug transport and metabolism genes) was followed throughout the 32 days. In parallel, the monolayer polarization and the formation of the cellular junctions were characterized by the immuno-staining of occludin, claudin-1 and actin proteins. The cell monolayer permeability was analyzed via transepithelial electric resistance measurements and paracellular transport of Lucifer Yellow. The P-gp efflux efficiency was assessed by rhodamine 123 transport. Alkaline phosphate activity was quantified to assess the cell differentiation. Three stages of differentiation were observed using the clustering of principal component analysis of the RTqPCR data and the overall assays. From D0 to D10, cells were in a proliferation stage and under-differentiated; from D14 to D21 a stable differentiation stage was reached; from D25 to D32 the epithelium seemed to enter into a post-differentiated stage. This study demonstrates that Caco-2/TC7 cells are functional and ready for use in drug screening permeability assays from 14 days in culture when compared with conventional 21 days for Caco-2 cells. In addition, this study provides a refined set of data allowing temporal and multi scale investigations, due to the intracellular kinetics and mRNA levels that can be correlated with membrane protein kinetics and functional extracellular activities. Therefore, shorter time in culture combined with a better knowledge of the cells during the time in culture will in turn help to improve the quality and cost of Caco-2/TC7 assays for drug development. PMID:25725134

  18. Inter- and intra-individual variation in urinary biomarker concentrations over a 6-day sampling period. Part 1: metals.

    PubMed

    Smolders, Roel; Koch, Holger M; Moos, Rebecca K; Cocker, John; Jones, Kate; Warren, Nick; Levy, Len; Bevan, Ruth; Hays, Sean M; Aylward, Lesa L

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the current HBM-study is to further the understanding of the impact of inter- and intra-individual variability in HBM surveys as it may have implications for the design and interpretation of the study outcomes. As spot samples only provide a snapshot in time of the concentrations of chemicals in an individual, it remains unclear to what extent intra-individual variability plays a role in the overall variability of population-wide HBM surveys. The current paper describes the results of an intensive biomonitoring study, in which all individual urine samples of 8 individuals were collected over a 6-day sampling period (a total of 352 unique samples). By analyzing different metals (As, Cd, Mn, Ni) in each individual sample, inter- and intra-individual variability for these four metals could be determined, and the relationships between exposure, internal dose, and sampling protocol assessed. Although the range of biomarker values for different metals was well within the normal range reported in large-scale population surveys, large intra-individual differences over a 6-day period could also be observed. Typically, measured biomarker values span at least an order of magnitude within an individual, and more if specific exposure episodes could be identified. Fish consumption for example caused a twenty- to thirty-fold increase in urinary As-levels over a period of 2-6h. Intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC) were typically low for uncorrected biomarker values (between 0.104 and 0.460 for the 4 metals), but improved when corrected for creatinine or specific gravity (SG). The results show that even though urine is a preferred matrix for HBM studies, there are certain methodological issues that need to be taken into account in the interpretation of urinary biomarker data, related to the intrinsic variability of the urination process itself, the relationship between exposure events and biomarker quantification, and the timing of sampling. When setting up HBM-projects, this expected relationship between individual exposure episode and urinary biomarker concentration needs to be taken into account. PMID:25128590

  19. AN ASSESSMENT OF THE ALL DAY NEIGHBORHOOD SCHOOL PROGRAM FOR CULTURALLY DEPRIVED CHILDREN.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SEXTON, PATRICIA; AND OTHERS

    THE PROGRAM WAS DEVISED TO DEMONSTRATE A WORKABLE PLAN FOR EXTENDED USE OF SCHOOL BUILDINGS, AND TO EMPHASIZE THE ROLE OF THE SCHOOL IN CREATING A WHOLESOME ENVIRONMENT FOR CHILDREN. GOALS INCLUDED--(1) A SCHOOL DAY THAT PROVIDES FOR EDUCATIONAL, EMOTIONAL, AND PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT OF CHILDREN, (2) EXTENSION OF THE SCHOOL DAY INTO A SPECIAL

  20. Use of a lactobacillus-based probiotic culture to reduce Salmonella in day of hatch broilers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A commercially available Lactobacillus probiotic (FM-B11 Ivesco LLC) (B11) significantly reduced Salmonella recovery from day-of-hatch chicks in several studies. For all experiments, day-of-hatch male broiler chicks (n=40 per pen) were challenged with approximately 10**4 cfu per chick of Salmonell...

  1. Complex-periodic spiral waves in confluent cardiac cell cultures induced by localized inhomogeneities

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Seong-min; Kim, Tae Yun; Lee, Kyoung J.

    2005-01-01

    Spatiotemporal wave activities in excitable heart tissues have long been the subject of numerous studies because they underlie different forms of cardiac arrhythmias. In particular, understanding the dynamics and the instabilities of spiral waves have become very important because they can cause reentrant tachycardia and their subsequent transitions to fibrillation. Although many aspects of cardiac spiral waves have been investigated through experiments and model simulations, their complex properties are far from well understood. Here, we show that intriguing complex-periodic (such as period-2, period-3, period-4, or aperiodic) spiral wave states can arise in monolayer tissues of cardiac cell culture in vitro, and demonstrate that these different dynamic states can coexist with abrupt and spontaneous transitions among them without any change in system parameters; in other words, the medium supports multistability. Based on extensive image data analysis, we have confirmed that these spiral waves are driven by their tips tracing complex orbits whose unusual, meandering shapes are formed by delicate interplay between localized conduction blocks and nonlinear properties of the culture medium. PMID:15985555

  2. Optimal Culture Incubation Time in Orthopedic Device-Associated Infections: a Retrospective Analysis of Prolonged 14-Day Incubation

    PubMed Central

    Wahl, Peter; Fracheboud, Dominique; Gautier, Emanuel

    2014-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis of orthopedic device-associated infections can be challenging. Culture of tissue biopsy specimens is often considered the gold standard; however, there is currently no consensus on the ideal incubation time for specimens. The aim of our study was to assess the yield of a 14-day incubation protocol for tissue biopsy specimens from revision surgery (joint replacements and internal fixation devices) in a general orthopedic and trauma surgery setting. Medical records were reviewed retrospectively in order to identify cases of infection according to predefined diagnostic criteria. From August 2009 to March 2012, 499 tissue biopsy specimens were sampled from 117 cases. In 70 cases (59.8%), at least one sample showed microbiological growth. Among them, 58 cases (82.9%) were considered infections and 12 cases (17.1%) were classified as contaminations. The median time to positivity in the cases of infection was 1 day (range, 1 to 10 days), compared to 6 days (range, 1 to 11 days) in the cases of contamination (P < 0.001). Fifty-six (96.6%) of the infection cases were diagnosed within 7 days of incubation. In conclusion, the results of our study show that the incubation of tissue biopsy specimens beyond 7 days is not productive in a general orthopedic and trauma surgery setting. Prolonged 14-day incubation might be of interest in particular situations, however, in which the prevalence of slow-growing microorganisms and anaerobes is higher. PMID:24153117

  3. A "Day in the Lives" of Four Resilient Youths: Cultural Roots of Resilience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theron, Linda; Cameron, Catherine Ann; Didkowsky, Nora; Lau, Cindy; Liebenberg, Linda; Ungar, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Grounded in the examples of four impoverished, relocated youths (two Sesotho-speaking orphans in South Africa and two Mexican immigrants in Canada), we explore cultural factors as potential roots of resilience. We triangulate rich qualitative findings (visual, dialogical, and observational) to foreground the particular, as well as acknowledge the

  4. The Class and Cultural Functions of Obesity Discourse: Our Latter Day Child Saving Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, John; Davies, Brian; Rich, Emma

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the inexorable rise of "health" as regulative discourse, highlighting its class and cultural dimensions. With reference to the policy content of recent obesity reports, analysis suggests that contemporary concerns around obesity are but a modern variant of earlier eighteenth and nineteenth century child saving crusades whose

  5. The Class and Cultural Functions of Obesity Discourse: Our Latter Day Child Saving Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, John; Davies, Brian; Rich, Emma

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the inexorable rise of "health" as regulative discourse, highlighting its class and cultural dimensions. With reference to the policy content of recent obesity reports, analysis suggests that contemporary concerns around obesity are but a modern variant of earlier eighteenth and nineteenth century child saving crusades whose…

  6. Podcasts as a Learning Tool: German Language and Culture Every Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Johannes

    2008-01-01

    Podcasts provide a straightforward opportunity to stay connected with language, culture, and recent events of German-speaking countries. Podcasts offer clearly articulated, authentic material that can be automatically and regularly delivered to your computer and classrooms; continuously exposing students and teachers to German. This article

  7. A "Day in the Lives" of Four Resilient Youths: Cultural Roots of Resilience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theron, Linda; Cameron, Catherine Ann; Didkowsky, Nora; Lau, Cindy; Liebenberg, Linda; Ungar, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Grounded in the examples of four impoverished, relocated youths (two Sesotho-speaking orphans in South Africa and two Mexican immigrants in Canada), we explore cultural factors as potential roots of resilience. We triangulate rich qualitative findings (visual, dialogical, and observational) to foreground the particular, as well as acknowledge the…

  8. Effects of timing of a modified-live respiratory viral vaccination (day 0 versus day 14 of a receiving period) on performance, feed intake, and febrile response of beef heifers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of timing associated with the administration of a modified-live respiratory viral vaccine (IBR-PI3-BRSV-BVD) on day 0 or on day 14 of a receiving period on performance, feed intake, and the febrile response in beef heifers. Our hypothesis was t...

  9. Effects of timing of vaccination (day 0 versus day 14 of a receiving period) with a modified-live respiratory viral vaccine on performance, feed intake, and febrile response of beef heifers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of timing of the administration of a modified-live respiratory viral vaccine on day 0 or on day 14 of a receiving period on performance, feed intake, and febrile response in beef heifers. Our hypothesis was vaccine timing will alter febrile res...

  10. Effects of a Seven Day Overload-Period of High-Intensity Training on Performance and Physiology of Competitive Cyclists

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Bradley; Costa, Vitor P.; O'Brien, Brendan J.; Guglielmo, Luiz G.; Paton, Carl D.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Competitive endurance athletes commonly undertake periods of overload training in the weeks prior to major competitions. This investigation examined the effects of two seven-day high-intensity overload training regimes (HIT) on performance and physiological characteristics of competitive cyclists. Design The study was a matched groups, controlled trial. Methods Twenty-eight male cyclists (mean ± SD, Age: 33±10 years, Mass 74±7 kg, VO2 peak 4.7±0.5 L·min−1) were assigned to a control group or one of two training groups for seven consecutive days of HIT. Before and after training cyclists completed an ergometer based incremental exercise test and a 20-km time-trial. The HIT sessions were ∼120 minutes in duration and consisted of matched volumes of 5, 10 and 20 second (short) or 15, 30 and 45 second (long) maximal intensity efforts. Results Both the short and long HIT regimes led to significant (p<0.05) gains in time trial performance compared to the control group. Relative to the control group, the mean changes (±90% confidence limits) in time-trial power were 8.2%±3.8% and 10.4%±4.3% for the short and long HIT regimes respectively; corresponding increases in peak power in the incremental test were 5.5%±2.7% and 9.5%±2.5%. Both HIT (short vs long) interventions led to non-significant (p>0.05) increases (mean ± SD) in VO2 peak (2.3%±4.7% vs 3.5%±6.2%), lactate threshold power (3.6%±3.5% vs 2.9%±5.3%) and gross efficiency (3.2%±2.4% vs 5.1%±3.9%) with only small differences between HIT regimes. Conclusions Seven days of overload HIT induces substantial enhancements in time-trial performance despite non-significant increases in physiological measures with competitive cyclists. PMID:25521824

  11. Primitive lymphohematopoietic precursor cell lines generated in culture from day 7 early-mid-primitive streak stage mouse embryo.

    PubMed

    Palacios, R; Imhof, B A

    1996-12-16

    During mouse development, the first lymphohematopoietic precursor cells and myeloid or erythroid cell lineage-determined cells can be detected in the yolk sac at days 8-8.5 of gestation. The characteristics of the cells that give rise to these yolk sac primitive lymphohematopoietic cells and the molecular events controlling this process remain poorly defined. We show here that cell suspensions from day 7 early-mid-primitive streak stage embryo proper generated early immature PgP-1+ Joro 177+ Lin- hematopoietic cells and some Mac-1+ myeloid and TER 119+ erythroid cells after co-culture with the yolk sac-derived stromal cell line YS6 without addition of exogenous cytokines. Purified Lin- hematopoietic cells generated in these cultures did not express genes known to be transcribed at early stages of lymphoid, myeloid or erythroid cell differentiation and were able to give rise to T and B lymphocytes, myeloid cells and erythroid cells after appropriate further induction in vitro. Several cell lines were established in culture with a mixture of four cytokines from the PgP-1+ Joro 177+ Lin- cell population. The cell lines shared phenotypic and genotypic characteristics with the PgP-1+ Joro 177+ Lin- cell population generated in culture from day 7 embryo proper and they were able to reconstitute the lymphohematopoietic system of irradiated mice. Taken together these results support a model of lymphohematopoiesis in which cells from day 7 early-mid-primitive streak mouse embryo proper migrate and colonize the visceral yolk sac. There they generate primitive lymphohematopoietic precursor cells and the first erythroid and myeloid hematopoietic cells under the influence of yolk sac stromal cells like the YS6 cells described here. PMID:9003763

  12. An automatic respirometer for determining oxygen uptake in crayfish (Austropotamobius pallipes (Lereboullet)) over periods of 3-4 days.

    PubMed

    Sutcliffe, D W; Carrick, T R; Moore, W H

    1975-12-01

    1. An automatic respirometer has been developed for continuous measurements over 3-4 days on 1-15 g crayfish. The sensor is a modified Mackereth oxygen electrode. Respiration is recorded on a millivolt potentiometric pen recorder during closed periods when the O2 concentration in the medium falls to a predetermined level. A solenoid-operated valve is then opened via a relay circuit energized by a reed switch mounted on the recorder. Medium flows through the respirometer until the O2 concentration is raised back to another predetermined level. Artificial media containing little or no nutrient salts are used to restrict the growth of microbes. 2. Respiration was determined chiefly on crayfish (Austropotamobius pallipes) with body wet weights of 7-0-12-5 g at 10-0 degrees C. In unrestrained but relatively quiescent animals, standard metabolism is described by the regression equation, ln O2 uptake = 3-3037 + 1-002 ln body wt. In restless crayfish active metabolism is described by the equation, ln O2 uptake = 4-4412 + 0-861 ln body wt. PMID:1214123

  13. Cultural techniques for altering the flowering time and double-cropping short-day varieties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    July-plugged transplants of short-day cv. Strawberry Festival (Fragaria x ananassa), flowered in October and November even though they were grown under long photoperiods and warm temperatures (greater than 21 degrees C) in July and August. These unexpected results were attributed to a high plant de...

  14. [Observation of the first mitose cycle of human lymphocytes after ten days in culture (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Doloy, M T; Le Go, R; Ducatez, G; Lepetit, J; Bourguignon, M

    1980-01-01

    A technique is described which allows the observation of the first in vitro division of human lymphocytes following a long lag period with no mitotic activity. This technique is useful when studying the effect of chronic aggressions on the chromosomes. PMID:6967292

  15. CTEPP-OH DATA COLLECTED ON FORM 10 (PERIODS 1-3): DAY CARE CENTER CHILD ACTIVITY DIARY AND FOOD SURVEY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set contains data for CTEPP-OH concerning the childs activities at the day care center over the 48-h monitoring period. The diary was divided into three time periods over the 48-h monitoring interval. The Food Survey collected information on the frequency and types of ...

  16. CTEPP-OH DATA COLLECTED ON FORM 10 (PERIODS 1-3): DAY CARE CENTER CHILD ACTIVITY DIARY AND FOOD SURVEY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set contains data for CTEPP-OH concerning the child’s activities at the day care center over the 48-h monitoring period. The diary was divided into three time periods over the 48-h monitoring interval. The Food Survey collected information on the frequency and types of ...

  17. Robust circadian rhythms in organoid cultures from PERIOD2::LUCIFERASE mouse small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Sean R.; Pruszka, Jill; Vallance, Jefferson; Aihara, Eitaro; Matsuura, Toru; Montrose, Marshall H.; Shroyer, Noah F.; Hong, Christian I.

    2014-01-01

    Disruption of circadian rhythms is a risk factor for several human gastrointestinal (GI) diseases, ranging from diarrhea to ulcers to cancer. Four-dimensional tissue culture models that faithfully mimic the circadian clock of the GI epithelium would provide an invaluable tool to understand circadian regulation of GI health and disease. We hypothesized that rhythmicity of a key circadian component, PERIOD2 (PER2), would diminish along a continuum from ex vivo intestinal organoids (epithelial miniguts), nontransformed mouse small intestinal epithelial (MSIE) cells and transformed human colorectal adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cells. Here, we show that bioluminescent jejunal explants from PERIOD2::LUCIFERASE (PER2::LUC) mice displayed robust circadian rhythms for >72 hours post-excision. Circadian rhythms in primary or passaged PER2::LUC jejunal organoids were similarly robust; they also synchronized upon serum shock and persisted beyond 2 weeks in culture. Remarkably, unshocked organoids autonomously synchronized rhythms within 12 hours of recording. The onset of this autonomous synchronization was slowed by >2 hours in the presence of the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist RU486 (20 ?M). Doubling standard concentrations of the organoid growth factors EGF, Noggin and R-spondin enhanced PER2 oscillations, whereas subtraction of these factors individually at 24 hours following serum shock produced no detectable effects on PER2 oscillations. Growth factor pulses induced modest phase delays in unshocked, but not serum-shocked, organoids. Circadian oscillations of PER2::LUC bioluminescence aligned with Per2 mRNA expression upon analysis using quantitative PCR. Concordant findings of robust circadian rhythms in bioluminescent jejunal explants and organoids provide further evidence for a peripheral clock that is intrinsic to the intestinal epithelium. The rhythmic and organotypic features of organoids should offer unprecedented advantages as a resource for elucidating the role of circadian rhythms in GI stem cell dynamics, epithelial homeostasis and disease. PMID:24997189

  18. Swift Reveals a ~5.7 Day Super-orbital Period in the M31 Globular Cluster X-Ray Binary XB158

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, R.; Garcia, M. R.; Murray, S. S.

    2015-03-01

    The M31 globular cluster X-ray binary XB158 (a.k.a. Bo 158) exhibits intensity dips on a 2.78 hr period in some observations, but not others. The short period suggests a low mass ratio, and an asymmetric, precessing disk due to additional tidal torques from the donor star since the disk crosses the 3:1 resonance. Previous theoretical three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamical modeling suggested a super-orbital disk precession period 29 1 times the orbital period, i.e., ~81 3 hr. We conducted a Swift monitoring campaign of 30 observations over ~1 month in order to search for evidence of such a super-orbital period. Fitting the 0.3-10 keV Swift X-Ray Telescope luminosity light curve with a sinusoid yielded a period of 5.65 0.05 days, and a >5? improvement in ?2 over the best fit constant intensity model. A Lomb-Scargle periodogram revealed that periods of 5.4-5.8 days were detected at a >3? level, with a peak at 5.6 days. We consider this strong evidence for a 5.65 day super-orbital period, ~70% longer than the predicted period. The 0.3-10 keV luminosity varied by a factor of ~5, consistent with variations seen in long-term monitoring from Chandra. We conclude that other X-ray binaries exhibiting similar long-term behavior are likely to also be X-ray binaries with low mass ratios and super-orbital periods.

  19. Analyzing the Relationship of Organizational Trust and Organizational Culture with Knowledge Sharing Behavior in Teachers of Second Intermediate Period

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shahhosseini, Sakineh; Nadi, Mohammad Ali

    2015-01-01

    The present paper aims to study the relationship of organizational trust, organizational culture with knowledge sharing behavior among teachers of Second Intermediate Period in the City of Isfahan. Research method was correlation and statistical population included all teachers of Second Intermediate Period of Isfahan in academic year 2013-2014 (N

  20. Can the 62 Day X-Ray Period of ULX M82 X-1 Be Due to a Precessing Accretion Disk?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasham, Dheeraj R.; Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2013-09-01

    We have analyzed all archival Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer/Proportional Counter Array monitoring observations of the ultraluminous X-ray source M82 X-1 in order to study the properties of its 62 day X-ray period, which was found by Kaaret and Feng in 2007. Based on its high coherence, it has been argued that the observed period is the orbital period of the binary. Utilizing a much longer data set than in previous studies, we find the following. (1) The phase-resolved X-ray (3-15 keV) spectramodeled with a thermal accretion disk and a power lawsuggest that the accretion disk's contribution to the total flux is strongly modulated with phase. (2) Suggestive evidence for a sudden phase shift of approximately 0.4 in phase (25 days) between the first and the second halves of the light curve separated by roughly 1000 days. If confirmed, the implied timescale to change the period is ~10 yr, which is exceptionally fast for an orbital phenomenon. These two independent pieces of evidence are consistent with the periodicity being due to a precessing accretion disk, similar to the super-orbital periods observed in systems like Her X-1, LMC X-4, and SS433. However, the timing evidence for a change in the period needs to be confirmed with additional observations. This should be possible with further monitoring of M82 with instruments such as the Swift X-Ray Telescope.

  1. African Easterly Waves in 30-day High-Resolution Global Simulations: A Case Study During the 2006 NAMMA Period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Bo-Wen; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Wu, Man-Li C.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, extended -range (30 -day) high-resolution simulations with the NASA global mesoscale model are conducted to simulate the initiation and propagation of six consecutive African easterly waves (AEWs) from late August to September 2006 and their association with hurricane formation. It is shown that the statistical characteristics of individual AEWs are realistically simulated with larger errors in the 5th and 6th AEWs. Remarkable simulations of a mean African easterly jet (AEJ) are also obtained. Nine additional 30 -day experiments suggest that although land surface processes might contribute to the predictability of the AEJ and AEWs, the initiation and detailed evolution of AEWs still depend on the accurate representation of dynamic and land surface initial conditions and their time -varying nonlinear interactions. Of interest is the potential to extend the lead time for predicting hurricane formation (e.g., a lead time of up to 22 days) as the 4th AEW is realistically simulated.

  2. 78 FR 69077 - Notice of 30-Day Public Review Period and Availability of Final Environmental Assessment and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-18

    ... of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the Department of Navy's (DoN) transfer of excess property at... VA's implementation and monitoring of the mitigation measures identified in the FONSI, would not have... infrastructure at the former NAS Alameda. The FONSI is available for public review for 30 days before...

  3. Disparities in Fetal Death and First Day Death: The Influence of Risk Factors in 2 Time Periods

    PubMed Central

    Barfield, Wanda D.; Petrini, Joann; Ruben Smith

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. We examined how changes in risk factors over time influence fetal, first day, and combined fetalfirst day mortality and subsequent racial/ethnic disparities. Methods. We selected deliveries to US resident non-Hispanic White and Black mothers from the linked live birthinfant death cohort and fetal deaths files (19951996; 20012002) and calculated changes over time of mortality rates, odds, and relative odds ratios (RORs) overall and among mothers with modifiable risk factors (smoking, diabetes, or hypertensive disorders). Results. Adjusted odds ratios (AORs) for fetal mortality overall (AOR?=?0.99; 95% confidence interval [CI]?=?0.96, 1.01) and among Blacks (AOR?=?0.98; 95% CI?=?0.93, 1.03) indicated no change over time. Among women with modifiable risk factors, the RORs indicated no change in disparities. The ROR was not significant for fetal mortality (ROR?=?0.96; 95% CI?=?0.83, 1.01) among smokers, but there was evidence of some decline. There was evidence of increase in RORs in fetal death among mothers with diabetes and hypertensive disorders, but differences were not significant. Conclusions. Disparities in fetal, first day, and combined fetalfirst day mortality have persisted and reflect discrepancies in care provision or other factors more challenging to measure. PMID:22698022

  4. Can the 62 Day X-ray Period of ULX M82 X-1 Be Due to a Precessing Accretion Disk?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasham, Dheeraj R.; Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2013-01-01

    We have analyzed all the archival RXTE/PCA monitoring observations of the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) M82 X-1 in order to study the properties of its previously discovered 62 day X-ray period (Kaaret & Feng 2007). Based on the high coherence of the modulation it has been argued that the observed period is the orbital period of the binary. Utilizing a much longer data set than in previous studies we find: (1) The phase-resolved X-ray (3-15 keV) energy spectra - modeled with a thermal accretion disk and a power-law corona - suggest that the accretion disk's contribution to the total flux is responsible for the overall periodic modulation while the power-law flux remains approximately constant with phase. (2) Suggestive evidence for a sudden phase shift-of approximately 0.3 in phase (20 days)-between the first and the second halves of the light curve separated by roughly 1000 days. If confirmed, the implied timescale to change the period is approx. = 10 yrs, which is exceptionally fast for an orbital phenomenon. These independent pieces of evidence are consistent with the 62 day period being due to a precessing accretion disk, similar to the so-called super-orbital periods observed in systems like Her X-1, LMC X-4, and SS433. However, the timing evidence for a change in the period needs to be confirmed with additional observations. This should be possible with further monitoring of M82 with instruments such as the X-ray telescope (XRT) on board Swift.

  5. Physical and Behavioral Measures that Predict Cats' Socialization in an Animal Shelter Environment during a Three Day Period.

    PubMed

    Slater, Margaret; Garrison, Laurie; Miller, Katherine; Weiss, Emily; Drain, Natasha; Makolinski, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    Animal welfare organizations typically take in cats with unknown levels of socialization towards humans, ranging from unsocialized cats well-socialized but lost pets. Agencies typically determine the socialization status and disposition options of cats within three days, when even a well-socialized pet may be too frightened of the unfamiliar surroundings to display its typical behavior. This is the third part of a three-phase project to develop and evaluate a reliable and valid tool to predict cats' socialization levels. We recruited cats from the full spectrum of socialization and, using information from the cats' caregivers regarding typical behavior toward familiar and unfamiliar people, assigned each cat to a Socialization Category. This information was compared to the cats' behavior during three days of structured assessments conducted in a shelter-like setting. The results of logistic regression modeling generated two models using assessments from the mornings of the second and third day, focusing on predicting shyer or more aloof but socialized cats. Using the coefficients from each of these models, two sets of points were calculated which were useful in differentiating More and Less Socialized cats. In combination with key socialized behaviors, these points were able to fairly accurately identify More and Less Socialized cats. PMID:26479759

  6. 43 CFR 1822.14 - What if I try to file a required document on the last day of the stated period for filing, but...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false What if I try to file a required document on the last day of the stated period for filing, but the BLM office where it is to be filed is...) APPLICATION PROCEDURES Filing a Document with BLM 1822.14 What if I try to file a required document on...

  7. 43 CFR 1822.14 - What if I try to file a required document on the last day of the stated period for filing, but...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false What if I try to file a required document on the last day of the stated period for filing, but the BLM office where it is to be filed is...) APPLICATION PROCEDURES Filing a Document with BLM 1822.14 What if I try to file a required document on...

  8. Variability of the quasi-2-day wave and interaction with longer period planetary waves in the MLT at Cachoeira Paulista (22.7S, 45W)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guharay, A.; Batista, P. P.; Clemesha, B. R.

    2015-08-01

    An exclusive study has been carried out with long term meteor wind data (2000-2014) to characterize the quasi-2-day wave (QTDW) in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) and its interactions with the longer period planetary waves at Cachoeira Paulista (22.7S, 45W). The QTDW is observed to be dominant during late summer (January-February) all the years under consideration except 2013. All the wave parameters exhibit significant interannual variability. The maximum wave amplitude comes out to be 39 m/s, which is significantly higher than the reported northern hemispheric findings. The mean MLT period exhibits a wide range of variability (36-70 h) indicating the presence of multiple Rossby normal modes with varying zonal wave numbers. Modulations of the QTDW amplitude by the planetary waves with longer periodicities (>9 days) are evident, especially during summer. The nonlinear interactions between the 2-day wave and longer period waves are believed to give rise to a host of secondary waves with frequencies lying close to 2-day. The strong QTDW activity, as observed at this location, has potential to cause significant effect on the overlying ionosphere and hence the atmosphere-ionosphere dynamical coupling.

  9. Effect of the fluid core on changes in the length of day due to long period tides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wahr, J. M.; Smith, M. L.; Sasao, T.

    1981-01-01

    The long period luni-solar tidal potential is known to cause periodic changes in the earth's rotation rate. It is found that the effect of a dissipationless fluid outer core is to reduce the amplitudes of these tidal perturbations by about 11 percent. When the fluid core effect is added to Agnew and Farrell's (1978) estimate of the effect of an equilibrium ocean, the result is in accord with observation. The effects of dissipative processes within the fluid core are also examined. Out-of-phase perturbations are found which could be as large as about 10 ms at 18.6 yr. It is concluded, however, that the poorly understood decade fluctuations in the earth's rotation rate will prohibit observation of this effect.

  10. Efficacy of optimized in vitro predegeneration period on the cell count and purity of canine Schwann cell cultures

    PubMed Central

    Niapour, Nazila; Mohammadi-Ghalehbin, Behnam; Golmohammadi, Mohammad Ghasem; Amani, Mohammad; Salehi, Hossein; Niapour, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Predegeneration is a standard technique to obtain mitotically activated and enriched cultures of Schwann cells (SCs). This study, for the first time, evaluated the impact of various duration of predegeneration on cell yield and enrichment of SCs from dog peripheral nerve. Materials and Methods: Dog sural nerves were subjected to 5, 10, 15 day-long in vitro predegeneration. The total cell yield and the purity of SCs were evaluated in each group on the first and seventh day after plating. Results: The maximum and minimum numbers of cells were counted in 15 day-long predegene-ration and control groups which underwent no predegeneration. The 10 day-long in vitro predegeneration group with 800.5% SCs enrichment had the best purity after plating day and could maintain its purity with elapsing on cultures. Conclusion: 10 day-long predegeneration results in the higher cell number and the better and prolonged purity of SCs in culture. PMID:25945245

  11. Variations of the semi-diurnal tidal wind in the meteor region with periods of about 27 and 13.5 days

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greisiger, K. M.

    1987-01-01

    Daily values of sunspot number and solar radio emission at 10.7 cm wavelength show a well known strong modulation with a period of 27 days, the Sun's rotation period. Recent satellite measurements revealed the same modulation of the ultraviolet irradiance at wavelength below 300 nm. These UV variations can influence the thermal heating of the ozone layer by altering the chemical composition. Therefore, one can also expect a corresponding variation in the middle atmosphere of the semi-diurnal tide, which is thermally excited essentially by absorption of UV between 200 and 370 nm in the upper ozone layer. Results of radar meteor wind measurements were used to detect a presumable very weak 27 day modulation within the natural and artificial noise of the daily values of the semi-diurnal wind amplitude. The summer period was chosen because of its relatively steady conditions and the maximum amplitudes during the year. The results of this investigation are given and discussed.

  12. Pathogenicity and pathogenesis of a United States porcine deltacoronavirus cell culture isolate in 5-day-old neonatal piglets.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qi; Gauger, Phillip; Stafne, Molly; Thomas, Joseph; Arruda, Paulo; Burrough, Eric; Madson, Darin; Brodie, Joseph; Magstadt, Drew; Derscheid, Rachel; Welch, Michael; Zhang, Jianqiang

    2015-08-01

    Porcine deltacoronavirus (PDCoV) was first identified in Hong Kong in 2009-2010 and reported in United States swine for the first time in February 2014. However, diagnostic tools other than polymerase chain reaction for PDCoV detection were lacking and Koch's postulates had not been fulfilled to confirm the pathogenic potential of PDCoV. In the present study, PDCoV peptide-specific rabbit antisera were developed and used in immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry assays to assist PDCoV diagnostics. The pathogenicity and pathogenesis of PDCoV was investigated following orogastric inoculation of 5-day-old piglets with a plaque-purified PDCoV cell culture isolate (3 × 10(4) TCID50 per pig). The PDCoV-inoculated piglets developed mild to moderate diarrhea, shed increasing amount of virus in rectal swabs from 2 to 7 days post inoculation, and developed macroscopic and microscopic lesions in small intestines with viral antigen confirmed by immunohistochemistry staining. This study experimentally confirmed PDCoV pathogenicity and characterized PDCoV pathogenesis in neonatal piglets. PMID:25817405

  13. Kepler and the seven dwarfs: detection of low-level day-time-scale periodic photometric variations in white dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maoz, Dan; Mazeh, Tsevi; McQuillan, Amy

    2015-02-01

    We make use of the high photometric precision of Kepler to search for periodic modulations among 14 normal (DA- and DB-type, likely non-magnetic) hot white dwarfs (WDs). In five, and possibly up to seven of the WDs, we detect periodic, 2 h-10 d, variations, with semi-amplitudes of 60-2000 ppm, lower than ever seen in WDs. We consider various explanations: WD rotation combined with magnetic cool spots; rotation combined with magnetic dichroism; rotation combined with hotspots from an interstellar-medium accretion flow; transits by size 50-200 km objects; relativistic beaming due to reflex motion caused by a cool companion WD; or reflection/re-radiation of the primary WD light by a brown-dwarf or giant-planet companion, undergoing illumination phases as it orbits the WD. Each mechanism could be behind some of the variable WDs, but could not be responsible for all five to seven variable cases. Alternatively, the periodicity may arise from UV metal-line opacity, associated with accretion of rocky material, a phenomenon seen in 50 per cent of hot WDs. Non-uniform UV opacity, combined with WD rotation and fluorescent optical re-emission of the absorbed UV energy, could perhaps explain our findings. Even if reflection by a planet is the cause in only a few of the seven cases, it would imply that hot Jupiters are very common around WDs. If some of the rotation-related mechanisms are at work, then normal WDs rotate as slowly as do peculiar WDs, the only kind for which precise rotation measurements have been possible to date.

  14. SWIFT OBSERVATIONS OF THE HIGH-MASS X-RAY BINARY IGR J16283-4838 UNVEIL A 288 DAY ORBITAL PERIOD

    SciTech Connect

    Cusumano, G.; Segreto, A.; La Parola, V.; D'Aì, A.; Masetti, N.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2013-09-20

    We report on the temporal and spectral properties of the high-mass X-ray binary IGR J16283-4838 in the hard X-ray band. We searched the first 88 months of Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) survey data for long-term periodic modulations. We also investigated the broad band (0.2-150 keV) spectral properties of IGR J16283-4838 complementing the BAT dataset with soft X-ray data from the available Swift-XRT pointed observations. The BAT light curve of IGR J16283-4838 revealed a periodic modulation at P{sub o} = 287.6 ± 1.7 days (with a significance higher than 4 standard deviations). The profile of the light curve folded at P{sub o} shows a sharp peak lasting ∼12 days over a flat plateau. The long-term light curve also shows a ∼300 day interval of prolonged enhanced emission. The observed phenomenology suggests that IGR J16283-4838 has a Be nature, where the narrow periodic peaks and the ∼300 day outburst can be interpreted as Type I and Type II outbursts, respectively. The broad band 0.2-150 keV spectrum can be described with an absorbed power-law and a steepening in the BAT energy range.

  15. Two-day period fluctuation of PMC occurrence over Syowa Station, Antarctica observed by a ground-based lidar and AIM satellite.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, T.; Suzuki, H.; Tsutsumi, M.; Ejiri, M. K.; Tomikawa, Y.; Abo, M.; Kawahara, T.; Tsuda, T. T.; Nishiyama, T.

    2014-12-01

    A Rayleigh/Raman lidar system has been operated by the Japanese Antarctic Research Expedition (JARE) since February, 2011 (JARE 52nd) in Syowa Station Antarctica (69.0S, 39.5E). The lidar system consists of a pulsed Nd:YAG laser (355nm) as a transmitter and two telescopes with four photo multiplier tubes which are to detect Rayleigh scattered light from low and high atmosphere at 355 nm and N2 Raman emission at 387nm. Polar Mesospheric Cloud (PMC) was detected by the lidar at 22:30UT (+3hr for LT) on Feb 4th, 2011, the first day of a routine operation. This event was the first time to detect PMC over Syowa Station by a lidar [Suzuki et al., Ann. Geophys., 2013]. However, signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the PMC event was not so good due to large shot noises from daytime background signals. Moreover, a receiver system was designed mainly for nighttime observations. In this way, observation of PMC during the midnight sun, which also corresponds to most frequent PMC season, was difficult. Thus, to improve SNR of the PMC observation with the lidar during daytime, a narrow band-pass Fabry-Perot etalon unit has been developed and installed in the receiver system on Dec 2013 by JARE 55th. By using this new system, clear PMC signals were successfully detected under daylight condition during the period of summer operation of JARE55th. During this period of 53 days (from 17 Dec. 2013 to 7 Feb. 2014), only 11 days were with a clear sky and suitable for PMC observation. Thus, it was difficult to study temporal variations on a PMC activity only by using the lidar data. Fortunately, NASA's AIM satellite had passed near Syowa Station and provided with complimentary PMC data during observation gap of the lidar. By combining our lidar data with the AIM/CIPS data, nearly continuous monitoring of PMC variability over Syowa Station was achieved for period between 13th and 18th in January 2014. PMC occurrence with an interval of two days over Syowa Station during the period was clearly confirmed. Co-located MF radar also showed clear two days fluctuation in horizontal wind velocities around PMC altitude during the same period. In this presentation, we will discuss the cause of the two-day oscillation found in PMC occurrence and horizontal wind velocity. In particular, two-day planetary wave will be quantitatively investigated as a potential cause of the fluctuation.

  16. Three Cases of West Nile Encephalitis over an Eight-Day Period at a Downtown Los Angeles Community Hospital.

    PubMed

    Puchalski, Adam; Liu, Antonio K; Williams, Byron

    2015-01-01

    Since its introduction in New York City in 1999, the virus has spread throughout the entire North American continent and continues to spread into Central and Latin America. Our report discusses the signs and symptoms, diagnostics, and treatment of West Nile disease. It is important to recognize the disease quickly and initiate appropriate treatment. We present three cases of West Nile encephalitis at White Memorial Medical Center in East Los Angeles that occurred over the span of eight days. All three patients live within four to six miles from the hospital and do not live or work in an environment favorable to mosquitoes including shallow bodies of standing water, abandoned tires, or mud ruts. All the patients were Hispanic. Physicians and other health care providers should consider West Nile infection in the differential diagnosis of causes of aseptic meningitis and encephalitis, obtain appropriate laboratory studies, and promptly report cases to public health authorities. State governments should establish abatement programs that will eliminate sources that allow for mosquito reproduction and harboring. The public needs to be given resources that educate them on what entails the disease caused by the West Nile virus, what the symptoms are, and, most importantly, what they can do to prevent themselves from becoming infected. PMID:26106493

  17. Cultural Identities of Adolescent Immigrants: A Three-Year Longitudinal Study Including the Pre-Migration Period

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tartakovsky, Eugene

    2009-01-01

    This article investigates the cultural identities of adolescent immigrants in the pre-migration period and during the first 3 years after immigration. The target population consists of high-school Jewish adolescents from Russia and Ukraine participating in an Israeli immigration program. In this program, Jewish adolescents immigrate to Israel

  18. Pharmacokinetics of butorphanol delivered with an osmotic pump during a seven-day period in common peafowl (Pavo cristatus).

    PubMed

    Clancy, Meredith M; KuKanich, Butch; Sykes Iv, John M

    2015-12-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine pharmacokinetics of butorphanol delivered via osmotic pumps in common peafowl (Pavo cristatus) as a method for analgesic administration to avian species. ANIMALS 14 healthy adult male common peafowl. PROCEDURES A preliminary experiment was conducted with 2 birds to establish time point and concentration requirements. Then, the remaining 12 birds were anesthetized, and 2 osmotic pumps containing butorphanol (volume, 2 mL; mean dosage, 247 ?g/kg/h) were implanted subcutaneously in each bird for 7 days prior to removal. Blood samples were collected before pump implantation (time 0); 3, 6, 12, 24, 48, 72, 96, 120, 144, and 168 hours after pump implantation; and 3 and 6 hours after pump removal. Plasma butorphanol concentrations were measured via liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. RESULTS Plasma concentrations peaked (mean, 106.4 ?g/L; range, 61.8 to 133.0 ?g/L) at a mean of 39.0 hours, with no evidence of sedation in any bird. After pump removal, butorphanol was rapidly eliminated (half-life, 1.45 hours; range, 1.31 to 1.64 hours; n = 5). Mean clearance per fraction of dose absorbed was 2.89 L/kg/h (range, 2.00 to 5.55 L/kg/h). Mean amount of time the plasma butorphanol concentration was ? 60 ?g/L was 85.6 hours (range, 3.5 to 155.3 hours). CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Plasma concentrations of butorphanol in common peafowl were maintained at or above reported efficacious analgesic concentrations. This study established a method for administering analgesics to avian patients without the need for frequent handling or injections. Use of these osmotic pumps may provide options for avian analgesia. PMID:26618732

  19. Earth Observing-1 Advanced Imager Flight Performance Assessment: Investigating Dark Current Stability Over One-Half Orbit Period during the First 60 Days

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendenhall, J. A.

    2001-01-01

    The stability of the EO-1 Advanced Land Imager dark current levels over the period of one-half orbit is investigated. A series of two-second dark current collections, over the course of 40 minutes, was performed during the first sixty days the instrument was in orbit. Analysis of this data indicates only two dark current reference periods, obtained entering and exiting eclipse, are required to remove ALI dark current offsets for 99.9% of the focal plane to within 1.5 digital numbers for any observation on the solar illuminated portion of the orbit.

  20. Poroelastic behaviour of the degenerating human intervertebral disc: a ten-day study in a loaded disc culture system.

    PubMed

    Emanuel, K S; Vergroesen, P-P A; Peeters, M; Holewijn, R M; Kingma, I; Smit, T H

    2015-01-01

    The intervertebral disc (IVD) allows flexibility to the vertebral column, and transfers the predominant axial loads during daily activities. Its axial biomechanical behaviour is poroelastic, due to the water-binding and releasing capacity of the nucleus pulposus. Degeneration of the intervertebral disc presumably affects both the instantaneous elastic response to the load on the IVD and the subsequent interstitial flow of fluid. This study aims to quantify the poroelastic behaviour of the IVD and its change with degeneration, as defined by the magnetic resonance imaging-based Pfirrmann Score (PS). For a period of ten days, 36 human lumbar IVDs were loaded with a simulated physiological axial loading regime, while deformation was monitored. The IVDs responded to the loads with instantaneous elastic and slow poroelastic axial deformation. Several mechanical parameters changed throughout the first five days of the experiment, until the IVDs settled into a dynamic equilibrium. In this equilibrium, degeneration was significantly related to a decrease in disc height loss during the daytime high load phase (?=-0.49), and to a decrease in the rate of this deformation during the final half hour of each day (?=-0.53). These properties were related to the nucleus glycosaminoglycan/hydroxyproline (GAG/HYP) ratio, rather than GAG content alone, indicating that remodelling of the extracellular matrix reduces poroelastic properties of the IVD. This implies that the degenerated discs have a reduced capacity to bind water and/or a reduced resistance against fluid flow. The resulting loss in hydrostatic pressure may further change cell behaviour in the nucleus pulposus. PMID:26091731

  1. Total radioactive residues and clenbuterol residues in swine after dietary administration of [14C]clenbuterol for seven days and preslaughter withdrawal periods of zero, three, or seven days.

    PubMed

    Smith, D J

    2000-11-01

    Nine barrows (23.8 +/- 0.9 kg) and 9 gilts (23.1 +/- 0.9 kg) were used to determine the disposition of radiocarbon after oral [14C]clenbuterol (4-amino-alpha-[t-butylaminomethyl]-3,5-dichlorobenzyl [7-(14)C]alcohol hydrochloride) administration and to determine total and parent residues in edible tissues. Three barrows and three gilts, housed in metabolism crates, were fed 1 ppm [14C]clenbuterol HCl for seven consecutive days in three separate trials; a single barrow and gilt from each trial was slaughtered after 0-, 3-, or 7-d preslaughter withdrawal periods. Urine and feces were collected during the dosing and the withdrawal period; edible and inedible tissues were collected at slaughter. Total recovery of radiocarbon was 94.2 +/- 6.5%. Total clenbuterol absorption was greater than 75% for barrows and 60% for gilts. Total radioactive residues in tissues were not different (P > 0.05) between barrows and gilts. Concentrations of parent clenbuterol in liver, kidney, skeletal muscle, adipose tissue, and lung did not differ between barrows and gilts (P > 0.05). Total radioactive and parent residues declined in tissues as withdrawal period increased. After the 0-d withdrawal period, total liver residues (286 ppb) were approximately equal to lung residues, twice those of the kidney, and about 15 times those of adipose tissue and skeletal muscle. After a 7-d withdrawal period, total radioactive residues in liver (15 ppb) were roughly three times greater than lung, kidney, and adipose tissue total residues and about 13 times those of skeletal muscle total residues. Parent clenbuterol represented 79, 63, 42, 67, and 100% of the total radioactive residue in adipose tissue, kidney, liver, lung, and skeletal muscle, respectively, in hogs slaughtered with a 0-d withdrawal period. With increasing withdrawal period, the percentage of total radioactive residue present as parent clenbuterol within edible tissues (including lung) decreased, so that after a 7-d withdrawal period, 7, 16, and 29% of the total residue was composed of parent clenbuterol in kidney, liver, and lung, respectively. After a 7-d withdrawal period, parent clenbuterol exceeded the European maximum residue limit (0.5 ppb) 4.6-fold in liver and 2.4-fold in lung. In muscle, clenbuterol was approximately 40 times the limit after a 0-d withdrawal period but had dropped below 0.5 ppb after a 3-d withdrawal period. Results from this study indicate that clenbuterol HCl is well absorbed in swine and that the use of clenbuterol in this species in an off-label manner is inconsistent with human food safety standards used in developed countries. PMID:11063315

  2. Modulation of innate immune function and phenotype in bred dairy heifers during the periparturient period induced by feeding an immunostimulant for 60 days prior to delivery.

    PubMed

    Nace, E L; Nickerson, S C; Kautz, F M; Breidling, S; Wochele, D; Ely, L O; Hurley, D J

    2014-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of a feed additive (OmniGen-AF(), reported to have immune modulating activity) on innate immunity and health events during the periparturient period in dairy heifers when immunity is suppressed. From 60 days prepartum through calving, supplemented heifers (n=20) received OmniGen-AF() daily and were compared with unsupplemented controls (n=20). Blood leukocyte innate immune activity (phenotype markers, phagocytic activity, and reactive oxygen species--ROS production) was measured prior to feeding (60 days prepartum), 30 days later, and on days 1, 7, 14, and 30 postpartum. Adverse health events (udder edema, ketosis, displaced abomasum, and death) and milk production were measured at calving and into early lactation. The fraction of leukocytes with measurable CD62L (L-selectin) on their surface from supplemented heifers tended to be greater during the periparturient period in treated heifers than controls (p=0.100). Likewise, leukocyte phagocytosis of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus during this time period tended to be greater in heifers supplemented with OmniGen-AF() (p=0.100). Conversely, ROS production in response to phorbol myristate acetate or when leukocytes were stimulated with killed S. aureus lysate tended to be greater among control heifers compared with supplemented animals (p=0.100). Supplemented heifers exhibited fewer incidents of udder edema than controls (p=0.030) and tended to exhibit a lower rate of new cases of mastitis (p=0.098); however, no differences were observed in milk somatic cell counts or level of milk production. Results demonstrate a positive role of OmniGen-AF() in amplifying leukocyte function consistent with antibacterial activity during the periparturient period, and support the continued study of dietary supplementation to enhance mammary gland health in dairy cows. PMID:25219783

  3. 25 CFR 291.9 - What must the Secretary do at the end of the 60-day comment period if the State offers an...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What must the Secretary do at the end of the 60-day comment period if the State offers an alternative proposal for Class III gaming procedures? 291.9 Section 291.9 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ECONOMIC ENTERPRISES CLASS III GAMING PROCEDURES 291.9 What must the...

  4. [Changes in the lysosome composition in cultured hepatocytes from 3-day-old rats with destabilization of the cytoplasmic microtubules].

    PubMed

    Stvolinskaia, N S; Korovokin, B F

    1991-01-01

    The monolayer culture of 3-day-old rat hepatocytes was treated by antimicrotubule agent colchicine after activation with isoproterenol. Alterations in the amount of lysosomes with the size of 1.0-2.5 and 3-6 mkm per cell were studied with light microscope after staining with the vital dye neutral red and after identification of acid phosphatase by plumbum precipitation in the frozen preparations. It was shown that isoproterenol application (20 microM) within 1.5 h did not change significantly the number of lysosomes sized 1.0-2.5 microns but stimulated the increase in the amount of lysosomes 3-6 mkm in size. The addition of 2.5 mM colchicine, after the isoproterenol treatment, decreases greatly the number of lysosomes with the size of 1.0-2.5 and 3-6 mkm. A considerable part of the large lysosomes can be resistant to the colchicine action. It is concluded that the microtubules play an important role in lysosome functioning. PMID:1841457

  5. Nothing Special, Everything Is Maamuli: Socio-Cultural and Family Practices Influencing the Perinatal Period in Urban India

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Shanti; Srinivasan, Krishnamachari; Kurpad, Anura; Razee, Husna; Ritchie, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Background Globally, India contributes the largest share in sheer numbers to the burden of maternal and infant under-nutrition, morbidity and mortality. A major gap in our knowledge is how socio-cultural practices and beliefs influence the perinatal period and thus perinatal outcomes, particularly in the rapidly growing urban setting. Methods and Findings Using data from a qualitative study in urban south India, including in-depth interviews with 36 women who had recently been through childbirth as well as observations of family life and clinic encounters, we explored the territory of familial, cultural and traditional practices and beliefs influencing women and their families through pregnancy, childbirth and infancy. We found that while there were some similarities in cultural practices to those described before in studies from low resource village settings, there are changing practices and ideas. Fertility concerns dominate womens experience of married life; notions of gender preference and ideal family size are changing rapidly in response to the urban context; however inter-generational family pressures are still considerable. While a rich repertoire of cultural practices persists throughout the perinatal continuum, their existence is normalised and even underplayed. In terms of diet and nutrition, traditional messages including notions of hot and cold foods, are stronger than health messages; however breastfeeding is the cultural norm and the practice of delayed breastfeeding appears to be disappearing in this urban setting. Marriage, pregnancy and childbirth are so much part of the norm for women, that there is little expectation of individual choice in any of these major life events. Conclusions A greater understanding is needed of the dynamic factors shaping the perinatal period in urban India, including an acknowledgment of the health promoting as well as potentially harmful cultural practices and the critical role of the family. This will help plan culturally appropriate integrated perinatal health care. PMID:25369447

  6. Randomized, observer-blind, split-face study to compare the irritation potential of 2 topical acne formulations over a 14-day treatment period.

    PubMed

    Ting, William

    2012-08-01

    This randomized, observer-blind, split-face study assessed the irritation potential and likelihood of continued use of clindamycin phosphate 1.2%--benzoyl peroxide (BPO) 2.5% gel or adapalene 0.1%--BPO 2.5% gel once daily over a 14-day treatment period in 21 participants (11 males; 10 females) with acne who were 18 years or older. Investigator clinical assessment (erythema and dryness) and self-assessment (dryness and burning/stinging) were performed at baseline and each study visit (days 1-14) using a 4-point scale (O = none; 3 = severe). Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and corneometry measurements were performed at baseline and days 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, and 14. Lesions were counted at baseline and on day 14. Participant satisfaction questionnaires were completed on days 7 and 14. At the end of the study, investigators reported none or only mild erythema in 86% (18/21) of participants treated with clindamycin phosphate 1.2%--BPO 2.5% gel compared with 62% (13/21) of participants treated with adapalene 0.1%--BPO 2.5% gel. No severe erythema was reported with clindamycin phosphate 1.2%--BPO 2.5% gel. Adapalene 0.1%--BPO 2.5% gel was prematurely discontinued due to severe erythema in 1 participant on day 5 and a second participant on day 9. Additionally, 2 more participants reported severe erythema on day 14. Mean erythema scores were 0.9 (mean change from baseline, 0.7) with clindamycin phosphate 1.2%--BPO 2.5% gel and 1.4 (mean change from baseline, 1.3) with adapalene 0. 1%--BPO 2.5% gel on day 14 (P < .05 for days 6-14). Similar results were seen with dryness. Mean scores were 0.5 (mean change from baseline, 0.4) and 1.0 (mean change from baseline, 1.0), respectively (P < .05 for days 6-14). Self-assessment, TEWL, and corneometry results underscored the investigator clinical assessment. Participant preference and likelihood of continued usage was greater with clindamycin phosphate 1.2%--BPO 2.5% gel. Continued use and efficacy results for the treatment of acne were influenced by the potential of the product to cause irritation and the participant preferences. Irritation potential was more pronounced and severe with adapalene 0.1%--BPO 2.5% gel. Undoubtedly, as a result more participants preferred treatment with clindamycin phosphate 1.2%--BPO 2.5% gel and were more likely to continue to use the product. PMID:22988653

  7. The influence of protozoa with a filtered and non-filtered seawater culture of Tetraselmis sp., and effects to the bacterial and algal communities over 10 days.

    PubMed

    Erkelens, Mason; Ball, Andrew S; Lewis, David M

    2014-12-01

    In this study a filter was used to remove protozoa and its effects on a Tetraselmis sp. culture were evaluated in terms of final total lipid, final total dry weight, cell counts, and both the bacterial and algal communities. The protozoa species observed within this study was identified as Cohnilembus reniformis. It was observed that on the final day no C. reniformis were present in filtered cultures compared to the non-filtered culture which contained 403 C. reniformis/mL. The presence of C. reniformis within the culture did not affect the total lipid or the total dry weight recovered, suggesting that Tetraselmis sp. was capable of surviving and growing in the presence of C. reniformis. Overall it is suggested that an 11 ?m filter was effective at removing protozoa, though growing a microalgae culture without filtration did not show any significant effect. PMID:25314666

  8. Effect of a 3-day high-fat feeding period on carbohydrate balance and ad-libitum energy intake in humans

    PubMed Central

    Galgani, Jose E.; de Jonge, Lilian; Most, Marlene M.; Bray, George A.; Smith, Steven R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective A reduction in glycogen after the switch to an isoenergetic high-fat diet might promote a compensatory increase in food intake in order to reestablish carbohydrate balance. We assessed the effect of an isoenergetic switch from a 49%-carbohydrate to 50%-fat diet on nutrient balance and ad-libitum food intake. We hypothesized that carbohydrate balance would be inversely related to ad-libitum energy intake. Methods In 47 males and 11 females (22.6 0.4 y; 26.1 0.5 kg/m2), fuel balance was measured in a respiration chamber over 4 days. During the first day, an isoenergetic, high-carbohydrate diet was provided followed by a 3-day isoenergetic, high-fat diet. At the end of this period and after 16 hours of fasting, three options of foods (cookies, fruit salad and turkey sandwich) were offered ad-libitum for 4 hours. The relationships between post-chamber ad-libitum intake and macronutrient oxidation and balance measured day-to-day and over the 4-day respiration chamber stay were studied. Results After switching to a high-fat diet, 24-h respiratory quotient decreased from 0.87 0.02 to 0.83 0.02 (p<0.0001) resulting in a 4-d cumulative carbohydrate, fat and protein balances of ?183 368, 342 480 and 65 267 kcal, respectively. Cumulative energy balance (224 362 kcal/4 d) did not influence ad-libitum energy intake. However, we detected that 4-d carbohydrate balance was a positive and independent predictor of post-chamber ad-libitum energy intake (R2=0.10; p=0.01), whereas no significant influence of fat and protein balances was found. Conclusion In response to an isoenergetic change from a high-carbohydrate to high-fat diet, higher carbohydrate balance related to increased energy intake. PMID:20195283

  9. A study of gravity-wave spectra in the troposphere and stratosphere at 5-min to 5-day periods with the Poker Flat MST radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bemra, R. S.; Rastogi, P. K.; Balsley, B. B.

    1986-01-01

    An analysis of frequency spectra at periods of about 5 days to 5 min from two 20-day sets of velocity measurements in the stratosphere and troposphere region obtained with the Poker Flat mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere (MST) radar during January and June, 1984 is presented. A technique based on median filtering and averaged order statistics for automatic editing, smoothing and spectral analysis of velocity time series contaminated with spurious data points or outliers is outlined. The validity of this technique and its effects on the inferred spectral index was tested through simulation. Spectra obtained with this technique are discussed. The measured spectral indices show variability with season and height, especially across the tropopause. The discussion briefly outlines the need for obtaining better climatologies of velocity spectra and for the refinements of the existing theories to explain their behavior.

  10. High energy X-ray observations of CYG X-3 from from OSO-8: Further evidence of a 34.1 day period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolan, J. F.; Crannell, C. J.; Dennis, B. R.; Frost, K. J.; Orwig, L. E.

    1981-01-01

    The X-ray source Cyg X-3 (=4U2030+40) was observed with the high energy X-ray spectrometer on OSO-8 for two weeks in 1975 and in 1976 and for one week in 1977. No change in spectral shape and intensity above 23 keV was observed from year to year. No correlation is observed between the source's intensity and the phase of the 34.1 day period discovered by Molteni, et al. (1980). The pulsed fraction of the 4.8 hour light curve between 23 and 73 keV varies from week to week, however, and the magnitude of the pulsed fraction appears to be correlated with the 34.1 day phase. No immediate explanation of this behavior is apparent in terms of previously proposed models of the source.

  11. Sexually active bucks are able to stimulate three successive groups of females per day with a 4-hour period of contact.

    PubMed

    Bedos, M; Velzquez, H; Fitz-Rodrguez, G; Flores, J A; Hernndez, H; Duarte, G; Vielma, J; Fernndez, I G; Retana-Mrquez, M S; Muoz-Gutirrez, M; Keller, M; Delgadillo, J A

    2012-05-15

    Bucks rendered sexually active by a photoperiod treatment of long days can induce fertile ovulation in a group of goats with only 4 h of contact daily with a male:female ratio of 1:10. Here we tested whether such bucks could induce fertile ovulations when stimulating successively three different groups of anovulatory goats when interacting 4 h per day during 15 consecutive days. Control males (n=3) were introduced in the control group (n=25) of does at 8:00 h and were removed at 12:00 h. Experimental males (n=3) were in contact with the experimental groups of does: from 8:00 h to 12:00 h with a first group (n=27), from 12:00 h to 16:00 h with a second group (n=26) and with a third one (n=27) from 16:00 h to 20:00 h. Bucks were then placed until next day in another pen. Both in the control and the experimental groups, more than 85% of females ovulated, and the proportions did not differ between the control and experimental groups (P?0.67) or between the three experimental groups (P?0.67). Moreover, the ovulation rate did not differ significantly between the control and the experimental females nor between the three experimental groups. Bucks were able to fertilize more than 72% of does independently of the number of females they were exposed to (P?0.17). Finally, more than 58% of females kidded and fertility did not differ between the control and experimental groups (P=1) nor among experimental groups (P?0.77). We conclude that sexually active bucks are able to induce fertile ovulation in three successive groups of anovulatory goats even when the period of contact between sexes is reduced to 4 h per day. PMID:22366159

  12. Seasonal size distribution of airborne culturable bacteria and fungi and preliminary estimation of their deposition in human lungs during non-haze and haze days

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Min; Jia, Ruizhi; Qiu, Tianlei; Han, Meilin; Song, Yuan; Wang, Xuming

    2015-10-01

    In recent years, haze events in Beijing have significantly increased in frequency. On haze days, airborne microorganisms are considered to be a potential risk factor for various health concerns. However, limited information on bioaerosols has prevented our proper understanding of the possible threat to human health due to these bioaerosols. In this study, we used a six-stage impactor for sampling culturable bioaerosols and the LUDEP 2.07 computer-based model for calculating their deposition on human lungs to investigate seasonal concentration, size distribution, and corresponding deposition efficiency and flux in the human respiratory tract during different haze-level events. The current results of the analysis of 398 samples over four seasons indicate that the concentration of culturable airborne bacteria decreased with increasing haze severity. The bioaerosol concentration ratio was skewed towards larger particle sizes on heavy haze days leading to larger bioaerosol aerodynamic diameters than on non-haze days. During nasal breathing by an adult male engaged in light exercise in an outdoor environment, the total deposition efficiency of culturable bioaerosols is 80-90% including approximately 70% in the upper respiratory tract, 5-7% in the alveoli, and about 3% in the bronchial couple with bronchiolar regions. Although the difference in culturable bioaerosol aerodynamic diameters at different haze levels was not large enough to cause obvious differences in lung deposition efficiency, the deposition fluxes clearly varied with the degree of haze owing to the varied concentration of culturable airborne bacteria and fungi. The results here could improve our understanding of the seasonal health threat due to culturable bioaerosols during non-haze and haze days.

  13. Practical Physical and Behavioral Measures to Assess the Socialization Spectrum of Cats in a Shelter-Like Setting during a Three Day Period.

    PubMed

    Slater, Margaret; Garrison, Laurie; Miller, Katherine; Weiss, Emily; Makolinski, Kathleen; Drain, Natasha; Mirontshuk, Alex

    2013-01-01

    Animal welfare organizations routinely accept large numbers of cats with unknown histories, and whose backgrounds vary from well-socialized pets to cats that have had little or no contact with humans. Agencies are challenged with making the determination of socialization level in a highly stressful environment where cats are often too frightened to show typical behaviors. A variety of structured behavioral assessments were conducted in a shelter-like environment, from intake through a three day holding period, on cats from the full range of socialization as reported by their caregivers. Our results show that certain behaviors such as rubbing, playing, chirping, having the tail up or being at the front of the cage were found to be unique to More Socialized cats. While not all more socialized cats showed these behaviors, cats that did were socialized. Assessing the cats throughout the three day period was beneficial in eliciting key behaviors from shyer and more frightened cats. These results will be used in future work to develop an assessment tool to identify the socialization status of cats as a standardized guide for transparent and reliable disposition decisions and higher live release rates for cats in animal shelters. PMID:26479757

  14. [Retrospective Analysis of the Afatinib Clinical Pathway during the 28-Day Introductory Period-The Japanese Style of Collaborative Drug Therapy Management(J-CDTM)].

    PubMed

    Iwata, Kaori; Ryota, Noriko; Hikita, Ami; Sando, Masumi; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Tamiya, Motohiro; Azuma, Yuichiro; Tani, Eriko; Hamaguchi, Masanari; Tanaka, Ayako; Shiroyama, Takayuki; Morishita, Naoko; Okamoto, Norio; Futagami, Sumiko; Hirashima, Tomonori

    2015-08-01

    Afatinib is a newly approved second-generation epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibito r(EGFR-TKI). Afatinib has been shown to prolongthe overall survival of patients with non-small cell lungcancer (NSCLC) with EGFR mutations compared with the standard chemotherapy. However, Grade 3 or 4 toxicities, includingdiarrhea, rash, paronychia, and stomatitis, have been observed more frequently in patients treated with afatinib than in those treated with first-generation EGFR-TKIs. Accordingly, our institution developed an afatinib clinical pathway (the afatinib pathway), which was designed by certified nurses, medical physicians, and certified pharmacists, with the goal of reducing the severity of diarrhea and rash that occur most frequently duringthe 28-day introductory period of afatinib treatment. Between May and October 2014, afatinib was administered accordingto the afatinib pathway to 14 patients with NSCLC and EGFR mutations. Of these patients, only one (7.1%) experienced Grade 3 diarrhea. No other patient experienced Grade 3 or 4 toxicity. The afatinib pathway was effective in reducingthe severities of the diarrhea and rash duringthe 28-day introductory period of the afatinib treatment. Our implementation of the afatinib pathway could be considered the Japanese style of collaborative drugtherapy management (J-CDTM). PMID:26321711

  15. Integrated biological and cultural practices can reduce crop rotation period of organic strawberries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Approached by an organic grower and the land owner, a team of researchers conducted a replicated on-farm experiment with the break period between strawberry crops (continuous strawberries with broccoli residue incorporation, one year break, two year break, three year break, and seven year break) as ...

  16. Musical rhythms in heart period dynamics: a cross-cultural and interdisciplinary approach to cardiac rhythms.

    PubMed

    Bettermann, H; Amponsah, D; Cysarz, D; van Leeuwen, P

    1999-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to expand classic heart period analysis methods by techniques from ethnomusicology that explicitly take complex musical rhythm principles into consideration. The methods used are based on the theory of African music, the theory of symbolic dynamics, and combinatorial theory. Heart period tachograms from 192 24-h electrocardiograms of 96 healthy subjects were transformed into binary symbol sequences that were interpretable as elementary rhythmic (percussive) patterns, the time lines in African music. Using a hierarchical rhythm pattern scheme closely related to the Derler Rhythm Classification (from jazz theory), we calculated the predominance and stability of pattern classes. The results show that during sleep certain classes, specific to individuals, occurred in a cyclically recurrent manner and many times more often than expected. Simultaneously, other classes disappeared more or less completely. Moreover, the most frequent classes obviously originate from phase-locking processes in autonomic regulation (e.g., between respiratory and cardiac cycles). In conclusion, the new interdisciplinary method presented here demonstrates that heart period patterns, in particular those occurring during night sleep, can be interpreted as musical rhythms. This method may be of great potential use in music therapy research. PMID:10564129

  17. Turbulence Kinetic Energy budget during the afternoon transition - Part 1: Observed surface TKE budget and boundary layer description for 10 intensive observation period days

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, E.; Lohou, F.; Lothon, M.; Pardyjak, E.; Mahrt, L.; Darbieu, C.

    2015-11-01

    The decay of turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) and its budget in the afternoon period from mid-day until zero buoyancy flux at the surface is studied in a two-part paper by means of measurements from the Boundary Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence (BLLAST) field campaign for 10 Intensive Observation Period days. Here, in Part 1, near-surface measurements from a small tower are used to estimate a TKE budget. The overall boundary layer characteristics and meso-scale situation at the site are also described based upon taller tower measurements, radiosoundings and remote sensing instrumentation. Analysis of the TKE budget during the afternoon transition reveals a variety of different surface layer dynamics in terms of TKE and TKE decay. This is largely attributed to variations in the 8 m wind speed, which is responsible for different amounts of near-surface shear production on different afternoons and variations within some of the afternoon periods. The partitioning of near surface production into local dissipation and transport in neutral and unstably stratified conditions was investigated. Although variations exist both between and within afternoons, as a rule of thumb, our results suggest that about 50 % of the near surface production of TKE is compensated by local dissipation near the surface, leaving about 50 % available for transport. This result indicates that it is important to also consider TKE transport as a factor influencing the near-surface TKE decay rate, which in many earlier studies has mainly been linked with the production terms of TKE by buoyancy and wind shear. We also conclude that the TKE tendency is smaller than the other budget terms, indicating a quasi-stationary evolution of TKE in the afternoon transition. Even though the TKE tendency was observed to be small, a strong correlation to mean buoyancy production of -0.69 was found for the afternoon period. For comparison with previous results, the TKE budget terms are normalized with friction velocity and measurement height and discussed in the framework of Monin-Obukhov similarity theory. Empirically fitted expressions are presented. Alternatively, we also suggest a non-local parametrization of dissipation using a TKE-length scale model which takes into account the boundary layer depth in addition to distance above the ground. The non-local formulation is shown to give a better description of dissipation compared to a local parametrization.

  18. The Presidents' Day cyclone of 18-19 February 1979 - Synoptic overview and analysis of the subtropical jet streak influencing the pre-cyclogenetic period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uccellini, L. W.; Kocin, P. J.; Petersen, R. A.; Wash, C. H.; Brill, K. F.

    1984-01-01

    A detailed examination is undertaken of the subtropical jet (STJ) streak revealed by an analysis of the Presidents' Day cyclone of February 18-19, 1979. During its 24 h period, the STJ's flow became increasingly supergeostrophic and apparently unbalanced, while ageostrophic wind speeds increased to more than 30 m/sec in association with a significant cross-contour component, directed toward lower values of the Montgomery streamfunction, as the flow along the STJ became more divergent with time. These phenomena are linked to the increasing confluence in the entrance region of the jet streak and the decreasing wavelength of the trough-ridge system in which the jet streak was embedded. The upper level divergence and upward vertical motion near the axis of the STJ are found to be important factors in the development of the cyclone's first area of heavy snow.

  19. Practical Physical and Behavioral Measures to Assess the Socialization Spectrum of Cats in a Shelter-Like Setting during a Three Day Period

    PubMed Central

    Slater, Margaret; Garrison, Laurie; Miller, Katherine; Weiss, Emily; Makolinski, Kathleen; Drain, Natasha; Mirontshuk, Alex

    2013-01-01

    Simple Summary Animal welfare organizations accept large numbers of cats with no known history. Because shelters are often highly stressful environments for cats, it is likely to be difficult to differentiate a frightened cat that is socialized to humans from a feral cat that is not. However, this distinction can help channel cats into appropriate dispositions. We conducted structured assessments to measure various behaviors and their potential to distinguish socialization levels. Our results show that a specific set of behaviors are only exhibited by more socialized cats. Many cats needed time to adjust to the shelter-type setting to show these socialized behaviors. Abstract Animal welfare organizations routinely accept large numbers of cats with unknown histories, and whose backgrounds vary from well-socialized pets to cats that have had little or no contact with humans. Agencies are challenged with making the determination of socialization level in a highly stressful environment where cats are often too frightened to show typical behaviors. A variety of structured behavioral assessments were conducted in a shelter-like environment, from intake through a three day holding period, on cats from the full range of socialization as reported by their caregivers. Our results show that certain behaviors such as rubbing, playing, chirping, having the tail up or being at the front of the cage were found to be unique to More Socialized cats. While not all more socialized cats showed these behaviors, cats that did were socialized. Assessing the cats throughout the three day period was beneficial in eliciting key behaviors from shyer and more frightened cats. These results will be used in future work to develop an assessment tool to identify the socialization status of cats as a standardized guide for transparent and reliable disposition decisions and higher live release rates for cats in animal shelters. PMID:26479757

  20. Socio-cultural factors surrounding mental distress during the perinatal period in Zambia: a qualitative investigation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The presence of mental distress during pregnancy and after childbirth imposes detrimental developmental and health consequences for families in all nations. In Zambia, the Ministry of Health (MoH) has proposed a more comprehensive approach towards mental health care, recognizing the importance of the mental health of women during the perinatal period. Aim The study explores factors contributing to mental distress during the perinatal period of motherhood in Zambia. Methods A qualitative study was conducted in Lusaka, Zambia with nineteen focus groups comprising 149 women and men from primary health facilities and schools respectively. Findings There are high levels of mental distress in four domains: worry about HIV status and testing; uncertainty about survival from childbirth; lack of social support; and vulnerability/oppression. Conclusion Identifying mental distress and prompt referral for interventions is critical to improving the mental health of the mother and prevent the effects of mental distress on the baby. Recommendation Strategies should be put in place to ensure pregnant women are screened for possible perinatal mental health problems during their visit to antenatal clinic and referral made to qualified mental health professionals. In addition further research is recommended in order to facilitate evidence based mental health policy formulation and implementation in Zambia. PMID:22954173

  1. Better Quality and More Usable Embryos Obtained on Day 3 Cultured in 5% Than 20% Oxygen: A Controlled and Randomized Study Using the Sibling Oocytes.

    PubMed

    Peng, Huixia; Shi, Wenhao; Zhang, Wei; Xue, Xia; Li, Na; Li, Wei; Shi, Juanzi

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the effect of atmospheric oxygen (O2) concentration on embryonic development, a controlled and randomized study using the sibling oocytes was carried out. A total of 147 patients were studied. Embryos were cultured in O2 concentration 20% versus 5% during the gamete, zygote, and first 3 days. The mean cell numbers of embryo (7.69 1.91 vs 7.20 1.82, P = .011) and rate of clinically useable embryos (81.62% vs 77.22%, P = .017) were significantly higher in 5% O2 than in 20% O2. There was no difference in the zygote developmental stage, day 2, day 4, and blastocyst stage. The quality of blastocyst (both inner cell mass and trophectoderm) showed no difference. Also, there was no increase in embryos fragmentation and uneven cells in 20% O2 culture condition. In conclusion, 20% O2 reduced the mean cell numbers of embryo and the number of clinically useable embryos on day 3. However, there was no subsequent negative impact on development of day 4 and blastocyst stage. PMID:26342053

  2. Outdoor Day-Care Centres--A Culturalization of Nature: How Do Children Relate to Nature as Educational Practice?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melhuus, E. Cathrine

    2012-01-01

    This article will discuss how children and adults experience a certain outdoor environment as part of an educational practice, through the activities the adults and children have. It will further discuss how these activities realize cultural values through the educators' and children's activities. In Norway the use of outdoor environments has

  3. Outdoor Day-Care Centres--A Culturalization of Nature: How Do Children Relate to Nature as Educational Practice?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melhuus, E. Cathrine

    2012-01-01

    This article will discuss how children and adults experience a certain outdoor environment as part of an educational practice, through the activities the adults and children have. It will further discuss how these activities realize cultural values through the educators' and children's activities. In Norway the use of outdoor environments has…

  4. Dancing as an Aspect of Early Mormon (Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints) and Utah Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holbrook, Leona

    Dance has often been a significant part of a cultural heritage. Most of the religious organizations which were formed just after the United States achieved its independence, however, rejected many European religious customs, including dance. Despite this, the Mormon church not only allowed dance, but advocated and sponsored it. Dance was an…

  5. Safety, efficacy and acceptability of outpatient mifepristone-misoprostol medical abortion through 70 days since last menstrual period in public sector facilities in Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Sanhueza Smith, Patricio; Pea, Melanie; Dzuba, Ilana G; Garca Martinez, Mara Laura; Arangur Peraza, Ana Gabriela; Bousiguez, Manuel; Shochet, Tara; Winikoff, Beverly

    2015-02-01

    Extensive evidence exists regarding the efficacy and acceptability of medical abortion through 63 days since last menstrual period (LMP). In Mexico City's Secretariat of Health (SSDF) outpatient facilities, mifepristone-misoprostol medical abortion is the first-line approach for abortion care in this pregnancy range. Recent research demonstrates continued high rates of complete abortion through 70 days LMP. To expand access to legal abortion services in Mexico City (where abortion is legal through 12 weeks LMP), this study sought to assess the efficacy and acceptability of the standard outpatient approach through 70 days in two SSDF points of service. One thousand and one women seeking pregnancy termination were enrolled and given 200 mg mifepristone followed by 800 ?g misoprostol 24-48 hours later. Women were asked to return to the clinic one week later for evaluation. The great majority of women (93.3%; 95% CI: 91.6-94.8) had complete abortions. Women with pregnancies ? 8 weeks LMP had significantly higher success rates than women in the 9th or 10th weeks (94.9% vs. 90.5%; p = 0.01). The difference in success rates between the 9th and 10th weeks was not significant (90.0% vs. 91.2%; p = 0.71). The majority of women found the side effects (82.9%) and the use of misoprostol (84.4%) to be very acceptable or acceptable. This study provides additional evidence supporting an extended outpatient medical abortion regimen through 10 weeks LMP. PMID:25702071

  6. Typing of Clinical Mycobacterium avium Complex Strains Cultured during a 2-Year Period in Denmark by Using IS1245

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Jeanett; Andersen, ?se B.; Askgaard, Dorthe; Giese, Sten B.; Larsen, Birger

    1999-01-01

    In the present study restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses with the recently described insertion sequence IS1245 as a probe was performed with clinical Mycobacterium avium complex strains cultured in Denmark during a 2-year period. The overall aim of the study was to disclose potential routes of transmission of these microorganisms. As a first step, the genetic diversity among isolates from AIDS patients and non-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients was described. In addition, a number of isolates from nonhuman sources cultured during the same period were analyzed and compared to the human isolates. A total of 203 isolates from AIDS patients (n = 90), non-HIV-infected patients (n = 91), and nonhuman sources (n = 22) were analyzed. The presence of IS1245 was restricted to Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium isolates. The majority of human isolates had large numbers of IS1245 copies, while nonhuman isolates could be divided into a high-copy-number group and a low-copy-number group. Groups of identical strains were found to be geographically widespread, comprising strains from AIDS patients as well as strains from non-HIV-infected patients. Samples of peat (to be used as potting soil) and veterinary samples were found to contain viable M. avium isolates belonging to genotypes also found in humans. PMID:9986819

  7. Inhibitory effect of essential oils against Lactobacillus rhamnosus and starter culture in fermented milk during its shelf-life period

    PubMed Central

    Moritz, Cristiane Mengue Feniman; Rall, Vera Lcia Mores; Saeki, Margarida Jri; Jnior, Ary Fernandes

    2012-01-01

    The use of essential oils in foods has attracted great interest, due to their antagonistic action against pathogenic microorganisms. However, this action is undesirable for probiotic foods, as products containing Lactobacillus rhamnosus. The aim of the present study was to measure the sensitivity profile of L. rhamnosus and a yogurt starter culture in fermented milk, upon addition of increasing concentrations of cinnamon, clove and mint essential oils. Essential oils were prepared by steam distillation, and chemically characterised by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and determination of density. Survival curves were obtained from counts of L. rhamnosus and the starter culture (alone and in combination), upon addition of 0.04% essential oils. In parallel, titratable acidity was monitored over 28 experimental days. Minimum inhibitory concentration values, obtained using the microdilution method in Brain Heart Infusion medium, were 0.025, 0.2 and 0.4% for cinnamon, clove and mint essential oils, respectively. Cinnamon essential oil had the highest antimicrobial activity, especially against the starter culture, interfering with lactic acid production. Although viable cell counts of L. rhamnosus were lower following treatment with all 3 essential oils, relative to controls, these results were not statistically significant; in addition, cell counts remained greater than the minimum count of 108CFU/mL required for a product to be considered a probiotic. Thus, although use of cinnamon essential oil in yogurt makes starter culture fermentation unfeasible, it does not prevent the application of L. rhamnosus to probiotic fermented milk. Furthermore, clove and mint essential oil caused sublethal stress to L. rhamnosus. PMID:24031939

  8. Auroral activities observed by SNPP VIIRS day/night band during a long period geomagnetic storm event on April 29-30, 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Xi; Cao, Changyong; Liu, Tung-chang; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Wenhui; Fung, Shing F.

    2015-10-01

    The Day/Night Band (DNB) of the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) onboard Suomi-NPP represents a major advancement in night time imaging capabilities. The DNB senses radiance that can span 7 orders of magnitude in one panchromatic (0.5-0.9 μm) reflective solar band and provides imagery of clouds and other Earth features over illumination levels ranging from full sunlight to quarter moon. When the satellite passes through the day-night terminator, the DNB sensor is affected by stray light due to solar illumination on the instrument. With the implementation of stray light correction, stray light-corrected DNB images enable the observation of aurora occurred in the high latitude regions during geomagnetic storms. In this paper, DNB observations of auroral activities are analyzed during a long period (> 20 hours) of geomagnetic storm event occurred on Apr. 29-30, 2014. The storm event has the Bz component of interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) pointing southward for more than 20 hours. During this event, the geomagnetic storm index Dst reached -67 nT and the geomagnetic auroral electrojet (AE) index increased and reached as high as 1200 nT with large amplitude fluctuations. The event occurred during new moon period and DNB observation has minimum moon light contamination. During this event, auroras are observed by DNB for each orbital pass on the night side (~local time 1:30am) in the southern hemisphere. DNB radiance data are processed to identify regions of aurora during each orbital pass. The evolution of aurora is characterized with time series of the poleward and equatorward boundary of aurora, area, peak radiance and total light emission of the aurora in DNB observation. These characteristic parameters are correlated with solar wind and geomagnetic index parameters. It is found that the evolution of total area-integrated radiance of auroral region over the southern hemisphere correlated well with the ground geomagnetic AE index with correlation coefficient = 0.71. DNB observations of aurora help understand the relations among solar wind variation, auroral activities and geomagnetic responses.

  9. Probing rotational dynamo extremes: X-ray and optical spectroscopy of the 0.5 day period eclipsing binary, HD 79826.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huenemoerder, David; Nichols, Joy S.; DePalma, David; Garcia-Alvarez, David; Schulz, Norbert S.; Canizares, Claude R

    2014-06-01

    The highly modulated optical light curve of HD 79826 (spectral type G5) was discovered in the Chandra guide-star light curves, indicating a period of about 0.5 days, a strong and migrating distortion wave, and a shallow eclipse. We subsequently obtained simultaneous Chandra high resolution X-ray spectra and optical photometry, along with contemporaneous ground-based photometry and spectra. X-ray rotational or eclipse modulation was totally obscured by X-ray variability and flares. X-ray spectra are characterized by coronal emission near thesaturation limit of Lx/Lbol = 0.001. Optical spectra show extremely rotationally broadened features, variable with orbital phase. Optical light curves show the modulation to be not only rapidly migrating in phase, but also of variable amplitude. We will further characterize the X-ray emission through measurements of line widths, velocities, and fluxes, and provide coronal plasma models. This star is near or at the limits of dynamo saturation, and since it is partially eclipsing, has potential to be well characterized in terms of fundamental stellar parameters. Acknowledgments: This work was supported by NASA through the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) contract SV3-73016 for the Chandra X-Ray Center and Science Instruments.

  10. Trade-offs between global warming and day length on the start of the carbon uptake period in seasonally cold ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Wohlfahrt, Georg; Cremonese, Edoardo; Hammerle, Albin; Hrtnagl, Lukas; Galvagno, Marta; Gianelle, Damiano; Marcolla, Barbara; di Cella, Umberto Morra

    2013-01-01

    [1] It is well established that warming leads to longer growing seasons in seasonally cold ecosystems. Whether this goes along with an increase in the net ecosystem carbon dioxide (CO2) uptake is much more controversial. We studied the effects of warming on the start of the carbon uptake period (CUP) of three mountain grasslands situated along an elevational gradient in the Alps. To this end, we used a simple empirical model of the net ecosystem CO2 exchange, calibrated, and forced with multiyear empirical data from each site. We show that reductions in the quantity and duration of daylight associated with earlier snowmelts were responsible for diminishing returns, in terms of carbon gain, from longer growing seasons caused by reductions in daytime photosynthetic uptake and increases in nighttime losses of CO2. This effect was less pronounced at high, compared to low, elevations, where the start of the CUP occurred closer to the summer solstice when changes in day length and incident radiation are minimal. PMID:24587563

  11. Reproductive performance of heifers offered ad libitum or restricted access to feed for a one hundred forty-day period after weaning.

    PubMed

    Roberts, A J; Geary, T W; Grings, E E; Waterman, R C; MacNeil, M D

    2009-09-01

    Reproductive performance was evaluated in composite heifers born over a 3-yr period that were randomly assigned to control (fed to appetite; n = 205) or restricted (fed at 80% of that consumed by controls adjusted to a common BW basis; n = 192) feeding for a 140-d period, beginning about 2 mo after weaning at 6 mo of age and ending at about 12.5 mo of age. Heifers were fed a diet of 67% corn silage, 18% alfalfa, and 9% of a protein-mineral supplement (DM basis). Restricted heifers consumed 27% less feed over the 140 d and had less ADG (0.53 +/- 0.01 vs. 0.65 +/- 0.01 kg/d; P < 0.001) than control heifers. After 140 d, all heifers were placed in common pens and subjected to an estrous synchronization protocol to facilitate AI at about 14 mo of age. Heifers were then exposed to bulls for the remainder of a 51-d breeding season. Average BW of heifers diverged within 28-d after initiation of feed restriction, and differences (P < 0.001) persisted through the prebreeding period (309 +/- 1 vs. 326 +/- 1 kg at approximately 13.5 mo of age) and subsequent grazing season (410 +/- 2 vs. 418 +/- 2 kg at about 19.5 mo of age). From the end of the 140-d restriction at about 12.5 to 19.5 mo of age, ADG was greater (P < 0.001) in restricted heifers than control heifers (0.51 +/- 0.01 vs. 0.47 +/- 0.01 kg/d). Proportion of heifers attaining puberty by 14 mo of age tended to be less (P = 0.1) in restricted (60 +/- 3%) than control-fed heifers (68 +/- 3%). Mean BW at puberty was less (P < 0.01) in restricted (309 kg) than control (327 kg) heifers. Pregnancy rate from AI tended to be less (P = 0.08) in restricted (48 +/- 4%) than control heifers (57 +/- 3%). Proportion of animals that were pubertal at breeding and pregnant from AI were positively associated (P < 0.1) with heifer age and ADG from birth to beginning of study. Final pregnancy rates were 87 and 91% for restricted and control heifers, respectively (P = 0.27). Day of breeding season that conception occurred was negatively associated with ADG from birth to weaning (P = 0.005), but was not associated with ADG within treatment (P = 0.60). Economic analysis revealed a $33 reduction in cost to produce a pregnant heifer under the restricted protocol when accounting for pregnancy rates and differences in BW and market prices between selection at weaning and marketing as open heifers at l.5 yr of age. A potential economic advantage exists for rearing replacement heifers on a restricted level of feeding during the postweaning period. PMID:19465497

  12. Collagen content in the vastus lateralis and the soleus muscle following a 90-day bed rest period with or without resistance exercises

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Rasmus Oestergaard; Schjerling, Peter; Tesch, Per; Stål, Per; Langberg, Henning

    2015-01-01

    Summary Introduction spaceflight seems associated with deterioration of the function of the skeletal muscles. Since muscle collagen is critical for muscle function, an improved understanding of the content of the muscle collagen during long-term inactivity seems important. Bed-rest with in-bed resistance training serves as a proxy for the conditions in space. Therefore, ground-based studies may improve the understanding of the consequences of long-term inactivity. Purpose the purpose is to compare the change in collagen protein in the vastus lateralis (VL) and the soleus (SOL) muscle amongst persons exposed to a 90-day bed rest with or without resistance exercise. Methods an explorative analysis was completed based on data from a randomized, controlled trial. The intervention group (BRE, SOL n=4, VL n=8) performed supine-based squat exercises, whereas the controls (BE, SOL n=6, VL n=12) remained inactive during follow-up. Muscle biopsies from vastus lateralis and soleus were taken at baseline (pre) and after 90-days’ follow-up (post). Muscle collagen (μg collagen/mg protein) was quantified. Two-way repeated measurements ANOVA was used to compare the interaction between the intervention (BRE/BR) and time (pre/post) for each muscle. Results the collagen content of VL was similar between pre and post in the BRE group (−3.8 μg collagen/mg protein [95% CI: −22.0; 14.4], p=0.68) while it rose amongst individuals in the BR group (14.9 μg collagen/mg protein [95% CI: −0.01; 29.7], p=0.05). The difference of 18.66 [95% CI: −6.5; 43.9] between BRE and BR across time was, however, not significant (p=0.14). No significant reduction in SOL muscle collagen content was observed from pre to post in the BR group (−9.3 μg collagen/mg protein [95% CI: −24.9; 6.4], p=0.25) or in the BRE group (−6.5 μg collagen/mg protein [95% CI: −25.6; 12.6], p=0.50). There was no difference in the effect of BR versus BRE over time (mean difference −2.78 μg collagen/mg protein [95% CI: −29.7; 24.1], p=0.82). Conclusion muscle collagen content in the VL or SOL muscle does not seem to differ after a 90-day bed rest period with or without squat exercises. PMID:26958541

  13. Ground-based observations of Saturn's auroral ionosphere over three days: Trends in H3+ temperature, density and emission with Saturn local time and planetary period oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Donoghue, James; Melin, Henrik; Stallard, Tom S.; Provan, G.; Moore, Luke; Badman, Sarah V.; Cowley, Stan W. H.; Baines, Kevin H.; Miller, Steve; Blake, James S. D.

    2016-01-01

    On 19-21 April 2013, the ground-based 10-m W.M. Keck II telescope was used to simultaneously measure H3+ emissions from four regions of Saturn's auroral ionosphere: (1) the northern noon region of the main auroral oval; (2) the northern midnight main oval; (3) the northern polar cap and (4) the southern noon main oval. The H3+ emission from these regions was captured in the form of high resolution spectral images as the planet rotated. The results herein contain twenty-three H3+ temperatures, column densities and total emissions located in the aforementioned regions - ninety-two data points in total, spread over timescales of both hours and days. Thermospheric temperatures in the spring-time northern main oval are found to be cooler than their autumn-time southern counterparts by tens of K, consistent with the hypothesis that the total thermospheric heating rate is inversely proportional to magnetic field strength. The main oval H3+ density and emission is lower at northern midnight than it is at noon, in agreement with a nearby peak in the electron influx in the post-dawn sector and a minimum flux at midnight. Finally, when arranging the northern main oval H3+ parameters as a function of the oscillation period seen in Saturn's magnetic field - the planetary period oscillation (PPO) phase - we see a large peak in H3+ density and emission at ∼115° northern phase, with a full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of ∼44°. This seems to indicate that the influx of electrons associated with the PPO phase at 90° is responsible at least in part for the behavior of all H3+ parameters. A combination of the H3+ production and loss timescales and the ±10° uncertainty in the location of a given PPO phase are likely, at least in part, to be responsible for the observed peaks in H3+ density and emission occurring at a later time than the peak precipitation expected at 90° PPO phase.

  14. Day to Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jurecki, Dennis

    2006-01-01

    A clean, healthy and safe school provides students, faculty and staff with an environment conducive to learning and working. However, budget and staff reductions can lead to substandard cleaning practices and unsanitary conditions. Some school facility managers have been making the switch to a day-schedule to reduce security and energy costs, and

  15. Day to Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jurecki, Dennis

    2006-01-01

    A clean, healthy and safe school provides students, faculty and staff with an environment conducive to learning and working. However, budget and staff reductions can lead to substandard cleaning practices and unsanitary conditions. Some school facility managers have been making the switch to a day-schedule to reduce security and energy costs, and…

  16. Day to day with COPD

    MedlinePLUS

    ... but there are things you can do every day to keep COPD from getting worse, to protect ... COPD - day to day; Chronic obstructive airways disease - day to day; Chronic obstructive lung disease - day to day ; Chronic ...

  17. KELT-6b: A P ~ 7.9 Day Hot Saturn Transiting a Metal-poor Star with a Long-period Companion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Karen A.; Eastman, Jason D.; Beatty, Thomas G.; Siverd, Robert J.; Gaudi, B. Scott; Pepper, Joshua; Kielkopf, John F.; Johnson, John Asher; Howard, Andrew W.; Fischer, Debra A.; Manner, Mark; Bieryla, Allyson; Latham, David W.; Fulton, Benjamin J.; Gregorio, Joao; Buchhave, Lars A.; Jensen, Eric L. N.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Penev, Kaloyan; Crepp, Justin R.; Hinkley, Sasha; Street, Rachel A.; Cargile, Phillip; Mack, Claude E.; Oberst, Thomas E.; Avril, Ryan L.; Mellon, Samuel N.; McLeod, Kim K.; Penny, Matthew T.; Stefanik, Robert P.; Berlind, Perry; Calkins, Michael L.; Mao, Qingqing; Richert, Alexander J. W.; DePoy, Darren L.; Esquerdo, Gilbert A.; Gould, Andrew; Marshall, Jennifer L.; Oelkers, Ryan J.; Pogge, Richard W.; Trueblood, Mark; Trueblood, Patricia

    2014-02-01

    We report the discovery of KELT-6b, a mildly inflated Saturn-mass planet transiting a metal-poor host. The initial transit signal was identified in KELT-North survey data, and the planetary nature of the occulter was established using a combination of follow-up photometry, high-resolution imaging, high-resolution spectroscopy, and precise radial velocity measurements. The fiducial model from a global analysis including constraints from isochrones indicates that the V = 10.38 host star (BD+31 2447) is a mildly evolved, late-F star with T eff = 6102 ± 43 K, log g_\\star =4.07_{-0.07}^{+0.04}, and [Fe/H] = -0.28 ± 0.04, with an inferred mass M sstarf = 1.09 ± 0.04 M ⊙ and radius R_\\star =1.58_{-0.09}^{+0.16} \\,R_\\odot. The planetary companion has mass MP = 0.43 ± 0.05 M Jup, radius R_{P}=1.19_{-0.08}^{+0.13} \\,R_Jup, surface gravity log g_{P}=2.86_{-0.08}^{+0.06}, and density \\rho _{P}=0.31_{-0.08}^{+0.07}\\,g\\,cm^{-3}. The planet is on an orbit with semimajor axis a = 0.079 ± 0.001 AU and eccentricity e=0.22_{-0.10}^{+0.12}, which is roughly consistent with circular, and has ephemeris of T c(BJDTDB) = 2456347.79679 ± 0.00036 and P = 7.845631 ± 0.000046 days. Equally plausible fits that employ empirical constraints on the host-star parameters rather than isochrones yield a larger planet mass and radius by ~4}-7}. KELT-6b has surface gravity and incident flux similar to HD 209458b, but orbits a host that is more metal poor than HD 209458 by ~0.3 dex. Thus, the KELT-6 system offers an opportunity to perform a comparative measurement of two similar planets in similar environments around stars of very different metallicities. The precise radial velocity data also reveal an acceleration indicative of a longer-period third body in the system, although the companion is not detected in Keck adaptive optics images. KELT is a joint project of The Ohio State University, Vanderbilt University, and Lehigh University.

  18. KELT-6b: A P ∼ 7.9 day hot Saturn transiting a metal-poor star with a long-period companion

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Karen A.; Kielkopf, John F.; Eastman, Jason D.; Beatty, Thomas G.; Gaudi, B. Scott; Siverd, Robert J.; Pepper, Joshua; Stassun, Keivan G.; Johnson, John Asher; Howard, Andrew W.; Fulton, Benjamin J.; Fischer, Debra A.; Manner, Mark; Bieryla, Allyson; Latham, David W.; Gregorio, Joao; Buchhave, Lars A.; Jensen, Eric L. N.; Penev, Kaloyan; Crepp, Justin R.; and others

    2014-02-01

    We report the discovery of KELT-6b, a mildly inflated Saturn-mass planet transiting a metal-poor host. The initial transit signal was identified in KELT-North survey data, and the planetary nature of the occulter was established using a combination of follow-up photometry, high-resolution imaging, high-resolution spectroscopy, and precise radial velocity measurements. The fiducial model from a global analysis including constraints from isochrones indicates that the V = 10.38 host star (BD+31 2447) is a mildly evolved, late-F star with T {sub eff} = 6102 ± 43 K, log g{sub ⋆}=4.07{sub −0.07}{sup +0.04}, and [Fe/H] = –0.28 ± 0.04, with an inferred mass M {sub *} = 1.09 ± 0.04 M {sub ☉} and radius R{sub ⋆}=1.58{sub −0.09}{sup +0.16} R{sub ⊙}. The planetary companion has mass M{sub P} = 0.43 ± 0.05 M {sub Jup}, radius R{sub P}=1.19{sub −0.08}{sup +0.13} R{sub Jup}, surface gravity log g{sub P}=2.86{sub −0.08}{sup +0.06}, and density ρ{sub P}=0.31{sub −0.08}{sup +0.07} g cm{sup −3}. The planet is on an orbit with semimajor axis a = 0.079 ± 0.001 AU and eccentricity e=0.22{sub −0.10}{sup +0.12}, which is roughly consistent with circular, and has ephemeris of T {sub c}(BJD{sub TDB}) = 2456347.79679 ± 0.00036 and P = 7.845631 ± 0.000046 days. Equally plausible fits that employ empirical constraints on the host-star parameters rather than isochrones yield a larger planet mass and radius by ∼4)-7). KELT-6b has surface gravity and incident flux similar to HD 209458b, but orbits a host that is more metal poor than HD 209458 by ∼0.3 dex. Thus, the KELT-6 system offers an opportunity to perform a comparative measurement of two similar planets in similar environments around stars of very different metallicities. The precise radial velocity data also reveal an acceleration indicative of a longer-period third body in the system, although the companion is not detected in Keck adaptive optics images.

  19. Effects of gaseous atmosphere and antioxidants on the development and cryotolerance of bovine embryos at different periods of in vitro culture.

    PubMed

    Rocha-Frigoni, Nathlia Alves de Souza; Leo, Beatriz Caetano da Silva; Nogueira, riklis; Accorsi, Mnica Ferreira; Mingoti, Gisele Zoccal

    2015-04-01

    This study examined the effects of antioxidant supplementation and O2 tension on embryo development, cryotolerance and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. The antioxidant supplementation consisted of 0.6 mM cysteine (CYST); 0.6 mM cysteine + 100 ?M cysteamine (C+C); 100 IU catalase (CAT) or 100 ?M ?-mercaptoethanol (?-ME) for 3 or 7 days of in vitro culture (IVC). Two O2 tensions (20% O2 [5% CO2 in air] or 7% O2, 5% CO2 and 88% N2 [gaseous mixture]) were examined. After 7 days of antioxidant supplementation, the blastocyst frequencies were adversely affected (P < 0.05) by CYST (11.2%) and C+C (1.44%), as well as by low O2 tension (17.2% and 11.11% for 20% and 7% O2, respectively) compared with the control (26.6%). The blastocyst re-expansion rates were not affected (P > 0.05) by the treatments (range, 66-100%). After 3 days of antioxidant supplementation, the blastocyst frequencies were not affected (P > 0.05) by any of the antioxidants (range, 43.6-48.5%), but they were reduced by low O2 tension (P < 0.05) (52.1% and 38.4% for 20% and 7% O2, respectively). The intracellular ROS levels, demonstrated as arbitrary fluorescence units, were not affected (P > 0.05) by antioxidant treatment (range, 0.78 to 0.95) or by O2 tension (0.86 and 0.88 for 20% and 7% O2, respectively). The re-expansion rates were not affected (P > 0.05) by any of the treatments (range, 63.6-93.3%). In conclusion, intracellular antioxidant supplementation and low O2 tension throughout the entire IVC period were deleterious to embryo development. However, antioxidant supplementation up to day 3 of IVC did not affect the blastocyst frequencies or intracellular ROS levels. PMID:24040954

  20. The analysis of fundamental period of cultural heritage buildings: experimental data for church towers in Basilicata (Southern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gizzi, Fabrizio T.; Liberatore, Domenico; Masini, Nicola; Sileo, Maria; Zotta, Cinzia; Potenza, Maria Rosaria; Scavone, Manuela; Sorrentino, Luigi

    2014-05-01

    Seismic hazard is among the main factors conditioning the conservation of historical centres and cultural heritage located in them. This consideration is suitable especially for downtown areas located in Italy, whose territory is prone to seismic hazards, in the southern area especially. As a matter of fact, the historical sources inform us that most of monuments located in Southern Italy suffered damage and consequent restoration or rebuilding due to the earthquake of the past. Therefore, knowing what buildings are the most exposed to the seismic risk can help the stakeholders to fix priority actions aimed at mitigating the effects of future events. Starting from these preliminary remarks, in the framework of the Project PRO_CULT, we started an extensive campaign of measurements of dynamic features of the church towers in some towns of the Basilicata Region (Southern Italy). The aim of the research activity is to assess the fundamental period of such a typology of historical buildings and comparing it with the dynamic features of the foundation soil to put into evidence possible resonance phenomena responsible of an increase of building damage during the seismic shaking. The selection of the towns to be considered as a target of the experimental survey was performed taking into account the availability of written sources dealing with the historical seismic effects suffered by the bell-towers over the centuries with special attention to the sites heavily affected by the 16 December 1857 Basilicata and 23 November 1980 Irpinia-Basilicata earthquakes (Gizzi and Masini 2007). The fundamental period of bell-towers is estimated using ambient noise vibration signals recorded at the highest level of the towers. The techniques used to get the dynamic values are both the Horizontal to Vertical Spectral Ratio (HVSR) and the Horizontal to Horizontal Spectral Ratio (HHSR) (Liberatore et al. 2008). Once the fundamental frequency has been estimated, it is compared with the dynamic features of the soil obtained by free-field measurements. The detailed architectural survey of each investigated tower will also allow correlating the estimated frequencies with the features of the historic building such as structural symmetry, number of storeys and height of the tower, building materials, presence and dimension of openings, presence of tie rods, and presence of adjoining buildings. In this way, we can get new insights for a tentative scheme of typological classification of such historic buildings. References Gizzi F.T., Masini N. 2007. Historical earthquakes and damage patterns in Potenza (Basilicata, southern Italy), Annals of Geophysics, 50 (5), pp.675-687, doi: 10.4401/ag-3061 Liberatore D., Mucciarelli M., Gallipoli M. R., Masini N. 2008, Two Applications of the HVSR Technique to Cultural Heritage and Historical Masonry in Increasing Seismic Safety by Combining Engineering Technologies and Seismological Data, M. Mucciarelli, M. Herak and J. Cassidy eds., Springer, [ISBN 978-1-4020-9196-4; ISSN: 1871-4668], 325-336, doi: 10.1007/978-1-4020-9196-4_22 Acknowledgements The authors thanks Basilicata Region for supporting this activity in the framework of the Project "PRO_CULT" (Advanced methodological approaches and technologies for Protection and Security of Cultural Heritage ) financed by Regional Operational Programme ERDF 2007/2013

  1. A whole-genome microarray study of Arabidopsis thaliana semisolid callus cultures exposed to microgravity and nonmicrogravity related spaceflight conditions for 5 days on board of Shenzhou 8.

    PubMed

    Fengler, Svenja; Spirer, Ina; Neef, Maren; Ecke, Margret; Nieselt, Kay; Hampp, Rdiger

    2015-01-01

    The Simbox mission was the first joint space project between Germany and China in November 2011. Eleven-day-old Arabidopsis thaliana wild type semisolid callus cultures were integrated into fully automated plant cultivation containers and exposed to spaceflight conditions within the Simbox hardware on board of the spacecraft Shenzhou 8. The related ground experiment was conducted under similar conditions. The use of an in-flight centrifuge provided a 1?g gravitational field in space. The cells were metabolically quenched after 5 days via RNAlater injection. The impact on the Arabidopsis transcriptome was investigated by means of whole-genome gene expression analysis. The results show a major impact of nonmicrogravity related spaceflight conditions. Genes that were significantly altered in transcript abundance are mainly involved in protein phosphorylation and MAPK cascade-related signaling processes, as well as in the cellular defense and stress responses. In contrast to short-term effects of microgravity (seconds, minutes), this mission identified only minor changes after 5 days of microgravity. These concerned genes coding for proteins involved in the plastid-associated translation machinery, mitochondrial electron transport, and energy production. PMID:25654111

  2. A Whole-Genome Microarray Study of Arabidopsis thaliana Semisolid Callus Cultures Exposed to Microgravity and Nonmicrogravity Related Spaceflight Conditions for 5 Days on Board of Shenzhou 8

    PubMed Central

    Neef, Maren; Ecke, Margret; Hampp, Rüdiger

    2015-01-01

    The Simbox mission was the first joint space project between Germany and China in November 2011. Eleven-day-old Arabidopsis thaliana wild type semisolid callus cultures were integrated into fully automated plant cultivation containers and exposed to spaceflight conditions within the Simbox hardware on board of the spacecraft Shenzhou 8. The related ground experiment was conducted under similar conditions. The use of an in-flight centrifuge provided a 1 g gravitational field in space. The cells were metabolically quenched after 5 days via RNAlater injection. The impact on the Arabidopsis transcriptome was investigated by means of whole-genome gene expression analysis. The results show a major impact of nonmicrogravity related spaceflight conditions. Genes that were significantly altered in transcript abundance are mainly involved in protein phosphorylation and MAPK cascade-related signaling processes, as well as in the cellular defense and stress responses. In contrast to short-term effects of microgravity (seconds, minutes), this mission identified only minor changes after 5 days of microgravity. These concerned genes coding for proteins involved in the plastid-associated translation machinery, mitochondrial electron transport, and energy production. PMID:25654111

  3. Effects of timing on vaccination (day 0 versus day 14 of a receiving period) with a modified-live respiratory viral vaccine on performance, feed intake, and febrile response of beef heifers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of timing of administration of a modified-live respiratory viral vaccine (IBR-PI3-BRSV-BVD) on d 0 or on d 14 of a receiving period on performance, feed intake, and febrile response in beef heifers. Our hypothesis was vaccine timing will alter ...

  4. Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1997

    Twelve conference papers on cultural aspects of second language instruction include: "Towards True Multiculturalism: Ideas for Teachers" (Brian McVeigh); Comparing Cultures Through Critical Thinking: Development and Interpretations of Meaningful Observations" (Laurel D. Kamada); "Authority and Individualism in Japan and the USA" (Alisa Woodring);

  5. Randomized, Double-Blind, Split-Face Study to Compare the Irritation Potential of Two Topical Acne Formulations Over a 21-Day Treatment Period.

    PubMed

    Kircik, Leon H; Bhatt, Varsha; Martin, Gina; Pillai, Radhakrishnan

    2016-02-01

    The use of fixed combinations in acne vulgaris (acne) is very common, however comparative clinical trial data are limited. Cutaneous tolerability can influence patient compliance, and concerns about skin irritation with topical acne treatments have lead to a number of comparative split-face studies.
    Recently, a new fixed combination product was introduced (clin 1.0%-BP 3.75% gel) that was shown to be effective in reducing both inflammatory and noninflammatory lesions in moderate to severe acne. Here, we assess the tolerability of clin 1.0%-BP 3.75% gel compared with adap 0.1%-BP 2.5% gel in healthy volunteers with no apparent facial redness or dryness over 21-days, using a split-face methodology.
    Especially over the first two weeks of treatment, clin 1.0%-BP 3.75% gel was more tolerable than adap 0.1%-BP 2.5% gel, with statistically significant differences in cumulative change from baseline starting as early as day 8 (dryness) and day 9 (erythema), and composite index on days 8-12 and 16. Transepidermal water loss was less with clin 1.0%-BP 3.75% gel, although the difference was not statistically significant.

    J Drugs Dermatol. 2016;15(2):178-182. PMID:26885785

  6. Inter- and intra-individual variation in urinary biomarker concentrations over a 6-day sampling period. Part 2: personal care product ingredients.

    PubMed

    Koch, Holger M; Aylward, Lesa L; Hays, Sean M; Smolders, Roel; Moos, Rebecca K; Cocker, John; Jones, Kate; Warren, Nicholas; Levy, Len; Bevan, Ruth

    2014-12-01

    An intensive study was conducted to provide data on intra- and inter-individual variation in urinary excretion of a series of ingredients in personal care products (parabens, triclosan, benzophenones) and bisphenol A (BPA, not expected to be an ingredient) in 8 volunteers over 6 days. Exposure diaries recorded use of personal care products with identified target analytes as ingredients. Participants' usual products were replaced with products without the target analytes for 2 of the 6 days. Urine void volumes and times were recorded. Methyl, ethyl, and n-propylparabens, triclosan, benzophenone-3, and BPA were frequently detected (?70% of samples). Urinary concentrations of the parabens and triclosan were lower on product replacement days. First morning void concentrations correlated moderately to highly with 24-h composite concentrations for all analytes. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) for spot samples collected on days with usual product use were low for BPA (0.15), moderate for n-propylparaben and methylparaben (0.39 and 0.56, respectively), and high for ethylparaben, benzophenone-3, and triclosan (0.76, 0.81, and 0.934, respectively); ICCs were consistently higher on the basis of cr-adjusted concentrations. Hydration status adjustment methods were assessed by comparing unadjusted and adjusted concentrations to urinary excretion rates (ER, ng/kg-h) for all analytes and samples. Specific gravity-adjusted concentrations correlated slightly better with ER than creatinine-adjusted concentrations. Within-individual variation in biomarker concentrations was highest for methyl and ethylparabens (2 orders of magnitude variation in spot sample concentrations) and lower for the other analytes (1-1.5 orders of magnitude). This dataset provides insight into the design and interpretation of urinary biomonitoring studies for non-persistent chemicals. PMID:24956590

  7. Parathyroid hormone blocks the stimulatory effect of insulin-like growth factor-I on collagen synthesis in cultured 21-day fetal rat calvariae

    SciTech Connect

    Kream, B.E.; Petersen, D.N.; Raisz, L.G. )

    1990-01-01

    We examined the interaction of parathyroid hormone (PTH) and recombinant human insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) on collagen synthesis in 21-day fetal rat calvariae as assessed by measuring the incorporation of ({sup 3}H)proline into collagenase-digestible protein. After 96 hours of culture, 10 nM PTH antagonized the stimulation of collagen synthesis and partially blocked the increase in dry weight produced by 10 nM IGF-I. The effect of PTH to block IGF-I stimulated collagen synthesis was observed in the central bone of calvariae and was mimicked by forskolin and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, but not by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, transforming growth factor-alpha or dexamethasone. Our data are consistent with the concept that the direct effect of PTH is to inhibit basal CDP labeling and fully oppose IGF-I stimulated CDP labeling. The finding that this effect of PTH is mimicked by forskolin and PMA suggests that this block in IGF-I stimulation of CDP labeling involves both cAMP and protein kinase C mediated pathways.

  8. Excess of mortality in patients with chest pain peaks in the first 3 days period after the incident and normalizes after 1 month

    PubMed Central

    Bruyninckx, Rudi; Van den Bruel, Ann; Buntinx, Frank; Van Casteren, Viviane; Aertgeerts, Bert

    2010-01-01

    Background. Patients presenting with chest pain have a 5% chance of experiencing a coronary event. These patients are at risk of mortality and should be recognized and referred to secondary care. Aim. To determine the relationship between referral type and mortality in patients with chest pain. Methods. The design of the study is an observational study. The setting of the study is a sentinel network of general practices in Belgium, covering 1.6% of the total population. The subjects are 1558 consecutive patients consulting with chest pain in 2003. Descriptive analyses report the standardized mortality ratios. We used the Belgian population of 1999 as the reference population and as the standard population. Results. The standardized mortality ratios of 3 days were 151.0 [95% confidence interval (CI): 82.3250.3] for the urgent referred group, 45.5 (95% CI: 12.4116.0) for non-urgent and 13.6 (95% CI: 1.749.4) for the non-referred group. The standardized ratios of 1 month were, respectively, 27.6 (95% CI: 18.040.4), 6.7 (95% CI: 2.514.6) and 4.7 (95% CI: 1.99.7). The standardized ratios of 212 months were normal for the urgent referral group (1.3; 95% CI: 0.72.2) and for the non-urgent referral group (1.0; 95% CI: 0.51.9) and even less in the non-referred group (0.4; 95% CI: 0.20.9). Conclusions. Mortality in the first 3 days and first month after consulting for chest pain is very high. There is a marked trend in mortality according to the referral typeurgently referred, non-urgently referred and not referredsuggesting risk stratification by the GP. After 1 month, mortality normalizes for all groups, suggesting that the surviving patients are well treated and the condition causing the chest pain no longer influences survival compared to the general population. PMID:20639281

  9. Influence of Culture Conditions on the Length of the Lag Period of Chlorophyll Synthesis in Preilluminated Dark-grown Euglena1

    PubMed Central

    Freyssinet, Georges

    1976-01-01

    Two parameters of the potentiation process, the lengths of preillumination and of the subsequent dark phase have been determined for Euglena cells which had been grown in the dark under two different culture conditions. In both cases a maximum potentiation response is obtained after a preillumination period of about 2 hours. The minimum length of the dark period necessary for maximum potentiation changes from 1 hour for cells which contain, at the moment of illumination, a high paramylum content, to 6 hours for cells which have a low paramylum content. PMID:16659579

  10. The impact of a 17-day training period for an international championship on mucosal immune parameters in top-level basketball players and staff members.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Alexandre; Arsati, Franco; Cury, Patrcia Ramos; Franciscon, Clvis; Simes, Antonio Carlos; de Oliveira, Paulo Roberto; de Arajo, Vera Cavalcanti

    2008-10-01

    This investigation examined the impact of a 17-d training period (that included basketball-specific training, sprints, intermittent running exercises, and weight training, prior to an international championship competition) on salivary immunoglobulin A (SIgA) levels in 10 subjects (athletes and staff members) from a national basketball team, as a biomarker for mucosal immune defence. Unstimulated saliva samples were collected at rest at the beginning of the preparation for the Pan American Games and 1 d before the first game. The recovery interval from the last bout of exercise was 4 h. The SIgA level was measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and expressed as absolute concentrations, secretion rate, and SIgA level relative to total protein. The decrease in SIgA levels following training was greater in athletes than in support staff; however, no significant differences between the two groups were detected. A decrease in SIgA level, regardless of the method used to express IgA results, was verified for athletes. Only one episode of upper respiratory tract illness symptoms was reported, and it was not associated with changes in SIgA levels. In summary, a situation of combined stress for an important championship was found to decrease the level of SIgA-mediated immune protection at the mucosal surface in team members, with greater changes observed in the athletes. PMID:18821985

  11. Producing biodiesel from cotton seed oil using Rhizopus oryzae ATTC #34612 whole cell biocatalysts: Culture media and cultivation period optimization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of culture medium composition and cultivation time on biodiesel production by Rhizopus oryzae ATCC #34612 whole cell catalysts, immobilized on novel rigid polyethylene biomass supports, was investigated. Supplementation of the medium with carbon sources led to higher lipase activity and i...

  12. Response of male broiler chickens to dietary lysine:true metabolizable energy (nitrogen-corrected) ratios during three consecutive fourteen-day periods from hatching.

    PubMed

    Sibbald, I R; Wolynetz, M S

    1990-08-01

    An experiment was conducted to estimate the changes in body composition associated with the concentration of dietary lysine, independent of energy intake. A secondary objective was to determine whether the treatment effects on body composition could be inferred by using the initial body weight of the birds as a covariate, rather than data from groups initially slaughtered. The experiment comprised three phases, based on the age of the birds: 1 to 15, 15 to 29, and 29 to 43 days. The same 56 dietary treatments, arranged as an 8-by-7 factorial, were used in each phase. The dietary treatments consisted of eight ratios for bioavailable lysine and TMEn with seven levels of cellulose dilution, the latter being used to ensure a range of TMEn intakes. The experimental units were groups of 4 chicks in Phase 1 and individual birds in Phases 2 and 3. The comparative slaughter procedure was used. The initial slaughter populations comprised 30 groups of 4 birds for Phase 1 and 40 individual birds for Phase 2 and Phase 3. The intakes of bioavailable lysine and bioavailable energy (ITMEn) were measured, and the body weights were recorded. The carcasses were assayed for dry matter, energy, protein, lipids, and ash. The gains in body weight, water content, and protein content reached maxima at ratios for lysine to TMEn of between .76 and .86 g per mJ, independent of the phase. The gains in dry matter, energy intake, and lipid content per unit of ITMEn were independent of the lysine:TMEn ratio and of the phase (P greater than .05). The phase affected the regression coefficients for gains in body weight and body water (P less than .01) but not for protein (P greater than .05). Phase effects were most apparent in the intercepts of the regression lines where the differences reflected variations in body-maintenance requirements for energy. A covariance analysis provided estimates for the rates of response very similar to those obtained by using data from the initial slaughter groups. Both experimental approaches depend for precision and accuracy on a strong relationship between body weight and composition; such does not appear to exist for total carcass energy and lipid content. PMID:2122432

  13. [Dynamics and functions of exometabolites in the process of the growth of Escherichia coli M-17 periodical culture].

    PubMed

    Vakhitov, T Ia; Momot, E N; Tolparov, Iu N

    2005-01-01

    The concentrations of metabolites altered immediately after culture inoculation into fresh medium and depended on the their dilution (in small dilutions metabolites were released into the medium, and, on the contrary, in great dilutions they were adsorbed). Acetate was the main exometabolite. The growth of culture started only when the acetate concentration reached the threshold value. At the stage of growth deceleration an intensive release of acetate and other exometabolites occurred. The process had the explosive character of chemical chain reaction. It could be initiated by high local concentrations of metabolites around bacteria, most sensitive to changes in growth conditions. At a high concentration of such cells the signal could be transmitted from one bacteria to another, otherwise the reaction chain was quickly broken and no mass release of metabolites occurred. At the stationary phase succinate, valine and lactate were consumed by bacteria with lactate concentration dropping practically to 0. At the same time acetate and citrate concentrations oscillated about some constant value. The release of growth inhibitors, formiate and alanine, continued to the end of cultivation, which was, seemingly, one of the factors of growth cessation. The specific features of the dymamics of metabolites were indicative of the fact that they had their individual regulatory functions. The problem of the self-synchronization of the bacterial culture is discussed. PMID:15773393

  14. Vaginal bleeding between periods

    MedlinePLUS

    ... menstrual flow lasts about 4 days (plus or minus 2 - 3 days). It produces a total blood ... and occurs normally every 28 days (plus or minus 7 days). Vaginal bleeding that occurs between periods ...

  15. Altered energy status of primary cerebellar granule neuronal cultures from rats exposed to lead in the pre- and neonatal period.

    PubMed

    Baranowska-Bosiacka, I; Gutowska, I; Marchetti, C; Rutkowska, M; Marchlewicz, M; Kolasa, A; Prokopowicz, A; Wiernicki, I; Piotrowska, K; Baśkiewicz, M; Safranow, K; Wiszniewska, B; Chlubek, D

    2011-02-01

    This paper examines the effect of pre- and neonatal exposure of rats to lead (0.1% lead acetate in drinking water, resulting in rat offspring whole blood lead concentration (Pb-B) 4μg/dL) on the energy status of neuronal mitochondria by measuring changes in ATP, ADP, AMP, adenosine, TAN concentration, adenylate energy charge value (AEC) and mitochondrial membrane potential in primary cerebellar granule neurons (CGC) in dissociated cultures. Fluorescence studies were performed to imaging and evaluate mitochondria mass, mitochondrial membrane potential, intracellular and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. The Na(+)/K(+) ATPase activity in intact CGC was measured spectrophotometrically. Our data shows that pre- and neonatal exposure of rats to Pb, even below the threshold of whole blood Pb value considered safe for people, affects the energy status of cultured primary cerebellar granule neurons through a decrease in ATP and TAN concentrations and AEC value, inhibition of Na(+)/K(+) ATPase, and increase in intracellular and mitochondrial ROS concentration. These observations suggest that even these low levels of Pb are likely to induce important alterations in neuronal function that could play a role in neurodegeneration. PMID:21108985

  16. Drought, epidemic disease, and the fall of classic period cultures in Mesoamerica (AD 750-950). Hemorrhagic fevers as a cause of massive population loss.

    PubMed

    Acuna-Soto, Rodolfo; Stahle, David W; Therrell, Matthew D; Gomez Chavez, Sergio; Cleaveland, Malcolm K

    2005-01-01

    The classical period in Mexico (AD 250-750) was an era of splendor. The city of Teotihuacan was one of the largest and most sophisticated human conglomerates of the pre-industrial world. The Mayan civilization in southeastern Mexico and the Yucatan peninsula reached an impressive degree of development at the same time. This time of prosperity came to an end during the Terminal Classic Period (AD 750-950) a time of massive population loss throughout Mesoamerica. A second episode of massive depopulation in the same area was experienced during the sixteenth century when, in less than one century, between 80% and 90% of the entire indigenous population was lost. The 16th century depopulation of Mexico constitutes one of the worst demographic catastrophes in human history. Although newly imported European and African diseases caused high mortality among the native population, the major 16th century population losses were caused by a series of epidemics of a hemorrhagic fever called Cocoliztli, a highly lethal disease unknown to both Aztec and European physicians during the colonial era. The cocoliztli epidemics occurred during the 16th century megadrought, when severe drought extended at times from central Mexico to the boreal forest of Canada, and from the Pacific to the Atlantic coast. The collapse of the cultures of the Classic Period seems also to have occurred during a time of severe drought. Tree ring and lake sediment records indicate that some of the most severe and prolonged droughts to impact North America-Mesoamerica in the past 1000-4000 years occurred between AD 650 and 1000, particularly during the 8th and 9th centuries, a period of time that coincides with the Terminal Classic Period. Based on the similarities of the climatic (severe drought) and demographic (massive population loss) events in Mesoamerica during the sixteenth century, we propose that drought-associated epidemics of hemorrhagic fever may have contributed to the massive population loss during the Terminal Classic Period. PMID:15922121

  17. Dinosaur Day!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakamura, Sandra; Baptiste, H. Prentice

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe how they capitalized on their first-grade students' love of dinosaurs by hosting a fun-filled Dinosaur Day in their classroom. On Dinosaur Day, students rotated through four dinosaur-related learning stations that integrated science content with art, language arts, math, and history in a fun and time-efficient

  18. Dinosaur Day!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakamura, Sandra; Baptiste, H. Prentice

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe how they capitalized on their first-grade students' love of dinosaurs by hosting a fun-filled Dinosaur Day in their classroom. On Dinosaur Day, students rotated through four dinosaur-related learning stations that integrated science content with art, language arts, math, and history in a fun and time-efficient…

  19. CEMI Days

    SciTech Connect

    2015-07-01

    CEMI Days are an important channel of engagement between DOE and the manufacturing industry to identify challenges and opportunities for increasing U.S. manufacturing competitiveness. CEMI Days that are held at manufacturing companies’ facilities can include tours of R&D operations or other points of interest determined by the host company.

  20. Pi Day.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldner, Bruce C.

    1994-01-01

    Presents a day of activities to encourage students to participate in mathematics. Five contests include poster; model; mathematics puzzle; mathematics problem challenge; and essay. Some student entries and the rules for each contest are described. (MKR)

  1. Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports: Using Strength-Based Approaches to Enhance the Culture of Care in Residential and Day Treatment Education Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalke, Thomas; Glanton, Ann; Cristalli, Maria

    2007-01-01

    Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports model, first introduced into public schools, has been extended to alternative settings. This article highlights applying PBIS to day treatment and residential treatment education programs increasingly challenged to serve seriously emotionally disturbed youth whose risk factors have become more…

  2. Increase in nitrate uptake by soybean plants during interruption of the dark period with low intensity light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raper, C. D. Jr; Vessey, J. K.; Henry, L. T.

    1991-01-01

    Diurnal patterns of net NO3- uptake by nonnodulated soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr. cv. Ransom] plants growing in flowing hydroponic culture at 26 and 16 degrees C root temperatures were measured at hourly intervals during alternate days of a 12-day growth period. Ion chromatography was used to determine removal of NO3- from the culture solution. Day and night periods of 9 and 15 h were used during growth. The night period included two 6-h dark periods and an intervening 3-h period of night interruption by incandescent lamps to effect a long-day photoperiod and repress floral initiation. At both root temperatures, the average specific rates of NO3- uptake were twice as great during the night interruption period as during the day period; they were greater during the day period than during the dark periods; and they were greater during the dark period immediately following the day period than during the later dark period that followed the night interruption. While these average patterns were repetitious among days, measured rates of uptake varied hourly and included intervals of net efflux scattered through the day period and more frequently through the 2 dark periods. Root temperature did not affect the average daily specific rates of uptake or the qualitative relationships among day, dark and night interruption periods of the diurnal cycle.

  3. Inspire Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohach, Barbara M.; Meade, Birgitta

    2014-01-01

    The authors collaborated on hosting a "Spring Inspire Day." planned and delivered by preservice elementary teachers as a social studies/science methods project. Projects that have authentic application opportunities can make learning meaningful for prospective teachers as well as elementary students. With the impetus for an integrated

  4. Inspire Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohach, Barbara M.; Meade, Birgitta

    2014-01-01

    The authors collaborated on hosting a "Spring Inspire Day." planned and delivered by preservice elementary teachers as a social studies/science methods project. Projects that have authentic application opportunities can make learning meaningful for prospective teachers as well as elementary students. With the impetus for an integrated…

  5. 34 CFR 300.11 - Day; business day; school day.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Day; business day; school day. 300.11 Section 300.11... CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part 300.11 Day; business day; school day. (a) Day means calendar day unless otherwise indicated as business day or school day. (b) Business...

  6. 34 CFR 300.11 - Day; business day; school day.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true Day; business day; school day. 300.11 Section 300.11... CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part 300.11 Day; business day; school day. (a) Day means calendar day unless otherwise indicated as business day or school day. (b) Business...

  7. Positive behavioral interventions and supports: using strength-based approaches to enhance the culture of care in residential and day treatment education environments.

    PubMed

    Kalke, Thomas; Glanton, Ann; Cristalli, Maria

    2007-01-01

    Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports model, first introduced into public schools, has been extended to alternative settings. This article highlights applying PBIS to day treatment and residential treatment education programs increasingly challenged to serve seriously emotionally disturbed youth whose risk factors have become more complex. The results demonstrate a more positive environment enhancing children's treatment and education along with decreasing numbers of safety holds and need for out-of-classroom supports. PMID:18422053

  8. CoRoT 101186644: A transiting low-mass dense M-dwarf on an eccentric 20.7-day period orbit around a late F-star. Discovered in the CoRoT lightcurves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tal-Or, L.; Mazeh, T.; Alonso, R.; Bouchy, F.; Cabrera, J.; Deeg, H. J.; Deleuil, M.; Faigler, S.; Fridlund, M.; Hébrard, G.; Moutou, C.; Santerne, A.; Tingley, B.

    2013-05-01

    We present the study of the CoRoT transiting planet candidate 101186644, also named LRc01_E1_4780. Analysis of the CoRoT lightcurve and the HARPS spectroscopic follow-up observations of this faint (mV = 16) candidate revealed an eclipsing binary composed of a late F-type primary (Teff = 6090 ± 200 K) and a low-mass, dense late M-dwarf secondary on an eccentric (e = 0.4) orbit with a period of ~20.7 days. The M-dwarf has a mass of 0.096 ± 0.011 M⊙, and a radius of 0.104-0.006+0.026 R⊙, which possibly makes it the smallest and densest late M-dwarf reported so far. Unlike the claim that theoretical models predict radii that are 5-15% smaller than measured for low-mass stars, this one seems to have a radius that is consistent and might even be below the radius predicted by theoretical models. Based on observations made with the 1-m telescope at the Wise Observatory, Israel, the Swiss 1.2-m Leonhard Euler telescope at La Silla Observatory, Chile, the IAC-80 telescope at the Observatory del Teide, Canarias, Spain, and the 3.6-m telescope at La Silla Observatory (ESO), Chile (program 184.C-0639).

  9. Silicon cell culture templates with nanotopography: periodic nanostructures and random nanoporous topologies generated by high-repetition rate sub-15 fs pulsed near-infrared laser light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straub, Martin; Uchugonova, Aisada; Koch, Marcus; Knig, Karsten

    2012-03-01

    In recent years a variety of studies has demonstrated that artificially generated microenvironments can exert a strong influence on cell growth, cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation behavior in the culture dish. In particular, cells tend to adapt themselves to elongated micro- and nanostructures. Thus, nanostructured substrates are of significant interest in the biological and biomedical sciences as adhesion and development of cells can be controlled via the topological surface properties. In contrast to earlier approaches relying on electron beam or nanoimprint lithography, nanostructures were produced on Si(100) surfaces using sub-15 femtosecond high-resolution laser scanning microscopy. Laser processing was performed with the silicon surface immersed in water followed by hydrofluoric acid etching in order to remove silicon oxide residues. Ripples of at a periodicity of 150 nm as well as random nanoporous surface arrangements were generated by Ti:Sapphire laser light of centre wavelength 800 nm (bandwidth 120 nm, repetition rate 85 MHz) at picojoule pulse energies. Growth of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells revealed good adhesion to the silicon substrates. Importantly, alignment of cells along the direction of ripples was observed, whereas randomly nanoporous surfaces did not induce any preferences in cell orientation.

  10. World Population Day in Beijing.

    PubMed

    1993-08-01

    A mass rally sponsored by the State Family Planning Commission (SFPC), the China Family Planning Association, the Population Culture Promotion Association of China, the Beijing Family Planning Committee, and the UNFPA was held July 10, 1993, in Beijing to mark World Population Day. Approximately 1000 people attended the rally including State Councillor and SFPC Minister Peng Peiyun who delivered a speech. She noted that the Chinese government has given significant attention to controlling population growth and that population norms on childbearing and reproductive behaviors have changed over the twenty years of family planning program implementation. The decline in the rate of total fertility over the period from 5-6 to 2 has greatly helped stabilize world population. Peng also stressed the need to continue improving the practice of the family planning program to help improve general economic conditions and individual living standards in the country. Plans exist to continue to strengthen cooperation and exchange with UNFPA and other countries in the effort to learn from other successful experiences in the field. Counseling and information on population and family planning, along with art and literary performances on controlling population growth were conducted as publicity activities during the day in the eight districts of Beijing. An exhibition on sex was also held in Zhongshan Park. PMID:12287602

  11. Painful menstrual periods

    MedlinePLUS

    Menstruation - painful; Dysmenorrhea; Periods - painful; Cramps - menstrual; Menstrual cramps ... a few days during each menstrual cycle. Painful menstruation is the leading cause of lost time from ...

  12. Radiometric detection of yeasts in blood cultures of cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Hopfer, R.L.; Orengo, A.; Chesnut, S.; Wenglar, M.

    1980-09-01

    During a 12-month period, 19,457 blood cultures were collected. Yeasts were isolated from 193 cultures derived from 76 cancer patients. Candida albicans or Candida tropicalis accounted for 79% of isolates. Of the three methods compared, the radiometric method required 2.9 days to become positive, blind subculture required 2.6 days, and Gram stains required 1 day. However, the radiometric method was clearly superior in detecting positive cultures, since 73% of all cultures were first detected radiometrically, 22% were detected by subculture, and only 5% were detected by Gram stain. Although 93% of the isolates were detected by aerobic culture, five (7%) isolates were obtained only from anaerobic cultures. Seven days of incubation appear to be sufficient for the radiometric detection of yeasts.

  13. Japan: The Modernization of an Ancient Culture. Series on Public Issues No. 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolken, Lawrence C.

    This booklet, one of a series of booklets intended to apply economic principles to major social and political issues of the day, traces the modernization of the ancient culture of Japan. Four major areas are covered: (1) "An Ancient Culture" covers the period from the first settling of Japan through the Heian period, the medieval ages, the Meiji…

  14. Osteocalcin, a marker of differentiated function during calcification of cultured chick osteoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Lian, J.; Chipman, S.; Glowacki, J.; Gerstenfeld, L.

    1986-05-01

    The expression of differentiated function was examined in cultured osteoblasts isolated from 17-day embryonic chicken calvarie. Cell cultures grown in the absence (control) or presence of 10 mM ..beta..-Glycerol Phosphate (..beta..GP) (stimulus for calcification) were analyzed at 6-day intervals over a 30-day period for total mineral, alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity, osteocalcin levels and collagen. AP was first detected in both cultures between days 6 and 9 when cells became crowded. Control cultures maintained high levels of enzyme activity (30-50 fold) while ..beta.. GPO/sub 4/ culture activity declined after day 18 when extensive mineralization occurred. Osteocalcin, the vitamin K-dependent, bone-specific, calcium-binding protein showed a similar pattern of induction as AP with at 50-100-fold increase in both cultures. Collagen accumulated through out the 30-day experimental period for both ..beta.. GPO/sub 4/ and control cultures while collagen synthesis (/sup 3/H-proline pulse) peaked at day 15 in culture. These results suggest that with time in culture, osteoblast differentiation may be occurring. The increased mineralization of ..beta.. GPO/sub 4/ cultures appeared to down regulate the enzyme activity of AP in comparison to control culture, while osteocalcin synthesis was enhanced. In conclusion, the chick osteoblast system offers a model to study bone cell differentiation, protein synthesis and matrix calcification.

  15. Heat Stress Responses in Cultured Plant Cells 1

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Min-Tze; Wallner, Stephen J.; Waddell, John W.

    1984-01-01

    The pipetting of pear (Pyrus communis cv Bartlett) suspension cultures was followed by a substantial but transient decrease in heat sensitivity. During a culture cycle, pear cells were most sensitive to heat at day 3, which coincided with the period of most active cell division. To minimize serious artifacts, the influence of culture handling and age on parameters such as heat sensitivity must be standardized. PMID:16663538

  16. Enhanced recovery of Phytophthora ramorum from soil following 30 days storage at 4C

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chlamydospores of Phytophthora ramorum produced by mixing 20 percent V8 juice broth cultures with sand and incubating over a 30 day period were used to infest field soil at densities ranging from 0.2 to 42 chlamydospores per cubic centimeter of soil. Chlamydospore recovery was determined by baiting...

  17. Festivals of the Darkest Days.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cacha, Frances B.

    1980-01-01

    Presents historical background on various winter festivals around the world including Saturnalia, Christmas, winter solstice, Yule festivals, Hannukah, Divali, and New Year's Day. Suggests how teachers can help elementary school students understand their own culture by studying these and other festivals using maps, mobiles, discussion, and reading…

  18. Stennis Space Center celebrates Diversity Day

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Kendall Mitchell of the Naval Oceanographic Office (right) learns about the culture of Bolivia from Narda Inchausty, president of the Foreign Born Wives Association in Slidell, La., during 2009 Diversity Day events at NASA's John Stennis Space Center. Stennis hosted Diversity Day activities for employees on Oct. 7. The day's events included cultural and agency exhibits, diversity-related performances, a trivia contest and a classic car and motorcycle show. It also featured the first-ever sitewide Stennis Employee Showcase.

  19. Paradoxical effect of supplementary progesterone between Day 3 and Day 7 on corpus luteum function and conceptus development in cattle.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, L; Forde, N; Carter, F; Rizos, D; Maillo, V; Ealy, A D; Kelly, A K; Rodriguez, P; Isaka, N; Evans, A C O; Lonergan, P

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of short-term progesterone (P4) supplementation during the early metoestrous period on circulating P4 concentrations and conceptus development in cattle. The oestrous cycles of cross-bred beef heifers were synchronised using a 7-day P4-releasing intravaginal device (PRID Delta; 1.55 g P4) treatment with administration of a prostaglandin F(2?) analogue (Enzaprost; CEVA Sante Animale) the day before PRID Delta removal. Only those heifers recorded in standing oestrus (Day 0) were used. In Experiment 1, heifers were randomly assigned to one of five groups: (1) control: no treatment; (2) placebo: insertion of a blank device (no P4) from Day 3 to Day 7; (3) insertion of a PRID Delta from Day 3 to Day 7; (4) insertion of a PRID Delta from Day 3 to Day 5; or (5) insertion of a PRID Delta from Day 5 to Day 7. In vitro-produced blastocysts were transferred to each heifer in Groups 2-5 on Day 7 (n=10 blastocysts per heifer) and conceptuses were recovered when heifers were killed on Day 14. Based on the outcome of Experiment 1, in Experiment 2 heifers were artificially inseminated at oestrus and randomly assigned to one of three treatment groups: (1) placebo; (2) PRID from Day 3 to Day 5; or (3) PRID from Day 3 to Day 7. All heifers were killed on Day 16 and recovered conceptuses were incubated in synthetic oviducal fluid medium for 24 h; spent media and uterine flushes were analysed for interferon-? (IFNT). In both experiments, daily blood samples were taken to determined serum P4 concentrations. Data were analysed using the PROC MIXED procedure of SAS (SAS Institute, Cary, NC, USA). Insertion of a PRID resulted in an increase (P<0.05) in serum P4 that declined following removal. In Experiment 1, P4 supplementation from Day 3 to Day 5 (17.01.4 mm) or Day 3 to Day 7 (11.32.3 mm) increased conceptus length compared with placebo (2.11.8 mm). Serum P4 was significantly lower from Day 9 to Day 14 (P<0.05) and the weight of the Day 14 corpus luteum (CL) was lower in the PRID Day 3-7 group than the placebo or control groups. In Experiment 2, supplementation from Day 3 to Day 5 (94.018.8 mm) or Day 3 to Day 7 (143.620.6 mm) increased conceptus length on Day 16 compared with placebo (50.317.4 mm). Serum P4 was significantly lower in the two supplemented groups following PRID removal compared with placebo (P<0.05) and was associated with a lower CL weight in the Day 3-7 group. Conceptus length was strongly correlated with the IFNT concentration in the uterine flush (r=0.58; P=0.011) and spent culture medium (r=0.68; P<0.002). The findings of the present study highlight the somewhat paradoxical effects of P4 supplementation when given in the early metoestrous period in terms of its positive effect on conceptus development and its potentially negative effects on CL lifespan. PMID:23439105

  20. Walls of Time: The "Walk through Time" Was Inspired by How Artists of Various Time Periods and Cultures Have Decorated Walls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Komrska, Shelley; Rupe, Melissa

    2005-01-01

    Last year, a school embarked on a school-wide project that would take all of their students, kindergarten through-sixth grade, through a tangible art timeline. The result was a passageway--over seventy-five feet in length--that revealed the history of art, from cave painting to modern-day graffiti art. The "walk through time" was inspired by how

  1. Walls of Time: The "Walk through Time" Was Inspired by How Artists of Various Time Periods and Cultures Have Decorated Walls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Komrska, Shelley; Rupe, Melissa

    2005-01-01

    Last year, a school embarked on a school-wide project that would take all of their students, kindergarten through-sixth grade, through a tangible art timeline. The result was a passageway--over seventy-five feet in length--that revealed the history of art, from cave painting to modern-day graffiti art. The "walk through time" was inspired by how…

  2. Period Cramps

    MedlinePLUS

    ... ago. She's learned to handle using pads and tampons, but the cramps are really bothering her. Sometimes ... Periods Getting Your Period at School Pads and Tampons Do Periods Ever End? All About Menstruation Contact ...

  3. Study of the Infectivity of Saline-Stored Campylobacter jejuni for Day-Old Chicks

    PubMed Central

    Hald, Birthe; Knudsen, Katrine; Lind, Peter; Madsen, Mogens

    2001-01-01

    The culturability of three Campylobacter jejuni strains and their infectivity for day-old chicks were assessed following storage of the strains in saline. The potential for colonization of chicks was weakened during the storage period and terminated 3 to 4 weeks before the strains became nonculturable. The results from this study suggest that the role of starved and aged but still culturable campylobacters may be diminutive, but even more, that the role of viable but nonculturable stages in campylobacter epidemiology may be negligible. Even high levels of maternally derived anti-campylobacter outer membrane protein serum antibodies in day-old chicks did not protect the chicks from campylobacter colonization. PMID:11319130

  4. When Every Day Is Professional Development Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tienken, Christopher H.; Stonaker, Lew

    2007-01-01

    In the Monroe Township (New Jersey) Public Schools, teachers' learning occurs daily, not just on one day in October and February. Central office and school-level administrators foster job-embedded teacher growth. Every day is a professional development day in the district, but that has not always been so. How did the district become a system with

  5. Optimization of Periprosthetic Culture for Diagnosis of Propionibacterium acnes Prosthetic Joint Infection?

    PubMed Central

    Butler-Wu, Susan M.; Burns, Erica M.; Pottinger, Paul S.; Magaret, Amalia S.; Rakeman, Jennifer L.; Matsen, Frederick A.; Cookson, Brad T.

    2011-01-01

    Propionibacterium acnes is increasingly recognized as an important agent of prosthetic joint infection (PJI). However, the optimum culture conditions for recovery of this organism from PJI specimens have not been determined. By applying a prolonged 28-day culture incubation to all periprosthetic specimens received for bacterial culture from 198 revision arthroplasty procedures, we retrospectively determined that a 13-day culture incubation period is necessary for the recovery of P. acnes from patients with PJI. Incubation beyond this period was associated with increasing recovery of nondiagnostic isolates: 21.7% of P. acnes isolates believed to be clinically unimportant were recovered after 13 days of incubation. Importantly, a diagnosis of P. acnes PJI would have been missed in 29.4% of patients had extended culture incubation been applied only to anaerobic culture media. Although specimens from P. acnes PJIs were more commonly associated with the presence of ?2 culture media positive for growth, acute inflammation (?5 neutrophils/high-power field) was observed in only 40% of patients with PJIs that had more than one specimen submitted for bacterial culture. These results support the need for a minimum culture incubation period of 13 days to be applied to both aerobic and anaerobic culture media for all periprosthetic specimens. Optimal recovery of infecting organisms from PJI specimens will be an important component in generating a universal definition for PJI due to indolent agents of infection, such as P. acnes. PMID:21543562

  6. Is Screening for Depression in the Perinatal Period Enough? The Co-Occurrence of Depression, Substance Abuse, and Intimate Partner Violence in Culturally Diverse Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Hazen, Andrea L.; Baker-Ericzn, Mary J.; Landsverk, John; Horwitz, Sarah McCue

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background The perinatal period provides unique opportunities to identify and intervene with the co-occurrence of perinatal depression, intimate partner violence (IPV), and substance use problems. Psychosocial screening recommended for women seen in maternal child health settings tends to target single rather than multiple risk factors; there is limited research examining the co-occurrence of these issues especially in racially and ethnically diverse women across the perinatal period. These analyses explore the relationships of sociodemographic, psychosocial, and behavioral characteristics in a large, diverse sample of women. Method Women receiving perinatal services at routinely scheduled visits, including the 6-week postpartum visit, were recruited from 10 community obstetric/gynecologic clinics. Data were collected on perinatal depression, IPV, maternal substance use, and sociodemographic characteristics by bilingual, bicultural research assistants. Results A total of 1868 women were screened, 1526 (82%) Latina, 1099 (58.8%) interviewed in Spanish; 20.4% (n=382) screened positive for depressive symptoms based on an Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale score of 10 or above, 20.9% reported harmful drinking, 4.3% reported drug use, 23% reported substance use problems, and 3.5% reported current or recent IPV. Women who were Black, Asian, Pacific Islander, or other race/ethnicity had greater odds for depressive symptoms relative to women who were Hispanic or Latino (odds ratio [OR]=1.81, p=0.005). Women reporting substance use problems (OR=2.37, p<0.0001) and IPV (OR=3.98, p<0.0001) had higher odds for depressive symptoms. Conclusion In a predominately Latina sample, 1 in 5 mothers (20.4%) screened positive for depressive symptoms and over one third (36.7%) reported one or more psychosocial issues during the perinatal period. Screening for multiple risk factors rather than just one can help clinicians tailor interventions for the successful management of psychosocial issues. PMID:23931153

  7. Stress-Induced Changes in the Expression of the Clock Protein PERIOD1 in the Rat Limbic Forebrain and Hypothalamus: Role of Stress Type, Time of Day, and Predictability

    PubMed Central

    Al-Safadi, Sherin; Al-Safadi, Aya; Branchaud, Marie; Rutherford, Spencer; Dayanandan, Arun; Robinson, Barry; Amir, Shimon

    2014-01-01

    Stressful events can disrupt circadian rhythms in mammals but mechanisms underlying this disruption remain largely unknown. One hypothesis is that stress alters circadian protein expression in the forebrain, leading to functional dysregulation of the brain circadian network and consequent disruption of circadian physiological and behavioral rhythms. Here we characterized the effects of several different stressors on the expression of the core clock protein, PER1 and the activity marker, FOS in select forebrain and hypothalamic nuclei in rats. We found that acute exposure to processive stressors, restraint and forced swim, elevated PER1 and FOS expression in the paraventricular and dorsomedial hypothalamic nuclei and piriform cortex but suppressed PER1 and FOS levels exclusively in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CEAl) and oval nucleus of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNSTov). Conversely, systemic stressors, interleukin-1? and 2-Deoxy-D-glucose, increased PER1 and FOS levels in all regions studied, including the CEAl and BNSTov. PER1 levels in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the master pacemaker, were unaffected by any of the stress manipulations. The effect of stress on PER1 and FOS was modulated by time of day and, in the case of daily restraint, by predictability. These results demonstrate that the expression of PER1 in the forebrain is modulated by stress, consistent with the hypothesis that PER1 serves as a link between stress and the brain circadian network. Furthermore, the results show that the mechanisms that control PER1 and FOS expression in CEAl and BNSTov are uniquely sensitive to differences in the type of stressor. Finally, the finding that the effect of stress on PER1 parallels its effect on FOS supports the idea that Per1 functions as an immediate-early gene. Our observations point to a novel role for PER1 as a key player in the interface between stress and circadian rhythms. PMID:25338089

  8. Non-spore forming eubacteria isolated at an altitude of 20,000 m in Earth's atmosphere: extended incubation periods needed for culture-based assays

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffin, Dale W.

    2008-01-01

    On 13 August 2004, an atmospheric sample was collected at an altitude of 20,000 m along a west to east transect over the continental United States by NASA’s Stratospheric and Cosmic Dust Program. This sample was then shipped to the US Geological Survey’s Global Desert Dust program for microbiological analyses. This sample, which was plated on a low nutrient agar to determine if cultivable microorganisms were present, produced 590 small yellow to off-white colonies after approximately 7 weeks of incubation at room-temperature. Of 50 colonies selected for identification using 16S rRNA sequencing, 41 belonged to the family Micrococcaceae, seven to the family Microbacteriaceae, one to the genus Staphylococcus, and one to the genus Brevibacterium. All of the isolates identified were non-spore-forming pigmented bacteria, and their presence in this sample illustrate that it is not unusual to recover viable microbes at extreme altitudes. Additionally, the extended period required to initiate growth demonstrates the need for lengthy incubation periods when analyzing high-altitude samples for cultivable microorganisms.

  9. Rabbit whole embryo culture.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Valerie A; Carney, Edward W

    2012-01-01

    Although the rabbit is used extensively in developmental toxicity testing, relatively little is known about the fundamental developmental biology of this species let alone mechanisms underlying developmental toxicity. This paucity of information about the rabbit is partly due to the historic lack of whole embryo culture (WEC) methods for the rabbit, which have only been made available fairly recently. In rabbit WEC, early somite stage embryos (gestation day 9) enclosed within an intact amnion and attached to the visceral yolk sac are dissected from maternal tissues and placed in culture for up to 48 h at approximately 37C and are continuously exposed to an humidified gas atmosphere mixture in a rotating culture system. During this 48 h culture period, major phases of organogenesis can be studied including cardiac looping and segmentation, neural tube closure, and development of anlagen of the otic system, eyes and craniofacial structures, somites and early phases of limb development (up to bud stage), as well as expansion and closure of the visceral yolk sac around the embryo. Following completion of the culture period, embryos are evaluated based on several growth and development parameters and also are assessed for morphological abnormalities. The ability to sustain embryo development independent of the maternal system allows for exposure at precise development stages providing the opportunity study the direct action of a teratogen or one of its metabolites on the developing embryo. Rabbit WEC is perhaps most useful when used in conjunction with rodent WEC methods to investigate species-specific mechanisms of developmental toxicity. PMID:22669668

  10. Bioactivity of water soluble extracts and some characteristics of white cheese during the ripening period as effected by packaging type and probiotic adjunct cultures.

    PubMed

    Erkaya, Tuba; ?engul, Mustafa

    2015-02-01

    In this study, the chemical composition, proteolysis and in vitro angiotensin-converting enzyme-(ACE)-inhibitory and antioxidant activities of white cheeses made using probiotic adjunct cultures (Bifidobacterium bifidum DSMZ 20456 and Lactobacillus acidophilus DSMZ 20079) were investigated. The cheeses were ripened in a vacuum package or brine for 120d at 4C. The cheese samples maintained the probiotic characteristics of the viable cells as >106cfu/g even after ripening for 120d. The proteolysis degrees in terms of water-soluble nitrogen/total nitrogen (WSN/TN), trichloroacetic acid-soluble nitrogen/total nitrogen (TCA-SN/TN) and phosphotungstic acid-soluble nitrogen/total nitrogen (PTA-SN/TN) values in the cheeses increased throughout the ripening. The highest levels of proteolysis were found in cheese made using Lb. acidophilus DSMZ 20079 and ripened in a vacuum package. ACE-inhibitory activity of the water soluble extracts (WSEs) of the cheeses increased significantly (P<005) throughout the ripening (IC50 values 8278-14099?g/ml). Use of Lb. acidophilus DSMZ 20079 and packaging under vacuum significantly increased the percentage of ACE inhibiting activity. WSEs had DPPH scavenging activity (the IC50 values were 241-539mg/ml and the inhibition values were 510-1038%), increasing up to 60d ripening. In the present study, it was observed that Lb. acidophilus DSMZ 20079 was more effective than Bifido. bifidum DSMZ 20456 in terms of the cheese characteristics investigated. PMID:25592630

  11. Schoolwide Literacy Days.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polder, Darlene D.

    2000-01-01

    Describes 10 "literacy day" activities that one California elementary school has used successfully schoolwide, typically one such day per month, to make reading fun and purposeful, while developing a sense of community. Includes: spread-a-quilt day; teacher exchange day; turn off the TV; Dr. Seuss day; community readers; schoolwide poets; original…

  12. 75 FR 42818 - Agency Information Collection; Activity Under OMB Review; Collection of Safety Culture Data for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-22

    ... on March 12, 2010 (75 FR 11988) and the comment period ended on May 11, 2010. The 60-day notice...; Collection of Safety Culture Data for Program Evaluation AGENCY: Research & Innovative Technology... Culture Data for Program Evaluation. Type of Request: Approval of a new information collection....

  13. First Day of Life

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Cerebral Palsy: Caring for Your Child The First Day of Life KidsHealth > For Parents > The First Day ... continue What Your Baby Does on the First Day Many parents are surprised to see how alert ...

  14. First Day of Life

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Your Child All About Food Allergies The First Day of Life KidsHealth > For Parents > The First Day ... continue What Your Baby Does on the First Day Many parents are surprised to see how alert ...

  15. In vitro maintenance of spermatogenesis in Xenopus laevis testis explants cultured in serum-free media

    SciTech Connect

    Risley, M.S.; Miller, A.; Bumcrot, D.A.

    1987-05-01

    Spermatogenesis has been maintained for extended periods in Xenopus laevis testis explants cultured in serum-free media supplemented with bovine serum albumin, insulin, transferrin, follicle-stimulating hormone, dihydrotestosterone, testosterone, retinol, ascorbate, and tocopherol. The organization of the testis fragments was maintained for 28 days, and all stages of development were present throughout the culture period. /sup 3/H-Thymidine-labeled secondary (Type B) spermatogonia developed in 28 days into spermatids at the acrosomal vesicle stage whereas labeled zygotene spermatocytes became mature spermatids in 28 days. Spermatogonial proliferation also continued in vitro for 28 days. Germ cell differentiation was not dependent upon exogenous testosterone, ascorbate, or tocopherol since /sup 3/H-labeled spermatogonia became mature spermatids in testes cultured 35 days in media lacking these supplements. Autoradiography demonstrated that 55% of the luminal sperm present in explants cultured 10 days had differentiated in vitro. Sperm from testes cultured 10-35 days were similar to sperm from freshly dissected testes with regard to motility and fecundity, and eggs fertilized with sperm from explant cultures developed normally into swimming tadpoles. The results demonstrate the feasibility of maintaining vertebrate spermatogenesis in culture and suggest that in vitro analysis of Xenopus spermatogenesis using defined media may provide important insights into the evolution of regulatory mechanisms in spermatogenesis.

  16. Family Day Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seefeldt, Carol, Ed.; Dittmann, Laura L., Ed.

    This handbook is intended to provide information for the family seeking day care for its children, the family wishing to begin a family day care service, and an agency considering implementing a network of family day care homes. The first section of the handbook is especially intended for parents who are trying to decide which type of day care…

  17. Adult Day Services

    MedlinePLUS

    A Smart Choice Adult Day Services Comparison At-a-Glance 1 Adult Day Services Assisted Living Home Care Nursing Homes Live at home with family ... supervision Nursing care available as needed during the day Flexibility to receive care only on days when ...

  18. Defrosting Polar Dunes--Changes Over a 26-Day Period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    As the retreat of the south polar winter frost cap became visible in June 1999, high resolution images from the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) began to show dark spots forming on the surfaces of frost-covered sand dunes. Immediately, the MOC science team began to plan to observe several dune fields more than once, should that opportunity arise, so that the evolution of these dark spots could be documented and studied. Such work will eventually lead to abetter understanding of how the martian polar caps retreat as winter ends and spring unfolds in each hemisphere.

    MGS is in a polar orbit, which means that, unlike many other places on Mars, the spacecraft has more opportunities to take pictures of the same place. Dune fields near 87o latitude can be repeatedly viewed; dunes near the equator are not likely to be photographed more than once during the entire MGS mission.

    The pictures presented here show changes on a set of nearly pear-shaped sand dunes located on the floor of an unnamed crater at 59oS, 353oW. The picture on the left shows the dunes as they appeared on June 19, 1999, the picture on the right shows the same dunes on July 15, 1999. The dark spots in the June 19picture--indicating areas where frost has sublimed away--became larger by July 15th. In addition, new spots had appeared as of mid-July. If possible, these dunes will be photographed by MOC again in mid-August and each month until the frost is gone.

    The pictures shown in (B) (above) are expanded views of portions of the pictures in (A). The 200 meter scale bar equals 656 feet; the 100 meter bar is 328 feet (109 yards) long. All images are illuminated from the upper left; north is toward the upper right.

    Malin Space Science Systems and the California Institute of Technology built the MOC using spare hardware from the Mars Observer mission. MSSS operates the camera from its facilities in San Diego, CA. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO.

  19. Day-1 chick development.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Guojun

    2014-03-01

    The first day of chick development takes place inside the mother hen (in utero), during which the embryo progresses from fertilization to late blastula/early gastrula formation. The salient features of developmental anatomy in this period are conserved among the sauropsids (birds and reptiles). Many of these features are also shared in prototherian (monotreme) embryos, whereas metatherian (marsupial) and eutherian (placental) embryos display significant variations. Important for understanding the evolution of early development in amniotes, the knowledge of cellular and molecular mechanisms regulating in utero chick development may also offer valuable insight into early lineage specification in prototherians and conserved features in mammalian early development. This commentary provides a snapshot of what is currently known about intrauterine chick development and identifies key issues that await further clarification, including the process of cellularization, allocation of maternal determinants, zygotic gene activation, mid-blastula transition, cell layer increase and reduction, radial symmetry breaking, early lineage segregation, and role of yolk syncytium in early patterning. PMID:24550174

  20. Nitric oxide and oxidative stress in placental explant cultures.

    PubMed

    Goncalves, Juvic M; Casart, Ysabel C; Camejo, Mara I

    2016-02-01

    Placental explant culture, and cellular cytolysis and cellular differentiation have been previously studied. However, oxidative stress and nitric oxide profiles have not been evaluated in these systems. The aim of this study was to determine the release of lipid peroxidation and nitric oxide from placental explants cultured over a seven day period. Placental explants were maintained for seven days in culture and the medium was changed every 24 hours. The response was assessed in terms of syncytiotrophoblast differentiation (human chorionic gonadotropin, hCG), cellular cytolysis (lactate dehydrogenase, LDH), oxidative stress (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, TBARS), and nitric oxide (NO). Levels of hCG increased progressively from day two to attain its highest level on days four and five after which it decreased gradually. In contrast, the levels of LDH, TBARS, and NO were elevated in the early days of placental culture when new syncytiotrophoblast from cytotrophoblast were forming and also in the last days of culture when tissue was declining. In conclusion, the levels of NO and lipid peroxidation follow a pattern similar to LDH and contrary to hCG. Future placental explant studies to evaluate oxidative stress and NO should consider the physiological changes inherent during the time of culture. PMID:26366632

  1. Period Cramps

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and what to do if you're a girl who gets them. What Are Period Cramps? Lots of girls experience cramps before or during their periods. Cramps ... prostaglandins (say: pross-tuh-GLAN-dinz), chemicals a girl's body produces to make the muscles of the ...

  2. Group culture of human zygotes is superior to individual culture in terms of blastulation, implantation and life birth.

    PubMed

    Ebner, T; Shebl, O; Moser, M; Mayer, R B; Arzt, W; Tews, G

    2010-12-01

    This prospective study tested a new type of culture dish for the effects of individual culture and autotrophic factors. Within a 6-month period, 72 patients with nine or more fertilized eggs were enrolled in this prospective evaluation. Their 936 zygotes were split into three subgroups (individual culture, individual culture with contact to neighbours, group culture). All concepti were cultured in 30 ?l drops (medium change on day 3) until blastocyst stage. On day 5, a single-blastocyst transfer was performed and the remaining blastocysts of good quality were vitrified. Fertilization rates were 69% for IVF and 81% for intracytoplasmic sperm injection. Blastulation was 48%. Single-blastocyst transfer resulted in a clinical pregnancy rate of 54%. Group culture was superior in terms of compaction (P<0.01) and blastulation (P<0.001) as compared with individual culture. A better blastocyst quality was observed in group culture (P<0.05). As a trend, more life births were achieved with blastocysts derived from group culture. As far as is known, this is the first evidence that grouping embryos improves preimplantation development in human and it is recommended that culture volume should be reduced or embryo density increased. PMID:21051291

  3. Hippocampal culture stimulus with 4-megahertz ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muratore, Robert; LaManna, Justine K.; Lamprecht, Michael R.; Morrison, Barclay, III

    2012-10-01

    Among current modalities, ultrasound uniquely offers both millisecond and millimeter accuracy in noninvasively stimulating brain tissue. In addition, by sweeping the ultrasound beam within the refractory period of the neuronal tissue, ultrasonic neuromodulation can be adapted to target extended or multiply connected regions with quasi-simultaneity. Towards the development of this safe brain stimulus technique, the response of rat hippocampal cultures to ultrasound was investigated. Hippocampal slices, 0.4-mm thick, were obtained from 8-day old Sprague Dawley rats and cultured for 6 days. The in vitro cultures were exposed to multiple 100-ms 4.04-MHz ultrasound pulses from a 42-mm diameter, 90-mm spherical cap transducer. Peak pressure ranged from 0 through about 77 kPa. Responses in the form of electrical potentials from a sixty channel electrode array were digitized and recorded. The DG and CA1 regions of the hippocampus exhibited similar ultrasonically-evoked field potentials.

  4. Every Day Is National Lab Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bull, Glen

    2010-01-01

    President Barack Obama recently issued a call for increased hands-on learning in U.S. schools in an address at the National Academy of Sciences. Obama concluded that the future of the United States depends on one's ability to encourage young people to "create, and build, and invent." In this article, the author discusses National Lab Day (NLD)

  5. Riley-Day syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    Riley-Day syndrome is an inherited disorder that affects nerves throughout the body. ... Riley-Day syndrome is passed down through families (inherited). A person must inherit a copy of the defective gene ...

  6. Periodized wavelets

    SciTech Connect

    Schlossnagle, G.; Restrepo, J.M.; Leaf, G.K.

    1993-12-01

    The properties of periodized Daubechies wavelets on [0,1] are detailed and contrasted against their counterparts which form a basis for L{sup 2}(R). Numerical examples illustrate the analytical estimates for convergence and demonstrate by comparison with Fourier spectral methods the superiority of wavelet projection methods for approximations. The analytical solution to inner products of periodized wavelets and their derivatives, which are known as connection coefficients, is presented, and several tabulated values are included.

  7. Every Day Is Mathematical

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barger, Rita H.; Jarrah, Adeeb M.

    2012-01-01

    March 14 is special because it is Pi Day. Mathematics is celebrated on that day because the date, 3-14, replicates the first three digits of pi. Pi-related songs, websites, trivia facts, and more are at the fingertips of interested teachers and students. Less celebrated, but still fairly well known, is National Metric Day, which falls on October

  8. Growing degree day calculator

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Degree-day benchmarks indicate discrete biological events in the development of insect pests. For the Sparganothis fruitworm, we have isolated all key development events and linked them to degree-day accumulations. These degree-day accumulations can greatly improve treatment timings for cranberry IP...

  9. Every Day Is Mathematical

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barger, Rita H.; Jarrah, Adeeb M.

    2012-01-01

    March 14 is special because it is Pi Day. Mathematics is celebrated on that day because the date, 3-14, replicates the first three digits of pi. Pi-related songs, websites, trivia facts, and more are at the fingertips of interested teachers and students. Less celebrated, but still fairly well known, is National Metric Day, which falls on October…

  10. Cultural Diplomacy in Europe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haigh, Anthony

    The evolution of European government activities in the sphere of international cultural relations is examined. Section 1 describes the period between World War I and World War II when European governments tried to enhance their prestige and policies by means of cultural propaganda. Section 2 analyzes the period during World War II when the

  11. 42 CFR 409.65 - Lifetime reserve days.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... that period. If an election not to use reserve days is effective after the first day on which reserve days are available, it must remain in effect until the end of the stay, unless it is revoked...

  12. 42 CFR 409.65 - Lifetime reserve days.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... that period. If an election not to use reserve days is effective after the first day on which reserve days are available, it must remain in effect until the end of the stay, unless it is revoked...

  13. 42 CFR 409.65 - Lifetime reserve days.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... that period. If an election not to use reserve days is effective after the first day on which reserve days are available, it must remain in effect until the end of the stay, unless it is revoked...

  14. 42 CFR 409.65 - Lifetime reserve days.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... that period. If an election not to use reserve days is effective after the first day on which reserve days are available, it must remain in effect until the end of the stay, unless it is revoked...

  15. A respirometer for organ cultures

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, D. R.

    1965-01-01

    1. A differential respirometer that can measure the oxygen uptake of organ cultures for periods of several days is described. 2. Diethanolamine is used as an external carbon dioxide buffer so that oxygen consumption can be measured in the presence of physiological concentrations of carbon dioxide and bicarbonate. 3. The efficiency of carbon dioxide retention with 5% carbon dioxide as gas phase is estimated to be 75% and the accuracy to be 5% with a measured rate of oxygen uptake in excess of 40?l./hr. 4. Some experiments with guinea-pig retina are reported. ImagesFig. 2. PMID:5881664

  16. Recent Innovations in Cultural Practices in the Mid-Atlantic Coast Region of the U. S.: Novel Systems for Increasing Fall Fruiting in Short-day Type Strawberry Cultivars and Opportunities for Out-of-Season Fruit Production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Producing strawberry transplants from runner tips that were plugged about one month earlier (early July) than the standard time (early August) promoted fall flowering in some short-day strawberry cultivars. In 2002, 100 percent of ‘Chandler’ transplants produced in early July flowered in the fall,...

  17. Meat Consumption Culture in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Seleshe, Semeneh; Jo, Cheorun; Lee, Mooha

    2014-01-01

    The consumption of animal flesh food in Ethiopia has associated with cultural practices. Meat plays pivotal and vital parts in special occasions and its cultural symbolic weight is markedly greater than that accorded to most other food. Processing and cooking of poultry is a gender based duty and has socio-cultural roles. Ethiopians are dependent on limited types of animals for meats due to the taboo associated culturally. Moreover, the consumption of meat and meat products has a very tidy association with religious beliefs, and are influenced by religions. The main religions of Ethiopia have their own peculiar doctrines of setting the feeding habits and customs of their followers. They influence meat products consumption through dictating the source animals that should be used or not be used for food, and scheduling the days of the years in periodical permeation and restriction of consumptions which in turn influences the pattern of meat consumption in the country. In Ethiopia, a cow or an ox is commonly butchered for the sole purpose of selling within the community. In special occasions, people have a cultural ceremony of slaughtering cow or ox and sharing among the group, called Kircha, which is a very common option of the people in rural area where access of meat is challenging frequently. PMID:26760739

  18. Meat Consumption Culture in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Cheorun

    2014-01-01

    The consumption of animal flesh food in Ethiopia has associated with cultural practices. Meat plays pivotal and vital parts in special occasions and its cultural symbolic weight is markedly greater than that accorded to most other food. Processing and cooking of poultry is a gender based duty and has socio-cultural roles. Ethiopians are dependent on limited types of animals for meats due to the taboo associated culturally. Moreover, the consumption of meat and meat products has a very tidy association with religious beliefs, and are influenced by religions. The main religions of Ethiopia have their own peculiar doctrines of setting the feeding habits and customs of their followers. They influence meat products consumption through dictating the source animals that should be used or not be used for food, and scheduling the days of the years in periodical permeation and restriction of consumptions which in turn influences the pattern of meat consumption in the country. In Ethiopia, a cow or an ox is commonly butchered for the sole purpose of selling within the community. In special occasions, people have a cultural ceremony of slaughtering cow or ox and sharing among the group, called Kircha, which is a very common option of the people in rural area where access of meat is challenging frequently. PMID:26760739

  19. Irregular Periods

    MedlinePLUS

    ... from Nemours for Parents for Kids for Teens Teens Home Body Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Q&A School & Jobs Drugs & Alcohol Staying Safe Recipes En Espaol Making a Change Your Personal Plan Hot ... > Irregular Periods Print A A A Text Size ...

  20. Growth of purified lacrimal acinar cells in Matrigel raft cultures.

    PubMed

    Schechter, Joel; Stevenson, Douglas; Chang, Donald; Chang, Natalie; Pidgeon, Michael; Nakamura, Tamako; Okamoto, Curtis T; Trousdale, Melvin D; Mircheff, Austin K

    2002-03-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a tissue culture system which closely mimics the in situ lacrimal gland for improved study of lacrimal acinar cell physiology. Highly purified preparations of lacrimal acinar cells from adult female New Zealand White rabbits were isolated and grown in suspension culture in the form of Matrigel 'rafts', i.e., aggregates of acinar cells enclosed within a Matrigel coating. The rafts were seeded onto Matrigel-coated culture plates and their growth was followed for up to 28 days. Immunohistochemistry was used to demonstrate the cellular sites of prolactin (PRL), epidermal growth factor (EGF), basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2), secretory component (SC) and major histocompatibility complex class-II molecules (MHC-II) within the acinar cells. By 3 days the cultures contained numerous, well-formed acini enclosed within the Matrigel. The acinar epithelial cells demonstrated histotypic polarity, with large, pale-staining, secretory granules aggregated adjacent to the lumen, and exocytotic release of secretory material into the lumen. From 5-10 days the pale-staining secretory granules decreased in number, while the lumenal contents of the acini increased in staining density. Throughout the culturing period as the pale-staining, secretory granules decreased in number, smaller more densely stained, secretory granules increased in number. The number of cells and size of acinar clusters increased steadily throughout the culturing period, and acini frequently achieved dimensions in excess of 0.5 mm. Increases in the size of acinar clusters were often accompanied by an increase in the size of the lumen. Frequently the lumen and its contents bulged asymmetrically towards one edge of the acinus. Immunhistochemistry demonstrated PRL and EGF within the lumens and within the apical cytoplasm of the acinar cells. Acini were strongly immunopositive for SC throughout the 28 day culture period, whereas immunopositivity for MHC-II molecules was strong initially, but diminished dramatically by 21 days. Immunostaining for FGF-2 was most intense on days 1 and 3, with staining throughout the cytoplasm, but became progressively more localized to the periphery of the acini as the culture period lengthened. In cultures of 1-28 days duration, Western blots of cell lysates demonstrated a major band (approximately 40 kDa) for PRL in 3-28 day preparations; a major band (approximately 80 kDa) for SC in 3 day and 7 day preparations that decreased in intensity in 14-28 day preparations; and a major band (approximately 23 kDa) for MHC-II protein in 1-21 day preparations that decreased in intensity in 28 day preparations. Lysosomes increased in number with time in culture, becoming a dominant cytoplasmic feature in 21 and 28 day cultures. Carbachol stimulation of 4 day rafts resulted in increased release of beta-hexosaminidase and SC from the rafts. The authors conclude that Matrigel rafts containing purified lacrimal gland acinar cells offer a highly advantageous system for study of lacrimal acinar cell function and one that correlates well with the in situ gland. PMID:12014916

  1. Open Day at SHMI.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarosova, M.

    2010-09-01

    During the World Meteorological Day there has been preparing "Open Day" at Slovak Hydrometeorological Institute. This event has more than 10 years traditions. "Open Day" is one of a lot of possibilities to give more information about meteorology, climatology, hydrology too to public. This "Day" is executed in whole Slovakia. People can visit the laboratories, the forecasting room....and meteo and clima measuring points. The most popular is visiting forecasting room. Visitors are interested in e.g. climatologic change in Slovakia territory, preparing weather forecasting, dangerous phenomena.... Every year we have more than 500 visitors.

  2. Culture Computing: Interactive Technology to Explore Culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheok, Adrian David

    The present day rapid development of media science and digital technology is offering the modern generation more opportunities as well as challenges as the new fundamental literacy. Therefore, to reach the modern generation on issues such as an appreciation of cultures, we have to find common grounds based on digital media technology. In an increasingly hybrid cultural environment, interaction and fusion of cultural factors with the computer technology will be an investigation into the possibilities of providing an experience into the cultures of the world, operating in the environments the modern generation inhabits. Research has created novel merging of traditional cultures and literature with recent media literacy. Three cultural computing systems, Media Me, BlogWall and Confucius Computer, are presented in this chapter. Studies showed that users gave positive feedback to their experience of interacting with cultural computing systems.

  3. Popular Chat Day Q & A

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Day / Popular Chat Day Q & A Popular Chat Day Q & A Read students most popular questions about ... New Order Free Materials National Drugs & Alcohol Chat Day Chat Day Participant FAQs Popular Chat Day Q & ...

  4. Popular Chat Day Q & A

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Day / Popular Chat Day Q & A Popular Chat Day Q & A Read students’ most popular questions about ... New Order Free Materials National Drugs & Alcohol Chat Day Chat Day Participant FAQs Popular Chat Day Q & ...

  5. Day of the Dead

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dann, Tammy; Murphy, Amy

    2012-01-01

    Foreign Language in Elementary School (FLES) teachers in the West Des Moines schools incorporate the Day of the Dead into the fourth grade curriculum each year. The teachers discuss the Day of the Dead celebration at the Art Center, and many ask for volunteers from fourth grade to participate in the event. Student presentations include a wide…

  6. Family Science Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCubbins, Sara; Thomas, Bethany; Vetere, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a family-friendly science day event that encourages scientific discovery through hands-on activities, while also providing an opportunity to learn about scientific careers from actual research scientists and science educators, thereby raising awareness of the importance of STEM in our society. The one-day event bought…

  7. The Presidents' Day Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, D. Jackson

    2008-01-01

    The history behind the holiday commonly called "Presidents' Day" is a bit confusing. It started as a federal holiday called Washington's Birthday. It was a day set aside to honor George Washington for his accomplishments as a founding father of the country. Later, many northern states began to recognize Abraham Lincoln's Birthday as well for his

  8. Who Cares? Day Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Dept. of Children and Family Services, Springfield.

    The purpose of this report prepared by the Illinois Department of Children and Family Services is to describe the growth of day care services in Illinois during 1972 and to present information which will aid state agencies and citizens in planning for and coordinating day care services. The report is divided into discussions of past, present, and

  9. Rainy Day Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Child Care, 1997

    1997-01-01

    Experienced caregivers plan ahead for rainy days. This article describes specific rainy day activities for young children, such as books and crafts to learn about rain (rain in a jar, making a rainbow), simple cooking activities (taffy pull, cinnamon candy tea), and games (mummy wrap, hunt the thimble, rain lotto). (EV)

  10. Day of the Dead

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dann, Tammy; Murphy, Amy

    2012-01-01

    Foreign Language in Elementary School (FLES) teachers in the West Des Moines schools incorporate the Day of the Dead into the fourth grade curriculum each year. The teachers discuss the Day of the Dead celebration at the Art Center, and many ask for volunteers from fourth grade to participate in the event. Student presentations include a wide

  11. Day Nurseries in Senegal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gueye, Khady

    1977-01-01

    Describes a village day nursery organized by peasant women in 1962 to provide care for preschool children whose mothers must work in the rice fields. Outlines the aims of the day nursery and the prerequisites for its establishment. Community and parent participation is stressed. (JK)

  12. My Lucky Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olvey, Maura

    2010-01-01

    Teaching based on problem solving brings challenges for the teacher, primarily that of finding problems with multiple access points that accommodate all students. This article narrates the author's lucky day as she discovers the Four fours problem which impacted her passion for teaching math. The day she presented the Four fours problem to her

  13. [Infants in Day Care].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pawl, Jeree, Ed.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    This newsletter theme issue looks at infant day care models including those emphasizing early intervention with special needs infants. The lead article, "Infants in Day Care: Reflections on Experiences, Expectations and Relationships," by Jeree H. Pawl, stresses the importance of understanding infants' and toddlers' capacities and needs in

  14. Extended-Day Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khripkova, Antonina

    1983-01-01

    Extended-day programs now enroll about 25 percent of school-age children in the USSR. While such schools make full-time work easier for women, they are also beneficial for children. In a longer school day more time is available for physical education and special interests, such as theater and art. (IS)

  15. For Just One Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, S.

    2004-01-01

    This essay explores the fantasy of a mother who wonders what her son would have been like if he were not severely disabled. For just one day, she confesses, she would like to know the anticipated son who disappeared from her life the day her disabled son was born, 21 years ago. The essay provides vivid examples of challenging experiences she has

  16. RED-LETTER DAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The word "red-letter" is an adjective meaning "of special significance." It's origin is from the practice of marking Christian holy days in red letters on calendars. The "red-letter days" to which I refer occurred while I was a graduate student of ...

  17. Science Challenge Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Science fairs can be good motivators, but as extracurricular activities, they leave some students behind. However, by staging a Science Challenge Day at school, educators can involve all students in doing everything from choosing activities to judging projects. This article presents a model for running a successful Science Challenge Day. The

  18. Family Science Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCubbins, Sara; Thomas, Bethany; Vetere, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a family-friendly science day event that encourages scientific discovery through hands-on activities, while also providing an opportunity to learn about scientific careers from actual research scientists and science educators, thereby raising awareness of the importance of STEM in our society. The one-day event bought

  19. Periodic Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Edwin

    2013-03-01

    Periodic polymers can be made by self assembly, directed self assembly and by photolithography. Such materials provide a versatile platform for 1, 2 and 3D periodic nano-micro scale composites with either dielectric or impedance contrast or both, and these can serve for example, as photonic and or phononic crystals for electromagnetic and elastic waves as well as mechanical frames/trusses. Compared to electromagnetic waves, elastic waves are both less complex (longitudinal modes in fluids) and more complex (longitudinal, transverse in-plane and transverse out-of-plane modes in solids). Engineering of the dispersion relation between wave frequency w and wave vector, k enables the opening of band gaps in the density of modes and detailed shaping of w(k). Band gaps can be opened by Bragg scattering, anti-crossing of bands and discrete shape resonances. Current interest is in our group focuses using design - modeling, fabrication and measurement of polymer-based periodic materials for applications as tunable optics and control of phonon flow. Several examples will be described including the design of structures for multispectral band gaps for elastic waves to alter the phonon density of states, the creation of block polymer and bicontinuous metal-carbon nanoframes for structures that are robust against ballistic projectiles and quasi-crystalline solid/fluid structures that can steer shock waves.

  20. Problems on Licensing Family Day Care Homes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galambos, Eva C.

    This document reports on a three-year demonstration day care project. The Southern Regional Education Board has responsibility for coordinating the project, providing training and assistance, and evaluating the program over the three-year period. Specifically, this report is one of a series of bulletins around a variety of topics related to day

  1. Embryonic mouse pre-metatarsal development in organ culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klement, B. J.; Spooner, B. S.

    1993-01-01

    Embryonic mouse pre-metatarsals were removed from embryos at 13 days of gestation and cultured in a defined, serum-free medium for up to 15 days. By histological analysis, we observe that the cultured pre-metatarsal tissue undergoes a similar developmental profile as pre-metatarsals growing normally in vivo. The initial mesenchyme condensation regions undergo differentiation and morphogenesis to form distinct rods made up of cartilage tissue. A marker of this differentiation step is the synthesis of type II collagen. Metabolic labelling, pepsin digestion, SDS-PAGE, and autoradiography were used to demonstrate this protein when cartilage tissue is present in the cultures. After additional culture time, terminal chondrocyte differentiation and morphogenesis take place in specific regions of the cartilage rods to form bands of hypertrophied chondrocytes. One marker of this differentiation step is the synthesis of the enzyme alkaline phosphatase. We have measured the activity of this enzyme throughout the culture period and see a substantial increase at the time of terminal chondrocyte differentiation. Another feature of hypertrophied chondrocytes is that the matrix around the cells becomes calcified. Calcified matrix in our cultured pre-metatarsals was visualized by staining with alizarin red. By supplementing the defined culture medium with ITS, we observed that terminal chondrocyte differentiation took place in a shorter culture time. Supplementation of the medium with serum results in a similar acceleration of terminal differentiation, and, with additional culture time, an osteoid-like matrix forms around the central region of the rods.

  2. 24 CFR 58.21 - Time periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Time periods. 58.21 Section 58.21...: Environmental Review Procedures 58.21 Time periods. All time periods in this part shall be counted in calendar days. The first day of a time period begins at 12:01 a.m. local time on the day following...

  3. 24 CFR 58.21 - Time periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Time periods. 58.21 Section 58.21...: Environmental Review Procedures 58.21 Time periods. All time periods in this part shall be counted in calendar days. The first day of a time period begins at 12:01 a.m. local time on the day following...

  4. 24 CFR 58.21 - Time periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Time periods. 58.21 Section 58.21...: Environmental Review Procedures 58.21 Time periods. All time periods in this part shall be counted in calendar days. The first day of a time period begins at 12:01 a.m. local time on the day following...

  5. 24 CFR 58.21 - Time periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Time periods. 58.21 Section 58.21...: Environmental Review Procedures § 58.21 Time periods. All time periods in this part shall be counted in calendar days. The first day of a time period begins at 12:01 a.m. local time on the day following...

  6. 24 CFR 58.21 - Time periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Time periods. 58.21 Section 58.21...: Environmental Review Procedures § 58.21 Time periods. All time periods in this part shall be counted in calendar days. The first day of a time period begins at 12:01 a.m. local time on the day following...

  7. Space Day 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winslow, Joyce

    2000-01-01

    Introduces three design challenges for fourth, fifth, and sixth grade students created by the Challenger Center for Space Science Education. Presents information on Space Day and the National Classroom and provides Internet site addresses. (YDS)

  8. Adult Day Care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 10 Warning Signs Adult Day Care Assistive Technology Elder Abuse Face the Facts Government Assisted Housing Home ... Hospital Discharges Pension Counseling A Talk with An Elder Driver Brochures Federal Websites Helpful Links Search by ...

  9. Day care health risks

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of the liver caused by the hepatitis A virus. It is spread by poor or no hand washing after going to the bathroom or changing a diaper, and then preparing food. In addition to good hand washing, day care ...

  10. Stennis Day Camper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Sara Beth Casey, 5, proudly displays her artwork, 'Planets.' Sara Beth created the art as a student of Stennis Day Camp, a free camp for Stennis Space Center employees' children whose schools have not resumed since Hurricane Katrina hit the region on Aug. 29. The camp has registered nearly 200 children and averages 100 children each day. The camp will continue until all schools are back in session.

  11. AAS 227: Day 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. Along with several fellow authors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Welcome to Day 4 of the winter American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting in Kissimmee! Several of us are attending the conference this year, and we will report highlights from each day here on astrobites. If youd like to see more timely updates during the day, we encourage you to follow @astrobites on twitter or search the #aas227 hashtag.Helen B. Warner Prize: Origins of Structure in Planetary Systems (by Erika Nesvold)Another excellent prize lecture started off todays sessions. The Helen B. Warner Prize is awarded for achievement in observational or theoretical astrophysics by a young researcher (no more than eight years after their Ph.D.). This years Warner Prize was presented to Ruth Murray-Clay of UC Santa Barbara. For her award lecture, Murray-Clay told us all about planetary system architecture: the number, masses, and orbits of planets in a given system.Ruth Murray-Clay [photo from http://web.physics.ucsb.edu/ ~murray/biocv.html]The underlying question motivating this type of research is: How rare is the Solar System? In other words, how likely is it that a given planetary system will have rocky planets close to their star, gas giants farther out, and ice giants at the outer reaches of the system? Answering this question will help us solve the physics problem of how and where planets form, and will also help us on our search for other planets like Earth.The data on exoplanet population from transit and radial velocity observations and from direct imaging tell us that our Solar System is not common (many systems we observe have much more eccentric gas giants), but that doesnt mean its not typical. While we wait for more and better observations of exoplanet systems, theory can help us understand why the Solar System formed the way it did, and where to look for systems that formed the same way. For example, some of Murray-Clays previous work has shown that metal-rich stars tend to host more hot Jupiters and eccentric giant planets (very different from Solar System architecture). So if we want to find more systems like our own, we need to search around stars with low-to-moderate metallicity.Extrasolar Planets: Hosts, Interactions, Formation, and Interiors (by Caroline Morley)This session was a mashup of a variety of planetary topics ranging from solar flares to interiors to habitability.Leslie Rogers kicked off the session by presenting work done in collaboration with her student Ellen Price to constrain the composition of the ultra-short period (4 hours!?!) planet candidate KOI 1843.03 using models of the objects interior. Since its so close to the star, it can only exist without being torn apart if its very dense, which allows them to calculate that it must be iron-rich like Mercury!Next Kevin Thielen, an undergrad at Eckerd College, presented results from a summer project to apply a variable polytrope index to planet models. Tom Barclay then showed models that demonstrate the huge effect that having giant planets in the outer solar system has on the formation of terrestrial planets. He finds that without Jupiter and Saturn, more planets would form (8 instead of 3-4!) and giant impacts (like the moon-forming impact) would be more frequent but less energetic.Aomawa Shields shifted to discuss her 3D GCM models to determine the orbital configurations that would lead to liquid water on the surface of the planet Kepler-62f. She determines the effect of eccentricity, axis tilt (obliquity), and rotation rate on habitability. Edward Guinan brought us closer to home discussing the potential for superflares solar flares up to hundreds of times more energetic than normalin our solar system. Analyses of Kepler data suggest that these flares likely happen every 300-500 years in Sunlike stars (way more often than previously thought!), and would devastate communications systems on Earth (and hurt astronauts in space).Peter Buhler and Taisiya Kopytova finished up the session. Peter showed how he used Spitzer secondary eclipses and MESA models to determine the tidal love number and core mass of HAT-P-13b. Taisiya presented her thesis work on observations of brown dwarfs and low-mass stars. She shows that in many cases, particularly for young objects and cold objects, the models for these objects do not fit the data very well!Press Conference: Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) IV (by Susanna Kohler)The final press conference of the meeting was all about the fourth generation of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey.In the opening talk, Michael Blanton (New York University) presented some early results from SDSS-IV, which is slated to run from 2014 to 2020. The major components to SDSS-IV are extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS), a cosmological survey of quasars and galaxies; APO Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE-2), a stellar survey of the Milky Way; and Mapping Nearby Galaxies at APO (MaNGA), a survey that will map the detailed internal structure of nearly 10,000 nearby galaxies.Next up was Melissa Ness (Max Planck Institute for Astronomy), speaking about APOGEEs creation of the first global age map of the Milky Way. APOGEE obtained the spectra for 70,000 red giant stars. These spectra, combined with the stars light curves, allowed the team to infer the ages of these stars distributed across the Milky Way galaxy. The resulting map is shown in the video below. From this map, Ness says its pretty clear: the Milky Way started as a small disk, and its expanded out from there, since. Our galaxy grew, and it grew up by growing out. Heres the press release. This is a big 3D map showing the age of stars in the Milky Way the latest from #aas227: https://t.co/HiPbm9eW6J pic.twitter.com/DqG6NNsPTU jonathan jb webb (@jjbw) January 8, 2016Francesco Belfiore (University of Cambridge) gave the next talk, cleverly titled Proof That Some Galaxies Are LIERs. The title is a play on the astrophysical source known as a LINER, or Low-Ionization Nuclear Emission-line Region an area within a galactic center that displays line emission from weakly ionized or neutral atoms. These have commonly been interpreted as being a wimpy active galactic nucleus (AGN). But a closer look with MaNGA, which is able to take spectroscopic data for the whole galaxy at once, has revealed that these sources are actually distributed throughout the galaxy, rather than being nuclear hence, no N: these galaxies are LIERs. Instead of AGN, the sources may be newly born white dwarfs. Heres the press release.Artists conception of the changing look quasar as it appeared in early 2015. [Dana Berry / SkyWorks Digital, Inc.; SDSS collaboration]The final speaker was Jessie Runnoe (Pennsylvania State University), who captured everyones attention with the topic of changing look quasars. We know that quasars can transition from a bright state, where active accretion onto the galaxys central supermassive black hole is visible in their emission spectrum, to a dim state, where they look like a normal galaxy. But SDSS has just observed the quasar SDSS J1011+5442 turn off within the span of just 10 years. Based on the data, the team concludes that this quasar exhausted the supply of gas in its immediate vicinity, turning off when there was no longer anything available to accrete. Runnoe showed an awesome animation of this process, which you can check out here. Heres the press release.Coffee, Black Holes, Editors and Beer: The Science-Writing Life (by Susanna Kohler)This talk was a part of the series Beyond the Academy: Showcasing Astronomy Alumni in Non-Academic Careers. Matthew Francis is a former academic scientist (with a PhD in physics and astronomy) who transitioned to being a freelance science writer. Wearing a distinctive bowler hat, Francis talked to a room full of students (and some non-students!) about what its like to be a science writer. Here are some highlights from among his recommendations and comments.A day in the life of a science writer.About the mechanics of freelancing:Some sample numbers: he wrote 73 articles in 2015, for 12 different publications. These vary in length and time invested. He supports himself fully by freelancing.The time between pitching a story and getting it published can vary between a few hours for online news stories to months for feature articles.The answer to the question, What do science writers do all day? (see photo)About transitioning into science writing:If youre interested in a science writing career, start blogging now to build up a portfolio.Use your training! As a researcher, you can read plots, understand scientific articles, and talk to scientists as colleagues. These are great strengths.About writing for the public:Theres a difference in writing for academics and the public: when writing for academics, youre trying to bring them up to your level. When writing for the public, thats probably not the goal.That said, on the subject of dumbing down: If you think your audience is somehow deficient, youve already failed.writing for the web: youll make fundamental spelling/grammar errors, youll find them only when you read the published post. Truth! #aas227 astrobites (@astrobites) January 8, 2016At the end of the session, Francis told us what he considers to be the best part of being a science writer: getting to tell people something that theyve never heard before. Getting it right is communicating a mundane fact to you that is an astounding surprise to your audience.Plenary Talk: News on the Search for Milky Way Satellite Galaxies (by Susanna Kohler)The second-to-last plenary talk of the meeting was given by Keith Bechtol, John Bahcall fellow at University of Wisconsin-Madison. Bechtol spoke about the recent discovery of new satellite galaxies of the Milky Way. Dwarf galaxies orbiting the Milky Way are often hard to spot because they are so faint while globular clusters have mass-to-light ratios of around 1, the ultra-faint satellites around the Milky Way can have mass-to-light ratios of hundreds or thousands! A combination of better facilities and improved analysis techniques has been lengthening the list of known Milky Way satellites, however: SDSS took us from ~10 to ~30 in the last ten years, and facilities like the Dark Energy Survey Camera (DES), Pan-STARRS 1, SkyMapper, and Hyper Suprime-Cam pushed that number to ~50 in 2015.Bechtol plenary on the discovery of new MW satellites #aas227 pic.twitter.com/3GH0Sd2J8c Matthias Steinmetz (@GalacticRAVE) January 8, 2016The new candidates discovered with DES are all less luminous and more distant than previous satellites found. One interesting aspect of this sample is that 15/17 of the candidates fall in the southern half of the DES footprint, and are located near the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds. This anisotropy is not thought to be a selection effect so is it coincidence, or could they possibly be satellites of satellites? Were not sure yet!Why do we care about finding Milky Way satellites? There are lots of reasons, but one of the biggest is that they may help us to unravel some of the mysteries of dark matter. These faint-but-massive galaxies were probably born in the Milky Ways dark-matter halo, and they could be great places to indirectly detect dark matter. In addition, theres the missing satellite problem the phenomenon wherein the cold-dark-matter model predicts there should be hundreds of satellites around the Milky Way, yet weve only found a few dozen. Finding more of these galaxies would help clear up whether its the theory or the observations that are wrong.One more time, it shouldnt be called the Missing Satellite Problem. The theorists have a Satellite Overabundance Problem. #aas227 Peter Yoachim (@PeterYoachim) January 8, 2016Overall, Bechtol declares, its been an exciting year for the discovery of new Milky Way satellites, and with new surveys and facilities still in development, the future looks promising as well!Hack Day (by Meredith Rawls)A large contingent of astronomers spent our Friday working on small projects or chunks of larger projects that could be accomplished in a day. Astrobites has written about hack days before. Look for a dedicated recap post with all the great projects later in January!

  12. Rationalization of Comet Halley's periods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belton, Michael J. S.

    1990-01-01

    The sense of long axis orientation of Comet Halley during the Vega 1 encounter must be reversed from that deduced by Sagdeev et al. (1986) in order to harmonize the comet nucleus' Vega/Giotto-observed orientations with periodicities extracted from time-series brightness data. It is also demonstrated that Vega/Giotto observations can be satisfied by either a 2.2- or 3.7-day long-axis free precession period. A novel Fourier algorithm is used to reanalyze five independent data sets; strong evidence is adduced for periods harmonically related to a 7.4-day period. The preferred candidate models for Halley's nuclear rotation are characterized by a long-axis precession period of 3.7 days.

  13. Rationalization of Comet Halley's periods

    SciTech Connect

    Belton, M.J.S. )

    1990-07-01

    The sense of long axis orientation of Comet Halley during the Vega 1 encounter must be reversed from that deduced by Sagdeev et al. (1986) in order to harmonize the comet nucleus' Vega/Giotto-observed orientations with periodicities extracted from time-series brightness data. It is also demonstrated that Vega/Giotto observations can be satisfied by either a 2.2- or 3.7-day long-axis free precession period. A novel Fourier algorithm is used to reanalyze five independent data sets; strong evidence is adduced for periods harmonically related to a 7.4-day period. The preferred candidate models for Halley's nuclear rotation are characterized by a long-axis precession period of 3.7 days. 79 refs.

  14. Use of an automated blood culture system (BD BACTEC) for diagnosis of prosthetic joint infections: easy and fast

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background For the diagnosis of prosthetic joint infection (PJI) automated BACTEC blood culture bottle methods have comparable sensitivity, specificity and a shorter time to positivity than traditional cooked meat enrichment broth methods. We evaluate the culture incubation period required to maximise sensitivity and specificity of microbiological diagnosis, and the ability of BACTEC to detect slow growing Propionibacteria spp. Methods Multiple periprosthetic tissue samples taken by a standardised method from 332 patients undergoing prosthetic joint revision arthroplasty were cultured for 14days, using a BD BACTEC instrumented blood culture system, in a prospective study from 1st January to 31st August 2012. The gold standard definition for PJI was the presence of at least one histological criterion, the presence of a sinus tract or purulence around the device. Cases where?>?=2 samples yielded indistinguishable isolates were considered culture-positive. 1000 BACTEC bottle cultures which were negative after 14days incubation were sub-cultured for Propionibacteria spp. Results 79 patients fulfilled the definition for PJI, and 66 of these were culture-positive. All but 1 of these 66 culture-positive cases of PJI were detected within 3days of incubation. Only one additional (clinically-insignificant) Propionibacterium spp. was identified on terminal subculture of 1000 bottles. Conclusions Prolonged microbiological culture for 2weeks is unnecessary when using BACTEC culture methods. The majority of clinically significant organisms grow within 3days, and Propionibacteria spp. are identified without the need for terminal subculture. These findings should facilitate earlier decisions on final antimicrobial prescribing. PMID:24885168

  15. Paleolithic Counseling - The Good Old Days.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Paul T.

    This paper outlines what clients were like in the "Good Ol' Days", as compared with what they are like now. Formerly clients appeared to come in with a plethora of ego energy, while now it seems more like a depletion. Explicit in our culture now is the idea that it is almost healthy and good to publicize one's private experience. Some of…

  16. Factors affecting the multiplication and subculture of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum in a tissue culture system.

    PubMed

    Norris, S J; Edmondson, D G

    1986-09-01

    Limited multiplication of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum (Nichols strain) can be obtained in the presence of Sf1Ep rabbit epithelial cell cultures, but continuous culture has not yet been achieved. In the system currently employed, growth is exponential for the first 10 to 15 days of culturing, after which multiplication and the percentage of motile organisms decrease. In an effort to identify culture conditions which may adversely affect treponemal viability and growth, eight culture parameters were monitored over a 12-day period of incubation. Several of these parameters, including pH, redox potential, dissolved oxygen concentration, and glucose levels were found to change dramatically during the course of incubation, indicating that they may be responsible for the cessation of treponemal multiplication. The feasibility of extending the period of growth by subculturing was also investigated. In preparation for planned serial subcultivation experiments, several subculture procedures were tested and found to be effective in allowing the transfer of T. pallidum from 3-day-old primary cultures to secondary cultures without loss of motility or growth potential. Increases of up to 55-fold were observed in secondary cultures, but increased growth due to subculturing was not a consistent finding. Use of subculture intervals of greater than or equal to 6 days resulted in a progressive decrease in treponemal multiplication in secondary cultures, although retention of motility was extended in the subcultures compared with motility in the primary cultures. These results indicate that the lack of continued multiplication of T. pallidum in subcultures is not due to damage to the treponemes during subculture. Prolonged multiplication of T. pallidum may be obtained through the stabilization of culture conditions by either performing subcultures at regular intervals or by medium replacement techniques. It was also found that primary T. pallidum cultures could be established by using as the inoculum treponemes that had been stored at -70 degrees C in a medium containing 15% glycerol. PMID:3091504

  17. The good old days

    SciTech Connect

    Axford, W.I.

    1994-10-01

    The author touches on personal experiences in the field of space physics during his professional career. The authors career in space physics began at the period of introduction of satellites, and has spanned this period. His training was not in this field, but he was fortunate to be steered into the field at a time of great expansion and significant progress. He was involved in shock wave studies, magnetic reconnection, and a wide range of magnetospheric phenomena.

  18. Day-to-Day Variability of the Migrating Diurnal Tide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palo, Scott

    The upward propagating diurnal tide dominates the wind and temperature structure of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. This phenomenon is forced in the lower atmosphere due to the absorption of infra-red radiation by water vapor in the troposphere and to a lesser extend the absorption of ultra violet radiation by ozone in the stratosphere. As the migrating diurnal tide propagate vertically, away from the source region, it can be impacted by a number of sources which can modify the amplitude and phase of the diurnal tide. These nonlinear interactions associated with the background zonal mean winds, dissipation and other large scale planetary waves can impact the amplitude and phase structure of the globally coherent migrating diurnal tide. Observations, primarily from ground-based radar and optical systems, have shown that the locally observed 24 hour oscillation, typically associated with the diurnal tide, can vary significantly over time scales from days to months. Satellite observations, which typically require integration times of months to extract the migrating tidal information have also shown the long period seasonal and interannual variations captured by the ground based observations. These long period variations have been replicated in both mechanistic and global circulation models, however the shorter period variations which occur on timescales of days have proven difficult to capture from observations and replicate using numerical models. One area that is problematic in understanding the day-to-day variability of the diurnal tide is the difficulty in separating potential sources of variability from the observations. From the ground-base perspective it is not clear if the observed variability is due to changes in the migrating diurnal tide or changes in other non-migrating components which cannot be separated from the migrating diurnal tide with measurements from multiple stations at similar latitudes. When utilizing measurements from a single satellite the difficulty arises from the fact that while the satellite provides nearly global coverage, all of the measurements on a give day are made at only one or two specific phases of the tide. To resolve this issue measurements are typically made over an extended time interval of months to build up measurements from multiple phases of the tide before inferring the tidal amplitudes. As a result of this process any short term variations in the tide are smoothed out. In this paper we will present an approach for utilizing observations from multiple satellite measurements to determine the global day-to-day variability of the migrating diurnal tide. Observations from the SABER instrument on the TIMED mission and the MLS instrument on the AURA mission will be combined to create estimates of the daily migrating diurnal tidal amplitude and phase. These results will be interpreted in an effort to understand the potential sources of variability associated with the migrating diurnal tide.

  19. Analysis of heart development in cultured rat embryos.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, M; Price, R L; Chintanawonges, C; Simpson, D G; Horacek, M J; Borg, T K; Terracio, L

    1997-01-01

    The long-range goal of this research is to establish an in vitro system that will permit pertubation of mammalian heart development and in situ examination of the cellular and molecular events underlying cardiac morphogenesis. Rat embryos at 9.5-11.5 days of gestation were placed in culture bottles containing rat serum and Tyrode's solution. Embryos cultured for 24 and 48 h were compared to age-matched in vivo controls for morphological score, morphometric analysis of heart development, and confocal and electron microscopic analysis of myofiber pattern formation. Morphological scores indicated that embryos cultured for 24 h from day 9.5 to 10.5 had essentially normal development when compared to age-matched embryos allowed to develop in vivo. Development of embryos maintained for 48 h in culture was slightly delayed at 66-68% of age matched in vivo embryos. Analysis of hearts from embryos allowed to develop 9.5-11.5 days in vivo plus 24 and 48 h in culture showed that the ventricular thickness and height, as well as the truncal, atrial and ventricular diameters were equivalent to those of hearts from age-matched in vivo controls. Hearts from embryos allowed to develop from 11.5-12.5 days in vitro and cultured for 24 and 48 h had smaller left ventricular and atrial dimensions than controls. Cardiac myofibrillogenesis and myofibrillar pattern formation in embryos cultured from 9.5 days of in vivo development for 48 h were also normal. These studies indicate that the rat whole embryo culture system is a useful model to study several critical periods in mammalian heart development. PMID:9040051

  20. One Play a Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blankenship, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Undergraduate theater students rarely get the chance to work on a major world premiere, but this year hundreds of them will. Currently, more than 70 colleges and universities are participating in "365 Days/365 Plays," an ambitious project from Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Suzan-Lori Parks. Every week, as they mount their portion of this epic

  1. First Day of School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bort, Nancy

    2004-01-01

    In this brief article, the author, a science teacher at F. C. Hammond Middle School in Alexandria, Virginia, describes how the setting up of a simple science experiment on the first day of school can get students excited about learning science. The experiment involves heating a small amount of water in a flask, then covering the opening of the

  2. Marketing Your Day Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, George

    1997-01-01

    Marketing strategies for day camps include encouraging camp staff to get involved in organizations involving children, families, and communities; holding camp fairs; offering the use of camp facilities to outside groups; hosting sport leagues and local youth outings; planning community fairs; and otherwise involving the camp in the community. (LP)

  3. Dog Day Afternoon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filipczak, Bob

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the problem faced by trainers who are "on stage" for eight hours a day. Offers tips to relieve the stress caused by continuous training, including maintaining personal space, taking a lunch break, keeping physically energized, and avoiding burnout when teaching the same thing over and over. (JOW)

  4. We Love Science Day.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kepler, Lynne

    1986-01-01

    Describes the goals and outcomes of the "We Love Science Day" programs that resulted from the inservice course, "Creative Integration of Science in Elementary Education" for Pennsylvania teachers. Provides samples of the hands-on activities that were offered to students, parents, and teachers. Includes a calendar of extracurricular science

  5. NASA Day of Remembrance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Stennis Space Center Director Gene Goldman (left) and Deputy Director Patrick Scheuermann place a wreath in StenniSphere in memory of the 17 astronauts lost in service of the space program since 1967. The wreath was placed during NASA's 2009 Day of Remembrance, observed each year on the last Thursday of January.

  6. Fabulous Weather Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Candice; Mogil, H. Michael

    2007-01-01

    Each year, first graders at Kensington Parkwood Elementary School in Kensington, Maryland, look forward to Fabulous Weather Day. Students learn how meteorologists collect data about the weather, how they study wind, temperature, precipitation, basic types/characteristics of clouds, and how they forecast. The project helps the students grow in

  7. Make a Splash Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coverdale, Greg; Rust, April; Jensen, Belinda

    2004-01-01

    At the annual, all-day events-sponsored by Project WET (Water Education for Teachers) and held in nearly every state across the country each September--students participate in interactive activities and exhibits to learn about water resources and explore how human behaviors, such as development and recreation, can affect the quality of the

  8. Fabulous Weather Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Candice; Mogil, H. Michael

    2007-01-01

    Each year, first graders at Kensington Parkwood Elementary School in Kensington, Maryland, look forward to Fabulous Weather Day. Students learn how meteorologists collect data about the weather, how they study wind, temperature, precipitation, basic types/characteristics of clouds, and how they forecast. The project helps the students grow in…

  9. Multigenerational Day Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerschner, Paul A.

    This study explores the potential benefits of multigenerational day care programs. Two small preschool programs serving predominantly low income black families were chosen for comparison. The programs were matched for child/staff ratio, level of staff professionalism, and characteristics of families served. The programs differed, however, in their

  10. Day Care: Nutrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Florence P.; And Others

    This collection of 12 short, bilingual papers on nutrition and preschool children is part of a series of papers on various aspects of day care published by the Canadian Department of Health and Welfare. Each paper is presented in both English and French. Topics dealt with include an overview of children's nutritional needs; development of…

  11. Sun-Earth Day

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Michael Sandras, a member of the Pontchartrain Astronomical Society, explains his solar telescope to students of Second Street in Bay St. Louis, Hancock County and Nicholson elementary schools in StenniSphere's Millennium Hall on April 10. The students participated in several hands-on activities at Stennis Space Center's Sun-Earth Day celebration.

  12. An Earth Day Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moser, Don, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Presents what the author believes to be some of the most important environmental books published since Earth Day 1970. Discusses each selection and how it provides the historical background, basic information, and appreciation necessary to understand the character of our environmental dilemma and our need to address it. (MCO)

  13. Family Day Care Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Community Coordinated Child Care (4-C) in Dane County, Inc., Madison, WI.

    This handbook provides both general and specific information on child development and child care to help adults who are providing child care in their homes. Information is presented in six sections which describe: (1) the family day care system, the occupation of caregiver, and the development of relationships; (2) development of a health program,

  14. Day Care: Nutrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Florence P.; And Others

    This collection of 12 short, bilingual papers on nutrition and preschool children is part of a series of papers on various aspects of day care published by the Canadian Department of Health and Welfare. Each paper is presented in both English and French. Topics dealt with include an overview of children's nutritional needs; development of

  15. Prolonged survival of human spermatozoa when co-incubated with epididymal cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Akhondi, M A; Chapple, C; Moore, H D

    1997-03-01

    Human epididymal tissue was recovered from 11 patients undergoing orchidectomy without anti-androgen treatment. Everted epithelial fragments from the caput and corpus epididymis of six patients were successfully cultured in a modified RPMI 1640 medium supplemented with HEPES and androgens for up to 110 days (mean 56 +/- 28) in 5% CO(2) in air at 37 degrees C. Epithelial cells from human oviduct and non-reproductive tract cells (breast epithelial cells, fibroblasts) were also cultured for comparison. The proportion of epididymal epithelial cells in primary cultures assessed by immunofluorescent localization using a cytokeratin monoclonal antibody was shown to be >70% for the first 6-8 weeks of culture. Light and electron microscopy indicated that epithelial cells maintained polarity and some normal morphology during the culture period. Washed epididymal or ejaculated spermatozoa prepared by a 'swim-up' procedure were co-incubated (i) directly with epididymal cells in culture wells, (ii) in 12 mm Millicell inserts within culture wells, thereby preventing contact of spermatozoa with culture cells; and (iii) in culture medium alone. A significant proportion of spermatozoa in direct contact with culture cells or in Millicell inserts were viable after 6 days of co-incubation (30-45%) and exhibited progressive motility, while all spermatozoa in medium alone were non-motile by 3 days. Using computer-assisted sperm analysis it was shown that the progressive motility of viable spermatozoa decreased gradually for the first 5 days in culture and then remained constant (approximately 30 microm/s, average path velocity). After 12 days of co-incubation, 15 +/- 4% of spermatozoa in direct contact with epithelial cells remained motile; in one experiment, a few spermatozoa (<1%) were motile at 17 days. Light and electron microscope observations indicated that prolonged sperm survival was associated with close apposition of spermatozoa (by equatorial segment) to the apical membrane of epithelial cells. Oviductal epithelial cells were also beneficial for sperm survival, but other cell types had no effect. PMID:9130753

  16. [Nonadhesive populations in cultures of mesenchymal stromal cells from hematopoietic organs in mouse and rat].

    PubMed

    Byeverova, E I; Bragina, E V; Molchanova, E A

    2008-01-01

    The study of adhesive properties of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells evaluated from fibroblast colony-forming units in the bone marrow of adult mice and rats in populations of cells attached and unattached to plastic substrate after 2 h to 7 days in culture demonstrated both similarities and differences. The increase in the fibroblast colony-forming units in the adhesive population peaked on day 7 of in vitro culture in both cases; however, nearly no fibroblast colony-forming units were observed in the nonadhesive population from the mouse bone marrow in this period. Conversely, the number of colonies from the rat bone marrow nonadhesive population on day 7 of culture considerably increased, and this nonadhesive population in long-term culture became the source for subsequent nonadhesive subpopulations containing fibroblast colony-forming units. After 7 days of in vitro culture, the suspension of cells isolated from the liver of 17-day-old rat fetuses also contained a fraction of unattached fibroblast colony-forming units. In the nonadhesive subpopulations from the bone marrow and fetal liver, fibroblast colony-forming units were observed up to day 48 and 30, respectively. Stromal cell precursors of nonadhesive subpopulations from the rat bone marrow featured a period of colony formation reduced to 7 days (i.e., they were formed 1.5-2 times faster compared to the primary culture). The total number of fibroblast colony-forming units from all nonadhesive subpopulations was roughly 6 and 7.4 times that of the adhesive population of the primary culture from the bone marrow and fetal liver, respectively. Considering that the mammalian bone marrow remains the preferred source of mesenchymal stromal cells, using nonadhesive subpopulations in the presented culture system can considerably increase the yield of stromal precursor cells. PMID:19137707

  17. Crusade for Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayre, Ruth W.

    1995-01-01

    Reprints an article originally published in 1961. Describes the "culture crusade" at William Penn High School for Girls in midcity Philadelphia, part of Project WINGS, an overall program of educational incentive and motivation. Notes that over a 2-year period, more than 1,000 girls went on at least 1 cultural trip. (RS)

  18. Mercury's Rotation Period: Photographic Confirmation.

    PubMed

    Smith, B A; Reese, E J

    1968-12-13

    Photographic measures of surface features on Mercury have led to a rotation period of 58.663 +/- 0.021 days, which is in good agreement with the 58.646-day period required by a predicted 2:3 resonance between the axial and orbital periods. The incorrect interpretation of earlier visual and photographic observations which supported an 88-day rotation period appears to be partially explained by peculiar characteristics associated with the observability of various hermo-graphic longitudes. The apparent contrast of most of the recorded surface features is marginal for visual observation when viewed through the terrestrial daytime sky. The intrinsic contrast of a relatively conspicuous feature was measured as 0.20, a value lower than that of typical markings observed on the moon and Mars. PMID:17756336

  19. Day One Sustainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orr, John; Ibell, Timothy; Evernden, Mark; Darby, Antony

    2015-01-01

    Emissions reductions targets for the UK set out in the Climate Change Act for the period to 2050 will only be achieved with significant changes to the built environment, which is currently estimated to account for 50% of the UK's carbon emissions. The socio-technological nature of Civil Engineering means that this field is uniquely placed to lead

  20. Day One Sustainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orr, John; Ibell, Timothy; Evernden, Mark; Darby, Antony

    2015-01-01

    Emissions reductions targets for the UK set out in the Climate Change Act for the period to 2050 will only be achieved with significant changes to the built environment, which is currently estimated to account for 50% of the UK's carbon emissions. The socio-technological nature of Civil Engineering means that this field is uniquely placed to lead…

  1. Flight Day 2 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The STS-107 second flight day begins with a shot of the Spacehab Research Double Module. Live presentations of experiments underway inside of the Spacehab Module are presented. Six experiments are shown. As part of the Space Technology and Research Student Payload, students from Australia, China, Israel, Japan, New York, and Liechtenstein are studying the effect that microgravity has on ants, spiders, silkworms, fish, bees, granular materials, and crystals. Mission Specialist Kalpana Chawla is seen working with the zeolite crystal growth experiment.

  2. Enhanced Osteogenesis of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells by Periodic Heat Shock in Self-Assembling Peptide Hydrogel

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jing; Shi, Zhong-Dong; Ji, Xinying; Morales, Jorge; Zhang, Jingwei; Kaur, Navneet

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms for the heat-induced osteogenesis are not completely known and the thermal regulation of human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) differentiation is not well studied. In this study, the direct effects of mild heat shock (HS) on the differentiation of hMSCs into osteoblasts in self-assembling peptide hydrogel and on tissue culture plates were investigated. hMSCs isolated from human bone marrow were seeded in conventional culture plates (two-dimensional [2D] culture) and on the surface of three-dimensional (3D) PuraMatrix peptide hydrogel (3D culture), followed by 1 h HS at 41°C once a week during osteogenic differentiation. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity was enhanced in both 2D and 3D cultures via periodic HS at early stage of differentiation; meanwhile, HS significantly increased the calcium deposition at day 19 and 27 of differentiation in both 2D and 3D cultures. The periodic HS also upregulated osteo-specific genes, osterix (OSX) on day 11, osteopontin (OP) on day 19, and bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) on day 25 in 2D culture. In 3D PuraMatrix culture, the runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) was upregulated by HS on day 25 of differentiation. The heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) was significantly upregulated by HS in differentiated hMSCs analyzed at 24 h after HS. These results demonstrate that HS induced an earlier differentiation of hMSCs and enhanced the maturation of osteoblasts differentiated from hMSCs. Therefore, mild HS treatment may be potentially used to enhance the bone regeneration using hMSCs. Our data will guide the design of in vivo heating protocols and enable further investigations in thermal treatments of MSC osteogenesis for bone tissue engineering. PMID:23072422

  3. Blood culture cross contamination associated with a radiometric analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, M.R.; Miller, A.D.; Davis, A.C.

    1982-04-01

    During a 9-day period in August 1980 in a New Jersey hospital, three pairs of consecutively numbered blood cultures from different patients were identified as positive for the same organism, for each pair, both cultures were positive in the same atmosphere, both organisms had the same sensitivities, and the second of each pair grew at least 2 days after the first and was the only positive blood culture obtained from the patient. When the hospital laboratory discontinued use of its radiometric culture analyzer for 15 days, no more consecutive pairs of positive cultures occurred. Subsequent use of the machine for 9 days with a new power unit but the original circuit boards resulted in one more similar consecutive pair (Staphylococcus epidermidis). After replacement of the entire power unit, there were no further such pairs. Examination of the machine by the manufacturer revealed a defective circuit board which resulted in inadequate needle sterilization. Laboratories which utilize radiometric analyzers should be aware of the potential for cross contamination. Recognition of such events requires alert microbiologists and infection control practitioners and a record system in the bacteriology laboratory designed to identify such clusters.

  4. 7 CFR 1230.621 - Voting period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Voting period. 1230.621 Section 1230.621 Agriculture... CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures for the Conduct of Referendum Definitions § 1230.621 Voting period. The term Voting period means the 3-consecutive business day period for in-person voting. Referendum...

  5. 7 CFR 1230.621 - Voting period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Voting period. 1230.621 Section 1230.621 Agriculture... CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures for the Conduct of Referendum Definitions § 1230.621 Voting period. The term Voting period means the 3-consecutive business day period for in-person voting. Referendum...

  6. 7 CFR 1230.621 - Voting period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Voting period. 1230.621 Section 1230.621 Agriculture... CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures for the Conduct of Referendum Definitions § 1230.621 Voting period. The term Voting period means the 3-consecutive business day period for in-person voting. Referendum...

  7. 7 CFR 1230.621 - Voting period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Voting period. 1230.621 Section 1230.621 Agriculture... CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures for the Conduct of Referendum Definitions § 1230.621 Voting period. The term Voting period means the 3-consecutive business day period for in-person voting. Referendum...

  8. 7 CFR 1230.621 - Voting period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Voting period. 1230.621 Section 1230.621 Agriculture... CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures for the Conduct of Referendum Definitions § 1230.621 Voting period. The term Voting period means the 3-consecutive business day period for in-person voting. Referendum...

  9. First Day in Organic Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermann, Christine K. F.

    1996-09-01

    This experiment is designed to introduce students to the techniques of reflux, distillation, gas chromatography, and the determination of boiling point and melting point during one lab period. This lab is written so that it can be performed during the first day of lab in organic chemistry, without the students necessarily knowing any organic chemistry. The students answer questions, based upon their observation of the reflux and distillation apparatus, which are already assembled and in operation upon the students' arrival in the lab. Melting points and boiling points are performed by the students on unknown samples, and these unknowns were identified by comparison to a limited list of possibilities. A mixture of alcohols is analyzed by the students. Each student injects a sample under supervision, obtains a chromatogram, and from this, calculates peak area.

  10. 2010 Day of Remembrance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Patrick Scheuermann (left), deputy director at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center, and Richard Gilbrech, associate director, place a wreath in memory of the 17 astronauts lost in service of the space program since 1967. The wreath was placed during NASA's 2010 Day of Remembrance, observed each year in January. The annual observance memorializes the three astronauts lost in the Apollo 1 launch pad fire in 1967, the seven astronauts lost in the Challenger tragedy in 1986 and the seven astronauts lost in the Columbia accident in 2003. During the Stennis observance, Scheuermann praised the fallen astronauts as 'brave space pioneers who gave their lives in the cause of exploration and discovery.'

  11. One Cold Autumn Day

    PubMed Central

    de Schweinitz, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Behavioral change is at the heart of effective primary care, but when patients don’t change, how do we account for our days? In this personal essay, I relate an encounter with a patient who wants to quit smoking, lose weight, and control her diabetes. I am discouraged when she deflects my recommendations, but a colleague’s comment encourages a deeper inquiry. Knowing the patient’s story and deepening the conversation, however, do not guarantee change. The experience reminds me why patience, humility, and faith are core values of the primary care physician. PMID:25964410

  12. Culture shock and travelers.

    PubMed

    Stewart, L; Leggat, P A

    1998-06-01

    As travel has become easier and more affordable, the number of people traveling has risen sharply. People travel for many and varied reasons, from the business person on an overseas assignment to backpackers seeking new and exotic destinations. Others may take up residence in different regions, states or countries for family, business or political reasons. Other people are fleeing religious or political persecution. Wherever they go and for whatever reason they go, people take their culture with them. Culture, like language, is acquired innately in early childhood and is then reinforced through formal and complex informal social education into adulthood. Culture provides a framework for interpersonal and social interactions. Therefore, the contact with a new culture is often not the exciting or pleasurable experience anticipated. When immersed in a different culture, people no longer know how to act when faced with disparate value systems. Contact with the unfamiliar culture can lead to anxiety, stress, mental illness and, in extreme cases, physical illness and suicide. "Culture shock" is a term coined by the anthropologist Oberg. It is the shock of the new. It implies that the experience of the new culture is an unpleasant surprise or shock, partly because it is unexpected and partly because it can lead to a negative evaluation of one's own culture. It is also known as cross-cultural adjustment, being that period of anxiety and confusion experienced when entering a new culture. It affects people intellectually, emotionally, behaviorally and physically and is characterized by symptoms of psychological distress. Culture shock affects both adults and children. In travelers or workers who have prolonged sojourns in foreign countries, culture shock may occur not only as they enter the new culture, but also may occur on their return to their original culture. Children may also experience readjustment problems after returning from leading sheltered lives in expatriate compounds. This readjustment back to their own culture after a period of time abroad has been termed "reverse culture shock, a condition which has been studied in both corporate managers and Peace Corps volunteers. With culture shock and many other processes of psychological adjustment, people tend to suffer alone, thinking that they are the only ones not coping well with their new circumstance. The objective of this paper was to bring the phenomenon of culture shock to the awareness of travel health advisors, who can in turn advise travelers, especially longer term travelers, about having realistic expectations of their travel and life in new cultures. PMID:9772322

  13. Three-day fever.

    PubMed

    Akakpo, A J

    2015-08-01

    Three-day fever is a viral disease caused by an Ephemerovirus of the family Rhabdoviridae, transmitted by arthropod vectors. It is common in tropical and sub-tropical regions, where it affects mainly domestic cattle and buffaloes, especially in intensive dairy or fattening production systems. It is of economic importance because it reduces milk production and fertility and causes abortion. The disease is generally benign. It manifests in several susceptible subjects simultaneously, with a sudden episode of fever accompanied by muscle involvement with arthritis, stiffness of the limbs, and lameness, followed by rapid recovery. The presence of a serofibrinous exudate in the joints is indicative of the disease. Clinical diagnosis is often difficult in the absence of pathognomonic signs. Epidemiological factors (proliferation of arthropod vectors), associated with a short-lived fever and the presence of many immature neutrophils, point strongly to three-day fever. In the absence of any specific treatment, the symptoms are treated with antibiotics and anti-inflammatories. Medical prophylaxis currently uses live attenuated vaccines, pending the development of recombinant vaccines, which are giving promising results. PMID:26601454

  14. Establishment and in vitro culture of porcine spermatogonial germ cells in low temperature culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won-Young; Park, Hyun-Jung; Lee, Ran; Lee, Kyung-Hoon; Kim, Yong-Hee; Ryu, Buom-Yong; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Kim, Jin-Hoi; Kim, Jae-Hwan; Moon, Sung-Hwan; Park, Jin-Ki; Chung, Hak-Jae; Kim, Dong-Hoon; Song, Hyuk

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this study was to establish a porcine spermatogonial germ cell (pSGC) line and develop an in vitro culture system. Isolated total testicular cells (TTCs) from 5-day-old porcine testes were primary cultured at 31, 34, and 37°C. Although the time of colony appearance was delayed at 31°C, strong alkaline phosphatase staining, expressions of pluripotency marker genes such as OCT4, NANOG, and THY1, and the gene expressions of the undifferentiated germ cell markers PLZF and protein gene product 9.5 (PGP9.5) were identified compared to 34 and 37°C. Cell cycle analysis for both pSGC and feeder cells at the three temperatures revealed that more pSGCs were in the G2/M phase at 31°C than 37°C at the subculture stage. In vitro, pSGCs could stably maintain undifferentiated germ cell and stem cell characteristics for over 60days during culture at 31°C. Xenotransplantation of pSGCs to immune deficient mice demonstrated a successful colonization and localization on the seminiferous tubule basement membrane in the recipient testes. In conclusion, pSGCs from neonatal porcine were successfully established and cultured for long periods under a low temperature culture environment in vitro. PMID:24041805

  15. TISSUE CULTURE AS A METHOD FOR EVALUATING THE BIOTRANSFORMATION OF XENOBIOTICS BY PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Suspension cultures of Rosa cv. Paul's scarlet were used as a model system to examine the metabolism of l,3-dinitrobenzene (DNB), an industrial waste compound. n a three-day period, 90% of the DNB supplied (96 nmoles) was metabolized by approximately 12 grams (fresh weight) of ce...

  16. DAY NEUTRAL FLOWERING represses CONSTANS to prevent Arabidopsis flowering early in short days.

    PubMed

    Morris, Karl; Thornber, Sarah; Codrai, Lesley; Richardson, Christine; Craig, Adam; Sadanandom, Ari; Thomas, Brian; Jackson, Stephen

    2010-04-01

    The photoperiodic response in Arabidopsis thaliana requires the precise regulation of CONSTANS (CO) expression in relation to the light period during the day. In short days (SDs) levels of CO expression are normally low during the light period, and this results in delayed flowering compared with long days (LDs) when CO expression rises to high levels before the end of the light period. We identified a novel flowering time gene called DAY NEUTRAL FLOWERING (DNF) that acts in the same flowering pathway as CO. DNF is a membrane-bound E3 ligase that represses CO expression and plays an important role in maintaining low levels of CO expression in SDs. The effect of DNF on the rhythm of CO expression is essential for the photoperiodic response of Arabidopsis, enabling it to have a different flowering response in LDs and SDs. PMID:20435904

  17. Proceedings, Dean's Day 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Zanner, M.A.

    1999-03-01

    On January 14--15, 1999, Sandia National Laboratories sponsored Deans Day, a conference for the Deans of Engineering and other executive-level representatives from 29 invited universities. Through breakout sessions and a wrap-up discussion, university and Sandia participants identified activities to further develop their strategic relationships. The four primary activities are: (A) concentrate joint efforts on current and future research strengths and needs; (B) attract the best students (at all grade levels) to science and engineering; (C) promote awareness of the need for and work together to influence a national science and technology R and D policy; and (D) enable the universities and Sandia to be true allies, jointly pursuing research opportunities and funding from government agencies and industry.

  18. [World Population Day editorial].

    PubMed

    1995-07-01

    Despite demographic progress in many regions, world population is growing by more than 90 million persons each year. This massive growth is relatively new in human history. 80 years were required to add 1 billion inhabitants after 1850, but at current rates only 11 years will be required. The course of world demographic evolution will be decided by the actions or inaction of each man and woman on the planet. Questions of population are at the center of sustainable development and should be an essential feature of any vision of the future. Correctly conducted population programs provide essential services for the health and well-being of individuals and families and facilitate the task of creating structures for sustainable economic growth. In honor of World Population Day on July 11, the Salvadoran Demographic Association has presented a series of informative articles on the relationship between population and health, environment, education, food and nutrition, reproductive health, and family planning. PMID:12179417

  19. [Effect evaluation of three cell culture models].

    PubMed

    Wang, Aiguo; Xia, Tao; Yuan, Jing; Chen, Xuemin

    2003-11-01

    Primary rat hepatocytes were cultured using three kinds of models in vitro and the enzyme leakage, albumin secretion, and cytochrome P450 1A (CYP 1A) activity were observed. The results showed that the level of LDH in the medium decreased over time in the period of culture. However, on 5 days, LDH showed a significant increase in monolayer culture (MC) while after 8 days LDH was not detected in sandwich culture (SC). The levels of AST and ALT in the medium did not change significantly over the investigated time. The basic CYP 1A activity gradually decreased with time in MC and SC. The decline of CYP 1A in rat hepatocytes was faster in MC than that in SC. This effect was partially reversed by using cytochrome P450 (CYP450) inducers such as omeprazol and 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MC) and the CYP 1A induction was always higher in MC than that in SC. Basic CYP 1A activity in bioreactor was keeped over 2 weeks and the highest albumin production was observed in bioreactor, and next were SC and MC. In conclusion, our results clearly indicated that there have some advantages and disadvantages in each of models in which can address different questions in metabolism of toxicants and drugs. PMID:14963896

  20. New Swedish Cultural Environment Protection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ministry of Education and Cultural Affairs, Stockholm (Sweden).

    Current Swedish cultural policy was laid down in 1974. It was decided that one of the aims of that policy must be to ensure that earlier periods of history would be preserved and brought to life. The Government Bill (Prop. 1987/88:104) on protection of the cultural environment is concerned with helping the general public understand that cultural

  1. World HABITAT Day message.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, A

    1990-01-01

    The Executive Director of the UN Centre for Human Settlements (HABITAT) discusses the 1989 World HABITAT Day message--Shelter, Health, and the Family. Women and children spend most of their time in their homes and neighborhoods. The environment and the way they live in that environment determine their health status and well being. Healthy housing encompasses protection against rain, heat, cold, and disease. Yet more than 25% of the world's population have inadequate housing which is responsible for various communicable and chronic diseases, injuries, and psychological stresses. For example, overcrowding leads to respiratory infection. Inferior building materials and designs foster the harboring and breeding of disease vectors and destruction by natural disasters. Limited access to potable water and sanitation facilities and poor personal hygiene cause death, disabilities, and blemishes to millions of people as well as fosters food contamination. 10,000 people die each day from injuries or conditions directly related to inadequate shelter and related services. The urban poor tend to be at the point where industrialization meets underdevelopment because they live in marginal areas often near refuse dumps, swamps, and areas subject to landslides, earthquake, or flooding. Social and psychological problems also emerge from such an environment which further undermine the underpinnings of a secure and pleasant family life. Few activities designed to improve shelter consider the health of the occupants, however. Education about the link between housing and health among the poor at the household and community levels may empower them to alleviate the health hazards. The Executive Director requests the international community, governments, their agencies, nongovernmental organizations, builders, planners, and policymakers to consider the link between housing and health when making policy and decisions. PMID:2326215

  2. The day of women.

    PubMed

    Jimenez David, R

    1994-09-01

    March, 1994, was celebrated as Women's Month in the Philippines, with a focus on women's health. The theme chosen was Me, Too, a response to the ideal of feminine martyrdom. The intended message was that it is acceptable for women to look after themselves first, because only this way could they look after the other people in their lives. The Woman Who is Okey is defined as the woman who looks after her health and who practices self-care. The major health problems of women include cancer of the breast and cervix; reproductive tract infections; HIV/AIDS; poor nutrition, exacerbated by pregnancy and lactation; and increased incidence of cardiovascular disease linked to an increase in women smokers. The Woman Who is Okey is a woman who: carries out breast self examination each month, submits to a pap smear examination every year, does not smoke, spaces her pregnancies by 2-3 year intervals, knows how to protect herself from HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases, visits a health center regularly for prenatal check-ups and other health services, and meets her hygienic and fitness needs. The campaign was broadened to include rape, violence, sexual harassment, and discrimination and exploitation of women. The activities of the Department of Health (DOH) during March 8, International Women's Day, were coordinated with those planned by women's groups spearheaded by the National Commission on the Role of Filipino Women (NCRFW). The DOH set up a permanent Women's Center in government hospitals throughout the country and began to institutionalize assistance to women who are victims of violence, including rape. The national celebration held in Manila was a day-long program organized by the NCRFW, in which close to 18,000 women participated from all political organizations. President Fidel V. Ramos was the keynote speaker. PMID:12288259

  3. Perspectives on Infant Day Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elardo, Richard, Ed.; Pagan, Betty, Ed.

    This second edition contains articles on (1) infant day care, (2) day care as a way to extend parental support systems, (3) meeting developmental needs of infants, (4) ecology of day care, (5) ecology of infant day care, (6) quality care for infants, (7) the daily schedule, (8) precautions in establishing infant day care, (9) teaching--learning

  4. Round the World in 18 Days: Science Connecting Cultures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodgson, Gill

    2003-01-01

    The autumn 2002 term at the Eden Project was a roller-coaster ride of multicultural celebration and a fantastic lesson in the power of young people to take practical action in addressing issues that affect their communities on a local and global scale. From Cornwall to India--global links provide valuable insights and opportunities for active

  5. International Cultural Experience Day: A Festival for Foreign Language Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Gene; And Others

    An annual foreign language festival established by McNeese State University and the Calcasieu Parish School System (Louisiana) was designed to motivate students, inform them of employment opportunities, help them understand their own and other heritages, and illustrate the international and intercultural opportunities and challenges of the modern…

  6. 26 CFR 31.3406(d)-3 - Special 30-day rules for certain reportable payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... chapter for the application of a 90-day grace period in lieu of the 30-day grace period described in this paragraph (a) if, at the beginning of the 90-day grace period, certain conditions are satisfied. If the grace period provisions of 1.6049-5(d)(2)(ii) or 1.1441-1(b)(3)(iv) of this chapter are applied...

  7. 26 CFR 31.3406(d)-3 - Special 30-day rules for certain reportable payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... chapter for the application of a 90-day grace period in lieu of the 30-day grace period described in this paragraph (a) if, at the beginning of the 90-day grace period, certain conditions are satisfied. If the grace period provisions of 1.6049-5(d)(2)(ii) or 1.1441-1(b)(3)(iv) of this chapter are applied...

  8. 26 CFR 31.3406(d)-3 - Special 30-day rules for certain reportable payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... chapter for the application of a 90-day grace period in lieu of the 30-day grace period described in this paragraph (a) if, at the beginning of the 90-day grace period, certain conditions are satisfied. If the grace period provisions of 1.6049-5(d)(2)(ii) or 1.1441-1(b)(3)(iv) of this chapter are applied...

  9. Cosmos: The Integrated Day Comes to College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kutz, Ronald E.; And Others

    Four full days of classroom instruction, devoted to the modeling of effective curriculum integration, were designed for preservice elementary school teachers. The unit was the result of a conviction on the part of teacher educators that children learn best when learning is not separated into forty-minute periods of math, social studies, language

  10. Carbon disulphide production in laboratory cultures of marine phytoplankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Huixiang; Scarratt, Michael G.; Moore, Robert M.

    Carbon disulphide (CS 2) data were collected from axenic monocultures of six species of marine phytoplankton. The tested species included Chaetoceros calcitrans, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, Phaeocystis sp., Porphyridium purpureum, Synechococcus sp. and Isochrysis sp. For a period of between two weeks and forty days, substantial accumulation of CS 2 was found in the cultures of C. calcitrans, P. tricornutum and Phaeocystis sp., whereas the change of CS 2 concentration in the remaining cultures was insignificant. C. calcitrans had a potential for CS 2 production about 10 times higher than P. tricornutum or Phaeocystis sp. The formation of the compound was strongly dependent on the physiological state of the cultured species. More investigation is needed to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for the formation of this sulphur compound in these cultures.

  11. National Adult Day Services Association

    MedlinePLUS

    ... near you THE NATIONAL VOICE FOR THE ADULT DAY SERVICE COMMUNITY The National Adult Day Services Association is seeking an Executive Director. Click ... the national development, recognition and use of adult day services. They provide a coordinated program of professional ...

  12. Glycine induced culture-harvesting strategy for Botryococcus braunii.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ying; Zhu, Wenzhe; Chen, Chaozhou; Nie, Yilei

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of culture conditions, including carbon sources and concentration, culture period, and precondition time, on the production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and its influence on microalgal flocculation. EPS are natural high molecule polymer, excreted by microalgae themselves. EPS can accelerate the formation of microbial aggregates through binding cells closely. Organic carbon sources, such as glucose, glycerol, acetate and glycine were compared to select the optimal source to stimulate EPS accumulation. Subsequently, the effect of culture period, glycine dose and precondition time on EPS production and its influence on biomass growth and flocculation efficiency were investigated. As the main parts of EPS, tightly bound EPS were found positively related to suspended solids concentration. However, the loosely bound EPS may weaken the floc structure, leading to poor water-cells separation. Under the optimal condition with culture period of 16 days, glycine dose of 0.5 g l(-1) and precondition time of 5 days, the biomass concentration increased from 1.49 to 2 g l(-1), and the maximum suspended solids concentration of 7.06% with biomass recovery rate of 70.6% was achieved. PMID:26553477

  13. Urine culture

    MedlinePLUS

    Culture and sensitivity - urine ... when urinating. You also may have a urine culture after you have been treated for an infection. ... when bacteria or yeast are found in the culture. This likely means that you have a urinary ...

  14. 42 CFR 409.65 - Lifetime reserve days.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... private insurance coverage that begins after the first 90 inpatient days in a benefit period, or if the... representative. In addition, if some other payment source is available, such as private insurance, any person... election to the period covered by private insurance but cannot use individual lifetime reserve days...

  15. Safeguards Culture

    SciTech Connect

    Frazar, Sarah L.; Mladineo, Stephen V.

    2012-07-01

    The concepts of nuclear safety and security culture are well established; however, a common understanding of safeguards culture is not internationally recognized. Supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration, the authors prepared this report, an analysis of the concept of safeguards culture, and gauged its value to the safeguards community. The authors explored distinctions between safeguards culture, safeguards compliance, and safeguards performance, and evaluated synergies and differences between safeguards culture and safety/security culture. The report concludes with suggested next steps.

  16. Comparative Analysis of Human and Rodent Brain Primary Neuronal Culture Spontaneous Activity Using Micro-Electrode Array Technology.

    PubMed

    Napoli, Alessandro; Obeid, Iyad

    2016-03-01

    Electrical activity in embryonic brain tissue has typically been studied using Micro Electrode Array (MEA) technology to make dozens of simultaneous recordings from dissociated neuronal cultures, brain stem cell progenitors, or brain slices from fetal rodents. Although these rodent neuronal primary culture electrical properties are mostly investigated, it has not been yet established to what extent the electrical characteristics of rodent brain neuronal cultures can be generalized to those of humans. A direct comparison of spontaneous spiking activity between rodent and human primary neurons grown under the same in vitro conditions using MEA technology has never been carried out before and will be described in the present study. Human and rodent dissociated fetal brain neuronal cultures were established in-vitro by culturing on a glass grid of 60 planar microelectrodes neurons under identical conditions. Three different cultures of human neurons were produced from tissue sourced from a single aborted fetus (at 16-18 gestational weeks) and these were compared with seven different cultures of embryonic rat neurons (at 18 gestational days) originally isolated from a single rat. The results show that the human and rodent cultures behaved significantly differently. Whereas the rodent cultures demonstrated robust spontaneous activation and network activity after only 10 days, the human cultures required nearly 40 days to achieve a substantially weaker level of electrical function. These results suggest that rat neuron preparations may yield inferences that do not necessarily transfer to humans. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 559-565, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26284690

  17. Hydroxylation, conjugation and sulfation of bile acids in primary monolayer cultures of rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Princen, H.M.; Meijer, P.

    1988-08-15

    Hydroxylation of lithocholic, chenodeoxycholic, deoxycholic and cholic acids was studied in monolayers of rat hepatocytes cultured for 76 h. The majority of added lithocholic and chenodeoxycholic acids was metabolized to beta-muricholic acid (56-76%). A small part of these bile acids (9%), however, and a considerable amount of deoxycholic and cholic acids (21%) were converted into metabolites more polar than cholic acid in the first culture period. Formation of these compounds decreased during the last day of culture. Bile acids synthesized after addition of (4-/sup 14/C)-cholesterol were almost entirely (97%) sulfated and/or conjugated, predominantly with taurine (54-66%), during culture. Sulfated bile acids were mainly composed of free bile acids. The ability of hepatocytes to sulfurylate bile acids declined with culture age. Thus, rat hepatocytes in primary monolayer culture are capable to sulfurylate bile acids and to hydroxylate trihydroxylated bile acids, suggesting formation of polyhydroxylated metabolites.

  18. On periodicity of solar wind phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verma, V. K.; Joshi, G. C.

    1995-01-01

    We have investigated the rate of occurrence of solar wind phenomena observed between 1972-1984 using power spectrum analysis. The data have been taken from the high speed solar wind (HSSW) streams catalogue published by Mavromichalaki et al. (1988). The power spectrum analysis of HSSW events indicate that HSSW stream events have a periodicity of 9 days. This periodicity of HSSW events is 1/3 of the 27 days period of coronal holes which are the major source of solar wind events. In our opinion the 9 days period may be the energy build up time to produce the HSSW stream events.

  19. Franco, the Early Days

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siemssen, R. H.

    2004-04-01

    As this meeting is to honour Franco on the occasion of his 60 birthday I thought that it might be fitting to report on some early reminiscences of Franco of the pre-IBA days. Franco first came to Groningen in 1972 for a seminar on the invitation of Alex Lande. Alex and Franco had known each other from the Niels Bohr Institute in Copenhagen, where they had collaborated. In 1972 both Alex and I had been freshly appointed at Groningen, Alex on the Faculty of the Theory Department, and I myself as the new director of the KVI. A position for a Senior Scientist in theory had been newly created at the KVI with the aim to establish a strong in-house theory group. Needless to say that everyone who met Franco was deeply impressed by him. We thus were extremely happy to be able to entice Franco to join the KVI as a Senior Scientist in 1974, after he had spent a few weeks in Groningen in 1973 as a visitor. So characteristic of Franco he immediately took a strong interest in the experimental program as evidenced by the following publications on the weak-coupling description of three-nucleon pickup in the (p, ?) reaction [1] and the spreading width of deep-hole states [2]. Both topics appear to have maintained their actuality, looking at the many papers that have been published since on these and related topics. But this brief citation of the "other Franco" would not do justice to him without mentioning the diverse palette of Franco's work also listed in the KVI 1974 Annual Report, reflecting Franco's extremely broad and diversified scientific interests. [3-10]...

  20. AAS 227: Day 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. Along with several fellow authors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Welcome to Day 3 of the winter American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting in Kissimmee! Several of us are attending the conference this year, and we will report highlights from each day here on astrobites. If youd like to see more timely updates during the day, we encourage you to follow @astrobites on twitter or search the #aas227 hashtag.Henry Norris Russell Lecture: Viewing the Universe with Infrared Eyes: The Spitzer Space Telescope (by Erika Nesvold)The Henry Norris Russell Award is the highest honor given by the AAS, for a lifetime of eminence in astronomy research. This years award went to Giovanni Fazio of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. Fazio became a leader in gamma ray astronomy before switching mid-career to the study of infrared astronomy, and he gave his award lecture on the latter subject, specifically on the Spitzer Space Telescope, one of the most successful infrared telescopes of all time.Artists rendering of the Spitzer space telescope. [NASA/JPL-Caltech]Spitzer has been operating for more than twelve years, and has resulted in over six thousand papers in refereed journals in that time. The telescope sits in an Earth-trailing orbit around the Sun, and is now farther from the Earth (1.4 AU) than the Earth is from the Sun. Fazio gave the audience a fascinating overview of the science done by Spitzer over more than a decade. One of the most productive areas of research for Spitzer is the study of exoplanets, which hadnt even been discovered when the Spitzer Telescope was first conceived. Spitzers high sensitivity and ability to observe exoplanets over many orbits has made it a powerhouse for learning about the temperatures, atmospheres, and orbits of exoplanets. The list of examples that Fazio provided included the first global temperature map of an exoplanet (HD 189733b), the detection of the closest transiting exoplanet (HD 219134b), and the measurement of thermal emission from a super-Earth (55 Cnc e). Spitzers large distance from the Earth (specifically, the ground-based telescopes on Earth) even allowed astronomers to observe an exoplanet via gravitational microlensing using a special technique called space-based parallax.Spitzer has also been extremely useful for observing everything from Solar System scales (such as the enormous infrared dust ring around Saturn) to galactic structures. Comparing images of galaxies observed at visible wavelengths with Spitzer images of the same galaxies at infrared wavelengths has allowed us to probe the structure and composition of galaxies at a new level.Astronomers have also used Spitzer to explore the evolution of stars. Thanks to its infrared detectors, Spitzer can look through large clouds of dust that are opaque at visible wavelengths, and observe young stellar objects in their birth environments. Cosmologists can use Spitzer to study the early universe and the formation of galaxies over twelve billion years ago. Fazio used all of these examples and more to demonstrate that Spitzer has truly changed our understanding of the universe.Climate Change for Astronomers (Meredith Rawls)Every astronomer at #aas227 wants to learn about climate change! WOW this room is ridiculously full. pic.twitter.com/ud9an0gLJG Meredith Rawls (@merrdiff) January 7, 2016The second half of the session was a presentation by Doug Duncan featuring an activity from his 101-level college course. He uses climate change as a way to teach critical thinking and scientific reasoning. Members of the audience were walked through an exercise that included interpreting plots of changing surface temperatures, think-pair-share style clicker questions, and comparing excerpts from scientific articles and the media. Eventually, students discover that the Earths overall temperature is going up, but observations can vary from year to year because heat is moving between the atmosphere and the oceans.Press Conference: Fermis Vision, First Stars, Massive Galaxy Cluster, and Dark Energy (by Susanna Kohler)Todays afternoon press conference was an exciting assortment of results, difficult to categorize under a single umbrella.First up was Marco Ajello (Clemson University), who spoke about 2FHL, the second Fermi-LAT catalog of high-energy sources. LAT stands for Large Area Telescope, an instrument on board the Fermi gamma-ray space observatory that scans the entire sky every three hours. Ajello described the contents of the 2FHL catalog: 360 gamma-ray sources, of which 75% are blazars (distant galactic nuclei with jets pointed toward us), 11% are sources within the galaxy, and the remaining 14% are unknown. With this catalog, Fermi has expanded into higher energies than ever before, providing the first map of the 50 GeV 2 TeV sky. Heres the press release.OMeara: Im a lowly spectroscopist so I dont have fun pictures to show you, just squiggly lines. #aas227 astrobites (@astrobites) January 7, 2016Next to speak, John OMeara (St. Michaels College) told us about the discovery of a gas cloud that may be a remnant from the first population of stars. OMeara showed us the emission spectrum from a distant quasar, which displays abrupt absorption by a cloud of gas located at a redshift of z~3.5. Absorption by gas clouds is not unusual but what is unusual is that this cloud is extremely metal-poor, with only 1/2500th solar metallicity. This is the lowest heavy-element content ever measured, and a sign that the cloud might have been enriched by Population III stars the theoretical first population of stars, which were born when gas in the universe was still pristine. Heres the press release.Cluster IDCS J1426.5+3508. [NASA, European Space Agency, University of Florida, University of Missouri, and University of California]Mark Brodwin (University of Missouri, Kansas City) was up next, discussing the most distant massive galaxy cluster that has ever been discovered. The cluster IDCS J1426.5+3508, weighing in at several trillion solar masses (as measured by three independent techniques!), is located at a redshift of z=1.75. Since clusters take several billion years to form, and its redshift corresponds to a time when the universe was only 3.8 billion years old, were probably seeing it at a very early age. This combination of mass and youth is unique! Brodwin also pointed out another interesting feature: the clusters core isnt centered, which means it probably underwent a major merger with another cluster within the last 500 million years. Heres the press release.The final speaker was Sukanya Chakrabarti (Rochester Institute of Technology), who gave a very interesting talk about a topic Id never heard of: galactoseismology. Galactoseismology involves observing waves in the disk of a galaxy to learn about the properties of dwarf galaxies that caused the perturbations. In this case, Chakrabarti evaluated ripples in the outer disk of our galaxy, and used these to predict the location of a dwarf galaxy that must have skimmed the outskirts of our galaxy a few hundred million years ago, causing the waves. This is a cool technique for learning about dwarf galaxies whether or not theyre visible, since theyll cause ripples even if theyre dominated by dark matter. Chakrabarti showed an awesome simulation of this dwarfs interaction with the Milky Way, which you can check out on her website. Heres the press release.

  1. Development of uridine diphosphate-glucuronyltransferase activity in cultures of chick-embryo liver

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Vivian; Dutton, G. J.; Nemeth, A. M.

    1967-01-01

    1. The liver of the domestric fowl (Gallus gallus) remains capable of conjugating o-aminophenol with glucuronic acid after 8 days' culture. The pathway of o-aminophenyl glucuronide formation in cultured liver, as in fresh tissue, includes the enzyme UDP-glucuronyltransferase. 2. UDP-glucuronyltransferase activity in chick-embryo liver increases on culture from very low to adult values within 6–8 days. 3. The development of UDP-glucuronyltransferase activity in cultured chick-embryo liver requires certain serum factors in the medium. The requirements change with embryo age. Liver from embryos younger than 15 days develops enzyme activity equally well in media containing either foetal or adult serum; liver from embryos older than 16 days develops activity only with adult serum. The development of enzyme activity in liver from the older embryos appears to be stimulated by diffusible factors in adult serum and inhibited by diffusible factors in foetal serum. It is suggested that the stimulation and inhibition of enzyme formation by small, diffusible molecules may be part of the mechanism regulating UDP-glucuronyltransferase activity in vivo. 4. Liver from 19-day-old chick embryos cultured with foetal serum begins to develop UDP-glucuronyltransferase activity if transferred to an adult-serum medium. Its capacity to develop UDP-glucuronyltransferase activity in adult serum survives in a foetal-serum medium for at least 5 days, the longest period tested. 5. The activity of UDP-glucuronyltransferase reached in 19-day chick-embryo liver after 1 or 2 days with adult serum is maintained without further increase after transfer to a foetal-serum medium. After 3 days with adult serum UDP-glucuronyltransferase activity continues to increase when the tissue is transferred to a foetal-serum medium. Thus liver from 19-day-old embryos requires 3 days with adult serum before development of enzyme activity becomes independent of a continuous adult-serum environment. PMID:6049938

  2. A critical period for functional vestibular development in zebrafish

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moorman, Stephen J.; Cordova, Rodolfo; Davies, Sarah A.

    2002-01-01

    We have determined a critical period for vestibular development in zebrafish by using a bioreactor designed by NASA to simulate microgravity for cells in culture. A critical period is defined as the briefest period of time during development when stimulus deprivation results in long lasting or permanent sensory deficits. Zebrafish eggs were collected within 3 hours of being laid and fertilized. In experiment 1, eggs were placed in the bioreactor at 3, 24, 30, 36, 48, or 72 hours postfertilization (hPF) and maintained in the bioreactor until 96 hPF. In experiment 2, eggs were placed in the bioreactor immediately after they were collected and maintained in the bioreactor until 24, 36, 48, 60, 66, 72, or 96 hPF. Beginning at 96 hPF, all larvae had their vestibulo-ocular reflexes (VOR) evaluated once each day for 5 days. Only larvae that hatched from eggs that were placed in the bioreactor before 30 hPF in experiment 1 or removed from the bioreactor later than 66 hPF in experiment 2 had VOR deficits that persisted for at least 5 days. These data suggest a critical period for vestibular development in the zebrafish that begins before 30 hPF and ends after 66 hPF. To confirm this, zebrafish eggs were placed in the bioreactor at 24 hPF and removed at 72 hPF. VORs were evaluated in these larvae once each day for 5 days beginning at 96 hPF. These larvae had VOR deficits that persisted for at least 5 days. In addition, larvae that had been maintained in the bioreactor from 24 to 66 hPF or from 30 to 72 hPF, had only temporary VOR deficits. In a final experiment, zebrafish eggs were placed in the bioreactor at 3 hPF and removed at 96 hPF but the bioreactor was turned off from 24 hPF to 72 hPF. These larvae had normal VORs when they were removed from the bioreactor at 96 hPF. Taken as a whole, these data support the idea that there is a critical period for functional maturation of the zebrafish vestibular system. The developmental period identified includes the timeframe during which the vestibular primary afferent neurons are born, innervate their central and peripheral targets, and remodel their central projections. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. AAS 227: Day 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. Along with several fellow authors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Welcome to Day 2 of the winter American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting in Kissimmee! Several of us are attending the conference this year, and we will report highlights from each day here on astrobites. If youd like to see more timely updates during the day, we encourage you to follow @astrobites on twitter or search the #aas227 hashtag.Plenary Session: Black Hole Physics with the Event Horizon Telescope (by Susanna Kohler)If anyone needed motivation to wake up early this morning, they got it in the form of Feryal Ozel (University of Arizona) enthralling us all with exciting pictures, videos, and words about black holes and the Event Horizon Telescope. Ozel spoke to a packed room (at 8:30am!) about where the project currently stands, and where its heading in the future.The EHT has pretty much the coolest goal ever: actually image the event horizons of black holes in our universe. The problem is that the largest black hole we can look at (Sgr A*, in the center of our galaxy) has an event horizon size of 50 as. For this kind of resolution roughly equivalent to trying to image a DVD on the Moon! wed need an Earth-sized telescope. EHT has solved this problem by linking telescopes around the world, creating one giant, mm-wavelength effective telescope with a baseline the size of Earth.Besides producing awesome images, the EHT will be able to test properties of black-hole spacetime, the no-hair theorem, and general relativity (GR) in new regimes.Ozel walked us through some of the theory prep work we need to do now in order to get the most science out of the EHT, including devising new tests of GR, and performing predictive GRMHD simulations hydrodynamics simulations that include magnetic fields and full GR treatment. Ozel pointed out that one of the recent theoretical advancements in GRMHD simulations is harnessing the power of GPUs to render images in simulations; check out the tweet below for the awesome video she showed us!Watch C. Chan manipulate black hole simulation with hand motions https://t.co/O5BgaltYAu (more on the code: https://t.co/9GC46ReMGs) #aas227 Sarah Scoles (@ScolesSarah) January 6, 2016Deployment of the full EHT array is planned for early 2017, and theyve already got 10 targets selected black holes that are near enough and large enough that the EHT should be able to image their shadows. I, for one, cant wait to see the first results!Grad School and Postdocs as a Means to a Job (by Meredith Rawls)This morning session was presented by Karen Kelsky of The Professor Is In. She presented a very practical overview of the advice in her book (which this job-searching Astrobiter highly recommends). Her target audience is postdocs and graduate students who are finishing their PhDs and applying for tenure-track jobs. Karens background is in the social sciences, but she has worked with many scientists and her expertise easily transferred. Much of her writing advice also applies for undergraduates who are writing research statements and proposals to apply to graduate school. For example:What not to do, with @ProfessorIsIn #aas227 pic.twitter.com/afGAsSuPwN Meredith Rawls (@merrdiff) January 6, 2016One of Karens main takeaways is that academia is not automatically good preparation for a job search. Writing documents like cover letters, resumes, and research statements will be harder and take more time than you think, and it is important to make them top-notch. Karen was also surprised that the majority of professional astronomers at the AAS meeting carry backpacks, because she typically advises against bringing a backpack to a job interview or campus visit. She conceded that astronomy is an exception to this rule!Brown Dwarfs and Exoplanets (by Caroline Morley)I started my morning in a session near and dear to my heart on brown dwarfs. The session had four dissertation talks, showcasing each students (impressive!) work over the last 4+ years.Astrobites alumnus Ben Montet kicked off the session to talk about his recent work to study the eclipsing brown dwarf LHS 6343, discovered in Kepler data. This brown dwarf is one of the best so-called benchmark brown dwarfs that we have discovered. Unlike almost every other object, we can measure LHS 6343s mass, radius, luminosity, and metallicity. Bens Spitzer observations reveal that its a ~1100 K T dwarf.Joe Filippazzo spoke next about his work to put together a large and impressive database of 300 brown dwarfs ranging in spectral type from M to Y, stitching together literature photometry, parallaxes, and both low and high resolution spectra. He studies the effect of age on the fundamental properties of these objects, empirically without needing models! You can download the database at BDNYC.org and use Joes open-source Python package astrokit which includes the SQL management tools to use the database.Jonathan Gagn presented results from his survey to find young free-floating objects in young moving groups. These objects are really interesting because they have the masses of planets but are easier to observe since they dont have nearby stars. He is currently extending his survey from his PhD thesis to be able to find even cooler objects (literally and figuratively) in these groups.Sebastian Pineda gave a very interesting talk about his thesis work to understand auroral emission from brown dwarfs. Brown dwarfs with a range of temperatures have been observed to have both radio activity and H-alpha emission, despite their neutral atmospheres. These properties are believed to be generated by auroral emission just like aurorae on Jupiter! One of many interesting results is that cooler objects have rare and weak aurorae. Sebastian postulates that these brown dwarfs may have aurorae that are modulated by the presence of satellites (brown dwarf moons?!). Very cool idea that needs more study!The last speaker of the session was the only non-dissertation talk of the session. Nolan Grieves presented results from his statistical survey of brown dwarf companions using the MARVELS radial velocity survey and finds a brown dwarf companion occurrence rate around 0.7%.Science to Action: Thoughts on Convincing a Skeptical Public (by Meredith Rawls)This years Public Policy plenary talk was delivered by William Press from UT Austin. Many scientific stories follow a familiar narrative, and too often, scientific consensus about a hazard has been accepted by the public only after some catalyzing event like a catastrophic fire or a spike in deaths linked to smoking. Press suggested that climate change may be at the tipping point of mainstream acceptance. He also discussed how a definition of science can encompass two distinct ideas: a series of fact-based conclusions and a value judgment based on rational thinking. To illustrate this dichotomy, he posed a question to the audience:Debate about science vs about values. Speaker forced a vote by raise of hand; split 50/50 in big room. Wow. #aas227 pic.twitter.com/rdvqUuuR95 Meredith Rawls (@merrdiff) January 6, 2016Press stated that he strongly supports the top view, but it was eye-opening to see a nearly even split of raised hands. His point was that GMO labeling ultimately boils down to a value judgement, not a scientific one, and we should be careful to understand the difference. Science communicators certainly have our work cut out for us! In the broadest sense, Press takeaway for effective science communication is a two-step approach: (1) communicate the value of a rationalist approach to decision making, and (2) communicate well-established scientific results.AAS Journals Workshop for Authors RefereesFirst half (by Susanna Kohler)Disclaimer: Im an employee of the AAS, as editor of AAS Nova.This 2-hour-long author referee workshop was intended partially as an overview of what it means to be an author or a referee (in any journal), and partly as a reveal of some of the new features that are now being implemented within the AAS publishing program. Many of the presentations have been uploaded here. A few highlights from the first half:Talks about authoring articles by Ethan Vishniac, and refereeing articles by Butler BurtonIntro to AAS Nova the AASs means of sharing its authors results with the broader community by me!Discussion of the AASs new policy for software citation by Chris LintottSecond half (by Becky Nevin)In between hopping between all the amazing science sessions today I made it to the last half of a very interesting Author Referee Workshop run by AAS journals. Even with missing the first half, I can still tell that theres a lot of changes coming to AAS journals (which include ApJ, AJ, ApJS, ApJL), in particular in the way that your research will be published. All good from what I saw in particular theyve addressed the long-standing problem of how to cite astronomical software (usually produced for free by a keen member of the community). Now they give guidelines for how to do this and have even appointed a new lead editor for instrumentation software.What got me most excited though was the demonstration by Greg Schwarz of AASTex v6.0 a markup package to assist authors in preparing manuscripts intended for submission to AAS-affiliated journals i.e. super cool amazing new LaTeX commands to satisfy even the most obsessive LaTeX-er! Check it out, because it will definitely ease the pain of writing and responding to referees. In the final talk (before free lunch, score!) Gus Muench showcased the new ways that authors will be able to include interactive JavaScript figures into articles in AAS journals. You can check out some of the amazing integrations in this nifty tutorial.A Report on the Inclusive Astronomy 2015 Meeting: Community Recommendations for Diversity and Inclusion in AstronomyThis very well-attended session recapped the Inclusive Astronomy 2015 meeting (see this link for a summary!)The IA2015 meeting results can be found here.A draft of the recommendations from IA2015 is here. Note that this document, termed the Nashville Recommendations, is a living document that isnt yet finalized, and feedback is welcome.Dannie Heineman Prize: From ~ to Precision Science: Cosmology from 1995 to 2025 (by Erika Nesvold)Marc Kamionkowski of Johns Hopkins University and David Spergel of Princeton University shared this years Heineman Prize for outstanding work in astronomy, and gave an impressive tag-team overview of the progress in the field of cosmology over the past 20 years.Spergel pointed out that in 1995, cosmologists were still debating over the value of the Hubble constant, and whether or not the universe is flat. Kamionkowski pointed out that back then, cosmology was an order of magnitude game where observations lagged far behind theory. He noted that in general, theorists tend to sit around predicting things, and not much progress is made in testing those predictions, at least not within the lifetime of an individual theorist. In cosmology, however, the measurements and observations made since 1995 have been more successful and precise than anyone could have anticipated.This is thanks in part to the WMAP mission and later the Planck satellite, which measured the cosmic microwave background and collected an amazing set of data. There is excellent agreement between the data from WMAP and Planck, a triumph for observational cosmologists. Much to the surprise of Spergel and other cosmologists, a simple model of only five fundamental parameters fits these data extremely well. Twenty years later, thanks to the hard work of cosmologists, we now know that the age of the universe is 13.8 billion years, and that it is composed of roughly 4% atoms, 23% dark matter, and 73% dark energy.Spergel and Kamionkowski then pointed towards the future, predicting even more spectacular results to come over the next decade or so. Our current model of the universe predicts gravitational waves, which we havent observed so far, but the search is heating up. Kamionkowski called this potentially the most important new physics result of this century! He also explained that we can now do neutrino physics using the cosmic microwave background, which already provides the strongest constraint on the sum of neutrinon masses. In the next decade, we should be able to further determine the neutrino mass hierarchy. The coming years in cosmology could be even more exciting than the past twenty!HEAD Rossi Prize talk: A New View of the High Energy Universe with NuSTAR (by Susanna Kohler)This years Rossi Prize winner Fiona Harrison capped off the main part of the day with a plenary talk about some of the highlights from the first two years of the NuSTAR mission, NASAs space-based, high-energy X-ray telescope.Additional science results from the past two years with NuSTAR.Harrison began by telling us about NuSTARs launch in 2012, in which a Pegasus rocket with NuSTAR as its payload was launched from a L-1011 Stargazer aircraft. She claims to have been unconcerned about this part: The payload would go up or it would go down, there wasnt anything I could do about it. The real terror for the NuSTAR team came 9 days later when the telescope slowly unfolded itself over the span of 24 minutes, snapping components into place. All went well, however, and NuSTAR has since been forging exciting new territory in the high-energy X-ray regime!Harrison discussed science highlights from the last two years of NuSTAR, like the discovery of a population of dead stars in the inner parsecs of the galaxy, the identification of the mechanism that most likely re-energizes stalled shocks in supernovae and launches the explosion (in case youre keeping track, its because the star sloshes around. Seriously.), or the evidence that supernova 1987A exploded asymmetrically.NuSTAR is funded through the end of 2016 and is now in its extended mission, so we can expect to see more exciting science coming from it in the future!

  4. The effect of ajmalicine spiking and resin addition timing on the production of indole alkaloids from Catharanthus roseus cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Lee-Parsons, Carolyn W T; Shuler, Michael L

    2002-08-20

    The potential for the feedback inhibition of indole alkaloid synthesis was investigated by spiking suspension cultures of Catharanthus roseus with 0, 9, or 18 mg/L ajmalicine on day 0. The production of ajmalicine, catharanthine, and serpentine were inhibited in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibition was transient as the exogenous ajmalicine was ultimately either metabolized in the medium or within the cell. The addition of neutral resin has previously been shown to enhance ajmalicine production. To minimize product inhibition and product metabolism, Amberlite XAD-7 resin was added to immobilized cultures of C. roseus starting on either day 0, 5, or 15, and fresh resin was exchanged for spent resin every 5 days. The addition of resin did not decrease the viability of the culture. Growth was reduced only in cultures with resin added on day 0. Alkaloid production was enhanced to different extents by the timing of resin addition, suggesting that feedback inhibition or product metabolism was present throughout the culture period. Ajmalicine recovery was nearly 100% when the resin was added initially either on day 0 or day 5. Ajmalicine recovery was reduced to 55% when the resin was added later in the culture period starting on day 15, presumably because of resin saturation or the inaccessibility of alkaloids trapped in the vacuole. Delaying the addition of XAD-7 resin until 5 days after the start of the culture resulted in the highest improvement in ajmalicine production, i.e approximately 70% and also resulted in the complete recovery of ajmalicine from the cell. PMID:12115404

  5. [Day Care in Canada - 1982.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of National Health and Welfare, Ottawa (Ontario). National Day Care Information Center.

    The three reports collected in this document focus on day care in the Canadian provinces, specifically addressing: (1) "Provincial Funding of Day Care Services"; (2) "Day Care Spaces in Canada - 1982"; and (3) "Provincial Day Care Requirements." The first report provides summary outlines of the mechanisms used by each province or territory to

  6. Family Day Care Training Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakatsu, Gail

    California's Family Day Care Training Program was designed to recruit and train in 7 weeks, Lao, Vietnamese, and Chinese refugees to establish their own state-licensed, family day care homes. Topics in the program's curriculum include an introduction to family day care, state licenses for family day care, state licensing requirements for family…

  7. Decrease in free cystine content of cultured cystinotic fibroblasts by ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Kroll, W A; Schneider, J A

    1974-12-13

    The 100-fold increase in free cystine content characteristic of cultured skin fibroblasts from patients with nephropathic cystinosis was decreased more than 50 percent by addition of L-ascorbic acid to the culture medium at concentrations of 0.29 to 2.9 millimolar. Fresh ascorbic acid must be added to the culture medium daily to produce a progressive decrease of the free cystine content of the cells over a 3-day period. Upon removal of ascorbic acid from the medium, the free cystine content returns to its initial value. PMID:4469696

  8. Post-translational control of collagen fibrillogenesis in mineralizing cultures of chick osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerstenfeld, L. C.; Riva, A.; Hodgens, K.; Eyre, D. R.; Landis, W. J.

    1993-01-01

    Cultured osteoblasts from chick embryo calvaria were used as a model system to investigate the post-translational extracellular mechanisms controlling the macroassembly of collagen fibrils. The results of these studies demonstrated that cultured osteoblasts secreted a collagenous extracellular matrix that assembled and mineralized in a defined temporal and spatial sequence. The assembly of collagen occurred in a polarized fashion, such that successive orthogonal arrays of fibrils formed between successive cell layers proceeding from the culture surface toward the media. Mineralization followed in the same manner, being observed first in the deepest and oldest fibril layers. Collagen fibrillogenesis, the kinetics of cross-link formation, and collagen stability in the extracellular matrix of the cultures were examined over a 30 day culture period. Between days 8 and 12 in culture, collagen fibril diameters increased from < 30 nm to an average of 30-45 nm. Thereafter, diameters ranged in size from 20 to 200 nm. Quantitation of the collagen cross-linking residues, hydroxylysyl pyridinoline (HP) and lysyl pyridinoline (LP), showed that these mature cross-links increased from undetectable levels to concentrations found in normal chick bone. Analysis of the kinetics of their formation by pulse-chase labeling the cultures with [3H]lysine showed a doubling time of approximately 5 days. The relationships between cross-link formation, fibrillogenesis, and collagen stability were examined in cultures treated with beta-aminopropionitrile (beta-APN), a potent inhibitor of lysyl oxidase and cross-link formation. In beta-APN-treated cultures, total collagen synthesis was increased twofold, with no change in mRNA levels for type I collagen, whereas the amount of collagen accumulated in the cell layer was decreased by 50% and mineral deposition was reduced. The rate of collagen retention in the matrix was assessed by pulse-chase analysis of [3H]proline over a 16 day period in control and beta-APN-treated cultures. In control cultures, about 20% of the labeled collagen was lost from the cell layers over a 16 day period compared with > 80% in the presence of beta-APN. The beta-APN-treated cultures also showed a wider diversity of fibril diameters with a median in the > 45-60 nm range. In summary, these data suggest that cross-linking and assembly of collagen fibrils secreted by osteoblasts in vitro occur in a fashion similar to that found in vivo. The rate of cross-link formation is relatively constant and may be correlated with increasing collagen mass.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS).

  9. A Rotating Bioreactor for Scalable Culture and Differentiation of Respiratory Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Raredon, Micha Sam Brickman; Ghaedi, Mahboobe; Calle, Elizabeth A.; Niklason, Laura E.

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory epithelium is difficult to grow in vitro, as it requires a well-maintained polarizing air–liquid interface (ALI) to maintain differentiation. Traditional methods rely on permeable membrane culture inserts, which are difficult to work with and are ill-suited for the production of large numbers of cells, such as the quantities required for cell-based clinical therapies. Herein, we investigate an alternative form of culture in which the cells are placed on a porous substrate that is continuously rolled, such that the monolayer of cells is alternately submerged in media or apically exposed to air. Our prototype bioreactor is reliable for up to 21 days of continuous culture and is designed for scale-up for large-scale cell culture with continuous medium and gas exchange. Normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells were cultured on an absorbent substrate in the reactor for periods of 7, 14, and 21 days and were compared to static controls that were submerged in media. Quantification by immunohistochemistry and quantitative PCR of markers specific to differentiated respiratory epithelium indicated increased cilia, mucous production, and tight junction formation in the rolled cultures, compared to static. Together with scanning electron microscopy and paraffin histology, the data indicate that the intermittent ALI provided by the rolling bioreactor promotes a polarized epithelial phenotype over a period of 21 days. PMID:26858899

  10. Periods found in heat measurements obtained by calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, K.C.

    1984-02-28

    During a span of 640 days, a periodicity of 1.5158 +- 0.0008 days was discovered in successive heater equilibria on Calorimeter No. 127. Measurements were taken at 12-h intervals, with occasional changes of exactly 3 or 6 h in the schedule of measurements. This schedule eliminated all other possible periods except a period of 0.150156 days. Periods of 1.519125 and 1.511283 days were discovered in data on the excess length of day as obtained by the US Naval Observatory over a period of 24 y. These two periods could equally well represent periods of 0.150189 and 0.150112 days, since measurements were obtained only once every 24 h. It is suggested that periods observed in sensitive calorimeters and in length of day data may be related. 1 reference, 6 figures, 5 tables.

  11. Effect of Fenton reagent shock and recovery periods on anaerobic microbial community structure and degradation of chlorinated aliphatics.

    PubMed

    Jho, Eun Hea; Shin, Doyun; Turner, Susan J; Singhal, Naresh

    2014-04-01

    This study investigates the effect of Fenton reagent on the structure and function of a microbial consortium during the anaerobic degradation of hexachloroethane (HCA) and tetrachloroethene (PCE). Anaerobic biodegradation tests of HCA and PCE were performed in batch reactors using an anaerobic microbial consortium that had been exposed to Fenton reagent for durations of 0, 0.04, and 2days and then allowed to recover for periods of 0, 3, and 7days. The bacterial community structure was determined using culture-independent methods of 16S rRNA gene sequencing and automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis. Larger recovery periods partially restored the microbial community structure; however, the recovery periods did not restore the loss of ability to degrade HCA and PCE in cultures shocked for 0.04days, and PCE in cultures shocked for 2days. Overall the exposure to Fenton reagent had an impact on bacterial community structure with downstream effects on HCA and PCE degradation. This study highlights that the impacts of short- and long-term shocks on microbial community structure and function can be correlated usinga combination of biodegradation tests and community structure analysis tools. PMID:23942782

  12. AAS 227: Day 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. Along with several fellow authors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. Follow along here or at astrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the @astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Things kicked off last night at our undergraduate reception booth. Thanks to all of you who stopped by we were delightedto have so many people tell us that they already know about and useastrobites, and we were excited to introduce a new cohort of students at AAS to astrobites for the first time.Tuesday morning was the official start of the meeting. Here are just a few of the talks and workshops astrobiters attended today.Opening Address (by Becky Smethurst)The President of the AAS, aka our fearless leader Meg Urry kicked off the meeting this morning at the purely coffee powered hour of 8am this morning. She spoke about the importance of young astronomers at the meeting (heres looking at you reader!) and also the importance of the new Working Group for Accessibility and Disabilities (aka WGAD pronounced like wicked) at the AAS. The Society has made extra effort this year to make the conference accessible to all,a message which was very well received by everyone in attendance.Kavli Lecture: New Horizons Alan Stern (by Becky Smethurst)We were definitely spoilt with the first Plenary lecture at this years conference Alan Stern gave us a a review of the New Horizons mission of the Pluto Fly By (astrobites covered the mission back in July with this post). We were treated to beautiful images, wonderful results and a foray into geology.Before (Hubble) and after #NewHorizons. #thatisall #science #astro alanstern #aas227 pic.twitter.com/kkMt6RsSIR Science News (@topsciencething) January 5, 2016Some awesome facts from the lecture that blew my mind:New Horizons is now 2AU (!) beyond PlutoThe mission was featured on the front pages of 450 newspapers worldwide on every single continent (including Antartica!)New Horizons reached the Moon in9 HOURSafter launch (compared to the ~3 days it took the Apollo missions)The mission controllers were aiming for a 100km window of space all the way from EarthThere was a window of ~400seconds which the probe had to arrive within the probe arrived90 seconds early! Putting tardy astronomers everywhere to shame.Charon was the only satellite of Pluto known at the time of the mission proposalThe canyon found on Charon is not only bigger than the Grand Canyon but bigger than Mariner Valley on Mars which is already4000 km (2500 mi) long and reaches depths of up to 7 km (4 mi)!Charons surface. Tectonic feature runs about 1500 km, around 10 km deep. Eat it, Mars. #aas227 pic.twitter.com/blewwJaXEn Danny Barringer (@HeavyFe_H) January 5, 2016The mountains ringing the Sputnik Planum (aka the heart of Pluto) are over 4km high and are snow capped with methane icePlutos mountain ranges. Means surface nitrogen layer is thin, probably water ice according to @AlanStern. #aas227 pic.twitter.com/0yyHZvpBOE Danny Barringer (@HeavyFe_H) January 5, 2016Plutos atmosphere has a dozendistincthaze layers but how they arecreated is a mystery#aas227 hazes on Pluto wow pic.twitter.com/VPx99ZhPj1 Lisa StorrieLombardi (@lisajsl) January 5, 2016Alan also spoke about the future of New Horizons there is a new mission proposal for a fly by of a Kuiper Belt object 2014MU69 in Jan 2019 which should give us a better understanding of this icy frontier at the edge ofthe Solar System. As a parting gift Alan playedthemost gorgeously detailed fly over video of Plutos surface that had all in the room melting into their flip flops. Its safe to say that the whole room is now Pluto-curious and wondering whether a change of discipline is in order!Press Conference: Black Holes and Exoplanets (by Susanna Kohler)This morning marked the first press conference of the meeting, covering some hot topics in black holes and exoplanets.Hubble (background) and Chandra (purple) image of SDSS J1126+2944. The arrow marks the second black hole. (From http://casa.colorado.edu/~comerford/press)The first speaker was Julie Comerford (University of Colorado Boulder), who told us about SDSS J1126+2944, a galaxy that was shown by Chandra X-ray detections to contain not just one, but two supermassive black holes. This is a sign of a recent merger between two galaxies, which can result in one new, larger galaxy with two nuclei for a while. The second black hole is surrounded by only a small sphere of stars. This may be because the rest have been stripped away in the process of the merger but its also possible that the second black hole is an elusive intermediate mass black hole of only 100-1,000,000 solar masses! Heres the press release.The second speaker was Eric Schlegel (University of Texas, San Antonio), who spoke about the galaxy NGC 5195. Eric discussed an interesting problem: we know that star formation ends in galaxies after a time, but the gas must be cleared out of the galaxy for the star formation to halt. What process does this? Schlegels collaboration found evidence in NGC 5195 for a burping supermassive black hole the shock from the black holes outflow sweeps up the hydrogen gas and blows it out of the galactic center. Heres the press release.NuSTAR image of Andromeda, inset on a UV image by NASAs Galaxy Evolution Explorer. Click for a better look! [NASA/JPL-Caltech/GSFC]Next up was Daniel Wik (NASA/Goddard SFC), who discussed recent high-energy X-ray observations of Andromeda galaxy with NASAs NuSTAR. As Wik described it, NuSTAR is like a CSI detective, working to identify what fraction of the compact remnants in X-ray binaries of Andromeda are neutron stars, and what fraction are black holes. Since X-ray binaries play a crucial role in heating gas in protogalaxies, shaping galaxy formation, its important that we learn more about this population and how it evolves over time. Heres the press release.The final speaker was grad studentSamuel Grunblatt (University of Hawaii Institute for Astronomy), who spoke about measuring the mass of exoplanets around active stars. In radial velocity studies of exoplanets, a planet orbiting its star causes the star to wobble. This signal for an Earth-like planet is as tiny as 9 cm/s! Unfortunately, activity of the star can cause radial velocity noise of 1-10 m/s so to detect Earth-like planets, we need to find a way of subtracting off the noise. Grunblatt talked about an intriguing new method for determining planet masses that controls for the signature of their hosts activity. Heres his paper.Annie Jump Cannon Award Lecture: On the Dynamics of Planets, Stars and Black Holes (by Erika Nesvold)This year, the Annie Jump Cannon Award was given to Smadar Naoz, an assistant professor at UCLA. The Cannon Award is given every year to a young (less than 5 years since PhD), female astronomer for outstanding work in her field. Traditionally, the Cannon Award recipient delivers a lecture on her research, so this year we were lucky to see a dynamic and engaging talk by Smadar Naoz about her research in dynamical theory.You may have heard the common career advice that you should focus on becoming the expert on one particular facet of astronomy: a particular type of object, an observational technique, a type of instrument, etc. Naoz has managed to follow that advice while still managing to study a huge range of astronomical topics, from exoplanets to cosmology. She studies hierarchical triples, systems of three gravitational bodies in which two of the bodies orbit one another very closely, while the third orbits the other two from a much greater distance. For example, a planet in a tight orbit around a star, with a brown dwarf orbiting hundreds of AU away, make up a hierarchical triple system. So does a system in which two black holes orbit each other closely, with a third black hole orbiting farther away. The physics of these systems are all the same, so by studying the equations that govern a hierarchical triple system, Naoz can study a huge variety of astronomical objects.In particular, Naoz studies a mechanism called the Kozai-Lidov mechanism, named after the two researchers who discovered it independently. If the outer body in a hierarchical triple orbits at a high enough inclination to the inner body ( 40 degrees), the Kozai-Lidov mechanism will excite the inclination and eccentricity of the inner body. In fact, the inclination and eccentricity will oscillate opposite one another: as the inclination increases, the eccentricity will decrease, and vice versa. In the course of her research, Naoz discovered a flaw in Kozais original derivations of this mechanism, and derived a more accurate, general set of equations describing the Kozai-Lidov mechanism. These new equations indicate that the eccentricity of the inner object can become extremely high, and that the inclination can become so high that the objects orbit can flip from prograde to retrograde! In other words, the object can start orbiting in the opposite direction around the central body.Wondering how Naoz found the error in Kozai? I happen to know she rederives all the equations in every paper she reads. Wow. #aas227 Erika Nesvold (@erikanesvold) January 5, 2016This work has applications in many different types of systems. For example, over the past decade, observers have discovered a large number of retrograde hot Jupiters, gas giant planets orbiting very close to their star, in the opposite direction from the stars spin. Naoz showed that the new, correct Kozai-Lidov mechanism can explain the orbits of these exoplanets, because it increases the planets eccentricity until its orbit approaches very close to the star, and it flips the inclination into a retrograde orbit. Naoz: A puzzle: how to explain retrograde planets? Kozai mechanism can do that! #aas227 Peter Edmonds (@PeterDEdmonds) January 5, 2016Naoz also showed applications of the Kozai-Lidov mechanisms to dark matter halos around black holes, triple black hole systems, and so-called blue stragglers: main-sequence stars in clusters that are brighter and bluer than they should be. Her body of work is an excellent example of how theorists can adapt general physics theories to a wonderful variety of astronomical problems.holy styrofoam planets batman naoz just explained everything. #aas227 August Muench (@augustmuench) January 5, 2016Harassment in the Astronomical Sciences Town Hall(by Caroline Morley)The Town Hall on Harassment in the Astronomical Sciences involved a sobering panel discussion on the current state on workplace climate in astronomy and the current steps that the AAS and federal agencies are taking to improve it. Christina Richey kicked it off by presenting preliminary results from the CSWA Survey on workplace climate. This survey involved 426 participants, and reveals that many people, especially junior members of the field, experience harassment including both verbal and physical harassment. These results will be published this year. Next up, Dara Norman, a Councilor of the AAS and a member of the AAS Ethics Task Force, spoke about the proposed changes to the current AAS Ethics Statement. These changes will focus on corrective policies to improve the state of the field; they will solicit community feedback this Spring and vote on the changes at the Summer AAS meeting. Last, Jim Ulvestad, representing the federal agencies including NSF, NASA, and the DOE, spoke about the current policies for reporting to federal funding agencies. He reminds us that if an institution accepts money from the federal government, they are required by law to follow laws such as Title VI (covering racial harassment) and Title IX (covering sexual harassment), and that breaches can be reported to the funding agency.Tools and Tips for Better Software (aka Pain Reduction for Code Authors)(by Caroline Morley)This afternoon breakout session included a drinking-from-the-firehose set of short talks that covered everything from source-code management and software testing to building communities that create sustainable code. First, Kenza Arraki discussed software such as Git to do version control to keep track of code changes. (Version Control is my (science) New Years Resolution, so I was happy to learn that there is aCodeAcademy tutorial for Git!). Next up, AdrianPrice-Whelan described the merits of software testing and suggests that we actually do Test-driven development where we write tests for the code first, then write code, run tests and debug until tests all pass. Erik Tollerud spoke on Why Document code and how you might convince yourself to do so (documenting code is another good science New Years Resolution!) The most important rule is to always document as you code because you wont ever go back! Bruce Berriman described the best practices for code release, including, importantly, licensing it and describing it well (with tutorials, examples). Matthew Turk reminded us the importance of building community around code development. Robert Nemiroff ended the talks with a discussion of what to do withdeadcodes. The lowest bar? Put it in your Dropbox and share it with your collaborators and students!For more info on all of these topics and more, consider attending a Software Carpentry workshop.

  13. Interest of co-cultures for embryos obtained by in-vitro fertilization: a French collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Guerin, J F; Nicollet, B

    1997-05-01

    Co-cultures of human embryos, particularly with Vero cells, are used by several French groups, mainly in cases of successive failures of implantation. In most cases co-culture is continued until the blastocyst stage, expanded if possible. A total of 1603 co-cultures have been performed by 11 groups over a 2-year period. Of these, 41.8% of cleaved eggs (day 2) reached the blastocyst stage at day 5 or day 6. The mean pregnancy rate and implantation rate per transfer were 32.9 and 24.8% respectively, which represented a significant improvement compared to the transfer of 2 day old embryos. The rate of multiple pregnancies remained high (29.1%), which implies that there should be transfer of not more than two blastocysts. The rate of anomalies perceived at birth or in utero was not different from the rate observed in the general population, taking account of the maternal age. PMID:9194663

  14. The effect of sodium salicylate on the rat embryo in culture: an in vitro model for the morphological assessment of teratogenicity.

    PubMed Central

    McGarrity, C; Samani, N; Beck, F; Gulamhusein, A

    1981-01-01

    The optimum teratogenic dose of subcutaneously administered sodium salicylate was determined in vivo at 9.5 days of gestation. Fetuses from rats injected with this dose at 9.5 days were examined at 11.5 days and its propensities for producing resorption as well as deformities noted. Next, maternal serum levels 3-3.5 hours and 18.5 hours after salicylate injection were determined. Having established the feasibility of determining an effect due to salicylate at 11.5 days, after injection at 9.5 days, the following experiments were performed in vitro in animals cultured between 9.5 and 11.5 days by the method of New et al. (1976a): (1) Sodium salicylate was added to the culture serum, at levels equivalent to those obtained 3-3.5 hours after maternal injection of the optimum teratogenic dose, for 24 of the 48 hours culture period. (2) Rats were cultured for the first 24 hours of the 48 hours culture period in serum taken from rats injected 3.5 hours previously with the optimum teratogenic dose. (3) Rats were cultured for 24 out of 48 hours in serum from animals which had been injected with the optimum teratogenic dose 18.5 hours before bleeding. (4) Rats were cultured for 24 out of 48 hours in serum containing salicylate added to make up levels normally associated with (3). (5) A control culture was performed. The experiment indicates great similarity between the results obtained from animals cultured in serum with salicylate added and results from culture in serum of salicylate treated rats. It appears therefore that sodium salicylate - acting directly on the feto-placental unit - is the active teratogen rather than any of its metabolites. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:7333953

  15. Long-Term continuous culture of hepatocytes in a packed-bed reactor utilizing porous resin.

    PubMed

    Miyoshi, H; Yanagi, K; Ohshima, N; Fukuda, H

    1994-03-25

    As part of our attempt to develop a hybrid artificial liver support system using cultured hepatocytes, we investigated the long-term metabolic function of hepatocytes incubated in a packed-bed type reactor using reticulated polyvinyl formal (PVF) resin as a supporting material. Long-term (up to 1 week) perfusion culture experiments using the packed-bed reactor (20 mm i.d.) loaded with 500 PVF resin cubes (mean pore size 250 mum, 2 x 2 x 2 mm), together with conventional monolayer culture experiments as controls, were performed in serum-free or serum-containing medium. Ammonium metabolism and urea synthesis activities were evaluated quantitatively based on reaction kinetic analyses. Initial rates of ammonium metabolism and urea-N synthesis, as well as GPT enzyme activities, were adopted as indexes of the metabolic performance of the reactor and activities of the cultured hepatocytes.When serum-free medium was used in the perfusion cultures, ammonium metabolic and urea-N synthetic rates showed significant decay with elapse of the culture period, being less than 10% of those measured on day 1. This loss of activity was more prominent in the perfusion culture than in the monolayer cultures using this medium. In contrast, when serum-containing medium was used, approximately 50% of these activities obtained on day 1 were maintained even at the end of the cultures both in the perfusion and monolayer culture experiments.We concluded that the packed-bed reactor using PVF resin enabled high-density culture of hepatocytes, and showed a satisfactory ability to maintain the metabolic function of immobilized hepatocytes for relatively long periods of up to 1 week. This type of reactor is thus considered to represent a breakthrough in overcoming the difficulties involved in the development of a hybridtype artificial liver support system. (c) 1994 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:18615763

  16. Optimization of adventitious root culture for production of biomass and secondary metabolites in Prunella vulgaris L.

    PubMed

    Fazal, Hina; Abbasi, Bilal Haider; Ahmad, Nisar

    2014-11-01

    Adventitious root cultures of Prunella vulgaris L. were established in shaking flask system for the production of biomass and secondary metabolites. Adventitious root cultures were induced from callus cultures obtained from leaf explants on solid Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium containing combination of 6-benzyladenine (BA; 1.0 mg l(-1)) and naphthalene acetic acid (NAA; 1.5 mg l(-1)). Thereafter, 0.49 g inoculum was transferred to liquid MS medium supplemented with different concentrations of NAA (0.5-2.0 mg l(-1)). Growth kinetics of adventitious roots was recorded with an interval of 7 days for 49 days period. Highest biomass accumulation (2.13 g/l) was observed in liquid medium containing 1.0 mg l(-1) NAA after 21 days of inoculation. However, other concentrations of NAA also showed similar accumulation pattern but the biomass gradually decreases after 49 days of inoculation. Adventitious roots were collected and dried for investigation of total phenolics (TP), total flavonoids (TF), and antioxidant activities. Higher TPC (0.995 GAE mg/g-DRB) and TFC (6.615 RE mg/g-DRB) were observed in 0.5 mg l(-1) NAA treated cultures. In contrast, higher antioxidant activity (83.53 %) was observed 1.5 mg l(-1) NAA treated cultures. These results are helpful in up scaling of root cultures into bioreactor for secondary metabolites production. PMID:25163888

  17. Optimal temperature control for a structured model of plant cell culture.

    PubMed

    Bailey, C M; Nicholson, H

    1990-02-01

    This article calculates optimal open-loop temperature trajectories that maximize the average rate of product synthesis of a plant cell culture. It uses a previously published five-state mathematical model which describes the growth and product synthesis of a batch plant cell suspension culture of Catharanthus roseus under temperature control. The optimal open-loop temperatures maximize the final product concentration for predefined fermentation periods. A single switch in temperature is shown by computer simulation to be near optimal, with a 22% increase in final product yield over that obtained at the optimal constant temperature. Examination of the achieved final product yield as a function of fermentation period allows this period also to be chosen optimally. This time is reduced from 16 days in the constant temperature case to 12 days in the switched temperature case. PMID:18592517

  18. Cultural Neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    Ames, Daniel L.; Fiske, Susan T.

    2013-01-01

    Cultural neuroscience issues from the apparently incompatible combination of neuroscience and cultural psychology. A brief literature sampling suggests, instead, several preliminary topics that demonstrate proof of possibilities: cultural differences in both lower-level processes (e.g. perception, number representation) and higher-order processes (e.g. inferring others’ emotions, contemplating the self) are beginning to shed new light on both culture and cognition. Candidates for future cultural neuroscience research include cultural variations in the default (resting) network, which may be social; regulation and inhibition of feelings, thoughts, and actions; prejudice and dehumanization; and neural signatures of fundamental warmth and competence judgments. PMID:23874143

  19. 2010 Stennis Day of Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Rich Delgado, commanding officer of the Fleet Survey Team located at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center, visits with Kertrina Watson Lewis, executive director of the HandsOn volunteer organization in New Orleans, during Day of Service activities Jan. 12. The Day of Service was part of the annual Martin Luther King Jr. Day observance at Stennis. During the day, Mississippi and Louisiana organizations visited the center to encourage employees to register and serve as volunteers for various community activities.

  20. 2010 Stennis Day of Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Employees at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center visit exhibits of volunteer organizations during their observance of Martin Luther King Jr. Day with a Day of Service on Jan. 12. During the day, Mississippi and Louisiana organizations visited the center to encourage employees to register and serve as volunteers for various community activities. The day's focus was emphasized again and again - great things can happen when individuals work together toward a common goal.

  1. The culture of care within psychiatric services: tackling inequalities and improving clinical and organisational capabilities

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Cultural Consultation is a clinical process that emerged from anthropological critiques of mental healthcare. It includes attention to therapeutic communication, research observations and research methods that capture cultural practices and narratives in mental healthcare. This essay describes the work of a Cultural Consultation Service (ToCCS) that improves service user outcomes by offering cultural consultation to mental health practitioners. The setting is a psychiatric service with complex and challenging work located in an ethnically diverse inner city urban area. Following a period of 18 months of cultural consultation, we gather the dominant narratives that emerged during our evaluation of our service. Results These narratives highlight how culture is conceptualized and acted upon in the day-to-day practices of individual health and social care professionals, specialist psychiatric teams and in care systems. The findings reveal common narratives and themes about culture, ethnicity, race and their perceived place and meaningfulness in clinical care. These narratives express underlying assumptions and covert rules for managing, and sometimes negating, dilemmas and difficulties when considering “culture” in the presentation and expression of mental distress. The narratives reveal an overall “culture of understanding cultural issues” and specific “cultures of care”. These emerged as necessary foci of intervention to improve service user outcomes. Conclusion Understanding the cultures of care showed that clinical and managerial over-structuring of care prioritises organisational proficiency, but it leads to inflexibility. Consequently, the care provided is less personalised and less accommodating of cultural issues, therefore, professionals are unable to see or consider cultural influences in recovery. PMID:23020856

  2. Perspectives on Infant Day Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elardo, Richard, E.; Pagan, Betty, Ed.

    These proceedings of the first annual SACUS workshop on infant day care contain the papers presented at the conference, plus an appendix--Developmental Objectives for Infants and Toddlers. The papers are: "Infant Day Care--Fads, Facts, and Fancies" by Bettye M. Caldwell; "Family Day Care""A Broad Perspective" by Malcolm S. Host; "Getting…

  3. Family Day Care Provider Handbook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Office of Children and Family Services, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Family day care providers are responsible for creating a high-quality program where children have opportunities to grow, learn and thrive. Part of providing high-quality child care includes complying with the family day care regulations from the New York State Office of Children and Family Services (OCFS). This Handbook will help day care…

  4. Guides for Day Care Licensing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Development Services Bureau (DHEW/OCD), Washington, DC.

    This booklet provides source materials for the development of state and local regulations applicable to day care service facilities. Sections discuss: (1) the Model State Day Care Licensing Act, (2) Day care program and staffing, (3) Health and sanitation, (4) Fire and safety regulations, (5) Principles of zoning, and (6) Principles of

  5. Perspectives on Infant Day Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elardo, Richard, E.; Pagan, Betty, Ed.

    These proceedings of the first annual SACUS workshop on infant day care contain the papers presented at the conference, plus an appendix--Developmental Objectives for Infants and Toddlers. The papers are: "Infant Day Care--Fads, Facts, and Fancies" by Bettye M. Caldwell; "Family Day Care""A Broad Perspective" by Malcolm S. Host; "Getting

  6. National Trails Day. Project SEED.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Mark

    This paper describes how a school district in Maine implemented an outdoor education program centered around National Trails Day (a day of awareness of outdoor recreational areas in the United States). The program combined classroom learning with an all-day hike on the Appalachian Trail by 240 seventh-grade students. Numerous teachers, school…

  7. The 4 Day School Week

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dam, Ai

    2006-01-01

    Colorado law requires school districts to schedule 1080 hours per year of instructional time for secondary schools and 990 instructional hours for elementary schools. The 1080 hours equate to six hours per day for 180 days. The 990 hours equate to five and one-half hours per day. Up to 24 hours may be counted for parent-teacher conferences, staff

  8. Evolution of periodicity in periodical cicadas

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Hiromu; Kakishima, Satoshi; Uehara, Takashi; Morita, Satoru; Koyama, Takuya; Sota, Teiji; Cooley, John R.; Yoshimura, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Periodical cicadas (Magicicada spp.) in the USA are famous for their unique prime-numbered life cycles of 13 and 17 years and their nearly perfectly synchronized mass emergences. Because almost all known species of cicada are non-periodical, periodicity is assumed to be a derived state. A leading hypothesis for the evolution of periodicity in Magicicada implicates the decline in average temperature during glacial periods. During the evolution of periodicity, the determinant of maturation in ancestral cicadas is hypothesized to have switched from size dependence to time (period) dependence. The selection for the prime-numbered cycles should have taken place only after the fixation of periodicity. Here, we build an individual-based model of cicadas under conditions of climatic cooling to explore the fixation of periodicity. In our model, under cold environments, extremely long juvenile stages lead to extremely low adult densities, limiting mating opportunities and favouring the evolution of synchronized emergence. Our results indicate that these changes, which were triggered by glacial cooling, could have led to the fixation of periodicity in the non-periodical ancestors. PMID:26365061

  9. Culturing Protozoa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Paul

    1980-01-01

    Compares various nutrient media, growth conditions, and stock solutions used in culturing protozoa. A hay infusion in Chalkey's solution maintained at a stable temperature is recommended for producing the most dense and diverse cultures. (WB)

  10. Gastric culture

    MedlinePLUS

    Gastric culture is a test to check a child's stomach contents for the bacteria that cause tuberculosis (TB). ... is placed in a special dish called a culture medium and watched for the growth of bacteria.

  11. Beyond Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barron, Daniel D.

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the lack of literature relating to cultural differences and school library media programs and reviews the book "Beyond Culture" by Edward T. Hall. Highlights include the population/environment crisis, cultural literacy, the use of technology, and Marshall McLuhan's idea of the global village. (LRW)

  12. Long term organ culture of human prostate tissue in a NASA-designed rotating wall bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margolis, L.; Hatfill, S.; Chuaqui, R.; Vocke, C.; Emmert-Buck, M.; Linehan, W. M.; Duray, P. H.

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE: To maintain ex vivo integral prostatic tissue including intact stromal and ductal elements using the NASA-designed Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) which maintains colocalized cells in an environment that promotes both three-dimensional cellular interactions together with the uniform mass transfer of nutrients and metabolic wastes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Samples of normal prostate were obtained as a byproduct of transurethral prostatectomy or needle biopsy. Prostatic tissue dissected into small 1 x 1 mm. blocks was cultured in the Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) Bioreactor for various time periods and analyzed using histological, immunochemical, and total cell RNA assays. RESULTS: We report the long term maintenance of benign explanted human prostate tissue grown in simple culture medium, under the simulated microgravity conditions afforded by the RWV bioreactor. Mesenchymal stromal elements including blood vessels and architecturally preserved tubuloglandular acini were maintained for a minimum of 28 days. Cytokeratins, vimentin and TGF-beta2 receptor and ligand were preserved through the entire culture period as revealed by immunocytochemistry. Prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) was continuously expressed during the culture period, although somewhat decreased. Prostatic specific antigen (PSA) and its transcript were down regulated over time of culture. Prostatic carcinoma cells from the TSU cell line were able to invade RWV-cultured benign prostate tissue explants. CONCLUSIONS: The RWV bioreactor represents an additional new technology for culturing prostate tissue for further investigations concerning the basic physiology and pathobiology of this clinically important tissue.

  13. Cultural practices updates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cultural practice updates from 2013 included the effects of shredding in spring, residue management, periodic flooding, no-till fertilizer applications, and billet planting on cane tonnage and sugar yield. Shredding, whether high or low, had little impacts in 2013. However, burning following shreddi...

  14. Life cycle of Lampito mauritii (Kinberg) in comparison with Eudrilus eugeniae (Kinberg) cultured on different substrates.

    PubMed

    Parthasarathi, K

    2007-10-01

    Growth (length, biomass and mean growth rate) and reproduction (total duration, clitellum appearance, clitellum completion, cocoon commencement, rate of cocoon production, incubation period, hatching success and mean number of hatching per cocoon) of indigenous Lampito mauritii (Kinberg) in comparison with exotic Eudrilus eugeniae (Kinberg) cultured on three feed substrates-clay loam soil, cowdung and pressmud (filter cake) have been studied over a period of 360 days under laboratory conditions (30 +/- 2 degrees C, 60-65% moisture). There is a positive relationship between length and biomass of both worms cultured on three feed substrates throughout the period of study The decrease of worm length and biomass observed slightly on 63-70th days in Lampito mauritii and 42-49th days in Eudrilus eugeniae cultured on three fed substrates are the results of the onset of cocoon production. After 270 days both worms in all these fed substrates show decreasing trends of length and biomass which are due to continued reproduction and aging. Among the three fed substrates, pressmud supports significantly maximum worm length and biomass (between 90-130 days in Eudrilus eugeniae and 110-170 days in Lampito mauritii), earlier attainment of sexual maturity (between 51-76 days in Limpito mauritii and 27-37 days in Eudrilus eugeniae), earlier commencement of cocoon production (37.7 +/- 0.0 days in Eudrilus eugeniae and 76.4 +/- 0.10 days in Limpitomauritii), shorter incubation periods (16.3 +/- 0.28 days in Eudrilus eugeniae and 26.7 +/- 0.81 days in Limpito mauritii), more hatching success (98% in Limpito mauritii and 86% in Eudrilus eugeniae), more mean number of hatchling percocoon (3.2 + 0.03 in Limpito mauritii and 2.6 +/- 0.06 in Eudrilus eugeniae) and shorter duration of life cycle (108.8 +/- 0.07 days in Limpito mauritii and 60.2 +/- 0.09 days in Eudrilus eugeniae) than cowdung and clay loam soil. PMID:18405116

  15. [Establishment of a cell suspension culture system of endangered Aquilaria sinensis (Lour.) Gilg].

    PubMed

    Liu, Juan; Han, Xiao-Min; Liang, Liang; Liu, Qing-Chang; Xu, Yan-Hong; Yang, Cheng-Min; Zhang, Zheng; Sun, Jing; Wei, Jian-He

    2014-08-01

    Aquilaria sinensis callus induced by stem tips were used to establish the suspension cell system. The results showed that the most suitable medium for callus induction and subculture is MS + 2.0 mg x L(-1) NAA + 1.0 mg x L(-1) 6-BA. After 12 times of subculture, the energetic and loose callus, which were appropriate for cell suspension culture, were cultured and shook in liquid medium MS + 2.0 mg x L(-1) NAA + 1.0 mg x L(-1) 6-BA + 500.0 mg x L(-1) casein hydrolysate (CH) to establish the suspension cell system. The growth curve of suspension cells showed a "S" type. At the beginning of the culture, cell density increased slowly; during 4 to 6 days, suspension cells reached logarithmic growth period; during 7 to 12 days, suspension cells were in the platform period; but after 12 days, cell density and activity went down obviously. Agarwood sesquiterpenes were not detected in the suspension cells during the growth period, however, they could be detected in MeJA treated suspension cells. In this study, a stable and active growing suspension cell system was established, which was a proper system to study the mechanism of agarwood sesquiterpene formation, and additionally provided a potential way to generate agarwood sesquiterpenes through application of cell culture. PMID:25322564

  16. Ajmalicine, Serpentine, and Catharanthine Accumulation in Catharanthus roseus Bioreactor Cultures.

    PubMed

    Drapeau, D; Blanch, H W; Wilke, C R

    1987-08-01

    A 141, stirred-tank bioreactor was used to investigate the effect of 7% glucose solutions on CATHARANTHUS ROSEUS suspension cultures. Measurement of oxygen uptake rate indicated that alkaloid accumulation occurred primarily during a 20-day transition period between growth-oriented metabolism and maintenance-oriented metabolism. Exposure of the cells to light during this period stimulated catharanthine accumulation and triggered a switch from ajmalicine accumulation to serpentine accumulation. In addition, it suppressed the secretion of both ajmalicine and serpentine; without light nearly 80% of the ajmalicine and serpentine was found in the medium, whereas with light less than 20% was secreted. Alkaloid accumulation was found to be adversely affected by increasing the volume of inoculum culture transferred to a given volume of fresh glucose solution, apparently due to the entry of 2,4-D with the inoculum. PMID:17269046

  17. Study of the Half-Day/Full-Day Kindergarten Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McInroy, Thomas R.

    2012-01-01

    This case study and problem analysis was an in-depth investigation of the half-day/full-day kindergarten model by utilizing interviews and focus groups to provide insight from parents, teachers, and other district personnel as to how the model has impacted the social, emotional, and academic development of the participating students. This study

  18. Study of the Half-Day/Full-Day Kindergarten Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McInroy, Thomas R.

    2012-01-01

    This case study and problem analysis was an in-depth investigation of the half-day/full-day kindergarten model by utilizing interviews and focus groups to provide insight from parents, teachers, and other district personnel as to how the model has impacted the social, emotional, and academic development of the participating students. This study…

  19. Zoning for Day Care (from Models for Day Care Licensing).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day Care and Child Development Council of America, Inc., Washington, DC.

    Recommendations and regulations regarding the zoning of child development day care programs are discussed. Zoning in general is discussed, as is the treatment of child development day care in zoning ordinance, the background of program planning, modular housing, the impelmentation of zoning, and model provisions regarding characteristics of

  20. Development of 3D hydrogel culture systems with on-demand cell separation.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Sharon K; Bloodworth, Nathaniel C; Massad, Christopher S; Hammoudi, Taymour M; Suri, Shalu; Yang, Peter J; Lu, Hang; Temenoff, Johnna S

    2013-04-01

    Recently there has been an increased interest in the effects of paracrine signaling between groups of cells, particularly in the context of better understanding how stem cells contribute to tissue repair. Most current 3D co-culture methods lack the ability to effectively separate two cell populations after the culture period, which is important for simultaneously analyzing the reciprocal effects of each cell type on the other. Here, we detail the development of a 3D hydrogel co-culture system that allows us to culture different cell types for up to 7 days and subsequently separate and isolate the different cell populations using enzyme-sensitive glues. Separable 3D co-culture laminates were prepared by laminating PEG-based hydrogels with enzyme-degradable hydrogel adhesives. Encapsulated cell populations exhibited good segregation with well-defined interfaces. Furthermore, constructs can be separated on-demand upon addition of the appropriate enzyme, while cell viability remains high throughout the culture period, even after laminate separation. This platform offers great potential for a variety of basic cell signaling studies as the incorporation of an enzyme-sensitive adhesive interface allows the on-demand separation of individual cell populations for immediate analysis or further culture to examine persistence of co-culture effects and paracrine signaling on cell populations. PMID:23447378

  1. Development of 3-D Hydrogel Culture Systems With On-Demand Cell Separation

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Sharon K.; Bloodworth, Nathaniel C.; Massad, Christopher S.; Hammoudi, Taymour M.; Suri, Shalu; Yang, Peter J.; Lu, Hang; Temenoff, Johnna S.

    2013-01-01

    Recently there has been an increased interest in the effects of paracrine signaling between groups of cells, particularly in the context of better understanding how stem cells contribute to tissue repair. Most current 3-D co-culture methods lack the ability to effectively separate 2 cell populations after the culture period, which is important for simultaneously analyzing the reciprocal effects of each cell type on the other. Here, we detail the development of a 3-D hydrogel co-culture system that allows us to culture different cell types for up to 7 days and subsequently separate and isolate the different cell populations using enzyme-sensitive glues. Separable 3-D co-culture laminates were prepared by laminating PEG-based hydrogels with enzyme-degradable hydrogel adhesives. Encapsulated cell populations exhibited good segregation with well-defined interfaces. Furthermore, constructs can be separated on-demand upon addition of the appropriate enzyme and cell viability remains high throughout the culture period, even after laminate separation. This platform offers great potential for a variety of basic cell signaling studies as the incorporation of an enzyme-sensitive adhesive interface allows the on-demand separation of individual cell populations for immediate analysis or further culture to examine persistence of co-culture effects and paracrine signaling on cell populations. PMID:23447378

  2. Treatment of typhoid fever with ceftriaxone for 5 days or chloramphenicol for 14 days: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Islam, A; Butler, T; Kabir, I; Alam, N H

    1993-08-01

    To compare the therapeutic efficacy of ceftriaxone given once daily for 5 days and chloramphenicol given four times daily for 14 days, a controlled trial was carried out with 59 patients who were culture positive for Salmonella typhi. Ceftriaxone was given to 28 patients in once-daily intravenous doses of 75 mg/kg of body weight to children and 4 g to adults for 5 days; chloramphenicol was given to 31 patients at a dosage of 60 mg/kg/day until defervescence and then at 40 mg/kg/day to complete 14 days of treatment. All Salmonella isolates were susceptible to both antibiotics. Clinical cures (defervescence without complications, no relapse, and no need for further treatment) occurred in 79% of the patients treated with ceftriaxone and 90% of those treated with chloramphenicol (P = 0.37). On the third day of treatment, blood cultures were positive for S. typhi for 60% of the patients in the chloramphenicol group and 0% of the ceftriaxone group (P = 0.001). Defervescence occurred in half the patients in both groups during the first 7 days, but on days 9 to 13 after the start of treatment, nine patients in the ceftriaxone group, compared with six patients in the chloramphenicol group, remained febrile (P = 0.4). The median hematocrit and total leukocyte counts at day 14 were significantly lower for the chloramphenicol group than those for the ceftriaxone group (P = 0.01 and P = 0.02, respectively). These results indicate that the effects of therapy with ceftriaxone for typhoid fever differed from those of chloramphenicol therapy in that blood cultures became negative earlier, prolonged fever persisted in some patients, and bone marrow suppression was reduced. We conclude that a short, 5-day course of ceftriaxone is a useful alternative to conventional 14-day chloramphenicol therapy in the treatment of typhoid fever. PMID:8215265

  3. Rethinking the Day of Silence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Adriana

    2013-01-01

    Back in 2006, 7th and 8th graders at Green Acres, the K-8 independent school where the author taught in suburban Maryland, participated in the Day of Silence. The Day of Silence is a national event: Students across the country take a one-day pledge of silence to show that they want to make schools safe for all students, regardless of their sexual…

  4. Sun-Earth Day, 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, M.; Mortfield, P.; Hathaway, D. H.

    2001-05-01

    In order to promote awareness of the Sun-Earth connection, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, in collaboration with the Stanford SOLAR Center, sponsored a one-day Sun-Earth Day event on April 27, 2001. Although "celebrated" on only one day, teachers and students from across the nation, prepared for over a month in advance. Workshops were held in March to train teachers. Students performed experiments, results of which were shared through video clips and an internet web cast. Our poster includes highlights from student experiments (grades 2 - 12), lessons learned from the teacher workshops, and plans for Sun-Earth Day 2002.

  5. Sun-Earth Day, 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Mitzi L.; Mortfield, P.; Hathaway, D. H.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    To promote awareness of the Sun-Earth connection, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, in collaboration with the Stanford SOLAR Center, sponsored a one-day Sun-Earth Day event on April 27, 2001. Although "celebrated" on only one day, teachers and students from across the nation, prepared for over a month in advance. Workshops were held in March to train teachers. Students performed experiments, results of which were shared through video clips and an internet web cast. Our poster includes highlights from student experiments (grades 2 - 12), lessons learned from the teacher workshops and the event itself, and plans for Sun-Earth Day 2002.

  6. Cultural Awareness: A Resource Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Velma E.; McNeill, Earldene

    This annotated bibliography cites books for children and resource materials such as books and articles, bibliographies, catalogs, and periodicals for adults which deal with various aspects of different cultures. Posters, pictures, records, films, filmstrips, slides, dolls, and museums which pertain to particular cultures are also listed. Separate

  7. 3D Hepatic Cultures Simultaneously Maintain Primary Hepatocyte and Liver Sinusoidal Endothelial Cell Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeonhee; Rajagopalan, Padmavathy

    2010-01-01

    Developing in vitro engineered hepatic tissues that exhibit stable phenotype is a major challenge in the field of hepatic tissue engineering. However, the rapid dedifferentiation of hepatic parenchymal (hepatocytes) and non-parenchymal (liver sinusoidal endothelial, LSEC) cell types when removed from their natural environment in vivo remains a major obstacle. The primary goal of this study was to demonstrate that hepatic cells cultured in layered architectures could preserve or potentially enhance liver-specific behavior of both cell types. Primary rat hepatocytes and rat LSECs (rLSECs) were cultured in a layered three-dimensional (3D) configuration. The cell layers were separated by a chitosan-hyaluronic acid polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEM), which served to mimic the Space of Disse. Hepatocytes and rLSECs exhibited several key phenotypic characteristics over a twelve day culture period. Immunostaining for the sinusoidal endothelial 1 antibody (SE-1) demonstrated that rLSECs cultured in the 3D hepatic model maintained this unique feature over twelve days. In contrast, rLSECs cultured in monolayers lost their phenotype within three days. The unique stratified structure of the 3D culture resulted in enhanced heterotypic cell-cell interactions, which led to improvements in hepatocyte functions. Albumin production increased three to six fold in the rLSEC-PEM-Hepatocyte cultures. Only rLSEC-PEM-Hepatocyte cultures exhibited increasing CYP1A1/2 and CYP3A activity. Well-defined bile canaliculi were observed only in the rLSEC-PEM-Hepatocyte cultures. Together, these data suggest that rLSEC-PEM-Hepatocyte cultures are highly suitable models to monitor the transformation of toxins in the liver and their transport out of this organ. In summary, these results indicate that the layered rLSEC-PEM-hepatocyte model, which recapitulates key features of hepatic sinusoids, is a potentially powerful medium for obtaining comprehensive knowledge on liver metabolism, detoxification and signaling pathways in vitro. PMID:21103392

  8. Oocyte maturation and expression pattern of follicular genes during in-vitro culture of vitrified mouse pre-antral follicles.

    PubMed

    Jamalzaei, Parisa; Valojerdi, Mojtaba Rezazadeh; Ebrahimi, Bita; Farrokhi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the oocyte maturation rate and follicular genes expression pattern during in-vitro culture of vitrified mouse pre-antral follicles. Middle sized pre-antral follicles were isolated mechanically from the ovaries of pre-pubertal mice and distributed in vitrification and control groups. In the vitrification group, follicles were washed in equilibration and vitrification solutions and then were immersed in liquid nitrogen after loading on cryotop tips. After warming in descending concentrations of sucrose solutions, fresh and vitrified-warmed follicles were cultured for 13 days. Follicles survival rate and follicular genes expression were assessed during invitro culture. Finally, at the end of the culture period oocytes maturation rate were compared in both groups. In the vitrification group, follicles survival rate was lower significantly comparing to the control group (P<0.05), whereas oocytes maturation rate were similar. Although at the beginning of the culture period, expression of some genes such as Gdf9, Bmp15, Tgf?1 and BmprII were higher in the vitrification group (P<0.05), during the rest of the culture period expression pattern of all follicular genes were similar in both groups. In conclusion, survival rate of cryotop vitrified pre-antral follicles reduced during culture period while oocytes maturation and follicular genes expression did not show any noticeable alteration. PMID:26699687

  9. Child Day Care Health Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fookson, Maxine; And Others

    Developed to meet Washington State Day Care Minimum Licensing Requirements, guidelines in this handbook concern 10 health topics. Discussion focuses on (1) preventing illness in day care settings; (2) illnesses, their treatment, ways to limit their spread, and what caregivers can do when they have a sick child at their center; (3) caregivers'

  10. Youth Field Day Planning Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin State Dept. of Natural Resources, Madison.

    Youth field days expose children to outdoor activities, land use ethics, and habitat conservation and encourage adults to be mentors in these areas. A typical youth field day could have programs in archery, fishing, boating, shooting, or safety. The event requires a diverse steering committee that usually includes sporting clubs and state…

  11. Day Care Infection Control Protocol.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seattle-King County Dept. of Public Health, Seattle, WA.

    This day care infection control manual was assembled to provide technical guidance for the prevention and control of communicable diseases to child day care facilities in Seattle and King County, Washington. For each disease, the manual provides background information, public health control recommendations, and letters that can be used to

  12. Celebrate International School Library Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braxton, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    The Fourth Monday in October is International School Library Day (ISLD)--an opportunity for school libraries around the world to celebrate the contribution they make to the education of the children in their care. International School Library Day was proclaimed in 1999 by Dr Blanche Woolls, president of the International Association of School

  13. In Defense of Snow Days

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    In snowy climates, school superintendents must frequently decide whether an impending storm warrants closing schools for the day. Concerns about student and teacher safety must be weighed against the loss of student learning time, along with state requirements for days of instruction and the cost and inconvenience of extending the school year into

  14. Day Care Center Enrichment Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West Virginia State Dept. of Welfare, Charleston.

    This guide to a West Virginia Department of Welfare project for upgrading the quality of day care centers throughout the state presents samples of the forms used in the program, accompanied by a brief description of the program's format, requirements and procedures. The Day Care Center Enrichment Program provides a monetary incentive for

  15. Day Care and the Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, Bettye M.

    1981-01-01

    Although it has always been considered the "poor relation" of early childhood education, day care in the public schools is the most effective way of establishing a continuity between the preschool and the elementary school. The Kramer Model of "extended day school" is a cooperative venture between a college and a public school. (JN)

  16. Day Care for America's Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaCrosse, E. Robert

    High quality day care is a pressing social need for the 1970's. Factors responsible for the strong interest in day care include pressures for welfare reform, the growing number of women in the labor force, minority pressures for equal opportunities, and research findings stressing the importance of development during the early years of a child's

  17. In Defense of Snow Days

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    In snowy climates, school superintendents must frequently decide whether an impending storm warrants closing schools for the day. Concerns about student and teacher safety must be weighed against the loss of student learning time, along with state requirements for days of instruction and the cost and inconvenience of extending the school year into…

  18. 2014 Maine Earth Science Day

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    On October 15, 2014 Maine Earth Science Day was held at the Maine State Museum in Augusta. The USGS was represented by Charlie Culbertson, left, and Nick Waldron, right. This photo was taken as the two were packing up for the day, and shows a main feature of the table, a touch screen display with th...

  19. Day Care Infection Control Protocol.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seattle-King County Dept. of Public Health, Seattle, WA.

    This day care infection control manual was assembled to provide technical guidance for the prevention and control of communicable diseases to child day care facilities in Seattle and King County, Washington. For each disease, the manual provides background information, public health control recommendations, and letters that can be used to…

  20. 7 CFR 247.16 - Certification period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS COMMODITY SUPPLEMENTAL FOOD PROGRAM § 247.16 Certification period. (a... final day of the month in which eligibility expires (e.g., the last day of the month in which a child... discrimination by race, color, national origin, age, sex, or disability. (Approved by the Office of...

  1. 7 CFR 247.16 - Certification period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS COMMODITY SUPPLEMENTAL FOOD PROGRAM § 247.16 Certification period. (a... final day of the month in which eligibility expires (e.g., the last day of the month in which a child... discrimination by race, color, national origin, age, sex, or disability. (Approved by the Office of...

  2. 7 CFR 247.16 - Certification period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS COMMODITY SUPPLEMENTAL FOOD PROGRAM § 247.16 Certification period. (a... final day of the month in which eligibility expires (e.g., the last day of the month in which a child... discrimination by race, color, national origin, age, sex, or disability. (Approved by the Office of...

  3. Specimen Sample Preservation for Cell and Tissue Cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meeker, Gabrielle; Ronzana, Karolyn; Schibner, Karen; Evans, Robert

    1996-01-01

    The era of the International Space Station with its longer duration missions will pose unique challenges to microgravity life sciences research. The Space Station Biological Research Project (SSBRP) is responsible for addressing these challenges and defining the science requirements necessary to conduct life science research on-board the International Space Station. Space Station will support a wide range of cell and tissue culture experiments for durations of 1 to 30 days. Space Shuttle flights to bring experimental samples back to Earth for analyses will only occur every 90 days. Therefore, samples may have to be retained for periods up to 60 days. This presents a new challenge in fresh specimen sample storage for cell biology. Fresh specimen samples are defined as samples that are preserved by means other than fixation and cryopreservation. The challenge of long-term storage of fresh specimen samples includes the need to suspend or inhibit proliferation and metabolism pending return to Earth-based laboratories. With this challenge being unique to space research, there have not been any ground based studies performed to address this issue. It was decided hy SSBRP that experiment support studies to address the following issues were needed: Fixative Solution Management; Media Storage Conditions; Fresh Specimen Sample Storage of Mammalian Cell/Tissue Cultures; Fresh Specimen Sample Storage of Plant Cell/Tissue Cultures; Fresh Specimen Sample Storage of Aquatic Cell/Tissue Cultures; and Fresh Specimen Sample Storage of Microbial Cell/Tissue Cultures. The objective of these studies was to derive a set of conditions and recommendations that can be used in a long duration microgravity environment such as Space Station that will permit extended storage of cell and tissue culture specimens in a state consistent with zero or minimal growth, while at the same time maintaining their stability and viability.

  4. Traditional healing with animals (zootherapy): medieval to present-day Levantine practice.

    PubMed

    Lev, Efraim

    2003-03-01

    Animals and products derived from different organs of their bodies have constituted part of the inventory of medicinal substances used in various cultures since ancient times. This article reviews the history of healing with animals in the Levant (the Land of Israel and parts of present-day Syria, Lebanon, and Jordan, defined by the Muslims in the Middle Ages as Bilad al-Sham) throughout history. Intensive research into the phenomenon of zootherapy in the Levant from early medieval to present-day traditional medicine yielded 99 substances of animal origin which were used medicinally during that long period. Fifty-two animal extracts and products were documented as being used from the early Muslim period (10th century) to the late Ottoman period (19th century). Seventy-seven were recorded as being used in the 20th century. Seven main animal sources have been exploited for medical uses throughout history: honey, wax, adder, beaver testicles, musk oil, coral, and ambergris. The first three are local and relatively easy to obtain; the last four are exotic, therefore, rare and expensive. The use of other materials of animal origin came to an end in the course of history because of change in the moral outlook of modern societies. Among the latter we note mummy, silkworm, stinkbug, scarabees, snail, scorpion, and triton. PMID:12576209

  5. Degradation of Ti-6Al-4V alloy under cyclic loading in a simulated body environment with cell culturing.

    PubMed

    Doi, Kotaro; Miyabe, Sayaka; Tsuchiya, Hiroaki; Fujimoto, Shinji

    2016-03-01

    The present study reports the corrosion fatigue of the Ti-6Al-4V alloy using cyclic deformation test in a simulated body fluid under cell culturing for the first time. Cyclic deformation tests were carried out using three types of specimens to reveal the effects of proteins and cells on the corrosion fatigue of the alloy. For the 1-day-immersed and 1-week-immersed specimens, tensile specimens were soaked in a simulated body fluid for 1 day and 1 week, respectively, before cyclic deformation test, whereas for the cell-cultured specimen, MC3T3-E1 osteoblast-like cells were seeded and then cultured on tensile specimens for 1 week. The incubation period for crack initiation was longer for the cell-cultured and 1-week-immersed specimens compared to that for the 1-day-immersed specimen. On the other hand, crack propagation period for the cell-cultured and 1-week-immersed specimens was shorter than that for the 1-day-immersed specimen. These results indicate that proteins and cells adhered on the alloy surface inhibit metal dissolution at newly created surface emerged by cyclic deformation to suppress crack initiation, whereas they accelerate crack propagation because dissolution at crack tip is accelerated in the occluded space formed under proteins and cells. PMID:26651063

  6. 78 FR 29147 - 30-Day Notice and Request for Comments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-17

    ..., 2013 at 78 FR 14807, allowing for OMB review and a 60-day public comment period. No comments were... SECURITY United States Secret Service 30-Day Notice and Request for Comments SUMMARY: The Department of... United States Secret Service, Department of Homeland Security, and sent via electronic mail to...

  7. Warm up Winter with Special Days.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spann, Mary Beth

    1992-01-01

    Fourteen examples are given of teacher-created day-long celebrations which are designed to sharpen students' thinking skills and incorporate math, science, reading, and language arts. The special days include Janus Day, Twins Day, Friendship Day, Interactive Reading Fair, Sixties Day, Clash Day, Generation Day, and Back-to-the-Future Day. (IAH)

  8. Developing Multicultural Awareness: An In-service Day Proposal for Rend Lake College, Ina, Illinois.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rust, Joseph Henry

    Noting that the state of Illinois mandates that community colleges address cultural diversity in their curriculum, this paper presents a proposal for a day-long in-service faculty education program to make faculty aware that cultural diversity exists at Rend Lake College (Illinois). The paper begins with a schedule for the in-service day, offering

  9. Skin or nail culture

    MedlinePLUS

    Mucosal culture; Culture - skin; Culture - mucosal; Nail culture; Culture - fingernail; Fingernail culture ... There, it is placed in a special dish (culture). It is then watched to see if bacteria, ...

  10. Nasopharyngeal culture

    MedlinePLUS

    Culture - nasopharyngeal; Swab for respiratory viruses; Swab for Staph carriage ... The test identifies viruses and bacteria that cause upper respiratory ... aureus Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus The ...

  11. 7 CFR 1.417 - Review period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... days after the comment period, pursuant to 36 CFR 233.190(h)(2). The request must be postmarked no... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Review period. 1.417 Section 1.417 Agriculture Office... of Sourcing Area Applications and Formal Review of Sourcing Areas Pursuant to the Forest...

  12. Periodic exploding dissipative solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartes, Carlos; Descalzi, Orazio

    2016-03-01

    We show the existence of periodic exploding dissipative solitons. These nonchaotic explosions appear when higher-order nonlinear and dispersive effects are added to the complex cubic-quintic Ginzburg-Landau equation modeling fiber soliton lasers. This counterintuitive phenomenon is the result of period-halving bifurcations leading to order (periodic explosions), followed by period-doubling bifurcations leading to chaos (chaotic explosions).

  13. Cell isolation and culture.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Sihui; Kuhn, Jeffrey R

    2013-01-01

    Cell isolation and culture are essential tools for the study of cell function. Isolated cells grown under controlled conditions can be manipulated and imaged at a level of resolution that is not possible in whole animals or even tissue explants. Recent advances have allowed for large-scale isolation and culture of primary C. elegans cells from both embryos and all four larval stages. Isolated cells can be used for single-cell profiling, electrophysiology, and high-resolution microscopy to assay cell autonomous development and behavior. This chapter describes protocols for the isolation and culture of C. elegans embryonic and larval stage cells. Our protocols describe isolation of embryonic and L1 stage cells from nematodes grown on high-density NA22 bacterial plates and isolation of L2 through L4 stage cells from nematodes grown in axenic liquid culture. Both embryonic and larval cells can be isolated from nematode populations within 3 hours and can be cultured for several days. A primer on sterile cell culture techniques is given in the appendices. PMID:23430760

  14. Changing our culture.

    PubMed

    Benzil, Deborah L

    2014-05-01

    Today, a great challenge of our profession is to envision how we will deliver exemplary neurosurgical care in the future. To accomplish this requires anticipating how economic, political, and societal influences will affect our ability to provide the highest quality of patient care in an arena that will look increasingly different from today's world of medicine. Already, our profession is battling a relentless assault as numerous sectors implement change that impacts us and our community every day. Surviving this requires an effective strategy that will involve significant cultural change. To accomplish this, neurosurgery must take an honest look inward and then commit to being the agents of positive cultural change. Such a path will not be easy but should reap important benefits for all of neurosurgery and our patients. Several practical and proven strategies can help us to realize the rewards of changing our culture. Vital to this process is understanding that effecting behavioral change will increase the likelihood of achieving sustainable cultural change. Innovation and diversity are crucial to encourage and reward when trying to effect meaningful cultural change, while appreciating the power of a "Tipping Point" strategy will also reap significant benefits. As a profession, if we adopt these strategies and tactics we can lead our profession to proceed in improvement, and as individuals we can use the spirit that drove us into neurosurgery to become the agents of an enduring and meaningful cultural change that will benefit our patients and us. PMID:24559225

  15. The Ocean Sampling Day Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Kopf, Anna; Bicak, Mesude; Kottmann, Renzo; Schnetzer, Julia; Kostadinov, Ivaylo; Lehmann, Katja; Fernandez-Guerra, Antonio; Jeanthon, Christian; Rahav, Eyal; Ullrich, Matthias; Wichels, Antje; Gerdts, Gunnar; Polymenakou, Paraskevi; Kotoulas, Giorgos; Siam, Rania; Abdallah, Rehab Z.; Sonnenschein, Eva C.; Cariou, Thierry; O’Gara, Fergal; Jackson, Stephen; Orlic, Sandi; Steinke, Michael; Busch, Julia; Duarte, Bernardo; Caçador, Isabel; Canning-Clode, João; Bobrova, Oleksandra; Marteinsson, Viggo; Reynisson, Eyjolfur; Loureiro, Clara Magalhães; Luna, Gian Marco; Quero, Grazia Marina; Löscher, Carolin R.; Kremp, Anke; DeLorenzo, Marie E.; Øvreås, Lise; Tolman, Jennifer; LaRoche, Julie; Penna, Antonella; Frischer, Marc; Davis, Timothy; Katherine, Barker; Meyer, Christopher P.; Ramos, Sandra; Magalhães, Catarina; Jude-Lemeilleur, Florence; Aguirre-Macedo, Ma Leopoldina; Wang, Shiao; Poulton, Nicole; Jones, Scott; Collin, Rachel; Fuhrman, Jed A.; Conan, Pascal; Alonso, Cecilia; Stambler, Noga; Goodwin, Kelly; Yakimov, Michael M.; Baltar, Federico; Bodrossy, Levente; Van De Kamp, Jodie; Frampton, Dion M. F.; Ostrowski, Martin; Van Ruth, Paul; Malthouse, Paul; Claus, Simon; Deneudt, Klaas; Mortelmans, Jonas; Pitois, Sophie; Wallom, David; Salter, Ian; Costa, Rodrigo; Schroeder, Declan C.; Kandil, Mahrous M.; Amaral, Valentina; Biancalana, Florencia; Santana, Rafael; Pedrotti, Maria Luiza; Yoshida, Takashi; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Ingleton, Tim; Munnik, Kate; Rodriguez-Ezpeleta, Naiara; Berteaux-Lecellier, Veronique; Wecker, Patricia; Cancio, Ibon; Vaulot, Daniel; Bienhold, Christina; Ghazal, Hassan; Chaouni, Bouchra; Essayeh, Soumya; Ettamimi, Sara; Zaid, El Houcine; Boukhatem, Noureddine; Bouali, Abderrahim; Chahboune, Rajaa; Barrijal, Said; Timinouni, Mohammed; El Otmani, Fatima; Bennani, Mohamed; Mea, Marianna; Todorova, Nadezhda; Karamfilov, Ventzislav; ten Hoopen, Petra; Cochrane, Guy; L’Haridon, Stephane; Bizsel, Kemal Can; Vezzi, Alessandro; Lauro, Federico M.; Martin, Patrick; Jensen, Rachelle M.; Hinks, Jamie; Gebbels, Susan; Rosselli, Riccardo; De Pascale, Fabio; Schiavon, Riccardo; dos Santos, Antonina; Villar, Emilie; Pesant, Stéphane; Cataletto, Bruno; Malfatti, Francesca; Edirisinghe, Ranjith; Silveira, Jorge A. Herrera; Barbier, Michele; Turk, Valentina; Tinta, Tinkara; Fuller, Wayne J.; Salihoglu, Ilkay; Serakinci, Nedime; Ergoren, Mahmut Cerkez; Bresnan, Eileen; Iriberri, Juan; Nyhus, Paul Anders Fronth; Bente, Edvardsen; Karlsen, Hans Erik; Golyshin, Peter N.; Gasol, Josep M.; Moncheva, Snejana; Dzhembekova, Nina; Johnson, Zackary; Sinigalliano, Christopher David; Gidley, Maribeth Louise; Zingone, Adriana; Danovaro, Roberto; Tsiamis, George; Clark, Melody S.; Costa, Ana Cristina; El Bour, Monia; Martins, Ana M.; Collins, R. Eric; Ducluzeau, Anne-Lise; Martinez, Jonathan; Costello, Mark J.; Amaral-Zettler, Linda A.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Davies, Neil; Field, Dawn; Glöckner, Frank Oliver

    2015-06-19

    In this study, Ocean Sampling Day was initiated by the EU-funded Micro B3 (Marine Microbial Biodiversity, Bioinformatics, Biotechnology) project to obtain a snapshot of the marine microbial biodiversity and function of the world’s oceans. It is a simultaneous global mega-sequencing campaign aiming to generate the largest standardized microbial data set in a single day. This will be achievable only through the coordinated efforts of an Ocean Sampling Day Consortium, supportive partnerships and networks between sites. This commentary outlines the establishment, function and aims of the Consortium and describes our vision for a sustainable study of marine microbial communities and their embedded functional traits.

  16. The ocean sampling day consortium.

    PubMed

    Kopf, Anna; Bicak, Mesude; Kottmann, Renzo; Schnetzer, Julia; Kostadinov, Ivaylo; Lehmann, Katja; Fernandez-Guerra, Antonio; Jeanthon, Christian; Rahav, Eyal; Ullrich, Matthias; Wichels, Antje; Gerdts, Gunnar; Polymenakou, Paraskevi; Kotoulas, Giorgos; Siam, Rania; Abdallah, Rehab Z; Sonnenschein, Eva C; Cariou, Thierry; O'Gara, Fergal; Jackson, Stephen; Orlic, Sandi; Steinke, Michael; Busch, Julia; Duarte, Bernardo; Caçador, Isabel; Canning-Clode, João; Bobrova, Oleksandra; Marteinsson, Viggo; Reynisson, Eyjolfur; Loureiro, Clara Magalhães; Luna, Gian Marco; Quero, Grazia Marina; Löscher, Carolin R; Kremp, Anke; DeLorenzo, Marie E; Øvreås, Lise; Tolman, Jennifer; LaRoche, Julie; Penna, Antonella; Frischer, Marc; Davis, Timothy; Katherine, Barker; Meyer, Christopher P; Ramos, Sandra; Magalhães, Catarina; Jude-Lemeilleur, Florence; Aguirre-Macedo, Ma Leopoldina; Wang, Shiao; Poulton, Nicole; Jones, Scott; Collin, Rachel; Fuhrman, Jed A; Conan, Pascal; Alonso, Cecilia; Stambler, Noga; Goodwin, Kelly; Yakimov, Michael M; Baltar, Federico; Bodrossy, Levente; Van De Kamp, Jodie; Frampton, Dion Mf; Ostrowski, Martin; Van Ruth, Paul; Malthouse, Paul; Claus, Simon; Deneudt, Klaas; Mortelmans, Jonas; Pitois, Sophie; Wallom, David; Salter, Ian; Costa, Rodrigo; Schroeder, Declan C; Kandil, Mahrous M; Amaral, Valentina; Biancalana, Florencia; Santana, Rafael; Pedrotti, Maria Luiza; Yoshida, Takashi; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Ingleton, Tim; Munnik, Kate; Rodriguez-Ezpeleta, Naiara; Berteaux-Lecellier, Veronique; Wecker, Patricia; Cancio, Ibon; Vaulot, Daniel; Bienhold, Christina; Ghazal, Hassan; Chaouni, Bouchra; Essayeh, Soumya; Ettamimi, Sara; Zaid, El Houcine; Boukhatem, Noureddine; Bouali, Abderrahim; Chahboune, Rajaa; Barrijal, Said; Timinouni, Mohammed; El Otmani, Fatima; Bennani, Mohamed; Mea, Marianna; Todorova, Nadezhda; Karamfilov, Ventzislav; Ten Hoopen, Petra; Cochrane, Guy; L'Haridon, Stephane; Bizsel, Kemal Can; Vezzi, Alessandro; Lauro, Federico M; Martin, Patrick; Jensen, Rachelle M; Hinks, Jamie; Gebbels, Susan; Rosselli, Riccardo; De Pascale, Fabio; Schiavon, Riccardo; Dos Santos, Antonina; Villar, Emilie; Pesant, Stéphane; Cataletto, Bruno; Malfatti, Francesca; Edirisinghe, Ranjith; Silveira, Jorge A Herrera; Barbier, Michele; Turk, Valentina; Tinta, Tinkara; Fuller, Wayne J; Salihoglu, Ilkay; Serakinci, Nedime; Ergoren, Mahmut Cerkez; Bresnan, Eileen; Iriberri, Juan; Nyhus, Paul Anders Fronth; Bente, Edvardsen; Karlsen, Hans Erik; Golyshin, Peter N; Gasol, Josep M; Moncheva, Snejana; Dzhembekova, Nina; Johnson, Zackary; Sinigalliano, Christopher David; Gidley, Maribeth Louise; Zingone, Adriana; Danovaro, Roberto; Tsiamis, George; Clark, Melody S; Costa, Ana Cristina; El Bour, Monia; Martins, Ana M; Collins, R Eric; Ducluzeau, Anne-Lise; Martinez, Jonathan; Costello, Mark J; Amaral-Zettler, Linda A; Gilbert, Jack A; Davies, Neil; Field, Dawn; Glöckner, Frank Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Ocean Sampling Day was initiated by the EU-funded Micro B3 (Marine Microbial Biodiversity, Bioinformatics, Biotechnology) project to obtain a snapshot of the marine microbial biodiversity and function of the world's oceans. It is a simultaneous global mega-sequencing campaign aiming to generate the largest standardized microbial data set in a single day. This will be achievable only through the coordinated efforts of an Ocean Sampling Day Consortium, supportive partnerships and networks between sites. This commentary outlines the establishment, function and aims of the Consortium and describes our vision for a sustainable study of marine microbial communities and their embedded functional traits. PMID:26097697

  17. A comparison study on airborne particles during haze days and non-haze days in Beijing.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhenquan; Mu, Yujing; Liu, Yanju; Shao, Longyi

    2013-07-01

    Airborne particles in Beijing during haze days and non-haze days were collected by an eleven-stage cascade impactor (MOUDI 110, MSP, USA), and the mass concentrations and water soluble inorganic ions of the size segregated airborne particles were quantitatively analyzed. PM10 concentrations during haze days ranged from 250.5 to 519.4 ?gm(-3) which were about 3-8 times greater than those (ranged from 67.6 to 94.0 ?gm(-3)) during non-haze days, and PM1.8 concentrations during haze periods were in the range of 117.6-378.6 ?gm(-3) which were 3-14 times higher than those (27.0 to 36.8 ?gm(-3)) during non-haze days. In comparison with non-haze days, all water soluble inorganic ions investigated in the airborne particles greatly enhanced during haze days. NH?(+), NO?(-) and SO?(2-) were found to be the dominant water soluble inorganic ions, accounting for 91-95% of the total inorganic ions in PM1.8 during haze days, and 73-81% during non-haze days. The size distributions of SO?(2-), NO?(-), Cl(-), K(+) and Na(+) exhibited bimodal types, while single mode was found for NH?(+), Ca(2+) and Mg(2+). Only with exception of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+), all ions were concentrated in fine particles around 0.56-1.0 ?m of "droplet mode" during haze days, while 0.32-0.56 ?m of "condensation mode" during non-haze days. The extremely high mole ratio (>2) of [NH4(+)]/[SO?(2-)] during haze days implied that the main form of ammonium in PM1.8 might be (NH4)?SO? and NH?NO?. The mass ratio of NO?(-)/SO?(2-) was >1 in PM1.8 during haze days and ~1 during non-haze days, indicating that NOx from the vehicle exhaust in Beijing is playing more and more important role on fine particle formation. PMID:23583755

  18. A 90-day subchronic toxicological assessment of Antrodia cinnamomea in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tai-I; Chen, Chin-Chu; Lin, Ting-Wei; Tsai, Yueh-Ting; Nam, Mun-Kit

    2011-02-01

    Antrodia cinnamomea (Ac) is a medicinal mushroom widely used for the treatment of abdominal pain, hypertension and hepatocellular carcinoma, but subchronic toxicity of this material has not yet been investigated. This present study was conducted to assess the 90-day oral toxicity of A. cinnamomea from submerged culture in male and female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Eighty rats were divided into four groups, each consisting of ten male and ten female rats. Test articles were administered by oral gavage to rats at 3000, 2200 and 1500 mg/kg BW/day for 90 consecutive days and reverse osmosis water was used as control. All animals survived to the end of the study. During the experiment period, no abnormal changes were observed in clinical signs, body weight and ophthalmological examinations. No significant differences were found in urinalysis, hematology and serum biochemistry parameters between the treatment and control groups. Necropsy and histopathological examination indicated no treatment-related changes. According to the above results, the no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) of Antrodia cinnamomea is identified to be greater than 3000 mg/kg BW/day in Sprague-Dawley rats. PMID:21093523

  19. Hydroponics or soilless culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, H. D.

    1963-01-01

    Historically, hydroponics is not a new field; plant physiologists have known and used it for some 100 years. Inevitably, some enthusiasts got carried away.Claims were made of enormous potential yields; skyscraper tops were said to be capable of producing enough food for all of their occupants; and closets, basements, garages, etc. were wishfully converted into fields for hydroponic culture. Numerous publications on the subject appeared during this period. Basic requirements for hydropinc techniques are given along with examples of where soilless culture has been used commercially.

  20. Career Day - Duration: 62 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's 2013 Career Days was a joint collaboration between NASA Langley and the Newport News Shipbuilding where 600 high school students from Virginia took on two design challenges -- designing a ca...

  1. STS-91 Day 04 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    On this forth day of the STS-91 mission, the flight crew, Cmdr. Charles J. Precourt, Pilot Dominic L. Pudwill Gorie and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, Janet L. Kavandi, and Valery Victorovitch Ryumin are awakened to the sounds of 'South Australia,' honoring Thomas who is a native of Adelaide in South Australia. The nine astronauts and cosmonauts aboard Discovery-Mir are spending their first full day of joint operations continuing the transfer of about four tons of logistical supplies and equipment. Much of the day is spent transferring water, scientific gear and other hardware between the two spacecraft. The crew members had transferred five bags of water to the Mir by the end of the day.

  2. Fine structure of Periplaneta americana neurons in long-term culture.

    PubMed

    Beadle, D J; Hicks, D; Middleton, C

    1982-08-01

    A new culture technique is described for dissociated ganglia of embryos of Periplaneta americana. Neurons obtained by the mechanical dissociation of ganglia from 23-26 day old embryos were grown for seven days in a combination of Schneider's Drosophila Medium and Eagle's Basal Medium and then transferred to a combination of Leibovitz's L-15 Medium and Yunker's Modified Grace's Medium supplemented with ecdysone. Neurons cultured in this way survived for periods in excess of one month. The cells had a typically neuronal ultrastructure and produced axonal processes that associated to form fibre bundles. Within these processes neurosecretory granules, dense-core vesicles and clear vesicles were found. In some instances these vesicles aggregated at points of contact between fibres giving the appearance of presynaptic endings. These cultures would appear to be suitable for pharmacological studies of the insect nervous system. PMID:7131046

  3. Effect of youth culture music on high school students' academic performance.

    PubMed

    Lavoie, J C; Collins, B R

    1975-03-01

    This study investigated the assumption that youth culture orientation adversely affects school performance, using rock music as the youth culture component. Adolescents in grades 9-12 were assigned to a subject matter topic in the area of literature, mathematics, physical science, or social science and requested to study this topic intensely for 30 min in a music condition consisting of rock, classical, or no music. The subjects then were tested on their retention of the factual content of the article either immediately after the study period, 1 day later, or 3 days later. Retention was significantly lower in the rock music condition. Students recalled more content in the literature topic and in the immediate test. The results are discussed with reference to a social learning theory interpretation of youth culture. PMID:24414436

  4. Factors Influencing Culture Positivity in Pyogenic Vertebral Osteomyelitis Patients with Prior Antibiotic Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chung-Jong; Kang, Seung-Ji; Yoon, Doran; Lee, Myung Jin; Kim, Moonsuk; Song, Kyoung-Ho; Jang, Hee-Chang; Jung, Sook-In; Kim, Eu Suk; Kim, Hong Bin; Oh, Myoung-don

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a retrospective cohort study to evaluate factors influencing tissue culture positivity in patients with pyogenic vertebral osteomyelitis exposed to antibiotics before diagnosis. Tissue culture was positive in 48.3% (28/58) of the patients, and the median antibiotic-free period was 1.5 days (range, 0.7 to 5.7 days). In a multivariate analysis, a higher C-reactive protein (CRP) level (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.18; 95% confidence interval, 1.07 to 1.29) and open surgical biopsy (aOR, 6.33; 95% confidence interval, 1.12 to 35.86) were associated with tissue culture positivity. PMID:25666156

  5. Bronchoscopic culture

    MedlinePLUS

    ... a laboratory exam to check a piece of tissue or fluid from the lungs for infection-causing organisms. ... Culture - bronchoscopic ... used to get a sample ( biopsy ) of lung tissue or fluid. The sample ... a special dish (culture). It is then watched to see if bacteria ...

  6. Ryukyuan Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trafton, Terry

    The Ryukyu Islands of Japan, of which Okinawa is the best known, possess a lengthy history and a sophisticated cultural background, an exploration of which helps to shed light on this area and on mainland Japan. This document is an exposition of Ryukuan culture. Divided into eight sections, the areas covered include: (1) Historical perspective;

  7. Cultural Communications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armas, Jose

    It is too often taken for granted that the communication process with culturally different children takes place as readily as it might with children from Anglo cultures. Most teachers receive training in verbal and formal communication skills; children come to school with nonverbal and informal communication skills. This initially can create

  8. STS-79 Flight Day 11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    On this eleventh day of the STS-79 mission, the flight crew, Cmdr. William F. Readdy, Pilot Terrence W. Wilcutt, Mission Specialists, Thomas D. Akers, Shannon Lucid, Jay Apt, and Carl E. Walz aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis glided into the Kennedy Space Center to mark the ending of the fourth docking flight with Mir and the end of Shannon Lucid's record setting 188 day stay on board the Russian space station.

  9. Go-To-Blazes Day.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLean, Ross

    THE FOLLOWING IS THE FULL TEXT OF THIS DOCUMENT: Last year, the Bruce Trail Association held its first annual Go-To-Blazes Day in which a record number of volunteers gave the 700 kilometres of Trail from Queenston to Tobermory a spring-cleaning. One key section of Trail near Dyer's Bay had been closed for over a year. On this day, over four miles

  10. Are you ready for that rainy day?

    PubMed

    O'Connor, John

    2009-01-01

    When taking out income protection, always insist that the company providing it will cover you for your 'own' occupation and not just 'any' occupation or a 'suited' one. Be aware of the deferred period or 'waiting time' and try and get some 'Day 1' in place. The younger a dentist decides to take out income protection, the better. Not only will they secure cover at a reasonable price now, but they will also be able to maintain it for their whole career. PMID:19301524

  11. A Day at the Museums

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubel, Joy Alter

    2009-01-01

    The school field trip, once a supporting player in a well-rounded education, is slowly becoming endangered. Widespread budget cuts have made happily anticipated class trips to museums, zoos, and other cultural destinations increasingly scarce. A librarian may be able to rescue the field trip from extinction by transforming the school building into

  12. A Day at the Museums

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubel, Joy Alter

    2009-01-01

    The school field trip, once a supporting player in a well-rounded education, is slowly becoming endangered. Widespread budget cuts have made happily anticipated class trips to museums, zoos, and other cultural destinations increasingly scarce. A librarian may be able to rescue the field trip from extinction by transforming the school building into…

  13. Antarctica Day: An International Celebration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, A.; Hambrook Berkman, J.; Berkman, P. A.

    2013-12-01

    For more than half a century, the 1959 Antarctic Treaty continues to shine as a rare beacon of international cooperation. To celebrate this milestone of peace in our civilization with hope and inspiration for future generations, Antarctica Day is celebrated each year on December 1st , the anniversary of the Antarctic Treaty signing. As an annual event - initiated by the Foundation for the Good Governance of International Spaces (www.internationalspaces.org/) in collaboration with the Association of Polar Early Carer Scientists (www.apecs.is) - Antarctica Day encourages participation from around the world. The Antarctic Treaty set aside 10% of the earth, 'forever to be used exclusively for peaceful purposes in the interest of mankind.' It was the first nuclear arms agreement and the first institution to govern all human activities in an international region beyond sovereign jurisdictions. In this spirit, Antarctica Day aims to: - Demonstrate how diverse nations can work together peacefully, using science as a global language of cooperation for decision making beyond national boundaries, - Provide strategies for students learning about Antarctica through art, science and history at all school levels, - Increase collaboration and communication between classrooms, communities, researchers and government officials around the world, and - Provide a focus for polar educators to build on each year. Through close collaboration with a number of partners. Antarctica Day activities have included: a Polar Film Festival convened by The Explorers Club; live sessions connecting classrooms with scientists in Antarctica thanks to PolarTREC and ARCUS; an international activity that involved children from 13 countries who created over 600 flags which exemplify Antarctica Day (these were actually flown in Antarctica with signed certificates then returned to the classes); a map where Antarctica Day participants all over the world could share what they were doing; an Antarctic bird count involving the International Association of Antarctic Tour Operators; and public lectures and online videos (including a notable submission from Polar Educators International). Antarctica Day was initiated as a legacy of the 2009 Antarctic Treaty Summit (www.atsumit50.aq), which was convened at the Smithsonian Institution with 40 sponsoring institutions from around the world as part of the International Polar Year. Antarctic Day involved participants from 14 nations in 2010. 28 nations in 2011, and 26 nations in 2012 with representatives from all 7 continents. Antarctica Day 2013 will have recently taken place before the AGU Fall Meeting 2013, and we will present updates at that time. Our aim is to continue expanding Antarctica Day as a globally-accessible platform to share, interpret and cherish the values associated with Antarctica for the benefit of present and future generations. We look forward to the discussion and sharing that this session will provide.

  14. Leadership for Learning: Tasks of Learning Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corrigan, Joe

    2012-01-01

    This is a comparative analysis of leadership related to organizational culture and change that occurred at a large Canadian university during a twenty year period 1983-2003. From an institutional development perspective, leadership is characterized as a culture creation and development responsibility. By centering on the tasks of learning culture,…

  15. The Wounded Bear: A Modern Day Medicine Story.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eagleheart, Shianne

    2002-01-01

    In Native American culture, medicine stories are used to teach important lessons that have healing effects on the listener. Following is an excerpt from "The Wounded Bear", a modern day medicine story. The story offers a blueprint for healing the heartbreak and violence in our communities. (Author)

  16. In the Schools: California Treat: Three Days in Five Ecosystems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rigby, Jennifer A.

    1986-01-01

    Describes a 3-day program sponsored by the Orange County Marine Institute that provides biological, cultural, and historical learning experiences. Discusses the setting and activities of the five ecosystems explored by the students. The Chaparral to Ocean Science Camp includes chaparral, riparian, woodland, intertidal, and pelagic environments.

  17. Giving Thanks: Observing Thanksgiving, Kwanzaa, and Day of the Dead.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dever, Martha T.; Barta, James J.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a primary-grade curriculum unit organized around the theme of "giving thanks" and encompassing the holidays of Thanksgiving, Kwanzaa, and Day of the Dead. Provides historical background and cultural context for each holiday, engagement activities, investigation activities, sharing activities, and a short list of related children's

  18. In the Schools: California Treat: Three Days in Five Ecosystems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rigby, Jennifer A.

    1986-01-01

    Describes a 3-day program sponsored by the Orange County Marine Institute that provides biological, cultural, and historical learning experiences. Discusses the setting and activities of the five ecosystems explored by the students. The Chaparral to Ocean Science Camp includes chaparral, riparian, woodland, intertidal, and pelagic environments.…

  19. Multi-cellular 3D human primary liver cell culture elevates metabolic activity under fluidic flow.

    PubMed

    Esch, Mandy B; Prot, Jean-Matthieu; Wang, Ying I; Miller, Paula; Llamas-Vidales, Jose Ricardo; Naughton, Brian A; Applegate, Dawn R; Shuler, Michael L

    2015-05-21

    We have developed a low-cost liver cell culture device that creates fluidic flow over a 3D primary liver cell culture that consists of multiple liver cell types, including hepatocytes and non-parenchymal cells (fibroblasts, stellate cells, and Kupffer cells). We tested the performance of the cell culture under fluidic flow for 14 days, finding that hepatocytes produced albumin and urea at elevated levels compared to static cultures. Hepatocytes also responded with induction of P450 (CYP1A1 and CYP3A4) enzyme activity when challenged with P450 inducers, although we did not find significant differences between static and fluidic cultures. Non-parenchymal cells were similarly responsive, producing interleukin 8 (IL-8) when challenged with 10 ?M bacterial lipoprotein (LPS). To create the fluidic flow in an inexpensive manner, we used a rocking platform that tilts the cell culture devices at angles between 12, resulting in a periodically changing hydrostatic pressure drop between reservoirs and the accompanying periodically changing fluidic flow (average flow rate of 650 ?L min(-1), and a maximum shear stress of 0.64 dyne cm(-2)). The increase in metabolic activity is consistent with the hypothesis that, similar to unidirectional fluidic flow, primary liver cell cultures increase their metabolic activity in response to fluidic flow periodically changes direction. Since fluidic flow that changes direction periodically drastically changes the behavior of other cells types that are shear sensitive, our findings support the theory that the increase in hepatic metabolic activity associated with fluidic flow is either activated by mechanisms other than shear sensing (for example increased opportunities for gas and metabolite exchange), or that it follows a shear sensing mechanism that does not depend on the direction of shear. Our mode of device operation allows us to evaluate drugs under fluidic cell culture conditions and at low device manufacturing and operation costs. PMID:25857666

  20. Synthesis of sperm-specific basic nuclear proteins (SPs) in cultured spermatids from Xenopus laevis

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, S.; Hiyoshi, H. )

    1991-05-01

    The accumulation and synthesis of sperm-specific basic nuclear proteins (SPs) in Xenopus spermatids in vitro were studied by acid-urea-Triton polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and fluorography. In synchronous cultures of round spermatids, the amount of SP2 and SP3-5 accumulated almost linearly with time, while that of SP1 remained almost constant. Fluorography showed that round spermatids incorporated {sup 14}C arginine mostly into SP1 and SP3-5, very little into SP2, and none into histones. When {sup 14}C arginine was incorporated into cells for 24 h on Days 0, 3, and 6, followed by immediate extraction of basic nuclear proteins, the SP1 band was detected faintly on Day 0 and the intensity increased to the maximum level by Day 3 and remained constant on Day 6; the SP3-5 bands were first detected on Day 3 and their intensity increased by Day 6. Thus, SP1 and SP3-5 were synthesized differentially during the culture period. When {sup 14}C arginine or {sup 14}C lysine was incorporated into round spermatids on Days 0, 3, and 6 for 15 h and chased for 3-12 days, the intensity of the SP2 band increased significantly, while the intensity of the SP1 band decreased concomitantly. This result indicates that SP2 was processed from a precursor protein which is probably SP1.

  1. Starting a Day Care Center: The Day Care Center Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Checkett, Donald

    Designed to be of help to individuals and groups seeking to establish a day care center in the metropolitan St. Louis area, this manual calls attention to important and basic information which must be taken into account if planning is to produce tangible results. Following a brief section defining commonly used terms referring to organized…

  2. Holy Day or Graduation Day in Fairfax County.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hentoff, Nat

    1980-01-01

    Discusses court cases which involved the First Amendment rights of two Jewish high school seniors. Presents the arguments between the seniors and their school board to have graduation day changed from the Jewish Sabbath so the seniors could participate in both events. (MK)

  3. Evaluation of postmortem bacterial migration using culturing and real-time quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Tuomisto, Sari; Karhunen, Pekka J; Vuento, Risto; Aittoniemi, Janne; Pessi, Tanja

    2013-07-01

    Postmortem bacteriology can be a valuable tool for evaluating deaths due to bacterial infection or for researching the involvement of bacteria in various diseases. In this study, time-dependent postmortem bacterial migration into liver, mesenteric lymph node, pericardial fluid, portal, and peripheral vein was analyzed in 33 autopsy cases by bacterial culturing and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). None suffered or died from bacterial infection. According to culturing, pericardial fluid and liver were the most sterile samples up to 5 days postmortem. In these samples, multigrowth and staphylococci were not or rarely detected. RT-qPCR was more sensitive and showed higher bacterial positivity in all samples. Relative amounts of intestinal bacterial DNA (bifidobacteria, bacteroides, enterobacter, clostridia) increased with time. Sterility of blood samples was low during the studied time periods (1-7 days). The best postmortem microbiological sampling sites were pericardial fluid and liver up to 5 days after death. PMID:23550887

  4. From microcarriers to hydrodynamics: introducing engineering science into animal cell culture.

    PubMed

    Croughan, Matthew S; Hu, Wei-Shou

    2006-10-01

    Professor Daniel I.C. Wang has conducted research in animal cell culture for approximately 40 years. Over that long time period and still to this day, he successfully addresses a multitude of engineering challenges, taking a unique, creative, systems-driven but still fundamental approach. As mammalian cell culture has become the predominant method of manufacturing therapeutic proteins, the impact of his leadership, not only in research but also student recruitment and education, has played a key role in the success of the bio/pharmaceutical industry. PMID:16933297

  5. Primary hepatocytes in monolayer culture: a model for studies on lipoprotein metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Forte, T.M.

    1984-01-01

    The pioneering studies of Berry and Friend on isolation of hepatocytes and that of Bissel et al on culturing hepatocytes in nonproliferating monolayers demonstrated the feasibility of using isolated parenchymal cells to study functional aspects of the liver. The obvious advantage of such a system is that one can study metabolic events in a defined, easily manipulated population of cells for periods of hours or even days. This review focuses on nonproliferating hepatic parenchymal cells in monolayer culture as a model for investigating lipoprotein synthesis and degradation. 60 references, 1 table.

  6. The Ocean Sampling Day Consortium

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kopf, Anna; Bicak, Mesude; Kottmann, Renzo; Schnetzer, Julia; Kostadinov, Ivaylo; Lehmann, Katja; Fernandez-Guerra, Antonio; Jeanthon, Christian; Rahav, Eyal; Ullrich, Matthias; et al

    2015-06-19

    In this study, Ocean Sampling Day was initiated by the EU-funded Micro B3 (Marine Microbial Biodiversity, Bioinformatics, Biotechnology) project to obtain a snapshot of the marine microbial biodiversity and function of the world’s oceans. It is a simultaneous global mega-sequencing campaign aiming to generate the largest standardized microbial data set in a single day. This will be achievable only through the coordinated efforts of an Ocean Sampling Day Consortium, supportive partnerships and networks between sites. This commentary outlines the establishment, function and aims of the Consortium and describes our vision for a sustainable study of marine microbial communities and theirmore » embedded functional traits.« less

  7. The moon-day project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchal, C.

    1982-07-01

    With the development of Astronautics very large projects become possible. The Moon-Day project comes from a simple idea: 2000 km 2 of mirrors on the Moon reflecting the solar light toward the Earth will make it possible to turn off street lighting during the Moon nights. With more mirrors it is even possible to produce a "moon-day" similar to the light at sunrise or sunset, that will be a great improvement on the quality of life, especially in tropical and equatorial countries where people, and above all farmers, will have the possibility to work during the cool night hours instead of the exhausting day hours. Comparison with mirrors on a geostationary orbit shows the many advantages of the mirrors on the Moon.

  8. The day-to-day occurrence of equatorial plasma bubbles measured from Vanimo, Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, B. A.; Yizengaw, E.; Francis, M.; Terkildsen, M. B.; Marshall, R. A.; Norman, R.; Zhang, K.

    2013-12-01

    An analysis of the occurrence of Equatorial Plasma Bubbles (EPBs) detected using a ground-based Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver located at Vanimo in South-east Asia will be presented. The 3-year (2000-2002) dataset employed shows that the EPB occurrence maximizes (minimizes) during the equinoxes (solstices), in good agreement with previous findings. The low-latitude ionosonde station at Vanimo is used in conjunction with the GPS receiver in an analysis of the day-to-day EPB occurrence variability during the equinox period. A superposed epoch analysis of the ionosonde data reveals that the height, and the change in height, of the F layer is 1 standard deviation (1σ) larger on the days for which EPBs were detected, compared to non-EPB days. These results are interpreted using the generalized Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) plasma instability growth rate, for which stronger upward drift of the lower-altitude F-layer plasma promotes faster growth of EPBs after sunset. These results are then compared to the results of the Thermosphere Ionosphere Electrodynamic General Circulation Model (TIEGCM), which surprisingly show strong similarities to the observations, despite only using geomagnetic and solar activity inputs. The TIEGCM is also used to directly calculate the hourly flux-tube integrated R-T growth rate. A superposed epoch analysis reveals that the modeled R-T growth rate is a little less than 1σ higher on average for EPB days compared to non-EPB days. The implication of this result is that the TIEGCM generates almost enough day-to-day variability in order to account for the day-to-day EPB occurrence observed during the equinox. This result isn't necessarily expected due to the model's limited altitude coverage of 100-700 km (depending on solar activity) and the lack of ionospheric observation inputs. It is thought that the remaining variability could originate from either lower altitudes (e.g. atmospheric gravity waves from the troposphere) or from higher altitudes (resulting from coupling with the magnetosphere and solar wind), or potentially both. It is concluded that the continuing advancement of numerical modeling of the thermosphere and ionosphere, coupled with altitudes above and below, is required to better understand the day-to-day EPB occurrence.

  9. The Periodic Pyramid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hennigan, Jennifer N.; Grubbs, W. Tandy

    2013-01-01

    The chemical elements present in the modern periodic table are arranged in terms of atomic numbers and chemical periodicity. Periodicity arises from quantum mechanical limitations on how many electrons can occupy various shells and subshells of an atom. The shell model of the atom predicts that a maximum of 2, 8, 18, and 32 electrons can occupy

  10. The Periodic Pyramid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hennigan, Jennifer N.; Grubbs, W. Tandy

    2013-01-01

    The chemical elements present in the modern periodic table are arranged in terms of atomic numbers and chemical periodicity. Periodicity arises from quantum mechanical limitations on how many electrons can occupy various shells and subshells of an atom. The shell model of the atom predicts that a maximum of 2, 8, 18, and 32 electrons can occupy…

  11. "Every Day He Has a Dream to Tell": Classroom Literacy Curriculum in a Full-Day Kindergarten

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heydon, Rachel; Moffatt, Lyndsay; Iannacci, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Within an era of change to early childhood education and care, this case study of kindergarten classroom literacy curricula sought to understand the production and effects of the curriculum within one urban, Canadian full-day kindergarten that included culturally and linguistically diverse children. Central was a concern for the place of

  12. "Every Day He Has a Dream to Tell": Classroom Literacy Curriculum in a Full-Day Kindergarten

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heydon, Rachel; Moffatt, Lyndsay; Iannacci, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Within an era of change to early childhood education and care, this case study of kindergarten classroom literacy curricula sought to understand the production and effects of the curriculum within one urban, Canadian full-day kindergarten that included culturally and linguistically diverse children. Central was a concern for the place of…

  13. STS-74 flight day 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-11-01

    On the second day of the STS-74 mission, the flight crew, Cmdr. Kenneth Cameron, Pilot James Halsell, and Mission Specialists William McArthur, Jerry Ross, and Chris Hatfield, were awakened to music from the play 'The Nutcracker'. The astronauts hosted an in-orbit interview with Canadian reporters and journalists from Toronto, answering general questions about living in space and space flight, and explaining the delicate maneuvers that the shuttle will have to perform for the Mir docking procedures scheduled for the next day. Due to the awkward angle that the shuttle will use to approach the Mir, the docking procedure will be done in an almost blind state.

  14. STS-79 Flight Day 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    On this seventh day of the STS-79 mission, the flight crew, Cmdr. William F. Readdy, Pilot Terrence W. Wilcutt, Mission Specialists, Thomas D. Akers, Shannon Lucid, Jay Apt, and Carl E. Walz, share a brief video tour of the Mir Space Station with flight controllers, taking a break from the transfer activities that has occupied the astronauts' time during three days of docked operations. Readdy and Apt floated through several of Mir's modules and back into Atlantis' double Spacehab module during the tour pointing out the numerous transfer items stowed on both spacecraft. Readdy, Wilcutt, Lucid and Blaha are seen discussing their mission in an interview with CNN's John Holliman.

  15. Day-to-day temperature variability trends in 160- to 275-year-long European instrumental records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moberg, A.; Jones, P. D.; Barriendos, M.; BergstrM, H.; Camuffo, D.; Cocheo, C.; Davies, T. D.; DemarE, G.; Martin-Vide, J.; Maugeri, M.; Rodriguez, R.; Verhoeve, T.

    2000-09-01

    Day-to-day temperature variability is investigated in eight European series of daily mean temperatures beginning between 1722 and 1833. Eight statistical measures of day-to-day temperature variability are compared. The intramonthly standard deviation of daily temperature anomalies is found to be a good measure. The absolute change in temperature anomaly from one day to the next is sensitive to changes in observational procedures and is suggested as a diagnostic tool for identification of inhomogeneities in instrumental temperature series. Because many changes in observational procedures have taken place, quantitative estimates of trends in day-to-day variability, based on all series, could only be calculated for 1880-1998. A trend analysis over this period indicates an increase by 5% in southwest Europe, 0 to -5% change in the northwest, and a decrease by 5 to 10% in northeast Europe. On a longer time perspective, day-to-day temperature variability in winter, spring, and autumn in northern Europe has decreased over the last 200-250 years. The frequency of extremely cold winter days in northern Europe was lower in the twentieth century than in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Day-to-day temperature variability in winter in northern Europe was negatively correlated with a North Atlantic Oscillation index in the period 1826-1997, but some other factor must also have contributed to the long-term variability decrease. More long daily temperature series, and development of homogenization methods for such data, are needed for an improved knowledge of long-term changes in day-to-day temperature variability.

  16. Esophageal culture

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for infection-causing germs in a sample of tissue from the esophagus. ... Culture - esophageal ... A sample of tissue from your esophagus is needed. The sample is ... or viruses. Other tests may be done to determine what medicine ...

  17. Modeling the contribution of individual proteins to mixed skeletal muscle protein synthetic rates over increasing periods of label incorporation.

    PubMed

    Miller, Benjamin F; Wolff, Christopher A; Peelor, Fredrick F; Shipman, Patrick D; Hamilton, Karyn L

    2015-03-15

    Advances in stable isotope approaches, primarily the use of deuterium oxide ((2)H2O), allow for long-term measurements of protein synthesis, as well as the contribution of individual proteins to tissue measured protein synthesis rates. Here, we determined the influence of individual protein synthetic rates, individual protein content, and time of isotopic labeling on the measured synthesis rate of skeletal muscle proteins. To this end, we developed a mathematical model, applied the model to an established data set collected in vivo, and, to experimentally test the impact of different isotopic labeling periods, used (2)H2O to measure protein synthesis in cultured myotubes over periods of 2, 4, and 7 days. We first demonstrated the influence of both relative protein content and individual protein synthesis rates on measured synthesis rates over time. When expanded to include 286 individual proteins, the model closely approximated protein synthetic rates measured in vivo. The model revealed a 29% difference in measured synthesis rates from the slowest period of measurement (20 min) to the longest period of measurement (6 wk). In support of these findings, culturing of C2C12 myotubes with isotopic labeling periods of 2, 4, or 7 days revealed up to a doubling of the measured synthesis rate in the shorter labeling period compared with the longer period of labeling. From our model, we conclude that a 4-wk period of labeling is ideal for considering all proteins in a mixed-tissue fraction, while minimizing the slowing effect of fully turned-over proteins. In addition, we advocate that careful consideration must be paid to the period of isotopic labeling when comparing mixed protein synthetic rates between studies. PMID:25593288

  18. Modeling the contribution of individual proteins to mixed skeletal muscle protein synthetic rates over increasing periods of label incorporation

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Christopher A.; Peelor, Fredrick F.; Shipman, Patrick D.; Hamilton, Karyn L.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in stable isotope approaches, primarily the use of deuterium oxide (2H2O), allow for long-term measurements of protein synthesis, as well as the contribution of individual proteins to tissue measured protein synthesis rates. Here, we determined the influence of individual protein synthetic rates, individual protein content, and time of isotopic labeling on the measured synthesis rate of skeletal muscle proteins. To this end, we developed a mathematical model, applied the model to an established data set collected in vivo, and, to experimentally test the impact of different isotopic labeling periods, used 2H2O to measure protein synthesis in cultured myotubes over periods of 2, 4, and 7 days. We first demonstrated the influence of both relative protein content and individual protein synthesis rates on measured synthesis rates over time. When expanded to include 286 individual proteins, the model closely approximated protein synthetic rates measured in vivo. The model revealed a 29% difference in measured synthesis rates from the slowest period of measurement (20 min) to the longest period of measurement (6 wk). In support of these findings, culturing of C2C12 myotubes with isotopic labeling periods of 2, 4, or 7 days revealed up to a doubling of the measured synthesis rate in the shorter labeling period compared with the longer period of labeling. From our model, we conclude that a 4-wk period of labeling is ideal for considering all proteins in a mixed-tissue fraction, while minimizing the slowing effect of fully turned-over proteins. In addition, we advocate that careful consideration must be paid to the period of isotopic labeling when comparing mixed protein synthetic rates between studies. PMID:25593288

  19. 7 CFR 3015.22 - Starting date of retention period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Starting date of retention period. 3015.22 Section... Access Requirements 3015.22 Starting date of retention period. (a) General. The retention period starts... funding period starts on the day the recipient submits to USDA its annual or final expenditure report...

  20. The "Little" Cultural Tradition of Hispanics. (La "Pequena" Tradicion Cultural de los Hispanos.)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benitez, Jose Spielberg

    1980-01-01

    Defining "little" cultural traditions as those customs, behaviors and attitudes of ordinary people involved in the day-to-day problems of living and survival, this article traces the origins, historic influences and general characteristics of Hispanic culture and of its Mexican, Puerto Rican and Cuban subcultures. (DS)