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1

77 FR 50062 - Safety Zone; Embry-Riddle Wings and Waves, Atlantic Ocean; Daytona Beach, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Embry-Riddle Wings and Waves, Atlantic Ocean; Daytona Beach, FL AGENCY...safety zone on the waters of the Atlantic Ocean east of Daytona Beach, Florida...host an air show event over the Atlantic Ocean in Daytona Beach, FL. In...

2012-08-20

2

Modifications in the DACUM Process of Curriculum Development at Daytona Beach Community College.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process has helped Daytona Beach Community College (DBCC) resolve several important issues in competency-based instruction. DACUM involves expert workers in defining and describing their jobs. A panel of workers and supervisors identify general areas of competence required in their jobs; specify skills within…

Klingman, Peter D.; Gardner, W. Aubrey

3

Beach and Inlet Task Force Report (Florida).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Beach erosion and inlet shoaling have been determined by both public and private authorities to be a serious problem for the economy and general welfare of the citizens and residents of Florida. To effectively cope with this problem, the state must develo...

1978-01-01

4

Visitors' Motivation for Attending the South Beach Wine and Food Festival, Miami Beach, Florida  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this study was to identify the major factors that motivated visitors to attend the South Beach Wine and Food Festival in Miami Beach, Florida, and determine whether these factors varied among the visitors from the United States, Canada, South America, Europe, and Asia. A survey of 475 visitors to South Florida was conducted in February 2006. Forty?four

Yvette Reisinger

2008-01-01

5

Ecological Monitoring of Beach Erosion Control Projects, Broward County, Florida, and Adjacent Areas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Ecological monitoring of algae, invertebrates, and fishes was conducted in the southeast Florida coast in connection with offshore dredging and beach nourishment projects. The Pompano Beach to Lauderdale-by-the-Sea segment of the Broward County Beach Eros...

D. J. Harrema J. van Montfrans M. J. Thompson W. P. Azzinaro W. R. Courtenay

1974-01-01

6

Ecological Evaluation of a Beach Nourishment Project at Hallandale (Broward County) Florida. Volume II. Evaluation of Benthic Communities Adjacent to a Restored Beach, Hallandale (Broward County), Florida.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Benthic communities adjacent to a restored beach at Hallandale (Broward County), Florida were analyzed and compared to similar communities at nearby Golden Beach (Dade County). Five sand stations and four reef stations were sampled at each locality along ...

G. A. Marsh, P. R. Bowen, D. R. Deis, D. B. Turbeville, W. R. Courtenay

1980-01-01

7

ASSESSMENT OF OFFSHORE SAND RESOURCES FOR BEACH NOURISHMENT ALONG THE SOUTHWEST COAST OF FLORIDA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Regional sand resource investigations along the west coast of Florida (from Pinellas County to Collier County) identify types of primary depositional settings that are commonly explored for beach nourishment projects and indicate future availability of sand for beach restoration. Because the nature of sedimentary deposits determines sand quality and its potential use for beach nourishment, it is necessary to understand

Charles W. Finkl; Jeffrey L. Andrews; Lindino Benedet

8

Geomorphology and Sediments of the Inner Continental Shelf - Palm Beach to Cape Kennedy, Florida.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Inner Continental Shelf off eastern Florida was surveyed by CERC to obtain information on bottom morphology and sediments, subbottom structure, and sand deposits suitable for restoration of nearby beaches. Primary survey data consists of seismic refle...

D. B. Duane E. P. Meisburger

1971-01-01

9

Using multiple geochemical tracers to characterize the hydrogeology of the submarine spring off Crescent Beach, Florida  

Microsoft Academic Search

A spectacular submarine spring is located about 4 km east of Crescent Beach, FL, in the Atlantic Ocean. The single vent feature of Crescent Beach Spring provides a unique opportunity to examine onshore–offshore hydrogeologic processes, as well as point source submarine ground water discharge. The Floridan aquifer system in northeastern Florida consists of Tertiary interspersed limestone and dolomite strata. Impermeable

P. W Swarzenski; C. D Reich; R. M Spechler; J. L Kindinger; W. S Moore

2001-01-01

10

Origin of stable flies (Diptera: Muscidae) on west Florida beaches: electrophoretic analysis of dispersal.  

PubMed

Stable fly adults were collected from 16 locations within the state of Florida and from locations in six other states in an attempt to determine the source of stable fly populations along Florida beaches on the Gulf of Mexico. Electrophoretic analyses were made of a minimum of 10 enzymes in each of 37 separate populations. Extremely low heterozygosity resulted in an inability to use standard genetic identity and distance procedures for determining the divergence of allopatric populations to establish the source of flies captured from beach areas where reproduction was unlikely. Comparisons of rare alleles in populations grouped geographically, computations of number of possible migrants, and analysis of conditional average frequency of alleles led to the conclusion that flies captured on Florida beaches come from a variety of sites, with locations northwest of the beaches contributing the majority of flies in outbreaks. PMID:1770514

Jones, C J; Hogsette, J A; Patterson, R S; Milne, D E; Propp, G D; Milio, J F; Rickard, L G; Ruff, J P

1991-11-01

11

Direct-current resistivity data from 94 sites in northeastern Palm Beach County, Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Direct-current resistivity data were collected from 94 vertical electric sounding profiles in northeastern Palm Beach County, Florida. Direct-current resistivity data, which may be used to determine the location and thicknesses of shallow, semipermeable marls or locate zones of high chloride concentration, are presented in this report. The resistivity data consist of field data, smoothed data, layer resistivity from smoothed data, and Cartesian graphs of resistivity in relation to depth for 94 sites located in northeastern Palm Beach County. (USGS)

Peterson, Cathleen J.

1988-01-01

12

Geologic data from test drilling in Palm Beach County, Florida since 1970  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Test hole data, in Palm Beach County, Florida, include lithologic logs from 66 test wells and geophysical logs from 54 test wells. The purpose of the study is to provide the geohydrologic information needed for water management and land use decisions, with emphasis on the urbanized eastern part of the county and the readily developable area in the central part. (Woodard-USGS)

Schneider, James J.

1976-01-01

13

Black Immigrant Mothers in Palm Beach County, Florida, and Their Children's Readiness for School  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report compares the circumstances and characteristics of Black immigrant mothers in Palm Beach County, Florida, to those of Latina immigrant and Black native-born mothers, focusing on those living in distressed areas. The study also compares the early developmental outcomes of their children. When controlling for parental and child…

Rich, Lauren; Spielberger, Julie; D'Angelo, Angela Valdovinos

2012-01-01

14

Wild Coastline Birds as Reservoirs of Broad-Spectrum-?-Lactamase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae in Miami Beach, Florida  

PubMed Central

A high rate of broad-spectrum-?-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli isolates was identified from seagull and pelican feces collected in the Miami Beach, Florida, area. The most commonly identified resistance determinants were CMY-2 and CTX-M-15. Those wild birds might be therefore considered vehicles for wide dissemination of multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae in the United States.

Potron, Anais; De La Cuesta, Carolina; Cleary, Timothy; Nordmann, Patrice; Munoz-Price, L. Silvia

2012-01-01

15

Ecological Evaluation of a Beach Nourishment Project at Hallandale (Broward County), Florida. Volume I. Evaluation of Fish Populations Adjacent to Borrow Areas of Beach Nourishment Project, Hallandale (Broward County), Florida.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A study of the fish populations within the surf zone and over the first and second reefs off Hallandale (Broward County), Florida, was conducted, 7 years following dredging for a beach restoration project. This study utilized an observational and recordin...

W. R. Courtenay, B. C. Hartig, G. R. Loisel

1980-01-01

16

Daytona And The Fourth-Generation Language Cymbal  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Daytona™ data management system is used by AT&T to solve a wide spectrum of data management problems. For example, Daytona is managing a 4 terabyte data warehouse whose largest table contains over 10 billion rows. Daytona's architecture is based on translating its high-level query language Cymbal™ (which includes SQL as a subset) completely into C and then compiling that

Rick Greer

1999-01-01

17

Relationship between Enterococcal Levels and Sediment Biofilms at Recreational Beaches in South Florida  

PubMed Central

Enterococci, recommended at the U.S. federal level for monitoring water quality at marine recreational beaches, have been found to reside and grow within beach sands. However, the environmental and ecological factors affecting enterococcal persistence remain poorly understood, making it difficult to determine levels of fecal pollution and assess human health risks. Here we document the presence of enterococci associated with beach sediment biofilms at eight south Florida recreational beaches. Enterococcal levels were highest in supratidal sands, where they displayed a nonlinear, unimodal relationship with extracellular polymeric secretions (EPS), the primary component of biofilms. Enterococcal levels peaked at intermediate levels of EPS, suggesting that biofilms may promote the survival of enterococci but also inhibit enterococci as the biofilm develops within beach sands. Analysis of bacterial community profiles determined by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphisms showed the bacterial communities of supratidal sediments to be significantly different from intertidal and subtidal communities; however, no differences were observed in bacterial community compositions associated with different EPS concentrations. Our results suggest that supratidal sands are a microbiologically unique environment favorable for the incorporation and persistence of enterococci within beach sediment biofilms.

Piggot, Alan M.; Johnson, Sara; Phillips, Matthew C.; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M.

2012-01-01

18

Airborne radioactivity survey of parts of Atlantic Ocean beach, Virginia to Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The accompanying maps show the results of an airborne radioactivity survey along the Atlantic Ocean beach from Cape Henry, Virginia to Cape Fear, North Carolina and from Savannah Bach Georgia to Miami Beach, Florida. The survey was made March 23-24, 1953, as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. The survey was made with scintillation detection equipment mounted in a Douglas DC-3 aircraft and consisted of one flight line, at a 500-foot altitude, parallel to the beach. The vertical projection of the flight line coincided approximately with the landward limit of the modern beach. The width of the zone on the ground from which anomalous radiation is measured at the normal 500 foot flight altitude varies with the areal extent radioactivity of the source. For strong sources of radioactivity the width of the zone would be as much as 1,400 feet. The location of the flight lines is shown on the index map below. No abnormal radioactivity was detected along the northern flight line between Cape Henry, Virginia and Cape Fear, North Carolina. Along the southern flight line fourteen areas of abnormal radioactivity were detected between Savannah Beach, Georgia and Anastasia Island, Florida as shown on the map on the left. The abnormal radioactivity is apparently due to radioactive minerals associated with "black sand" deposits with occur locally along the beach in this region. The present technique of airborne radioactivity measurement does not permit distinguishing between activity sue to thorium and that due to uranium. An anomaly, therefore, may represent radioactivity due entirely to one or to a combination of these elements. It is not possible to determine the extent or radioactive content of the materials responsible for the abnormal radioactivity. The information given on the accompanying map indicates only those localities of greater-than-average radioactivity and, therefore suggest areas in which uranium and thorium deposits are more likely to occur.

Moxham, R.M.; Johnson, R.W.

1953-01-01

19

Proceedings of the 1998 Photovoltaic Performance and Reliability Workshop; Cocoa Beach, Florida; November 3-5, 1998  

SciTech Connect

This proceedings is the compilation of all papers presented at the 11th PV Performance and Reliability Workshop held at the Doubletree Hotel in Cocoa Beach, Florida, on November 3-5, 1998. The workshop was hosted by the Florida Solar Energy Center. This year's workshop included presentations from 29 speakers and had 110 attendees.

Kroposki, B.

1998-12-17

20

Florida Red Tide and Human Health: A Pilot Beach Conditions Reporting System to Minimize Human Exposure  

PubMed Central

With over 50% of the US population living in coastal counties, the ocean and coastal environments have substantial impacts on coastal communities. While may of the impacts are positive, such as tourism and recreation opportunities, there are also negative impacts, such as exposure to harmful algal blooms (HABs) and water borne pathogens. Recent advances in environmental monitoring and weather prediction may allow us to forecast these potential adverse effects and thus mitigate the negative impact from coastal environmental threats. One example of the need to mitigate adverse environmental impacts occurs on Florida’s west coast, which experiences annual blooms, or periods of exuberant growth, of the toxic dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis. K. brevis produces a suite of potent neurotoxins called brevetoxins. Wind and wave action can break up the cells, releasing toxin that can then become part of the marine aerosol or sea spray. Brevetoxins in the aerosol cause respiratory irritation in people who inhale it. In addition, asthmatics who inhale the toxins report increase upper and lower airway lower symptoms and experience measurable changes in pulmonary function. Real-time reporting of the presence or absence of these toxic aerosols will allow asthmatics and local coastal residents to make informed decisions about their personal exposures, thus adding to their quality of life. A system to protect public health that combines information collected by an Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) has been designed and implemented in Sarasota and Manatee Counties, Florida. This system is based on real-time reports from lifeguards at the eight public beaches. The lifeguards provide periodic subjective reports of the amount of dead fish on the beach, apparent level of respiratory irritation among beach-goers, water color, wind direction, surf condition, and the beach warning flag they are flying. A key component in the design of the observing system was an easy reporting pathway for the lifeguards to minimize the amount of time away from their primary duties. Specifically, we provided a Personal Digital Assistant for each of the eight beaches. The portable unit allows the lifeguards to report from their guard tower. The data are transferred via wireless Internet to a website hosted on the Mote Marine Laboratory Sarasota Operations of the Coastal Ocean Observation Laboratories (SO COOL) server. The system has proven to be robust and well received by the public. The system has reported variability from beach to beach and has provided vital information to users to minimize their exposure to toxic marine aerosols.

Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Currier, Robert; Nierenberg, Kate; Reich, Andrew; Backer, Lorraine C.; Stumpf, Richard; Fleming, Lora; Kirkpatrick, Gary

2008-01-01

21

Florida red tide and human health: a pilot beach conditions reporting system to minimize human exposure.  

PubMed

With over 50% of the US population living in coastal counties, the ocean and coastal environments have substantial impacts on coastal communities. While many of the impacts are positive, such as tourism and recreation opportunities, there are also negative impacts, such as exposure to harmful algal blooms (HABs) and water borne pathogens. Recent advances in environmental monitoring and weather prediction may allow us to forecast these potential adverse effects and thus mitigate the negative impact from coastal environmental threats. One example of the need to mitigate adverse environmental impacts occurs on Florida's west coast, which experiences annual blooms, or periods of exuberant growth, of the toxic dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis. K. brevis produces a suite of potent neurotoxins called brevetoxins. Wind and wave action can break up the cells, releasing toxin that can then become part of the marine aerosol or sea spray. Brevetoxins in the aerosol cause respiratory irritation in people who inhale it. In addition, asthmatics who inhale the toxins report increase upper and lower airway symptoms and experience measurable changes in pulmonary function. Real-time reporting of the presence or absence of these toxic aerosols will allow asthmatics and local coastal residents to make informed decisions about their personal exposures, thus adding to their quality of life. A system to protect public health that combines information collected by an Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) has been designed and implemented in Sarasota and Manatee Counties, Florida. This system is based on real-time reports from lifeguards at the eight public beaches. The lifeguards provide periodic subjective reports of the amount of dead fish on the beach, apparent level of respiratory irritation among beach-goers, water color, wind direction, surf condition, and the beach warning flag they are flying. A key component in the design of the observing system was an easy reporting pathway for the lifeguards to minimize the amount of time away from their primary duties. Specifically, we provided a Personal Digital Assistant for each of the eight beaches. The portable unit allows the lifeguards to report from their guard tower. The data are transferred via wireless Internet to a website hosted on the Mote Marine Laboratory Sarasota Operations of the Coastal Ocean Observation Laboratories (SO COOL) server. The system has proven to be robust and well received by the public. The system has reported variability from beach to beach and has provided vital information to users to minimize their exposure to toxic marine aerosols. PMID:18501955

Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Currier, Robert; Nierenberg, Kate; Reich, Andrew; Backer, Lorraine C; Stumpf, Richard; Fleming, Lora; Kirkpatrick, Gary

2008-08-25

22

Airborne laser quantification of Florida shoreline and beach volume change caused by hurricanes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This dissertation combines three separate studies that measure coastal change using airborne laser data. The initial study develops a method for measuring subaerial and subaqueous volume change incrementally alongshore, and compares those measurements to shoreline change in order to quantify their relationship in Palm Beach County, Florida. A poor correlation (R2 = 0.39) was found between shoreline and volume change before the hurricane season in the northern section of Palm Beach County because of beach nourishment and inlet dynamics. However, a relatively high R2 value of 0.78 in the southern section of Palm Beach County was found due to little disturbance from tidal inlets and coastal engineering projects. The shoreline and volume change caused by the 2004 hurricane season was poorly correlated with R 2 values of 0.02 and 0.42 for the north and south sections, respectively. The second study uses airborne laser data to investigate if there is a significant relationship between shoreline migration before and after Hurricane Ivan near Panama City, Florida. In addition, the relationship between shoreline change and subaerial volume was quantified and a new method for quantifying subaqueous sediment change was developed. No significant spatial relationship was found between shoreline migration before and after the hurricane. Utilization of a single coefficient to represent all relationships between shoreline and subaerial volume change was found to be problematic due to the spatial variability in the linear relationship. Differences in bathymetric data show only a small portion of sediment was transported beyond the active zone and most sediment remained within the active zone despite the occurrence of a hurricane. The third study uses airborne laser bathymetry to measure the offshore limit of change, and compares that location with calculated depth of closures and subaqueous geomorphology. There appears to be strong geologic control of the depth of closure in Broward and Miami-Dade Counties. North of Hillsboro Inlet, hydrodynamics control the geomorphology which in turn indicates the location of the depth of closure.

Robertson, William, V.

23

Aerial gamma ray and magnetic survey: West Palm Beach quadrangle, Florida. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The West Palm Beach quadrangle of south peninsular Florida, covers 8300 square miles of predominantly Floridan Everglades. Extremely thick platform deposits overlie the pre-Cretaceous Peninsular Arch. Surficial exposures are entirely Miocene to Recent in age. A search of available literature revealed no economically feasible uranium deposits. Thirty-two uranium anomalies were detected and are discussed briefly in this report. All appear to have cultural associations, and none appear to contain significant measured quantities of uranium. Magnetic data appear to be roughly in agreement with present structural interpretations, but suggest some lithologic and/or structural complexities in the Paleozoic and older basement material.

Not Available

1981-03-01

24

Airborne radioactivity survey of the Gulf of Mexico beach between Sanibel Island and Caladesi Island, Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The accompanying map shows the results of an airborne radioactivity survey along the Gulf of Mexico beach between Sanibel Island and Caladesi Island in Florida. This survey was made May 4, 1953, as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. The survey was made with scintillation detection equipment mounted in a Douglas DC-3 aircraft and consisted of one flight line, at a 500-foot altitude , parallel to the beach. The vertical projection of the flight line coincided approximately with the landward limit of the modern beach. The width of the zone on the ground from which anomalous radiation is measured at the nominal 500 foot flight altitude varies with the areal extent and intensity of the radioactivity the width of the zone may be as much as 1400 feet. The accompanying map and index map show the approximate locations of the areas of greater-than-average radioactivity and the location of the traverse flown. The abnormal radioactivity is apparently caused by radioactive minerals associated with "black sand" deposits which occur locally along the beach in the region. The present technique of airborne radioactivity measurement does not permit distinguishing between activity due to thorium and that due to uranium. An anomaly, therefore, may represent radioactivity due entirely to one or to a combination of these elements. It is not possible to determine the extent or radioactive content of the materials responsible for the abnormal radioactivity. The information given in the accompanying map showing the localities of greater-than-average radioactivity therefore, suggests area in which uranium or thorium deposits are more likely to occur.

Meuschke, J.L.; Moxham, R.M.; Bortner, T.E.

1953-01-01

25

The fate of wastewater-derived nitrate in the subsurface of the Florida Keys: Key Colony Beach, Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Shallow injection is the predominant mode of wastewater disposal for most tourist-oriented facilities and some residential communities in the US Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary. Concern has been expressed that wastewater nutrients may be escaping from the saline groundwater system into canals and surrounding coastal waters and perhaps to the reef tract 10 km offshore, promoting unwanted algal growth and degradation of water quality. We performed a field study of the fate of wastewater-derived nitrate in the subsurface of a Florida Keys residential community (Key Colony Beach, FL) that uses this disposal method, analyzing samples from 21 monitoring wells and two canal sites. The results indicate that wastewater injection at 18-27 m depth into saline groundwater creates a large buoyant plume that flows quickly (within days) upward to a confining layer 6 m below the surface, and then in a fast flow path toward a canal 200 m to the east within a period of weeks to months. Low-salinity groundwaters along the fast flow path have nitrate concentrations that are not significantly reduced from that of the injected wastewaters (ranging from 400 to 600 ??molkg-1). Portions of the low-salinity plume off the main axis of flow have relatively long residence times (>2 months) and have had their nitrate concentrations strongly reduced by a combination of mixing and denitrification. These waters have dissolved N 2 concentrations up to 1.6 times air-saturation values with ??15N[N2] = 0.5 - 5???, ?? 15N[NO3-] = 16-26???, and calculated isotope fractionation factors of about -12??4???, consistent with denitrification as the predominant nitrate reduction reaction. Estimated rates of denitrification of wastewater in the aquifer are of the order of 4 ??molkg-1N day-1 or 0.008 day-1. The data indicate that denitrification reduces the nitrate load of the injected wastewater substantially, but not completely, before it discharges to nearby canals.

Griggs, E. M.; Kump, L. R.; Bohlke, J. K.

2003-01-01

26

PROCEEDINGS OF THE WORKSHOP: MICROBIAL DEGRADATION OF POLLUTANTS IN MARINE ENVIRONMENTS HELD AT PENSACOLA BEACH, FLORIDA ON 9-14 APRIL 1978  

EPA Science Inventory

The international workshop, held April 10-14, 1978, at Pensacola Beach, Florida, focuses on pertinent issues related to the scientific investigation of microbial degradation of organic chemicals in aquatic environments. Participants discuss methodological criteria for these inves...

27

THE APPLICATION OF PEPTIDE NUCLEIC ACID PROBES FOR RAPID DETECTION AND ENUMERATION OF EUBACTERIA, STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS AND PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA IN RECREATIONAL BEACHES OF S. FLORIDA. (R828830)  

EPA Science Inventory

A novel chemiluminescent in situ hybridization technique using peptide nucleic acids (PNA) was adapted for the detection of bacteria in beach sand and recreational waters in South Florida. The simultaneous detection and enumeration of eubacteria and the novel indicators, S...

28

Literature Review and Cultural Resources Survey of the U.S. Coast Guard Light Station, Jupiter Inlet, Palm Beach County, Florida.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This project consisted of a literature review and cultural resources survey of the Jupiter Inlet Coast Guard Station, Palm Beach County, Florida. An intensive survey of 122 acres was conducted resulting in identification and evaluation of one large prehis...

C. S. Weed L. J. Campbell P. M. Thomas

1982-01-01

29

Evaluation of a cavity-riddled zone of the shallow aquifer near Riviera Beach, Palm Beach County, Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The shallow aquifer near Riviera Beach, Palm Beach County, Fla., contains a cavity-riddled zone extending north and south about 5 miles inland from the Atlantic Ocean. The zone lies at approximately 60 feet below land surface and varies from 15 to 50 feet in thickness. It is approximately 3 miles in width. Aquifer material is calcareous quartz sand-stone in the cavity zone, whereas the remainder of the consolidated aquifer material is primarily limestone. The zone is overlain by several thin clay beds which provide varying degrees of confinement. The transmissivity of the cavity-riddled zone of the aquifer in the area of investigation is approximately 11,000 square feet per day. Preliminary evaluation indicates that large volumes of water of suitable quality for public supply can be developed from the zone, except in an area adjacent to a landfill where leachate has adversely affected water quality. (USGS)

Fischer, John North, Jr.

1980-01-01

30

The Benthic Fauna and Sediments of the Nearshore Zone Off Panama City Beach, Florida.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This study presents: (1) basic data on the benthic fauna and surface sediments of the nearshore zone of Panama City Beach, Fla., before restoration of the beach, and (2) the results of a study on the effect of Hurricane Eloise on the benthic fauna in the ...

C. H. Saloman

1976-01-01

31

76 FR 61744 - Xpedite Systems, LLC Deerfield Beach, Florida; Notice of Negative Determination on Reconsideration  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...TA-W-74,733] Xpedite Systems, LLC Deerfield Beach...former workers of Xpedite Systems, LLC, a subsidiary...trust, cooperative, trustee in bankruptcy, and receiver under...revealed that Xpedite Systems, LLC had an...

2011-10-05

32

Effect of a Shore-Oblique Ridge on Beach and Bar Morphodynamics at Kennedy Space Center, Cape Canaveral, Florida  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Processes linking beach and bar response to external wave forcing are poorly understood where spatial complexities, such as inner shelf shoals, are present. At NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Cape Canaveral, Florida, two persistant surfzone sand bars occur in a region that also includes cape-associated shoals and multiple shore-oblique ridges at depths below the fair-weather wave base of sediment transport. These features transform incoming deep-water waves, redistributing the spatial pattern of wave energy along- and cross-shore. To observe beach and sandbar response in this complex environment we have collected and georectified hourly beach images at KSC since April 2010. Comparisons of imagery to monthly differential GPS surveys reveal that a double-bar system, with ~25-50 m spacing between crests, has persisted over the last 2 years. Welding of the inner and outer bars occurs intermittently. The preferred welding location coincides with a dune overwash area that has been an erosion hotspot (EHS) over the last decade. Strong nor'easter activity in November 2011 activated wave breaking across a large (~10 km long, ~500 m wide, ~5 m tall) shore-oblique subaqueous ridge that intersects the nearshore system at the EHS. Our observations allow testing of a hypothesis that the ridge controls nearshore morphodynamics through two mechanisms: 1) by focusing, dissipating, and shadowing wave energy, especially during storm events and 2) by providing a sediment source to the nearshore system. The former mechanism is supported through image and survey analysis that shows beach and bar behavior differ updrift and downdrift of the ridge-beach intersection. Three ADCPs were deployed during the early 2010-2011 and late 2011-2012 winter nor'easter seasons to measure wave transformation and current structures in this region. During the most recent deployment, an instrument on the ridge's leeward side was nearly completely buried, yet measured bottom currents (< 50 cm/s) do not imply that significant sediment transport should occur. Rather, we hypothesize that wave breaking over the ridge entrained sediment that was subsequently deposited on the leeward side. This finding suggests that the ridge is mobile and may be a source of sediment to the dynamic nearshore system.

Kline, S. W.; Adams, P. N.; Plant, N. G.; MacKenzie, R. A.; Jaeger, J. M.

2012-12-01

33

Impact of trichloroethylene contaminated groundwater discharged to the main canal and Indian River lagoon, Vero Beach, Florida  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater highly contaminated with trichloroethylene (TCE) from a leaky storage tank was detected in Vero Beach, Florida in 1978. Aware of this problem, the local and state authorities gave permission to pump out the contaminated water as a means of reducing concentrations in the aquifer. The water was air sprayed to strip the organic compounds and subsequently discharged and mixed by means of a hydraulic pump in the drainage canal. The average discharge rate of contaminated water into the canal was approximately 0.2 million gallons per day. This project was initiated to determine the spatial distribution of pollutants in the canal and river as well as rainfall and canal flow rate effects on water, sediment, and biological organisms. Prior to flushing the well, a baseline survey of trichloroethylene and other related compounds in the canal and river was performed.

Wang, T.; Lenahan, R.; Kanik, M.

1985-04-01

34

Hydrogeologic and Hydraulic Characterization of the Surficial Aquifer System, and Origin of High Salinity Groundwater, Palm Beach County, Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Previous studies of the hydrogeology of the surficial aquifer system in Palm Beach County, Florida, have focused mostly on the eastern one-half to one-third of the county in the more densely populated coastal areas. These studies have not placed the hydrogeology in a framework in which stratigraphic units in this complex aquifer system are defined and correlated between wells. Interest in the surficial aquifer system has increased because of population growth, westward expansion of urbanized areas, and increased utilization of surface-water resources in the central and western areas of the county. In 2004, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the South Florida Water Management District, initiated an investigation to delineate the hydrogeologic framework of the surficial aquifer system in Palm Beach County, based on a lithostratigraphic framework, and to evaluate hydraulic properties and characteristics of units and permeable zones within this framework. A lithostratigraphic framework was delineated by correlating markers between all wells with data available based primarily on borehole natural gamma-ray geophysical log signatures and secondarily, lithologic characteristics. These correlation markers approximately correspond to important lithostratigraphic unit boundaries. Using the markers as guides to their boundaries, the surficial aquifer system was divided into three main permeable zones or subaquifers, which are designated, from shallowest to deepest, zones 1, 2, and 3. Zone 1 is above the Tamiami Formation in the Anastasia and Fort Thompson Formations. Zone 2 primarily is in the upper part or Pinecrest Sand Member of the Tamiami Formation, and zone 3 is in the Ochopee Limestone Member of the Tamiami Formation or its correlative equivalent. Differences in the lithologic character exist between these three zones, and these differences commonly include differences in the nature of the pore space. Zone 1 attains its greatest thickness (50 feet or more) and highest transmissivity in coastal areas. Zone 2, the most transmissive and extensive zone, is thickest (80 feet or more) and most transmissive in the inland eastern areas near Florida's Turnpike. In this area, zone 1 is absent, and the semiconfining unit above zone 2 extends to the land surface with a thickness commonly ranging from 50 to 100 feet. The thickness of zone 2 decreases to zero in most wells near the coast. Zone 3 attains its greatest thickness (100 feet or more) in the southwestern and south-central areas; zone 3 is equivalent to the gray limestone aquifer. The distribution of transmissivity was mapped by zone; however, zones 2 and 3 were commonly combined in aquifer tests. Maximum transmissivities for zone 1, zones 2 and 3, and zone 3 were 90,000, 180,000, and 70,000 ft2/d (feet-squared per day), respectively. The northern extent of the area with transmissivity greater than 50,000 ft2/d for zones 2 and 3 in the inland northeastern area along Florida's Turnpike has not been defined based on available data and could extend 5 to 10 miles farther north than mapped. Based on the thickness of zone 2 and a limited number of aquifer tests, a large area of zone 2 with transmissivity greater than 10,000 ft2/d, and possibly as much as 30,000 ft2/d, extends to the west across Water Conservation Area 1 from the inland southeastern area into the south-central area and some of the southwestern area. In contrast to the Biscayne aquifer present to the south of Palm Beach County, zones 2 and 3 are interpreted to be present principally in the Tamiami Formation and are commonly overlain by a thick semiconfining unit of moderate permeability. These zones have been referred to as the 'Turnpike' aquifer in the inland eastern areas of Palm Beach County, and the extent of greatest thickness and transmissivity follows, or is adjacent to, Florida's Turnpike. Where it is thick and transmissive, zone 1 may be considered equivalent to the Biscayne aquifer. Areas

Reese, Ronald S.; Wacker, Michael A.

2009-01-01

35

Assessment of water quality in the South Indian River Water Control District, Palm Beach County, Florida, 1989-94  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A study was conducted to assess ground-water and surface-water quality in the South Indian River Water Control District in northern Palm Beach County from 1989 to 1994. Contamination of the surficial aquifer system and availability of a potable water supply have become of increasing concern. The study consisted of sampling 11 ground-water wells and 14 surface- water sites for determination of major inorganic constituents and physical characteristics, trace metals, nitrogen and phosphorus species, and synthetic organic compounds. Sodium and chloride concentrations exceeded Florida drinking-water standards in ground water at two wells, dissolved- solids concentrations at five ground-water wells and one surface-water site, and color values at all 11 ground-water wells and all 14 surface-water sites. Other constituents also exhibited concentrations that exceeded drinking-water standards. Cadmium and zinc concentrations exceeded the standards in ground water at one well, and lead concentrations exceeded the standard in ground water at five wells. Nitrogen and phosphorus specie concentrations did not exceed respective drinking-water standards in any ground-water or surface-water samples. Several synthetic organic compounds were detected at or above 50 micrograms per liter in water samples collected from six ground-water wells and three surface-water sites.

Lietz, A. C.

1996-01-01

36

Hydrogeology and simulation of ground-water flow near the Lantana Landfill, Palm Beach County, Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Lantana landfill in Palm Beach County has a surface that is 40 to 50 feet above original ground level and consists of about 250 acres of compacted garbage and trash. Parts of the landfill are below the water table. Surface-resistivity measurements and water-quality analyses indicate that leachate-enriched ground water along the eastern perimeter of the landfill has moved about 500 feet eastward toward an adjacent lake. Concentrations of chloride and nutrients within the leachate-enriched ground water were greater than background concentrations. The surficial aquifer system in the area of the landfill consists primarily of sand of moderate permeability, from land surface to a depth of about 68 feet deep, and consists of sand interbedded with sandstone and limestone of high permeability from a depth of about 68 feet to a depth of 200 feet. The potentiometric surface in the landfill is higher than that in adjacent areas to the east, indicating ground-water movement from the landfill toward a lake to the east. Steady-state simulation of ground-water flow was made using a telescoping-grid technique where a model covering a large area is used to determine boundaries and fluxes for a finer scale model. A regional flow model encompassing a 500-square mile area in southeastern Palm Beach County was used to calculate ground-water fluxes in a 126.5-square mile subregional area. Boundary fluxes calculated by the subregional model were then used to calculate boundary fluxes for a local model of the 3.75-square mile area representing the Lantana landfill site and vicinity. Input data required for simulating ground-water flow in the study area were obtained from the regional flow models, thus, effectively coupling the models. Additional simulations were made using the local flow model to predict effects of possible remedial actions on the movement of solutes in the ground-water system. Possible remedial actions simulated included capping the landfill with an impermeable layer and pumping five leachate recovery wells. Results of the flow analysis indicate that the telescoping grid modeling approach can be used to simulate ground-water flow in small areas such as the Lantana landfill site and to simulate the effects of possible remedial actions. Water-quality data indicate the leachate-enriched ground water is divided vertically into two parts by a fine sand layer at about 40 to 50 feet below land surface. Data also indicate the extent of the leachate-enriched ground-water contamination and concentrations of constituents seem to be decreasing over time.

Russell, G. M.; Wexler, E. J.

1993-01-01

37

Determining discharge-coefficient ratings for selected coastal control structures in Broward and Palm Beach counties, Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Discharges through 10 selected coastal control structures in Broward and Palm Beach Counties, Florida, are presently computed using the theoretical discharge-coefficient ratings developed from scale modeling, theoretical discharge coefficients, and some field calibrations whose accuracies for specific sites are unknown. To achieve more accurate discharge-coefficient ratings for the coastal control structures, field discharge measurements were taken with an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler at the coastal control structures under a variety of flow conditions. These measurements were used to determine computed discharge-coefficient ratings for the coastal control structures under different flow regimes: submerged orifice flow, submerged weir flow, free orifice flow, and free weir flow. Theoretical and computed discharge-coefficient ratings for submerged orifice and weir flows were determined at seven coastal control structures, and discharge ratings for free orifice and weir flows were determined at three coastal control structures. The difference between the theoretical and computed discharge-coefficient ratings varied from structure to structure. The theoretical and computed dischargecoefficient ratings for submerged orifice flow were within 10 percent at four of seven coastal control structures; however, differences greater than 20 percent were found at two of the seven structures. The theoretical and computed discharge-coefficient ratings for submerged weir flow were within 10 percent at three of seven coastal control structures; however, differences greater than 20 percent were found at four of the seven coastal control structures. The difference between theoretical and computed discharge-coefficient ratings for free orifice and free weir flows ranged from 5 to 32 percent. Some differences between the theoretical and computed discharge-coefficient ratings could be better defined with more data collected over a greater distribution of measuring conditions.

Tillis, G. M.; Swain, E. D.

1998-01-01

38

Choctawhatchee Beach Mouse, Perdido Key Beach Mouse and Alabama Beach Mouse Recovery Plan.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The old field mouse (Peromyscus polionotus) is distributed throughout northeastern Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, South Carolina, and Florida. Certain subspecies occur on beaches and dunes of the Atlantic coast of Florida and the Gulf Coast of Alabama and...

1987-01-01

39

Hydrography and Beach Dynamics.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Hydrologic and beach dynamics studies were conducted in and near Rookery Bay Sanctuary south of Naples on the southwest coast of Florida. These studies determined water exchange rates, tidal range variations, the characteristics of the tidal prism, bottom...

T. N. Lee B. J. Yokel

1973-01-01

40

PROCEEDINGS: SECOND CONFERENCE ON WASTE HEAT MANAGEMENT AND UTILIZATION HELD AT MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA IN DECEMBER 1978, VOLUME 2  

EPA Science Inventory

The proceedings document most presentations made during the Second Conference on Waste Heat Management and Utilization, held December 4-6, 1978, at Miami Beach, FL. Presentations were grouped by areas of concern: general, utilization, mathematical modeling, ecological effects, co...

41

PROCEEDINGS: SECOND CONFERENCE ON WATER HEAT MANAGEMENT AND UTILIZATION HELD AT MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA IN DECEMBER 1978, VOLUME 1  

EPA Science Inventory

The proceedings document most presentations made during the Second Conference on Waste Heat Management and Utilization, held December 4-6, 1978, at Miami Beach, FL. Presentations were grouped by areas of concern: general, utilization, mathematical modeling, ecological effects, co...

42

33 CFR 334.605 - Meloy Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Miami Beach, Florida; restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...approval from the Base Commander, U.S. Coast Guard Base Miami Beach or his/her designated representative. (3) Fishing, trawling, net-fishing, and other aquatic activities are prohibited in the restricted area without prior approval from the...

2013-07-01

43

ANNUAL VOLUME OF PROCEEDINGS, ADDRESSES, AND RESEARCH PAPERS OF THE ANNUAL MEETING AND EDUCATIONAL EXHIBIT OF THE ASSOCIATION OF SCHOOL BUSINESS OFFICIALS OF THE UNITED STATES AND CANADA (53D, MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA, OCTOBER 14-19, 1967).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A VERBATIM REPORTING OF PRESENTATIONS MADE AT THE 53D ANNUAL MEETING OF THE ASSOCIATION OF SCHOOL BUSINESS OFFICIALS OF THE UNITED STATES AND CANADA, HELD IN MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA, OCTOBER 14-19, 1967, INCLUDES THE KEYNOTE ADDRESS BY THE HONORABLE BARRY G. LOWES, CHAIRMAN OF THE METROPOLITAN TORONTO BOARD OF EDUCATION, ON PURPOSES, PROBLEMS, AND…

FOSTER, CHARLES W.

44

PROCEEDINGS: ADVANCES IN PARTICLE SAMPLING AND MEASUREMENT (DAYTONA BEACH, FL, OCTOBER 1979)  

EPA Science Inventory

The proceedings consist of 20 reports of research on equipment and techniques for sampling and characterizing particulate emissions and other aerosols. The inhalable particle size range (up to 15 micrometers) is emphasized, and the basis for selecting this range as a standard is ...

45

Annotated bibliography of the geology and hydrology of the surficial aquifers in Dade, Broward, and Palm Beach counties, Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

References and abstracts from 149 hydrologic and geologic investigations concerning the surficial aquifers of southeast Florida have been compiled to prepare an annotated bibliography. The references are listed alphabetically by the author 's name. (USGS)

Causaras, C. R.

1982-01-01

46

Physical, Chemical, and Biological Characteristics of Nearshore Zone of Sand Key, Florida, Prior to Beach Restoration. Volume 2.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The study defines some of the major physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of the nearshore zone off Sand Key, Florida before restoration by dredging. Results of a supplemental study on the effects of hydraulic dredging for emergency restorati...

C. H. Saloman

1974-01-01

47

Confirmation of putative stormwater impact on water quality at a Florida beach by microbial source tracking methods and structure of indicator organism populations.  

PubMed

The effect of a stormwater conveyance system on indicator bacteria levels at a Florida beach was assessed using microbial source tracking methods, and by investigating indicator bacteria population structure in water and sediments. During a rain event, regulatory standards for both fecal coliforms and Enterococcus spp. were exceeded, contrasting with significantly lower levels under dry conditions. Indicator bacteria levels were high in sediments under all conditions. The involvement of human sewage in the contamination was investigated using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays for the esp gene of Enterococcus faecium and for the conserved T antigen of human polyomaviruses, all of which were negative. BOX-PCR subtyping of Escherichia coli and Enterococcus showed higher population diversity during the rain event; and higher population similarity during dry conditions, suggesting that without fresh inputs, only a subset of the population survives the selective pressure of the secondary habitat. These data indicate that high indicator bacteria levels were attributable to a stormwater system that acted as a reservoir and conduit, flushing high levels of indicator bacteria to the beach during a rain event. Such environmental reservoirs of indicator bacteria further complicate the already questionable relationship between indicator organisms and human pathogens, and call for a better understanding of the ecology, fate and persistence of indicator bacteria. PMID:17544051

Brownell, M J; Harwood, V J; Kurz, R C; McQuaig, S M; Lukasik, J; Scott, T M

2007-08-01

48

Ground-water quality at the site of a proposed deep-well injection system for treated wastewater, West Palm Beach, Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey collected scientific and technical information before, during, and after construction of a deep test well at the location of a future regional waste-water treatment plant to be built for the city of West Palm Beach, Florida. Data from the test well will be used by the city in the design of a proposed deep-well injection system for disposal of effluent from the treatment plant. Shallow wells in the vicinity of the drilling site were inventoried and sampled to provide a data base for detecting changes in ground water quality during construction and later operation of the deep wells. In addition, 16 small-diameter monitor wells, ranging in depth from 10 to 162 feet, were drilled at the test site. During the drilling of the deep test well, water samples were collected weekly from the 16 monitor wells for determination of chloride content and specific conductance. Evidence of small spills of salt water were found in monitor wells ranging in depth from 10 to 40 feet. Efforts to remove the salt water from the shallow unconfined aquifer by pumping were undertaken by the drilling contractor at the request of the city of West Palm Beach. The affected area is small and there has been a reduction of chloride concentration.

Pitt, William A., Jr.; Meyer, Frederick W.

1976-01-01

49

The Early Childhood Cluster Initiative of Palm Beach County, Florida. Early Implementation Study and Evaluability Assessment. Executive Summary  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report summarizes findings from the first year of an implementation study of the Early Childhood Cluster Initiative (ECCI). ECCI is a prekindergarten program in ten elementary schools and a community child care center in Palm Beach County, based on the design of the High/Scope Perry Preschool model. The initiative is characterized by low…

Spielberger, Julie; Goyette, Paul

2006-01-01

50

Physical, Chemical, and Biological Characteristics of Nearshore Zone of Sand Key, Florida, Prior to Beach Restoration. Volume I.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Continuing erosion along the gulf side of Sand Key, Fl., has reduced desirable beach area and rendered shore installations vulnerable to storm damage. Authorized by the River and Harbor Act of 1966, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers plans to restore the da...

C. H. Saloman

1974-01-01

51

Assessing the Impact of Urban Runoff in Recreational Beaches in South Carolina and Florida Using Culturable and QPCR Fecal Indicator  

EPA Science Inventory

Urban/suburban runoff carries a variety of pollutants that often includes bacterial pathogens and indicators of fecal contamination. The objective of this study was to assess the microbial water quality of recreational beaches impacted solely by urban runoff through the use of cu...

52

Collaborative Governance of HIV Health Services Planning Councils in Broward and Palm Beach Counties of South Florida  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study uses the collaborative governance concept to examine efforts of HIV Health Services Planning Councils in two South\\u000a Florida Counties. The study employs qualitative methods such as interviews and document reviews in collecting data from various\\u000a relevant sources. The results reveal more similarities than differences in the Councils’ efforts toward addressing the HIV\\/AIDS\\u000a problem. The Councils are similar in

James K. Agbodzakey

2012-01-01

53

The UF GEM Research Center Mobile Terrestrial Laser Scanner System M-TLSS Applied to Beach Morphology Studies in St. Augustine, Florida.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The UF GEM Research Center is working towards developing a Mobile Terrestrial Laser Scanning System (M- TLSS). The core of the M-TLSS is a commercial 2-axis ground based laser scanner, Optech ILRIS-36D, which is capable of generating XYZ with laser intensity or RGB textured point clouds in a range from 3m to 1500m. The laser operates at a wavelength of 1535 nm. The sample separation can be adjusted down to 0.00115°, and the scanning speed is 2,000 points per second. The scanner is integrated to a mobile telescoping, rotating and tilting platform which is essentially a telescopic lift mounted on the back of a pick up truck. This provides up to 6 degrees of freedom for performing scanning operations. A scanner built-in 6 megapixel digital camera and a digital video camera provide the M-TLSS moving and still imagining capability. The applications of the M-TLSS data sets are numerous in both the fields of science and engineering. This paper will focus on the application of M-TLSS as a complement to ALSM in the study of beach morphology in the St. Augustine, Florida area. ALSM data covers a long stretch of beach with a moderate sample density of approximately 1 laser return per square meter, which enables the detection of submeter-scale changes in shoreline position and dune heights over periods of few months. The M-TLSS, on the other hand, can provide high density point clouds (centimeter scale point spacing) of smaller areas known to be highly prone to erosion. From these point clouds centimeter level surface grids are created. These grids will be compared with the ALSM data and with a time series of M-TLSS data over the same area to provide high resolution, short term beach erosion monitoring. Surface morphological parameters that will be compared among the ALSM and M-TLSS data sets include shoreline position and gradients and standard deviations of elevations on cross- shore transects.

Fernandez, J. C.; Shrestha, R. L.; Carter, W. E.; Slatton, C. K.; Singhania, A.

2006-12-01

54

The Ecological Condition of Gulf of Mexico Resources from Perdido Key to Port St. Joe, Florida, USA: Part I. Coastal Beach Resources  

EPA Science Inventory

Using the approach established by EPA's Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP), a shoreline monitoring survey was conducted in August and September 1999, encompassing the Florida Panhandle from Perdido Key, Florida to Port St. Joe, Florida. The objective of this ...

55

77 FR 63722 - Special Local Regulations; Palm Beach World Championship, Atlantic Ocean; Jupiter, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Special Local Regulations; Palm Beach World Championship, Atlantic Ocean; Jupiter...Jupiter, Florida during the Palm Beach World Championship, a high speed power boat race. The Palm Beach World Championship is scheduled to take...

2012-10-17

56

78 FR 2916 - Special Local Regulation; West Palm Beach Triathlon Championship, Intracoastal Waterway, West...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Intracoastal Waterway, West Palm Beach, FL AGENCY: Coast Guard...Intracoastal Waterway, in West Palm Beach, Florida, during the West Palm Beach Triathlon Championship...designated representative. DATES: Comments and related...

2013-01-15

57

78 FR 22193 - Special Local Regulations; West Palm Beach Triathlon Championship, Intracoastal Waterway; West...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Intracoastal Waterway; West Palm Beach, FL AGENCY: Coast Guard...Intracoastal Waterway, in West Palm Beach, Florida, during the West Palm Beach Triathlon Championship...designated representative. DATES: This rule is effective...

2013-04-15

58

78 FR 22814 - Special Local Regulations; Miami Super Boat Grand Prix, Atlantic Ocean; Miami Beach, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Miami Super Boat Grand Prix, Atlantic Ocean; Miami Beach, FL AGENCY: Coast...special local regulation on the Atlantic Ocean east of Miami Beach, Florida...will be held on the waters of the Atlantic Ocean east of Miami Beach,...

2013-04-17

59

77 FR 50065 - Safety Zone; Jacksonville Sea and Sky Spectacular, Atlantic Ocean; Jacksonville Beach, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Jacksonville Sea and Sky Spectacular, Atlantic Ocean; Jacksonville Beach, FL AGENCY...safety zone on the waters of the Atlantic Ocean east of Jacksonville Beach, Florida...host an air show event over the Atlantic Ocean in Jacksonville Beach, FL....

2012-08-20

60

Beach Pollution  

MedlinePLUS

... have been reported for ocean, bay, and Great Lakes beaches, but these problems are not limited to ... safety of swimming beaches at rivers and other lakes across the country. A primary goal of the ...

61

78 FR 11094 - Safety Zone; Lake Worth Dredge Operations, Lake Worth Inlet; West Palm Beach, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Lake Worth Inlet; West Palm Beach, FL AGENCY: Coast...Lake Worth Inlet, West Palm Beach, Florida, to provide...designated representative. DATES: This rule is effective...delay in the effective date of this rule would be...Lake Worth Inlet in West Palm Beach, Florida....

2013-02-15

62

Education Conference of the Gulf of Mexico Accord (1st, Daytona Beach, FL, September 28-30, 1995). Interim Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Under the auspices of the North American Free Trade Agreement, five states in the United States and six states in Mexico established the Gulf of Mexico Accord to create a working partnership to foster economic development in the Gulf of Mexico. The agreement addresses six major sectors: investment; communication and transportation; health;…

Day, Philip R., Jr.

63

Beach Access Enhancement. Phase One. Final Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Division of Beaches and Shores contracted the services of the University of Florida, Department of Recreation, Parks and Tourism to inventory and map all public owned properties which front the Atlantic Ocean, Straits of Florida, and Gulf of Mexico, a...

1994-01-01

64

A Gathering Storm: How Palm Beach County Schools Fail Poor and Minority Children.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report takes a hard look at the day-to-day workings of Palm Beach County (Florida) schools to explain why the systemic change model of Florida's current reform legislation is likely to fail the students in greatest need of improved schooling. The Palm Beach County School District is the 4th largest district in Florida, and the 15th largest in…

Carmona, Lisa A.; Wheelock, Anne; First, Joan

65

Estimating the Effect of Beach Nourishment on Caretta caretta (Loggerhead Sea Turtle) Nesting  

Microsoft Academic Search

Caretta caretta (loggerhead sea turtle) nesting activity was recorded daily during three seasons prior to and two seasons immediately following a beach nourish- ment (replenishment) project in Palm Beach County, Florida. Surveys were done at the nourished beach (Jupiter\\/Carlin) and at two natural beaches (Juno and Tequesta). The size of the nourishment effect on nest- ing activity was estimated using

D. G. Rumbold; P. W. Davis; C. Perretta

2001-01-01

66

The Early Childhood Cluster Initiative of Palm Beach County, Florida. Early Implementation Study And Evaluability Assessment. Final Report. Chapin Hall Working Paper  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication reports findings from the first year of an implementation study of the Early Childhood Cluster Initiative (ECCI). ECCI is a prekindergarten program in ten elementary schools and a community child care center in Palm Beach County, based on the design of the High/Scope Perry Preschool model. The initiative is characterized by low…

Spielberger, Julie; Goyette, Paul

2006-01-01

67

The Beach  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Have you ever wondered what sand is made of? Where does it come from? How can we keep our beaches clean? Let's work together using the internet to find out a little bit more about the beach. Web Quest Links Introduction Task Resources Evaluation Conclusion Teacher Guide TASK Dear students, Miss Kaysha was at the beach last week and she saw lots of sand. She wants to know how it got there and what it is made of. She also saw ...

2009-04-26

68

76 FR 29642 - Special Local Regulations; Miami Super Boat Grand Prix, Miami Beach, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...1625-AA08 Special Local Regulations; Miami Super Boat Grand Prix, Miami Beach, FL AGENCY: Coast Guard...Miami Beach, Florida during the Miami Super Boat Grand Prix. The Miami Super Boat Grand Prix will consist of a series of...

2011-05-23

69

Beach Classification  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This activity provides students with an in-class practice of landscape interpretation using slides of beaches shown by the instructor. Students view a select number of slides and are asked to classify each beach shown using the Wright and Short Beach Classification: dissipative, reflexive, and intermediate by visually identifying landforms and processes of each beach type. The outcome of this activity is that students have practice identifying landforms and processes and applying their observations and interpretations of geomorphic features and processes for an applied purpose. Designed for a geomorphology course Has minimal/no quantitative component

Davis, Lisa

70

BEACH Watch  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Environmental Protection Agency has released data from the third annual National Health Protection Survey of Beaches for the 1999 swimming season. Based on voluntarily returned surveys, the site offers information on water quality at 1,891 beaches in the US. Using an interactive map, users can find out if the water at a selected beach is being monitored, who is responsible for monitoring, and if any advisories or closures have been issued. Initial entries for each beach include basic monitoring information, contact information, and a map. Users can also read the submitted survey form in full. Additional resources at the BEACH Watch site include summary results from the survey, a fact sheet, technical reports and reference, brochures amd pamphlets, a FAQ, and related links.

71

76 FR 53822 - Safety Zone; Labor Day at the Landing Santa Rosa Sound, Fort Walton Beach, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Zone; Labor Day at the Landing Santa Rosa Sound, Fort Walton Beach, FL AGENCY: Coast...safety zone for a portion of the Santa Rosa Sound in Fort Walton Beach, Florida extending...conduct a fireworks display on the Santa Rosa Sound, in Fort Walton Beach, Florida from...

2011-08-30

72

33 CFR 165.761 - Security Zones; Port of Palm Beach, Port Everglades, Port of Miami, and Port of Key West, Florida.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Florida. A fixed security zone encompasses all waters between Watson Park and Star Island on the MacArthur Causeway south to the Port of Miami...to 25°46.88ⲠN, 080°10.84ⲠW, and ending on Watson Park at 25°47.00ⲠN, 080°10.67ⲠW. The...

2010-07-01

73

FLORIDA HAZARDOUS WASTE AND SANITARY LANDFILL REPORT, COUNTY DATA. GENERATOR DATA AND CHARACTERISTICS OF SANITARY LANDFILLS. PART 8. COUNTIES: OSCEOLA, PALM BEACH, PASCO, PINELLAS  

EPA Science Inventory

The report provides data on the use of sanitary landfills (Subtitle D facilities) for hazardous waste disposal in Florida by small quantity generators. It consists of eleven parts including a part called Study Area Data which contains the data aggregated across the counties cover...

74

Beach Erosion  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Beach Erosion site of the WhyFiles (last mentioned in the August 9, 1996 Scout Report), a project funded by the graduate school of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, has been recently updated. Its newest addition includes a story about the population of the tiny Pacific Island nation of Tuvalu that is preparing to abandon its home due to rising sea levels. The site takes a look at this subject and the resulting increased beach erosion that takes place around the world. Visitors can read about the physical processes of beach erosion, view a QuickTime movie of a house falling into the ocean, and more. The site includes good descriptions, photographs, and links to additional information (although some were broken at the time of this annotation), giving interested readers insight into this widespread phenomenon.

1999-01-01

75

Beach Erosion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Two miles of beach at Cape Canaveral eroded by construction of a port and jetties was recently restored. Such work in harbors of many cities often disrupts normal flow of sand for many miles along coasts. Brevard County, FL residents now enjoy a 400 ft. wide public beach in an area in imminent danger of destructive erosion just a year previously. Before and after aerial photos show how more than two miles of beach were rebuilt with 2.7 million cubic yards of sand helping abate the erosion problem caused by construction of jetties. NASA volunteered its remote-sensing technology and instrumented aircraft to provide low-altitude color infrared photography about every three months since 1972.

1976-01-01

76

Effects of lowering interior canal stages on salt-water intrusion into the shallow aquifer in Southeast Palm Beach County, Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Land in southeast Palm Beach County is undergoing a large-scale change in use, from agricultural to residential. To accommodate residential use, a proposal has been made by developers to the Board of the Lake Worth Drainage District to lower the canal stages in the interior part of the area undergoing change. This report documents one of the possible effects of such lowering. Of particular interest to the Board was whether the lower canal stages would cause an increase in salt-water intrusion into the shallow aquifer along the coast. The two main tools used in the investigation were a digital model for aquifer evaluation and an analytical technique for predicting the movement of the salt-water front in response to a change of ground-water flow into the ocean. The method of investigation consisted of developing a digital ground-water flow model for three east-west test strips. They pass through the northern half of municipal well fields in Lake Worth, Delray Beach, and Boca Raton. The strips were first modeled with no change in interior canal stages. Then they were modeled with a change in canal stages of 2 to 4 feet (0.6 to 1.6 metres). Also, two land development schemes were tested. One was for a continuation of the present level of land development, simulated by continuing the present pumpage rates. The second scheme was for land development to continue until the maximum allowable densities were reached, simulated by increasing the pumping rates. The results of the test runs for an east-west strip through Lake Worth show that lowering part of the interior canal water levels 3 feet (1.0 metre), as done in 1961, does not affect the aquifer head or salt-water intrusion along the coastal area of Lake Worth. As a result, no effect in the coastal area would be expected as a result of canal stage lowering in other, interior parts of the study area. Results from the other test runs show that lowering interior canal water levels by as much as 4 feet (1.2 metres) would result in some salt-water intrusion for either land development scheme. Salt-water intrusion is dependent on the location, and amount of water withdrawn, from well fields.

Land, Larry F.

1975-01-01

77

Coastal land loss in Florida  

SciTech Connect

Florida has approximately 593 mi of shoreline fronting on the Atlantic Ocean and Straits of Florida and approximately 673 mi of shoreline fronting on the Gulf of Mexico with an additional 5,000 mi of bay and estuary shoreline. Of a statewide total of 818.9 mi of open coast sandy beaches, 337.2 mi or 41.2% of the beaches are identified as erosion problem areas. These erosion problem areas include those beaches with a moderate or low erosion rate, but with a narrow width fronting a highly developed area, and those restored beaches with an active maintenance nourishment program. Of these erosion problem areas, 217.8 mi or 26.6% of the statewide beach length are areas of critical erosion; that is, segments of the shoreline where substantial development or recreation interests are threatened by the erosion processes. On a shorewide basis, the Atlantic Ocean beaches of Florida typically have historical erosion rates of between 0 and {minus}3 ft per year, while the Gulf of Mexico beaches typically have historical erosion rates of between 0 and {minus}2 ft per year. Many of the problem areas have shoreline erosion rates in the magnitude of between {minus}3 and {minus}5 ft per year. The most extreme erosion rates are occurring along the southern portion of St. Joseph Peninsula at Cape San Bias where the annual shoreline recession exceeds {minus}20 ft. Erosion conditions in Florida are most apparent as a result of storm tides and storm wave activity. Extreme meteorological events inflict significant erosion conditions in all beach areas of the state. Historical shoreline changes are often the cumulative effect of a number of storm events and their cycles of poststorm recovery. Erosion and damage from recent storms as well as efforts to mitigate storm damage have heightened the erosion problems and incited a public response through coastal construction regulation and beach management planning.

Clark, R.R. (Florida Dept. of Natural Resources, Tallahassee (USA))

1990-09-01

78

76 FR 24813 - Safety Zone; Fourth Annual Offshore Challenge, Sunny Isles Beach, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...a temporary safety zone in the Atlantic Ocean east of Sunny Isles Beach, Florida...boat races will be held in the Atlantic Ocean offshore of Sunny Isles Beach...safety zone. All waters of the Atlantic Ocean east of Sunny Isles Beach,...

2011-05-03

79

Hydrogeology and Migration of Septic-Tank Effluent in the Surficial Aquifer System in the Northern Midlands Area, Palm Beach County, Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The northern Midlands area in Palm Beach County is an area of expected residential growth, but its flat topography, poor drainage, and near-surface marl layers retard rainfall infiltration and cause frequent flooding. Public water supplies and sewer services are not planned for the area, thus, residents must rely on domestic wells and septic tanks. The water table in the northern Midlands area is seldom more than 5 feet below land surface, and regional ground-water flows are east, southwest, and south from the north-central part of the area where ground-water levels are highest. Ground-water quality in the western part of the area and in the Loxahatchee Slough is greatly influenced by residual seawater emplaced during the Pleistocene Epoch. Chloride and dissolved-solids concentrations of ground water in the surficial aquifer system in these areas often exceed secondary drinking-water standards. Residual seawater has been more effectively flushed from the more permeable sediments elsewhere in the eastern and southwestern parts of the study area. Test at three septic-tank sites showed traces of effluent in ground water (38-92 feet from the septic tank outlets) and that near-surface marl layers greatly impede the downward migration of the effluent in the surficial aquifer system throughout the northern midlands.

Miller, Wesley L.

1992-01-01

80

Beach Sand  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The purpose of this assessment probe is to elicit students' ideas about weathering, erosion, deposition, and landforms. It is designed to determine if students recognize that sand on a beach may have come from distant mountains and landforms as a result of the weathering of rock, subsequent erosion, and deposition.

Eberle, Francis; Farrin, Lynn; Keeley, Page

2005-01-01

81

The Economic Impact and Valuation of Saltwater Recreational Fisheries in Florida.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Florida economy is highly dependent on natural resources. These resources range from beaches to deep sea fisheries. Florida is a traditional mecca for outdoor recreation seekers in the eastern United States, if not the entire United States. Residents ...

F. W. Bell P. E. Sorensen V. R. Leeworthy

1982-01-01

82

Beach profile variation on Hawaiian carbonate beaches  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Beach profiles from selected Oahu and Maui beaches quantitatively document beach volume variation and change between 1994 and 1999. Along exposed, high-energy beaches, large fluctuations in beach volume, characterized primarily by the formation and erosion of extensive berms, dominate the seasonal changes. Beaches along more protected stretches of coastline show much less variation in profile morphology. Beaches on the west (leeward) coast of Oahu experienced the most seasonal variation in profile volume, followed by the north shore, east (windward) shore, and south shore. Similar to Oahu, beaches along the west coast of Maui showed the greatest overall profile variation. However, the mean variation for profiles along a single coastal reach showed little difference compared to other coastal segments. Although some beaches showed net gain or loss during the study period, most beaches remained relatively stable with change limited to a finite envelope. No island-wide trends in beach erosion or accretion were observed during the study period. However, no extreme events, such as tropical storms or hurricanes, directly influenced the Hawaiian Islands during the study period. This data set should therefore be considered as representative of typical annual beach activity. Greater variation and possible long-term change would be expected during extreme events.

Gibbs, A. E.; Richmond, B. M.; Fletcher, C. H.

2000-01-01

83

76 FR 26931 - Safety Zone; Second Annual Space Coast Super Boat Grand Prix, Atlantic Ocean, Cocoa Beach, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Coast Super Boat Grand Prix, Atlantic Ocean, Cocoa Beach, FL AGENCY: Coast...safety zone on the waters of the Atlantic Ocean east of Cocoa Beach, Florida...will be held on the waters of the Atlantic Ocean east of Cocoa Beach,...

2011-05-10

84

NATIONAL HEALTH SURVEY OF BEACHES  

EPA Science Inventory

Resource Purpose: The annual Beach Survey is designed to gather information about beach water quality, standards, monitoring, and beach health advisories or closures issued during the previous year's bathing season. Each year the survey updates previously submitted beach i...

85

Viability analysis of endangered Gulf Coast beach mice ( Peromyscus polionotus) populations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Beach mice, endangered subspecies of oldfield mice (Peromyscus polionotus), occur in a few, isolated populations along the Gulf Coast of Alabama and Florida, USA. To provide information needed for the management of these species, we conducted population viability analyses (PVA) using a stochastic differential equation (Wiener-drift) model applied to long-term demographic data for four populations of beach mice. In the

Madan K. Oli; Nicholas R. Holler; Michael C. Wooten

2001-01-01

86

Impact of Hurricanes on Habitat Occupancy and Spatial Distribution of Beach Mice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent ; increases in hurricane activity along the Gulf of Mexico lend urgency to understanding storm impacts on beach mice (Peromyscus polionotus) that occupy dune systems along this coast in Florida and Alabama. We documented changes in occupancy patterns of the Santa Rosa beach mouse (P. p. leucocephalus) from Hurricane Ivan and examined predictors of habitat use before and after

Alexander J. Pries; Lyn C. Branch; Deborah L. Miller

2009-01-01

87

76 FR 9278 - Safety Zone; Fourth Annual Offshore Challenge, Sunny Isles Beach, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...a temporary safety zone in the Atlantic Ocean east of Sunny Isles Beach, Florida...Challenge has been held in the Atlantic Ocean offshore of Sunny Isles Beach...zone around a race area in the Atlantic Ocean offshore of Sunny Isles...

2011-02-17

88

BEACHES HEALTH SURVEY  

EPA Science Inventory

Baterial samples were taken at swimming beaches (primarily freshwater beaches) in Region 10 while evaluating potential bacterial sources (e.g., people, cattle, pets, septic systems, runoff, birds). For each beach selected, the preferred sampling is: background, low/no use period...

89

University of Florida Digital Collections: Florida Photograph Collections  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Florida is much, much more than a certain rather large theme park and the bustling nightlife of South Beach. Anyone with a cursory interest in the history of the Sunshine State should make a beeline for this engaging site. Created by the University of Florida Digital Collections, the Florida Photograph collection contains thousands of images related to the history and culture of the state. The collection features a number of subcollections, including Florida Ephemera and Concrete Blog: Messages on the Wall. The Concrete Blog section offers a fascinating portrait of Gainesville's 34th Street Wall, which has served as a community sounding board and place of artistic reflection for over 30 years. Neophytes can also type a few keywords into the search engine to get started; they might do well to begin with Tampa, Apalachicola, or hotels.

2012-05-18

90

Relations between Municipal Water Use and Selected Meteorological Parameters and Drought Indices, East-Central and Northeast Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water-use data collected between 1992 and 2006 at eight municipal water-supply utilities in east-central and northeast Florida were analyzed to identify seasonal trends in use and to quantify monthly variations. Regression analyses were applied to identify significant correlations between water use and selected meteorological parameters and drought indices. Selected parameters and indices include precipitation (P), air temperature (T), potential evapotranspiration (PET), available water (P-PET), monthly changes in these parameters (Delta P, Delta T, Delta PET, Delta(P-PET), the Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI), and the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI). Selected utilities include the City of Daytona Beach (Daytona), the City of Eustis (Eustis), Gainesville Regional Utilities (GRU), Jacksonville Electric Authority (JEA), Orange County Utilities (OCU), Orlando Utilities Commission (OUC), Seminole County Utilities (SCU), and the City of St. Augustine (St. Augustine). Water-use rates at these utilities in 2006 ranged from about 3.2 million gallons per day at Eustis to about 131 million gallons per day at JEA. Total water-use rates increased at all utilities throughout the 15-year period of record, ranging from about 4 percent at Daytona to greater than 200 percent at OCU and SCU. Metered rates, however, decreased at six of the eight utilities, ranging from about 2 percent at OCU and OUC to about 17 percent at Eustis. Decreases in metered rates occurred because the number of metered connections increased at a greater rate than did total water use, suggesting that factors other than just population growth may play important roles in water-use dynamics. Given the absence of a concurrent trend in precipitation, these decreases can likely be attributed to changes in non-climatic factors such as water-use type, usage of reclaimed water, water-use restrictions, demographics, and so forth. When averaged for the eight utilities, metered water-use rates depict a clear seasonal pattern in which rates were lowest in the winter and greatest in the late spring. Averaged water-use rates ranged from about 9 percent below the 15-year daily mean in January to about 11 percent above the daily mean in May. Water-use rates were found to be statistically correlated to meteorological parameters and drought indices, and to be influenced by system memory. Metered rates (in gallons per day per active metered connection) were consistently found to be influenced by P, T, PET, and P-PET and changes in these parameters that occurred in prior months. In the single-variant analyses, best correlations were obtained by fitting polynomial functions to plots of metered rates versus moving-averaged values of selected parameters (R2 values greater than 0.50 at three of eight sites). Overall, metered water-use rates were best correlated with the 3- to 4-month moving average of Delta T or Delta PET (R2 values up to 0.66), whereas the full suite of meteorological parameters was best correlated with metered rates at Daytona and least correlated with rates at St. Augustine. Similarly, metered rates were substantially better correlated with moving-averaged values of precipitation (significant at all eight sites) than with single (current) monthly values (significant at only three sites). Total and metered water-use rates were positively correlated with T, PET, Delta P, Delta T, and Delta PET, and negatively correlated with P, P-PET, Delta (P-PET), PDSI, and SPI. The drought indices were better correlated with total water-use rates than with metered rates, whereas metered rates were better correlated with meteorological parameters. Multivariant analyses produced fits of the data that explained a greater degree of the variance in metered rates than did the single-variant analyses. Adjusted R2 values for the 'best' models ranged from 0.79 at JEA to 0.29 at St. Augustine and exceeded 0.60 at five of eight sites. The amount of available water (P-PET) was the si

Murray, Louis C., Jr.

2009-01-01

91

Florida Law  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This fine collection from the University of Florida's George A. Smathers Libraries documents the laws and legal heritage of Florida. It has digitized texts from the holdings of the University of Florida's Lawton Chiles Legal Information Center and the P. K. Yonge Library of Florida History as well as other sources. This omnibus collection features the Journal of the Florida House of Representatives, a variety of general texts on Florida laws, and the Florida Water Law collection. This last collection is particularly fascinating as it brings together over 7,000 documents related to long-term water management plans across the Sunshine State. Moving on, the Florida Historical Legal Documents section of the site contains primary source materials that survey changes in Florida law from 1822 through 1845, when the area became a state. Finally, the House Journal section brings together the official record of actions taken by the House and its committees.

2011-01-01

92

Volusia County, Florida. PLATO Evaluation Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An evaluation was conducted to determine how the PLATO Pathways program was used in three high schools in Volusia County, Florida: Deland, New Smyrna Beach, and Atlantic. Of the many PLATO sites in Volusia, these three were selected for study because of the representative patterns of low, medium, and high PLATO use. PLATO is a computer learning…

Hannafin, Bob

93

Florida Ecosystems  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Provided by FICUS (the Florida Internet Center for Understanding Sustainability) and the University of South Florida, this gem of a site covers Florida's native upland, freshwater, and marine ecosystems. Streamlined in organization but solid in content, Florida Ecosystems offers introductory information and photographic images of a dozen ecosystems, ranging from Pine Flatwoods and Dry Prairies to Mangrove Swamps and Coral Reefs. For students and educators interested in subtropical ecosystems, this is a nice place to start.

94

Beach and Dune.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The flora, vegetation, and microenvironment of beach and dune are sufficiently different to warrant their separate treatment in this chapter. Beach is defined here as the expanse of sandy substrate between mean tide and the foredune or, in the absence of ...

M. G. Barbour A. F. Johnson

1977-01-01

95

NHD INDEXED LOCATIONS FOR BEACH  

EPA Science Inventory

Beach locational data for BEACH Act. Beach locations are coded onto route.drain (Transport and Coastline Reach) feature of NHD to create Point Events and Linear Events. Beach locations are coded onto region.rch (Waterbody Reach) feature of NHD to create NHD Waterbody Shapefiles...

96

State of the Beach  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This annual Surfrider Foundation report surveys the state of the beaches in coastal and Great Lakes states that are home to Foundation chapters. Each state is rated based on the availability of information and status of eight indicators, including beach access, Website access, surf zone water quality, and beach erosion, among others. The report is written from the perspective of a "concerned local citizen" and aimed at "the people who use and care most about this precious resource." The online report contains six sections, including an executive summary, an explanation of the indicators, conclusions, and recommendations.

2000-01-01

97

Beaches and Coastal Environments  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a This chapter summarizes the rationale for using microbial source tracking (MST) methods at beach sites and coastal water bodies\\u000a (Sect. 20.1), as MST methods are especially useful for evaluating waters impacted by nonpoint sources of pollution. This chapter\\u000a also describes the most common traditional and alternative MST markers used at beach sites (Sect. 20.2). Two case studies\\u000a are presented (Sect.

Helena M. Solo-Gabriele; Alexandria B. Boehm; Troy M. Scott; Christopher D. Sinigalliano

98

Beach cleaning method  

SciTech Connect

A method of separating oil and other floatatable debris from the sand on a beach by localized flooding of the beach is disclosed. Suitable large diameter conduits are provided to introduce large quantities of water to a selected area of the beach, the water mixing with the sand and causing oil and other debris on or buried in the sand to float, and thus to rise toward the surface of the sand. A second flooding operation refloats the debris and a skimmer mechanism then removes the floating oil and other material while allowing the water to return to the beach area. The water supply is provided by means of suitable conduits carried by a truck, tractor, or other beach vehicle. In the preferred embodiment, the water required for flooding is obtained from the ocean by an extension of the supply conduits, with the forward motion of the tractor providing the required water flow through the conduits to the area to be cleaned. Alternatively, the desired water flow can be obtained by means of a low lift pump in the conduits, the pumps being hydraulically operated from the beach vehicle. The first flooding operation provides water to move the oil and other debris toward a center line, while the second provides water to refloat the material in the vicinity of the intake for the skimmer.

Cloutier, C.C.

1981-11-24

99

77 FR 9682 - Announcement of Funding Awards for the HUD-Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing (HUD-VASH) Program...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Ridgewood Daytona Beach... FL 32114 129,978 25 Daytona Beach. Avenue, Ste 200. Sarasota Housing Authority... 40 South Pineapple Sarasota........ FL 34236 141,324 25 Ave, Ste 200. West Palm Beach Housing 1715 Division Avenue. West Palm...

2012-02-17

100

Beaches: Profiles, processes and permeability  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The problems involved in the interaction between waves and beaches are complex and it is not yet possible to predict on empirical grounds, let alone theoretical grounds, the shape of a beach after it is subjected to given wave conditions. This investigation began as a study of the use of crushed coal as a model beach material to represent natural beaches of quartz sand but subsequently developed into a more general study of the processes which determine the shape of beach profiles formed in beach materials with different permeabilities.

Gourlay, M. R.

1980-06-01

101

Best Beaches in the USA  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Dr. Stephen Leatherman, professor and director of the Laboratory for Coastal Research at the University of Maryland, College Park, has released his annual list of America's best beaches. "Dr. Beach" considered fifty different factors, including current, wave size, smell, views and vistas, and intensity of beach use, to rate the twenty finest public beaches of 650 nation wide. This site features photos of the winners, a complete list of the Beach Rating Scale Criteria, and Dr. Leatherman's selections for the five best Walking, Wild, and Romantic Beaches.

Leatherman, Stephen.

1997-01-01

102

Hawaii Beach Monitoring Program: Beach Profile Data  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Coastal erosion is widespread and locally severe in Hawaii and other low-latitude areas. Typical erosion rates in Hawaii are in the range of 15 to 30 cm/yr (0.5 to 1 ft/yr; Hwang, 1981; Sea Engineering, Inc., 1988; Makai Ocean Engineering, Inc. and Sea Engineering, Inc.,1991). Recent studies on Oahu (Fletcher et al., 1997; Coyne et al., 1996) have shown that nearly 24%, or 27.5 km (17.1 mi) of an original 115 km (71.6 mi) of sandy shoreline (1940's) has been either significantly narrowed (17.2 km; 10.7 mi) or lost (10.3 km; 6.4 mi). Nearly one-quarter of the islands' beaches have been significantly degraded over the last half-century and all shorelines have been affected to some degree. Oahu shorelines are by far the most studied, however, beach loss has been identified on the other islands as well, with nearly 13 km (8 mi) of beach likely lost due to shoreline hardening on Maui (Makai Engineering, Inc. and Sea Engineering, Inc., 1991). Causes of coastal erosion and beach loss in Hawaii are numerous but, unfortunately, poorly understood and rarely quantified. Construction of shoreline protection structures limits coastal land loss, but does not alleviate beach loss and may actually accelerate the problem by prohibiting sediment deposition in front of the structures. Other factors contributing to beach loss include: a) reduced sediment supply; b) large storms; and, c) sea-level rise. Reduction in sand supply, either from landward or seaward (primarily reef) sources, can have a myriad of causes. Obvious causes such as beach sand mining and emplacement of structures that interrupt natural sediment transport pathways or prevent access to backbeach sand deposits, remove sediment from the active littoral system. More complex issues of sediment supply can be related to reef health and carbonate production which, in turn, may be linked to changes in water quality. Second, the accumulated effect of large storms is to transport sediment beyond the littoral system. Third, rising sea level leads to a natural landward migration of the shoreline. Dramatic examples of coastal erosion, such as houses and roads falling into the sea, are rare in Hawaii, but the impact of erosion is still very serious. The signs of erosion are much more subtle and typically start as a "temporary" hardening structure designed to mitigate an immediate problem which, eventually, results in a proliferation of structures along a stretch of coast. The natural ability of the sandy shoreline to respond to changes in wave climate is lost. The overall goals of this study are to document the coastal erosion history in Hawaii, determine the causal factors of that erosion, provide high-quality data for other "end-users" in applied studies (i.e. coastal engineers, planners, and managers), and increase our general understanding of low-latitude coastal geologic development. This project involves close cooperation between the USGS Coastal and Marine Geology Program and the University of Hawaii.

Gibbs, Ann E.; Richmond, Bruce M.; Fletcher, Charles H.; Hillman, Kindra P.

2001-01-01

103

Morphologic Features and Morphodynamic Zones along the Inner Continental Shelf of Southeastern Florida: An Example of Form and Process Controlled by Lithology  

Microsoft Academic Search

FINKL, C.W. and WARNER, M.T., 2004. Morphologic features and morphodynamic zones along the inner continental shelf of southeastern florida: An example of form and process controlled by lithology. Journal of Coastal Research, SI(42), 000-000. West Palm Beach (Florida), ISSN 0749-0208. Submarine morphological features along the southeast Florida coast in central Palm Beach County were mapped from large-scale aerial images (acquisition

Charles W. Finkl; Mathew T. Warner

104

Aerosolized Red Tide Toxins (Brevetoxins) and Asthma: Continued health effects after 1 hour beach exposure  

PubMed Central

Blooms of the toxic dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis, produce potent neurotoxins in marine aerosols. Recent studies have demonstrated acute changes in both symptoms and pulmonary function in asthmatics after only 1 hour of beach exposure to these aerosols. This study investigated if there were latent and/or sustained effects in asthmatics in the days following the initial beach exposure during periods with and without an active Florida red tide. Symptom data and spirometry data were collected before and after 1 hour of beach exposure. Subjects kept daily symptom diaries and measured their peak flow each morning for 5 days following beach exposure. During non-exposure periods, there were no significant changes in symptoms or pulmonary function either acutely or over 5 days of follow-up. After the beach exposure during an active Florida red tide, subjects had elevated mean symptoms which did not return to the pre-exposure baseline for at least 4 days. The peak flow measurements decreased after the initial beach exposure, decreased further within 24 hours, and continued to be suppressed even after 5 days. Asthmatics may continue to have increased symptoms and delayed respiratory function suppression for several days after 1 hour of exposure to the Florida red tide toxin aerosols.

Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Fleming, Lora E; Bean, Judy A; Nierenberg, Kate; Backer, Lorraine C; Cheng, Yung Sung; Pierce, Richard; Reich, Andrew; Naar, Jerome; Wanner, Adam; Abraham, William M; Zhou, Yue; Hollenbeck, Julie; Baden, Daniel G

2010-01-01

105

BACTERIA, BEACHES AND SWIMMABLE WATERS: INTRODUCING VIRTUAL BEACH  

EPA Science Inventory

Safe beaches meet water quality standards and are valued for their aesthetics and the recreational opportunities that they afford. In the United States recreational water quality assessments and beach closure decisions are presently based on samples of enterococci or Escherichia ...

106

The Die-Hard Communicator  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article profiles Margaret A. Smith, superintendent of Volusia County School District in Florida. In the six years since her appointment as superintendent of Volusia County--a district that has 63,000 students in 16 cities, including Daytona Beach--Smith has had her share of success. But what makes her so different from other superintendents…

Rivero, Victor

2010-01-01

107

Field Trip: Multimedia and the Curriculum.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the development of the Academy of Communications and Multimedia Technology--a school-to-work program integrating English, social studies, and mathematics with multimedia, art, and television production--at Mainland High School in Daytona Beach, Florida. Discusses the program's goals, student recruitment, roles of business partners (such…

McBroom, George

1997-01-01

108

Coatings Preserve Metal, Stone, Tile, and Concrete  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

John B. Schutt, a chemist at Goddard Space Flight Center, created a coating for spacecraft that could resist corrosion and withstand high heat. After retiring from NASA, Schutt used his expertise to create new formulations for Daytona Beach, Florida-based Adsil Corporation, which now manufactures a family of coatings to preserve various surfaces. Adsil has created 150 jobs due to the products.

2014-01-01

109

Geomorphology of Puget Sound Beaches.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this report is to synthesize information about the geomorphology and dynamics of Puget Sound's beaches. It summarizes important peer-reviewed literature relevant to these beach environments and assemblies background information that should ...

D. Finlayson

2006-01-01

110

Great Lakes BeachCast  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Great Lakes Information Network developed this website to "broadcast critical information about beach closings and educational content on human health concerns." The website provides the latest news on erosion control projects, contamination and cleanup efforts, beach testing efforts, and other environmental news. Users can explore monitoring data and maps by location. The website also contains the proceedings from the Great Lakes Beach Conferences from 2001 and 2002 and the US EPA's Beach Program activities.

111

Analysis of the Relationship Between Physical Environmental Parameters and Beach Water Quality in a Subtropical Setting  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fecal Indicator Bacteria(FIB) are found in high concentrations in sewage water, and thus are used to indicate whether there is fecal material related pathogen present and to determine whether a beach is safe for recreational use. Studies have shown, however, in subtropical regions, FIB concentrations above EPA standards may be present in the absence of known point sources of human or animal waste, thus reducing the efficacy of FIB beach monitoring programs. An interdisciplinary study is being conducted in Miami, Florida , the goal is to understand the sources and behavior of FIB on a beach without point source loads and also to improve beach health hazard warnings in subtropical regions. This study, examines relationship between enterococci (EPA recommended FIB for use in marine water) and physical environmental parameters such as rain, tide and wind. FIB data employed include Florida Department of Health weekly beach monitoring enterococci (ENT) data during a five year period and a two-day experiment with hourly sampling at Hobie Cat Beach on Virginia Key in the Miami metropolitan area. The environmental data consist of wind from a nearby CMAN tower, and local rain and tide. The analysis also includes data from nearby beaches monitored by the Health Department. Results show the correlation coefficient between ENT and tide at Hobie Cat Beach is positive but not significant(r=0.17). Rain events have a significant influence on ENT at Hobie Cat Beach, with a correlation coefficient of up to 0.7 while at other beaches the correlation is less than 0.2. Reasons for this aberration are being investigated. Although this is the only beach allowing dogs there are other factors of possible importance, such as tidal flats frequented by birds and weaker water circulation and exchange at this beach facing a bay rather than the ocean. Higher ENT levels (> 300CFU/100ml water) are more likely (67% of the time) to be associated with periods of onshore winds, which may affect the circulation of water at the beach or cause waves and wave breaking that stir and resuspend the beach sediment. To help interpret FIB observations and to improve the use of future monitoring results, a coastal circulation model and a bacteria fate model is being constructed to simulate and predict the FIB transport and distribution at Hobie Cat Beach.

Zhu, X.; Wang, J. D.; Elmir, S.; Solo-Gabriele, H. M.; Wright, M. E.; Abdelzaher, A.

2006-12-01

112

Virtual Beach 3: User's Guide  

EPA Science Inventory

Virtual Beach version 3 (VB3) is a decision support tool that constructs site-specific statistical models to predict fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) concentrations at recreational beaches. VB3 is primarily designed for beach managers responsible for making decisions regarding beac...

113

SOUND BEACH SOCCER CLUB  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sound Beach Soccer Club, our local travel club of the Long Island Junior Soccer League, is proud to bring you the 2009 Summer Soccer Camp. For the 4th year running, the camp will once again be held at the North Shore Heritage Park (\\

SUMMER CAMP

2009-01-01

114

Florida Everglades  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This problem-based learning module focuses on the dilemma of wetlands management. The module is based upon the continued debate over the restoration of the natural cycle of water to the Florida Everglades. Students are challenged to perform an Earth system science analysis of the restoration of water level and flow to the Everglades ecosystem. They are also asked to predict the future survival of the Florida Panther. This module is part of Exploring the Environment.

115

Florida Aquarium  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Web page features information for visitors, calendar of events, guide to the aquarium, activities, education and community programs, conservation initiatives, and information on employment, internships, membership and donors. The Florida Aquarium is a not-for-profit educational and cultural attraction whose mission allows people of all ages and backgrounds to engage in experiences that inspire a sense of wonder, understanding and stewardship of aquatic environments. Located in Tampa, Florida.

116

Public Perceptions of Florida Red Tide Risks  

PubMed Central

This research integrates theoretical frameworks of risk perception, social amplification of risk, and the role of place-specific contexts in order to explore the various perceptions surrounding Florida red tides. Florida red tides are naturally occurring events that are increasing in frequency, duration, and severity. This has implications for public health, the local economy, and ecosystem health. While many of the negative impacts of Florida red tides are not easily controlled, some of the secondary impacts may be mitigated through individuals’ responses. However, public perception and consequent reactions to Florida red tides have not been investigated. This research uses questionnaire surveys, and semi-structured interviews, to explore the various perceptions of the risk surrounding red tides. Surveys and interviews were conducted along two Florida west coast beaches. The results indicate that the underlying foundations of the social amplification of the risk framework are applicable to understanding how individuals form perceptions of risk relative to red tide events. There are key differences between the spatial locations of individuals and corresponding perceptions, indicating that place-specific contexts are essential to understanding how individuals receive and interpret risk information. The results also suggest that individuals may be lacking efficient and up-to-date information about Florida red tides and their impacts because of inconsistent public outreach. Overall, social and spatial factors appear to be influential as to whether individuals amplify or attenuate the risks associated with Florida red tides.

Kuhar, Sara E.; Nierenberg, Kate; Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Tobin, Graham A.

2009-01-01

117

Archive of digital boomer subbottom data collected during USGS cruise 05FGS01 offshore east-central Florida, July 17-29, 2005  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In July of 2005, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Florida Geological Survey (FGS), conducted a geophysical survey of the Atlantic Ocean offshore of Florida's east coast from Flagler Beach to Daytona Beach. This report serves as an archive of unprocessed digital boomer subbottom data, trackline maps, navigation files, Geographic Information System (GIS) files, Field Activity Collection System (FACS) logs and formal Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) metadata. Filtered and gained (showing a relative increase in signal amplitude) digital images of the seismic profiles are also provided. Refer to the Acronyms page for expansions of acronyms and abbreviations used in this report. The USGS Saint Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center (SPCMSC) assigns a unique identifier to each cruise or field activity. For example, 05FGS01 tells us the data were collected in 2005 for cooperative work with the FGS and the data were collected during the first field activity for that project in that calendar year. Refer to http://walrus.wr.usgs.gov/infobank/programs/html/definition/activity.html for a detailed description of the method used to assign the field activity ID. The boomer subbottom processing system consists of an acoustic energy source that is made up of capacitors charged to a high voltage and discharged through a transducer in the water. The transducer is towed on a sled floating on the water surface and when discharged emits a short acoustic pulse, or shot, which propagates through the water column and shallow stratrigraphy below. The acoustic energy is reflected at density boundaries (such as the seafloor or sediment layers beneath the seafloor), detected by the receiver (a hydrophone streamer), and recorded by a PC-based seismic acquisition system. This process is repeated at timed intervals (for example, 0.5 s) and recorded for specific intervals of time (for example, 100 ms). In this way, a two-dimensional (2-D) vertical image of the shallow geologic structure beneath the ship track is produced. Figure 1 displays the acquisition geometry. Refer to table 1 for a summary of acquisition parameters and table 2 for trackline statistics. The archived trace data are in standard Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) SEG Y format (Barry and others, 1975), except an ASCII format is used for the first 3,200 bytes of the card image header instead of the standard EBCDIC format. For a detailed description about the recorded trace headers, refer to the SEG Y Format page. The SEG Y files may be downloaded and processed with commercial or public domain software such as Seismic Unix (Cohen and Stockwell, 2005). See the How To Download SEG Y Data page for download instructions. The printable profiles provided here are GIF images that were processed and gained using SU software; refer to the Software page for links to example SU processing scripts. The processed SEG Y data were also exported to Chesapeake Technology, Inc. (CTI) SonarWeb software to produce a geospatially interactive version of the profile that allows the user to obtain a geographic location and depth from the profile for a given cursor position; this information is displayed in the status bar of the browser. Please note that clicking on the profile image switches it to "Expanded View" (a compressed image of the entire line) and cursor tracking is not available in this mode.

Forde, Arnell S.; Dadisman, Shawn V.; Wiese, Dana S.; Phelps, Daniel C.

2012-01-01

118

Florida Red Tide Perception: Residents versus Tourists  

PubMed Central

The west coast of Florida has annual blooms of the toxin-producing dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis with Sarasota, FL considered the epicenter for these blooms. Numerous outreach materials, including Frequently Asked Question (FAQ) cards, exhibits for local museums and aquaria, public beach signs, and numerous websites have been developed to disseminate information to the public about this natural hazard. In addition, during intense onshore blooms, a great deal of media attention, primarily via newspaper (print and web) and television, is focused on red tide. However to date, the only measure of effectiveness of these outreach methods has been counts of the number of people exposed to the information, e.g., visits to a website or number of FAQ cards distributed. No formal assessment has been conducted to determine if these materials meet their goal of informing the public about Florida red tide. Also, although local residents have the opinion that they are very knowledgeable about Florida red tide, this has not been verified empirically. This study addressed these issues by creating and administering an evaluation tool for the assessment of public knowledge about Florida red tide. A focus group of Florida red tide outreach developers assisted in the creation of the evaluation tool. The location of the evaluation was the west coast of Florida, in Sarasota County. The objective was to assess the knowledge of the general public about Florida red tide. This assessment identified gaps in public knowledge regarding Florida red tides and also identified what information sources people want to use to obtain information on Florida red tide. The results from this study can be used to develop more effective outreach materials on Florida red tide.

Nierenberg, Kate; Byrne, Margaret; Fleming, Lora E.; Stephan, Wendy; Reich, Andrew; Backer, Lorraine C.; Tanga, Elvira; Dalpra, Dana R.; Kirkpatrick, Barbara

2010-01-01

119

The Genetic Basis of Phenotypic Convergence in Beach Mice: Similar Pigment Patterns but Different Genes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Convergent evolution is a widespread phenomenon seen in diverse organisms inhabiting similar selective environments. However, it is unclear if similar phenotypes are produced by the same or different genes and mutations. Here we analyze the molecular mechanisms underlying convergent pigment pattern among subspecies of the beach mouse (Peromyscus polionotus) inhabiting the Gulf and Atlantic coasts of Florida. In these two

Cynthia C. Steiner; Holger Rompler; Linda M. Boettger; Torsten Schoneberg; Hopi E. Hoekstra

2008-01-01

120

Supporting Low-Income Parents of Young Children: The Palm Beach County Family Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

For more than a decade, Florida's Palm Beach County has been building an infrastructure of prevention and early intervention services to promote and support the healthy development and school readiness of children from birth to age 8. The county began this effort with a set of programs focused on serving families in four targeted geographic areas…

Spielberger, Julie; Rich, Lauren; Gouvea, Marcia; Winje, Carolyn; Scannell, Molly; Harden, Allen; Berg, Kristin

2009-01-01

121

Palm Beach School Board Acquisition of Relocatable Classrooms Examined. OPPAGA Special Review.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report, responding to a Florida legislative request, examines the Palm Beach County School Board's planned purchase of concrete relocatable classrooms. The report presents a number of findings and recommendations. Concrete units are more expensive than models with metal stud walls; both types meet state building code standards. The district…

Florida State Legislature, Tallahassee. Office of Program Policy Analysis and Government Accountability.

122

Improving School Readiness: A Brief Report from the Palm Beach County Family Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

For more than a decade, Florida's Palm Beach County has been building a system of prevention and early intervention services to promote and support the healthy development and school readiness of children from birth to age 8. The county began this effort with a set of programs focused on serving families in four targeted geographic areas that have…

Spielberger, Julie; Gouvea, Marcia; Rich, Lauren

2012-01-01

123

AN ASSESSMENT OF THE ECOLOGICAL CONDITION OF PENSACOLA BAY, FLORIDA  

EPA Science Inventory

Assessment of the Ecological Condition of Pensacola Bay, Florida (Abstract). To be presented at the16th Biennial Conference of the Estuarine Research Foundation, ERF 2001: An Estuarine Odyssey, 4-8 November 2001, St. Pete Beach, FL. 1 p. (ERL,GB R848). We conducted surve...

124

A ground-water sapping landscape in the Florida Panhandle  

Microsoft Academic Search

Drainage networks that have formed by ground-water sapping are developed in the highly permeable sands of the Citronelle Formation in the Florida Panhandle. The valleys resemble those formed on Hawaii, the Colorado Plateau and on Mars, but they have developed without significant lithologic controls. Drainage patterns range from trellis to dentritic depending on the effect of beach ridges and relative

S. A. Schumm; K. F. Boyd; C. G. Wolff; W. J. Spitz

1995-01-01

125

77 FR 50019 - Safety Zone; Cocoa Beach Air Show, Atlantic Ocean, Cocoa Beach, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Zone; Cocoa Beach Air Show, Atlantic Ocean, Cocoa Beach, FL AGENCY: Coast...safety zone on the waters of the Atlantic Ocean located east of Cocoa Beach...in aerobatic maneuvers over the Atlantic Ocean east of Cocoa Beach,...

2012-08-20

126

Respect the Beach Program  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Interdisciplinary coastal education program from Surfrider Foundation incorporates science processes, oceanography, watershed ecology and environmental awareness in lessons for K-12 students and community groups. Include: teaching guides, classroom lectures, handouts, video, hands-on projects. Beachology, for grades K-6, studies sand processes, beach ecology, human impacts. Watershed Works, for grades 5-12, explains links between coast and watershed. The Snowrider Project educates alpine communities about hydrologic cycle. Available online as PDF documents.

2012-04-03

127

Beach ridges and prograded beach deposits as palaeoenvironment records  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Beach ridges are landforms commonly developed on prograded coasts with beach shorelines. A sequence of beach ridges, coupled with their subsurface deposits, can be regarded as a time series of coastal evolution. Methodological advances in field surveying and chronology applicable to beach ridges have led to detailed palaeoenvironmental reconstructions to be derived from such sequences. This paper reconsiders the basic aspects of beach ridges and deposits, which need to be properly understood for their comprehensive interpretation in a palaeo-environmental context. It also reviews case studies in which beach-ridge sequences have been used to unveil past sea-level history, catastrophic events, and climate changes. Proposed formative processes of beach ridges include: 1) progradation of sandy beach and berm formations in relation to fairweather waves, coupled with aeolian foredune accumulation; 2) building of gravel ridges by storm waves; 3) welding of longshore bars. Beach-ridge formation through sea-level oscillation is thought to be questionable and caution is suggested for this process when undertaking palaeoenvironmental reconstruction. Beach deposit stratification is known to dip either landwards or seawards, but landward dips are uncommon. Seaward dipping stratification is formed in relation to beachface progradation, and is usually dissected in places by erosion surfaces resulting from episodic beach retreat. The boundary between the foreshore and the underlying shoreface is well defined only in the case that longshore bars lead to complex bedding structure relative to that of the foreshore. Reliable chronology of beach ridges can be determined by radiocarbon and optically-stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating. Radiocarbon dating of articulated shells, which are considered not to be extensively reworked, provides robust results, but OSL dating is more useful as it enables direct dating of sediment grains. It is noted that there are restrictions in chronological resolution and continuity inherent to beach ridge and beach deposits. The plan-view geomorphic expression of beach ridges typically consists of ridge sets with multi-decadal intervals, whereas their internal sedimentary structures define shorter time scales. Records of beach sedimentation and erosion are likely to be reworked by episodic high-magnitude beach retreat, and the resultant record of the net progradation is likely to be sporadic and discontinuous. The height of sandy beach ridges is often variable due to differing degrees of aeolian sand accumulation, and they are thus not used as sea-level indicators unless purely wave-built. Gravel ridge height is a relatively reliable indicator of sea level, but can vary in response to storminess fluctuations. Subsurface sediment facies boundaries are preferred as sea-level indicators, and those proposed include: boundaries of aeolian/beach, foreshore/shoreface, and upper/lower shorefaces. Catastrophic events are expressed in both erosional and depositional records. Erosion surfaces, or scarp imprints, revealed in a cross section of beach deposits, indicate storm or tsunami events. However, erosional events are likely to rework previous records of sedimentation and even other erosional events, and thus the apparent history decoded from the resultant deposits tends to be biased. Several attempts for estimating the frequency and intensity of prehistoric cyclones rely on assumed relationships between the level of coarse sand beach ridges and cyclone inundation. The formative process of coarse sand ridges remains uncertain and needs to be clarified, as it constitutes the fundamental basis of these attempts. The growth rates of beach-ridge systems are expected to reflect fluctuations in river sediment discharge to the coast and in aeolian sand flux due to onshore winds, both of which are affected by climate change. Assessment of the growth rate is potentially improved by ground-penetrating radar survey of subsurface structure and by detailed chronology. Orientation of beach ridges reflects long-term trends in wave dir

Tamura, Toru

2012-09-01

128

Sand hazards on tourist beaches.  

PubMed

Visiting the beach is a popular tourist activity worldwide. Unfortunately, the beach environment is abundant with hazards and potential danger to the unsuspecting tourist. While the traditional focus of beach safety has been water safety oriented, there is growing concern about the risks posed by the sand environment on beaches. This study reports on the death and near death experience of eight tourists in the collapse of sand holes, sand dunes, and sand tunnels. Each incident occurred suddenly and the complete burial in sand directly contributed to the victims injury or death in each case report. PMID:23290717

Heggie, Travis W

2013-01-01

129

South Florida Aquatic Environments  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Interactive content highlights three imperiled south Florida ecosystems: the Everglades, Florida Bay, and Florida Keys. Provides introduction, definition, and image of each habitat type within the ecosystems; outlines threats to ecosystems and conservation issues. Other features include: introduced species and their impacts; biological profiles for marine and freshwater fishes from the Florida Museum's ichthyology collection; and Florida-related word search and crossword puzzles.

130

Inland Transport of Aerosolized Florida Red Tide Toxins  

PubMed Central

Florida red tides, an annual event off the west coast of Florida, are caused by the toxic dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis. K. brevis produces a suite of potent neurotoxins, brevetoxins, which kill fish, sea birds, and marine mammals, as well as sickening humans who consume contaminated shellfish. These toxins become part of the marine aerosol, and can also be inhaled by humans and other animals. Recent studies have demonstrated a significant increase in symptoms and decrease lung function in asthmatics after only one hour of beach exposure during an onshore Florida red tide bloom. This study constructed a transect line placing high volume air samplers to measure brevetoxins at sites beginning at the beach, moving approximately 6.4 km inland. One non-exposure and 2 exposure studies, each of 5 days duration, were conducted. No toxins were measured in the air during the non-exposure period. During the 2 exposure periods, the amount of brevetoxins varied considerably by site and by date. Nevertheless, brevetoxins were measured at least 4.2 kilometers from the beach and/or 1.6 km from the coastal shoreline. Therefore, populations sensitive to brevetoxins (such as asthmatics) need to know that leaving the beach may not discontinue their environmental exposure to brevetoxin aerosols.

Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Pierce, Richard; Cheng, Yung Sung; Henry, Michael S.; Blum, Patricia; Osborn, Shannon; Nierenberg, Kate; Pederson, Bradley A.; Fleming, Lora E.; Reich, Andrew; Naar, Jerome; Kirkpatrick, Gary; Backer, Lorraine C; Baden, Daniel

2009-01-01

131

Satellite applications to a coastal inlet study, Clearwater Beach, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Two sets of LANDSAT magnetic tapes were obtained and displayed on the screen of an IMAGE 100 computer. Spectral analysis was performed to produce various signatures, their extent and location. Subsequent ground truth observations and measurements were gathered by means of hydrographic surveys and low-altitude aerial photography for interpretation and calibration of the LANDSAT data. Finally, a coastal engineering assessment based on the LANDSAT data was made. Recommendations to the City of Clearwater regarding the navigational channel alignment and dredging practice are presented in the light of the inlet stability.

Wang, Y. H.; Smutz, M.; Ruth, B. E.; Brooks, H. K.

1977-01-01

132

Beryllium technology workshop, Clearwater Beach, Florida, November 20, 1991  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the following topics: beryllium in the ITER blanket; mechanical testing of irradiated beryllium; tritium release measurements on irradiated beryllium; beryllium needs for plasma-facing components; thermal conductivity of plasma sprayed beryllium; beryllium research at the INEL; Japanese beryllium research activities for in-pile mockup tests on ITER; a study of beryllium bonding of copper alloy; new production technologies; thermophysical properties of a new ingot metallurgy beryllium product line; implications of beryllium:steam interactions in fusion reactors; and a test program for irradiation embrittlement of beryllium at JET.

Longhurst, G.R.

1991-12-01

133

Overview of Pacific Island carbonate beach systems  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Beach systems in Pacific Islands are Holocene deposits of reef-dervied and terrigenous sediment. Thus, geologic setting is important in determining the success at which beach systems are established. Generally, older islands exhibit better beach system development. Although modern beach systems are composed of Holocene sediment, development of suitable accommodation space requires more geologic time.

Richmond, B. M.

2000-01-01

134

Coastal Erosion: Where's the Beach?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This data tip from Bridge, the Ocean Sciences Education Teacher Resource Center archive, explores erosion and accretion of coastal sediments, the two processes that keep our beaches in a constant state of change. Both natural and not-so-natural factors influencing these processes are discussed. Learners can view a variety of weblinks on the topic and conduct their own beach profile investigation, or access profile data from a 1999 Ocean City, Maryland beach and plot the changes over time for a graphic illustration of these processes.

2000-05-01

135

PAH concentrations in Coquina (Donax spp.) on a sandy beach shoreline impacted by a marine oil spill.  

PubMed

The BP MC252 well failure in the Gulf of Mexico, April 2010 caused concern for crude oil and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs) exposure along the sandy beaches of the Florida Panhandle. We began collections of Coquina clams (Donax spp.) from the surf zone of Florida Panhandle beaches to monitor PAH contamination to compliment analysis of surf zone sand samples. These clams had higher levels of PAHs relative to ambient sand, and this allowed us to continue to monitor PAH levels after sand concentrations fell below limits of detection. PAH levels in the Coquina tissues were highly variable, perhaps indicative of the heterogeneous distribution of oil and tar on the beaches and exposure to tar particles. Overall, PAH levels decreased continuously in both sand and Coquina tissues, reaching limits of detection within one and two years respectively after oil landed on Florida Panhandle beaches. Our work suggests these surf zone molluscs may be used to monitor pollutant exposure along high energy sandy beach shorelines. PMID:24775069

Snyder, Richard A; Vestal, Alexandra; Welch, Christina; Barnes, Gracie; Pelot, Robert; Ederington-Hagy, Melissa; Hileman, Fredrick

2014-06-15

136

An Alternative Approach to Water Regulations for Public Health Protection at Bathing Beaches  

PubMed Central

New approaches should be considered as the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) moves rapidly to develop new beach monitoring guidelines by the end of 2012, as these guidelines serve as the basis by which states and territories with coasts along the oceans and Great Lakes can then develop and implement monitoring programs for recreational waters. We describe and illustrate one possible approach to beach regulation termed as the “Comprehensive Toolbox within an Approval Process (CTBAP).” The CTBAP consists of three components. The first is a “toolbox” consisting of an inventory of guidelines on monitoring targets, a series of measurement techniques, and guidance to improve water quality through source identification and prevention methods. The second two components are principles of implementation. These include first, “flexibility” to encourage and develop an individualized beach management plan tailored to local conditions and second, “consistency” of this management plan to ensure a consistent national level of public health protection. The results of this approach are illustrated through a case study at a well-studied South Florida recreational marine beach. This case study explores different monitoring targets based on two different health endpoints (skin versus gastrointestinal illness) and recommends a beach regulation program for the study beach that focuses predominately on source prevention.

Abdelzaher, Amir M.; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M.; Phillips, Matthew C.; Elmir, Samir M.; Fleming, Lora E.

2013-01-01

137

Beach Recovery Rates Derived From Airborne LIDAR Following Hurricane Ivan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hurricanes are a major source for erosion and damage along the southeastern US coastline. This study uses airborne LIDAR data to quantify shoreline change due to Hurricane Ivan. Hurricane Ivan made landfall on the Alabama gulf coast in September, 2004 with maximum sustained winds of 58 m/s. Five separate LIDAR data sets of barrier beaches situated in the front right quadrant of the hurricane were collected during a six month period before and after landfall allowing an excellent timeline for analyzing change in shoreline position. Shorelines were extracted and incremental shoreline position differences were quantified for a 30 km portion of Panama City Beach, Florida. Preliminary results show alternating trends in shoreline change. The hurricane caused an initial average shoreline retreat of more than 16 m relative to pre-storm positions. Within three weeks this shoreline position recovered or moved seaward by 10 m. However, during the 2 month interval between October and December, 2004, the shoreline again retreated 5 m. This 5 m of shoreline retreat in the two months following the initial recovery could be attributed to the beach profile transition from summer to winter, and will have to be researched further.

Robertson, W.; Zhang, K.; Whitman, D.; Leatherman, S. P.

2005-12-01

138

Responses of small rodents to habitat restoration and management for the imperiled Florida Scrub-Jay  

Microsoft Academic Search

Debate about the relative merits of single-species management versus more comprehensive approaches has intensified in recent years. In east-central Florida, USA, land managers use prescribed burns and mechanical cutting to manage and restore scrub habitat to benefit the imperiled Florida Scrub-Jay (Aphelocoma coerulescens). However, these land-management techniques may affect non-target taxa, especially the threatened southeastern beach mouse (Peromyscus polionotus niveiventris).

Alexis A. Suazo; John E. Fauth; James D. Roth; Christopher L. Parkinson; I. Jack Stout

2009-01-01

139

Landing techniques in beach volleyball.  

PubMed

The aims of the present study were to establish a detailed and representative record of landing techniques (two-, left-, and right-footed landings) in professional beach volleyball and compare the data with those of indoor volleyball. Beach volleyball data was retrieved from videos taken at FIVB World Tour tournaments. Landing techniques were compared in the different beach and indoor volleyball skills serve, set, attack, and block with regard to sex, playing technique, and court position. Significant differences were observed between men and women in landings following block actions (?(2)(2) = 18.19, p < 0.01) but not following serve, set, and attack actions. Following blocking, men landed more often on one foot than women. Further differences in landings following serve and attack with regard to playing technique and position were mainly observed in men. The comparison with landing techniques in indoor volleyball revealed overall differences both in men (?(2)(2) = 161.4, p < 0.01) and women (?(2)(2) = 84.91, p < 0.01). Beach volleyball players land more often on both feet than indoor volleyball players. Besides the softer surface in beach volleyball, and therefore resulting lower loads, these results might be another reason for fewer injuries and overuse conditions compared to indoor volleyball. Key PointsAbout 1/3 of all jumping actions in beach volleyball result in a landing on one foot.Especially following block situations men land on one foot more often than women.Landing techniques are related to different techniques and positions.Landings on one foot are less common in beach volleyball than indoor volleyball. This could be a reason for fewer injuries and overuse conditions. PMID:24149150

Tilp, Markus; Rindler, Michael

2013-01-01

140

Landing Techniques in Beach Volleyball  

PubMed Central

The aims of the present study were to establish a detailed and representative record of landing techniques (two-, left-, and right-footed landings) in professional beach volleyball and compare the data with those of indoor volleyball. Beach volleyball data was retrieved from videos taken at FIVB World Tour tournaments. Landing techniques were compared in the different beach and indoor volleyball skills serve, set, attack, and block with regard to sex, playing technique, and court position. Significant differences were observed between men and women in landings following block actions (?2(2) = 18.19, p < 0.01) but not following serve, set, and attack actions. Following blocking, men landed more often on one foot than women. Further differences in landings following serve and attack with regard to playing technique and position were mainly observed in men. The comparison with landing techniques in indoor volleyball revealed overall differences both in men (?2(2) = 161.4, p < 0.01) and women (?2(2) = 84.91, p < 0.01). Beach volleyball players land more often on both feet than indoor volleyball players. Besides the softer surface in beach volleyball, and therefore resulting lower loads, these results might be another reason for fewer injuries and overuse conditions compared to indoor volleyball. Key Points About 1/3 of all jumping actions in beach volleyball result in a landing on one foot. Especially following block situations men land on one foot more often than women. Landing techniques are related to different techniques and positions. Landings on one foot are less common in beach volleyball than indoor volleyball. This could be a reason for fewer injuries and overuse conditions.

Tilp, Markus; Rindler, Michael

2013-01-01

141

A single amino acid mutation contributes to adaptive beach mouse color pattern.  

PubMed

Natural populations of beach mice exhibit a characteristic color pattern, relative to their mainland conspecifics, driven by natural selection for crypsis. We identified a derived, charge-changing amino acid mutation in the melanocortin-1 receptor (Mc1r) in beach mice, which decreases receptor function. In genetic crosses, allelic variation at Mc1r explains 9.8% to 36.4% of the variation in seven pigmentation traits determining color pattern. The derived Mc1r allele is present in Florida's Gulf Coast beach mice but not in Atlantic coast mice with similar light coloration, suggesting that different molecular mechanisms are responsible for convergent phenotypic evolution. Here, we link a single mutation in the coding region of a pigmentation gene to adaptive quantitative variation in the wild. PMID:16825572

Hoekstra, Hopi E; Hirschmann, Rachel J; Bundey, Richard A; Insel, Paul A; Crossland, Janet P

2006-07-01

142

Tybee Island, Georgia, Beach Erosion Control.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The action consists of restoration and periodic nourishment of 13,200 feet of ocean beach and a rubble stone terminal groin extending 800 feet seaward on Tybee Island, Georgia. Environmental impacts include the restoration and maintenance of scenic beach ...

1972-01-01

143

78 FR 35596 - Special Local Regulation; Long Beach Regatta, Powerboat Race, Atlantic Ocean, Long Beach, NY  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Beach Regatta, Powerboat Race, Atlantic Ocean, Long Beach, NY AGENCY: Coast...on the navigable waters of the Atlantic Ocean off Long Beach, NY during the...The event will be held on the Atlantic Ocean off Long Beach, NY and will...

2013-06-13

144

Florida Environments Online  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Florida Environments Online contains both digital full text materials and research bibliographies about the ecology and environment of Florida. Digitized materials include more than 200 seminal texts on species and ecosystems selected by scientific experts throughout the state of Florida and digitized specifically for the Linking Florida's Natural Heritage project. They also include the publications of the Florida Geological Society, and agricultural documents created by the Agricultural Experiment Station/Extension Service (IFAS) and the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Affairs, as well as engineering documents created by the UF Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station.

145

Reflection wave on sloping beach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Most water wave simulations use fixed boundaries. This simplification of course change the wave height prediction near the shore. In this paper, we will find a relation between reflected wave and incoming wave on a sloping beach. This result is important for later use in water wave simulations with moving boundaries. In this paper, we solve the 1-D nonlinear shallow water equation, using the conservative finite volume method. The scheme plus wet and dry procedure can simulate wave running up and down on a sloping beach. Comparison with Carrier and Greenspan analytical run up and down waves shows a good agreement. Then, we use this scheme to find a relation between reflected and incident wave on a sloping beach, incorporating the moving shoreline. And we obtain amplitude ratio and phase difference depending on wave frequency for moderate bottom slopes.

Erwina, N.; Pudjaprasetya, S. R.

2014-03-01

146

RAINFALL AND RUNOFF AS A SOURCE OF ORGANIC CARBON ADDITIONS TO BAYOU TEXAR, FLORIDA  

EPA Science Inventory

Rainfall and Runoff as a Source of Organic Carbon Additions to Bayou Texar, Florida (Abstract). To be presented at the16th Biennial Conference of the Estuarine Research Foundation, ERF 2001: An Estuarine Odyssey, 4-8 November 2001, St. Pete Beach, FL. 1 p. (ERL,GB R852). T...

147

FLORIDA HIGH-SPEED RAIL: AN AMBITIOUS PLAN FOR THE FUTURE  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is noted that by 2000, 40 million annual trips will be generated in the Miami, Fort Lauderdale, West Palm Beach, Orlando, and Tampa corridor in Florida, and that high speed rail (HSR) is a technology capable of helping to meet this transportation need. This article discusses the environmental impact issues of HSR. In an effort to make ridership forecasts

L. L. D. Shen; A. M. Farooqi

1989-01-01

148

Humans were contemporaneous with late Pleistocene mammals in Florida: evidence from rare earth elemental analyses  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the early 20th century, human skeletal remains were excavated from the Vero Beach site in southeastern Florida in direct stratigraphic association with extinct late Pleistocene mammals, including giant ground sloths, armadillos, carnivores, camels, tapirs, and horses. Despite the demonstrable stratigraphic context, prominent scientists during the early 20th century, such as the anthropologist Aleš Hrdli?ka, dismissed these human remains from

Bruce J. Macfadden; Barbara A. Purdy; Krista Church; Thomas W. Stafford JR

2012-01-01

149

Standing edge waves on a pocket beach  

Microsoft Academic Search

Field measurements of edge waves obtained on a narrow pocket beach are described. The beach (named Usgo) is located on the north coast of Spain immediately to the west of the city of Santander and is exposed to the Atlantic Ocean. The edge wave field on this beach is analyzed utilizing data from a longshore array of current meters located

H. Tuba Özkan-Haller; César Vidal; Iñigo J. Losada; Raúl Medina; Miguel A. Losada

2001-01-01

150

Florida Law Collections  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Florida Law Collections document the laws and legal heritage of Florida through a wide range of texts digitized from the holdings of the University of Florida's Lawton Chiles Legal Information Center, the State Library, and Archives of Florida, and several other key institutions. Specifically, the collection includes issues of the Journal of the Florida House of Representatives, the Florida Historical Legal Documents collection, a Florida Water Law collection that is particularly noteworthy, as well as other general texts on Florida laws, the legislative process, and government. Given the debates over water rights and usage throughout the state, the Water Law collection is a real find, and visitors can search over 7300 documents within the collection. From the homepage, visitors can perform advanced searches and also look over recently added items. Finally, visitors can also sign up to receive their RSS feed and contact the site administrators with any additional queries they might have.

151

Leatherback nests increasing significantly in Florida, USA; trends assessed over 30 years using multilevel modeling.  

PubMed

Understanding population status for endangered species is critical to developing and evaluating recovery plans mandated by the Endangered Species Act. For sea turtles, changes in abundance are difficult to detect because most life stages occur in the water. Currently, nest counts are the most reliable way of assessing trends. We determined the rate of growth for leatherback turtle (Dermochelys coriacea) nest numbers in Florida (USA) using a multilevel Poisson regression. We modeled nest counts from 68 beaches over 30 years and, using beach-level covariates (including latitude), we allowed for partial pooling of information between neighboring beaches. This modeling approach is ideal for nest count data because it recognizes the hierarchical structure of the data while incorporating variables related to survey effort. Nesting has increased at all 68 beaches in Florida, with trends ranging from 3.1% to 16.3% per year. Overall, across the state, the number of nests has been increasing by 10.2% per year since 1979. Despite being a small population (probably < 1000 individuals), this nesting population may help achieve objectives in the federal recovery plan. This exponential growth rate mirrors trends observed for other Atlantic populations and may be driven partially by improved protection of nesting beaches. However, nesting is increasing even where beach protection has not been enhanced. Climate variability and associated marine food web dynamics, which could enhance productivity and reduce predators, may be driving this trend. PMID:21516903

Stewart, Kelly; Sims, Michelle; Meylan, Anne; Witherington, Blair; Brost, Beth; Crowder, Larry B

2011-01-01

152

Florida Panther Society  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

With only 30 to 50 individual cats remaining in Florida's wild areas, Florida panthers are a conservation concern. The Florida Panther Society is a non-governmental organization dedicated to the recovery of the Florida panther population. The Society's Webpage offers background information on panthers, genetic restoration efforts, the state's panther population, field notes on current research/ restoration activities, and photographs of some of the remaining individuals.

153

Florida Panther Net  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

With only 30 to 50 individual cats remaining in Florida's wild areas, Florida panthers are a conservation concern. The state's Florida Panther Net Website offers additional information, including natural history information, notes from the field, photographs, and a series of educational materials.

154

Sequential monitoring of beach litter using webcams.  

PubMed

This study attempts to establish a system for the sequential monitoring of beach litter using webcams placed at the Ookushi beach, Goto Islands, Japan, to establish the temporal variability in the quantities of beach litter every 90 min over a one and a half year period. The time series of the quantities of beach litter, computed by counting pixels with a greater lightness than a threshold value in photographs, shows that litter does not increase monotonically on the beach, but fluctuates mainly on a monthly time scale or less. To investigate what factors influence this variability, the time derivative of the quantity of beach litter is compared with satellite-derived wind speeds. It is found that the beach litter quantities vary largely with winds, but there may be other influencing factors. PMID:20392465

Kako, Shin'ichiro; Isobe, Atsuhiko; Magome, Shinya

2010-05-01

155

Florida Keys  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Florida Keys are a chain of islands, islets and reefs extending from Virginia Key to the Dry Tortugas for about 309 kilometers (192 miles). The keys are chiefly limestone and coral formations. The larger islands of the group are Key West (with its airport), Key Largo, Sugarloaf Key, and Boca Chica Key. A causeway extends from the mainland to Key West.

This image was acquired on October 28, 2001, by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is the U.S. Science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, a long- term research effort to understand and protect our home planet. Through the study of Earth, NASA will help to provide sound science to policy and economic decision-makers so as to better life here, while developing the technologies needed to explore the universe and search for life beyond our home planet.

Size: 51.6 by 29.7 kilometers ( 32.0 by 18.4 miles) Location: 24.7 degrees North latitude, 81.5 degrees West longitude Orientation: North at top Image Data: ASTER bands 1, 2, and 3 Original Data Resolution: 15 meters (49.2 feet) Date Acquired: October 28, 2001

2002-01-01

156

Comparison of Airborne Lidar and Multibeam Bathymetric Data in the Florida Reef Tract Along Broward County  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Although large, well-known concentrations of corals are found in deeper waters off Florida's eastern seaboard, most mapping of Florida's coral resources addresses the relatively shallow waters of the Florida Keys. To date, technological limitations precluded mapping corals in these deeper waters. Satellite imaging systems and natural color aerial photography, two mapping mainstays, are generally only effective in Florida waters shallower than 20 meters. Conservation of the northern portion of the Florida reef tract, which parallels the Atlantic coast in Miami-Dade, Broward, and Palm Beach counties, has been hampered by minimal or nonexistent coordinated management, monitoring, and mapping activities. In November 2000, the Simrad EM3000 multibeam system was used to collect data south of Port Everglades. Additionally, the Broward County shore protection project conducted a Laser Airborne Depth Sounder (LADS) survey in 2001. Wavelet analyses performed on overlapping transects of the two data sets compare the accuracy of reef bathymetry and complexity captured in the two data collection projects.

Morton, N. E.; Burd, J. J.

2003-12-01

157

Adaptive basis of geographic variation: genetic, phenotypic and environmental differences among beach mouse populations  

PubMed Central

A major goal in evolutionary biology is to understand how and why populations differentiate, both genetically and phenotypically, as they invade a novel habitat. A classical example of adaptation is the pale colour of beach mice, relative to their dark mainland ancestors, which colonized the isolated sandy dunes and barrier islands on Florida's Gulf Coast. However, much less is known about differentiation among the Gulf Coast beach mice, which comprise five subspecies linearly arrayed on Florida's shoreline. Here, we test the role of selection in maintaining variation among these beach mouse subspecies at multiple levels—phenotype, genotype and the environments they inhabit. While all beach subspecies have light pelage, they differ significantly in colour pattern. These subspecies are also genetically distinct: pair-wise Fst-values range from 0.23 to 0.63 and levels of gene flow are low. However, we did not find a correlation between phenotypic and genetic distance. Instead, we find a significant association between the average ‘lightness’ of each subspecies and the brightness of the substrate it inhabits: the two most genetically divergent subspecies occupy the most similar habitats and have converged on phenotype, whereas the most genetically similar subspecies occupy the most different environments and have divergent phenotypes. Moreover, allelic variation at the pigmentation gene, Mc1r, is statistically correlated with these colour differences but not with variation at other genetic loci. Together, these results suggest that natural selection for camouflage—via changes in Mc1r allele frequency—contributes to pigment differentiation among beach mouse subspecies.

Mullen, Lynne M.; Vignieri, Sacha N.; Gore, Jeffery A.; Hoekstra, Hopi E.

2009-01-01

158

Adaptive basis of geographic variation: genetic, phenotypic and environmental differences among beach mouse populations.  

PubMed

A major goal in evolutionary biology is to understand how and why populations differentiate, both genetically and phenotypically, as they invade a novel habitat. A classical example of adaptation is the pale colour of beach mice, relative to their dark mainland ancestors, which colonized the isolated sandy dunes and barrier islands on Florida's Gulf Coast. However, much less is known about differentiation among the Gulf Coast beach mice, which comprise five subspecies linearly arrayed on Florida's shoreline. Here, we test the role of selection in maintaining variation among these beach mouse subspecies at multiple levels-phenotype, genotype and the environments they inhabit. While all beach subspecies have light pelage, they differ significantly in colour pattern. These subspecies are also genetically distinct: pair-wise F(st)-values range from 0.23 to 0.63 and levels of gene flow are low. However, we did not find a correlation between phenotypic and genetic distance. Instead, we find a significant association between the average 'lightness' of each subspecies and the brightness of the substrate it inhabits: the two most genetically divergent subspecies occupy the most similar habitats and have converged on phenotype, whereas the most genetically similar subspecies occupy the most different environments and have divergent phenotypes. Moreover, allelic variation at the pigmentation gene, Mc1r, is statistically correlated with these colour differences but not with variation at other genetic loci. Together, these results suggest that natural selection for camouflage-via changes in Mc1r allele frequency-contributes to pigment differentiation among beach mouse subspecies. PMID:19656790

Mullen, Lynne M; Vignieri, Sacha N; Gore, Jeffery A; Hoekstra, Hopi E

2009-11-01

159

USE OF COMPOSITE DATA SETS FOR SOURCE-TRACKING ENTEROCCOCCI IN THE WATER COLUMN AND SHORELINE INTERSTITIAL WATERS ON PENSACOLA BEACH, FL  

EPA Science Inventory

Genthner, Fred J., Joseph B. James, Diane F. Yates and Stephanie D. Friedman. Submitted. Use of Composite Data Sets for Source-Tracking Enterococci in the Water Column and Shoreline Interstitial Waters on Pensacola Beach Florida. Mar. Pollut. Bull. 33 p. (ERL,GB 1212). So...

160

Folly Beach Turtle Watch Program  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site provides nesting data for loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta) using this South Carolina beach. Entries include: location, date discovered, number of eggs, expected and actual hatch dates, percent hatched, and photos. Data archives extend back to 1998. Site also includes information: on what you can do to help nesting turtles, strandings, impacts of beachfront construction on sea turtles, and a photo collection of turtle nesting.

2011-02-09

161

Parasailing fatalities in southwest Florida.  

PubMed

Parasailing is a recreational sport that is generally considered to be of little risk to the participants. Typically, the passenger launches from a motorboat with a specially designed winch that pulls him or her back to the boat at the end of the ride. The sport is not regulated at the federal, state, or county level. There have been few reports of injuries to parasailors. Additionally, there have been only 2 fatalities reported to the United States Coast Guard in a 10-year review. We report the details of these 2 deaths, those of a mother and daughter riding in a tandem parasail, which occurred on Fort Myers Beach in 2001, as well as an additional case of a parasailing fatality that occurred in southwest Florida in 1999. These cases illustrate the injuries seen in such fatalities and the hazards posed by adverse weather conditions and faulty equipment, as well as the impairment of passenger judgment by drugs and/or alcohol. PMID:19901809

Wolf, Barbara C; Harding, Brett E

2009-12-01

162

33 CFR 100.736 - Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...100.736 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY REGATTAS AND MARINE PARADES SAFETY OF LIFE ON NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.736 Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL....

2013-07-01

163

77 FR 5793 - Beaches Environmental Assessment and Coastal Health Act; Availability of BEACH Act Grants  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...coastal recreation waters, including the Great Lakes. EPA encourages coastal and Great Lakes states and tribes that have received BEACH...EPA also encourages eligible coastal and Great Lakes tribes to apply for BEACH Act grants to...

2012-02-06

164

Ocean Beach, San Francisco, California mega rip currents on a dissipative beach  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary form only given. Ocean Beach is a dissipative beach, which is associated with large powerful rip currents. The processes that cause these rip currents on Ocean Beach have not been studied. As well, the general dimension of size, shape and velocity (the 3-dimension seaward distance and vertical distance) of these rip currents are also unknown. This report looks at

F. J. Smith

2003-01-01

165

First Magnitude Springs of Florida.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The 2001 Florida Legislature funded the Florida Springs Initiative to investigate the first order magnitude springs in the State. In response to the initiative's mandate, the Florida Geological Survey, Division of Resource Assessment and Management, Depar...

T. M. Scott G. H. Means R. C. Means R. P. Meegan

2002-01-01

166

Florida Heritage Collection  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Recently launched by the libraries of the State University System (SUS) of Florida, this site contains some 48,000 pages of materials on Florida's history, culture, arts, literatures, sciences, and social sciences. The collection may be browsed by Florida county, title, or author or searched by a number of options. Item records include author, title, date published, a description, series, notes, a summary, and links to the electronic version (in .pdf or JPEG formats). Users can mark selected records and then email or print them. A user guide and tutorial are provided, as is a Florida timeline which links to related materials.

167

Made in Florida: Videos  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This webpage from the Florida Advanced Technological Education Center for Manufacturing (FLATE) features two videos which will help students understand the manufacturing of products domestically. Specifically, the videos focus on products made in the state of Florida. More than 16,000 companies and 400,000 Florida residents are active in manufacturing. The first video, which focuses on general manufacturing in Florida, is available in English and Spanish. The second video, which is only available in English, looks at the manufacture of Tropicana orange juice.

2011-09-19

168

Florida Red Tide Current Status  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Fish and Wildlife Research Institute website provides links to several Florida-based red tide sites. These sites include the current status of Florida's red tide, a photo gallery of red tide distribution maps, and regional Florida red tide statuses. The site expands further on its research and contains information on the Florida manatee, Florida panther, freshwater, geographic information systems/mapping, habitat, saltwater and wildlife. This is a nice resource for a broad overview of Florida ecosystems and natural resources.

2009-09-18

169

Illness associated with red tide--Nassau County, Florida, 2007.  

PubMed

A "red tide" is a harmful algal bloom that occurs when toxic, microscopic algae in seawater proliferate to a higher-than-normal concentration (i.e., bloom), often discoloring the water red, brown, green, or yellow. Red tides can kill fish, birds, and marine mammals and cause illness in humans. Florida red tide is caused by the dinoflagellate Karenia brevis, which produces toxins called brevetoxins and is most commonly found in the Gulf of Mexico; however, K. brevis blooms also can occur along the Atlantic coast. On September 25, 2007, a cluster of respiratory illnesses was reported to the Nassau County Health Department (NCHD) in northeastern Florida. All of the ill persons were employed at a beach restoration worksite by a dredging company operating at Fernandina Beach; they reported symptoms of eye or respiratory irritation (e.g., coughing, sneezing, sniffling, and throat irritation). NCHD and the Florida Department of Health promptly conducted epidemiologic and environmental investigations and determined the illnesses likely were associated with exposure to a red tide along the Atlantic coast. These actions highlight the importance of rapid investigation of health concerns with potential environmental causes to enable timely notification of the public and prevent further illness. PMID:18600196

2008-07-01

170

Cutaneous B-Cell Lymphoma in a Perdido Key Beach Mouse (Peromyscus poliontus trissyllepsis)  

PubMed Central

The Perdido Key beach mouse (Peromyscus poliontus trissyllepsis) is an endangered mammal indigenous to the panhandle beaches of Northwest Florida. A captive 3.5-y-old female mouse was evaluated because of severe pruritus, diffuse alopecia, skin reddening, and ulcerations over the dorsum of her body. Initial skin biopsy of the affected area suggested bacterial dermatitis but was inconclusive. Despite empiric antibiotic, anthelmintic, and antihistamine treatments, she continued to decline and developed severe ulcerations over the majority of her body. Postmortem histopathologic evaluation led to a tentative diagnosis of epitheliotropic lymphoma, suggestive of a mycosis fungoides T-cell–type cutaneous lymphoma. However, immunohistochemistry results challenged this diagnosis, indicating that the lesion was actually an epidermotropic B-cell lymphoma. Spontaneous cutaneous B-cell lymphomas are rare in rodents and had not previously been reported to occur in Perdido Key beach mice. This case report provides initial evidence that the Perdido Key beach mouse is susceptible to cutaneous B-cell lymphoma.

Aitken-Palmer, Copper; Kiupel, Matti; Russell, Kathy; Hayes, Linda; Heard, Darryl

2012-01-01

171

75 FR 16201 - FPL Energy Point Beach, LLC; Point Beach Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2; Exemption  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...NRC-2010-0123] FPL Energy Point Beach, LLC; Point Beach Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2; Exemption 1.0 Background FPL Energy Point Beach, LLC (FPLE...NRC) to M. S. Fertel (Nuclear Energy Institute) dated June...

2010-03-31

172

"Beach-Ball" Robotic Rovers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Robotic vehicles resembling large beach balls proposed for carrying scientific instruments. Conceived for use in exploring planet Mars, also useful on Earth to carry meteorological or pollution-monitoring equipment to remote locations across rough terrain and even across water. Each vehicle features approximately spherical balloonlike outer shell inflated to suitable pressure. Three diametral tethers approximately perpendicular to each other attached to shell. Control box moves itself along tethers to shift center of gravity, causing vehicle to roll. Alternatively, instead of shell, structure of approximately spherical outline made of twisted rods; of course, not suitable for traversing water or thick vegetation.

Smyth, David E.

1995-01-01

173

Data on selected deep wells in south Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A data base of 870 deep wells was assembled for the south Florida part of the Southeastern Limestone Regional Aquifer Study. The data in this report are for wells in Broward, Collier , Dade, Hendry, Lee, Martin, Monroe, Palm Beach, and St. Lucie Counties. Data are compiled for water wells, oil test wells, injection wells, and monitor wells. These data consist of: (1) well identification and geographic location; (2) well construction and site use; (3) logs available (geologic and geophysical); and (4) selected water-quality parameters. The well locations are shown, by counties, on maps. The number of wells in each county are: Broward, 6; Collier, 237; Dade, 61; Hendry, 130; Lee, 226; Martin, 91; Monroe, 34; Palm Beach, 33; and St. Lucie, 52. Data are stored in the National Water Data Storage and Retrieval system (WATSTORE) in the following files: header, water-quality, and ground-water site inventory (GWSI). (USGS)

Smith, C. A.; Lidz, Lauralee; Meyer, F. W.

1982-01-01

174

Florida: Feast of Connotations  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this lesson, students will read the poem “Florida” by Elizabeth Bishop and code the text for positive and negative descriptions of Florida. Students will then explain in writing how connotation and denotation contribute to the central idea of the poem.

Davis, Helen

2012-08-10

175

Made in Florida: Interviews  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This web page from the Florida Advanced Technological Education Center for Manufacturing (FLATE) includes interviews with individuals working in manufacturing in the state of Florida. The companies they work for, their job specifics and the schooling and skills required for their careers are discussed.

2011-09-19

176

Recent Beach Restoration Projects in Taiwan  

Microsoft Academic Search

Similar to many places in the world, Taiwan's coastlines have experienced short term beach erosion arising from awesome waves and storm surges which have aggravated the long term erosion caused by various man-made factors. To combat beach erosion, hard structures using seawalls more than 500 km with protective precast concrete blocks have been installed throughout the island since the 1970s.

John R. C. Hsu; Melissa M. J. Yu; Shue-Ruey Liaw; Jyh-Cheng Chu; Chien-Chung Chen; Nan-Jing Wu

177

Hydrodynamic variability on megatidal beaches, Normandy, France  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several experiments aimed at characterising the hydrodynamics of megatidal beaches outside the surf zone were carried out between 1990 and 1994 on the Cotentin coast of the Cherbourg Peninsula in Normandy. The database was established from the records of several electromagnetic current meters and pressure sensors and from field surveys. The mean spring tidal range on these beaches varies between

Franck Levoy; Olivier Monfort; Claude Larsonneur

2001-01-01

178

PREDICTING BACTERIAL CONCENTRATION ON THE NATION'S BEACHES  

EPA Science Inventory

A classical example of the failure of institutions and environmental technology to protect the nation's aesthetic, recreational, and public health values is represented by the July-August, 1999 Huntington Beach, California beach closure. This multi-million dollar regional public ...

179

Springs of Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The first comprehensive report of Florida's springs, which contains both a story of the springs and a collection of facts about them, was published thirty years ago (Ferguson and others, 1947). Since then, much additional data on springs have been gathered and the current report, Springs of Florida, makes a wealth of information on springs available to the public. Springs of Florida, prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Bureau of Geology, Florida Department of Natural Resources, publishers, and the Bureau of Water Resources Management, Florida Department of Environmental Regulation, is intended to provide sufficient background information for a lucid understanding of the nature and occurrence of the springs in the State.

Rosenau, Jack C.; Faulkner, Glen L.; Hendry, Charles W., Jr.; Hull, Robert W.

1977-01-01

180

A ground-water sapping landscape in the Florida Panhandle  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Drainage networks that have formed by ground-water sapping are developed in the highly permeable sands of the Citronelle Formation in the Florida Panhandle. The valleys resemble those formed on Hawaii, the Colorado Plateau and on Mars, but they have developed without significant lithologic controls. Drainage patterns range from trellis to dentritic depending on the effect of beach ridges and relative relief. Many of the drainage networks are not fully developed, and the adjacent uplands have been modified by marine, aeolian, and to a limited extent fluvial processes. Extension of the networks appears to be episodic, as a result of fires, hurricanes, and human activities, which damage or destroy vegetation.

Schumm, S. A.; Boyd, K. F.; Wolff, C. G.; Spitz, W. J.

1995-07-01

181

Horseshoe crab (Limulus polyphemus) reproductive activity on Delaware Bay beaches: Interactions with beach characteristics  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We used results from a survey of horseshoe crab reproductive activity that was conducted in 1999 throughout Delaware Bay to examine the relationship between estimates of spawning females and egg deposition and analyze how that relationship varies with geography, time within a spawning season, beach morphology, and wave energy. We found that beach morphology and wave energy interacted with density of spawning females to explain variation in the density and distribution of eggs and larvae. For example, the quantity of eggs in surface sediment (i.e., eggs that are potentially available to foraging shorebirds) was associated with the density of spawning females, beach morphology, and wave energy. The association between beach morphology and live eggs in surface sediment was strong especially in late May (Percent Reduction in Error = 86% from regression tree model) where egg density was an order of magnitude higher on beaches <15 m wide (3.38*105 m-2; 90% CI: 2.29*105, 4.47*105) compared to wider beaches (1.49*104 m-2; 90% CI: 4.47*103, 2.53*104). Results also indicate that, among bay-front beaches, horseshoe crabs prefer to spawn on narrow beaches, possibly because of reduced wave energy. At peak periods of spawning activity, density of spawning females was inversely related to foreshore width on mid-latitude beaches within Delaware Bay (t = -2.68, 7 df, p = 0.03). Because the distribution of eggs across the foreshore varied with beach morphology and widened as the spawning season progressed, methods used to sample eggs need to be robust to variation in beach morphology and applicable regardless of when the samples are taken. Because beach morphology and wave energy were associated with the quantity of eggs in surface sediment, certain beach types may be critical to the conservation of shorebird foraging habitat.

Smith, D. R.; Pooler, P. S.; Loveland, R. E.; Botton, M. L.; Michels, S. F.; Weber, R. G.; Carter, D. B.

2002-01-01

182

Characterization of Florida red tide aerosol and the temporal profile of aerosol concentration  

PubMed Central

Red tide aerosols containing aerosolized brevetoxins are produced during the red tide bloom and transported by wind to coastal areas of Florida. This study reports the characterization of Florida red tide aerosols in human volunteer studies, in which an asthma cohort spent 1 h on Siesta Beach (Sarasota, Florida) during aerosolized red tide events and non-exposure periods. Aerosol concentrations, brevetoxin levels, and particle size distribution were measured. Hourly filter samples were taken and analyzed for brevetoxin and NaCl concentrations. In addition, the aerosol mass concentration was monitored in real time. The results indicated that during a non-exposure period in October 2004, no brevetoxin was detected in the water, resulting in non-detectable levels of brevetoxin in the aerosol. In March 2005, the time-averaged concentrations of brevetoxins in water samples were moderate, in the range of 5–10 ?g/L, and the corresponding brevetoxin level of Florida red tide aerosol ranged between 21 and 39 ng/m3. The temporal profiles of red tide aerosol concentration in terms of mass, NaCl, and brevetoxin were in good agreement, indicating that NaCl and brevetoxins are components of the red tide aerosol. By continuously monitoring the marine aerosol and wind direction at Siesta Beach, we observed that the marine aerosol concentration varied as the wind direction changed. The temporal profile of the Florida red tide aerosol during a sampling period could be explained generally with the variation of wind direction.

Cheng, Yung Sung; Zhou, Yue; Pierce, Richard H.; Henry, Mike; Baden, Daniel G.

2009-01-01

183

Genetic structure of the southeastern United States loggerhead turtle nesting aggregation: evidence of additional structure within the peninsular Florida recovery unit  

Microsoft Academic Search

The southeastern United States supports one of two large loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta) nesting aggregations worldwide and is therefore critical to global conservation and recovery efforts for the species. Previous\\u000a studies have established the presence of four demographically distinct nesting populations (management units) corresponding\\u000a to beaches from (1) North Carolina through northeastern Florida, (2) peninsular Florida, (3) the Dry Tortugas,

Brian M. Shamblin; Mark G. Dodd; Dean A. Bagley; Llewellyn M. Ehrhart; Anton D. Tucker; Chris Johnson; Raymond R. Carthy; Russell A. Scarpino; Erin McMichael; David S. Addison; Kristina L. Williams; Michael G. Frick; Stefanie Ouellette; Anne B. Meylan; Matthew H. Godfrey; Sally R. Murphy; Campbell J. Nairn

2011-01-01

184

Basic Information on the Beach Standards, Monitoring, & Notification Program  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The U.S. EPA BEACH Program website describes how the public's health and environmental quality of our nation's beaches can be improved. It focuses on strengthening beach standards and testing, providing faster laboratory test methods, predicting pollution, investing in health and methods research, and informing the public about the environmental quality of our beaches.

2006-11-30

185

Tar loads on Omani beaches  

SciTech Connect

Owing to Oman's geographic position and long coastal line, the coastal areas of Oman are particularly vulnerable to oil pollution from normal tanker operations, illegal discharges, and accidental spills as well as local sources of oil input. UNEP carried out a survey on the coasts of Oman to determine the major sources of oil pollution and concluded that the major shoreline pollution problems in Oman arose from operational discharges of oil from passing vessels traffic. The oil, because of the high sea and air temperatures in the area, was subjected to relatively high rates of evaporation and photo-oxidation and tended to arrive at the coast as heavy petroleum particulate residues (tar balls). The aim of the present study was to measure the loads of tar balls in Omani coastal areas and to identify the source of oil pollutants on beaches.

Badawy, M.I.; Al-Harthy, F.T. (National Research Center, Cairo (Egypt))

1991-11-01

186

75 FR 20802 - Safety Zone; New York Air Show at Jones Beach State Park, Atlantic Ocean off of Jones Beach...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Show at Jones Beach State Park, Atlantic Ocean off of Jones Beach, Wantagh...performing aerobatic maneuvers over the Atlantic Ocean off of Jones Beach State Park...aircraft over a specified area of the Atlantic Ocean off of Jones Beach State...

2010-04-21

187

Florida Mental Health Institute  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Florida Mental Health Institute, dedicated to research, training and program development for improving psychological wellbeing, has four main divisions: Aging and Mental Health, Child and Family Studies, Community Mental Health, and Mental Health Law and Policy.

188

MONITORING FLORIDA'S WATERS  

EPA Science Inventory

GIS plays an important role as a management tool for the multi-dimensional Status Monitoring Network (SMN) program to monitor Florida's freshwater resources. By pulling together basin assessments, statistical analysis, surface water and groundwater analytical data, background is...

189

Natural Disasters in Florida  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The students will translate the information they have gained into a poster/picture of Florida's natural disasters, label the storms, and list on the poster at least three safety practices to use with each storm.

Markham-Ahl, Claudia

2011-10-18

190

Made in Florida  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Everyday, you enjoy things you may not realize were made in Florida. Behind every product and technology you use, there is a world of manufacturing. Today, in Florida, more than 16,000 different companies and 400,000 people work in the manufacturing field.This means that not just jobs, but manufacturing careers are being Made in Florida, by people like you, right now. If you get satisfaction by making something, get excited about using new technology, or you work well with teams of people, then the manufacturing industry may be the place for you, with a challenging job, great pay, and excellent benefits. The diversity of Manufacturing in Florida includes: Food, Beverages, Pharmaceuticals, Medical Devices and Instruments, Metals and Plastics, Electronics and Technical instruments, Aerospace components, Transportation, Household goods, Mining, Industrial and Construction Components.

2010-05-31

191

A Day at the Beach, Anyone?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A field trip to the shore can engage students in real-world science and offer plentiful opportunities for interdisciplinary learning. This field trip "action plan" ensures that a day at the beach goes smoothly for students and chaperones alike.

Fredericks, Anthony D.; Childers, Julie

2004-07-01

192

Surf zone flushing on embayed beaches  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Abstract Using a numerical model, we show that the surf zone of embayed <span class="hlt">beaches</span> systematically flushes out more floating material (simulated using passive tracers) than on open <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, with most exits occurring through the headland rips. For obliquely incident waves, a headland rip acts as a persistent conduit for transporting floating material out of the surf zone and into the inner shelf region. Wave angle and embayment size determine which headland rip (upwave or downwave) flushes out more the surf zone material. For narrow embayed <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, passive drifters exit the surf zone through the upwave headland rip. For wider embayed <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, the longshore current has enough room to develop and is further deflected against the downwave headland where most drifters exit the surf zone. Our results indicate that wave-exposed rugged coasts strongly enhance exchange of floating matter (e.g., pollutants and nutrients) at the ocean/continent interface.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Castelle, Bruno; Coco, Giovanni</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">193</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22SOLID+WASTE%22&id=EJ677488"> <span id="translatedtitle">What Is the Impact of <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Debris?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Presents a marine education activity. Students construct a web of changes that shows potential problems caused by solid waste on <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. They then determine whether each change is an increase or a decrease from previous conditions. (Author/SOE)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fortner, Rosanne W.; Jax, Dan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">194</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB2013110391"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> Water Quality Decision Support System.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The need for rapid assessment of bacterial contamination at <span class="hlt">beaches</span> is well known. Bacterial concentrations change rapidly (Bohm, Whitman et al. 1995, Olyphant and Whitman 2004, Whitman and Nevers 2008). The persistence model regulates todays swimming wit...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. Rockwell D. J. Schwab G. Land G. Mann K. Campbell</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">195</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB2010113539"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> and Nearshore Sedimentation, Western Lake Michigan.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Systematic measurement of barometric pressure, wind speed, wind direction, wave period, breaker height, angle of wave approach, and long-shore current velocity at Illinois <span class="hlt">Beach</span> State Park in 1974 and Sheboygan, Wisconsin in summer 1972 shows the relation...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. A. Davis W. T. Fox</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1975-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">196</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2845918"> <span id="translatedtitle">Reported Respiratory Symptom Intensity in Asthmatics During Exposure to Aerosolized <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Red Tide Toxins</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> red tides are naturally occurring blooms of the marine dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis. K. brevis produces natural toxins called brevetoxins. Brevetoxins become part of the marine aerosol as the fragile, unarmored cells are broken up by wave action. Inhalation of the aerosolized toxin results in upper and lower airway irritation. Symptoms of brevetoxin inhalation include: eye, nose, and throat irritation, coughing, wheezing, chest tightness, and shortness of breath. Asthmatics appear to be more sensitive to the effects of inhaled brevetoxin. This study examined data from 97 asthmatics exposed at the <span class="hlt">beach</span> for 1 hour during K. brevis blooms, and on separate occasions when no bloom was present. In conjunction with extensive environmental monitoring, participants were evaluated utilizing questionnaires and pulmonary function testing before and after a 1-hour <span class="hlt">beach</span> walk. A modified Likert scale was incorporated into the questionnaire to create respiratory symptom intensity scores for each individual pre- and post-<span class="hlt">beach</span> walk. Exposure to <span class="hlt">Florida</span> red tide significantly increased the reported intensity of respiratory symptoms; no significant changes were seen during an unexposed period. This is the first study to examine the intensity of reported respiratory symptoms in asthmatics after a 1-hour exposure to <span class="hlt">Florida</span> red tide.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Milian, Alexyz; Nierenberg, Kate; Fleming, Lora E.; Bean, Judy A.; Wanner, Adam; Reich, Andrew; Backer, Lorraine C.; Jayroe, David; Kirkpatrick, Barbara</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">197</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009AGUFMEP43A0645T"> <span id="translatedtitle">Wave Overtopping of a Barrier <span class="hlt">Beach</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The rate of wave overtopping of a barrier <span class="hlt">beach</span> is measured and modeled as a first step in modeling the breaching of a <span class="hlt">beach</span> impounding an ephemeral river. Unique rate of wave overtopping data are obtained from the measure of the Carmel River, California, lagoon filling during a time when the lagoon is closed-off and there is no river inflow. Volume changes are calculated from measured lagoon height changes owing to wave overtopping by a stage-volume curve, then center differenced and averaged to provide volume rates of change in the lagoon. Wave height and period are obtained from CDIP MOPS directional wave spectra data in 15m fronting the <span class="hlt">beach</span>. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> morphology was measured by GPS walking surveys and interpolated for <span class="hlt">beach</span> slopes and berm heights. Three empirical overtopping models by van der Meer and Janssen (1995), Hedges and Reis (1998) and Pullen et al. (2007) with differing parameterizations on wave height, period and <span class="hlt">beach</span> slope and calibrated using extensive laboratory data obtained over plane, impermeable <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are compared with the data. In addition, the run-up model by Stockdon et al. (2006) based on field data is examined. Three wave overtopping storm events are considered when morphology data were available less than 2 weeks prior to the event. The models are tuned to fit the data using a reduction factor to account for <span class="hlt">beach</span> permeability, berm characteristics, non-normal wave incidence and surface roughness influence. It is concluded that the Stockdon et al. (2006) model underestimates run-up as no overtopping is predicted with this model. The three empirical overtopping models behaved similarly well with regression coefficients ranging 0.72 to 0.86 using a reasonable range of reduction factors 0.66 - 0.81 with an average of 0.74.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Thornton, E. B.; Laudier, N.; Macmahan, J. H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">198</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2850072"> <span id="translatedtitle">Changes in Work Habits of Lifeguards in Relation to <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Red Tide</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The marine dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis, is responsible for <span class="hlt">Florida</span> red tides. Brevetoxins, the neurotoxins produced by K. brevis blooms, can cause fish kills, contaminate shellfish, and lead to respiratory illness in humans. Although several studies have assessed different economic impacts from <span class="hlt">Florida</span> red tide blooms, no studies to date have considered the impact on <span class="hlt">beach</span> lifeguard work performance. Sarasota County experiences frequent <span class="hlt">Florida</span> red tides and staffs lifeguards at its <span class="hlt">beaches</span> 365 days a year. This study examined lifeguard attendance records during the time periods of March 1 to September 30 in 2004 (no bloom) and March 1 to September 30 in 2005 (bloom). The lifeguard attendance data demonstrated statistically significant absenteeism during a <span class="hlt">Florida</span> red tide bloom. The potential economic costs resulting from red tide blooms were comprised of both lifeguard absenteeism and presenteeism. Our estimate of the costs of absenteeism due to the 2005 red tide in Sarasota County is about $3,000. On average, the capitalized costs of lifeguard absenteeism in Sarasota County may be on the order of $100,000 at Sarasota County <span class="hlt">beaches</span> alone. When surveyed, lifeguards reported not only that they experienced adverse health effects of exposure to <span class="hlt">Florida</span> red tide but also that their attentiveness and abilities to take preventative actions decrease when they worked during a bloom, implying presenteeism effects. The costs of presenteeism, which imply increased risks to beachgoers, arguably could exceed those of absenteeism by an order of magnitude. Due to the lack of data, however, we are unable to provide credible estimates of the costs of presenteeism or the potential increased risks to bathers.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nierenberg, Kate; Kirner, Karen; Hoagland, Porter; Ullmann, Steven; LeBlanc, William G; Kirkpatrick, Gary; Fleming, Lora E.; Kirkpatrick, Barbara</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">199</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=KSC-96PC-1359&hterms=coconut&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dcoconut"> <span id="translatedtitle">A PIECE OF THE SPACE SHUTTLE CHALLENGER WASHED ASHORE AT COCOA <span class="hlt">BEACH</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A Cocoa <span class="hlt">Beach</span> front-end loader holds a large piece of debris from the Space Shuttle orbiter Challenger after it washed ashore in Cocoa <span class="hlt">Beach</span> near the Coconuts on the <span class="hlt">Beach</span> restaurant and bar. Overseeing the recovery and protection of the piece is KSC criminal investigator Jan Seinkner, facing camera at center, of EG&G <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Inc., base operations contractor. The piece, about 15 feet by 6 feet, is believed to be part of an elevon or rudder. It is one of the biggest pieces to wash ashore to date. A smaller piece was found several blocks south. NASA recovered thousands of pounds of debris from the Atlantic Ocean after the Jan. 28, 1986 accident which destroyed the Shuttle and claimed the lives of the seven crew members; about 50 percent of the orbiter remained in the ocean after search operations were suspended. Those remains are stored at Cape Canaveral Air Station, mostly in two Minutemen silos. The two newly recovered pieces will be brought to KSC's Security Patrol Headquarters on Contractor Road for examination and temporary storage.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">200</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60411625"> <span id="translatedtitle">Data from radar images integrated with information from traditional lithologic and dating techniques improve resolution of surficial geologic units in the central <span class="hlt">Florida</span> peninsula</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Side Looking Airborne Radar (SLAR) images provide information useful to 1:100,000-scale surficial geologic mapping across the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> peninsula from Sarasota to Fort Pierce. The SLAR images show textural patterns, sharp gradients, and certain compositional variations that cause differences in reflectivity. Quaternary and Pliocene <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridges and marginal marine plains, visible on SLAR images, occupy most of the eastern half of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">L. McCartan; W. S. Moy; Wingard; J. P. G. L. Owens; A. N. Kover; S. G. Van Valkenburg; D. B. Mason</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">201</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-05-09/pdf/2012-11196.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">77 FR 27120 - Safety Zone; Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Oceanfront Air Show, Atlantic Ocean, Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, VA</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Atlantic Ocean, Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, VA in the Federal Register (76 FR 13519). We received one comment on the proposed rule...Atlantic Ocean in Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, VA. In recent years, there have...Changes The Coast Guard did receive one comment in response to the...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-05-09</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">202</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-03-07/pdf/2012-5543.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">77 FR 13519 - Safety Zone; Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Oceanfront Air Show, Atlantic Ocean, Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, VA</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Ocean in Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, VA. This action is necessary...2012-0095 using any one of the following methods...If we determine that one would aid this rulemaking, we will hold one at a time and place announced...Ocean in Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, VA. In recent years,...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-03-07</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">203</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.sfu.ca/%7Esdashtga/publications/Dash_etal_Sed_06.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Sedimentology and stratigraphy of a transgressive, muddy gravel <span class="hlt">beach</span>: Waterside <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Bay of Fundy, Canada</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Sediments exposed at low tide on the transgressive, hypertidal (>6 m tidal range) Waterside <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, New Brunswick, Canada permit the scrutiny of sedimentary structures and textures that develop at water depths equivalent to the upper and lower shoreface. Waterside <span class="hlt">Beach</span> sediments are grouped into eleven sedimentologically distinct deposits that represent three depositional environments: (1) sandy foreshore and shoreface; (2) tidal-creek</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">SHAHIN E. DASHTGARD; MURRAY K. GINGRAS; KARL E. BUTLER</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">204</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=258391"> <span id="translatedtitle">Advanced Decision-Support for Coastal <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Health: Virtual <span class="hlt">Beach</span> 3.0</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Virtual <span class="hlt">Beach</span> is a free decision-support system designed to help <span class="hlt">beach</span> managers and researchers construct, evaluate, and operate site-specific statistical models that can predict levels of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) based on environmental conditions that are more readily mea...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">205</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.floridaplants.com/eflora/cover.htm"> <span id="translatedtitle">E-Flora <span class="hlt">Florida</span>: Illustrated Atlas of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Plants</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">E-Flora <span class="hlt">Florida</span> is edited and maintained by Leigh Fulghum of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Plants Online, and offers illustrations and links to the Atlas of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Vascular Plants' distribution maps for roughly 40 species of mostly marshy/aquatic plants. Though limited by species coverage, several online glossaries, bibliographies, and other reference materials fill out the E-Flora site.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">206</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013Geomo.199...36P"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> changes from sediment delivered by streams to pocket <span class="hlt">beaches</span> during a major flood</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The significance of sediment delivered via storm-associated stream discharge in altering sediment characteristics, <span class="hlt">beach</span> form, and volume is evaluated on pocket <span class="hlt">beaches</span> with different basin characteristics and wave exposures. The focus is on changes on three <span class="hlt">beaches</span> on Elba Island, Italy caused by a flood event in September 2002 that had an estimated recurrence interval of 200 years. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> profiles and foreshore sediment samples were gathered in 1999 and 2000 to identify pre-storm characteristics, in September 2002 to reveal the immediate effects of the storm, and in 2003 and 2004 to reveal post-storm recovery. Foreshore sediments were finer and better sorted and contained no pebbles prior to the flood. Coarsening of the sand and granule fraction was evident after the flood, along with pebble accumulations, especially near major streams. Mean size, sorting values and percent pebbles one and two years after the flood were generally greater than pre-flood conditions but less than immediately after the flood. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> profiles reveal conspicuous erosion immediately after the flood, when sediment delivered by streams is transported to subaqueous deltas. Thereafter, sediment moves onshore and alongshore to adjacent <span class="hlt">beaches</span> to restore subaerial volumes. The location of streams within a compartment, relative to the location of capes and headlands, is important in determining the movement of sediment added to the <span class="hlt">beach</span> by streams. The sites are all sheltered from the highest-energy waves from the west, facilitating longshore transport to the west. Where the largest stream is located at the east end of a compartment, sediment discharged from it is source material for the downdrift <span class="hlt">beaches</span> to the west. Where the largest stream is at the west end of the compartment, the ability to supply sediment to the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> to the east is restricted. Hence, broad-scale geologic controls (headlands and capes) enhance or diminish the ability of streams to influence <span class="hlt">beach</span> change throughout the pocket. The inability of <span class="hlt">beaches</span> on two of the sites to migrate landward, due to human development of uplands, will be an issue in the future. Lack of sediment to replenish <span class="hlt">beaches</span> through erosion of the upland, places increased emphasis on the role of coastal streams in the <span class="hlt">beach</span> sediment budget. Changing watershed attributes to allow more sediment discharge during high-energy, low-frequency events (e.g. devoting more land to agriculture) would be a way of helping to restore <span class="hlt">beach</span> sediment.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pranzini, Enzo; Rosas, Valentina; Jackson, Nancy L.; Nordstrom, Karl F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">207</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=8539"> <span id="translatedtitle">SOUTH <span class="hlt">FLORIDA</span> ECOSYSTEM ASSESSMENT PROJECT</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The South <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Ecosystem Assessment Project is an innovative, large-scale monitoring and assessment program designed to measure current and changing conditions of ecological resources in South <span class="hlt">Florida</span> using an integrated holistic approach. Using the United States Environmenta...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">208</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.fsec.ucf.edu/en/index.php"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Solar Energy Center</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An institute of the University of Central <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Solar Energy Center (FSEC) is the largest and most active state-supported renewable energy and energy efficiency research, training, testing and certification institute in the United States. FSEC's mission is to research and develop energy technologies that enhance <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s economy and environment, and to educate the public, students and practitioners on the results of the research. Their website contains educational resources for children and adults, including workshops and courses about working with solar energy systems, energy gauge rater training, and building science training and certification. Also available are useful guides about home energy ratings, maximizing energy efficiency in the home, energy efficient home-design tips, and information about solar energy.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-04-04</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">209</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009ECSS...81....1D"> <span id="translatedtitle">Threats to sandy <span class="hlt">beach</span> ecosystems: A review</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We provide a brief synopsis of the unique physical and ecological attributes of sandy <span class="hlt">beach</span> ecosystems and review the main anthropogenic pressures acting on the world's single largest type of open shoreline. Threats to <span class="hlt">beaches</span> arise from a range of stressors which span a spectrum of impact scales from localised effects (e.g. trampling) to a truly global reach (e.g. sea-level rise). These pressures act at multiple temporal and spatial scales, translating into ecological impacts that are manifested across several dimensions in time and space so that today almost every <span class="hlt">beach</span> on every coastline is threatened by human activities. Press disturbances (whatever the impact source involved) are becoming increasingly common, operating on time scales of years to decades. However, long-term data sets that describe either the natural dynamics of <span class="hlt">beach</span> systems or the human impacts on <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are scarce and fragmentary. A top priority is to implement long-term field experiments and monitoring programmes that quantify the dynamics of key ecological attributes on sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Because of the inertia associated with global climate change and human population growth, no realistic management scenario will alleviate these threats in the short term. The immediate priority is to avoid further development of coastal areas likely to be directly impacted by retreating shorelines. There is also scope for improvement in experimental design to better distinguish natural variability from anthropogenic impacts. Sea-level rise and other effects of global warming are expected to intensify other anthropogenic pressures, and could cause unprecedented ecological impacts. The definition of the relevant scales of analysis, which will vary according to the magnitude of the impact and the organisational level under analysis, and the recognition of a physical-biological coupling at different scales, should be included in approaches to quantify impacts. Zoning strategies and marine reserves, which have not been widely implemented in sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, could be a key tool for biodiversity conservation and should also facilitate spillover effects into adjacent <span class="hlt">beach</span> habitats. Setback and zoning strategies need to be enforced through legislation, and all relevant stakeholders should be included in the design, implementation and institutionalisation of these initiatives. New perspectives for rational management of sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> require paradigm shifts, by including not only basic ecosystem principles, but also incentives for effective governance and sharing of management roles between government and local stakeholders.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Defeo, Omar; McLachlan, Anton; Schoeman, David S.; Schlacher, Thomas A.; Dugan, Jenifer; Jones, Alan; Lastra, Mariano; Scapini, Felicita</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">210</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70106982"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> science in the Great Lakes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Monitoring <span class="hlt">beach</span> waters for human health has led to an increase and evolution of science in the Great Lakes, which includes microbiology, limnology, hydrology, meteorology, epidemiology, and metagenomics, among others. In recent years, concerns over the accuracy of water quality standards at protecting human health have led to a significant interest in understanding the risk associated with water contact in both freshwater and marine environments. Historically, surface waters have been monitored for fecal indicator bacteria (fecal coliforms, Escherichia coli, enterococci), but shortcomings of the analytical test (lengthy assay) have resulted in a re-focusing of scientific efforts to improve public health protection. Research has led to the discovery of widespread populations of fecal indicator bacteria present in natural habitats such as soils, <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand, and stranded algae. Microbial source tracking has been used to identify the source of these bacteria and subsequently assess their impact on human health. As a result of many findings, attempts have been made to improve monitoring efficiency and efficacy with the use of empirical predictive models and molecular rapid tests. All along, <span class="hlt">beach</span> managers have actively incorporated new findings into their monitoring programs. With the abundance of research conducted and information gained over the last 25 years, “<span class="hlt">Beach</span> Science” has emerged, and the Great Lakes have been a focal point for much of the ground-breaking work. Here, we review the accumulated research on microbiological water quality of Great Lakes <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and provide a historic context to the collaborative efforts that have advanced this emerging science.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nevers, Meredith B.; Byappanahalli, Murulee N.; Edge, Thomas A.; Whitman, Richard L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">211</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1097276"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Hydrogen Initiative</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Hydrogen Initiative (FHI) was a research, development and demonstration hydrogen and fuel cell program. The FHI program objectives were to develop <span class="hlt">Florida?s</span> hydrogen and fuel cell infrastructure and to assist DOE in its hydrogen and fuel cell activities The FHI program funded 12 RD&D projects as follows: Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure and Rental Car Strategies -- L. Lines, Rollins College This project analyzes strategies for <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s early stage adaptation of hydrogen-powered public transportation. In particular, the report investigates urban and statewide network of refueling stations and the feasibility of establishing a hydrogen rental-car fleet based in Orlando. Methanol Fuel Cell Vehicle Charging Station at <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Atlantic University ? M. Fuchs, EnerFuel, Inc. The project objectives were to design, and demonstrate a 10 kWnet proton exchange membrane fuel cell stationary power plant operating on methanol, to achieve an electrical energy efficiency of 32% and to demonstrate transient response time of less than 3 milliseconds. Assessment of Public Understanding of the Hydrogen Economy Through Science Center Exhibits, J. Newman, Orlando Science Center The project objective was to design and build an interactive Science Center exhibit called: ?H2Now: the Great Hydrogen Xchange?. On-site Reformation of Diesel Fuel for Hydrogen Fueling Station Applications ? A. Raissi, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Solar Energy Center This project developed an on-demand forecourt hydrogen production technology by catalytically converting high-sulfur hydrocarbon fuels to an essentially sulfur-free gas. The removal of sulfur from reformate is critical since most catalysts used for the steam reformation have limited sulfur tolerance. Chemochromic Hydrogen Leak Detectors for Safety Monitoring ? N. Mohajeri and N. Muradov, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Solar Energy Center This project developed and demonstrated a cost-effective and highly selective chemochromic (visual) hydrogen leak detector for safety monitoring at any facility engaged in transport, handling and use of hydrogen. Development of High Efficiency Low Cost Electrocatalysts for Hydrogen Production and PEM Fuel Cell Applications ? M. Rodgers, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Solar Energy Center The objective of this project was to decrease platinum usage in fuel cells by conducting experiments to improve catalyst activity while lowering platinum loading through pulse electrodeposition. Optimum values of several variables during electrodeposition were selected to achieve the highest electrode performance, which was related to catalyst morphology. Understanding Mechanical and Chemical Durability of Fuel Cell Membrane Electrode Assemblies ? D. Slattery, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Solar Energy Center The objective of this project was to increase the knowledge base of the degradation mechanisms for membranes used in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. The results show the addition of ceria (cerium oxide) has given durability improvements by reducing fluoride emissions by an order of magnitude during an accelerated durability test. Production of Low-Cost Hydrogen from Biowaste (HyBrTec?) ? R. Parker, SRT Group, Inc., Miami, FL This project developed a hydrogen bromide (HyBrTec?) process which produces hydrogen bromide from wet-cellulosic waste and co-produces carbon dioxide. Eelectrolysis dissociates hydrogen bromide producing recyclable bromine and hydrogen. A demonstration reactor and electrolysis vessel was designed, built and operated. Development of a Low-Cost and High-Efficiency 500 W Portable PEMFC System ? J. Zheng, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> State University, H. Chen, Bing Energy, Inc. The objectives of this project were to develop a new catalyst structures comprised of highly conductive buckypaper and Pt catalyst nanoparticles coated on its surface and to demonstrate fuel cell efficiency improvement and durability and cell cost reductions in the buckypaper based electrodes. Development of an Interdisciplinary Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology Academic Program ? J. Politano, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Institute of Technology, Melbourne, FL This project developed a hydrogen and fuel cel</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Block, David L</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-06-30</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">212</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED094651.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Board of Regents Annual Report 1972-73.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Contained in the annual report for 1973 of the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Board of Regents are reports from each state higher education institution in <span class="hlt">Florida</span> (University of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> State University, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Agricultural and Mechanical University, the University of South <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Atlantic University, University of West <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Technological…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">State Univ. System of Florida, Tallahassee.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">213</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.plantatlas.usf.edu/default.asp"> <span id="translatedtitle">Atlas of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Vascular Plants</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This online atlas provides information on the occurrence and distribution of plants in the State of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. Records are based on collections in the four major <span class="hlt">Florida</span> institutional herbaria: the University of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> State University, Fairchild Tropical Gardens, and the University of South <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. There are also records from the New York Botanical Garden, Harvard University, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The collection is browsable by county or by an alphabetical listing of families, and searchable by scientific name. An advanced search feature lets users search by text string, taxonomic category, county, nativity, wetland status, and several other parameters.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">214</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=66368"> <span id="translatedtitle">USING PUBLIC-DOMAIN MODELS TO ESTIMATE <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> BACTERIA CONCENTRATIONS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Stretches of <span class="hlt">beach</span> along popular Huntington <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California are occassionally closed to swimming due to high levels of bacteria. One hypothesized source is the treated wastewater plume from the Orange County Sanitation District's (OCSD) ocean outfall. While three independent sc...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">215</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-01-11/pdf/2010-260.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">75 FR 1373 - <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> Environmental Assessment and Coastal Health Act</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...coastal recreation waters, including the Great Lakes. EPA encourages coastal and Great Lakes States and Tribes that have received <span class="hlt">BEACH</span>...EPA also encourages eligible coastal and Great Lakes Tribes to apply for 2010 <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> Act...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-11</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">216</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=EISCT731595D"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> Erosion Control Project Sherwood Island State Park, Westport, Connecticut.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> widening and sand retention structures are proposed along 6,000 feet of shorefront at Sherwood Island State Park, Town of Westport, Fairfield County, Connecticut. Environmental impacts include restoration and protection of valuable <span class="hlt">beach</span> fronting on...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1973-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">217</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=COM7411551"> <span id="translatedtitle">Intertidal Macrobiology of Selected Sandy <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> in Southern California.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The study is designed to provide information about the intertidal macrofauna of representative sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in southern California, along with the factors affecting their distribution. Nine <span class="hlt">beaches</span> between Coal Oil Point in the north and Deheny State Par...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. M. Patterson</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1974-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">218</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED198376.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Driver Education Handbook.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This student edition contains the same basic information as the official <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Driver Handbook, but the reading difficulty of the material has been sharply reduced. It also provides activity-oriented exercises and review tests on this material. Introductory materials include a complete listing of all activities given, some vocabulary exercises…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mick, Susan H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">219</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2001/10/30/archive/main316383.shtml"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s Red Tide Infestation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This CBS news article reports a toxic algae bloom that spread along the <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s west coast in 2001, threatening the wildlife of Tampa Bay's estuary. The article briefly discusses the cause of the red tide and its affect on the shellfish industry.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">News, Cbs</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">220</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=florida+AND+everglades&id=ED371920"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Seminoles of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This book gives a complete account of the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Seminoles from their entrance into the state almost 300 years ago, through the great chiefdoms of Micanopy, Osceola, and Billy Bowlegs, to the current political reality of democratic tribal elections. After moving into the peninsula from Georgia and Alabama, the Seminoles fought three wars against…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Covington, James W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a 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title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">221</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.harcourtschool.com/activity/exploring_ecosystems/everglades.html"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Everglades, <span class="hlt">Florida</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This tutorial explains the wetland ecosystem of the Everglades. Students will discover how living and nonliving parts of the ecosystem interact and the importance of habitats such as the saltwater environment of the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bay, the coastal prairie, freshwater sloughs, pinelands, and mangrove forests. There is an interactive glossary within the text.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">222</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED468854.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Educational Facilities, 2000.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This publication describes <span class="hlt">Florida</span> school and community college facilities completed in 2000, including photographs and floor plans. The facilities profiled are:J. R. Arnold High School (Bay County); Falcon Cove Middle School (Broward); Floranada Elementary School (Broward); Lyons Creek Middle School (Broward); Parkside Elementary School…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Office of Educational Facilities.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">223</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22zero+sum%22+AND+%22funding%22&id=EJ845832"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s Online Option</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Education reform often appears a zero-sum battle, one that pits crusaders demanding accountability and choice against much of the traditional education establishment, including teachers unions. The political skirmishes in <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, including court fights over vouchers and charter schools, and ongoing struggles over a parade of different merit pay…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tucker, Bill</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">224</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED446414.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Educational Facilities, 1996.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This document contains information, photographs, and floor plans of many of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s new elementary through high school facilities occupied in 1996. Each entry lists the facility's type, building size, student capacity, and general structural information. Also provided is information on the facility's total construction cost; the architects and…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Office of Educational Facilities.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">225</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Interior+AND+Design+AND+Document&id=ED446415"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Educational Facilities, 1997.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This document contains information, photographs, and floor plans of many of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s new elementary through high school facilities occupied in 1997. Each entry lists the facility's type, building size, student capacity, and general structural information. Also provided is information on the facility's total construction cost; the architects and…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Office of Educational Facilities.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">226</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/58957567"> <span id="translatedtitle">2003 <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Transportation almanac</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Almanac contains data from existing data sources throughout <span class="hlt">Florida</span> and the United States. A range of transportation topics is covered, and, to the extent possible, statistical data are for the most recent year available. Although most of the information provided in the Almanac is available directly from the respective agencies that compiled or collected the information, the ability to</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Michael Baltes; D Hinebaugh</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">227</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Office+AND+Architecture+AND+Design&pg=7&id=ED468853"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Educational Facilities, 1999.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This publication describes <span class="hlt">Florida</span> school and community college facilities completed in 1999, including photographs and floor plans. The facilities profiled are: Buchholz High School (Alachua County); Gator Run Elementary School (Broward); Corkscrew Elementary School (Collier); The 500 Role Models Academy of Excellence (Miami-Dade); Caribbean…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Office of Educational Facilities.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">228</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/80765015156w5244.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Sedimentary characterization of Tagus estuarine <span class="hlt">beaches</span> (Portugal)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background, Aim and Scope  The distribution of sediments in estuarine <span class="hlt">beaches</span> is controlled by the interactions between sediment supply, hydrodynamic\\u000a processes and human intervention. The main purpose of this study is to characterize the sediments of Tagus estuarine <span class="hlt">beaches</span>\\u000a in order to understand their origin and to contribute to a better knowledge of the Tagus estuary sediment budget.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Surface sediment samples</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Paula Freire; Rui Taborda; Ana M. Silva</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">229</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3082139"> <span id="translatedtitle">Frontiers in Outreach and Education: The <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Red Tide Experience</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">To enhance information sharing and garner increased support from the public for scientific research, funding agencies now typically require that research groups receiving support convey their work to stakeholders. The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences-(NIEHS) funded Aerosolized <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Red Tide P01 research group (<span class="hlt">Florida</span> Red Tide Research Group) has employed a variety of outreach strategies to meet this requirement. Messages developed from this project began a decade ago and have evolved from basic print material (fliers and posters) to an interactive website, to the use of video and social networking technologies, such as Facebook and Twitter. The group was able to track dissemination of these information products; however, evaluation of their effectiveness presented much larger challenges. The primary lesson learned by the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Red Tide Research Group is that the best ways to reach specific stakeholders is to develop unique products or services to address specific stakeholders needs, such as the <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Conditions Reporting System. Based on the experience of the Group, the most productive messaging products result when scientific community engages potential stakeholders and outreach experts during the very initial phases of a project.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nierenberg, Kate; Hollenbeck, Julie; Fleming, Lora E.; Stephan, Wendy; Reich, Andrew; Backer, Lorraine C.; Currier, Robert; Kirkpatrick, Barbara</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">230</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ww4.doh.wa.gov/scripts/esrimap.dll?name=bioview&BCmd=Map&BStep=1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Recreational Shellfish <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Closures Due to Biotoxins or Pollution</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This map represents the Health Status of <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in the state of Washington. The interactive map allows users to click on counties, water bodies, and <span class="hlt">beaches</span> to view seasons and limits. The page also includes links to text bulletins regarding <span class="hlt">beach</span> closures, descriptions of marine biotoxins and associated health effects, and a factsheet of shellfish program publications.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Health, Washington S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">231</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://serc.carleton.edu/NAGTWorkshops/sedimentary/SGP2014/activities/84346.html"> <span id="translatedtitle">Grand Strand Geology and its impact on <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Nourishment</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Brief analysis of the geologic setting of the Grand Strand (Myrtle <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, South Carolina, and vicinity) coast and the limited occurrence of sand suitable for <span class="hlt">beach</span> re-nourishment. Students use a USGS Fact Sheet to examine the <span class="hlt">beach</span>, near offshore, and edge of Coastal Plain geology.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Farley, Martin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">232</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/ca1561.photos.014187p/"> <span id="translatedtitle">103. VIEW OF <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> STRUCTURES ON NORTHWEST SIDE OF PIER, ...</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p class="result-summary">103. VIEW OF <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> STRUCTURES ON NORTHWEST SIDE OF PIER, LOOKING SOUTHEAST; PACIFIC ELECTRIC RAILWAY CAR (UPPER LEFT), CONCESSION STANDS (LOWER LEFT), BANDSHELL (RIGHT), AND PIER IN BACKGROUND Photograph #5352-HB. Photographer unknown, c. 1914 - Huntington <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Orange County, CA</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">233</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=wave+AND+energy&pg=6&id=ED326415"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beaches</span> in Motion. Interaction and Environmental Change. Secondary.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The terms "high energy" and "low energy" refer to the amount of energy a wave has that reaches the face of a <span class="hlt">beach</span>. In this student guide, two types of <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are investigated. The objective is to be able to identify whether a <span class="hlt">beach</span> is of high or low energy. Background information is provided, as well as instructions and worksheets for activities…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lee County School District, Ft. Myers, FL. Dept. of Environmental Education and Instructional Development Services.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">234</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=231202"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> Sand Analysis for Indicators of Microbial Contamination</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Traditional <span class="hlt">beach</span> monitoring has focused on water quality, with little attention paid to health risks associated with <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand. Recent research has reported that fecal indicator bacteria, as well as human pathogens can be found in <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand and may constitute a risk to human h...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">235</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..1614268D"> <span id="translatedtitle">North <span class="hlt">beach</span> (Nazaré) sand tracer experiment</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The littoral in the vicinity of Nazaré (West Portuguese coast) is characterized by two distinct coastal stretches separated by Nazaré headland: a northern sector (Norte <span class="hlt">beach</span>) characterized by a high energetic continuous sandy <span class="hlt">beach</span> and a southern sector (Nazaré bay <span class="hlt">beach</span>) that corresponds to an embayed <span class="hlt">beach</span>, sheltered by the Nazaré headland. The bay is a geomorphological expression of the Nazaré canyon head, which acts as powerful sediment sink, capturing the large longshore net southward transport at Norte <span class="hlt">beach</span> generated by the north Atlantic high energetic swell. The northern side of the canyon head is carved on highly resistant Cretaceous limestone sustaining an underwater vertical relief that emerges on the Nazaré headland, creating a unusual nearshore wave pattern. This wave pattern not only concentrates high energy levels at the Norte <span class="hlt">beach</span> but also contributes to local complex longshore drift gradients capable of inducing <span class="hlt">beach</span> seasonal cross-shore variations of more than 200 m. The main factors that influence local sediment budget are: (1) canyon head capturing and (2) headland sediment bypassing. To obtain a direct measure of the net longshore drift at Norte <span class="hlt">beach</span> (upstream boundary of the system) a large scale fluorescent tracer experiment was performed. The data will be used to validate longshore transport formulas in a high energetic environment and to access Nazaré canyon head sediment loss. Considering the anticipation of high transport rates, approximately 10 tonnes of native sand where coated with orange fluorescent ink using a set of concrete mixers. The experiment took place on the 9th to 15th September 2013 period and followed the continuous injection method (CIM). The CIM approach was justified by the expected high energy levels that inhibits sediment sampling across the surf zone. During the tracer injection procedure (approx. 5 hours), sediment sampling was performed at 13 sites along a rectilinear coastal stretch extended through 600 m downdrift of the injection point. Tracer was injected at a rate of 16 kg each 30 sec and collected at a frequency of 10 min at each site. Complementary sampling was performed at the inner shelf and at the <span class="hlt">beach</span> southern of the headland. In order to follow tracer downdrift movement and headland sediment bypassing low resolution sampling was extended through three more days. Oceanographic forcing throughout the experiment was measured by an offshore wave buoy and an ADCP specifically deployed for the experiment. During the first tidal cycle, data from field observations using a hand held UV light showed a southward tracer displacement of more than 600 m. After the second tidal cycle, sediment tracer was detected in the Nazaré bay <span class="hlt">beach</span> showing headland bypassing. Further insights on the sediment transport at the Nazaré canyon head system will be supported by the analysis of sediment samples collected at the <span class="hlt">beach</span> and inner shelf using an automated image analysis system. This work was done in the framework of the PTDC/MAR/114674/2009 program, financed by FCT which the authors acknowledge gratefully.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Duarte, João; Taborda, Rui; Ribeiro, Mónica; Cascalho, João; Silva, Ana; Bosnic, Ivana</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">236</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUSMOS31B..07D"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> Cusps: Spatial distribution and time evolution at Massaguaçú <span class="hlt">beach</span> (SP), Brazil</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> cusps are crescentic morphological structures observed on the foreshore of <span class="hlt">beaches</span> characterized by steep seaward protruding extensions, called cusp horns, and gently sloped landward extensions, called cusp embayments. Their formation depends on the grain size, <span class="hlt">beach</span> slope, tidal range and incoming waves. Cusps are best developed on gravel or shingle <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, small tidal range with a large slope for incoming waves generate a well-developed swash excursion. These structures are quickly responding to wave climate and tidal range, changing the position of the rhythmic features on the <span class="hlt">beach</span> face. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> cusps are favored by normal incoming waves, while oblique waves tend to wash these features out. This study aims to analyze the spatial distribution and temporal evolution of rhythmic features such as <span class="hlt">beach</span> cusps in Massaguaçú embayment (Caraguatatuba, northern coast of São Paulo, Brazil). This embayment has an extension of 7.5 km with reflective <span class="hlt">beaches</span> cusped mainly in its more exposed central portion. The data set for this study consists of a series of video images (Argus system), covering a stretch of the <span class="hlt">beach</span>. Visible <span class="hlt">beach</span> cusps were digitalized from these rectified images. Results obtained from the images were related to the wave climate, water level and the storm surges. Results show that the cusps on the upper portion of the foreshore were more regular and present than the cusps on the lower portion of the foreshore due to the tidal modulation of wave action. The cusp spacing on the upper portion of the foreshore is of about 38 m and the lower portion of the foreshore is of about 28 m and their presence was correlated with the wave direction and water elevation. As expected, waves approaching with shore-normal angles (southeast direction) were favorable to the formation of <span class="hlt">beach</span> cusps while the waves from the southwest, south, east and northeast generated a longshore current that reduced or destroyed any rhythmic feature. Other important forcing was the influence of the water level. Waves acting at higher water levels are able to produce the less dynamic upper layer of cusps. During 31 consecutive days from 8 July 2011 to 8 August of the same year these features show four periods with the presence of cusps on the upper and lower portion of the foreshore with three periods with cups only on the upper portion of the foreshore. The analyzed dataset shows the highly dynamic behavior of cusps, with rapid generation and destruction, related directly to its forcing hydrodynamic conditions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">dos Santos, H. H.; Siegle, E.; Sousa, P. H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">237</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFMOS33C1681C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Study of <span class="hlt">beach</span> cusps via high resolution TLS acquisitions on the pocket <span class="hlt">beach</span> of Porsmilin (Brittany)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> cusps are rhythmic shoreline features made up of series of horns and embayments. Their build-up occurs in specific conditions (steep beachface, low-energy wave conditions...). These features can notably be characterized by the cusp spacing ? and their prominence ? (difference in beachface gradient between embayment and horn). At present, two main theories confront to explain the formation of such features on natural <span class="hlt">beaches</span> : standing edge waves (special class of waves propagating longshore) and self-organisation hypothesis. - Standing edge wave theory proposes that the superimposition of incident waves and standing edge waves generates longshore variations of swash height linked with the position of edge wave nodes and anti-nodes. These variations of swash height result in regular zones of erosion. Depending on the context, different types of edge-waves may occur. The predicted <span class="hlt">beach</span> cusp spacing is : ? = (g T^2 tan?) / ? for a sub-harmonic edge wave model ? = (g T^2 tan?) / 2? for a synchronous edge wave model with : ? : <span class="hlt">beach</span> cusp spacing (m) g : gravitational acceleration (9.81 m/s) T : incident wave period (s) tan? : <span class="hlt">beach</span> gradient - Self-organisation theory suggests that a combination of interactions and feedbacks between swash flow and <span class="hlt">beach</span> topography leads to the growth of morphologic irregularities of a given wavelength (because of flow divergence or convergence), resulting in <span class="hlt">beach</span> cusp formation and maintaining. The predicted <span class="hlt">beach</span> cusp spacing is then : ? = f S with : ? : <span class="hlt">beach</span> cusp spacing (m) S : horizontal extent of the swash flow (m) f : empirical constant (~1.5) Three multitemporal Terrestrial Laser Scan acquisitions have been carried out for three consecutive days on the sandy <span class="hlt">beach</span> of Porsmilin (Brittany, France) with a spatial resolution varying from few centimetres to few metres. Moreover the hydrodynamic conditions have been obtained thanks to the Previmer project website (http://www.previmer.org/), notably based on WaveWatch3 and MARS-2D models. This study proposes to profit from the high resolution and accuracy of Terrestrial Laser data to measure the geometry and the spacing of <span class="hlt">beach</span> cusps, to compare the measured parameters to the predicted ones (with both theories) and thus to attempt to identify the hydrodynamic process which sparks off their formation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chabrol, C.; Jaud, M.; Delacourt, C.; Allemand, P.; Augereau, E.; Cuq, V.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">238</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20090021319&hterms=grid+synchronization+photovoltaic&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dgrid%2Bsynchronization%2Bphotovoltaic"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hydrogen Research at <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Universities</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This final report describes the R&D activities and projects conducted for NASA under the 6-year NASA Hydrogen Research at <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Universities grant program. Contained within this report are summaries of the overall activities, one-page description of all the reports funded under this program and all of the individual reports from each of the 29 projects supported by the effort. The R&D activities cover hydrogen technologies related to production, cryogenics, sensors, storage, separation processes, fuel cells, resource assessments and education. In the span of 6 years, the NASA Hydrogen Research at <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Universities program funded a total of 44 individual university projects, and employed more than 100 faculty and over 100 graduate research students in the six participating universities. Researchers involved in this program have filed more than 20 patents in all hydrogen technology areas and put out over 220 technical publications in the last 2 years alone. This 6 year hydrogen research program was conducted by a consortium of six <span class="hlt">Florida</span> universities: <span class="hlt">Florida</span> International University (FIU) in Miami, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> State University (FSU) and <span class="hlt">Florida</span> A&M University (FAMU) in Tallahassee, University of Central <span class="hlt">Florida</span> (UCF) in Orlando, University of South <span class="hlt">Florida</span> (USF) in Tampa, and University of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> (UF) in Gainesville. The <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Solar Energy Center (FSEC) of the University of Central <span class="hlt">Florida</span> managed the research activities of all consortium member universities except those at the University of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. This report does not include any of the programs or activities conducted at the University of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, but can be found in NASA/CR-2008-215440-PART 1-3.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Block, David L.; T-Raissi, Ali</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">239</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AGUSMOS23G..05F"> <span id="translatedtitle">Nowcasting and Forecasting <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Bacteria Concentration Using EPA's Virtual <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Software</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Beaches</span> in the United States of (North) America are subject to closure when bacterial counts exceed water quality criteria. Many authorities base these decisions on water samples that typically require at least 18 hours to analyze. This persistence approach, or model, often leads to erroneous decisions due to the great variability in bacterial concentrations. <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> are closed when they could be open and vice versa, their true status unknown until the next day. Studies show that mathematical models based on multi-variable linear regression (MLR) principles can produce better estimates, or nowcasts, using real-time explanatory variables, such as turbidity, cloud cover, and rainfall. To make such models generally available, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is developing a program called Virtual <span class="hlt">Beach</span> (VB). VB is public-domain software for developing site-specific predictive models. It features capabilities that make it possible with reasonable effort to develop, and compare the performance of, static and dynamic MLR models. The results of tests on 2006 Huntington <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Lake Erie <span class="hlt">beach</span> data are presented. In addition to nowcasting, the work begins to address the question, can weather and water forecasts be used to forecast <span class="hlt">beach</span> conditions in advance? A preliminary affirmative answer is provided based on an analysis of the Huntington <span class="hlt">Beach</span> data, with weather forecasts for nearby Cleveland-Hopkins international airport, and NOAA lake condition forecasts. We encourage those engaged in <span class="hlt">beach</span> monitoring and management to request VB, applying the nowcast and forecast models developed with it to their locations of interest. Disclaimer: Although this work was reviewed by EPA and approved for presentation, it may not necessarily reflect official Agency policy.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Frick, W. E.; Ge, Z.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">240</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ADA189312"> <span id="translatedtitle">Floating Tire Breakwater Tests Pickering <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Delaware.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report documents a 1-week long field monitoring effort conducted at Pickering <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Delaware. The purpose of the study was to gain information concerning mooring line response of a floating breakwater subjected to boat-generated waves. Data are comp...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">P. J. Grace J. E. Clausner</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">241</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/987568"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cosmology at the <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Lecture: Wayne Hu</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Wayne Hu lectures on Secondary Anisotropy in the CMB. The lecture is the first in a series of 3 he delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the <span class="hlt">Beach</span>" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wayne Hu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-03-02</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">242</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22New+York+Times%22&pg=6&id=EJ767525"> <span id="translatedtitle">An Interview with Beatrice <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Szekely</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This article presents an interview with Beatrice <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Szekely, a comparative education scholar that specialized in the Soviet Union. She was editor of the journal "Soviet Education" from 1970 to 1989. During the interview, Szekely talked about how she became personally involved in Russian/Soviet studies of education. She related that her interest…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Steiner-Khamsi, Gita</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">243</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=EISGA731792F"> <span id="translatedtitle">Tybee Island, Georgia, <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Erosion Control Project.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The proposal concerns restoration and periodic nourishment of 13,200 feet of ocean <span class="hlt">beach</span> and a rubble stone terminal groin extending 800 feet seaward. Proposed for the future, when and if needed, is the placement of two additional rubble groins 760 feet a...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1973-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">244</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB2011101931"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cliffwood <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Fossil Preserve Environmental Assessment.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Fossil Preserve built as part of the Cliffwood <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Shore Protection project in the mid 1970's is important to scientists. The Township of Aberdeen now wants the Preserve filled to halt further cliff erosion and avoid safety problems. Before filling ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1982-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">245</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/sciencecinema/biblio/987568"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cosmology at the <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Lecture: Wayne Hu</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/sciencecinema/">ScienceCinema</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Wayne Hu lectures on Secondary Anisotropy in the CMB. The lecture is the first in a series of 3 he delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the <span class="hlt">Beach</span>" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wayne Hu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-08</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">246</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.maine.gov/doc/nrimc/mgs/explore/marine/sites/apr02.htm"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mile and Half Mile <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> at Reid State Park</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This guide introduces visitors to the sediments and geologic histories of Mile and Half Mile <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Reid State Park on the coast of Maine. Topics include the source of the sand presently found on the <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, the origin and migration of <span class="hlt">beach</span> deposits, dunes, and marsh peat deposits as sea level has risen, and some history of the area. Some suggested activities for visitors include observing grain size sorting of <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands, observing the size and angle of waves washing ashore, and making measurements of <span class="hlt">beach</span> cusps and berms. References and links to additional information are included.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">247</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ufdc.ufl.edu/aerials"> <span id="translatedtitle">Aerial Photography: <span class="hlt">Florida</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Millions of people fly over <span class="hlt">Florida</span> each year, but how many of them really see anything? The University of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Map & Digital Imagery Library contains over 160,000 aerial photographs of the Sunshine State, and it is a tremendous resource for agronomists, ecologists, geographers, and historians. These particular aerial images were originally created to assist farmers in accurately assessing their farms and to provide information on soil conservation. This collection contains 120 maps that range from 1937 to 1990, and visitors to the site can use a Google Maps interface to search the maps by location. Alternately, visitors can use the "Flights By County" to look through the maps in places like Hillsborough and Alachua County.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">248</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.fdha.org"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Dental Hygiene Association</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Dental Hygiene Association's (FDHA) mission is to advance the art and science of dental hygiene by increasing awareness as well as ensuring access to quality oral health care, promoting the highest standards of dental hygiene education, licensure and practice while promoting the interests of dental hygiene. Available on the FDHA's website is their official publication Prophyways. This is a seasonal publication covering a wide range of information in the dental hygienist field, including changes to local organizations, such as the Board of Dentistry, to upcoming events in the State of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> and nationally. Also available on the website is a calendar of events for the entire year as well as a directory of contact information for FDHA board members.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-11-02</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">249</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://merrick.library.miami.edu/specialCollections/asm0567/"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Documents Collection</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Created as part of the University of Miami Libraries Digital Collections, this rather remarkable offering includes an assortment of documents related to various aspects of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>â≢s history, life, and culture from 1777 to the 1920s. The range of materials here includes correspondence diaries, invoices, receipts, reports, and other documents. Key highlights cover a range from the Seminole Wars to the early days of Miami history. The user interface here is quite useful as visitors can use the Location Map & Timeline to browse around from Pensacola down to the Keys. Also, visitors can use the Subject Index area to look around from "Abstracts of Title" to "Yulee, David Levy." First-time visitors may wish to start by looking at the signature of Napoleon B. Broward and then wandering on over to a unique deed from the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> East Coast Railway.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">250</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=STS043-84-029&hterms=sinkholes&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dsinkholes"> <span id="translatedtitle">Orlando, <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, USA</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Much of central <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, including this detailed view of Orlando (28.5N, 81.0W) can be seen in this single photo. Disney World is at the top center of the scene and the crescent shaped Lake Tohopekaliga is near the bottom. The large round lakes are believed to be sinkholes formed during glacial times when ocean levels were several hundred feet lower than the present. Linear patterns east of Orlando are thought to be ancient shoreline ridges.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">251</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19950008270&hterms=CIT+report&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3DCIT%2Breport"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s propagation report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">One of the key goals of the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Center is to obtain a maximum of useful information on propagation behavior unique to its subtropical weather and subtropical climate. Such weather data is of particular interest when it is (or has the potential to become) useful for developing and implementing techniques to compensate for adverse weather effects. Also discussed are data observations, current challenges, CDF's, sun movement, and diversity experiments.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Helmken, Henry; Henning, Rudolf</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">252</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://guides.lib.usf.edu/content.php?pid=49131&sid=364819"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Citrus Industry Oral Histories</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">What's so special about oranges? They are a major cash crop for <span class="hlt">Florida</span> and other warm weather places, and this fascinating oral history project from the University of South <span class="hlt">Florida</span> (USF) explores the very nature of this industry. Working together with the USF's Patel Center for Global Studies, oral historian William Mansfield conducted 20 interviews regarding the impact of globalization on the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> citrus industry. Visitors can listen to or read the interviews, as well as look over the online exhibition, "Selling Sunshine: <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s Citrus Industry." The exhibition details <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s unique relationship with the citrus industry, incorporating documents, promotional material, and post cards with its information. The website hosts a remarkable collection that will be of interest to oral historians, folks with an interest in <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, and many others.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">253</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.cfmemory.org/"> <span id="translatedtitle">Central <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Memory</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Central <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Memory project was started in 2002 by The University of Central <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Library, The Orange County Regional History Center, and The Orange County Library System. The intent of the project is "to provide an online platform and focal point for gathering, preserving, and disseminating the documents, artifacts, and stories of the history of Central <span class="hlt">Florida</span>." Over the past few years, the project has been awarded with additional funding grants from the Institute of Museum and Library Services. Currently, the project site contains over 80,000 images, along with maps, plans, and other documents. Visitors to the homepage will find three primary sections of note: "Collection", "Share", and "Learn". In the "Collection" area, visitors can make their way through postcards, maps, and the "most recent" additions to the site. For people looking for a more organized experience, there's the "Learn" area. Here they can find thematic collections like "Dreams and Schemes", "Roads, Rivers and Rails", and "Critters, Crackers and Cottages". For those looking for a sample search, words like "Deland", "Stetson University", "Orlando", and "pineapple" will return a host of compelling items.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">254</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.fknms.nos.noaa.gov"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Keys NMS: Coral Reefs</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Keys National Marine Sanctuary's page with information on coral reefs and links to information on research, restoration and monitoring. Wealth of information on the protection of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s coral reefs and the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Keys as a whole. Includes an in-class activity for grades K-5, as well as information on a Keys field experience and teacher workshops. Information on safe diving and snorkeling. Education materials available for purchase, including the Seagrass Toolbox.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">255</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1257563"> <span id="translatedtitle">Initial Evaluation of the Effects of Aerosolized <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Red Tide Toxins (Brevetoxins) in Persons with Asthma</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> red tides annually occur in the Gulf of Mexico, resulting from blooms of the marine dinoflagellate Karenia brevis. K. brevis produces highly potent natural polyether toxins, known as brevetoxins, that activate voltage-sensitive sodium channels. In experimental animals, brevetoxins cause significant bronchoconstriction. A study of persons who visited the <span class="hlt">beach</span> recreationally found a significant increase in self-reported respiratory symptoms after exposure to aerosolized <span class="hlt">Florida</span> red tides. Anecdotal reports indicate that persons with underlying respiratory diseases may be particularly susceptible to adverse health effects from these aerosolized toxins. Fifty-nine persons with physician-diagnosed asthma were evaluated for 1 hr before and after going to the <span class="hlt">beach</span> on days with and without <span class="hlt">Florida</span> red tide. Study participants were evaluated with a brief symptom questionnaire, nose and throat swabs, and spirometry approved by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. Environmental monitoring, water and air sampling (i.e., K. brevis, brevetoxins, and particulate size distribution), and personal monitoring (for toxins) were performed. Brevetoxin concentrations were measured by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry, high-performance liquid chromatography, and a newly developed brevetoxin enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Participants were significantly more likely to report respiratory symptoms after <span class="hlt">Florida</span> red tide exposure. Participants demonstrated small but statistically significant decreases in forced expiratory volume in 1 sec, forced expiratory flow between 25 and 75%, and peak expiratory flow after exposure, particularly those regularly using asthma medications. Similar evaluation during nonexposure periods did not significantly differ. This is the first study to show objectively measurable adverse health effects from exposure to aerosolized <span class="hlt">Florida</span> red tide toxins in persons with asthma. Future studies will examine the possible chronic effects of these toxins among persons with asthma and other chronic respiratory impairment.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fleming, Lora E.; Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Backer, Lorraine C.; Bean, Judy A.; Wanner, Adam; Dalpra, Dana; Tamer, Robert; Zaias, Julia; Cheng, Yung Sung; Pierce, Richard; Naar, Jerome; Abraham, William; Clark, Richard; Zhou, Yue; Henry, Michael S.; Johnson, David; Van De Bogart, Gayl; Bossart, Gregory D.; Harrington, Mark; Baden, Daniel G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">256</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.usgs.gov/wri/1982/4058/plate-1.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Recharge and discharge areas of the Floridan Aquifer in the St. Johns River Water Management District and vicinity, <span class="hlt">Florida</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Floridan aquifer is the principal source of most of the freshwater used in the St. Johns River Water Management District. An important step in managing water resources is the delineation of recharge and discharge areas. Geohydrologic factors to be considered when delineating recharge and discharge areas include: altitude and configuration of the potentiometric surface; direction and magnitude of the gradient between the water table and the potentiometric surface; and thickness and permeability of the overlying sediments. Recharge to the aquifer comes almost entirely from rainfall within the Water Management District. Significant recharge occurs where the aquifer is at or very near land surface, and where the overlying sediments are very permeable sand so that recharge takes place downward leakage. Recharge also occurs through sinkholes, sinkhole lakes, and other lakes that have a good connection to the aquifer. Major recharge areas are delineated on the map. Discharge occurs in areas of artesian flow (where the potentiometric surface is above land surface), primarily by diffuse upward leakage and by discharge from springs. Fifty-five springs, with total discharge of about 1,600 million gallons per day, are in the Water Management District. Areas of discharge and the location of springs are shown on the map. In 1980, total pumpage in the Water Management District was about 1,000 million gallons per day. Under predevelopment conditions, discharge by springs and upward leakage approximately balanced recharged. Additional discharge by pumpage may or may not be balanced by decreased spring discharge of increased downward leakage. Examination of long-term water level trends can indicate if recharge and discharge balance. Graphs of rainfall, water levels, and municipal pumpage for Jacksonville, Orlando, and <span class="hlt">Daytona</span> <span class="hlt">Beach</span> are shown on the map. (USGS)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Phelps, G. G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">257</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23025610"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evidence of adaptation from ancestral variation in young populations of <span class="hlt">beach</span> mice.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">To understand how organisms adapt to novel habitats, which involves both demographic and selective events, we require knowledge of the evolutionary history of populations and also selected alleles. There are still few cases in which the precise mutations (and hence, defined alleles) that contribute to adaptive change have been identified in nature; one exception is the genetic basis of camouflaging pigmentation of oldfield mice (Peromyscus polionotus) that have colonized the sandy dunes of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s Gulf Coast. To quantify the genomic impact of colonization as well as the signature of selection, we resequenced 5000 1.5-kb noncoding loci as well as a 160-kb genomic region surrounding the melanocortin-1 receptor (Mc1r), a gene that contributes to pigmentation differences, in <span class="hlt">beach</span> and mainland populations. Using a genome-wide phylogenetic approach, we recovered a single monophyletic group comprised of <span class="hlt">beach</span> mice, consistent with a single colonization event of the Gulf Coast. We also found evidence of a severe founder event, estimated to have occurred less than 3000 years ago. In this demographic context, we show that all <span class="hlt">beach</span> subspecies share a single derived light Mc1r allele, which was likely selected from standing genetic variation that originated in the mainland. Surprisingly, we were unable to identify a clear signature of selection in the Mc1r region, despite independent evidence that this locus contributes to adaptive coloration. Nonetheless, these data allow us to reconstruct and compare the evolutionary history of populations and alleles to better understand how adaptive evolution, following the colonization of a novel habitat, proceeds in nature. PMID:23025610</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Domingues, Vera S; Poh, Yu-Ping; Peterson, Brant K; Pennings, Pleuni S; Jensen, Jeffrey D; Hoekstra, Hopi E</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">258</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB2006113921"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Scrub Jay Recovery Plan.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">Florida</span> scrub jay occurs in small, isolated patches of scrub in peninsular <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. The estimated population is between 7,010 and 10, 978 individuals. This species is federally listed as threatened due to loss of habitat. Most land favored by scrub ja...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">259</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=fiore&pg=3&id=EJ645628"> <span id="translatedtitle">Born To Read: <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Style.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Describes the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Born To Read (BTR) program, a statewide early literacy program that has grown from 10 Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA) funded pilot projects in 1998-99 to include LSTA and locally funded programs in more than one-third of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s 67 counties in 2001-02. Sidebars list topics and presenters at BTR Capacity Building…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fiore, Carole D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">260</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.aoml.noaa.gov/sfros/database/Publications/Salinity%20Patterns%20Estuarine,%20Coastal%20and%20Shelf%20Science%202006.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Salinity patterns of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bay</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The salinity of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bay has undergone dramatic changes over the past century. Salinity values reached their most extreme, up to 70, in the late 1980s, concurrent with ecological changes in <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bay including a mass seagrass die-off. In this study, surface salinity was measured at approximately monthly intervals between 1998 and 2004. The 7-year data set was analyzed to</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Christopher R. Kelble; Elizabeth M. Johns; William K. Nuttle; Thomas N. Lee; Ryan H. Smith; Peter B. Ortner</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">261</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22inhalants%22&pg=2&id=EJ940815"> <span id="translatedtitle">Inhalant Use in <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Youth</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Purpose: To determine (1) the prevalence of use, (2) risk and protective factors for use of inhalants in <span class="hlt">Florida</span> youth. Methods: The <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Youth Substance Abuse Survey 2004 is a comprehensive assessment of youth substance abuse attitudes and practices obtained by sampling youth from sixty-five counties. Results: The sample consisted of 60,345…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Siqueira, Lorena; Crandall, Lee A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">262</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://actionbioscience.org/environment/Jensen_McLellan.html"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> Closings: Science versus Public Perception</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The issue-focused, peer-reviewed article addresses how <span class="hlt">beach</span> closings are on the rise, but the public is not being given accurate information to help them get involved in solving the problem. The media, the publics primary information source, must provide information based on factual scientific evidence, not be swayed by economic and political factors, and work with scientists to obtain data and facts.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Erika Jensen and Sandra McLellan (Great Lakes WATER Institute;)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">263</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/3189908"> <span id="translatedtitle">Holocene cemented <span class="hlt">beach</span> deposits in Belize</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Two types of cemented <span class="hlt">beach</span> deposits occur on reef islands off the coast of Belize. These are (1) intertidal beachrock that is dominantly cemented by marine aragonite and high-magnesium-calcite cements, and (2) supratidal cayrock that is cemented mainly by vadose low-magnesium-calcite cements. Besides differences in position relative to present sea level and resulting early diagenesic features, beachrock and cayrock can</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Eberhard Gischler; Anthony J. Lomando</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">264</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.dep.state.fl.us/geology/default.htm"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Geological Survey</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Geological Survey (FGS) homepage provides data, research materials and interpretations on aquifer systems, geologic frameworks, landforms, energy and non-energy mineral resources, and geologic hazards which which can be used to address issues of conservation and protection, sustainable development, human health protection, and implementation of successful environmental regulatory programs. Educational materials for earth science and the pre-historic development of the state are also provided. These include topics such as sinkholes, data and maps, rock and mineral identification, minerals, hydrogeology, and fossils.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">265</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002AGUFMOS62E..11T"> <span id="translatedtitle">Wave Reflection on a Steep <span class="hlt">Beach</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Wave reflection was measured during the RIPEX/Steep<span class="hlt">Beach</span> experiment conducted at the Sand City <span class="hlt">Beach</span> in Monterey Bay, California during April/May 2001. The morphology is a barred shoreline, cut by rip channels spaced 100-200 m apart. The <span class="hlt">beach</span> slope is steep at 1:5, and the slope offshore of the bar is 1:20. Measuring wave reflection in the dissipative surf zone is complicated because the wave field is not spatially homogeneous and the nodes of the reflected waves pose difficulties in analysis. The inverse approach by Dickson et.al. (1995) is extended to the case of local pressure/velocity (puv) measurements, to avoid having to assume spatial homogeniety. In this inverse approach, the various expected puv cross-spectra and energy density spectra are modeled for a reflective wave field and compared with actual measurements. The unknown coefficients as a function of frequency are reflection coefficient, phase difference, mean incident wave direction, and incident wave energy of the model, and are determined iteratively in a least square sense. The estimated reflection coefficients increase towards the shoreline inside the surf zone, decrease with increasing frequency and vary with the tidal stage. Dickson, W.S., T.H.C. Herbers, and E.B. Thornton, 1995, Wave Reflection from Breakwater, J. Waterway, Port, Coastal and Ocean Engineering, Vol. 121 (5), 262-268.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Thornton, E. B.; Stanton, T. P.; Reniers, A. R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">266</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-07-28/pdf/2011-19117.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">76 FR 45282 - Announcement of Funding Awards for the HUD-Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing (HUD-VASH) Program...</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Avenue.... <span class="hlt">Daytona</span> <span class="hlt">Beach</span>.......... FL 32114 $173,742 25 HOUSING AUTHORITY SARASOTA......... 40 South Pineapple Ave..... Sarasota............... FL 34236 $241,566 25 HOUSING AUTHORITY WEST PALM <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> 1715...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-07-28</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">267</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ESRv..132...85T"> <span id="translatedtitle">Aeolian transport of coarse sand over <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridges in NE Australia: A reply to a discussion of '<span class="hlt">Beach</span> ridges and prograded <span class="hlt">beach</span> deposits as palaeoenvironment records'</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Nott (2013) argued that Tamura's (2012) review of <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridges as palaeoenvironment records comprises an incorrect interpretation of the processes of building coarse sand <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridges in NE Australia. Nott (2013) stressed no possibility of aeolian transport of coarse sand onto <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridges during both cyclone and non-cyclone conditions. The facts presented by Nott (2013) however fail to completely rule out the possibility that aeolian transport could be at least contributing to the building of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridges. This reply aims to clarify the original intentions of Tamura (2012), which Nott (2013) appears to have misunderstood, and further examines the possibility of aeolian transport of coarse sand onto the <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridges from incipient ridges. If this does occur, then it is appropriate to question how this might affect the theory and algorithm employed by Nott et al. (2009) and Forsyth et al. (2010) to assess the intensity and frequency of prehistoric cyclone landfall.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tamura, Toru</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">268</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.usgs.gov/wri/1988/4073/report.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Geohydrology of Indian River County, <span class="hlt">Florida</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The surficial aquifer system and the Floridan aquifer system are the sources of groundwater used in Indian River County, <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. About 65% of the groundwater is used for irrigation and is from the Floridan aquifer system. Saline water ranging from slightly saline to brine underlies the fresh groundwater throughout the county and is the chief water quality problem. Transmissivities of the surficial aquifer system in eastern Indian River County range from 1,500 to 11,000 sq ft/d. Yields of wells are as much as 1,200 gal/min. Reported transmissivities for the Floridan aquifer system range from 65,000 to 200,000 sq ft/d. Most wells that tap the Floridan aquifer system flow; flow rates range from 30 to 2,000 gal/min. Chloride concentrations of water in the surficial aquifer system generally are below 100 mg/L, but concentrations often exceed 250 mg/L in water from the Floridan aquifer system. Between 1976 and 1983, average chloride concentrations in water from six wells that tap the surficial aquifer system in the Vero <span class="hlt">Beach</span> well field increased about 36 mg/L, but were unchanged in four other wells. The increase in chloride concentration probably is related to a well-field pumpage increase from 5.44 million gal/d in 1976 to 8.00 million gal/d in 1983. In most of the County, chloride concentrations of wells that tap the Floridan aquifer system have not changed significantly in the 15-year period, 1968-83. Water levels in the surficial aquifer system declined 15 to 19 ft between 1971 and 1984 in the Vero <span class="hlt">Beach</span> well field where the larger groundwater withdrawals occur, but have not declined significantly outside heavily pumped areas. Water levels in the Floridan aquifer system have declined 16 to 24 ft in eastern Indian River County in the 50-year period, 1934-84, but declines outside the heavily pumped areas generally have been less than 10 ft during this period. (USGS)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Schiner, G. R.; Laughlin, C. P.; Toth, D. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">269</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24040219"> <span id="translatedtitle">Shifts in the microbial community composition of Gulf Coast <span class="hlt">beaches</span> following <span class="hlt">beach</span> oiling.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Microorganisms associated with coastal sands serve as a natural biofilter, providing essential nutrient recycling in nearshore environments and acting to maintain coastal ecosystem health. Anthropogenic stressors often impact these ecosystems, but little is known about whether these disturbances can be identified through microbial community change. The blowout of the Macondo Prospect reservoir on April 20, 2010, which released oil hydrocarbons into the Gulf of Mexico, presented an opportunity to examine whether microbial community composition might provide a sensitive measure of ecosystem disturbance. Samples were collected on four occasions, beginning in mid-June, during initial <span class="hlt">beach</span> oiling, until mid-November from surface sand and surf zone waters at seven <span class="hlt">beaches</span> stretching from Bay St. Louis, MS to St. George Island, FL USA. Oil hydrocarbon measurements and NOAA shoreline assessments indicated little to no impact on the two most eastern <span class="hlt">beaches</span> (controls). Sequence comparisons of bacterial ribosomal RNA gene hypervariable regions isolated from <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands located to the east and west of Mobile Bay in Alabama demonstrated that regional drivers account for markedly different bacterial communities. Individual <span class="hlt">beaches</span> had unique community signatures that persisted over time and exhibited spatial relationships, where community similarity decreased as horizontal distance between samples increased from one to hundreds of meters. In contrast, sequence analyses detected larger temporal and less spatial variation among the water samples. Superimposed upon these <span class="hlt">beach</span> community distance and time relationships, was increased variability in bacterial community composition from oil hydrocarbon contaminated sands. The increased variability was observed among the core, resident, and transient community members, indicating the occurrence of community-wide impacts rather than solely an overprinting of oil hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria onto otherwise relatively stable sand population structures. Among sequences classified to genus, Alcanivorax, Alteromonas, Marinobacter, Winogradskyella, and Zeaxanthinibacter exhibited the largest relative abundance increases in oiled sands. PMID:24040219</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Newton, Ryan J; Huse, Susan M; Morrison, Hilary G; Peake, Colin S; Sogin, Mitchell L; McLellan, Sandra L</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">270</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3769389"> <span id="translatedtitle">Shifts in the Microbial Community Composition of Gulf Coast <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> Following <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Oiling</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Microorganisms associated with coastal sands serve as a natural biofilter, providing essential nutrient recycling in nearshore environments and acting to maintain coastal ecosystem health. Anthropogenic stressors often impact these ecosystems, but little is known about whether these disturbances can be identified through microbial community change. The blowout of the Macondo Prospect reservoir on April 20, 2010, which released oil hydrocarbons into the Gulf of Mexico, presented an opportunity to examine whether microbial community composition might provide a sensitive measure of ecosystem disturbance. Samples were collected on four occasions, beginning in mid-June, during initial <span class="hlt">beach</span> oiling, until mid-November from surface sand and surf zone waters at seven <span class="hlt">beaches</span> stretching from Bay St. Louis, MS to St. George Island, FL USA. Oil hydrocarbon measurements and NOAA shoreline assessments indicated little to no impact on the two most eastern <span class="hlt">beaches</span> (controls). Sequence comparisons of bacterial ribosomal RNA gene hypervariable regions isolated from <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands located to the east and west of Mobile Bay in Alabama demonstrated that regional drivers account for markedly different bacterial communities. Individual <span class="hlt">beaches</span> had unique community signatures that persisted over time and exhibited spatial relationships, where community similarity decreased as horizontal distance between samples increased from one to hundreds of meters. In contrast, sequence analyses detected larger temporal and less spatial variation among the water samples. Superimposed upon these <span class="hlt">beach</span> community distance and time relationships, was increased variability in bacterial community composition from oil hydrocarbon contaminated sands. The increased variability was observed among the core, resident, and transient community members, indicating the occurrence of community-wide impacts rather than solely an overprinting of oil hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria onto otherwise relatively stable sand population structures. Among sequences classified to genus, Alcanivorax, Alteromonas, Marinobacter, Winogradskyella, and Zeaxanthinibacter exhibited the largest relative abundance increases in oiled sands.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Newton, Ryan J.; Huse, Susan M.; Morrison, Hilary G.; Peake, Colin S.; Sogin, Mitchell L.; McLellan, Sandra L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">271</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/41004818"> <span id="translatedtitle">The morphodynamics of megatidal <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Normandy, France</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">beaches</span> on the west coast of Cotentin, on the Cherbourg Peninsula in Normandy, France, experience mean spring tidal ranges of 9.3–11.4m. A study of the morphology, hydrodynamics and grain-size characteristics of these <span class="hlt">beaches</span> was carried out in order to highlight the influence of large tidally induced water level fluctuations on their morphodynamics. These <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are herein referred to as</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">F. Levoy; E. J. Anthony; O. Monfort; C. Larsonneur</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">272</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/42679860"> <span id="translatedtitle">Tailings <span class="hlt">beach</span> slope prediction: a new rheological method</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A new semi-empirical model for tailings <span class="hlt">beach</span> slope prediction is presented. The model is based on existing non-Newtonian rheology theory combined with some well-established turbulent channel flow equations. It is shown that solid particles do not deposit from the self-formed channels of the tailings slurry as it flows down the <span class="hlt">beach</span>, and that the slope of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> is dictated</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">T. G. Fitton; A. G. Chryss; S. N. Bhattacharya</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">273</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/909972"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">FLORIDA</span> TOWER FOOTPRINT EXPERIMENTS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Footprint experiments were a series of field programs in which perfluorocarbon tracers were released in different configurations centered on a flux tower to generate a data set that can be used to test transport and dispersion models. These models are used to determine the sources of the CO{sub 2} that cause the fluxes measured at eddy covariance towers. Experiments were conducted in a managed slash pine forest, 10 km northeast of Gainesville, <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, in 2002, 2004, and 2006 and in atmospheric conditions that ranged from well mixed, to very stable, including the transition period between convective conditions at midday to stable conditions after sun set. There were a total of 15 experiments. The characteristics of the PFTs, details of sampling and analysis methods, quality control measures, and analytical statistics including confidence limits are presented. Details of the field programs including tracer release rates, tracer source configurations, and configuration of the samplers are discussed. The result of this experiment is a high quality, well documented tracer and meteorological data set that can be used to improve and validate canopy dispersion models.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">WATSON,T.B.; DIETZ, R.N.; WILKE, R.; HENDREY, G.; LEWIN, K.; NAGY, J.; LECLERC, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">274</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=PIA02610&hterms=big+band&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3Dbig%2Bband"> <span id="translatedtitle">MISR Views <span class="hlt">Florida</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) images of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> acquired on April 9, 2000 during Terra orbit 1650. The image at the top is a color view acquired by the vertical (nadir) camera. It has been reoriented so that the flight path is from left to right, to facilitate comparison with the lower image, a stereo 'anaglyph' generated using 275-m resolution red band data from the cameras viewing 45.6 degrees and 70.5 degrees aft of nadir. The anaglyph provides a three-dimensional effect when viewed using red/blue glasses with the red filter placed over the left eye. This stereoscopic 'depth perception' and the variation in brightness as a function of view angle enables scientists to assess the climate impact of different types of cloud fields. The plume from a large brush fire that burned about 15,000 acres is visible at the western edge of the Big Cypress Swamp in southern <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. East is toward the top.<p/>MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.<p/>For more information: http://www-misr.jpl.nasa.gov</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">275</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70015997"> <span id="translatedtitle">Changes along a seawall and natural <span class="hlt">beaches</span>: Fourchon, LA</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper compares shoreline and <span class="hlt">beach</span> morphology changes and responses to storms from 1985 to 1988 along sections of a rapidly eroding coast at the Bayou Lafourche headland, Louisiana. A <span class="hlt">beach</span> consisting of a cement-filled bag seawall and nourishment was compared with natural <span class="hlt">beaches</span> to the west and east of the project. Local patterns of <span class="hlt">beach</span> response could be attributed to several recent processes and historical conditions. Hurricane Gilbert, which made landfall in Mexico, caused about 70% of the sediment loss on both the artificially-stablized and the natural shorelines over this three-year period.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mossa, Joann; Nakashima, Lindsay, D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">276</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15530520"> <span id="translatedtitle">Shore litter along sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of the Gulf of Oman.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> debris abundance and weight were estimated from surveys on 11 <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of the Gulf of Oman along the Omani coast. Debris were collected on two occasions from 100 m transects, sorted and categorized by origin and type. Overall contaminations ranged from 0.43 to 6.01 items m(-1) of <span class="hlt">beach</span> front on different <span class="hlt">beaches</span> with a mean value of 1.79+/-1.04 gm(-1) (95% C.I). In terms of weight, contamination levels ranged from 7.8 to 75.44 gm(-1) of <span class="hlt">beach</span> front with a mean contamination of 27.02+/-14.48 gm(-1) (95% C.I). In terms of numbers of items, plastic debris ranked first on all <span class="hlt">beaches</span> followed by either wood items or other organic materials such as cigarette butts. Industrial debris remained few on all <span class="hlt">beaches</span> (<10%). Most debris had a local origin and, in terms of numbers, were associated with <span class="hlt">beach</span> recreational activities whereas fishing debris represented the largest proportion of the debris in terms of weight. There were notable differences between <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in the relative abundance of recreation-related and fishing-related debris. PMID:15530520</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Claereboudt, Michel R</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">277</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.usgs.gov/sim/3166/"> <span id="translatedtitle">Geospatial characteristics of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s coastal and offshore environments: Distribution of important habitats for coastal and offshore biological resources and offshore sand resources</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Geospatial Characteristics GeoPDF of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s Coastal and Offshore Environments is a comprehensive collection of geospatial data describing the political boundaries and natural resources of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. This interactive map provides spatial information on bathymetry, sand resources, and locations of important habitats (for example, Essential Fish Habitats (EFH), nesting areas, strandings) for marine invertebrates, fish, reptiles, birds, and marine mammals. The map should be useful to coastal resource managers and others interested in marine habitats and submerged obstructions of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s coastal region. In particular, as oil and gas explorations continue to expand, the map can be used to explore information regarding sensitive areas and resources in the State of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. Users of this geospatial database will have access to synthesized information in a variety of scientific disciplines concerning <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s coastal zone. This powerful tool provides a one-stop assembly of data that can be tailored to fit the needs of many natural resource managers. The map was originally developed to assist the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation, and Enforcement (BOEMRE) and coastal resources managers with planning <span class="hlt">beach</span> restoration projects. The BOEMRE uses a systematic approach in planning the development of submerged lands of the Continental Shelf seaward of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s territorial waters. Such development could affect the environment. BOEMRE is required to ascertain the existing physical, biological, and socioeconomic conditions of the submerged lands and estimate the impact of developing these lands. Data sources included the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, BOEMRE, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Department of Environmental Protection, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Geographic Data Library, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Natural Areas Inventory, and the State of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, Bureau of Archeological Research. Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) compliant metadata are provided as attached xml files for all geographic information system (GIS) layers.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Demopoulos, Amanda W.J.; Foster, Ann M.; Jones, Michal L.; Gualtieri, Daniel J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">278</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60536035"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hydrogen energy. Volume II. 1st World conference, Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, March 1--3, 1976</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Thirty-five full papers and abstracts of twelve other papers are included in this volume. An abstract of each full paper was prepared for ERDA Energy Research Abstracts (ERA); four are also included in Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Veziroglu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1976-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">279</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1984STIN...8516013M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Control technology for integrated circuit fabrication at Micro-Circuit Engineering, Incorporated, West Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, <span class="hlt">Florida</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A survey to assess control technology for integrated circuit fabrication was conducted. Engineering controls included local and general exhaust ventilation, shielding, and personal protective equipment. Devices or work stations that contained toxic materials that were potentially dangerous were controlled by local exhaust ventilation. Less hazardous areas were controlled by general exhaust ventilation. Process isolation was used in the plasma etching, low pressure chemical vapor deposition, and metallization operations. Shielding was used in ion implantation units to control X-ray emissions, in contact mask alignes to limit ultraviolet (UV) emissions, and in plasma etching units to control radiofrequency and UV emissions. Most operations were automated. Use of personal protective equipment varied by job function.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mihlan, G. I.; Mitchell, R. I.; Smith, R. K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">280</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ADA214499"> <span id="translatedtitle">Symposium on Chemical Precursors to Ceramics. Held in Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> on September 12, 1989.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">It was the purpose of the Symposium on Chemical Precursors to Ceramics to promote exchange of information among chemists and materials scientists engaged in studies related to the chemistry of materials. Participants were chosen to represent perspectives ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">F. N. Tebbe J. D. Bolt U. Chowdhry</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">281</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_146989.html"> <span id="translatedtitle">1 in 10 U.S. <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> Fails Bacteria Test, Survey Finds</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePLUS</a></p> <p class="result-summary">... samples taken annually at <span class="hlt">beaches</span> around the country, Great Lakes <span class="hlt">beaches</span> have the highest failure rate, with excessively ... Main Street <span class="hlt">Beach</span> in Chautauqua County In the Great Lakes, 13 percent of samples failed to meet federal ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">282</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title33-vol3/pdf/CFR-2013-title33-vol3-sec334-930.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 334.930 - Anaheim Bay Harbor, Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">... Anaheim Bay Harbor, Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>. 334.930 Section... Anaheim Bay Harbor, Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>. (a) The restricted...west jetties at the United States Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California,...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">283</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ADA119864"> <span id="translatedtitle">West <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Westport, Connecticut, Sherwood Island State Park. Detailed Project Report and Environmental Assessment.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Detailed Project Report present results of an analysis of <span class="hlt">beach</span> erosion problems at Sherwood Island State Park, and investigated several alternative plans of erosion control for West <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, the Sherwood Island State Park. Recommended <span class="hlt">beach</span> widening by pla...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1981-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">284</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-01-10/pdf/2011-167.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">76 FR 1359 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, NC</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...the 2011 Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span>/Quintiles Marathon will be transiting across the bridge...the 2011 Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span>/Quintiles Marathon. DATES: This deviation is effective...The Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span>/Quintiles Marathon Committee on behalf of the North...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-10</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">285</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=STS043-605-068&hterms=port+city&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dport%2Bcity"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Everglades and Keys, USA</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Though much of southern <span class="hlt">Florida</span> is covered by clouds, the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Everglades and Keys (25.0N, 82.0W) remain relatively clear in this nearly vertical view. The view covers the Gulf of Mexico port city of Ft. Myers, and Lake Okeechobee, at the top of the scene, in the north, The Everglades, in the center and the entire <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Key Chain at the bottom. Even with the many popcorn clouds, ground detail and the city of Miami is easily discerned.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">286</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=163365"> <span id="translatedtitle">NOWCASTING AND FORECASTING <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> BACTERIA CONCENTRATION USING THE EPA VIRTUAL <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> SOFTWARE</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Beaches</span> are subject to closure when bacterial counts exceed water quality criteria. Many authorities base these decisions on sample counts, which typically require a day or more to analyze. Sometimes called the persistence model, because conditions are assumed to persist, experie...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">287</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/26659316"> <span id="translatedtitle">Predicting the effect of <span class="hlt">beach</span> nourishment and cross-shore sediment variation on <span class="hlt">beach</span> morphodynamic assessment</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Studies of coastal morphodynamics are becoming increasingly more focused on quantification of relationships between processes, form and function of dynamic landform systems because wave climates (e.g., wave height, wave period, seasonality, cyclical patterns) and sediments (i.e., composition, size, and shape) interact in various ways to collectively produce distinctive types of <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. This paper identifies criteria and boundary conditions that characterize</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lindino Benedet; Charles W. Finkl; Thomas Campbell; Antonio Klein</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">288</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1694930"> <span id="translatedtitle">The health effects of swimming at Sydney <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. The Sydney <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Users Study Advisory Group.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">OBJECTIVES. The purpose of the study was to determine the health risks of swimming at ocean <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Sydney, Australia. METHODS. From people attending 12 Sydney <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in the period from December 5, 1989 to February 26, 1990, we recruited a cohort of 8413 adults who agreed to participate in this study. Of these, 4424 were excluded either because they had been swimming in the previous 5 days or because they reported a current illness. Of the remainder, 2839 successfully completed a follow-up telephone interview conducted within 10 days after recruitment. We recorded reported respiratory, gastrointestinal, eye, and ear symptoms and fever that occurred within the 10 days between initial interview on the <span class="hlt">beach</span> and the follow-up interview. RESULTS. A total of 683 participants (24.0%) reported experiencing symptoms in the 10 days following initial interview. Of these, 435 (63.7%) reported respiratory symptoms. Swimmers were almost twice as likely as nonswimmers to report symptoms. There was a linear relationship between water pollution and all reported symptoms with the exception of gastrointestinal complaints. CONCLUSIONS. Swimmers at Sydney ocean <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are more likely to report respiratory, ear, and eye symptoms than beachgoers who do not swim. The incidence of these symptoms increases slightly with increasing levels of pollution.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Corbett, S J; Rubin, G L; Curry, G K; Kleinbaum, D G</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">289</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=165685"> <span id="translatedtitle">MEETING IN MEXICO: NOWCASTING AND FORECASTING <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> BACTERIA CONCENTRATION USING EPA'S VIRTUAL <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> SOFTWARE</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Beaches</span> in the United States of (North) America are subject to closure when bacterial counts exceed water quality criteria. Many authorities base these decisions on water samples that typically require at least 18 hours to analyze. This persistence approach, or model, often leads...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">290</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-07-22/pdf/2013-17568.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">78 FR 43881 - <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Petroleum Reprocessors Site, Davie, Broward County, <span class="hlt">Florida</span>; Notice of Settlement</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...CERCLA-04-2013-3758] <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Petroleum Reprocessors Site, Davie, Broward County...Tech, Inc. concerning the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Petroleum Reprocessors Site located in Davie...Submit your comments by Site name <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Petroleum Reprocesssors Site by one of the...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-07-22</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">291</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/39725945"> <span id="translatedtitle">Rocky shore-gravelly <span class="hlt">beach</span> transition, and storm\\/post-storm changes of a holocene gravelly <span class="hlt">beach</span> (Kos island, Aegean sea): Stratigraphic significance</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Summary  On Kos island, Greece, along an investigated coastal segment 3 km in length, four adjacent sectors were distinguished, (1)\\u000a Empros <span class="hlt">beach</span>, a rocky shore with plunging cliffs and a steeply dipping, submarine talus, (2) Thermi <span class="hlt">beach</span>, a „coarse-clastic\\u000a <span class="hlt">beach</span>” with a subaerial cliff fringed by a bouldery to coarse gravelly <span class="hlt">beach</span> with poorly developed zonation, (3) Dimitra <span class="hlt">beach</span>,\\u000a a gravelly</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Diethard Sanders</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">292</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://serc.carleton.edu/sp/ssdan/examples/31666.html"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Cities and Metro Areas</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This exercise for an Urban Sociology course provides a look at demographics in <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Metropolitan Area. This activity uses The Statistical Abstract of the United States, The County and City Data Book and The State and Metropolitan Area Data Book.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wright, Jim</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">293</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22CPR%22&pg=6&id=EJ235411"> <span id="translatedtitle">Teaching CPR to <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s Students.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A program in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) instruction for <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s school children is described. Program guidelines and support services are detailed for other schools wishing to implement such a program. (JN)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Varnes, Jill W.; Crone, Ernest G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1980-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">294</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB85187946"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Seafood Regulations and Regulators.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This article is intended to explain the pertinent regulations and responsible regulatory authorities which have some monitoring role for the seafood industry in <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. The primary concerns are proper use of the respective natural resources, product qual...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">W. S. Otwell</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">295</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB185812"> <span id="translatedtitle">Tourism in East Central <span class="hlt">Florida</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report summarizes a research effort to project tourism as an industry in East Central <span class="hlt">Florida</span> and present such key planning factors as employment, population supported, retail sales, motel and restaurant data and total investment. The approach used i...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1969-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">296</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/61249422"> <span id="translatedtitle">Experimental use of dispersants for spill countermeasures on Arctic <span class="hlt">beaches</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Field experiments have been conducted on arctic <span class="hlt">beaches</span> to asses the effectiveness of dispersants for the cleanup of stranded oil. The application of two commercially available chemical dispersants to aged and emulsified oil plots, in the intertidal zone on a semi-sheltered <span class="hlt">beach</span>, resulted in a significant reduction of oil loadings immediately following the experiment as compared to loadings on adjacent</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">E. H. Owens; C. R. Foget; W. Robson</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1982-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">297</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2009-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2009-title33-vol1-sec110-74b.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 110.74b - Apollo <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Fla.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Navigable Waters 1 2009-07-01 2009-07-01 false Apollo <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Fla. 110.74b Section 110.74b Navigation...ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.74b Apollo <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Fla. Beginning at a point approximately 300 feet south of...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">298</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2010-title33-vol1-sec110-74b.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 110.74b - Apollo <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Fla.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Apollo <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Fla. 110.74b Section 110.74b Navigation...ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.74b Apollo <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Fla. Beginning at a point approximately 300 feet south of...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">299</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JDE...256.3999I"> <span id="translatedtitle">Instability of edge waves along a sloping <span class="hlt">beach</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The stability of three-dimensional edge waves along a sloping <span class="hlt">beach</span> described in the Lagrangian framework is investigated by the theory of short-wavelength perturbations. We prove that the edge waves with the steepness parameter higher than 7/18 sin?, ? being the sloping angle of the <span class="hlt">beach</span>, are unstable.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ionescu-Kruse, Delia</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">300</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB263401"> <span id="translatedtitle">Factors Influencing Equilibrium of a Model Sand <span class="hlt">Beach</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Characteristics of a two-dimensional model <span class="hlt">beach</span> subjected to wave action and with initial slope 1:60 were investigated. The hypothesis that the <span class="hlt">beach</span> profile reaches a repeatable equilibrium form was tested. It was found that the entire profile did not h...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. C. Smith J. B. Herbich T. W. Spence</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1976-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">301</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=189109"> <span id="translatedtitle">Tracer Studies In Laboratory <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Simulating Tidal Influences</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Bioremediation of oil spills on tidally influenced <span class="hlt">beaches</span> commonly involves the addition of a nutrient solution to the contaminated region of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> at low tide to stimulate the growth of indigenous oil-degrading bacteria. Maximizing the residentce time of nutrients in the be...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">302</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/58011335"> <span id="translatedtitle">Increasing <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Recreation Benefits by Using Wetlands to Reduce Contamination</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The public swimming <span class="hlt">beach</span> at Maumee Bay State Park (MBSP) on Lake Erie is often posted for occurrences of unsafe levels of bacteria. The main source of bacteria derives from a drainage ditch that discharges near the <span class="hlt">beach</span>. We have conducted a comprehensive study to determine the feasibility of using a constructed wetland to filter the ditch water, prior to</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sebastain N. Awondo; Kevin J. Egan; Daryl F. Dwyer</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">303</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=84925"> <span id="translatedtitle">WATER QUALITY ASSESSMENT OF LAKE TEXOMA <span class="hlt">BEACHES</span>, 1999-2001</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A biological and inorganic assessment of five <span class="hlt">beaches</span> on Lake Texoma was conducted from September 1999 through July 2001. Water samples for each <span class="hlt">beach</span> site were divided into two groups, a swimming season and non-swimming season. Water properties such as temperature, alkalinity,...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">304</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/ri0347.photos.146640p/"> <span id="translatedtitle">270. OFFICERS' QUARTERS (FORMER SUMMER COTTAGES) AT DOG PATCH <span class="hlt">BEACH</span>, ...</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p class="result-summary">270. OFFICERS' QUARTERS (FORMER SUMMER COTTAGES) AT DOG PATCH <span class="hlt">BEACH</span>, C. 1939. VIEW NORTH DOWN GREENWICH ROAD TOWARD FORMER SUMMER COTTAGES, CONVERTED TO OFFICER'S QUARTERS, OVER-LOOKING DOG PATCH <span class="hlt">BEACH</span>. - Quonset Point Naval Air Station, Roger Williams Way, North Kingstown, Washington County, RI</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">305</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=241934"> <span id="translatedtitle">Virtual <span class="hlt">Beach</span> v2.2 User Guide</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Virtual <span class="hlt">Beach</span> version 2.2 (VB 2.2) is a decision support tool. It is designed to construct site-specific Multi-Linear Regression (MLR) models to predict pathogen indicator levels (or fecal indicator bacteria, FIB) at recreational <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. MLR analysis has outperformed persisten...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">306</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB2008112242"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> Sanitary Survey Great Lakes Pilot Project, 2007.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report summarizes the information provided by grantees that pilot tested a <span class="hlt">beach</span> sanitary survey tool for identifying sources of bacteria to Great Lakes <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in 2007. The purpose of the project was to improve the tool so that it could be used by b...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">307</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED287913.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Howard <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Youth: A Study of Racial and Ethnic Attitudes.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This assessment of the climate of racial and ethnic attitudes in Howard <span class="hlt">Beach</span> (New York) was conducted at John Adams High School, the public school attended by the greatest number of high school children in the Howard <span class="hlt">Beach</span> community. The survey of 1,217 students was administered in December, 1986, several weeks before the incident in which a…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lichter, Linda S.; Lichter, S. Robert</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">308</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19970037751&hterms=booz+hamilton&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dbooz%2Bhamilton"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spaceport <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Authority: Business Plan</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Spaceport <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Authority (SFA) was established under <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Statute by the Governor and Legislature to assist the development of our nation's space transportation industry and to generate new space-related jobs, investment and opportunities statewide. Included in the Authorities' business plan is the statement of work and list of team members involved in creating the report, SFA's current operating concept, market analysis, assessment of accomplishments, a sample operating concept and a "roadmap to success".</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">309</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.cpalms.org/Public/PreviewResourceUrl/Preview/32764"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span>: Feast of Figurative Language</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this lesson (part two of a two-part unit), students will read the poem “<span class="hlt">Florida</span>” by Elizabeth Bishop and label her use of figurative language. Students will then determine how word choice and figurative language enhance and convey authorâs meaning and tone. Using Bishopâs poem as a model, students then write their own <span class="hlt">Florida</span> poem brimming with figurative language and vivid vocabulary.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Davis, Helen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-08-10</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">310</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://sofia.usgs.gov/flaecohist/index.html"> <span id="translatedtitle">South <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Ecosystem History Project</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Ecosystem History Project is designed to integrate studies of terrestrial, marine, and freshwater ecosystems in South <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. Projects cover Biscayne Bay, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bay, and terrestrial ecosystems. Each project gives an introduction, investigation methods, evidence of past ecosystem changes, and modern distribution of flora and fauna. Recent ecosystem history is based on paleontology, palynology, geochemistry, hydrology, and sedimentology as seen in core samples. There are links to open-file reports, salinity maps, a database, poster presentations, and a Kid's Corner.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">311</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23460426"> <span id="translatedtitle">The relationship between sandy <span class="hlt">beach</span> nematodes and environmental characteristics in two Brazilian sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> (Guanabara Bay, Rio de Janeiro).</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We investigated if the differences in density and nematode communities of intertidal sediments from two Brazilian sheltered sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> were related to environmental characteristics. The upper tide level (UTL) and the low tide level (LTL) of both <span class="hlt">beaches</span> were surveyed in January (austral summer) and June 2001 (austral winter) during low-spring tides, by collecting samples of nematodes and sediments. Differences in density between <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, tidal level and seasons, and nematode community structure were investigated. Sediments from both <span class="hlt">beaches</span> were composed of medium to very coarse sand. The highest nematode densities were found at the UTL, and significant differences between <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, tidal levels and months were found. A total of 54 genera were found and the genera composition on both sheltered <span class="hlt">beaches</span> was similar to other exposed worldwide sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. The density and structure of the nematode community at both <span class="hlt">beaches</span> clearly varied along the spatial and temporal scales. Gravel percentage was the most important variable explaining the spatial distribution of the nematodes, determining the four sub-communities; this suggests that the sediment characteristics influence the nematode community, rather than physical hydrodynamic forces. Temperature and salinity were suggested to be important variables affecting the temporal variation. PMID:23460426</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Maria, Tatiana F; Paiva, Paulo; Vanreusel, Ann; Esteves, André M</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">312</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17465163"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> dynamics and nest distribution of the leatherback turtle (Dermochelys coriacea) at Grande Riviere <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Trinidad & Tobago.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Grande Riviere <span class="hlt">Beach</span> in Trinidad and Tobago is an important nesting site in the Caribbean for the Critically Endangered leatherback sea turtle, Dermochelys coriacea. Community members were concerned that <span class="hlt">beach</span> erosion and seasonal river flooding were destroying many of the nests deposited annually and thought that a hatchery was a possible solution. Over the 2001 turtle nesting season, the Institute of Marine Affairs (IMA) assessed the spatial and temporal distribution of nests using the Global Positioning System recorded to reference points, and <span class="hlt">beach</span> dynamics using permanent bench mark profile stations, to determine areas of high risk and more stable areas for nesting. A total of 1449 leatherback nests were positioned. It was evident that at the start of the season in March, the majority of leatherback nests were deposited at the eastern section of the <span class="hlt">beach</span>. After May, there was a continuing westward shift in nest distribution as the season progressed until August and <span class="hlt">beach</span> erosion in the eastern section became predominant. The backshore remained relatively stable along the entire <span class="hlt">beach</span> throughout the nesting season, and erosion was predominant in the foreshore at the eastern section of the <span class="hlt">beach</span>, from the middle to the end of the season. Similar trends in accretion and erosion were observed in 2000. River flooding did not occur during the study period or in the previous year. With both high risk and more stable regions for turtle nesting available at Grande Riviere <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, there was no compelling evidence to justify the need for a hatchery. PMID:17465163</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lum, Lori Lee</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">313</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001CSR....21..563L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hydrodynamic variability on megatidal <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, Normandy, France</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Several experiments aimed at characterising the hydrodynamics of megatidal <span class="hlt">beaches</span> outside the surf zone were carried out between 1990 and 1994 on the Cotentin coast of the Cherbourg Peninsula in Normandy. The database was established from the records of several electromagnetic current meters and pressure sensors and from field surveys. The mean spring tidal range on these <span class="hlt">beaches</span> varies between 9.3 and 11.4 m. The results show the prevalence of strong longshore currents, with velocities up to 0.5 m s -1, on the low- and mid-tidal <span class="hlt">beach</span> zones. Mostly oriented northward, these currents reflect both a progressive tidal wave and a strong longshore gradient in water level between the Channel Islands embayment and the English Channel. While varying largely during a typical tidal cycle, these longshore velocities are maximum at high tide, reflecting the progressive nature of the tides. This high-tide maximum velocity increases by a factor of 1.5 between the mean tide and mean spring tide, and between the mid- and low-tidal zones due to bed friction effects. Cross-shore velocities are generally weak (<0.1 m s -1), but sometimes stronger in smaller water depths. In the low-tidal zone, they are commonly oriented onshore at the beginning of the rising tide and offshore during the falling tide. This circulation results from a west-east cross-shore gradient in water level that is particularly important around the mean water level. Towards high tides, weak offshore steady flows were observed in the presence of waves. Site-specific relationships were defined in order to characterise the modulation of significant wave height by sea level fluctuations both on the shoreface and in the intertidal zone. The water depth variability during the tidal cycle induces fluctuations in the dissipation by bottom friction, resulting in wave height changes. The influence of tidal currents on the wave height proved to be very small in this context. The tidal fluctuations also influence the instantaneous near-bed currents induced by simultaneous action of non-breaking waves and the tides. During stormy conditions, wave-induced gravity orbital motions dominate the steady flows in the mid-tidal zone, outside the surf zone. At this location, the shallow water friction effect results in weak steady longshore currents, and low water depths explain strong orbital motions. The opposite conditions prevail in the low-tidal zone, where the steady tidal currents are stronger than gravity orbital velocities during a few hours around high tide. Outside this period, with the decrease in water depth and in steady current intensity due to friction effects, the tidal and gravity wave-induced currents have comparable intensities. In both the low- and mid-tidal zones, infragravity motions are weak outside the surf zone. The foregoing results show that outside the surf zone, these megatidal <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are characterised by wave-dominated mid-tidal zones and tide-dominated low-tidal zones during spring tides. We suggest the term "mixed wave-tide-dominated" for these <span class="hlt">beaches</span> with very large tidal ranges.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Levoy, Franck; Monfort, Olivier; Larsonneur, Claude</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">314</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB2010111828"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report, FY 2007.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The mission of the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Water Resources Research Center at the University of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> is to facilitate communication and collaboration between <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s Universities and the state agencies that are responsible for managing <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s water resources. A p...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">315</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://sofia.usgs.gov/publications/wri/78-107/index.html"> <span id="translatedtitle">Biscayne aquifer, southeast <span class="hlt">Florida</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Peak daily pumpage from the highly permeable, unconfined Biscayne aquifer for public water-supply systems in southeast <span class="hlt">Florida</span> in 1975 was about 500 million gallons. Another 165 million gallons was withdrawn daily for irrigation. Recharge to the aquifer is primarily by local rainfall. Discharge is by evapotranspiration, canal drainage, coastal seepage, and pumping. Pollutants can enter the aquifer by direct infiltration from land surface or controlled canals, septic-tank and other drainfields, drainage wells, and solid-waste dumps. Most of the pollutants are concentrated in the upper 20 to 30 feet of the aquifer; public supply wells generally range in depth from about 75 to 150 feet. Dilution, dispersion, and adsorption tend to reduce the concentrations. Seasonal heavy rainfall and canal discharge accelerate ground-water circulation, thereby tending to dilute and flush upper zones of the aquifer. The ultimate fate of pollutants in the aquifer is the ocean, although some may be adsorbed by the aquifer materials en route to the ocean, and some are diverted to pumping wells. (Woodard-USGS)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Klein, Howard; Hull, John E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1978-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">316</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB95128955"> <span id="translatedtitle">Health Hazard Evaluation Report HETA 94-0096-2433, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Gainesville, <span class="hlt">Florida</span>; Miami, <span class="hlt">Florida</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In response to a request from the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, an evaluation was begun into possible hazardous conditions at the Fruit Fly Detection Program (SIC-9641), Gainesville and Miami, <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. The concern was centered a...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. Kiefer S. W. Lenhart S. Salisbury</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">317</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=62998"> <span id="translatedtitle">TESTING A <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> BACTERIA MODEL IN LAKE MICHIGAN AND SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> closures due to high bacterial concentrations deprive the public and disrupt the tourist industry. Almost half the Lake Michigan <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are closed more than 10% of the time. In 1999 the six-mile long <span class="hlt">beach</span> in Huntington <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California was closed in July and August. Due ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">318</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-09-29/pdf/2010-24236.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">75 FR 59966 - Safety Zone; New York Air Show at Jones <span class="hlt">Beach</span> State Park, Wantagh, NY</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...performing aerobatic maneuvers over the Atlantic Ocean off of Jones <span class="hlt">Beach</span> State Park...Show at Jones <span class="hlt">Beach</span> State Park, Atlantic Ocean off of Jones <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Wantagh...aircraft over a specified area of the Atlantic Ocean off of Jones <span class="hlt">Beach</span> State...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-09-29</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">319</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23103149"> <span id="translatedtitle">Nourishment practices on Australian sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span>: a review.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">It is predicted that the coastal zone will be among the environments worst affected by projected climate change. Projected losses in <span class="hlt">beach</span> area will negatively impact on coastal infrastructure and continued recreational use of <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> nourishment practices such as artificial nourishment, replenishment and scraping are increasingly used to combat <span class="hlt">beach</span> erosion but the extent and scale of projects is poorly documented in large areas of the world. Through a survey of <span class="hlt">beach</span> managers of Local Government Areas and a comprehensive search of peer reviewed and grey literature, we assessed the extent of nourishment practices in Australia. The study identified 130 <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Australia that were subject to nourishment practices between 2001 and 2011. Compared to projects elsewhere, most Australian projects were small in scale but frequent. Exceptions were nine bypass projects which utilised large volumes of sediment. Most artificial nourishment, replenishment and <span class="hlt">beach</span> scraping occurred in highly urbanised areas and were most frequently initiated in spring during periods favourable to accretion and outside of the summer season of peak <span class="hlt">beach</span> use. Projects were generally a response to extreme weather events, and utilised sand from the same coastal compartment as the site of erosion. Management was planned on a regional scale by Local Government Authorities, with little monitoring of efficacy or biological impact. As rising sea levels and growing coastal populations continue to put pressure on <span class="hlt">beaches</span> a more integrated approach to management is required, that documents the extent of projects in a central repository, and mandates physical and biological monitoring to help ensure the engineering is sustainable and effective at meeting goals. PMID:23103149</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cooke, Belinda C; Jones, Alan R; Goodwin, Ian D; Bishop, Melanie J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-30</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">320</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003JGRC..108.3101C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Test of self-organization in <span class="hlt">beach</span> cusp formation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Field observations of swash flow patterns and morphology change are consistent with the hypothesis that <span class="hlt">beach</span> cusps form by self-organization, wherein positive feedback between swash flow and developing morphology causes initial development of the pattern and negative feedback owing to circulation of flow within <span class="hlt">beach</span> cusp bays causes pattern stabilization. The self-organization hypothesis is tested using measurements from three experiments on a barrier island <span class="hlt">beach</span> in North Carolina. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> cusps developed after the <span class="hlt">beach</span> was smoothed by a storm and after existing <span class="hlt">beach</span> cusps were smoothed by a bulldozer. Swash front motions were recorded on video during daylight hours, and morphology was measured by surveying at 3-4 hour intervals. Three signatures of self-organization were observed in all experiments. First, time lags between swash front motions in <span class="hlt">beach</span> cusp bays and horns increase with increasing relief, representing the effect of morphology on flow. Second, differential erosion between bays and horns initially increases with increasing time lag, representing the effect of flow on morphology change because positive feedback causes growth of <span class="hlt">beach</span> cusps. Third, after initial growth, differential erosion decreases with increasing time lag, representing the onset of negative feedback that stabilizes <span class="hlt">beach</span> cusps. A numerical model based on self-organization, initialized with measured morphology and alongshore-uniform distributions of initial velocities and positions of the swash front at the beginning of a swash cycle, reproduces the measurements, except for parts of one experiment, where limited surveys and a significant low-frequency component to swash motions might have caused errors in model initialization.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Coco, Giovanni; Burnet, T. K.; Werner, B. T.; Elgar, Steve</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return 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href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">321</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Museum of Natural History</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Enter the lobby of the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Museum of Natural History, and you are greeted by the skeletons of a Mastodon and Mammoth, both found in a North <span class="hlt">Florida</span> river. Permanent exhibits in the Museum also include Butterfly Rainforest, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Fossils-Evolution of Life and Land, Waterways and Wildlife, and People and Environments which is based extensively on the Museum's archaeological and ecological research. There are a number of online exhibits including South <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Aquatic Environments, and Fossil Horses in Cyberspace where one can learn about paleontology and evolution by exploring stratigraphy, geological time scales and the rich fossil record of horses. Traveling Inquiry Boxes are available at low cost, and include a collection of objects with participatory lessons and activities that are designed to be flexible. Many of the research collections are searchable online, and step by step outlines of several exhibit designs are viewable online as well. The Museum, in conjunction with the University of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, has established the Katharine Ordway Chair of Ecosystem Conservation, and the Center for Lepidoptera and Biodiversity which fosters research on insects. The Museum produces and rents several traveling exhibits. Full information is available online.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">322</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WIguauvBUtQ"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span>, National Space Club Embrace Commercial Endeavors</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/videogallery/index.html">NASA Video Gallery</a></p> <p class="result-summary">NASA's Commercial Crew Program (CCP) Manager Ed Mango and <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s Lt. Gov. Jennifer Carroll were guest speakers at the National Space Club <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Committee's luncheon at the Radisson Resort at t...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">323</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19730024604&hterms=humate&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3D%2522humate%2522"> <span id="translatedtitle">Kennedy Space Center ocean <span class="hlt">beach</span> erosion</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Dune barrier erosion and possible breakthrough due to storm and hurricane wave activity is studied near Mosquito Lagoon, in Kennedy Space Center property. The results of a geological as well as hydrodynamic appraisal of the problem area indicate that no inlet has existed across the dune barrier since 500 A.D., and that there is little likelihood of a possible breakthrough inlet remaining open permanently, primarily because the relatively shallow lagoon does not contain enough volume of water to maintain an inlet between the ocean and the lagoon. It is therefore recommended that only minimal measures, such as closing up the man-made passes across the dunes, be carried out to ensure continuation of the action of natural <span class="hlt">beach</span> maintaining processes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mehta, A. J.; Obrien, M. P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1973-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">324</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20059729"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ultraviolet radiation protection by a <span class="hlt">beach</span> umbrella.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A <span class="hlt">beach</span> umbrella intercepts all direct UV irradiance, but only part of the diffuse component. Using a simple sky view factor model, we have determined the fraction of the hemispheric diffuse irradiance that is not intercepted by the umbrella. Assuming a sensor at the surface and close to the center of the umbrella, isotropic diffuse irradiance and for an umbrella of 80 cm radius and 100 cm high, our results show that approximately 34% of the incident horizontal irradiance is not intercepted by the umbrella. These results agree with irradiance measurements conducted with and without the umbrella. The model is next extended to examine receipt of UV radiation by a human figure in a vertical position, either standing or sitting. PMID:20059729</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Utrillas, María P; Martínez-Lozano, José A; Nuñez, Manuel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">325</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www2.fiu.edu/~seagrass/"> <span id="translatedtitle">South <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Seagrass Ecosystems Home Page</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This site features information from the Seagrass Ecosystems Research Lab in south <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. An abundance of information is at your fingertips. Follow the recent research links to view modeled data from all over southern <span class="hlt">Florida</span> and the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Keys. The information links feature sights loaded with publications and research information, and even a dichotomous key for <span class="hlt">Florida</span> SAV. Also featured is a video where you can actually swim with scientists as they conduct a transect study.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-09-02</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">326</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ccop.cancer.gov/ccop-network/sites/florida-pediatric-ccop"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Pediatric CCOP - National Cancer Institute</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.cancer.gov">Cancer.gov</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In 1983, NCI awarded the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Association of Pediatric Tumor Programs (FAPTP) a grant to establish the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Pediatric Community Clinical Oncology Program (FLCCOP) in a consortium of four <span class="hlt">Florida</span> community hospitals. Subsequently, acknowledging the FLCCOP's outstanding performance and growth, the NCI approved additional grant awards in 1987, 1990, 1995, 2000, and 2005. In June 2010, FAPTP was awarded a seventh NCI grant to continue the FLCCOP in 6 <span class="hlt">Florida</span> community hospitals and one hospital in Puerto Rico through May 2015.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">327</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://fawn.ifas.ufl.edu/"> <span id="translatedtitle">FAWN: <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Automated Weather Network</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Automated Weather Network (FAWN) provides up-to-date weather information through a system of automated weather stations distributed throughout the State of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. Research scientists at the University of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> work closely with extension agents to monitor the FAWN system and make sure it provides fast, reliable, and convenient access. Overall, there are four parts to the FAWN system: collecting data, transmitting it to the collection site, processing the data, and redistributing it to the end user. FAWN database servers maintained by IFAS Information Technologies receive weather data about the date and time of collection, the air temperature, soil temperature, relative humidity, dewpoint, rainfall, wind direction, wind speed, and radiation from remote stations every 15 minutes. The information is processed and made available almost instantaneously through several different search methods accessible through FAWN web server, as well as an interactive voice-response system.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">328</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.usf.edu/~isb/projects/atlas/mapindex.html"> <span id="translatedtitle">Atlas of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Vascular Plants</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Richard Wunderlin and Bruce Hansen of the Institute of Systematic Botany (University of South <span class="hlt">Florida</span>) and Edwin L. Bridges of Fairchild Tropical Garden created the monumental Atlas of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Vascular Plants. The searchable Atlas is organized by Pteridophytes, Gymnosperms, Monocots, and Dicots. Although not illustrated, the Atlas includes maps of the distribution (by county) of "each of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s over 4,000 plant species." These maps are arranged alphabetically by family, genus, and species, within each of the four major plant groups. In addition to the online version, "a fully searchable version that also includes information on endangered species, native status, wetland species, synonymy and more is available on a fully searchable, multi-platform CD-ROM."</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bridges, Edwin L.; Hansen, Bruce F.; Wunderlin, Richard P., 1939-.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">329</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2812993"> <span id="translatedtitle">Presence of Pathogens and Indicator Microbes at a Non-Point Source Subtropical Recreational Marine <span class="hlt">Beach</span> ? †</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Swimming in ocean water, including ocean water at <span class="hlt">beaches</span> not impacted by known point sources of pollution, is an increasing health concern. This study was an initial evaluation of the presence of indicator microbes and pathogens and the association among the indicator microbes, pathogens, and environmental conditions at a subtropical, recreational marine <span class="hlt">beach</span> in south <span class="hlt">Florida</span> impacted by non-point sources of pollution. Twelve water and eight sand samples were collected during four sampling events at high or low tide under elevated or reduced solar insolation conditions. The analyses performed included analyses of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) (fecal coliforms, Escherichia coli, enterococci, and Clostridium perfringens), human-associated microbial source tracking (MST) markers (human polyomaviruses [HPyVs] and Enterococcus faecium esp gene), and pathogens (Vibrio vulnificus, Staphylococcus aureus, enterovirus, norovirus, hepatitis A virus, Cryptosporidium spp., and Giardia spp.). The enterococcus concentrations in water and sand determined by quantitative PCR were greater than the concentrations determined by membrane filtration measurement. The FIB concentrations in water were below the recreational water quality standards for three of the four sampling events, when pathogens and MST markers were also generally undetectable. The FIB levels exceeded regulatory guidelines during one event, and this was accompanied by detection of HPyVs and pathogens, including detection of the autochthonous bacterium V. vulnificus in sand and water, detection of the allochthonous protozoans Giardia spp. in water, and detection of Cryptosporidium spp. in sand samples. The elevated microbial levels were detected at high tide and under low-solar-insolation conditions. Additional sampling should be conducted to further explore the relationships between tidal and solar insolation conditions and between indicator microbes and pathogens in subtropical recreational marine waters impacted by non-point source pollution.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Abdelzaher, Amir M.; Wright, Mary E.; Ortega, Cristina; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M.; Miller, Gary; Elmir, Samir; Newman, Xihui; Shih, Peter; Bonilla, J. Alfredo; Bonilla, Tonya D.; Palmer, Carol J.; Scott, Troy; Lukasik, Jerzy; Harwood, Valerie J.; McQuaig, Shannon; Sinigalliano, Chris; Gidley, Maribeth; Plano, Lisa R. W.; Zhu, Xiaofang; Wang, John D.; Fleming, Lora E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">330</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19966020"> <span id="translatedtitle">Presence of pathogens and indicator microbes at a non-point source subtropical recreational marine <span class="hlt">beach</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Swimming in ocean water, including ocean water at <span class="hlt">beaches</span> not impacted by known point sources of pollution, is an increasing health concern. This study was an initial evaluation of the presence of indicator microbes and pathogens and the association among the indicator microbes, pathogens, and environmental conditions at a subtropical, recreational marine <span class="hlt">beach</span> in south <span class="hlt">Florida</span> impacted by non-point sources of pollution. Twelve water and eight sand samples were collected during four sampling events at high or low tide under elevated or reduced solar insolation conditions. The analyses performed included analyses of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) (fecal coliforms, Escherichia coli, enterococci, and Clostridium perfringens), human-associated microbial source tracking (MST) markers (human polyomaviruses [HPyVs] and Enterococcus faecium esp gene), and pathogens (Vibrio vulnificus, Staphylococcus aureus, enterovirus, norovirus, hepatitis A virus, Cryptosporidium spp., and Giardia spp.). The enterococcus concentrations in water and sand determined by quantitative PCR were greater than the concentrations determined by membrane filtration measurement. The FIB concentrations in water were below the recreational water quality standards for three of the four sampling events, when pathogens and MST markers were also generally undetectable. The FIB levels exceeded regulatory guidelines during one event, and this was accompanied by detection of HPyVs and pathogens, including detection of the autochthonous bacterium V. vulnificus in sand and water, detection of the allochthonous protozoans Giardia spp. in water, and detection of Cryptosporidium spp. in sand samples. The elevated microbial levels were detected at high tide and under low-solar-insolation conditions. Additional sampling should be conducted to further explore the relationships between tidal and solar insolation conditions and between indicator microbes and pathogens in subtropical recreational marine waters impacted by non-point source pollution. PMID:19966020</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Abdelzaher, Amir M; Wright, Mary E; Ortega, Cristina; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M; Miller, Gary; Elmir, Samir; Newman, Xihui; Shih, Peter; Bonilla, J Alfredo; Bonilla, Tonya D; Palmer, Carol J; Scott, Troy; Lukasik, Jerzy; Harwood, Valerie J; McQuaig, Shannon; Sinigalliano, Chris; Gidley, Maribeth; Plano, Lisa R W; Zhu, Xiaofang; Wang, John D; Fleming, Lora E</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">331</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012ECSS..107...81G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mechanical grooming and <span class="hlt">beach</span> award status are associated with low strandline biodiversity in Scotland</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> grooming and <span class="hlt">beach</span> award status are both shown to be associated with low macroinvertebrate taxon richness in Scotland. Previous studies in California have revealed that mechanical raking to remove wrack from sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> has negative ecological consequences for coastal ecosystems. In the current study the presence and absence of eight common taxa that inhabit <span class="hlt">beached</span> wrack on sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Scotland was assessed at 60 sites, 24 of which were groomed and 29 of which were in receipt of a <span class="hlt">beach</span> award. On average 4.86 of the eight taxa were found to be present on ungroomed <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, whereas only 1.13 taxa were present on groomed <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Thus, <span class="hlt">beach</span> grooming seems to be having a major effect on the biodiversity of <span class="hlt">beach</span> macroinvertebrates in Scotland. Fewer macroinvertebrate taxa were also found on award (1.5) compared to non-award (4.38) <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. It was also revealed that award <span class="hlt">beaches</span> were much more likely to be groomed than non-award <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, with 69% of award <span class="hlt">beaches</span> surveyed being groomed compared to only 6% of non-award <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. This pattern is surprising as the awarding bodies discourage the removal of seaweed and regulations state that <span class="hlt">beached</span> wrack should only be removed if it constitutes a nuisance. It is concluded that award status, not nuisance level, has the main factor driving most <span class="hlt">beach</span> grooming and that this has resulted in the substantial loss of macroinvertebrate biodiversity from award <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Scotland. In conclusion it is shown that <span class="hlt">beach</span> grooming has a substantial negative impact upon strandline macroinvertebrate biodiversity in Scotland and that grooming is much more likely to occur on award <span class="hlt">beaches</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gilburn, Andre S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">332</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB92198910"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ecosystems of the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Keys: A Bibliography.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The bibliography was originally prepared for the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Keys National Marine Sanctuary located in Key Largo, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> by the NOAA Regional Library in Miami, <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. It was prepared with the idea that it would be used by scientists and educators intereste...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">L. Pikula S. Elswick</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">333</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED446777.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Library Directory with Statistics, 2000.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This document contains directory and statistical information about libraries in <span class="hlt">Florida</span> organized in the following sections: (1) "<span class="hlt">Florida</span> Division of Library and Information Services (DLIS) Library Organizations, Councils, and Associations," including the State Library Council, Library Services & Technology Act Advisory Council, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Library…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Taylor-Furbee, Sondra, Comp.; Kellenberger, Betsy, Comp.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">334</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED082799.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Action Plan for <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s Public Libraries.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In response to the objective of providing quality library services to <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s citizens and to supplement efforts of the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Library Association and local leaders, a library study commission was formed to produce an action plan for <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s public libraries. The plan concentrates upon three principal needs of the library system:…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Florida Library Study Commission, Tallahassee.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">335</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22contact+numbers%22&pg=3&id=ED422027"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Library Directory with Statistics, 1998.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This 49th annual <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Library directory with statistics edition includes listings for over 1,000 libraries of all types in <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, with contact named, phone numbers, addresses, and e-mail and web addresses. In addition, there is a section of library statistics, showing data on the use, resources, and financial condition of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s libraries.…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Florida Dept. of State, Tallahassee. Div. of Library and Information Services.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">336</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED099225.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hydrology of Southeast <span class="hlt">Florida</span> and Associated Topics.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This booklet deals with the hydrology of southeastern <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. It is designed to provide the citizen, teacher, or student with hydrological information, to promote an understanding of water resources, and to initiate conservation practices within <span class="hlt">Florida</span> communities. The collection of articles within the booklet deal with <span class="hlt">Florida</span> water resources…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Monsour, William, Comp.; Moyer, Maureen, Comp.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">337</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=STS052-153-101&hterms=west+north+central&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dwest%2Bnorth%2Bcentral"> <span id="translatedtitle">Central and Southern <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, USA</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This oblique view documents conditions in South <span class="hlt">Florida</span> (27.0N, 81.0W) in the aftermath of Hurricane Andrew that severly mauled south <span class="hlt">Florida</span> on 24 Aug 92, battering Dade County with a 16.9 ft. storm surge and wind gusts of up to 169 mph. An additional feature is the band of haze running across the central portion of the state The band of air pollution has been drawn from the north by a weak cold front and was focused along the east/west axis of the front.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">338</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://floridamemory.com/collections/churchrecords/"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Memory: WPA Church Records</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Churches and other religious institutions are the lifeblood of any community in terms of the services and support they provide to their members. This rather remarkable collection features the Works Progress Administration from the State Library of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s collections. During the 1930s and 1940s, each state created a list of known churches and synagogues to be surveyed and organized by county. Based on these lists, survey workers ventured out into the field to document church histories and record holdings by interviewing clergy and congregation members. All told, there are over 5,500 separate records contained here, chronicling everything from tiny Baptist churches to prominent south <span class="hlt">Florida</span> synagogues.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">339</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/scripts/dbs/herps_pub.asp"> <span id="translatedtitle">University of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Herpetology Database</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The University of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Herpetology Collection Master Database currently contains 137,936 records. The Database search engine offers fields for common and scientific name, as well as Country or Nation; State or Department; County or Province; and Collection Month and Year. Users can select up to 200 records per page, and request a Table or Report output style. Specimen loans are available to permanent staff members at institutions, but not to individuals. In addition to information about specimen loans from the Herpetology Collection at the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Museum of Natural History, the Collection site contains concise information about data requests, and specimen dissections.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">340</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.floridasprings.org/"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Springs: Protecting Nature's Gems</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This educational Web site from the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Department of Environmental Protection offers an in-depth exploration of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s freshwater springs and the aquifer that supports them. The site includes many informal (and highly visual) learning opportunities, such as an animated demonstration of the hydrologic cycle and classroom lesson plans based on Web site content. The four lessons plans (one each for grades 1-2, 3-5, 6-8, and 9-12) emphasize ecosystem interconnectivity and how human activity impacts groundwater resources.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a 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showDiv("page_19");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">341</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ces.fau.edu/index.php"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Center for Environmental Studies</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Center for Environmental Studies site acts as a university system research and training facilitator and environmental education center with activities that especially address the issues of water dominated ecosystems. There is information on: the Agro-Ecology program, which focuses on the interface between agriculture and natural systems in <span class="hlt">Florida</span>; the Riverwoods Field Laboratory, which is committed to restoration of the Kissimmee River and the greater Everglades watershed; and events, internships, workshops, field studies and academic programs. The site also contains a water and environmental website database, environmental news, and discussion lists.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">342</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002AGUFMOS72A0345M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Comparison of Airborne Lidar and Mulitbeam Bathymetric Data in the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Reef Tract Along Broward County</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Most mapping of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s coral resources has been in the relatively shallow waters of the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Keys. However, it is well known that large concentrations of corals are found in deeper waters off <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s eastern seaboard. To date, technological limitations have precluded the mapping of corals in these deeper waters. Satellite imaging systems and natural color aerial photography, two mapping mainstays, are generally only effective in <span class="hlt">Florida</span> waters shallower than 20 meters. Conservation of the northern portion of the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> reef tract, which parallels the Atlantic coast in Miami-Dade, Broward and Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> counties, has been hampered by the fact that there are little or no coordinated management, monitoring and mapping activities in place. To assist the Broward county shore protection project geographic information systems database, a Laser Airborne Depth Sounder (LADS) survey was performed in 2001. The surveyFlanked the 43 km shoreline to a depth of ~50m and distances out to 2km in the north and 3.5km in the southern portion at a spatial resolution of 1.524m (5ft). Additionally, in November 2000 as part of a container vessel grounding lawsuit, funding was allocated to find an alternative anchorage for Port Everglades. The Simrad EM3000 multibeam system was used to collect data in a 2km x 2km square south of Port Everglades, offshore at a depth from 7m to 36m deep and at a spatial resolution of 1m. The area of overlap coincided with the second and third reef tracts, which have the highest biodiversity of the three reef tracts. These datasets were compared at overlapping geographic extents.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Morton, N. E.; Burd, J. J.; McIntyre, M. L.; O'Kiefe, K. M.; Wheaton, J. L.; Naar, D. F.; Donahue, B. T.; Kohler, M. F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">343</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-12-30/pdf/2010-32926.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">75 FR 82382 - <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> Environmental Assessment and Coastal Health Act</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...coastal recreation waters, including the Great Lakes. EPA encourages coastal and Great Lakes states and tribes that have received <span class="hlt">BEACH</span>...defined in CWA section 502(21) to mean the Great Lakes and marine coastal waters (including...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-12-30</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">344</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB89108864"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dynamic Stability of Rock Slopes and Gravel <span class="hlt">Beaches</span>,</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">More than 150 tests have been analyzed in order to describe the dynamically stable profiles of rock slopes and gravel <span class="hlt">beaches</span> under wave attack. Relationships between profile parameters and boundary conditions have been established. These relationships ha...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. W. van der Meer K. W. Pilarczyk</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">345</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=DOESF01963T2"> <span id="translatedtitle">Community Wind Electrical Power Case Study: Muir <span class="hlt">Beach</span>. Final Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Muir <span class="hlt">Beach</span> experiences relatively steady northwest coastal winds. Recordings at anemometer stations have indicated wind speeds averaging 10 to 12 mph over the year. This compares favorably with the minimum of 8 to 9 mph generally considered necessary for ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. Bluhm R. Freebairn-Smith</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1979-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">346</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/md0997.photos.082508p/"> <span id="translatedtitle">11. <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> TOILET BUILDING, OFFICE AND FIRST AID BUILDING, PLANS, ...</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p class="result-summary">11. <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> TOILET BUILDING, OFFICE AND FIRST AID BUILDING, PLANS, ELEVATIONS AND SECTIONS Drawing No. 103-07 - Glen Echo Park, Crystal Swimming Pool, 7300 McArthur Boulevard, Glen Echo, Montgomery County, MD</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">347</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/md0997.photos.082515p/"> <span id="translatedtitle">18. SAND <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> WITH SUNBATHERS AND UMBRELLAS. VIEW FROM SOUTHEAST. ...</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p class="result-summary">18. SAND <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> WITH SUNBATHERS AND UMBRELLAS. VIEW FROM SOUTHEAST. NORTHWEST ELEVATION OF REFRESHMENT STAND Photocopy of 1930-1940 photograph - Glen Echo Park, Crystal Swimming Pool, 7300 McArthur Boulevard, Glen Echo, Montgomery County, MD</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">348</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/11421653"> <span id="translatedtitle">Marine debris contamination along undeveloped tropical <span class="hlt">beaches</span> from northeast Brazil</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We hypothesize that floating debris leaving polluted coastal bays accumulate on nearby pristine <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. We examined composition,\\u000a quantities and distribution of marine debris along ?150 km of relatively undeveloped, tropical <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Costa do Dendê (Bahia,\\u000a Brazil). The study site is located south of Salvador City, the largest urban settlement from NE Brazil. Strong spatial variations\\u000a were observed. Plastics accounted for</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Isaac R. Santos; Ana Cláudia Friedrich; Juliana Assunção Ivar do Sul</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">349</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18256899"> <span id="translatedtitle">Marine debris contamination along undeveloped tropical <span class="hlt">beaches</span> from northeast Brazil.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We hypothesize that floating debris leaving polluted coastal bays accumulate on nearby pristine <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. We examined composition, quantities and distribution of marine debris along approximately 150 km of relatively undeveloped, tropical <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Costa do Dendê (Bahia, Brazil). The study site is located south of Salvador City, the largest urban settlement from NE Brazil. Strong spatial variations were observed. Plastics accounted for 76% of the sampled items, followed by styrofoam (14%). Small plastic fragments resultant from the breakdown of larger items are ubiquitous all over the area. Because the dominant littoral drift in Bahia is southward, average <span class="hlt">beach</span> debris densities (9.1 items/m) along Costa do Dendê were threefold higher than densities previously observed north of Salvador City. River-dominated and stable <span class="hlt">beaches</span> had higher debris quantities than unstable, erosional <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Areas immediately south of the major regional embayments (Camamu and Todos os Santos) were the preferential accumulation sites, indicating that rivers draining populous areas are the major source of debris to the study site. Our results provide baseline information for future assessments. Management actions should focus on input prevention at the hydrographic basin level rather than on cleaning services on <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. PMID:18256899</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Santos, Isaac R; Friedrich, Ana Cláudia; Ivar do Sul, Juliana Assunção</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">350</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/fs20133070"> <span id="translatedtitle">Coastal processes influencing water quality at Great Lakes <span class="hlt">beaches</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In a series of studies along the Great Lakes, U.S. Geological Survey scientists are examining the physical processes that influence concentrations of fecal indicator bacteria and related pathogens at recreational <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. These studies aim to estimate human health risk, improve management strategies, and understand the fate and transport of microbes in the nearshore area. It was determined that embayed <span class="hlt">beaches</span> act as traps, accumulating Escherichia coli (E. coli) and other bacteria in the basin and even in <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand. Further, shear stress and wave run-up could resuspend accumulated bacteria, leading to water-contamination events. These findings are being used to target <span class="hlt">beach</span> design and circulation projects. In previous research, it was determined that E. coli followed a diurnal pattern, with concentrations decreasing throughout the day, largely owing to solar inactivation, but rebounding overnight. Studies at a Chicago <span class="hlt">beach</span> identified the impact of wave-induced mass transport on this phenomenon, a finding that will extend our understanding of bacterial fate in the natural environment. In another series of studies, scientists examined the impact of river outfalls on bacteria concentrations, using mechanistic and empirical modeling. Through these studies, the models can indicate range and extent of impact, given E. coli concentration in the source water. These findings have been extended to extended lengths of coastlines and have been applied in <span class="hlt">beach</span> management using empirical predictive modeling. Together, these studies are helping scientists identify and eliminate threats to human and coastal health.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">U.S. Geological Survey</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">351</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.floridamemory.com/Collections/SpanishLandGrants/"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Memory Spanish Land Grants</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">For several centuries, Spain established a presence in the area that is now <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. After the land was transferred to the United States in 1821, European settlers filed land grants to prove land ownership. Interestingly enough, in 1790 Spain had started offering land grants to encourage settlement to the sparsely populated and vulnerable <span class="hlt">Florida</span> colony. Of course, those who had filed claims had to prove to the United States that they had valid claims via documentation and testimonials. The <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Memory project has digitized these documents and placed them online here for use by the general public. These documents provide information about the settlement and cultivation of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> during this period via descriptions of the land, copies of royal grants, and so on. Visitors can browse all of the grants here or look at the five volume history of these documents created as part of the WPA's work in the 1930s. Finally, there is information here about how to order the maps for closer consideration.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">352</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=nail&pg=5&id=EJ276280"> <span id="translatedtitle">What's Happening in . . . Tallahassee, <span class="hlt">Florida</span>?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Describes the origins and continuing successes of the New Adventure in Learning (NAIL) program in the Leon County (<span class="hlt">Florida</span>) school district. NAIL's effectiveness in tackling reading problems through a combination of group instruction using basals and newer, diagnostic/prescriptive, individualized techniques has led to the program's national…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Levy, Ann K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1983-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">353</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=HRP0017047"> <span id="translatedtitle">Renal Disease Plan for <span class="hlt">Florida</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The comprehensive renal disease plan for the State of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> is presented in five major sections: (1) introduction and general background; (2) identification of needs and gaps in programs; (3) recommendations for a 5-year program in renal disease to comp...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1975-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">354</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Online+AND+Project-based+AND+Learning&pg=5&id=EJ980598"> <span id="translatedtitle">A Community Affair in <span class="hlt">Florida</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Volusia County (<span class="hlt">Florida</span>) Schools' Career and Technical Education (CTE) program has a high school graduation rate of 95 percent. That beats the districtwide rate of 78 percent. That's not all: The 4,500 students enrolled in 33 different career programs at 10 high schools have higher grade point averages in general and do better in Advanced…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pierce, Margo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">355</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://heritage.fsu.edu/"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> State University Heritage Protocol</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">Florida</span> State University (FSU) Heritage Protocol was created to preserve the history of FSU through collections of various ephemeral items, including yearbooks, photographs, items of clothing, audio recordings, and films. The materials on the site are divided into six primary sections that include: "Virtual Museum", "Photo Galleries", "Mixed Media", and "Publications". In the "Virtual Museum", visitors can look at the mortar board of physical education professor, Katherine W. Montgomery, and the 1913 commencement announcement for the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> State College for Women. Moving on, the "Photo Galleries" area includes a photo of the week feature, a collection of images from the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> State College for Women and some unique photos of one Burt Reynolds, who went to <span class="hlt">Florida</span> State University in the 1950s. The "Mixed Media" area is quite interesting, and visitors can view a FSU circus rehearsal film from the early 1950s and listen to an album of performances from FSU's School of Music. Finally, the "Publications" area includes primary documents like an article on the FSU Circus from the March 31, 1952 issue of Life magazine and a piece from 1955 on the FSU Marine Lab.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">356</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED307262.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Public Health Education in <span class="hlt">Florida</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report documents issues related to the work of the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Comprehensive Health Professions Education Plan. Public health education prepares students for initial employment or advancement in a number of positions. While the public health work force is primarily employed in various units in local, state, and federal governments, industry also…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">357</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB2004103777"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Hogfish Fishery Stock Assessment.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">Florida</span> hogfish fishery is an economically-important part of the snapper-grouper complex of about 60 exploited reef fishes. As a consumer of shrimp, crabs and clams, hogfish play an essential ecological role within the larger multispecies reef fish co...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. S. Ault, S. G. Smith, G. A. Diaz, E. Franklin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">358</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB82101999"> <span id="translatedtitle">Forest Statistics for <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, 1980.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Since the fourth inventory of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s forest resources in 1970, area of commercial forest has declined by 597,000 acres, or 4 percent. Commercial forest now occupies 15.7 million acres, or 45 percent of the total land area. The ratio of pine types to ha...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. M. Sheffield W. A. Bechtold</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1981-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">359</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.klokavskade.no/upload/publication/bahr_2003_ajsm_injuries%20among%20world-class%20professional%20beach%20volleyball%20players%20-%20the%20federation%20internationale%20de%20volleyball%20beach%20volleyball%20injury%20study.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Injuries Among World-Class Professional <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Volleyball PlayersThe Fédération Internationale de Volleyball <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Volleyball Injury Study</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background: Very little is known about the injury characteristics of <span class="hlt">beach</span> volleyball.Purpose: To describe the incidence and pattern of injuries among professional male and female <span class="hlt">beach</span> volleyball players.Study Design: Cohort study—retrospective injury recall and prospective registration.Methods: Injuries occurring over a 7.5-week interval of the summer season were retrospectively registered by interviewing 178 of the 188 participating players (95%) in the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Roald Bahr; Jonathan C. Reeser</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">360</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFMEP33B0773H"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Impacts of Back-<span class="hlt">Beach</span> Barriers on Sandy <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Morphology Along the California Coast and Implications for Coastal Change with Future Sea-Level Rise</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Coastal squeeze, or foreshore narrowing, is a result of marine encroachment, such as sea-level rise in the presence of a back-<span class="hlt">beach</span> barrier, terrestrial encroachment, such as coastal development, or both. In California, the permanent coastal population increased by almost 10 million people between 1980 and 2003, and an additional 130 million beachgoers visit Southern California <span class="hlt">beaches</span> each year. <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> in California are an important component of the state and federal economy and provide hundreds of thousands of jobs. Approximately 14% of the California coast from Marin County to the Mexican border is artificially armored with seawalls, rip rap, or revetment, more than half of which protects back-<span class="hlt">beach</span> developments or lower-lying dynamic regions like harbors and dunes. Many sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> that do not have back-<span class="hlt">beach</span> armoring are still restricted by commercial and residential infrastructure, parking lots, and roadways. Although these types of coastal infrastructure are not back-<span class="hlt">beach</span> barriers by intentional design like seawalls and rip rap, they still restrict <span class="hlt">beaches</span> from landward migration and can cause significant placement loss of the <span class="hlt">beach</span>. Nearly 67 km, or 44% of the total length of sandy coastline from Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span> to the U.S.-Mexico border is backed by such infrastructure. This study is part of a broader effort to catalog the extent to which California’s <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are restricted in the back <span class="hlt">beach</span>, to describe the effects of back-<span class="hlt">beach</span> barriers on sandy <span class="hlt">beach</span> morphology, and to predict how these different <span class="hlt">beaches</span> might behave with future sea-level rise. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> morphology, shoreface characteristics, and historical rates of shoreline change were compared between select <span class="hlt">beaches</span> with back-<span class="hlt">beach</span> barriers and unrestricted <span class="hlt">beaches</span> using 1997 LiDAR data and shoreline rates of change published in the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Assessment of Shoreline Change report. Although preliminary results of the morphological analysis show that there is no statistically significant difference in foreshore characteristics such as seasonal berm height and foreshore slope between the two types of <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, <span class="hlt">beaches</span> without back-<span class="hlt">beach</span> barriers have more developed back dune systems and are significantly wider than adjacent restricted <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, given that no extensive artificial <span class="hlt">beach</span> nourishment has occurred. In regions such as Ventura and Imperial <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, unrestricted <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are 50-100% wider than adjacent <span class="hlt">beaches</span> with back-<span class="hlt">beach</span> barriers even with no significant differences in historical rates of shoreline change. Taking into account the nature of the back <span class="hlt">beach</span> is just as crucial in predicting impacts of sea-level rise on <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in California as considering inundation and retreat in the foreshore, and will be an important consideration for coastal managers in designing sea-level rise adaptation plans.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Harden, E. L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">361</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=KSC-03PD-2083&hterms=auto+seat&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dauto%2Bseat"> <span id="translatedtitle">KSC-03PD-2083</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. NASCAR driver Ryan Newman tries out a seat of another vehicle known for speed: the orbiter Endeavour. Newman and other drivers Dale Jarrett and Jimmie Johnson were on a tour of KSC. The men are scheduled to drive in the Pepsi 400 auto race being held July 5 at the <span class="hlt">Daytona</span> International Speedway, <span class="hlt">Daytona</span> <span class="hlt">Beach</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">362</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=KSC-03PD-2082&hterms=auto+seat&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dauto%2Bseat"> <span id="translatedtitle">KSC-03PD-2082</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. NASCAR driver Jimmie Johnson tries out a seat of another vehicle known for speed: the orbiter Endeavour. Johnson and other drivers Dale Jarrett and Ryan Newman were on a tour of KSC. The men are scheduled to drive in the Pepsi 400 auto race being held July 5 at the <span class="hlt">Daytona</span> International Speedway, <span class="hlt">Daytona</span> <span class="hlt">Beach</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">363</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=KSC-03PD-2079&hterms=auto+seat&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dauto%2Bseat"> <span id="translatedtitle">KSC-03PD-2079</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. NASCAR driver Dale Jarrett tries out a seat of another vehicle known for speed: the orbiter Endeavour. Jarrett and other drivers Jimmie Johnson and Ryan Newman were on a tour of KSC. The men are scheduled to drive in the Pepsi 400 auto race being held July 5 at the <span class="hlt">Daytona</span> International Speedway, <span class="hlt">Daytona</span> <span class="hlt">Beach</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">364</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFMEP13A0851P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Bed Level Fluctuations on a Dissipative <span class="hlt">Beach</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A field study was conducted on a dissipative <span class="hlt">beach</span> at Perranporth, United Kingdom to quantify inner surf and swash-zone bed level change from time scales of individual swash/wave events to tidal cycles. Elevations were measured at millimeter resolution using a new conductivity concentration profiler that allowed quantification of the bed level throughout the duration of the wave/swash cycle and also during periods of bed exposure. Bed level changes were low-frequency-dominated. But individual event-scale net bed level changes exceeding the low frequency and tidal-scale net bed level change were also observed. Net bed level change for individual events was nearly normally distributed with most individual events displaying little or no net bed level change. 'Large' erosion and accretion events with bed level elevation magnitudes that exceeded net tidal elevation change occurred with similar frequency. The similarity between the frequency of 'large' erosion and accretion events suggests that a few events may be ultimately responsible for the observed net elevation change over the tidal cycle. The 'large' events displayed different hydrodynamic characteristics. Erosion events have longer duration onshore-directed flow and higher maximum onshore-directed velocity magnitude than offshore-directed velocity magnitude. The opposite was found for accretion events.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Puleo, J. A.; Lanckriet, T. M.; Blenkinsopp, C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">365</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-03-03/pdf/2010-4378.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">75 FR 9616 - FPL Energy Point <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, LLC; Notice of Consideration of Issuance of Amendment to Facility...</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...licensee) for operation of the Point <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Nuclear Plant, Units...and owner from ``FPL Energy Point <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, LLC'' to ``NextEra Energy Point <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, LLC.'' On January...i.e., fuel cladding, reactor coolant system pressure...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-03-03</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">366</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-12-11/pdf/2012-29802.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">77 FR 73636 - Rock River <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Inc.; Notice of Application Tendered for Filing With the Commission and...</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Regulatory Commission [Project No. 14345-001] Rock River <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Inc.; Notice of Application...filed: November 23, 2012. d. Applicant: Rock River <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Inc. e. Name of Project: Rock River <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Hydroelectric Project. f....</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-11</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">367</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-08-07/pdf/2013-18994.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">78 FR 48155 - Rock River <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Inc.; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing With the Commission; Intent To...</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Regulatory Commission [Project No. 14345-001] Rock River <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Inc.; Notice of Application...filed: November 23, 2012. d. Applicant: Rock River <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Inc. e. Name of Project: Rock River <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Hydroelectric Project f....</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-08-07</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">368</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6840203"> <span id="translatedtitle">SPREX (Spring Removal Experiment) Hydrographic Data Report: Volume 4, R/V (research vessel) Cape <span class="hlt">Florida</span> station profiles, April 1985</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Volume 4 of the SPREX Hydrographic Data Report includes CTD data listings and profile plots of each CTD station taken aboard the R/V Cape <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. SPREX (Spring Removal Experiment) took place in April 1985 in order to determine the processes affecting the transport and fate of freshwater input to the continental shelf off Georgia and South Carolina during the time of expected high runoff. It was hypothesized that this water is transported offshore in spring by a semi-permanent cyclonic eddy located at about 32/degree/N, 79/degree/W. The SPREX field program included a large array of moored current meters and other instruments, and three research vessels (R/V Cape <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, R/V Cape Hatteras, and R/V Blue Fin) that conducted hydrographic mapping and biological and chemical sampling. Ship surveys (Cape Hatteras and Cape <span class="hlt">Florida</span>) were designed to provide near synoptic coverage of a few specific events during SPREX. The purpose of the surveys was to determine the time variations in fresh water content and tracer concentrations over the shelf, the characteristics of shelf water/Gulf Stream water interaction, and biological responses to the events. The general cruise plan was for the Cape <span class="hlt">Florida</span> to occupy CTD stations along cross-isobath transects out to the shelf break at three primary locations/endash/Savannah, Charleston, and Myrtle <span class="hlt">Beach</span>. 4 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chandler, W.S.; Atkinson, L.P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">369</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFMOS31C1736K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Millennial, centennial and decadal sea- level change in <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, USA</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Reconstructions of relative sea-level changes on millennial timescales provide data against which to test and calibrate Earth-Ice models. On the U.S. mid-Atlantic coast they constrain the geometry of the Laurentide Ice Sheet's collapsing forebulge. Sea -level data from southeastern Atlantic coast additionally constrain ice-equivalent meltwater input. Here we produce the first Holocene sea-level curve for <span class="hlt">Florida</span> and Georgia from the St. Mary's River using agglutinated foraminifera preserved in radiocarbon-dated brackish and salt-marsh sediment. The use of foraminfera as sea-level indicators was underpinned by local and regional datasets describing the modern distribution of assemblages that are analogues for those preserved in buried sediment. This approach produced 25 index points that record 5.2 m of relative sea level rise over the last 8000 years with no evidence of a mid Holocene high stand. These reconstructions indicate that existing GIA models do not replicate proxy reconstructions and that northern <span class="hlt">Florida</span> is subsiding in response to ongoing forebulge collapse at an estimated rate of approximately 0.3 mm/yr. Over multi decadal time scales, detailed sea level reconstructions provide an appropriate geological context for modern rates of sea-level rise. Reconstructions spanning the last 2000 years of known climate variability are important for developing models with predictive capacity that link climate and sea level changes. A reconstruction of sea-level changes since 2000 years BP was developed using a core of brackish marsh sediment from the Nassau River in <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. Foraminifera estimated the elevation of former sea level with an uncertainty of ± 10 cm. Consistent downcore assemblages indicate that the marsh maintained its tidal elevation for 2000 years. An age depth model was developed for the core results from radiocarbon dating, 210Pb and 137Cs. The resulting relative sea level record was adjusted for the contribution made by glacio-isostatic subsidence to reveal climate-related sea level variability. The proxy dataset reproduces trends recorded by reliable nearby tide gauges at Fernandina <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL and Fort Pulaski, GA and indicates that modern rates of rise were initiated in the latest part of the 19th century and are greater than any persistent trend in the last 2000 years.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kemp, A.; Hawkes, A. D.; Donnelly, J. P.; Horton, B. P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">370</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB93119345"> <span id="translatedtitle">Health Hazard Evaluation Report HETA 91-104-2229, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Hospital, Orlando, <span class="hlt">Florida</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In response to a request by hospital management to evaluate employee exposures to aerosolized ribavirin (36791045) (AR), an investigation was made at <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Hospital (SIC-8062), Orlando, <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. The hospital was an 801 bed medical center and teaching ho...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. Decker R. A. Shults</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">371</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB83141978"> <span id="translatedtitle">An Ecological Characterization of the Lower Everglades, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bay and the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Keys.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A conceptual model of the study area identifies four major ecological zones; terrestrial and freshwater wetlands, estuarine and saltwater wetlands, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bay and mangrove islands and the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Keys. These zones are delineated by differences in basic p...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">N. S. Schomer R. D. Drew</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1982-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">372</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB94129491"> <span id="translatedtitle">Health Hazard Evaluation Report HETA 89-0343-2348, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Hospital, Orlando, <span class="hlt">Florida</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In response to a request from the hospital management, a study was made regarding employee exposure to aerosolized ribavirin (36791045) at <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Hospital (SIC-8062) located in Orlando, <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. Concern was voiced about several spontaneous abortions whic...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">S. Deitchman D. Wall</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">373</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013ESRv..124...32A"> <span id="translatedtitle">Sediment transport on dissipative, intermediate and reflective <span class="hlt">beaches</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper, we review and synthesize field measurements of suspended sediment transport on the shoreface of dissipative, intermediate and reflective <span class="hlt">beach</span> states. The morphodynamic <span class="hlt">beach</span> state continuum was originally established in the 1970s but at the time, only hydrodynamic processes and morphologies in these various states were described. Since the early 1980s when sensors capable of resolving suspended sediment concentration at intra-wave time scale became available, many studies have examined suspended sediment transport by waves and currents on the shoreface. The synthesis of this work shows that the two end states in the morphodynamic continuum, which are the dissipative and reflective states, exhibit relatively small rates of cross-shore sediment transport and weak gradients in that transport which both ensure that the nearshore morphology is relatively stable. The intervening intermediate <span class="hlt">beach</span> states typically exhibit prominent bar topographies and in these states, strong morphodynamic feedbacks between hydrodynamic processes and morphology create locally large transport rates and sharp transport gradients which is the reason for the dynamic nature of these <span class="hlt">beach</span> states. Transport processes driving sediment onshore and offshore within <span class="hlt">beach</span> states are discussed as well as the transport processes responsible for state transitions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Aagaard, Troels; Greenwood, Brian; Hughes, Michael</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">374</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=STS004-40-1056&hterms=1056&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3D1056"> <span id="translatedtitle">Thunderstorm off <span class="hlt">Florida</span> coast, USA</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This cumulonimbus thunderhead with its towering anvil was photographed just north of Cape Canaveral and the Kennedy Space Center, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> (28.5N, 80.5W). Cumulonimbus clouds are the familiar thunderheads that can tower up to as much as 75,000 ft. producing thunderstorms and sometimes tornadoes as well. Inland from the cape, Orlando in the center of the state, can be seen.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1982-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">375</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://madeinflorida.org/salary-information/"> <span id="translatedtitle">Made in <span class="hlt">Florida</span>: Salary Information</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This web page from the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Advanced Technological Education Center for Manufacturing (FLATE) provides salary information for several different technical careers. Entry level, mid-level and advanced salary levels are included for jobs such as manufacturing production technicians, industrial engineering technicians and computer software engineers. The webpage also shares which careers are attainable with two and four-year degrees. The information is also available for download in PDF format.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-08-09</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">376</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ces.fau.edu/"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Center For Environmental Studies</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Based at <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Atlantic University in Boca Raton, the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Center for Environmental Studies collects and disseminates research and educational materials related to water-dominated ecosystems, especially the Everglades. Scholars working in the field of ecology will want to read about their current multi-year research projects, which include working to coordinate ecological restoration efforts in South <span class="hlt">Florida</span> and to alleviate the effects of agriculture on the complex ecosystems in the region. One of the more valuable features on the Web site is a searchable database of over 600 Web sites related to water ecosystems. The database is searchable by organization type, geographic scope, language, and location. The site also contains a list of upcoming academic conferences around the world and those sponsored in conjunction with the work of the Center. Educators and students alike will want to peruse the educational opportunities available for both groups under the Education and Outreach area of the site, many of which offer professional development or academic credit.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">377</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.floridamarine.org"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Explore the latest fish and wildlife research in <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. Site includes extensive information on current news and events, as well as teacher and student resources. Information available on many of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s most valuable wildlife including corals, sea turtles, whooping cranes, manatees, and the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> panther. Obtain boating and angling guides, as well as information on sport fish restoration. Learn about MarineQuest, the Fish and Wildlife Research Institute's annual open house.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">378</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2009-title7-vol9/pdf/CFR-2009-title7-vol9-sec1006-2.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">7 CFR 1006.2 - <span class="hlt">Florida</span> marketing area.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...2009-01-01 2009-01-01 false <span class="hlt">Florida</span> marketing area. 1006.2 Section...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MILK IN THE <span class="hlt">FLORIDA</span> MARKETING AREA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 1006.2 <span class="hlt">Florida</span> marketing area. The marketing...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">379</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB2012102112"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Aviation and Aerospace Industry: Labor Market Industry Profile.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> has a rich history of aviation firsts, being the site of the first night flight in aviation history (Tampa, 1911) and having the worlds first scheduled airline service (St. Petersburg to Tampa, 1914). According to Enterprise <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, Inc., <span class="hlt">Florida</span>...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">380</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB86243326"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Acid Deposition Study. Monitoring Program. Phase 1. Summary Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In November 1980, the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Electric Power Coordinating Group, Inc. (FCG) Executive Committee approved the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Acid Deposition Study. The <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Acid Deposition Study's overall objective is to assess and/or develop the information needed to place t...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1982-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return 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showDiv("page_21");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">381</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED461589.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Folk Festival: Asian and Pacific Island Traditions in <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. Resource Materials for Teachers.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This information and activity booklet discusses the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Folk Festival, a celebration that offers students and teachers an opportunity to hear music, taste foods, see folk art demonstrations, observe dance, and listen to stories that celebrate <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s cultural and ethnic legacies. The booklet offers resources for learning about <span class="hlt">Florida</span>…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Smith. KC, Ed.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">382</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://water.epa.gov/type/oceb/beaches/dosdonts.cfm"> <span id="translatedtitle">Do's and Don'ts for Protecting Your Health and Your <span class="hlt">Beach</span>'s Health</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePLUS</a></p> <p class="result-summary">... <span class="hlt">Beach</span>'s Health Dos and Dont's for Protecting Your Health and Your <span class="hlt">Beach</span>'s Health You can do several things to keep yourself ... closed. Learn more about the risks to your health . Be sun safe Check the UV Index Use ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">383</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ADA032115"> <span id="translatedtitle">Sampling Variation in Sandy <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Littoral and Nearshore Meiofauna and Macrofauna.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This study evaluates sampling procedures and statistical methos for analysis of the fauna assoicated with high-energy sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. A intensive, one-season sampling of selected physical attributes and fauna of a relatively undistrubed <span class="hlt">beach</span> site in centr...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. L. Cox</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1976-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">384</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=AD765397"> <span id="translatedtitle">Bimodal Composition and Cyclic Characteristics of <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Sediment in Continuously Changing Profiles.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In the paper simultaneous samplings of both sediment and <span class="hlt">beach</span> profiles in a continuously changing ocean <span class="hlt">beach</span> are reported. Acquisition of these data was coordinated with observations of wind, wave, tide, longshore current, and swash. The site was locate...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">C. J. Sonu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1972-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">385</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ADA046195"> <span id="translatedtitle">Chigger (Acarina: Trombiculidae) Surveys of the West Coast <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> of Sabah and Sarawak.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Leptotrombidium (Leptotrombidium) arenicola Traub, a vector of scrub typhus, had previously been found to occur in the coastal vegetation behind the edge of open sand along the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of Peninsular Malaysia. Surveys of the west coast <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of Sabah and...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. L. Dohany O. W. Phang G. Rapmund</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1977-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">386</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title33-vol2/pdf/CFR-2013-title33-vol2-sec165-1155.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 165.1155 - Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">... false Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California...1155 Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California...a 2,000 yard radius of Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant centered at position...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">387</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://guides.ucf.edu/homepage"> <span id="translatedtitle">University of Central <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Libraries: Research Guides</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Many academic libraries pride themselves on their online research guides on a variety of interests, including comparative literature, chemistry, and dozens of other subjects. The University of Central <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Libraries has just such a collection and it covers fourteen different topical areas, including Engineering, <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, and Public Affairs & Law. Each of these areas contains additional subtopics, complete with detailed annotations and references. The <span class="hlt">Florida</span> section is a true gem as it covers topics such as GLBTQ resources, cartography, and weather. Additionally, each heading also includes specific references to other digital collections created by the University of Central <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Libraries.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">388</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2771205"> <span id="translatedtitle">Microbial Load from Animal Feces at a Recreational <span class="hlt">Beach</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The goal of this study was to quantify the microbial load (enterococci) contributed by the different animals that frequent a <span class="hlt">beach</span> site. The highest enterococci concentrations were observed in dog feces with average levels of 7.4 × 106 CFU/g; the next highest enterococci levels were observed in birds averaging 3.3 × 105 CFU/g. The lowest measured levels of enterococci were observed in material collected from shrimp fecal mounds (2.0 CFU/g). A comparison of the microbial loads showed that 1 dog fecal event was equivalent to 6,940 bird fecal events or 3.2 × 108 shrimp fecal mounds. Comparing animal contributions to previously published numbers for human bather shedding indicates that one adult human swimmer contributes approximately the same microbial load as one bird fecal event. Given the abundance of animals observed on the <span class="hlt">beach</span>, this study suggests that dogs are the largest contributing animal source of enterococci to the <span class="hlt">beach</span> site.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wright, Mary E.; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M.; Elmir, Samir; Fleming, Lora E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">389</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5502826"> <span id="translatedtitle">External costs of coastal <span class="hlt">beach</span> pollution: an hedonic approach</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A technique for inputing a monetary value to the loss in <span class="hlt">beach</span> recreational services that would result from a hypothetical oil spill in the Georges Bank area combines an oil-spill risk analysis model with a hedonic pricing model of the market for tourist accommodations on Cape Cod and Martha's Vineyard. The estimate of <span class="hlt">beach</span> pollution costs associated with offshore oil development allows a rational judgment of whether the benefits of developing offshore oil outweigh the costs. The method is an effort to improve the economic efficiency of coastal zone management. The report concludes with a discussion of the many sources of uncertainty and suggestions for overcoming them. Five appendices present information on the models, variables, questionnaire responses, <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, and factor patterns. 7 figures, 27 tables.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wilman, E.A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">390</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003ECSS...56..459D"> <span id="translatedtitle">Macrobenthic zonation patterns along a morphodynamical continuum of macrotidal, low tide bar/rip and ultra-dissipative sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The species composition, densities, biomass and zonation patterns of the macrobenthos of sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are greatly influenced by the morphodynamics and morphology of the <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Macrobenthic zonation patterns along a small-scale morphodynamic gradient, comprising eight Belgian <span class="hlt">beach</span> sites, were investigated. By taking into account the dimensionless fall velocity ( ?) and the relative tidal range, the <span class="hlt">beach</span> sites were ordered along the gradient from the ultra-dissipative <span class="hlt">beach</span> type (UD) to the low tide bar/rip <span class="hlt">beach</span> type (LTBR). The resulting <span class="hlt">beach</span> state index varied between 1.8 and 4.2 and the <span class="hlt">beach</span> profiles were related with the <span class="hlt">beaches</span>' morphodynamic state. In total 35 macrobenthic species, mainly polychaetes and crustaceans, were encountered, varying between 19 and 23 species per <span class="hlt">beach</span> site. The species composition was quite similar among <span class="hlt">beach</span> sites, with Scolelepis squamata being abundant at all eight sites. Furthermore, the macrobenthic distribution patterns were mainly related to elevation at all <span class="hlt">beach</span> sites. Some remarkable difference in metrics, largely related to the <span class="hlt">beach</span> morphodynamics and the consequent hydrodynamics, were found. At the hydrodynamically benign and consequently macrobenthos-rich UD <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, the highest macrobenthic densities and biomass occurred on the upper <span class="hlt">beach</span>, while at the hydrodynamically harsh and thus macrobenthos-poor LTBR <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, the maximum densities and biomass occurred lower on the <span class="hlt">beach</span>. Species, typically occurring on the upper UD <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, such as Eurydice pulchra, S. squamata, and Bathyporeia sarsi, were restricted to the sub-optimal middle and lower <span class="hlt">beach</span> zone at LTBR <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Only Bathyporeia pilosa was found on the upper <span class="hlt">beach</span> of both UD and LTBR <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. The more robust polychaete Ophelia rathkei and the interstitial polychaete Hesionides arenaria were exclusively found in the hydrodynamically harsh conditions of the middle LTBR <span class="hlt">beach</span> zone.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Degraer, S.; Volckaert, A.; Vincx, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">391</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://dx.doi.org/10.1029/2010JC006681"> <span id="translatedtitle">Equilibrium shoreline response of a high wave energy <span class="hlt">beach</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Four years of <span class="hlt">beach</span> elevation surveys at Ocean <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, San Francisco, California, are used to extend an existing equilibrium shoreline change model, previously calibrated with fine sand and moderate energy waves, to medium sand and higher-energy waves. The shoreline, characterized as the cross-shore location of the mean high water contour, varied seasonally by between 30 and 60 m, depending on the alongshore location. The equilibrium shoreline change model relates the rate of horizontal shoreline displacement to the hourly wave energy E and the wave energy disequilibrium, the difference between E and the equilibrium wave energy that would cause no change in the present shoreline location. Values for the model shoreline response coefficients are tuned to fit the observations in 500 m alongshore segments and averaged over segments where the model has good skill and the estimated effects of neglected alongshore sediment transport are relatively small. Using these representative response coefficients for 0.3 mm sand from Ocean <span class="hlt">Beach</span> and driving the model with much lower-energy winter waves observed at San Onofre <span class="hlt">Beach</span> (also 0.3 mm sand) in southern California, qualitatively reproduces the small seasonal shoreline fluctuations at San Onofre. This consistency suggests that the shoreline model response coefficients depend on grain size and may be constant, and thus transportable, between sites with similar grain size and different wave climates. The calibrated model response coefficients predict that for equal fluctuations in wave energy, changes in shoreline location on a medium-grained (0.3 mm) <span class="hlt">beach</span> are much smaller than on a previously studied fine-grained (0.2 mm) <span class="hlt">beach</span>. Copyright ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yates, M. L.; Guza, R. T.; O'Reilly, W. C.; Hansen, J. E.; Barnard, P. L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">392</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011JGRC..116.4014Y"> <span id="translatedtitle">Equilibrium shoreline response of a high wave energy <span class="hlt">beach</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Four years of <span class="hlt">beach</span> elevation surveys at Ocean <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, San Francisco, California, are used to extend an existing equilibrium shoreline change model, previously calibrated with fine sand and moderate energy waves, to medium sand and higher-energy waves. The shoreline, characterized as the cross-shore location of the mean high water contour, varied seasonally by between 30 and 60 m, depending on the alongshore location. The equilibrium shoreline change model relates the rate of horizontal shoreline displacement to the hourly wave energy E and the wave energy disequilibrium, the difference between E and the equilibrium wave energy that would cause no change in the present shoreline location. Values for the model shoreline response coefficients are tuned to fit the observations in 500 m alongshore segments and averaged over segments where the model has good skill and the estimated effects of neglected alongshore sediment transport are relatively small. Using these representative response coefficients for 0.3 mm sand from Ocean <span class="hlt">Beach</span> and driving the model with much lower-energy winter waves observed at San Onofre <span class="hlt">Beach</span> (also 0.3 mm sand) in southern California, qualitatively reproduces the small seasonal shoreline fluctuations at San Onofre. This consistency suggests that the shoreline model response coefficients depend on grain size and may be constant, and thus transportable, between sites with similar grain size and different wave climates. The calibrated model response coefficients predict that for equal fluctuations in wave energy, changes in shoreline location on a medium-grained (0.3 mm) <span class="hlt">beach</span> are much smaller than on a previously studied fine-grained (0.2 mm) <span class="hlt">beach</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yates, M. L.; Guza, R. T.; O'Reilly, W. C.; Hansen, J. E.; Barnard, P. L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">393</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..1615494B"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> and dunal system monitoring at Su Giudeu <span class="hlt">beach</span>, Sardinia (Italy)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Even if coastal floods are quite rare events in Sardinia (Italy) at present, they have had dramatic consequences for coastal communities, particularly in conjunction with river flooding. However, flood risk (defined as the product of event probability, vulnerability and value of assets) is expected to increase significantly in the future, due to climate change, defence degradation and sea level rise. Sardinia island has a costal length of approximately 1.900 km including minor neighbouring islands (25% of the entire Italian coasts) and the estimation of the potential exposure of coastal communities to flooding is therefore a critical task. To date methods for achieving this have been based on modelling of coastal inundation using hydrodynamic or GIS-based models of varying complexity. The Dept of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Architecture at the University of Cagliari is carrying out a comprehensive activity of coastal flooding risk mapping at the regional scale within the framework of a scientific collaboration with the Sardinian Regional Authority for the Hydrographic District, that includes monitoring and scientific activities along the entire Sardinian coast. Bathymetry and topographical surveys, sediment characterization, waves and currents measurements, hydrodynamic and morphodynamic modelling are planned, focusing on critical extended areas. In this paper we present an overview of the entire activity programme and give an in-depth account of the ongoing monitoring survey of the dunal system of the Su Giudeu <span class="hlt">beach</span> (Southern Sardinia, 50 km far from the city of Cagliari). Su Giudeu is a sandy, bay-shaped <span class="hlt">beach</span>, extending for about 1200 m between two headlands, evolving under waves with a predominant direction of 220-240°N (Scirocco wind). The survey is expected to provide evidence of the response of the remarkable dunal system to wave runup occurring during storm events, to be used in the verification of existing numerical models of dune erosion.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Balzano, Andrea; Sulis, Andrea</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">394</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-08-23/pdf/2011-21424.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">76 FR 52596 - Proposed Establishment of Class C Airspace for Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, CA; Public Meetings</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Establishment of Class C Airspace for Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, CA; Public Meetings AGENCY: Federal Aviation...establish Class C airspace at Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, CA. The purpose of these meetings is to provide...2640 N. Lakewood Blvd., Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, CA 90815, 562-597-4401. Comments:...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-08-23</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">395</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/42618839"> <span id="translatedtitle">A haptic geography of the <span class="hlt">beach</span>: naked bodies, vision and touch</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">beach</span> and the naked body are a casualty of the idealism that dominates social sciences. Despite the resurgence of work on embodiment, very few accounts have actually explored the centrality of the body on the <span class="hlt">beach</span>. Drawing on ethnographic research on the island of Menorca (Spain), this article focuses on practices of nudity on the <span class="hlt">beach</span>. Instead of giving</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pau Obrador-Pons</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">396</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-09-01/pdf/2011-22354.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">76 FR 54375 - Safety Zone; Thunder on the Gulf, Gulf of Mexico, Orange <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, AL</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Thunder on the Gulf, Gulf of Mexico, Orange <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, AL AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS...the Gulf of Mexico for the waters off Orange <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Alabama. This action is necessary...race on the Gulf of Mexico, south of Orange <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Alabama to occur from...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">397</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/j331p44606464207.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Impacts of off-road vehicles (ORVs) on macrobenthic assemblages on sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are the prime sites for human recreation and underpin many coastal economies and developments. In many coastal areas worldwide, <span class="hlt">beach</span> recreation relies on the use of off-road vehicles (ORVs) driven on the shore. Yet, the use of ORVs is not universally embraced due to social conflicts with other <span class="hlt">beach</span> user groups and putative environmental consequences of vehicle traffic</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Thomas A. Schlacher; Darren Richardson; Ian McLean</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">398</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=81156"> <span id="translatedtitle">GREAT LAKES <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> CLOSURES: USING SATELLITE IMAGES TO IDENTIFY AREAS AT RISK</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Are people getting sick from swimming at Great Lakes <span class="hlt">beaches</span>? Some are. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, swimmers are experiencing an increase in bacterial borne illnesses from swimming at many popular Great Lakes <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. The <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in the Great Lak...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">399</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/4838250"> <span id="translatedtitle">Seasonal changes in <span class="hlt">beach</span> morphology along the sheltered coastline of Perth, Western Australia</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Seasonal change in <span class="hlt">beach</span> morphology is traditionally ascribed to a variation in the incident wave energy level with calm conditions in summer resulting in wide <span class="hlt">beaches</span> with pronounced subaerial berms and energetic conditions in winter causing narrow <span class="hlt">beaches</span> with nearshore bar morphology. The coastline of Perth, Western Australia, is characterised by a large seasonal variation in the incident wave height</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">G. Masselink; C. B. Pattiaratchi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">400</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-12-02/pdf/2013-28694.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">78 FR 72022 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, NC</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Quintiles Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Full and Half Marathon. This deviation allows the bridge to...Quintiles Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Full and Half Marathon committee on behalf of the North Carolina...Quintiles Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Full and Half Marathon scheduled for Sunday, March 16,...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-02</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" 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<a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">401</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-01-04/pdf/2012-31647.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">78 FR 669 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, NC</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Quintiles Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Full and Half Marathon. This deviation allows the bridge to...Quintiles Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Full and Half Marathon committee on behalf of the North Carolina...Quintiles Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Full and Half Marathon scheduled for Sunday, March 17,...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-04</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">402</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-02-02/pdf/2012-2285.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">77 FR 5184 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, NC</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Quintiles Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Full and Half Marathon. This deviation allows the bridge to...Quintiles Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Full and Half Marathon committee on behalf of the North Carolina...Quintiles Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Full and Half Marathon scheduled for Sunday, March 18,...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-02-02</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">403</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40731980"> <span id="translatedtitle">Grain size distribution along the Msasani <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, north of Dar es Salaam Harbour</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> sediments collected from the tidal flat and <span class="hlt">beach</span> slope at the Msasani <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, about 15 km north of the Dar es Salaam Harbour, are used to (1) establish the grain size distribution pattern, (2) assess the effect of man-made and natural structures (rivers, creeks, sea wall and groynes) on the grain size distribution, and (3) assess whether sediments are</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Alfred N. N. Muzuka; Yohana W. Shaghude</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">404</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-05-01/pdf/2013-10212.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">78 FR 25383 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; West Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Class E Airspace in the West Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL area, as new Standard...SIAPs) have been developed at Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> County Park Airport...operations within the West Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL airspace area. This...coordinates of the airport. DATES: Effective 0901 UTC,...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">405</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70013382"> <span id="translatedtitle">BRADWELL BAY WILDERNESS AND THE SOPCHOPPY RIVER WILDERNESS STUDY AREA, <span class="hlt">FLORIDA</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A survey to determine the mineral-resource potential, especially for oil, phosphate, fuller's earth, sand, and peat, was conducted in the Bradwell Bay Wilderness and the Sopchoppy River Wilderness Study Area, <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. On the basis of this survey, the entire area was concluded to offer little promise for the occurrence of mineral resources except the commodity peat. Approximately 136,000 tons of demonstrated peat resources, on a dry weight basis, are available in areas of substantiated peat resource potential from bay swamps in the area, but the deposits are shallow and widespread. Large quantities of quartz sand are available in ancient <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridges and in deposits that were originally laid down in a shallow nearshore marine environment.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cameron, Cornelia, C.; Mory, Peter, C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">406</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=49212"> <span id="translatedtitle">ADVANCES IN PARTICLE SAMPLING AND MEASUREMENT</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The paper, by five authorities who contributed significantly to the second symposium on advances to particle sampling and measurement (October 1979 in <span class="hlt">Daytona</span> <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL) summarizes salient developments in the field. Current techniques were described as being expensive, complicate...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">407</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19875791"> <span id="translatedtitle">Geographic relatedness and predictability of Escherichia coli along a peninsular <span class="hlt">beach</span> complex of Lake Michigan.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">To determine more accurately the real-time concentration of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) in <span class="hlt">beach</span> water, predictive modeling has been applied in several locations around the Great Lakes to individual or small groups of similar <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Using 24 <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Door County, Wisconsin, we attempted to expand predictive models to multiple <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of complex geography. We examined the importance of geographic location and independent variables and the consequential limitations for potential <span class="hlt">beach</span> or <span class="hlt">beach</span> group models. An analysis of Escherichia coli populations over 4 yr revealed a geographic gradient to the <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, with mean E. coli concentrations decreasing with increasing distance from the city of Sturgeon Bay. <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> grouped strongly by water type (lake, bay, Sturgeon Bay) and proximity to one another, followed by presence of a storm or creek outfall or amount of shoreline enclosure. Predictive models developed for <span class="hlt">beach</span> groups commonly included wave height and cumulative 48-h rainfall but generally explained little E. coli variation (adj. R2=0.19-0.36). Generally low concentrations of E. coli at the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> influenced the effectiveness of model results presumably because of low signal-to-noise ratios and the rarity of elevated concentrations. Our results highlight the importance of the sensitivity of regressors and the need for careful methods evaluation. Despite the attractiveness of predictive models as an alternative <span class="hlt">beach</span> monitoring approach, it is likely that FIB fluctuations at some <span class="hlt">beaches</span> defy simple prediction approaches. Regional, multi-<span class="hlt">beach</span>, and individual <span class="hlt">beach</span> predictive models should be explored alongside other techniques for improving monitoring reliability at Great Lakes <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. PMID:19875791</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nevers, Meredith B; Shively, Dawn A; Kleinheinz, Gregory T; McDermott, Colleen M; Schuster, William; Chomeau, Vinni; Whitman, Richard L</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">408</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AGUFMOS21E1229R"> <span id="translatedtitle">A Comprehensive Study on Coastline Process and Sedimentary Dynamics, Sardinera <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Mona Island, P.R.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Sardinera <span class="hlt">beach</span> in Mona Island, Puerto Rico, has a great recreational and ecological value and is an important research place to gather information on shoreline processes in an area far from the main land and with only scarce man made influences. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> rock exposures present along the shoreline in Sardinera <span class="hlt">Beach</span> have increased considerably during the last decade. A new management plan is being developed for Mona Island and the Department of Natural Resources (DNRA) of Puerto Rico wants to better understand the <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand dynamics on this and other Mona Island <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. This research includes field and laboratory work that characterize coastal sedimentary processes and helps to better understand the shoreline changes as well as seasonal variations in sand movement and composition. This work also establish the logistics and methodology basis for further studies that will expand to other Mona Island <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Benchmarks, GPS coordinates, and landmarks were used to establish ten permanent <span class="hlt">beach</span> profiles along Sardinera <span class="hlt">Beach</span>. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> profiles were (and will be) measured monthly. Sardinera <span class="hlt">Beach</span> sands are composed mostly of carbonate (CaCO3) components, products of the combination of biological, chemical and diagenetic processes, high grade of micritization, and of lithic limestone fragments. Sand composition differences between Sardinera <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, the Mona Shelf and adjacent <span class="hlt">beach</span>, reef crest and reef lagoon systems suggest Sardinera sands are not replenished by the modern marine components produced in these environments. The input of "fresh bioclasts" in this <span class="hlt">beach</span> seems to be limited by natural (<span class="hlt">beach</span> rock) and mane made (dock) barriers along the shore and by alteration in the current patterns produced by the man made aperture of the reef. Sardinera's micritized and recrystalized sand deposits seem to have been re-transported between the reefal lagoon and the <span class="hlt">beach</span>. Sand volume analysis indicates a total sand loss of 1,322 m3 between the months of September to April. Aerial images from the years 1977, 1992 and 2003 show 14 to 27 meters of recession along the coast line.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rodriguez-Delga, A. M.; Ramirez, W. R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">409</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB2012102113"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Biotechnology Industry: Labor Market Industry Profile.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> is home to an expanding number of world-renowned research institutes, making it the epicenter of some of the most exciting research and promising discoveries. <span class="hlt">Florida</span> has a growing biomedical cluster that supports one of the countrys largest medic...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">410</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=College+AND+Projects&pg=4&id=EJ843155"> <span id="translatedtitle">Collection Assessment: The <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Community College Experience</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Beginning in 1994, a series of collection analysis and assessment projects of community college library/LRC collections in <span class="hlt">Florida</span> has been conducted by the College Center for Library Automation (CCLA). The purpose of the assessments conducted through LINCC, the network for <span class="hlt">Florida</span> community colleges, was to provide data for improvement of…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Perrault, Anna H.; Dixon, Jeannie</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">411</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22vtt%22&id=ED397819"> <span id="translatedtitle">Lessons Learned from the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Teletraining Project.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Teletraining Project (FTP) was funded by the Department of Defense to test the feasibility of using a video teletraining network (VTT) (two-way audio/two-way compressed video) to present military instruction to reservists in <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. The program was to be conducted by two-year community colleges in collaboration with armed forces…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Martin, Barbara L.; And Others</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">412</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title40-vol18/pdf/CFR-2013-title40-vol18-sec81-407.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">40 CFR 81.407 - <span class="hlt">Florida</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. 81.407 Section 81.407 Protection...Is an Important Value § 81.407 <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. Area name Acreage Public Law... 23,360 94-557 USDI-FWS Everglades NP 1,397,429 73-267...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">413</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22contact+numbers%22&pg=5&id=ED414907"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Library Directory with Statistics, 1997.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This 48th annual edition includes listings for over 1,000 libraries of all types in <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, with contact names, phone numbers, addresses, and e-mail and web addresses. In addition, there is a section of library statistics, showing data on the use, resources, and financial condition of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s libraries. The first section consists of listings…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Florida Dept. of State, Tallahassee. Div. of Library and Information Services.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">414</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED517466.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Lessons for Tennessee from <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s Education Revolution</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Jeb Bush campaigned for governor on a clear and bracing set of education reforms in 1998. Having won office, he immediately pursued a dual-track strategy for reforming <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s K-12 education system: standards and accountability for public schools, choice and options for parents. <span class="hlt">Florida</span> lawmakers followed those reforms with additional measures.…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ladner, Matthew</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">415</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=SSC-2007-02089&hterms=camp&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3D%2522camp%2522"> <span id="translatedtitle">Astro Camp Goes to <span class="hlt">Florida</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Katie Craig, daughter of former Stennis Space Center Deputy Director Mark Craig, launches a 'balloon rocket' with the help of Rebecca Compretta, Astro Camp coordinator at SSC. SSC took Astro Camp on the road to <span class="hlt">Florida</span> this week to engage children and their parents during activities surrounding the Aug. 8 launch of Space Shuttle Endeavour on NASA's STS-118 mission to the International Space Station. Astro Camp is SSC's popular space camp program designed to inspire and educate students using science and math principles.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">416</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ufdc.ufl.edu/?dlc=yes&c=fao1&m=hhh/"> <span id="translatedtitle">University of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>: Soil Texture</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This University of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> website educates the public about soil texture, which is the distribution of sizes of mineral particles found in soils. After learning the basics about soil separates, students and educators can learn about the USDA textural triangle and the characteristics of the twelve textural classes. Researchers can discover how to determine the correct soil texture in the field. The website addresses the important role soil textures play in the determination of proper land use activities and management practices. Visitors will also find a short discussion about other factors that affect the behavior and qualities of soils.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">417</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/50343914"> <span id="translatedtitle">Baker <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, San Francisco, California. Rip current-<span class="hlt">beach</span> cusp coupled system: waves, currents, sediments and tides self-organize to form a self-maintaining geometrical coastal geomorphology</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report looks beyond waves and explores the probability that waves, currents, sediments and tides self-organize into a rip current-<span class="hlt">beach</span> cusp coupled system to create a <span class="hlt">beach</span> condition which endangers the lives of <span class="hlt">beach</span> bathers. The coastal geography of Baker <span class="hlt">Beach</span> is described, and information given on how, why, and where the greatest dangers occur.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Francis James Smith</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">418</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=220110"> <span id="translatedtitle">Empirical Modeling of Microbial Indicators at a South Carolina <span class="hlt">Beach</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Public concerns about water quality at <span class="hlt">beaches</span> have prompted the development of multiple linear regression and other models that can be used to "nowcast" levels of bacterial indicators. Hydrometeorological and biogeochemical data from summer, 2009 were used to develop empirical m...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">419</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006AGUFMED51D..03N"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Chemistry of Sand: Not All <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> Are Created Equal</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In South Carolina, the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> can be a natural laboratory for scientific inquiry. By middle school most students have visited one of the state's <span class="hlt">beaches</span> through field trips or family vacations. These fun experiences can be a platform for scientific inquiry and investigation. Many students can describe a <span class="hlt">beach</span> where the sand was perfect for building sand castles, too sharp to walk on, or just right on a hot summer day. With a dissecting microscope and some weak acid, these observations can be turned into an engaging activity for students to explore the chemical and/or mineralogical make-up of the sand. This presentation will describe an experiment where students use a microscope to draw sand samples and identify some common grains. The students form hypotheses about the amount of carbonate in the samples and test these hypotheses using the weak acid. By the end of the lab students should be able to identify several indications that a chemical reaction has occurred and be able to form and test a hypothesis. They should also understand that sand from different <span class="hlt">beaches</span> may have different mineralogical compositions. This activity incorporates the following National Science Content Standards: Abilities necessary to do scientific inquiry; understandings about scientific inquiry; properties and changes of properties in matter; chemical reactions; and populations, resources, and environments. The activity was developed with the support of the National Science Foundation's Graduate Teaching Fellows in K-12 Education Program, Award # 0440568.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Newton, A. J.; Brooker, D.; Lyons, J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">420</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22customer+AND+satisfaction%22&pg=6&id=EJ483407"> <span id="translatedtitle">Parents as Valued Customers: The Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Parent Perception Survey.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In 1993, the teachers in Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span> City (Virginia) Public Schools surveyed parents' views concerning classroom practices as part of a client satisfaction project. Intended to increase parent involvement, gauge customer satisfaction, and guarantee continuous improvement, the survey found that comments about teacher efforts were overwhelmingly…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Faucette, Sidney L.; And Others</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> 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</span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">421</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/56380053"> <span id="translatedtitle">Documenting the global impacts of <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand mining</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">For centuries, <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand has been mined for use as aggregate in concrete, for heavy minerals, and for construction fill. The global extent and impact of this phenomenon has gone relatively unnoticed by academics, NGOs, and major news sources. Most reports of sand mining activities are found at the very local scale (if the mining is ever documented at all).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. Young; A. Griffith</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">422</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=EISCA731258DR"> <span id="translatedtitle">Los Angeles-Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Harbors, Los Angeles County, California.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">It is proposed to deepen areas in the Los Angeles part of the Los Angeles-Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Harbors and use the fill to create new lands for terminals. The federal part of the proposed project involves the deepening of existing Federal project channels and turni...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1973-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">423</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/61384075"> <span id="translatedtitle">Expert system for computer interpretation of <span class="hlt">beach</span> and nearshore facies</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A user-friendly, rule-based expert system has been designed for interpretation of lithofacies characteristics of <span class="hlt">beach</span> and nearshore depositional environments. Recently, similar expert systems have been widely applied in medicine, business, and mineral exploration. The expert system runs on a VAX 780 (trade name). By incorporating knowledge and understanding of an expert, the system can interact with a user the way</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">K. B. Krystinik; H. E. Clifton</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">424</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/hi0489.photos.195428p/"> <span id="translatedtitle">20. 8" PIPELINE ON <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> AND ALONG PALI, VIEW WEST ...</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p class="result-summary">20. 8" PIPELINE ON <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> AND ALONG PALI, VIEW WEST TOWARD KALAWAO. NOTE GATE VALVE (LARGER) AND BLOW-OFF VALVE (SMALLER). PIPELINE GENERALLY AT 20' ABOVE SEA LEVEL. - Kalaupapa Water Supply System, Waikolu Valley to Kalaupapa Settlement, Island of Molokai, Kalaupapa, Kalawao County, HI</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">425</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB88146063"> <span id="translatedtitle">Shetland <span class="hlt">Beached</span> Bird Survey, March 1986-February 1987,</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The results of <span class="hlt">Beached</span> Bird Surveys in Shetland during the period March 1986 to February 1987 are reported. A greater distance was surveyed than in any of the previous 8 annual periods. The 240 corpses found oiled during the period was the highest proport...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. Heubeck J. N. Dymond</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">426</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.agu.org/journals/jc/v085/iC06/JC085iC06p03264/JC085iC06p03264.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Statistical Prediction of <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Changes in Southern California</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">files and wave statistics from southern California constituted the data base for this two-faceted statistical study. First, daily <span class="hlt">beach</span> profile changes were predicted using four different spectral representations of the wave field. These profile changes were predictable using spectral representations of wave energy, radiation stress, energy flux, and wave steepness. Because of constraints on statistical reliability, a longer data set</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">David G. Aubrey; Douglas L. Inman; Clinton D. Winant</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1980-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">427</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60558231"> <span id="translatedtitle">Environmental geophysics at <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Point, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Geophysical studies at <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Point Peninsula, in the Edgewood area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, provide diagnostic signatures of the hydrogeologic framework and possible contaminant pathways. These studies permit construction of the most reasonable scenario linking dense, nonaqueous-phase liquid contaminants introduced at the surface with their pathway through the surficial aquifer. Subsurface geology and contaminant presence were identified by drilling,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">L. D. McGinnis; C. R. Daudt; M. D. Thompson; S. F. Miller; W. A. Mandell; J. Wrobel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">428</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED048882.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">A Development Plan for the Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> County Library System.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> County Library System is evaluated for its program to date and for its existing public library resources in the County. Population trends are examined and a realistic program for the development of library services over a six-year period is recommended. The estimated costs for implementation of these recommendations are outlined in…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Little (Arthur D.), Inc., Cambridge, MA.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">429</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ADA322357"> <span id="translatedtitle">Amphibious Cargo <span class="hlt">Beaching</span> (ACB) Lighter Development - Phase I.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report documents a conceptual design effort for the Amphibious Cargo <span class="hlt">Beaching</span> (ACB) Lighter, a modular barge system which is being developed to replace the Navy Lighter (NL) pontoon causeway system. The ACB Lighter will be rapidly deployed from an au...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">430</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60140665"> <span id="translatedtitle">Seychelles <span class="hlt">beach</span> tars, well oil tied to same source rock</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Geochemical analyses of <span class="hlt">beach</span>-stranded tars from Seychelles can be correlated to comparable analyses of an oil sample from a well in the Seychelles offshore. The analyses also enable the precursor source rock to be characterized. Such a source rock was encountered in the three offshore wells and is extensively developed to the west and south of the granitic islands. The</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Plummer</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">431</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004AGUFM.H33I..05N"> <span id="translatedtitle">Carbonate <span class="hlt">Beaches</span>: A Balance Between Biological and Physical Processes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Carbonate <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are a unique example of the interaction between biological processes, creating the sediments, and physical processes, moving and often removing the sediments. On the sediment supply side, carbonate sediments are born, not made. They exist in dynamic equilibrium between production and destruction. Following the creation of carbonate sediment in coral reef and lagoon environments, the sediments are moved shoreward to the <span class="hlt">beach</span>, transport along the shore and sometimes, eventually lost offshore, often as the result of tropical storms. Comprehensive studies of the balance between the supply and loss of carbonate sediments and <span class="hlt">beach</span> dynamics have been completed for the islands of Mauritius and Barbados. Field studies and remote sensing (Compact Airborne Spectrometry Imaging) have been applied to develop carbonate sediment production rates for a range of reef and lagoon conditions. Using GIS, these production rates have been integrated to determine sediment supply rates for different segments of the coastline. 1-D and 2-D models of waves, hydrodynamics, sediment transport and morphodynamics were set-up and tested against observed <span class="hlt">beach</span> response to storm events or a sequence of storm events. These complex deterministic models are not suitable for application over periods of decades. However, it was possible to characterize storm events by the extent of sand loss, and relate this to key descriptive factors for groups of storm events, thereby encapsulating the erosion response. A long-term predictive tool for evaluating <span class="hlt">beach</span> erosion and accretion response, over a period of several decades, was developed by combining the supply rates for carbonate sediment and the encapsulated representation of the loss rates through physical processes. The ability of this predictive tool was successfully tested against observed long term <span class="hlt">beach</span> evolution along sections of the coast in Barbados and Mauritius using air photo analysis in GIS for shoreline change over periods of 40 years. The long-term predictive tool for carbonate <span class="hlt">beach</span> evolution provided valuable support to developing coastal zone management policy and actions to preserve the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in their natural form, minimizing the need for artificial nourishment of the <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Many models of sediment movement on shorelines are derived from clastic examples, and fit carbonate coastlines only with difficulty. We have combined field surveys of benthic biota, estimates of sediment production from skeletal growth and bioerosion, and sediment destruction by comminution and dissolution with dynamic models of sediment movement in the littoral zone, achieving improved understanding of coastal processes of erosion and deposition. Mauritius is fringed by shallow lagoons, often with luxuriant stands of Acropora. The offshore region is exhumed Pleistocene-all the sediment on the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> comes from the lagoons. From surveys of coral cover, and estimates of sediment production from reef, sand and hardground areas, we produced dynamic models that faithfully hindcast shoreline dynamics for decades, and allowed identification of regions especially vulnerable to erosion. On the south coast of Barbados, one of the main issues in stabilising and rehabilitation the coastline is the balance between sediment from longshore drift and local sources. By identifying localised areas of characteristic sediment-producers (e.g., the foraminiferan Homotrema rubrum, the green alga Halimeda), we were able to determine the balance between proximal and distal sediment sources. The resulting model hindcasts the coastline through all the major hurricanes of the past 30 years.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nairn, R.; Risk, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">432</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.1680R"> <span id="translatedtitle">Seasonal Variation of Surface Sediments in the Gochang <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Korea</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Gochang <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, located on the southwestern coast of Korea, was studied in terms of four season variations of surface sediment and sedimentary environment. The Gochang <span class="hlt">Beach</span> consists of the Dongho, Kwangseungri, Myeongsasipri <span class="hlt">beaches</span> from north to south. During the four seasons of spring (May), summer (August), and fall (November), and winter (February), surface sediments of 135 sites were sampled across nine survey lines (15 sites in each survey line), respectively. The pocket-type Dongho <span class="hlt">Beach</span> is mainly composed of fine to coarse sands, and the ratio of fine sand is the largest. The average of grain size is the coarsest in the summer. The spatial distribution of surface sediments shows a coast-parallel band of fine and medium sands during three seasons of spring, fall, and winter, whereas medium sands dominated in the northern part of the study area during the summer. These results suggest that a tide is more effective than a wave in the surface sediments of the Dongho <span class="hlt">Beach</span> during the summer. The surface sediments of the Kwangseungri <span class="hlt">Beach</span> are mainly composed of fine-grained sands, and the mean grain size is the coarsest in winter. Mud facies partly exists in summer, whereas it is nearly absent in winter. The spatial distribution of surface sediments shows a coast-parallel band of fine and medium sands during spring, fall, and winter. In the northern part, the study area is dominated by fine sands during summer, whereas by coarse sands during winter. These results are interpreted that tide is more effective than wave on the surface sediment distribution of the Kwangseungri <span class="hlt">Beach</span> during summer season. The open-coast Myeongsasipri <span class="hlt">Beach</span> is mainly composed of fine to medium sand, the distribution of which shows a coast-parallel trend. Grain-size distribution shows a bi-modal trend in the summer and winter and a uni-mode in the spring and fall. Grain size of the winter is the coarsest among those of four seasons. During the winter, the upper tidal flat was dominated by medium sand, while the lower tidal flat was dominated by find sand. Such a feature is attributed to wave-dominated sedimentation in the winter. The dominant finer-grain size of the summer rather than that of the winter is interpreted that tidal energy played an important role in the tidal flat sedimentation during the summer. Sedimentary environments of the Myeongsasipri <span class="hlt">Beach</span> are suggestive of a seasonal change from wave-dominated conditions in the winter to tide-dominated conditions in the summer as a result of seasonal variations of the intensity of onshore-directed winds and waves. Keywords: seasonal variation, surface sediment, macro-tide, <span class="hlt">beach</span>, Gochang Acknowledgements: This research was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (2010-0025733) and by the Korea Institute of Marine Science and Technology Promotion (KIMST) through the project grant of Tracking and Prediction on Impacts of Ancient Extreme Climatic Events in the West and South Coastal Zone of Korea.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ryang, Woo Hun; Kang, Sol Ip</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">433</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008Geomo.101..558L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Coastal cliff behaviour: Observations on the relationship between <span class="hlt">beach</span> levels and recession rates</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Beaches</span> dissipate wave energy and regulate the frequency that the cliff foot is subject to wave attack. The relationship between <span class="hlt">beach</span> levels and cliff recession rates has been established for Pleistocene soft rock cliffs along the North Norfolk and Suffolk coasts, UK. The results suggest that over a decadal timescale, there is a non-linear increase in the average recession rate as the <span class="hlt">beach</span> profile area above High Water Mark (HWM) decreases. Small changes in <span class="hlt">beach</span> level can result in significant differences in the recession rates. The impact of a unit change in <span class="hlt">beach</span> level on the recession rate depends on the initial <span class="hlt">beach</span> level. On a year-by-year basis, it is possible to divide the <span class="hlt">beach</span> level and recession relationship into a series of zones with characteristic types of behaviour. At low <span class="hlt">beach</span> levels there is high to extremely high recession with considerable variability, whereas at high <span class="hlt">beach</span> levels there is almost zero recession with limited variability. It is concluded that historical recession rates are the product of both the past forcing events and changes in cliff-<span class="hlt">beach</span> state. Extrapolation of historical rates can be extremely unreliable unless it is supported by an understanding of the dynamic behaviour of the cliff-<span class="hlt">beach</span> system and the energy inputs over the observation period.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lee, E. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">434</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3391285"> <span id="translatedtitle">Disentangling Diversity Patterns in Sandy <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> along Environmental Gradients</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Species richness in sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> is strongly affected by concurrent variations in morphodynamics and salinity. However, as in other ecosystems, different groups of species may exhibit contrasting patterns in response to these environmental variables, which would be obscured if only aggregate richness is considered. Deconstructing biodiversity, i.e. considering richness patterns separately for different groups of species according to their taxonomic affiliation, dispersal mode or mobility, could provide a more complete understanding about factors that drive species richness patterns. This study analyzed macroscale variations in species richness at 16 Uruguayan sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> with different morphodynamics, distributed along the estuarine gradient generated by the Rio de la Plata over a 2 year period. Species richness estimates were deconstructed to discriminate among taxonomic groups, supralittoral and intertidal forms, and groups with different feeding habits and development modes. Species richness was lowest at intermediate salinities, increasing towards oceanic and inner estuarine conditions, mainly following the patterns shown for intertidal forms. Moreover, there was a differential tolerance to salinity changes according to the habitat occupied and development mode, which determines the degree of sensitivity of faunal groups to osmotic stress. Generalized (additive and linear) mixed models showed a clear increase of species richness towards dissipative <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. All taxonomic categories exhibited the same trend, even though responses to grain size and <span class="hlt">beach</span> slope were less marked for crustaceans and insects than for molluscs or polychaetes. However, supralittoral crustaceans exhibited the opposite trend. Feeding groups decreased from dissipative to reflective systems, deposit feeders being virtually absent in the latter. This deconstructive approach highlights the relevance of life history strategies in structuring communities, highlighting the relative importance that salinity and morphodynamic gradients have on macroscale diversity patterns in sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Barboza, Francisco R.; Gomez, Julio; Lercari, Diego; Defeo, Omar</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">435</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21984862"> <span id="translatedtitle">Impact of erosion and accretion on the distribution of enterococci in <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Bacterial pathogens in coastal sediments may pose a health risk to users of <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Although recent work shows that <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands harbor both indicator bacteria and potential pathogens, it is not known how deep within <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands the organisms may persist nor if they may be exposed during natural physical processes. In this study, sand cores of approximately 1 m depth were collected at three sites across the <span class="hlt">beach</span> face in Kitty Hawk, North Carolina before, during and after large waves from an offshore hurricane. The presence of DNA from the fecal indicator bacterium Enterococci was detected in subsamples at different depths within the cores by PCR amplification. Erosion and accretion of <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand at the three sites also was determined for each sampling day. The results indicate that ocean <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands with persisting enterococci signals could be exposed and redistributed when wind, waves, and currents cause <span class="hlt">beach</span> erosion or accretion. PMID:21984862</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gast, Rebecca J; Gorrell, Levi; Raubenheimer, Britt; Elgar, Steve</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-09-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">436</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EnMan..53..999W"> <span id="translatedtitle">Pro-Environmental <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Driving is Uncommon and Ineffective in Reducing Disturbance to <span class="hlt">Beach</span>-Dwelling Birds</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Vehicles on <span class="hlt">beaches</span> cause numerous deleterious effects to coastal wildlife. These impacts may, hypothetically, be lessened if drivers act to reduce disturbance. Since it is unknown to what extent such behavior occurs, and whether it can reduce disturbance, we quantified the behavior of drivers who encountered birds on open-coast, sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in eastern Australia and the consequent bird responses. Drivers of commercial tourist buses never slowed or altered course ("evaded birds") to avoid disturbing birds; conversely, 34 % of drivers of private cars did evade birds. Drivers of vehicles with fishing rod holders tended ( P = 0.09) to evade birds more frequently than non-fishing vehicles. Evasion, when it occurred, was modest, and did not significantly decrease the intensity of bird response or the probability of escapes on the wing. Voluntary behavioral adjustments to alleviate impacts on wildlife may be unworkable, suggesting that other solutions (e.g., <span class="hlt">beach</span> closures) might be the only effective and feasible way to reduce disturbance to birds on ocean <span class="hlt">beaches</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Weston, Michael A.; Schlacher, Thomas A.; Lynn, David</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">437</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24599507"> <span id="translatedtitle">Pro-environmental <span class="hlt">beach</span> driving is uncommon and ineffective in reducing disturbance to <span class="hlt">beach</span>-dwelling birds.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Vehicles on <span class="hlt">beaches</span> cause numerous deleterious effects to coastal wildlife. These impacts may, hypothetically, be lessened if drivers act to reduce disturbance. Since it is unknown to what extent such behavior occurs, and whether it can reduce disturbance, we quantified the behavior of drivers who encountered birds on open-coast, sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in eastern Australia and the consequent bird responses. Drivers of commercial tourist buses never slowed or altered course ("evaded birds") to avoid disturbing birds; conversely, 34 % of drivers of private cars did evade birds. Drivers of vehicles with fishing rod holders tended (P = 0.09) to evade birds more frequently than non-fishing vehicles. Evasion, when it occurred, was modest, and did not significantly decrease the intensity of bird response or the probability of escapes on the wing. Voluntary behavioral adjustments to alleviate impacts on wildlife may be unworkable, suggesting that other solutions (e.g., <span class="hlt">beach</span> closures) might be the only effective and feasible way to reduce disturbance to birds on ocean <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. PMID:24599507</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Weston, Michael A; Schlacher, Thomas A; Lynn, David</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">438</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007ECSS...72..138D"> <span id="translatedtitle">Source discrimination of fine-grained deposits occurring on marine <span class="hlt">beaches</span>: The Calvados <span class="hlt">beaches</span> (eastern Bay of the Seine, France)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In tide-dominated systems, fine-grained deposits occur in intertidal areas of inner estuaries as loci of convergence of fluvial and marine material. Even in the vicinity of estuaries, mud deposits are rare on open sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. This study focuses on temporary occurrences of muddy sediments on marine <span class="hlt">beaches</span> along the Calvados coastline in Normandy, adjacent to the macrotidal Seine estuary (France). Clay mineralogy, major-minor-trace elements and radionuclides were used as particulate markers to determine the provenance of the mud deposits. The fine fraction, defined here as particles <50 ?m, was analysed, in surficial muddy sediments on seven <span class="hlt">beaches</span> between the Seine estuary and the Orne river mouth, sampled between February 2002 and June 2003. The deposits were compared to earlier Holocene relict deposits, which crop out on some <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and on the shoreface, and to Mesozoic marls and limestones, which have detached from the coastal cliffs. The use of the three types of particulate markers revealed no significant seasonal or geographical variations between the <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. The muddy deposits were made up of the same sedimentary pool of particles. The clay mineralogical and geochemical characteristics of these mud deposits enabled modern (i.e. present-day and earlier Holocene fine silts and clays) to be distinguished from ancient (i.e. Mesozoic) sediments. The use of radionuclides ( 60Co and 137Cs) confirmed the marine influence in the modern deposits, with a decreasing gradient along the Calvados <span class="hlt">beaches</span> towards the east. The presence of several specific major-minor-trace elements (e.g. Ti, P) revealed that some of the fine material originated in the Seine estuary. Despite the occurrence of easily erodable rocks (i.e. clays, marls and limestones) in the coastal cliffs, this source represented a limited supply, which is only of local significance. Small rivers, such as the Orne, Dives and Touques which discharge in the study area act as secondary suppliers of fine-grained material to this system. In spite of the exposed coastal setting where strong tidal currents and waves occur, the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> have become a distal part of the Seine estuarine system and form a temporary sink for strongly mixed fine material mainly of riverine (Seine River) and open marine (Bay of the Seine and the Central English Channel) origins. This is consistent with the infilling of the estuary, the reduction in accommodation space in its inner part, and the offshore shifting of the depocentre of the mud.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dubrulle, C.; Lesueur, P.; Boust, D.; Dugué, O.; Poupinet, N.; Lafite, R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">439</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010EGUGA..1213468T"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> hazard and susceptibility to inundation and erosion. Case studies in the west coast of Portugal.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Hydrodynamic forces over the <span class="hlt">beach</span> sediments are the main driving factors affecting the frequency and magnitude of morphological changes in <span class="hlt">beach</span> systems. In most of the time, this driving factors act in a foreseeable way and don't represent any danger to the coastal systems nor to its populations. However, hydrodynamic forces are also capable of induce high morphodynamic behavior on the <span class="hlt">beach</span> profiles and very often in a short period of time which endangers people and property and leads to system retreat. The most common consequences of the occurrence of this type of phenomena over the coastal landforms are costal inundation and erosion. Still, many coastal systems, and specially <span class="hlt">beach</span> systems, have recovery mechanisms and resilience levels have a very important role in the <span class="hlt">beach</span> morphodynamic state and exposure to potential damaging events assessments. The wave dominated Portuguese West coast is an high energetic environment during winter, with 2.5m mean offshore significant wave height. Waves with 5 year recurrence period can reach 9.2m and storms are frequent. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> systems are frequently associated with rocky coasts. In these cases, the subsystems present are <span class="hlt">beach</span>-dune, <span class="hlt">beach</span>-cliff and <span class="hlt">beach</span>-estuary subsystems exposed to NW Atlantic wave climate. This research aim is to access <span class="hlt">beach</span> hazard and susceptibility to inundation and erosion. Three <span class="hlt">beach</span> systems were selected and monitored applying sequential profiling methodology over a three year period (2004-2007). Sta. Rita, Azul and Foz do Lizandro <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are representative systems of the coastal stretch between Peniche and Cascais, which is a cliff dominate coast. Results from the monitoring campaigns are presented, including volume budgets, <span class="hlt">beach</span> face slope changes, berm occurrence and heights and planimetric coastline dynamics. A hazard and susceptibility assessment schema and zonation are proposed, including the parameterization of local flood (i.e. mean sea, maximum spring tide, and storm surge and run-up levels) and erosion potentials (i.e. volume budget and <span class="hlt">beach</span> planimetric dynamics).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Trindade, Jorge; Ramos-Pereira, Ana</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">440</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16..416C"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> ridge sedimentology: field observation and palaeoenvironmental interpretation for Anegada Island, British Virgin Islands.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> ridge landforms have been observed in different environments and in settings that range from polar to tropical. Their stratigraphy and sedimentology has received a limited amount of discussion in the literature (Tamura, 2012). In coastal geomorphology a <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridge can be seen as a transitional deposit between onshore and offshore environments. They are regarded as representing high level wave action along a coastline. In the Caribbean the origin of <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridges has been variously attributed to one of three extreme wave events: extreme swell, extreme storm or tsunami waves. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> ridges are arranged in <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridge plains where there is succession of the landforms and can be several kilometres long. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> ridge accumulation is not continuous and the coast shows alternating accretion and erosion periods. The use of <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridges as palaeostorm archives is therefore not straightforward. The temporal continuity of <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridge formation is being assessed on the <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridge plains of Anegada, British Virgin Islands (Lesser Antilles). This carbonate platform surrounded by a fringing reef contains two <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridge plains. There are more than 30 ridges in the Atlantic facing- coast and around 10 in the south, Caribbean- facing coast. The sediments of the modern <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are dominated by the sand fraction and are 100% biogenic origin due to the isolation of Anegada from terrestrial sediment sources. The <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridge sections have been studied in different area of Anegada <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridge plains and present low angle seaward-dipping bedding. The sand fraction is dominant in the stratigraphy with a few intact shells. At only one site were coral pebbles deposited in association with the sand fraction. Aeolian deposits represent the upper part of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridges and reflect the stabilization of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridges with ongoing accretion. The sedimentology of the contemporary <span class="hlt">beach</span> and dunes will be discussed in terms of their implications for understanding <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridge genesis and its relationship to extreme wave events. Tamura, T., 2012. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> ridges and prograded <span class="hlt">beach</span> deposits as palaeoenvironment records. Earth-Science Reviews, 114, pp. 279-297.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cescon, Anna Lisa; Cooper, J. Andrew G.; Jackson, Derek W. T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return 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onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">441</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=dance+AND+injuries&pg=2&id=EJ999969"> <span id="translatedtitle">An Analysis of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Physical Educators' Knowledge of Bicycle Laws</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Bicycling among youth is a popular activity, but like all modes of travel it is not without risk. <span class="hlt">Florida</span> has a particularly high rate of bicycle-related fatalities and injuries. To reduce such risks, the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Department of Transportation and <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Department of Education have developed a youth bicycle safety educational program (<span class="hlt">Florida</span>…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Connaughton, Daniel P.; Egberts, John B.; Spengler, J. O.; Zhang, James J.; Jin, Liyan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">442</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..1612845B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Storm recovery on two Italian coarse-grained <span class="hlt">beaches</span>: a comparison between a mixed sand and gravel and a pebble <span class="hlt">beach</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">High energy events emphasize <span class="hlt">beach</span> erosion processes, sometimes leading to huge volume deficits not balanced by recovery under fair-weather conditions. In this scenario, artificial replenishments are frequently used as a form of coastal protection with large volumes of sediments re-injected in the system without strongly altering the environment as it happens with hard structures. Since climate change is expected to accentuate in the near future erosion effects, the need to artificially feed <span class="hlt">beaches</span> is likely to increase. Gravel and pebbles are more and more often used as <span class="hlt">beach</span> fill, on some occasions replacing sandy sediments. That was the case for two <span class="hlt">beaches</span> located at either sides of the Italian Peninsula (Portonovo, Adriatic Sea; Marina di Pisa, Ligurian Sea), which constitute the study area of the present research. Portonovo is a 500 m-long mixed sand and gravel <span class="hlt">beach</span> with a significant pebble-sized content (about 40%), unloaded on the <span class="hlt">beach</span> during multiple replenishments. Marina di Pisa is an artificial, 180 m-long <span class="hlt">beach</span>, mainly composed of 40-to-90 mm pebbles; it was built in 2008 as a part of a larger protection scheme. Groins or headlands that prevent any sediment exchange with adjacent areas bound both <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Periodic topographic surveys were carried out to evaluate the response of these human-altered <span class="hlt">beaches</span> to high-energy events. The topographic surveys, undertaken with a DGPS-RTK instrument along cross-shore transects (from the landward end of the backshore to about 1.5 m depth seaward), were done following intense storm events occurred during the time period of the research. Transects were done out every 10 m along the entire length of the <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Prior to the first topographic survey, a sediment tracing experiment was set up as a form of control of the results provided by the geomorphologic analysis. Pebbles directly sampled from the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> were marked by means of the RFID technology and injected back all along the beachface. As expected, considerable <span class="hlt">beach</span> profile changes after the storms were identified, in particular at Portonovo (mixed <span class="hlt">beach</span>), where huge sediment volumes were displaced longshore according to the incident wave direction as opposed to Marina di Pisa (gravel dominated), where the main <span class="hlt">beach</span> changes developed along the cross-shore direction. In terms of resilience, results showed a better response of the Portonovo <span class="hlt">beach</span> rather than the Marina di Pisa <span class="hlt">beach</span>. The different response might be ascribed to the grain-size that constitutes the <span class="hlt">beaches</span>: no physical process can rework the pebbles at Marina di Pisa once they are moved during the storms towards the back-end of the backshore or seaward of the step, thus preventing any <span class="hlt">beach</span> recovery process to take place. Since the awareness on storm impacts is more critical than in the past, the understanding of <span class="hlt">beach</span> recovery to extreme events needs new insights to combine the preservation of natural <span class="hlt">beach</span> evolution as well as maintenance for end-users. That is particularly pressing on coarse-grained <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, where the need to predict storm impact and recovery is much more vital considering that finding suitable sediment to refill the <span class="hlt">beach</span> is never an easy task.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bertoni, Duccio; Grottoli, Edoardo; Ciavola, Paolo; Sarti, Giovanni; Pozzebon, Alessandro</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">443</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFM.H42A..07O"> <span id="translatedtitle">Challenges in Projecting Sea Level Rise impacts on the Coastal Environment of South <span class="hlt">Florida</span> (Invited)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Due to flat topography, a highly transmissive groundwater aquifer, and a growing population with the associated infrastructure, South <span class="hlt">Florida’s</span> coastal environment is one of the most vulnerable areas to sea level rise. Current projections of sea level rise and the associated storm surges will have direct impacts on coastal <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and infrastructure, flood protection, freshwater aquifers, and both the isolated and regional wetlands. Uncertainties in current projections have made it difficult for regional and local governments to develop adaptation strategies as such measures will depend heavily on the temporal and spatial patterns of sea level rise in the coming decades. We demonstrate the vulnerability of both the built and natural environments of the coastal region and present the current efforts to understand and predict the sea level rise estimate that management agencies could employ in planning of adaptation strategies. In particular, the potential vulnerabilities of the flood control system as well as the threat to the water supply wellfields in the coastal belt will be presented. In an effort to understand the historical variability of sea level rise, we present linkages to natural phenomena such as Atlantic Multi-Decadal Oscillation, and the analytical methods we have developed to provide probabilistic projections of both mean sea level rise and the extremes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Obeysekera, J.; Park, J.; Irizarry-Ortiz, M. M.; Barnes, J. A.; Trimble, P.; Said, W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">444</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14765654"> <span id="translatedtitle">Convergent habitat segregation of Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) in southeastern Brazil and <span class="hlt">Florida</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">During the rainy season of 2001, the incidence of the dengue vectors Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus was examined in different habitats of two cities (Rio de Janeiro and Nova Iguaçu) in Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil, and in two cities (Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> and Boca Raton) in <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. Oviposition trap collections were performed in urban, suburban, and rural habitats in both areas. Our hypothesis that the abundances and frequencies of occurrence of Ae. aegypti and Ae albopictus are affected in opposite ways by increasing urbanization was only partially supported. City, habitat, and their interaction significantly affected the abundance of both species. Cities with high abundance of Ae. aegypti also had a high abundance of Ae. albopictus. The two species were most abundant in the cities of Rio de Janeiro state and the lowest in Boca Raton. Habitat had a significant but opposite effect on the abundances of Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus. In general, Ae. aegypti was most prevalent in highly urbanized areas and Ae. albopictus in rural, suburban, and vegetated urban areas in Rio de Janeiro state and <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. However, abundances of the two species were similar in most suburban areas. Analyses of frequencies of occurrence showed an unexpected high level of co-occurrence of both species in the same oviposition trap. Despite the different geographical origins of Ae. albopictus in Brazil and the United States, the habitats used by this recent invader are remarkably similar in the two countries. PMID:14765654</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Braks, Marieta A H; Honório, Nildimar A; Lourençqo-De-Oliveira, Ricardo; Juliano, Steven A; Lounibos, L Philip</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">445</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=GL-2002-001543&hterms=florida+coral+reef&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dflorida%2Bcoral%2Breef"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mysterious Black Water off <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s Gulf Coast</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In mid-December last year, a mysterious black water overtook the normally bluish green waters of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bay. Over the course of the winter, the extent of the water grew to encompass an area as big as Lake Okeechobee, <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, before subsiding over the last few weeks. These images taken by the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS), flying aboard the Orbview-2 satellite, show the progression of the black water over the last three months. The affected water sits along the southeastern coast of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> about fifty miles north of the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Keys. As of now, scientists do not know why the water appears black in satellite and aerial images or whether the water is harming the wildlife. They speculate that it could be due to an exotic algae bloom, an underwater fountain pushing up sediments from the ocean floor, or possibly chemical and sediment run-off from the nearby Shark River. Researchers at the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Marine Research Institute in St. Petersburg and the Mote Marine Research Institute in Sarasota are running tests to determine the chemical make-up of the water. No big fish kills have been reported in the area. But fishermen say the catch has been low this winter. In addition, the black water sits just north of the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Keys National Marine Sanctuary, which is home to one of the largest coral reef habitats in the United States. Toxic run-off from the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> coastline and motor boats in the area have already destroyed many of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s reefs. Scientists are concerned that if the extent of the black water grows again, it could endanger these reefs. Information provided by the Naples Daily News. For up-to-date images of the area, view these SeaWiFS Images of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bay. Image courtesy the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">446</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/wri7672"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hydrology of Lake County, <span class="hlt">Florida</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Lake County includes a 1,150 square-mile area consisting of ridges, uplands, and valleys in central-peninsular <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. About 32 percent of the county is covered by lakes, swamps, and marshes. Water requirements in 1970 averaged about 54 million gallons per day. About 85 percent of the water was obtained from wells; about 15 percent from lakes. The Floridan aquifer supplies almost all the ground water used in Lake County. Annual recharge to the Floridan aquifer averages about 7 inches over the county; runoff average 8.5 inches. The quality of ground and surface water in Lake County is in general good enough for most uses; however, the poor quality of Floridan-aquifer water in the St. John River Valley probably results from the upward movement of saline water along a fault zone. Surface water in Lake County is usually less mineralized than ground water but is more turbid and colored. (Woodard-USGS)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Knochenmus, Darwin D.; Hughes, G. H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1976-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">447</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18243682"> <span id="translatedtitle">Seasonal evolution of <span class="hlt">beach</span> waste and litter during the bathing season on the Catalan coast.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> waste and litter composition and evolution on popular urban (located in the main nucleus of the municipality) and urbanized (located in residential areas outside the main nucleus) <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of the Costa Brava (Catalan coast) were assessed during the bathing season. Waste and litter production (amount and composition) were affected by urbanization and varied during the summer. Urban <span class="hlt">beaches</span> had higher densities of waste deposition and lower percentages of organic, domestic and other miscellaneous waste than urbanized <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Litter characteristics were also influenced by type of <span class="hlt">beach</span>, and varied during the season as a consequence of <span class="hlt">beach</span> use and cleaning practices, but not environmental factors. Urbanized <span class="hlt">beaches</span> obtained higher scores for aesthetic quality of sand than urban <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, and small-sized litter tended to accumulate during the season in the <span class="hlt">beach</span> of Lloret Centre. The most important problems are management of recyclable materials, litter left by users on the sand, and separation of sand from litter. In addition, current efficiency of mechanical cleaning is low, especially in the withdrawal of cigarette butts. These analyses highlight problems that should be addressed in future management of area <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. PMID:18243682</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ariza, Eduard; Jiménez, José A; Sardá, Rafael</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">448</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013Geomo.199..106D"> <span id="translatedtitle">Global patterns in sandy <span class="hlt">beach</span> macrofauna: Species richness, abundance, biomass and body size</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Global patterns in species richness in sandy <span class="hlt">beach</span> ecosystems have been poorly understood until comparatively recently, because of the difficulty of compiling high-resolution databases at continental scales. We analyze information from more than 200 sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> around the world, which harbor hundreds of macrofauna species, and explore latitudinal trends in species richness, abundance and biomass. Species richness increases from temperate to tropical sites. Abundance follows contrasting trends depending on the slope of the <span class="hlt">beach</span>: in gentle slope <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, it is higher at temperate sites, whereas in steep-slope <span class="hlt">beaches</span> it is higher at the tropics. Biomass follows identical negative trends for both climatic regions at the whole range of <span class="hlt">beach</span> slopes, suggesting decreasing rates in carrying capacity of the environment towards reflective <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Various morphodynamic variables determine global trends in <span class="hlt">beach</span> macrofauna. Species richness, abundance and biomass are higher at dissipative than at reflective <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, whereas a body size follows the reverse pattern. A generalized linear model showed that large tidal range (which determines the vertical dimension of the intertidal habitat), small size of sand particles and flat <span class="hlt">beach</span> slope (a product of the interaction among wave energy, tidal range and grain size) are correlated with high species richness, suggesting that these parameters represent the most parsimonious variables for modelling patterns in sandy <span class="hlt">beach</span> macrofauna. Large-scale patterns indicate a scaling of abundance to a body size, suggesting that dissipative <span class="hlt">beaches</span> harbor communities with highest abundance and species with the smallest body sizes. Additional information for tropical and northern hemisphere sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> (underrepresented in our compilation) is required to decipher more conclusive trends, particularly in abundance, biomass and body size. Further research should integrate meaningful oceanographic variables, such as temperature and primary production, in deciphering latitudinal trends.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Defeo, Omar; McLachlan, Anton</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">449</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://dx.doi.org/10.1061/40926(239)133"> <span id="translatedtitle">Regional <span class="hlt">beach</span>/cliff system dynamics along the california coast</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The coast of California is comprised of both sandy shorelines and cliffed coastline, and in many areas these features spatially coincide. In order to better understand the regional trends of change along the California coast, the U.S. Geological Survey is quantifying both sandy shoreline change and coastal cliff retreat for the state. The resulting database was used to examine the dynamics of the <span class="hlt">beach</span>/cliff system. We found inconsistent evidence of a relationship between rates of cliff retreat and shoreline change on the spatial scale of 100-km cells. However, when the data are correlated within individual regions, a strong relationship exists between the geomorphology of the coast and the behavior of the <span class="hlt">beach</span>/cliff system. Areas of high-relief coast show negative correlations, indicating that higher rates of cliff retreat correlate with lower rates of shoreline erosion. In contrast, low- to moderate-relief coasts show strong positive correlations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hapke, C. J.; Reid, D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">450</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003ECSS...58...41H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Shorebird use of an exposed sandy <span class="hlt">beach</span> in southern California</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Frequent morning surveys of birds were conducted on 1 km of <span class="hlt">beach</span> in southern California to investigate shorebird use of an exposed sandy <span class="hlt">beach</span>. The overall mean abundance (98.6 individuals km -1), estimated biomass (9.6 kg km -1), and species richness (5.5 species km -1) of shorebirds observed were very high for a sandy <span class="hlt">beach</span> in the temperate zone. Eight species, sanderling ( Calidris alba), semipalmated plover ( Charadrius semipalmatus), marbled godwit ( Limosa fedoa), black-bellied plover ( Pluvialis squatarola), western sandpiper ( Calidris mauri), willet ( Catoptrophorus semipalmatus), surfbird ( Aphriza virgata), and whimbrel ( Numenius phaeopus), occurred in overall mean abundances >1 bird km -1 and accounted for 97% of the abundance and biomass of shorebirds. Sanderlings were the most abundant shorebird every year (64% of individuals and 35% of the biomass). Different species of abundant shorebirds exhibited distinct patterns of use of <span class="hlt">beach</span> habitat, including fall, spring, and winter peaks in abundance. Temporal variation in shorebird use on seasonal and interannual scales was associated with migration patterns, and also with habitat availability and condition. Seasonal variation in monthly mean abundance and estimated biomass of shorebirds varied over more than an order of magnitude and followed a similar pattern in each year, reaching maxima in the fall or winter (161-280 individuals km -1 and 15.4-23.9 kg km -1) and minima in May or June (3-11 individuals km -1 and 0.8-2.2 kg km -1). A minor peak in shorebird abundance and biomass coinciding with spring migration was observed in April of most years. The number of species of shorebirds observed in individual surveys ranged from 0 to 11 species km -1 and was positively and significantly correlated with abundance. Monthly mean species richness and the total species observed monthly followed similar seasonal patterns, ranging from annual maxima of 7.4-9.1 and 12-17 species km -1 between August and October to minima of 0.8-2.1 and 2-8 species km -1, respectively, during June. In contrast, species turnover was lowest (1.1-1.7) in October and November, and generally highest (2-4) during early summer (June). The amount of sandy intertidal habitat available to shorebirds on the transect was estimated using sand elevations and predicted tide heights. In the fall and winter, the abundance of shorebirds was significantly and positively correlated with tide height, possibly reflecting feeding opportunities and high tide refuge effects during the highest tides. In the spring when sand levels were low, the abundance of shorebirds was negatively correlated with tide height. Prey availability, <span class="hlt">beach</span> condition and the local availability, and condition of alternative foraging habitats may influence those relationships. Interannual variations in shorebird use and <span class="hlt">beach</span> condition were observed in the course of the study. During an El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) event (1997-1998), the extent of sandy habitat was greatly reduced and intertidal habitat was mostly converted to rocky substrate. The overall abundance of shorebirds and the mean abundance of some common species (e.g. sanderling) were depressed, and an uncommon species (surfbird, A. virgata) was unusually abundant during the ENSO event. In summary, the results suggest that sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are important habitat for many species of shorebirds, particularly in areas where alternative coastal foraging habitats, such as coastal wetlands, have become scarce. Understanding the dynamics of and threats to exposed sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> may be increasingly important for shorebird conservation in many coastal regions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hubbard, David M.; Dugan, Jenifer E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">451</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009EGUGA..1111593Y"> <span id="translatedtitle">Documenting the global impacts of <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand mining</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">For centuries, <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand has been mined for use as aggregate in concrete, for heavy minerals, and for construction fill. The global extent and impact of this phenomenon has gone relatively unnoticed by academics, NGOs, and major news sources. Most reports of sand mining activities are found at the very local scale (if the mining is ever documented at all). Yet, sand mining in many localities has resulted in the complete destruction of <span class="hlt">beach</span> (and related) ecosystems along with severe impacts to coastal protection and tourism. The Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines at Western Carolina University and Beachcare.org have initiated the construction of a global database of <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand mining activities. The database is being built through a combination of site visits and through the data mining of media resources, peer reviewed papers, and reports from private and governmental entities. Currently, we have documented sand mining in 35 countries on 6 continents representing the removal of millions of cubic meters of sand. Problems extend from Asia where critical infrastructure has been disrupted by sand mining to the Caribbean where policy reform has swiftly followed a highly publicized theft of sand. The Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines recently observed extensive sand mining in Morocco at the regional scale. Tens of kilometers of <span class="hlt">beach</span> have been stripped of sand and the mining continues southward reducing hope of a thriving tourism-based economy. Problems caused by <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand mining include: destruction of natural <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and the ecosystems they protect (e.g. dunes, wetlands), habitat loss for globally important species (e.g. turtles, shorebirds), destruction of nearshore marine ecosystems, increased shoreline erosion rates, reduced protection from storms, tsunamis, and wave events, and economic losses through tourist abandonment and loss of coastal aesthetics. The threats posed by sand mining are made even more critical given the prospect of a significant rise in global sea level over the coming decades. Most governments recognize the local impacts of sand mining and mining activities are illegal in many localities. However, enforcement of these protections has been problematic and there has been little pressure to stop the practice from local or international environmental groups. In many cases, addressing the issue of sand mining requires addressing the local issues that allow it to persist. This includes poverty, corruption, and unregulated development. In areas where <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand mining significantly supports the local economy, care needs to be given that local workers are given alternative means of income, and builders are provided an affordable substitute for the sand (e.g. crushed rock). Regardless, it is time for both academics and NGOs to address the cumulative environmental impacts of the direct destruction of the world's <span class="hlt">beaches</span> through mining activities.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Young, R.; Griffith, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">452</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB2013101263"> <span id="translatedtitle">Economic Profile of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s Marine Life Industry.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The marine life industry in <span class="hlt">Florida</span> is defined as the harvest of live marine specimens (fish and invertebrate species including plants, live rock and sand, and small critters) for commercial use, primarily aquariums. This paper summarizes data collected o...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">C. M. Adams D. J. Lee J. W. Milon R. L. Degner S. L. Larkin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">453</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=56589"> <span id="translatedtitle">COLEMAN-EVANS WOOD PRESERVING, WHITEHOUSE, <span class="hlt">FLORIDA</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Coleman-Evans Wood Preserving facility in Whitehouse, <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, required technical support to reassure the local citizens that the selected remediation technology (thermal desorption) would be feasable and safe. Later technical support was required to help the contractor fix...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">454</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-06-02/pdf/2010-13192.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">75 FR 30870 - <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Disaster #FL-00053</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> dated 05/25/2010. Incident: Freezing Temperatures and Sinkholes. Incident Period: 01/02/2010 through 02/01/2010. Effective Date: 05/25/2010. Physical Loan...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-06-02</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">455</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://fl.water.usgs.gov/Abstracts/c1137_schiffer.html"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hydrology of Central <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Lakes - A Primer</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">INTRODUCTION Lakes are among the most valued natural resources of central <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. The landscape of central <span class="hlt">Florida</span> is riddled with lakeswhen viewed from the air, it almost seems there is more water than land. <span class="hlt">Florida</span> has more naturally formed lakes than other southeastern States, where many lakes are created by building dams across streams. The abundance of lakes on the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> peninsula is a result of the geology and geologic history of the State. An estimated 7,800 lakes in <span class="hlt">Florida</span> are greater than 1 acre in surface area. Of these, 35 percent are located in just four counties (fig. 1): Lake, Orange, Osceola, and Polk (Hughes, 1974b). Lakes add to the aesthetic and commercial value of the area and are used by many residents and visitors for fishing, boating, swimming, and other types of outdoor recreation. Lakes also are used for other purposes such as irrigation, flood control, water supply, and navigation. Residents and visitors commonly ask questions such as Whyare there so many lakes here?, Why is my lake drying up (or flooding)?, or Is my lake spring-fed? These questions indicate that the basic hydrology of lakes and the interaction of lakes with ground water and surface water are not well understood by the general population. Because of the importance of lakes to residents of central <span class="hlt">Florida</span> and the many questions and misconceptions about lakes, this primer was prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the St. Johns River Water Management District and the South <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Water Management District. The USGS has been collecting hydrologic data in central <span class="hlt">Florida</span> since the 1920s, obtaining valuable information that has been used to better understand the hydrology of the water resources of central <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, including lakes. In addition to data collection, as of 1994, the USGS had published 66 reports and maps on central <span class="hlt">Florida</span> lakes (Garcia and Hoy, 1995). The main purpose of this primer is to describe the hydrology of lakes in central <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, the interactions between lakes and ground- and surface-waters, and to describe how these interactions affect lake water levels. Included are descriptions of the basic geology and geomorphology of central <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, origins of central <span class="hlt">Florida</span> lakes, factors that affect lake water levels, lake water quality, and common methods of improving water quality. The geographic area discussed in this primer is approximate (fig. 1) and includes west and east-central <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, extending from the Gulf of Mexico to the Atlantic Ocean coastlines, northward into Marion, Putnam, and Flagler Counties, and southward to Lake Okeechobee. The information presented here was obtained from the many publications available on lakes in central <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, as well as from publications on <span class="hlt">Florida</span> geology, hydrology, and primers on ground water, surface water, and water quality. Many publications are available that provide more detailed information on lake water quality, and this primer is not intended as an extensive treatise on that subject. The reader is referred to the reference section of this primer for sources of more detailed information on lake water quality. Lakes discussed in this report are identified in figure 2. Technical terms used in the report are shown in bold italics and are defined in the glossary. The classification of some water bodies as lakes is highly subjective. What one individual considers a lake another might consider a pond. Generally, any water- filled depression or group of depressions in the land surface could be considered a lake. Lakes differ from swamps or wetlands in the type and amount of vegetation, water depth, and some water-quality characteristics. Lakes typically have emergent vegetation along the shoreline with a large expanse of open water in the center. Swamps or wetlands, on the other hand, are characterized by a water surface interrupted by the emergence of many varieties of plant life, from saw grasses to cypress trees. Lakes may be na</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Schiffer, Donna M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">456</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/midlit10.sci.splglades/"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s Everglades: The River of Grass</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this lesson designed to enhance literacy skills, students learn about the unique environment of southern <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s Everglades and gain insights into the interrelatedness of living things, nonliving things, and climate.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Foundation, Wgbh E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-12-13</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">457</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-09-26/pdf/2013-23491.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">78 FR 59410 - <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Disaster #FL-00093</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...for the State of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> dated 09/17/2013. Incident: Severe Storms and...26/2013. Effective Date: 09/17/2013. Physical Loan Application Deadline...Loan Application Deadline Date: 06/17/2014. ADDRESSES: Submit completed...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-09-26</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">458</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB231632"> <span id="translatedtitle">Native Reptiles and Amphibians of South <span class="hlt">Florida</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The 74 native species of reptiles and amphibians of South <span class="hlt">Florida</span> (Lake Okeechobee southward) are listed. Their distributions among six major habitats, xeric, mesic, alternohygric, hygric, halohygric, and edificarian-ruderal are noted, with reference to t...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. P. Crowder</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1974-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">459</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB235214"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Exotic Vertebrates of South <span class="hlt">Florida</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Species of introduced exotic vertebrates of south <span class="hlt">Florida</span> (Lake Okeechobee southward) are identified and described. The principal factors responsible for their introductions are explored and recommendations are made for alleviation of current problems cau...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. P. Crowder</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1974-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">460</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title40-vol23/pdf/CFR-2013-title40-vol23-sec131-44.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">40 CFR 131.44 - <span class="hlt">Florida</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Standards § 131.44 <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. (a) Phosphorus Rule. (1) The document entitled...62-302.540, Water Quality Standards for Phosphorus Within the Everglades Protection Area...25, 2005, as annotated by EPAâ (Phosphorus Rule), is incorporated by...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" 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id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">461</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=64500"> <span id="translatedtitle">ECOLOGICAL CONDITION OF SOUTH <span class="hlt">FLORIDA</span> ESTUARIES</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An assessment of the ecological condition of south <span class="hlt">Florida</span> estuaries based on regional probabilistic monitoring was conducted during the summer of 1995. Samples and data were collected on water and sediment quality, benthos, and fish tissue contaminants. Elevated concentrations o...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">462</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB2008108548"> <span id="translatedtitle">Water-Supply Problems in Southwest <span class="hlt">Florida</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The rapid urbanization of many parts of southwest <span class="hlt">Florida</span> has created numerous water-supply problems for both public and private water systems. The increased water demands by the expanding population, the increased water requirements for commercial and ag...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. H. Boggess</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1968-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">463</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ERSSB858"> <span id="translatedtitle">Pesticide Use in <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s Grapefruit Packinghouses.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A USDA survey of 103 <span class="hlt">Florida</span> grapefruit packinghouses showed that 74 reported postharvest pesticide applications, most often using imazalil, sodium orthophenylphenate (SOPP), and thia bendazole (TBZ). These three postharvest pesticides were applied to the...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. C. Buzby J. M. Love</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">464</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB87188801"> <span id="translatedtitle">Exposure Assessment Modeling for Aldicarb in <span class="hlt">Florida</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A modeling study was performed to assess aldicarb concentrations in drinking water wells in the vicinity of citrus groves in <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. Areas in the citrus growing region were identified, with respect to the unsaturated and saturated zones, in which transpo...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. D. Dean, D. F. Atwood</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">465</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB2012102820"> <span id="translatedtitle">Bibliography of South <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Wading Birds.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The wading birds of south <span class="hlt">Florida</span> have attracted the attention of naturalists, biologists and conservationists for decades. These species of herons, ibis, spoonbills, and storks have figured importantly in national and international conservation efforts a...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. A. Kushlan L. C. McEwan M. C. Baumann</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1978-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">466</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-11-07/pdf/2011-28702.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">76 FR 68804 - <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Disaster #FL-00064</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of <span class="hlt">FLORIDA</span> dated 10/27/2011. Incident: Severe Storms and Tornadoes. Incident Period: 10/18/2011. Effective Date: 10/27/2011. Physical Loan Application Deadline Date:...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-11-07</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">467</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1985EOSTr..66..434M"> <span id="translatedtitle">FACTS: The <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Atlantic Coast Transport Study</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">As a result of concerns expressed by the State of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> regarding possible effects from oil, gas, and mineral mining activities that result from the July 1983 lease sale in the offing of the southeastern United States, a 2-year physical oceanographic study has been initiated off the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> east coast. The program is supported by the Minerals Management Service (MMS) of the U.S. Department of the Interior and is administered by the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Institute of Oceanography (FIO) at the University of Southern <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, St. Petersburg. With pun intended, the program is known as FACTS and is nestled both in time and space between the NOAA/ONR-supported Subtropical Atlantic Climate Study (STACS) to the south [Molinari, 1983] and the MMS-supported South Atlantic Bight (SAB) program to the north [Lee, 1983]. The area of interest is shown in Figure 1.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Maul, George A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">468</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/36606710"> <span id="translatedtitle">Brevetoxin composition in water and marine aerosol along a <span class="hlt">Florida</span> <span class="hlt">beach</span>: Assessing potential human exposure to marine biotoxins</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The toxic dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis, produces a suite of polyether neurotoxins (brevetoxins, PbTx) that cause massive fish kills and neurotoxic shellfish poisoning. A unique characteristic of K. brevis blooms is the associated airborne (aerosolized) toxin component causing respiratory irritation to humans and other mammals. This study was undertaken in collaboration with human respiratory effects studies to establish the type and</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. H. Pierce; M. S. Henry; P. C. Blum; S. L. Hamel; B. Kirkpatrick; Y. S. Cheng; Y. Zhou; C. M. Irvin; J. Naar; A. Weidner; L. E. Fleming; L. C. Backer; D. G. Baden</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">469</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40123881"> <span id="translatedtitle">Comparisons of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal species and inocula formulations in a commercial nursery and on diverse <span class="hlt">Florida</span> <span class="hlt">beaches</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">For efficient use of mycorrhizal inoculum the effectiveness of the isolate used and the rate of application required for maximum colonization must be known. The objectives of this research were to (1) define the lower limit of inoculum density required for maximum colonization of Uniola paniculata in a commercial nursery and (2) evaluate the performance of a selected native dune</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. M. Sylvia; A. G. Jarstfer; M. Vosátka</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">470</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/r1478767501r56ww.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Impact of trichloroethylene contaminated groundwater discharged to the