Sample records for daytona beach florida

  1. Aerial gamma ray and magnetic survey: Gainesville and Daytona Beach quadrangles, Florida. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-03-01

    The Gainesville and Daytona Beach quadrangles cover 9250 square miles of land in north-central Florida. The area includes moderately thick sections of platform sediments covering the pre-Cretaceous Peninsular Arch. Surficial materials are composed of Tertiary or more recent deposits. A search of available literature revealed no known significant uranium deposits. Sixty-four uranium anomalies were detected and are discussed briefly in this report. All appear to be related to culture. One well-defined group of anomalies appear to have higher uranium concentrations and are closely associated with the Hawthorne Formation. These few anomalies are considered significant and suggest that more detailed local resource studies should concentrate in this area. Magnetic data appear to suggest complexities in the Paleozoic and older basement material. While some linear features appear related to known diabase dikes, several isolated features are not accounted for by known information.

  2. Daytona Beach Community College's Leadership Development Institute: Cultivating Leaders from within

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinton, Rita

    2006-01-01

    Many industries in the U.S., including higher education, will face employee shortages in the coming years, due in large part to the departure of baby-boomers from the workforce. In anticipation of this reduction in the workforce, and knowing that competition for those in the job market will be fierce, Daytona Beach Community College has created a…

  3. Modifications in the DACUM Process of Curriculum Development at Daytona Beach Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klingman, Peter D.; Gardner, W. Aubrey

    The DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process has helped Daytona Beach Community College (DBCC) resolve several important issues in competency-based instruction. DACUM involves expert workers in defining and describing their jobs. A panel of workers and supervisors identify general areas of competence required in their jobs; specify skills within…

  4. Debra J. DiChiara, MSN, RN University of Central Florida College of Nursing

    E-print Network

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    Debra J. DiChiara, MSN, RN University of Central Florida College of Nursing: Daytona Beach Campus of Central Florida Nursing Ed Instructor 2004 BSN University of Central Florida Nursing Nurse Education 1980 AA Daytona State College Liberal Arts Nurse 1978 ADN Daytona State College Nursing Registered Nurse

  5. DASC Conference Daytona Beach, FL, 14-18 October 2001 Paper #154 Session 2A FLIGHT DECK DISPLAY OF AIRBORNE TRAFFIC WAKE VORTICES

    E-print Network

    Stanford University

    20th DASC Conference Daytona Beach, FL, 14-18 October 2001 Paper #154 Session 2A 1 FLIGHT DECK governing the safe minimum separation distance between aircraft is the hazard associated with the wake systems, such as the Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance System (TCAS), that provide ground independent

  6. Sarah Landreville, MSN, RN University of Central Florida College of Nursing

    E-print Network

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    Sarah Landreville, MSN, RN University of Central Florida College of Nursing: Regional Campus, FL Nursing 2002 ADN Daytona Beach Community College Daytona Beach, FL Nursing II. LICENSURE/CERTIFICATION RN Florida, 9189388 Psychiatric & Mental Health Nursing ANCC Board Certified, Exp. 10/2014 III

  7. Rip Channel Morphodynamics at Pensacola Beach, Florida 

    E-print Network

    Labude, Daniel

    2012-08-15

    80% of all lifeguard related rescues along the beaches of northwest Florida are believed to be related to rip currents. A rip current is the strong flow of water, seaward extending from the beach to the breaker line. It has previously been shown...

  8. The Florida Beach Case and the Road to Judicial Takings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael C. Blumm; Elizabeth B. Dawson

    2011-01-01

    In Stop the Beach Renourishment v. Florida Department of Environmental Protection, the U.S. Supreme Court unanimously upheld a state beach restoration project against landowner claims of an unconstitutional taking of the property. This result was not nearly as surprising as the fact that the Court granted certiorari on a case that turned on an obscure aspect of Florida property law:

  9. Thousands of migrating sharks spotted along South Florida coast, beaches

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    Thousands of migrating sharks spotted along South Florida coast, beaches closed Chopper VIDEO captures sharks migrating Posted: March 7, 2013 By: Katie Johnson, WPTV.com PALM BEACH, Fla. - Seasonal of migrating sharks have been spotted by lifeguards, anglers and swimmers, and confirmed by television news

  10. The Effects of an Education Campaign on Beach User Perceptions of Beach-Nesting Birds in Pinellas County, Florida

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alison A. Ormsby; Elizabeth A. Forys

    2010-01-01

    Much of the suitable habitat for birds that nest on beaches in Florida is managed by municipal and county governments whose primary goal is human recreation. Birds attempting to nest on these beaches are exposed to higher levels of human disturbance and predation by human-associated species than birds on more natural, protected beaches. An education program about the birds was

  11. Economic Impact of THE PLAYERS Championship Golf Tournament at Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida, March 2005

    E-print Network

    Florida, University of

    1 Economic Impact of THE PLAYERS Championship Golf Tournament at Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida, March in Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida. This event is part of the PGA TOUR and is operated by PGA TOUR Inc. Ponte both Jacksonville (to the northwest) and St. Augustine (to the south). Ponte Vedra is also the world

  12. Effects of Hurricane Eloise on beach and coastal structures, Florida Panhandle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert A. Morton

    1976-01-01

    Natural process-response changes in beach and dune configuration attendant with passage of Hurricane Eloise caused extensive structural damage to residential and commercial establishments in the vicinity of Panama City Beach, Florida. Damage was largely attributed to storm surge and wave set-up with subsequent beach scour; wind damage and flooding were minimal. Dune retreat and scour behind failed seawalls (from 12

  13. Integrated solid waste management of Palm Beach County, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    The subject document reports the results of an in-depth investigation of the fiscal year 1992 cost of the Palm Beach County, Florida integrated municipal solid waste management system (IMSWMS), the energy consumed to operate the system, and the environmental performance requirements for each of the system`s waste-processing and disposal facilities. Actual data from records kept by participants is reported in this document. Every effort was made to minimize the use of assumptions, and no attempt is made to interpret the data reported. Analytical approaches are documented so that interested analysts may perform manipulation or further analysis of the data. As such, the report is a reference document for MSW management professionals who are interested in the actual costs and energy consumption for a one-year period, of an operating IMSWMS.

  14. 33 CFR 334.605 - Meloy Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Miami Beach, Florida; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Meloy Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Miami Beach, Florida; restricted area. 334...Meloy Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Miami Beach, Florida; restricted area. ...Base Commander, U.S. Coast Guard Base Miami Beach or his/her designated...

  15. 33 CFR 334.605 - Meloy Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Miami Beach, Florida; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Meloy Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Miami Beach, Florida; restricted area. 334...Meloy Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Miami Beach, Florida; restricted area. ...Base Commander, U.S. Coast Guard Base Miami Beach or his/her designated...

  16. Origin of the epeirogenic uplift of Pliocene-Pleistocene beach ridges in Florida and development of the Florida karst

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. D. Opdyke; D. P. Spangler; D. L. Smith; D. S. Jones; R. C. Lindquist

    1984-01-01

    Marine fossils of Pleistocene age are known to occur in beach ridges near the border of northern Florida and southern Georgia at elevations of between 42 and 49 m above mean sea level. No evidence exists for a massive melt-off of glacial ice, which would be required to raise sea level to these elevations. Florida, therefore, must have been uplifted

  17. HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS WASTE CHARACTERIZATION STUDY FOR PALM BEACH COUNTY, FLORIDA: A MITE PROGRAM EVALUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objectives of the Household hazardous Waste Characterization Study (the HHW Study) were to quantify the annual household hazardous waste (HHW) tonnages disposed in Palm Beach County, Florida's (the county) residential solid waste (characterized in this study as municipal soli...

  18. Oil spill nears the beaches of Florida, and the leak may not be plugged before Christmas

    E-print Network

    Belogay, Eugene A.

    Oil spill nears the beaches of Florida, and the leak may not be plugged before Christmas By David governor Charlie Crist warned mats of weathered oil and tar balls from the Gulf of Mexico spill could hit come up with ideas on how to stop the disastrous oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. The 'Avatar

  19. Black Immigrant Mothers in Palm Beach County, Florida, and Their Children's Readiness for School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rich, Lauren; Spielberger, Julie; D'Angelo, Angela Valdovinos

    2012-01-01

    This report compares the circumstances and characteristics of Black immigrant mothers in Palm Beach County, Florida, to those of Latina immigrant and Black native-born mothers, focusing on those living in distressed areas. The study also compares the early developmental outcomes of their children. When controlling for parental and child…

  20. South Florida Sun-Sentinel.com Job growth is expanding in West Palm Beach, Miami

    E-print Network

    Belogay, Eugene A.

    South Florida Sun-Sentinel.com Job growth is expanding in West Palm Beach, Miami By Donna Gehrke-White 3:48 PM EDT, October 10, 2011 The number of jobs is expanding in Miami but not growing as fast. New jobs in Miami-Dade County are expected to grow by about 3 percent by the end of the year

  1. Atlantic coastline of Florida as seen from the Apollo 7 spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Atlantic coastline of Florida from Daytona Beach southward to Palm Beach area, as seen from the Apollo 7 spacecraft during its 17th revolution of the earth. Photographed from an altitude of 123 nautical miles, at ground elapsed time of 27 hours and 12 minutes. Cape Kennedy area is in center of picture. Small cumulus cloud puffs cover part of the Kennedy Space Center's Launch Complex 39, although the Vehicle Assembly Building and crawlerways can be seen. The city of Orlando, some 50 miles inland from Cape Kennedy, is also in the photograph.

  2. Relationship between enterococcal levels and sediment biofilms at recreational beaches in South Florida.

    PubMed

    Piggot, Alan M; Klaus, James S; Johnson, Sara; Phillips, Matthew C; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M

    2012-09-01

    Enterococci, recommended at the U.S. federal level for monitoring water quality at marine recreational beaches, have been found to reside and grow within beach sands. However, the environmental and ecological factors affecting enterococcal persistence remain poorly understood, making it difficult to determine levels of fecal pollution and assess human health risks. Here we document the presence of enterococci associated with beach sediment biofilms at eight south Florida recreational beaches. Enterococcal levels were highest in supratidal sands, where they displayed a nonlinear, unimodal relationship with extracellular polymeric secretions (EPS), the primary component of biofilms. Enterococcal levels peaked at intermediate levels of EPS, suggesting that biofilms may promote the survival of enterococci but also inhibit enterococci as the biofilm develops within beach sands. Analysis of bacterial community profiles determined by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphisms showed the bacterial communities of supratidal sediments to be significantly different from intertidal and subtidal communities; however, no differences were observed in bacterial community compositions associated with different EPS concentrations. Our results suggest that supratidal sands are a microbiologically unique environment favorable for the incorporation and persistence of enterococci within beach sediment biofilms. PMID:22706061

  3. Relationship between Enterococcal Levels and Sediment Biofilms at Recreational Beaches in South Florida

    PubMed Central

    Piggot, Alan M.; Johnson, Sara; Phillips, Matthew C.; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M.

    2012-01-01

    Enterococci, recommended at the U.S. federal level for monitoring water quality at marine recreational beaches, have been found to reside and grow within beach sands. However, the environmental and ecological factors affecting enterococcal persistence remain poorly understood, making it difficult to determine levels of fecal pollution and assess human health risks. Here we document the presence of enterococci associated with beach sediment biofilms at eight south Florida recreational beaches. Enterococcal levels were highest in supratidal sands, where they displayed a nonlinear, unimodal relationship with extracellular polymeric secretions (EPS), the primary component of biofilms. Enterococcal levels peaked at intermediate levels of EPS, suggesting that biofilms may promote the survival of enterococci but also inhibit enterococci as the biofilm develops within beach sands. Analysis of bacterial community profiles determined by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphisms showed the bacterial communities of supratidal sediments to be significantly different from intertidal and subtidal communities; however, no differences were observed in bacterial community compositions associated with different EPS concentrations. Our results suggest that supratidal sands are a microbiologically unique environment favorable for the incorporation and persistence of enterococci within beach sediment biofilms. PMID:22706061

  4. Alongshore variation in the rip current hazard at Pensacola Beach, Florida

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chris Houser; Gemma Barrett; Daniel Labude

    2011-01-01

    Many drowning and near drownings at Pensacola Beach, Florida are attributed to rip currents, the strong seaward-flowing currents\\u000a that extend from the shoreline to the line of breakers and sometimes beyond. While surf forecasts assume that the rip hazard\\u000a is uniform alongshore and that the (erosion) rips are ephemeral features, evidence is presented to suggest that the rip hazard\\u000a at

  5. Palm Beach Post investigation: What Florida lawmakers are worth

    E-print Network

    Belogay, Eugene A.

    , and the gap is growing. The disparity in Florida echoes a nationwide trend. According to an analysis. Rick Scott, for one, a former health care executive, spent $73 million of his reported $218 million net With Congress making decisions in areas such as national defense, financial regulation and health care

  6. Florida red tide and human health: a pilot beach conditions reporting system to minimize human exposure.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Currier, Robert; Nierenberg, Kate; Reich, Andrew; Backer, Lorraine C; Stumpf, Richard; Fleming, Lora; Kirkpatrick, Gary

    2008-08-25

    With over 50% of the US population living in coastal counties, the ocean and coastal environments have substantial impacts on coastal communities. While many of the impacts are positive, such as tourism and recreation opportunities, there are also negative impacts, such as exposure to harmful algal blooms (HABs) and water borne pathogens. Recent advances in environmental monitoring and weather prediction may allow us to forecast these potential adverse effects and thus mitigate the negative impact from coastal environmental threats. One example of the need to mitigate adverse environmental impacts occurs on Florida's west coast, which experiences annual blooms, or periods of exuberant growth, of the toxic dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis. K. brevis produces a suite of potent neurotoxins called brevetoxins. Wind and wave action can break up the cells, releasing toxin that can then become part of the marine aerosol or sea spray. Brevetoxins in the aerosol cause respiratory irritation in people who inhale it. In addition, asthmatics who inhale the toxins report increase upper and lower airway symptoms and experience measurable changes in pulmonary function. Real-time reporting of the presence or absence of these toxic aerosols will allow asthmatics and local coastal residents to make informed decisions about their personal exposures, thus adding to their quality of life. A system to protect public health that combines information collected by an Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) has been designed and implemented in Sarasota and Manatee Counties, Florida. This system is based on real-time reports from lifeguards at the eight public beaches. The lifeguards provide periodic subjective reports of the amount of dead fish on the beach, apparent level of respiratory irritation among beach-goers, water color, wind direction, surf condition, and the beach warning flag they are flying. A key component in the design of the observing system was an easy reporting pathway for the lifeguards to minimize the amount of time away from their primary duties. Specifically, we provided a Personal Digital Assistant for each of the eight beaches. The portable unit allows the lifeguards to report from their guard tower. The data are transferred via wireless Internet to a website hosted on the Mote Marine Laboratory Sarasota Operations of the Coastal Ocean Observation Laboratories (SO COOL) server. The system has proven to be robust and well received by the public. The system has reported variability from beach to beach and has provided vital information to users to minimize their exposure to toxic marine aerosols. PMID:18501955

  7. Journal of Coastal Research 24 1 7083 West Palm Beach, Florida January 2008 Geospatial Analysis of Barrier Island Width of Two Segments

    E-print Network

    Culver, Stephen J.

    , such as construction of barrier dune ridges, planting of stabilizing vegetation, and urban development, can curtailJournal of Coastal Research 24 1 70­83 West Palm Beach, Florida January 2008 Geospatial Analysis-sustaining processes. Journal of Coastal Research, 24(1), 70­83. West Palm Beach (Florida), ISSN 0749- 0208

  8. Journal of Coastal Research SI 59 61-75 West Palm Beach, Florida 2011 Lack of Evidence for Onshore Sediment Transport from Deep

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    : Coastal erosion, sediment budget, Fire Island, depth of closure, cross-shore transport, longshore Journal of Coastal Research SI 59 61-75 West Palm Beach, Florida 2011 Lack of Evidence, Journal of Coastal Research, Special Issue, No. 59, pp. 61-75. West Palm Beach (Florida), ISSN 0749

  9. Journal of Coastal Research SI 59 150-155 West Palm Beach, Florida 2011 Analysis of Packery Channel Public Access Boat Ramp Shoreline

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Journal of Coastal Research SI 59 150-155 West Palm Beach, Florida 2011 Analysis of Packery of Coastal Research, Special Issue, No. 59, pp. 150-155. West Palm Beach (Florida), ISSN 0749 is the likely mechanism for failure. Typical sources of hydrodynamic forcing that can lead to toe erosion

  10. Earliest art in the Americas: incised image of a proboscidean on a mineralized extinct animal bone from Vero Beach, Florida

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Barbara A. Purdy; Kevin S. Jones; John J. Mecholsky; Gerald Bourne; Richard C. Hulbert; Bruce J. MacFadden; Krista L. Church; Michael W. Warren; Thomas F. Jorstad; Dennis J. Stanford; Melvin J. Wachowiak; Robert J. Speakman

    2011-01-01

    A fragmented fossil bone incised with the figure of a proboscidean was recently found at Vero Beach, Florida near the location where Late Pleistocene fauna and human bones were recovered from 1913 to 1916. This engraving may represent the oldest and only existing example of Terminal Pleistocene art depicting a proboscidean in the Americas. Because of the uniqueness, rarity, and

  11. Journal of Coastal Research 25 1 822 West Palm Beach, Florida January 2009 Geomorphologic Evolution of Barrier Islands along the

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Evolution of Barrier Islands along the Northern U.S. Gulf of Mexico and Implications for Engineering Design, G.W., 2009. Geomorphologic evolution of barrier islands along the northern U.S. Gulf of Mexico Beach (Florida), ISSN 0749-0208. Aspects of northern Gulf of Mexico (NGOM) (Louisiana, Mississippi

  12. The ecological condition of Gulf of Mexico resources from Perdido Key to Port St. Joe, Florida, USA: part I. coastal beach resources.

    PubMed

    Smith, Lisa M; Didonato, Eva M; Harwell, Linda C; Nestlerode, Janet A; Summers, J Kevin

    2007-05-01

    Using the approach established by EPA's Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP), a shoreline monitoring survey was conducted in August and September 1999, encompassing the Florida Panhandle from Perdido Key, Florida to Port St. Joe, Florida. The objective of this survey was to demonstrate the use of a probabilistic survey for monitoring and estimating the condition of swimmable beach areas. Thirty stations were sampled using a probabilistic sampling design. Hydrographic data were collected in addition to samples for water chemistry. Bacterial indicators, enterococci and fecal coliforms, were enumerated from the water according to the EPA Beaches Environmental Assessment Closure and Health (BEACH) Program and Florida state guidelines. Additional criteria for site condition included the presence or absence of primary and secondary dunes, anthropogenic debris and vegetation. Based on EMAP evaluation guidelines and Florida state criteria, a baseline assessment of the condition of the Gulf of Mexico beach resources surveyed is presented. PMID:16957844

  13. Public supply water use, Palm Beach County, Florida, 1978-82

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, W.L.; Alvarez, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    Public supply water-use data are listed for 32 utilities in Palm Beach County, Florida, for 1978 through 1982. The data are tabulated as monthly and yearly untreated water withdrawals from each public supply utility. Utilities using ground water as a source are listed separately from those using surface-water sources. In 1978, the total public supply water withdrawal in the county was 37,580.64 million gallons, of which 74.0 percent (27,823.22 million gallons) was ground water. By 1982, the total withdrawal had increased to 43,264.16 million gallons, of which 77.5 percent (33,544.52 million gallons) was ground water. Nearly 57 percent of the ground-water withdrawal was in southeast Palm Beach County (Zone 1) during 1982. The greatest surface-water withdrawal during this time was from Clear Lake and Lake Mangonia (Zone 2) and amounted to 79.3 percent of the county 's total surface-water withdrawal. (USGS)

  14. THE APPLICATION OF PEPTIDE NUCLEIC ACID PROBES FOR RAPID DETECTION AND ENUMERATION OF EUBACTERIA, STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS AND PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA IN RECREATIONAL BEACHES OF S. FLORIDA. (R828830)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A novel chemiluminescent in situ hybridization technique using peptide nucleic acids (PNA) was adapted for the detection of bacteria in beach sand and recreational waters in South Florida. The simultaneous detection and enumeration of eubacteria and the novel indicators, S...

  15. Geologic and hydrologic data from a test-monitor well at Fernandina Beach, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, David P.

    1980-01-01

    A 2,102-foot observation well was drilled at Fernandina Beach, Florida, to obtain geologic and hydrologic data. Drill cuttings, water samples, and water-level measurements were collected. Geologist's, driller's, and geophysical logs were completed. The well is constructed with 12-inch diameter casing to a depth of 515 feet and 6-inch diameter casing from 515 to 2,000 feet. The remainder is open hole. The uppermost 500 feet of material penetrated by the well consists of sand, clay, limestone, and dolomite. In the remainder of the hole, the material consists of fragmental and granular limestone and massive to finely crystalline dolomite, which comprise the Floridan aquifer in the area. After the well was completed, water levels in the monitored zone, 2,000 to 2,102 feet, were above land surface. During July and August 1979, water levels ranged from about 8 to 13 feet above land surface. Chloride concentrations of water sampled through the drill stem from a depth of 632 to 2,039 feet ranged from 25 to 710 milligrams per liter. Chloride increased markedly below 2,039 feet to a maximum of 7,800 milligrams per liter at 2,094 feet. After completion of the well, chloride was 8,100 milligrams per liter. (USGS)

  16. Establishment of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and other microorganisms on a beach replenishment site in Florida.

    PubMed

    Sylvia, D M; Will, M E

    1988-02-01

    Beach replenishment is a widely used method of controlling coastal erosion. To reduce erosional losses from wind, beach grasses are often planted on the replenishment sands. However, there is little information on the microbial populations in this material that may affect plant establishment and growth. The objectives of this research were to document changes in the populations of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungi and other soil microorganisms in replenishment materials and to determine whether roots of transplanted beach grasses become colonized by beneficial microbes. The study was conducted over a 2-year period on a replenishment project in northeastern Florida. Three sampling locations were established at 1-km intervals along the beach. Each location consisted of three plots: an established dune, replenishment sand planted with Uniola paniculata and Panicum sp., and replenishment sand left unplanted. Fungal and bacterial populations increased rapidly in the rhizosphere of beach grasses in the planted plots. However, no bacteria were recovered that could fix significant amounts of N(2). The VAM fungi established slowly on the transplanted grasses. Even after two growing seasons, levels of root colonization and sporulation were significantly below those found in the established dune. There was a shift in the dominant VAM fungi found in the planted zone with respect to those in the established dunes. The most abundant species recovered from the established dunes were Glomus deserticola, followed by Acaulospora scrobiculata and Scutellospora weresubiae. The VAM fungi that colonized the planted zone most rapidly were Glomus globiferum, followed by G. deserticola and Glomus aggregatum. PMID:16347547

  17. High numbers of Staphylococcus aureus at three bathing beaches in South Florida.

    PubMed

    Esiobu, Nwadiuto; Green, Melissa; Echeverry, Andrea; Bonilla, Tonya D; Stinson, Corine Melanie; Hartz, Aaron; Rogerson, Andrew; McCorquodale, Donald S

    2013-01-01

    While the value of Staphylococcus aureus as an indicator for non-enteric diseases is unclear, understanding its prevalence in recreational beaches would prove useful, given its pathogenic potential. Staphylococcus aureus levels were evaluated in sand and seawater at three beaches during one year. To elucidate possible S. aureus sources or colonization trends, distribution in sand was analyzed at Hollywood Beach. Staphylococcus aureus levels fluctuated throughout the study with highest average densities detected in dry sand (3.46 × 10? CFU/g, Hobie Beach), particularly at beaches with high human density. Patchy distribution marked hotspots of human use and/or possible bacterial re-growth. Data from a brief epidemiological survey indicated a very slight association between beach usage and skin conditions; suggesting high S. aureus levels in sand may not necessarily constitute major health risks. Because the possibility of disease transmission exists, particularly to children and immuno-compromised beach-goers, periodic surveying of highly frequented beaches seems warranted. PMID:22924435

  18. Evolution of the Beach Ridge Strandplain on St. Vincent Island, Florida

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Beth Margaret Forrest

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this investigation was to determine whether highly accurate sampling and dating methods could be employed to develop a high-resolution history of barrier evolution and sea-level change. The focus of the study was St. Vincent Island, an undeveloped barrier island beach ridge plain in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. The island consists of more than 100 beach ridges

  19. Journal of Coastal Research SI 59 98-110 West Palm Beach, Florida 2011 New Ebb-Tidal Delta at an Old Inlet, Shark River Inlet, New Jersey

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    at an Old Inlet, Shark River Inlet, New Jersey Tanya M. Beck and Nicholas C. Kraus ABSTRACT BECK, T.M. and KRAUS, N.C., 2011. New Ebb-Tidal Delta at an Old Inlet, Shark River Inlet, New Jersey. In: Roberts, T of Coastal Research, Special Issue, No. 59, pp. 98-110. West Palm Beach (Florida), ISSN 0749-0208. Shark

  20. Journal of Coastal Research 22 4 894905 West Palm Beach, Florida July 2006 Comparing Mean High Water and High Water Line

    E-print Network

    erosion, lidar, coastal mapping, shoreline change. INTRODUCTION Many coastal areas are populated heavilyJournal of Coastal Research 22 4 894­905 West Palm Beach, Florida July 2006 Comparing Mean High West Lorain Street Oberlin, OH 44074, U.S.A. laura.moore@oberlin.edu Coastal and Marine Geology

  1. Florida (Pensacola Beach) dune restoration Project General Project DescriPtion

    E-print Network

    2010. The primary dunes are the first natural line of defense for coastal Florida to prevent the loss appropriate dune vegetation approximately 40 feet seaward of the existing primary dune on 18-inch centersP to injury The Florida Dune Restoration Project will directly restore primary vegetated dune habitat injured

  2. Effect of a Shore-Oblique Ridge on Beach and Bar Morphodynamics at Kennedy Space Center, Cape Canaveral, Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kline, S. W.; Adams, P. N.; Plant, N. G.; MacKenzie, R. A.; Jaeger, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    Processes linking beach and bar response to external wave forcing are poorly understood where spatial complexities, such as inner shelf shoals, are present. At NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Cape Canaveral, Florida, two persistant surfzone sand bars occur in a region that also includes cape-associated shoals and multiple shore-oblique ridges at depths below the fair-weather wave base of sediment transport. These features transform incoming deep-water waves, redistributing the spatial pattern of wave energy along- and cross-shore. To observe beach and sandbar response in this complex environment we have collected and georectified hourly beach images at KSC since April 2010. Comparisons of imagery to monthly differential GPS surveys reveal that a double-bar system, with ~25-50 m spacing between crests, has persisted over the last 2 years. Welding of the inner and outer bars occurs intermittently. The preferred welding location coincides with a dune overwash area that has been an erosion hotspot (EHS) over the last decade. Strong nor'easter activity in November 2011 activated wave breaking across a large (~10 km long, ~500 m wide, ~5 m tall) shore-oblique subaqueous ridge that intersects the nearshore system at the EHS. Our observations allow testing of a hypothesis that the ridge controls nearshore morphodynamics through two mechanisms: 1) by focusing, dissipating, and shadowing wave energy, especially during storm events and 2) by providing a sediment source to the nearshore system. The former mechanism is supported through image and survey analysis that shows beach and bar behavior differ updrift and downdrift of the ridge-beach intersection. Three ADCPs were deployed during the early 2010-2011 and late 2011-2012 winter nor'easter seasons to measure wave transformation and current structures in this region. During the most recent deployment, an instrument on the ridge's leeward side was nearly completely buried, yet measured bottom currents (< 50 cm/s) do not imply that significant sediment transport should occur. Rather, we hypothesize that wave breaking over the ridge entrained sediment that was subsequently deposited on the leeward side. This finding suggests that the ridge is mobile and may be a source of sediment to the dynamic nearshore system.

  3. Hydrostratigraphic Framework and Selection and Correlation of Geophysical Log Markers in the Surficial Aquifer System, Palm Beach County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reese, Ronald S.; Wacker, Michael A.

    2007-01-01

    The surficial aquifer system is the major source of freshwater for public water supply in Palm Beach County, Florida, yet many previous studies of the hydrogeology of this aquifer system have focused only on the eastern one-half to one-third of the county in the more densely populated coastal area (Land and others, 1973; Swayze and others, 1980; Swayze and Miller, 1984; Shine and others, 1989). Population growth in the county has resulted in the westward expansion of urbanized areas into agricultural areas and has created new demands on the water resources of the county. Additionally, interest in surface-water resources of central and western areas of the county has increased. In these areas, plans for additional surface-water storage reservoirs are being made under the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan originally proposed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the South Florida Water Management District (1999), and stormwater treatment areas have been constructed by the South Florida Water Management District. Surface-water and ground-water interactions in the Everglades are thought to be important to water budgets, water quality, and ecology (Harvey and others, 2002). Most of the previous hydrogeologic and ground-water flow simulation studies of the surficial aquifer system have not utilized a hydrostratigraphic framework, in which stratigraphic or sequence stratigraphic units, such as those proposed in Cunningham and others (2001), are delineated in this stratigraphically complex aquifer system. A thick zone of secondary permeability mapped by Swayze and Miller (1984) was not subdivided and was identified as only being within the Anastasia Formation of Pleistocene age. Miller (1987) published 11 geologic sections of the surficial aquifer system, but did not delineate any named stratigraphic units in these sections. This limited interpretation has resulted, in part, from the complex facies changes within rocks and sediments of the surficial aquifer system and the seemingly indistinct and repetitious nature of the most common lithologies, which include sand, shell, sandstone, and limestone. Model construction and layer definition in a simulation of ground-water flow within the surficial aquifer system of Palm Beach County utilized only the boundaries of one or two major hydrogeologic zones, such as the Biscayne aquifer and surficial aquifer system; otherwise layers were defined by average elevations rather than geologic structure or stratigraphy (Shine and others, 1989). Additionally, each major permeable zone layer in the model was assumed to have constant hydraulic conductivity with no allowance for the possibility of discrete (thin) flow zones within the zone. The key to understanding the spatial distribution and hydraulic connectivity of permeable zones in the surficial aquifer system beneath Palm Beach County is the development of a stratigraphic framework based on a consistent method of county-wide correlation. Variability in hydraulic properties in the system needs to be linked to the stratigraphic units delineated in this framework, and proper delineation of the hydrostratigraphic framework should provide a better understanding and simulation of the ground-water flow system. In 2004, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the South Florida Water Management District, initiated an investigation to develop a hydrostratigraphic framework for the surficial aquifer system in Palm Beach County.

  4. First Case of Bioterrorism-Related Inhalational Anthrax in the United States, Palm Beach County, Florida, 2001

    PubMed Central

    Wiersma, Steven T.; Rosenstein, Nancy E.; Malecki, Jean M.; Shepard, Colin W.; Raghunathan, Pratima L.; Pillai, Segaran P.; Popovic, Tanja; Quinn, Conrad P.; Meyer, Richard F.; Zaki, Sharif R.; Kumar, Savita; Bruce, Sherrie M.; Sejvar, James J.; Dull, Peter M.; Tierney, Bruce C.; Jones, Joshua D.; Perkins, Bradley A.

    2002-01-01

    On October 4, 2001, we confirmed the first bioterrorism-related anthrax case identified in the United States in a resident of Palm Beach County, Florida. Epidemiologic investigation indicated that exposure occurred at the workplace through intentionally contaminated mail. One additional case of inhalational anthrax was identified from the index patient’s workplace. Among 1,076 nasal cultures performed to assess exposure, Bacillus anthracis was isolated from a co-worker later confirmed as being infected, as well as from an asymptomatic mail-handler in the same workplace. Environmental cultures for B. anthracis showed contamination at the workplace and six county postal facilities. Environmental and nasal swab cultures were useful epidemiologic tools that helped direct the investigation towards the infection source and transmission vehicle. We identified 1,114 persons at risk and offered antimicrobial prophylaxis. PMID:12396910

  5. Variations in Nearshore Bar Morphology: Implications for Rip Current Development at Pensacola Beach, Florida from 1951 to 2004 

    E-print Network

    Barrett, Gemma Elizabeth

    2012-10-19

    In 2002, Pensacola Beach was identified by the United States Lifesaving Association as being the most hazardous beach in the continental United States for beach drowning by rip currents. Recent studies suggest that the rip currents at Pensacola...

  6. Hydraulics and geology related to beach restoration in Lee County, Florida. [Captiva Island

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winton, T. (principal investigator); Brooks, H. K.; Degner, J.; Ruth, B.

    1981-01-01

    The erosion problem on Captiva Island is discussed. It is due to a deficit in the sand budget of the littoral drift system; a system with losses due to attrition of the particles and mass losses into the lagoons, to offshore, and to lateral transport. The effect that reopening Blind Pass would have, and the placement of sediment retaining structures in the surf zone at the northern and southern limits of the Captiva beach system, wave examined. A geological approach was used to study the origin and dynamic changes that have occurred. Through hydraulic modeling, changes that will occur by reopening and stabilizing Blind Pass are predicted. It is concluded that if the island is to be stabilized, beach nourishment with proper amounts and particle size is a necessity and that jetties adequate to restrict lateral and offshore losses are essential. It is shown that the reopening of Blind Pass would have minimal effects on the passes to the north and south, and would improve the environmental conditions in the sound with no adverse effects on the beach system.

  7. Results of the followup site verification survey at Eglin Air Force Base, Fort Walton Beach, Florida

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. D. Foley; L. M. Floyd

    1989-01-01

    Air Force Research, Development, Testing, and Evaluation (RDT and E) of depleted uranium (DU) as a conventional munitions component beam at Eglin Air Force Base (AFB), Florida. The relatively small volumes of depleted uranium waste (DUW) generated during these efforts were disposed of at commercial disposal sites. However, as the utility of DU as a munition component became well established,larger

  8. Evaluation of airborne carbon monoxide exposure monitoring program in produce cooler operations (Palm Beach County, Florida)

    SciTech Connect

    Garsik, D.A. [Palm Beach County Public Health Unit, West Palm Beach, FL (United States). Div. of Environmental Health

    1995-05-01

    The effectiveness of a carbon monoxide (CO) monitoring program was evaluated by measuring changes in employee exposure levels annually over a three-year period following various reduction strategies. Workers in produce coolers were monitored for exposure to CO from the exhaust of propane lift trucks used to load and unload produce during the spring corn season in western Palm Beach County. Personal monitoring, using dosimeter tubes attached to the employees` breathing zones, was performed over 8-hour workshifts to determine the time weighted average (TWA) airborne exposures to CO in parts per million (ppm). Intervention strategies used at the operations found to have elevated employee CO exposure levels were: (1) source elimination; (2) source reduction; and (3) administrative control. The interventions were found to reduce significantly CO exposure levels. The greatest decrease in carbon monoxide resulted from source elimination.

  9. Hydrogeology and simulation of ground-water flow near the Lantana Landfill, Palm Beach County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Russell, G.M.; Wexler, E.J.

    1993-01-01

    The Lantana landfill in Palm Beach County has a surface that is 40 to 50 feet above original ground level and consists of about 250 acres of compacted garbage and trash. Parts of the landfill are below the water table. Surface-resistivity measurements and water-quality analyses indicate that leachate-enriched ground water along the eastern perimeter of the landfill has moved about 500 feet eastward toward an adjacent lake. Concentrations of chloride and nutrients within the leachate-enriched ground water were greater than background concentrations. The surficial aquifer system in the area of the landfill consists primarily of sand of moderate permeability, from land surface to a depth of about 68 feet deep, and consists of sand interbedded with sandstone and limestone of high permeability from a depth of about 68 feet to a depth of 200 feet. The potentiometric surface in the landfill is higher than that in adjacent areas to the east, indicating ground-water movement from the landfill toward a lake to the east. Steady-state simulation of ground-water flow was made using a telescoping-grid technique where a model covering a large area is used to determine boundaries and fluxes for a finer scale model. A regional flow model encompassing a 500-square mile area in southeastern Palm Beach County was used to calculate ground-water fluxes in a 126.5-square mile subregional area. Boundary fluxes calculated by the subregional model were then used to calculate boundary fluxes for a local model of the 3.75-square mile area representing the Lantana landfill site and vicinity. Input data required for simulating ground-water flow in the study area were obtained from the regional flow models, thus, effectively coupling the models. Additional simulations were made using the local flow model to predict effects of possible remedial actions on the movement of solutes in the ground-water system. Possible remedial actions simulated included capping the landfill with an impermeable layer and pumping five leachate recovery wells. Results of the flow analysis indicate that the telescoping grid modeling approach can be used to simulate ground-water flow in small areas such as the Lantana landfill site and to simulate the effects of possible remedial actions. Water-quality data indicate the leachate-enriched ground water is divided vertically into two parts by a fine sand layer at about 40 to 50 feet below land surface. Data also indicate the extent of the leachate-enriched ground-water contamination and concentrations of constituents seem to be decreasing over time.

  10. Hydrogeology and the distribution of salinity in the Floridan aquifer system, Palm Beach County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reese, R.S.; Memberg, S.J.

    2000-01-01

    The virtually untapped Floridan aquifer system is considered to be a supplemental source of water for public use in the highly populated coastal area of Palm Beach County. A recent study was conducted to delineate the distribution of salinity in relation to the local hydrogeology and assess the potential processes that might control (or have affected) the distribution of salinity in the Floridan aquifer system. The Floridan aquifer system in the study area consists of the Upper Floridan aquifer, middle confining unit, and Lower Floridan aquifer and ranges in age from Paleocene to Oligocene. Included at its top is part of a lowermost Hawthorn Group unit referred to as the basal Hawthorn unit. The thickness of this basal unit is variable, ranging from about 30 to 355 feet; areas where this unit is thick were paleotopographic lows during deposition of the unit. The uppermost permeable zones in the Upper Floridan aquifer occur in close association with an unconformity at the base of the Hawthorn Group; however, the highest of these zones can be up in the basal unit. A dolomite unit of Eocene age generally marks the top of the Lower Floridan aquifer, but the top of this dolomite unit has a considerable altitude range: from about 1,200 to 2,300 feet below sea level. Additionally, where the dolomite unit is thick, its top is high and the middle confining unit of the Floridan aquifer system, as normally defined, probably is not present. An upper zone of brackish water and a lower zone of water with salinity similar to that of seawater (saline-water zone) are present in the Floridan aquifer system. The brackish-water and saline-water zones are separated by a transition zone (typically 100 to 200 feet thick) in which salinity rapidly increases with depth. The transition zone was defined by using a salinity of 10,000 mg/L (milligrams per liter) of dissolved-solids concentration (about 5,240 mg/L of chloride concentration) at its top and 35,000 mg/L of dissolved-solids concentration (about 18,900 mg/L of chloride concentration) at its base. The base of the brackish-water zone and the top of the saline-water zone were approximately determined mostly by means of resistivity geophysical logs. The base of the brackish-water zone in the study area ranges from about 1,600 feet below sea level near the coast to almost 2,200 feet below sea level in extreme southwestern Palm Beach County. In an area that is peripheral to Lake Okeechobee, the boundary unexpectedly rises to perhaps as shallow as 1,800 feet below sea level. In an upper interval of the brackish-water zone within the Upper Floridan aquifer, chloride concentration of water ranges from 490 to 8,000 mg/L. Chloride concentration correlates with the altitude of the basal contact of the Hawthorn Group, with concentration increasing as the altitude of this contact decreases. Several areas of anomalous salinity where chloride concentration in this upper interval is greater than 3,000 mg/L occur near the coast. In most of these areas, salinity was found to decrease with depth from the upper interval to a lower interval within the brackish-water zone: a reversal of the normal salinity trend within the zone. These areas are also characterized by an anomalously low altitude of the base of the brackish-water zone, and a much greater thickness of the transition zone than normal. These anomalies could be the result of seawater preferentially invading zones of higher permeability in the Upper Floridan aquifer during Pleistocene high stands of sea level and incomplete flushing of this high salinity water by the present-day flow system.

  11. Results of the baseline radiological survey at Eglin Air Force Base, Fort Walton Beach, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, R.D.; Carrier, R.F.

    1989-03-01

    Air Force Research, Development, Testing, and Evaluation (RDT and E) of depleted uranium (DU) as a conventional munitions component began at Eglin Air Force Base (AFB), Florida. The relatively small volumes of depleted uranium waste (DUW) generated during these efforts were disposed of at commercial disposal sites. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was awarded a management contract by the US Air Force to oversee the repackaging, transportation, and disposal of the DUW. The ORNL Measurement Applications and Development (MAD) group participated in the contract administration by providing advice in planning, site radiological baseline characterization surveys, radiation safety audits, and a followup site verification survey. The reason for these baseline surveys was to determine the radiological conditions on: (1) two areas where uranium had been handled, and (2) a section of public roadway over which the radioactive material would be hauled from one site to another on the base. The findings of this survey constitute the radiological baseline for the repackaging operation. 3 refs., 13 figs., 7 tabs.

  12. 77 FR 26229 - Meloy Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Miami Beach, FL; Restricted Area

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-03

    ...Part 334 Meloy Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Miami Beach, FL; Restricted Area AGENCY: United States...waters surrounding the U.S. Coast Guard Base Miami Beach, Florida (Base Miami Beach). Base Miami Beach is composed of...

  13. 77 FR 42652 - Meloy Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Miami Beach, FL; Restricted Area

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-20

    ...Part 334 Meloy Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Miami Beach, FL; Restricted Area AGENCY: United States...waters surrounding the U.S. Coast Guard Base Miami Beach, Florida (Base Miami Beach). Base Miami Beach is composed of...

  14. Proceedings of the American Psychological Association, Incorporated, for the year 1970: Minutes of the Annual Meeting of the Council of Representatives. September 6, 1970 Miami Beach, Florida and October 3 and 4 1970 Washington, D.C

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wilbert J. McKeachie

    1971-01-01

    Presents the minutes of the 1970 American Psychological Association (APA) Council of Representatives. The Council of Representatives met in Miami Beach, Florida on September 6, 1970 at the APA Annual Convention, and again in Washington, D.C., on October 3 and 4. These minutes constitute the official record of actions of the Association taken during the year.

  15. PROCEEDINGS: SECOND CONFERENCE ON WASTE HEAT MANAGEMENT AND UTILIZATION HELD AT MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA IN DECEMBER 1978, VOLUME 2

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proceedings document most presentations made during the Second Conference on Waste Heat Management and Utilization, held December 4-6, 1978, at Miami Beach, FL. Presentations were grouped by areas of concern: general, utilization, mathematical modeling, ecological effects, co...

  16. PROCEEDINGS: SECOND CONFERENCE ON WATER HEAT MANAGEMENT AND UTILIZATION HELD AT MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA IN DECEMBER 1978, VOLUME 1

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proceedings document most presentations made during the Second Conference on Waste Heat Management and Utilization, held December 4-6, 1978, at Miami Beach, FL. Presentations were grouped by areas of concern: general, utilization, mathematical modeling, ecological effects, co...

  17. Journal of Coastal Research 20 1 4460 West Palm Beach, Florida Winter 2004 Potential Impacts of Sand Mining Offshore of

    E-print Network

    Hilton, Eric J.

    Jerome P.-Y. Maa, Carl H. Hobbs, III, S.C. Kim, and Eugene Wei§ Virginia Institute of Marine Science terrestrial sources of good, beach-quality sand. Near shore submarine sources are limited and problem- atical

  18. Ground-water quality at the site of a proposed deep-well injection system for treated wastewater, West Palm Beach, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pitt, William A., Jr.; Meyer, Frederick W.

    1976-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey collected scientific and technical information before, during, and after construction of a deep test well at the location of a future regional waste-water treatment plant to be built for the city of West Palm Beach, Florida. Data from the test well will be used by the city in the design of a proposed deep-well injection system for disposal of effluent from the treatment plant. Shallow wells in the vicinity of the drilling site were inventoried and sampled to provide a data base for detecting changes in ground water quality during construction and later operation of the deep wells. In addition, 16 small-diameter monitor wells, ranging in depth from 10 to 162 feet, were drilled at the test site. During the drilling of the deep test well, water samples were collected weekly from the 16 monitor wells for determination of chloride content and specific conductance. Evidence of small spills of salt water were found in monitor wells ranging in depth from 10 to 40 feet. Efforts to remove the salt water from the shallow unconfined aquifer by pumping were undertaken by the drilling contractor at the request of the city of West Palm Beach. The affected area is small and there has been a reduction of chloride concentration.

  19. Assessing the Impact of Urban Runoff in Recreational Beaches in South Carolina and Florida Using Culturable and QPCR Fecal Indicator

    EPA Science Inventory

    Urban/suburban runoff carries a variety of pollutants that often includes bacterial pathogens and indicators of fecal contamination. The objective of this study was to assess the microbial water quality of recreational beaches impacted solely by urban runoff through the use of cu...

  20. PROCEEDINGS: ADVANCES IN PARTICLE SAMPLING AND MEASUREMENT (DAYTONA BEACH, FL, OCTOBER 1979)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proceedings consist of 20 reports of research on equipment and techniques for sampling and characterizing particulate emissions and other aerosols. The inhalable particle size range (up to 15 micrometers) is emphasized, and the basis for selecting this range as a standard is ...

  1. PROCEEDINGS: ADVANCES IN PARTICLE SAMPLING AND MEASUREMENT (DAYTONA BEACH, FL, OCTOBER 1981)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proceedings consist of reports of research on equipment and techniques for sampling and characterizing particulate emissions from industrial sources (e.g., nickel smelters and a power plant burning low-sulfur coal) and other aerosols (e.g., uranium oxide in high-energy enviro...

  2. 77 FR 50065 - Safety Zone; Jacksonville Sea and Sky Spectacular, Atlantic Ocean; Jacksonville Beach, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-20

    ...Jacksonville Sea and Sky Spectacular, Atlantic Ocean; Jacksonville Beach, FL AGENCY...safety zone on the waters of the Atlantic Ocean east of Jacksonville Beach, Florida...host an air show event over the Atlantic Ocean in Jacksonville Beach, FL....

  3. 77 FR 63722 - Special Local Regulations; Palm Beach World Championship, Atlantic Ocean; Jupiter, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-17

    ...Special Local Regulations; Palm Beach World Championship, Atlantic Ocean; Jupiter...Jupiter, Florida during the Palm Beach World Championship, a high speed power boat race. The Palm Beach World Championship is scheduled to take...

  4. 78 FR 22193 - Special Local Regulations; West Palm Beach Triathlon Championship, Intracoastal Waterway; West...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-15

    ...Intracoastal Waterway; West Palm Beach, FL AGENCY: Coast Guard...Intracoastal Waterway, in West Palm Beach, Florida, during the West Palm Beach Triathlon Championship...designated representative. DATES: This rule is effective...

  5. Comparison of Pleistocene and Holocene barrier island beach-to-offshore sequences, Georgia and northeast Florida coasts, U.S.A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, James D.; Scott, Richard M.

    1983-03-01

    Well-exposed vertical sequences of Pleistocene shoreline deposits are rare on the coastal plain of the southeastern United States. An important exception is an exposure along the St. Mary's River on the Georgia-Florida state line. This outcrop contains an excellent depositional strike section of a prograding offshore, shoreface, foreshore and backshore sequence with well-preserved physical and biogenic sedimentary structures. Offshore sediments are composed of highly bioturbated, muddy fine sand. Distinct burrows and bedding become progressively more abundant upward through a transition zone into shoreface deposits. The shoreface is dominated by the trace fossil Ophiomorpha nodosa and physical sedimentary structures are poorly preserved. Foreshore sediments contain low-angle seaward dipping beds, high-angle landward dipping beds and ripple laminae. Heavy-mineral accumulations in the backshore accentuate bedding and biogenic structures such as ghost crab and insect burrows and bioturbation by amphipods. Direct correlation of most primary physical and biogenic sedimentary structures and textures can be made between the Pleistocene and Holocene beach-to-offshore facies assemblages. However, our studies of the Pleistocene indicate that the existing Holocene vertical sequence model for the Georgia coast needs to be modified to account for biogenically produced post-depositional effects.

  6. Solar energy system economic evaluation: final report for SEMCO-Loxahatchee, Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge, Palm Beach County, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    None

    1980-07-01

    The economic analysis of the solar energy system that was installed at Loxahatchee, Florida Operational Test Site (OTS) is developed for Loxahatchee and four other sites typical of a wide range of environmental and economic conditions in the continental United States. This analysis is accomplished based on the technical and economic models in the f-Chart design procedure with inputs based on the characteristics of the installed system and local conditions. The results are expressed in terms of the economic parameters of present worth of system costs over a projected twenty year life, life cycle savings, year of positive savings and year of payback for the optimized solar energy system at each of the analysis sites. The sensitivity of the economic evaluation to uncertainties in constituent system and economic variables is also investigated. The results demonstrate that the solar energy system is economically viable at all of the five sites for which the analysis was conducted.

  7. Tel Aviv: Beach

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chet Smolski

    1980-01-01

    Along the west side of Tel Aviv rests a lengthy stretch of shoreline divided into several different beaches. These beaches include: Hof Hatzuk Beach, Sheraton Beach, The Separated Beach, Atzmout Beach, Hilton Beach, Gordon Beach, Frishman Beach, The Southern Beaches, and Drums Beach. All of these give the public access to the Mediterranean Sea around the months of May until

  8. Seabed ripple morphology and surficial sediment size at the SAX04 experiments near Fort Walton Beach, Florida, fall 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanes, Daniel M.; Erikson, Li H.; Lescinski, Jamie M.R.; Harney, Jodi N.; Carter, Carissa L.; Hatcher, Gerry A.; Lacy, Jessica R.; Rubin, David M.

    2007-01-01

    Data presented in this report originates from measurements obtained off the Florida coast (fig. 1) as part of the Sediment Acoustics Experiment (SAX04) and Ripples Department Research Initiative (DRI) (Office of Naval Research (ONR), Critical Benthic Environmental Processes and Modeling, Long Range BAA 04-001, Sept. 10, 2003). The aim of this document is to present methods employed to extract data and the resulting measured ripple characteristics (ripple height, wavelength, and orientation) and seabed grain sizes. Application and analysis of the data with respect to hydro- and morphodynamics will be addressed in subsequent reports. Sediment transport in the coastal region is a complex process involving interactions between flow dynamics, sediments, and bedforms. Sediment type and bed geometry directly influence entrainment of sediments into suspension, and at sites where ripples occur (sand formations on the order of several cm high and less than two meter long wavelengths), the understanding of ripple dynamics is an essential component in improving sediment transport models. To gain a better understanding and ability to predict sediment transport, a field study was undertaken to investigate morphology, orientation, and dynamics of ripples on the seafloor. The data obtained from the field campaign also supports an on-going effort to study the effects of ripples on low grazing acoustic penetration into sandy marine sediments for the detection of objects, such as mines (Jackson and others, 2002).

  9. Beach Erosion

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    David Tenenbaum

    1999-07-22

    This Why Files article considers beach erosion. Topics covered are: the nature and extent of beach losses, the role of beaches in protecting coasts, some measures -good and bad- to prevent coastal erosion, predicted effects of global warming and sea-level changes on beaches and the impact of melting ice sheets on global ocean volume. Some glaciologists using new calculations, think that instead of possibly collapsing in 100 years, as was considered possible 10 years ago, that the West Antarctic Ice Sheet is more likely to collapse in perhaps 5,000 years at the soonest. Five scientists were interviewed for this article.

  10. 76 FR 65378 - Safety Zone; The Florida Orchestra Pops in the Park Fireworks Display, Tampa Bay, St. Petersburg, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-21

    ...the waters of Tampa Bay in the vicinity of Spa Beach in St. Petersburg, Florida during...Florida. The fireworks will be launched from Spa Beach. The fireworks will explode over...certain waters of Tampa Bay in the vicinity of Spa Beach in St. Petersburg, Florida....

  11. BEACH Watch

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Environmental Protection Agency has released data from the third annual National Health Protection Survey of Beaches for the 1999 swimming season. Based on voluntarily returned surveys, the site offers information on water quality at 1,891 beaches in the US. Using an interactive map, users can find out if the water at a selected beach is being monitored, who is responsible for monitoring, and if any advisories or closures have been issued. Initial entries for each beach include basic monitoring information, contact information, and a map. Users can also read the submitted survey form in full. Additional resources at the BEACH Watch site include summary results from the survey, a fact sheet, technical reports and reference, brochures amd pamphlets, a FAQ, and related links.

  12. The Early Childhood Cluster Initiative of Palm Beach County, Florida. Early Implementation Study And Evaluability Assessment. Final Report. Chapin Hall Working Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spielberger, Julie; Goyette, Paul

    2006-01-01

    This publication reports findings from the first year of an implementation study of the Early Childhood Cluster Initiative (ECCI). ECCI is a prekindergarten program in ten elementary schools and a community child care center in Palm Beach County, based on the design of the High/Scope Perry Preschool model. The initiative is characterized by low…

  13. Education Conference of the Gulf of Mexico Accord (1st, Daytona Beach, FL, September 28-30, 1995). Interim Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Philip R., Jr.

    Under the auspices of the North American Free Trade Agreement, five states in the United States and six states in Mexico established the Gulf of Mexico Accord to create a working partnership to foster economic development in the Gulf of Mexico. The agreement addresses six major sectors: investment; communication and transportation; health;…

  14. Relationships Between Sand and Water Quality at Recreational Beaches

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Matthew C.; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M.; Piggot, Alan M.; Klaus, James S.; Zhang, Yifan

    2011-01-01

    Enterococci are used to assess the risk of negative human health impacts from recreational waters. Studies have shown sustained populations of enterococci within sediments of beaches but comprehensive surveys of multiple tidal zones on beaches in a regional area and their relationship to beach management decisions are limited. We sampled three tidal zones on eight South Florida beaches in Miami-Dade and Broward counties and found that enterococci were ubiquitous within South Florida beach sands although their levels varied greatly both among the beaches and between the supratidal, intertidal and subtidal zones. The supratidal sands consistently had significantly higher (p<0.003) levels of enterococci (average 40 CFU/g dry sand) than the other two zones. Levels of enterococci within the subtidal sand correlated with the average level of enterococci in the water (CFU/100mL) for the season during which samples were collected (rs= 0.73). The average sand enterococci content over all the zones on each beach correlated with the average water enterococci levels of the year prior to sand samplings (rs=0.64) as well as the average water enterococci levels for the month after sand samplings (rs=0.54). Results indicate a connection between levels of enterococci in beach water and sands throughout South Florida’s beaches and suggest that the sands are one of the predominant reservoirs of enterococci impacting beach water quality. As a result, beaches with lower levels of enterococci in the sand had fewer exceedences relative to beaches with higher levels of sand enterococci. More research should focus on evaluating beach sand quality as a means to predict and regulate marine recreational water quality. PMID:22071324

  15. On the Season, a Report of a Public Health Project Conducted Among Negro Migrant Agricultural Workers in Palm Beach County, Florida.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browning, Robert H.; Northcutt, Travis J., Jr.

    A 5-year project to develop public health services for migrant workers was initiated in Florida in 1956. The project staff consisted of 8 public health personnel: 2 public health nurses, a public health educator, a public health nutritionist, a medical social worker, a part-time sanitarian, a liaison worker, and a secretary. Two practicing…

  16. Economic interrelationships and impacts of the aviation/aerospace industry in the state of Florida using input-output analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whealan George, Kelly

    The study provided a detailed description of the interrelatedness of the aviation and aerospace industry with principal industries in Florida and Volusia County (VC) using Input-Output (IO) analysis. Additionally, this research provided an economic impact analysis of the creation of a university research park in Daytona Beach (DB). The economic impact measures included not only direct economic output and industry employment descriptions but also described the multiplier effects in the form of indirect and induced impacts using data for 2012. This research concluded the average labor income of the aviation and aerospace industry was higher than average labor income in Florida and VC. A substantive difference between the Florida and VC average labor income for the aviation and aerospace industry existed because VC's aerospace sector was only concentrated in the search, detection, and navigation instruments manufacturing sector. VC's transport by air sector was one-fifth the size of Florida's. Differences in the aviation and aerospace industry composition between Florida and VC are important because the economic impacts from a shock to the entire aviation and aerospace industry will be distributed differently. Since the aviation and aerospace average labor income is higher than the average labor income in Florida and VC, it would be a positive move for Florida's economy to attract and grow the aviation and aerospace industry. It would be highly unlikely that the entirety of newly created jobs would be resourced from the local population. Nonetheless, growing the aviation and aerospace industry jobs would have a positive influence on the region's economy and tax revenues. It would be a desirable course of action to spur the growth of this sector, as its direct effect would culminate with additional jobs in Florida that would bring higher wage jobs to the state. The interdependencies of the aviation and aerospace industry in Florida and VC with other industries had a positive indirect and induced effect in the economy providing almost a two-fold indirect and induced effect. However, the benefits were not equal. Florida's average labor income of the most sensitive non-aviation and aerospace industry was 15% lower than the average Florida labor income. The average labor income in VC of the most sensitive non-aviation and aerospace industry was significantly higher than the average VC labor income. Industry interdependencies also presented risk. If the aviation and aerospace industry experiences a contraction, then through the interdependencies of the industries, the region would contract twice as much as the aviation and aerospace industry. The overall impact of a university research park would benefit Florida's economy. Since the research park project is currently funded partially by public state money, 14 sectors of the economy experienced negative impacts. While the net result was an increase in additional labor income, the employment growth was characterized by gaining more lower-paying jobs while losing less higher-paying jobs. The most expected outcome, an expansion of the aviation and aerospace industry, was not evidenced by the model results.

  17. The breeding behavior and patterns of movement of horseshoe crabs, Limulus polyphemus , in the vicinity of breeding beaches in Apalachee Bay, Florida

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anne Rudloe

    1980-01-01

    Breeding activity of the horseshoe crab,Limulus polyphemus, was quantitatively monitored in Apalachee Bay, Florida, throughout one breeding season. Breeding peaked at times of full\\u000a and new moon at the hour of high tide. Breeding activity was heavier on night tides than on corresponding day tides of the\\u000a same date. Males routinely outnumbered females and indications of sperm competition were present.

  18. Beach Sand

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Francis Eberle

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this assessment probe is to elicit students' ideas about weathering, erosion, deposition, and landforms. It is designed to determine if students recognize that sand on a beach may have come from distant mountains and landforms as a result of the weathering of rock, subsequent erosion, and deposition.

  19. Cost and performance of membranes for organic control in small systems: Flagler Beach and Punta Gorda, Florida. Final report, 1 June 1986-28 February 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.S.; Mulford, L.A.; Barrett, W.M.; Duranceau, S.J.; Smith, D.K .

    1989-05-01

    This project documented the performance and cost of low-pressure membrane technology to remove THM precursors from drinking water. A 12,500-gpd membrane pilot plant was operated for one year at both ground-water and surface-water source test sites in Florida. Use of this type of membrane technology on such surface water will require lower membrane flux, lower recovery, more-frequent membrane cleanings, and extensive pretreatment. Capital costs for such an application will be significantly higher than conventional treatment.

  20. Coastal land loss in Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R.R. (Florida Dept. of Natural Resources, Tallahassee (USA))

    1990-09-01

    Florida has approximately 593 mi of shoreline fronting on the Atlantic Ocean and Straits of Florida and approximately 673 mi of shoreline fronting on the Gulf of Mexico with an additional 5,000 mi of bay and estuary shoreline. Of a statewide total of 818.9 mi of open coast sandy beaches, 337.2 mi or 41.2% of the beaches are identified as erosion problem areas. These erosion problem areas include those beaches with a moderate or low erosion rate, but with a narrow width fronting a highly developed area, and those restored beaches with an active maintenance nourishment program. Of these erosion problem areas, 217.8 mi or 26.6% of the statewide beach length are areas of critical erosion; that is, segments of the shoreline where substantial development or recreation interests are threatened by the erosion processes. On a shorewide basis, the Atlantic Ocean beaches of Florida typically have historical erosion rates of between 0 and {minus}3 ft per year, while the Gulf of Mexico beaches typically have historical erosion rates of between 0 and {minus}2 ft per year. Many of the problem areas have shoreline erosion rates in the magnitude of between {minus}3 and {minus}5 ft per year. The most extreme erosion rates are occurring along the southern portion of St. Joseph Peninsula at Cape San Bias where the annual shoreline recession exceeds {minus}20 ft. Erosion conditions in Florida are most apparent as a result of storm tides and storm wave activity. Extreme meteorological events inflict significant erosion conditions in all beach areas of the state. Historical shoreline changes are often the cumulative effect of a number of storm events and their cycles of poststorm recovery. Erosion and damage from recent storms as well as efforts to mitigate storm damage have heightened the erosion problems and incited a public response through coastal construction regulation and beach management planning.

  1. Effects of lowering interior canal stages on salt-water intrusion into the shallow aquifer in Southeast Palm Beach County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Land, Larry F.

    1975-01-01

    Land in southeast Palm Beach County is undergoing a large-scale change in use, from agricultural to residential. To accommodate residential use, a proposal has been made by developers to the Board of the Lake Worth Drainage District to lower the canal stages in the interior part of the area undergoing change. This report documents one of the possible effects of such lowering. Of particular interest to the Board was whether the lower canal stages would cause an increase in salt-water intrusion into the shallow aquifer along the coast. The two main tools used in the investigation were a digital model for aquifer evaluation and an analytical technique for predicting the movement of the salt-water front in response to a change of ground-water flow into the ocean. The method of investigation consisted of developing a digital ground-water flow model for three east-west test strips. They pass through the northern half of municipal well fields in Lake Worth, Delray Beach, and Boca Raton. The strips were first modeled with no change in interior canal stages. Then they were modeled with a change in canal stages of 2 to 4 feet (0.6 to 1.6 metres). Also, two land development schemes were tested. One was for a continuation of the present level of land development, simulated by continuing the present pumpage rates. The second scheme was for land development to continue until the maximum allowable densities were reached, simulated by increasing the pumping rates. The results of the test runs for an east-west strip through Lake Worth show that lowering part of the interior canal water levels 3 feet (1.0 metre), as done in 1961, does not affect the aquifer head or salt-water intrusion along the coastal area of Lake Worth. As a result, no effect in the coastal area would be expected as a result of canal stage lowering in other, interior parts of the study area. Results from the other test runs show that lowering interior canal water levels by as much as 4 feet (1.2 metres) would result in some salt-water intrusion for either land development scheme. Salt-water intrusion is dependent on the location, and amount of water withdrawn, from well fields.

  2. Beach Erosion: Causes and Stabilization R.G. Dean, T.L. Walton, J.D. Rosati, and L. Absalonsen

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    .L. Walton Beaches and Shores Resource Center, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32310, USA J to erosion and other natural hazards." Beach erosion is fairly ubiquitous: the Heinz Center (H. John HeinzChapter 13 Beach Erosion: Causes and Stabilization R.G. Dean, T.L. Walton, J.D. Rosati, and L

  3. Quality of ground water in the Biscayne Aquifer in Miami-Dade, Broward, and Palm Beach counties, Florida, 1996-1998, with emphasis on contaminants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradner, Anne; McPherson, Benjamin F.; Miller, Ronald L.; Kish, George; Bernard, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    The high permeability of the sand and limestone sediments and shallow water table of the Biscayne aquifer make ground water vulnerable to contamination by human activities. To assess potential contamination in the aquifer, untreated ground water was sampled from 30 public-supply wells (40-165 feet deep) in Broward, Miami-Dade, and Palm Beach Counties, 32 shallow wells (10-50 feet deep) in a recently urbanized (residential and light commercial) part of Broward County, and 3 shallow reference wells in Broward County. Results from sample analyses indicate that major ions, pH, dissolved oxygen, nutrients, and trace element concentrations were generally within the range indicative of background concentrations, except for: (1) substantially higher bromide concentrations in water from public-supply wells in southern Miami-Dade County; (2) a few relatively high (greater than 2 milligrams per liter) concentrations of nitrate in water from public-supply wells near agricultural lands in Miami-Dade and southern Broward Counties; and (3) a few relatively high concentrations of arsenic (greater than 10 micrograms per liter) in water from some shallow urban wells near golf courses. Pesticides were detected in every public-supply well, in most of the shallow, urban monitoring wells (78 percent), and in one reference well; however, no pesticide concentration exceeded any drinking-water standard. Fifteen different pesticides or their degradation products were detected. The most frequently detected pesticides were atrazine and tebuthiuron; less frequently detected were the herbicides diuron, fenuron, prometon, metolachlor, simazine, and 2,6-diethylaniline. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were detected in most of the public-supply wells (77 percent) and shallow, urban wells (91 percent) and in two of the three reference wells. Thirty-two different VOCs were detected in ground water in the Biscayne aquifer, with cis-1,2-dichloroethene the most frequently detected VOC in the public-supply wells, followed by methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), 1,4-dichlorobenzene, and chloroform. Toluene, p-isopropyltoluene, and 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene were the most frequently detected VOCs in the shallow, urban wells. Concentrations of all VOCs were less than the maximum contaminant level (MCL) for public drinking water, except in two samples from public-supply wells near industrialized areas that had vinyl chloride concentrations (3 and 5 micrograms per liter) above the MCL of 1 microgram per liter.

  4. South Florida Sun-Sentinel.com South Florida a bargain haven for used cars, website says

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    South Florida Sun-Sentinel.com South Florida a bargain haven for used cars, website says By Donna on a used car. According to CarGurus.com, a car-shopping website, used cars in Broward, Palm Beach and Miami on an analysis of 3 million listings for pre-owned cars across the country. Shopping patterns seem to bear

  5. FLORIDA INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY Miami, Florida

    E-print Network

    Fan, Jeffrey

    FLORIDA INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY Miami, Florida NONLINEAR MODELING OF RADIO FREQUENCY CIRCUITS International University, 2008 Miami, Florida Professor Jeffrey Fan, Major Professor The purpose of this thesis

  6. BEACHES HEALTH SURVEY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Baterial samples were taken at swimming beaches (primarily freshwater beaches) in Region 10 while evaluating potential bacterial sources (e.g., people, cattle, pets, septic systems, runoff, birds). For each beach selected, the preferred sampling is: background, low/no use period...

  7. The 47th annual Florida pesticide residue workshop

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This is an introductory article to a special section of the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry consisting of publications from the 47th Annual Florida Pesticide Residue Workshop held in St. Pete Beach, FL in July of 2010....

  8. Florida From Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Taken during the STS-95 mission from a point over Cuba, this photo shows an oblique, foreshortened view of the Florida Peninsula, with the light blue, shallow seafloor of both the Florida Keys (curving across the bottom of the view) and the Bahama banks (right). 'Popcorn' cumulus cloud covers Miami and the Southern Everglades, although the built-up area from Ft. Lauderdale to West Palm Beach can be discerned. Lake Okeechobee is the prominent waterbody in Florida. Cape Canaveral is shown well, half way up the peninsula. Orlando appears as the lighter patch West (left) of Cape Canaveral, near the middle of the peninsula. Cape Hatteras appears top right, with the North part of Chesapeake Bay also visible. This is a visibility of 16 degrees of latitude (23 degrees N over Cuba to 39 degrees at Baltimore), showing unusual atmospheric clarity.

  9. USGS Collects Sediment Samples at Grand Isle Beach

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists collected environmental data and samples at beach, barrier island, and wetland sites in response to the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.  The USGS Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas Science Centers collaborated to ...

  10. Florida High Schools Contributing 20 or More FTIC Students Admissions High School City # Students Summer Fall Total

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    Florida High Schools Contributing 20 or More FTIC Students Admissions High School City # Students Community Lake Worth 75 Pompano Beach Pompano Beach 69 West Boca Raton Boca Raton 65 Most Popular Majors 89 Monarch High Coconut Creek 40 Exercise Science 84 Atlantic Delray Beach 39 Liberal Arts & Science

  11. World Beach Project

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Sometimes visiting a website makes you want to dash out, leave your computer behind, and get busy doing whatever the site's talking about. The World Beach Project is one of those sites. It's a gallery of art made by all kinds of people, using stones gathered on beaches all over the world. Visitors to this site can browse images of these creations, and read a little bit about how each work came about. For example, there are 64 projects in North America, and 232 in Europe and visitors can travel (via the artwork) from the beaches of England to Malaysia to Mexico in seconds. The World Beach Project was devised by artist-in-residence Sue Lawty in association with the Victoria & Albert Museum. Detailed instructions are provided so that anyone can participate in the World Beach Project, or, from the map, simply click the button labeled "I want to add my beach project to the map".

  12. University of Florida Digital Collections: Florida Photograph Collections

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-05-18

    Florida is much, much more than a certain rather large theme park and the bustling nightlife of South Beach. Anyone with a cursory interest in the history of the Sunshine State should make a beeline for this engaging site. Created by the University of Florida Digital Collections, the Florida Photograph collection contains thousands of images related to the history and culture of the state. The collection features a number of subcollections, including Florida Ephemera and Concrete Blog: Messages on the Wall. The Concrete Blog section offers a fascinating portrait of Gainesville's 34th Street Wall, which has served as a community sounding board and place of artistic reflection for over 30 years. Neophytes can also type a few keywords into the search engine to get started; they might do well to begin with Tampa, Apalachicola, or hotels.

  13. 77 FR 9682 - Announcement of Funding Awards for the HUD-Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing (HUD-VASH) Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-17

    ...Ridgewood Daytona Beach... FL 32114 129,978 25 Daytona Beach. Avenue, Ste 200. Sarasota Housing Authority... 40 South Pineapple Sarasota........ FL 34236 141,324 25 Ave, Ste 200. West Palm Beach Housing 1715 Division Avenue. West Palm...

  14. Canon Beach: Seaside

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chet Smolski

    2011-01-01

    Originally named Ecola for the river that empties, the name of this small Oregon town was changed to Canon Beach in 1922. As of the 2000 census there we 1,588 people living in Canon Beach. It is tourist attraction and popular weekend getaway for Portland residents.

  15. Beaches Forever Newsletter

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1969-01-01

    One page newsletter urging people to write their senators and representatives on bills related to the Oregon Highway Commission's budget to include money to purchase beach lands and access. One of these bills, HB 1045, was a revision to the Beach Bill passed in 1967.

  16. The Die-Hard Communicator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivero, Victor

    2010-01-01

    This article profiles Margaret A. Smith, superintendent of Volusia County School District in Florida. In the six years since her appointment as superintendent of Volusia County--a district that has 63,000 students in 16 cities, including Daytona Beach--Smith has had her share of success. But what makes her so different from other superintendents…

  17. QUANTA: An Interdisciplinary Learning Community (Four Studies).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avens, Cynthia; Zelley, Richard

    QUANTA is a year-long interdisciplinary program at Daytona Beach Community College (Florida) that seeks to establish a learning community of students and teachers. Three courses (English, Pyschology, and Humanities) are integrated around a common theme each semester of the freshman year, and are taught using a collaborative teaching model. This…

  18. Volusia County, Florida. PLATO Evaluation Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannafin, Bob

    An evaluation was conducted to determine how the PLATO Pathways program was used in three high schools in Volusia County, Florida: Deland, New Smyrna Beach, and Atlantic. Of the many PLATO sites in Volusia, these three were selected for study because of the representative patterns of low, medium, and high PLATO use. PLATO is a computer learning…

  19. State of the Beach

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This annual Surfrider Foundation report surveys the state of the beaches in coastal and Great Lakes states that are home to Foundation chapters. Each state is rated based on the availability of information and status of eight indicators, including beach access, Website access, surf zone water quality, and beach erosion, among others. The report is written from the perspective of a "concerned local citizen" and aimed at "the people who use and care most about this precious resource." The online report contains six sections, including an executive summary, an explanation of the indicators, conclusions, and recommendations.

  20. Florida Law

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2011-01-01

    This fine collection from the University of Florida's George A. Smathers Libraries documents the laws and legal heritage of Florida. It has digitized texts from the holdings of the University of Florida's Lawton Chiles Legal Information Center and the P. K. Yonge Library of Florida History as well as other sources. This omnibus collection features the Journal of the Florida House of Representatives, a variety of general texts on Florida laws, and the Florida Water Law collection. This last collection is particularly fascinating as it brings together over 7,000 documents related to long-term water management plans across the Sunshine State. Moving on, the Florida Historical Legal Documents section of the site contains primary source materials that survey changes in Florida law from 1822 through 1845, when the area became a state. Finally, the House Journal section brings together the official record of actions taken by the House and its committees.

  1. BP money will go to study dolphin, sharks, reefs, beaches A research council has awarded more than $9 million in BP money to 27 projects designed to

    E-print Network

    Belogay, Eugene A.

    BP money will go to study dolphin, sharks, reefs, beaches TBO.com A research council has awarded on Florida's environment. The money will pay for studies of bottle-nosed dolphin, coral reefs, sharks, water

  2. BACTERIA, BEACHES AND SWIMMABLE WATERS: INTRODUCING VIRTUAL BEACH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Safe beaches meet water quality standards and are valued for their aesthetics and the recreational opportunities that they afford. In the United States recreational water quality assessments and beach closure decisions are presently based on samples of enterococci or Escherichia ...

  3. South Florida Sun-Sentinel.com Easier access to medical care comes to local senior centers

    E-print Network

    Belogay, Eugene A.

    Community Center west of Delray Beach have received a grant for a nurse practitioner to do blood pressure Education and Research Center in West Palm Beach. Senior center planners hope to work with FAU's nursingSouth Florida Sun-Sentinel.com Easier access to medical care comes to local senior centers Nurse

  4. The University of Miami, Nature Publishing Group, and Scripps Florida present

    E-print Network

    Cai, Long

    The University of Miami, Nature Publishing Group, and Scripps Florida present THE MIAMI 2009 WINTER the advancement of knowledge. January 24-28, 2009 Deauville Beach Resort Miami Beach, FL, USA SESSION TOPICS Corporation, USA) Margaret Pericak-Vance (University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, USA) David Porteous

  5. Morphologic Features and Morphodynamic Zones along the Inner Continental Shelf of Southeastern Florida: An Example of Form and Process Controlled by Lithology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Charles W. Finkl; Mathew T. Warner

    FINKL, C.W. and WARNER, M.T., 2004. Morphologic features and morphodynamic zones along the inner continental shelf of southeastern florida: An example of form and process controlled by lithology. Journal of Coastal Research, SI(42), 000-000. West Palm Beach (Florida), ISSN 0749-0208. Submarine morphological features along the southeast Florida coast in central Palm Beach County were mapped from large-scale aerial images (acquisition

  6. Great Lakes BeachCast

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Great Lakes Information Network developed this website to "broadcast critical information about beach closings and educational content on human health concerns." The website provides the latest news on erosion control projects, contamination and cleanup efforts, beach testing efforts, and other environmental news. Users can explore monitoring data and maps by location. The website also contains the proceedings from the Great Lakes Beach Conferences from 2001 and 2002 and the US EPA's Beach Program activities.

  7. Morphodynamics of Prograding Beaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggiero, P.

    2012-12-01

    Long-term coastal evolution often results from the cumulative effects of small residual differences between relatively large signals. In light of dire projections of sea level rise over the next several decades to century, there is a strong societal need for accurate forecasts of net interannual- to decadal-scale coastal change. However, our present understanding of the processes responsible for storm-induced erosion and coastal recession is significantly more advanced than our knowledge of coastal recovery during calm periods. To investigate the processes and morphodynamics associated with progading beaches we synthesize findings from a long-term (15 years) beach morphology monitoring program in the U.S. Pacific Northwest. Most of the beaches along the Columbia River littoral cell (northwest Oregon and southwest Washington) were eroded during the two intense winters of 1997/1998 (a major El Niño event) and 1998/1999 (a moderate La Niña event). Subsequent to these winters the beaches have exhibited net residual progradation of several meters per year resulting in significant shoreline advance. During this same period as many as two to three new foredunes formed with backshore beach profiles accumulating sand at rates of well over 10 m3/m/yr. Interestingly, these large signals of horizontal and vertical coastal advance have occurred on beaches in which nearshore morphological variability is dominated by net offshore sandbar migration. Net offshore sandbar migration follows a three-stage process; bar generation near the shoreline, seaward migration, and bar degeneration in the outer nearshore with a cyclic return period of approximately 4 to 5 years in the region. Gradients in alongshore sediment transport, net onshore directed cross-shore sediment transport within the surf zone, and cross-shore feeding from a shoreface out of equilibrium with forcing conditions may each be partially responsible for the sediment supplied to the beaches and dunes during the study period. In this paper we will exploit regional variability in physical (e.g. sediment supply) and ecological variables (e.g. % cover of exotic beach grass species and density) thought responsible for the varying rates and form of coastal advance in the region. These gradients allow us to test hypotheses regarding the relative role of the various controls on interannual- to decadal-scale coastal evolution.

  8. Archive of digital boomer subbottom data collected during USGS cruise 05FGS01 offshore east-central Florida, July 17-29, 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Forde, Arnell S.; Dadisman, Shawn V.; Wiese, Dana S.; Phelps, Daniel C.

    2012-01-01

    In July of 2005, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Florida Geological Survey (FGS), conducted a geophysical survey of the Atlantic Ocean offshore of Florida's east coast from Flagler Beach to Daytona Beach. This report serves as an archive of unprocessed digital boomer subbottom data, trackline maps, navigation files, Geographic Information System (GIS) files, Field Activity Collection System (FACS) logs and formal Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) metadata. Filtered and gained (showing a relative increase in signal amplitude) digital images of the seismic profiles are also provided. Refer to the Acronyms page for expansions of acronyms and abbreviations used in this report. The USGS Saint Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center (SPCMSC) assigns a unique identifier to each cruise or field activity. For example, 05FGS01 tells us the data were collected in 2005 for cooperative work with the FGS and the data were collected during the first field activity for that project in that calendar year. Refer to http://walrus.wr.usgs.gov/infobank/programs/html/definition/activity.html for a detailed description of the method used to assign the field activity ID. The boomer subbottom processing system consists of an acoustic energy source that is made up of capacitors charged to a high voltage and discharged through a transducer in the water. The transducer is towed on a sled floating on the water surface and when discharged emits a short acoustic pulse, or shot, which propagates through the water column and shallow stratrigraphy below. The acoustic energy is reflected at density boundaries (such as the seafloor or sediment layers beneath the seafloor), detected by the receiver (a hydrophone streamer), and recorded by a PC-based seismic acquisition system. This process is repeated at timed intervals (for example, 0.5 s) and recorded for specific intervals of time (for example, 100 ms). In this way, a two-dimensional (2-D) vertical image of the shallow geologic structure beneath the ship track is produced. Figure 1 displays the acquisition geometry. Refer to table 1 for a summary of acquisition parameters and table 2 for trackline statistics. The archived trace data are in standard Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) SEG Y format (Barry and others, 1975), except an ASCII format is used for the first 3,200 bytes of the card image header instead of the standard EBCDIC format. For a detailed description about the recorded trace headers, refer to the SEG Y Format page. The SEG Y files may be downloaded and processed with commercial or public domain software such as Seismic Unix (Cohen and Stockwell, 2005). See the How To Download SEG Y Data page for download instructions. The printable profiles provided here are GIF images that were processed and gained using SU software; refer to the Software page for links to example SU processing scripts. The processed SEG Y data were also exported to Chesapeake Technology, Inc. (CTI) SonarWeb software to produce a geospatially interactive version of the profile that allows the user to obtain a geographic location and depth from the profile for a given cursor position; this information is displayed in the status bar of the browser. Please note that clicking on the profile image switches it to "Expanded View" (a compressed image of the entire line) and cursor tracking is not available in this mode.

  9. Great Lakes Beach Health

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    As schools close for the year and summer weather beckons, many recreationalists head to the Great Lakes' public beaches. However, these coastal areas can become contaminated with disease-causing bacteria that threaten public health, disrupt water recreation, and pay a toll on the Great Lakes economi...

  10. South Florida Sun-Sentinel.com With primary looming, Republican candidates flock to

    E-print Network

    Belogay, Eugene A.

    Napoli, chairman of the Broward Republican Party. Santorum, for example, was forced to defend his position againstSouth Florida Sun-Sentinel.com With primary looming, Republican candidates flock to Florida, January 22, 2012 POMPANO BEACH Like spring breakers or Canadian snowbirds, Republican presidential

  11. Charlotte Neubauer, MSN, RN University of Central Florida College of Nursing

    E-print Network

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    River Memorial Hospital, Vero Beach, Florida. Women's Health Educator, staff nurse for labor Memorial Hospital, Sebastian, Florida. Staff nurse and patient educator for women's health unit including, FL. Partners in Women's Health, OB/GYN RN Coordinator for outpatient obstetric and gynecology

  12. 76 FR 26771 - Florida Power & Light Company; Turkey Point, Units 3 and 4; Notice of Consideration of Issuance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-09

    ...amendment request involves no significant hazards consideration, the Commission may issue...amendment request involves a significant hazards consideration, then any hearing held...Power & Light, P.O. Box 14000, Juno Beach, Florida 33408-0420. Order...

  13. 76 FR 33789 - Florida Power & Light Company, St. Lucie Plant, Unit 1; Notice of Consideration of Issuance of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-09

    ...amendment request involves no significant hazards consideration, the Commission may issue...amendment request involves a significant hazards consideration, then any hearing held...Power & Light, P.O. Box 14000, Juno Beach, Florida 33408-0420. Order...

  14. 75 FR 29699 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans: Florida; Approval of Section 110(a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-27

    ...and the Southeast Florida Area comprises Broward, Dade, and Palm Beach Counties. These maintenance plans were submitted to EPA...reconsidered ozone standards will be addressed in the future. DATES: Written comments must be received on or before June 28,...

  15. Supporting Low-Income Parents of Young Children: The Palm Beach County Family Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spielberger, Julie; Rich, Lauren; Gouvea, Marcia; Winje, Carolyn; Scannell, Molly; Harden, Allen; Berg, Kristin

    2009-01-01

    For more than a decade, Florida's Palm Beach County has been building an infrastructure of prevention and early intervention services to promote and support the healthy development and school readiness of children from birth to age 8. The county began this effort with a set of programs focused on serving families in four targeted geographic areas…

  16. Improving School Readiness: A Brief Report from the Palm Beach County Family Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spielberger, Julie; Gouvea, Marcia; Rich, Lauren

    2012-01-01

    For more than a decade, Florida's Palm Beach County has been building a system of prevention and early intervention services to promote and support the healthy development and school readiness of children from birth to age 8. The county began this effort with a set of programs focused on serving families in four targeted geographic areas that have…

  17. For first time since 2007, food stamp use drops in state, Palm Beach County

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    For first time since 2007, food stamp use drops in state, Palm Beach County March 13, 2013|By Donna Gehrke-White, Sun Sentinel For the first time in nearly six years, the number of people on food stamps." The state also saw an overall decline with the total number of people on food stamps in Florida dropping

  18. Palm Beach School Board Acquisition of Relocatable Classrooms Examined. OPPAGA Special Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Legislature, Tallahassee. Office of Program Policy Analysis and Government Accountability.

    This report, responding to a Florida legislative request, examines the Palm Beach County School Board's planned purchase of concrete relocatable classrooms. The report presents a number of findings and recommendations. Concrete units are more expensive than models with metal stud walls; both types meet state building code standards. The district…

  19. Genetic structure of Florida green turtle rookeries as indicated by mitochondrial DNA control region sequences

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shamblin, Brian M.; Bagley, Dean A.; Ehrhart, Llewellyn M.; Desjardin, Nicole A.; Martin, R. Erik; Hart, Kristen M.; Naro-Maciel, Eugenia; Rusenko, Kirt; Stiner, John C.; Sobel, Debra; Johnson, Chris; Wilmers, Thomas; Wright, Laura J.; Nairn, Campbell J.

    2014-01-01

    Green turtle (Chelonia mydas) nesting has increased dramatically in Florida over the past two decades, ranking the Florida nesting aggregation among the largest in the Greater Caribbean region. Individual beaches that comprise several hundred kilometers of Florida’s east coast and Keys support tens to thousands of nests annually. These beaches encompass natural to highly developed habitats, and the degree of demographic partitioning among rookeries was previously unresolved. We characterized the genetic structure of ten Florida rookeries from Cape Canaveral to the Dry Tortugas through analysis of 817 base pair mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region sequences from 485 nesting turtles. Two common haplotypes, CM-A1.1 and CM-A3.1, accounted for 87 % of samples, and the haplotype frequencies were strongly partitioned by latitude along Florida’s Atlantic coast. Most genetic structure occurred between rookeries on either side of an apparent genetic break in the vicinity of the St. Lucie Inlet that separates Hutchinson Island and Jupiter Island, representing the finest scale at which mtDNA structure has been documented in marine turtle rookeries. Florida and Caribbean scale analyses of population structure support recognition of at least two management units: central eastern Florida and southern Florida. More thorough sampling and deeper sequencing are necessary to better characterize connectivity among Florida green turtle rookeries as well as between the Florida nesting aggregation and others in the Greater Caribbean region.

  20. Characterization of the mesophotic reef fish community in south Florida, USA By D. R. Bryan1,2

    E-print Network

    Miami, University of

    Beach, FL, USA; 3 National Coral Reef Institute, Dania Beach, FL, USA; 4 Estuarine, Coastal and Ocean-central Florida and the Gulf of Mexico than those associated with adjacent low-relief habitat or nearby coral reef- tance of the mesophotic zone, the associated reef-fish assem- blages are still poorly described in many

  1. Hydrodynamic and geologic influence of event-dependent depth of closure along the South Florida Atlantic Coast

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William Robertson V; Keqi Zhang; Charles W. Finkl; Dean Whitman

    2008-01-01

    This study develops a method to identify the depth of closure using airborne laser bathymetric data, and compares the measured depth of closure to calculated depth of closures and subaqueous geomorphic units. Airborne laser data sets were collected before and after the 2004 hurricane season along 100 km of beaches in Palm Beach, Broward, and Miami-Dade Counties in southeast Florida. Wave

  2. Changes in Beachface Bed Elevation over a Tidal Cycle on Santa Rosa Island, Florida and Matagorda, Texas

    E-print Network

    Barrett, Gemma

    2009-06-09

    using a cross-shore array of ultrasonic distance sensors on a dissipative beach at Matagorda Peninsula, Texas, in December 2008. The data collected in this study are compared to data collected in a companion study on an intermediate beach in Pensacola..., Florida in June 2008. Both beaches are currently in a state of recovery from hurricane activity within the last 5 years, and therefore serve as good comparison sites for bed elevation change models. At both sites, the ultrasonic distance sensors were...

  3. Factors controlling beach changes of a Texas gulf coast beach 

    E-print Network

    Seelig, William Newton

    1973-01-01

    FACTORS CONTROLLING BEACH CHANGES OF A TEXAS GULF COAST BEACH A Thesis by WILLIAM NEWTON SEEL IG Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... December 1973 Najor Subject: Civil Engineering FACTORS CONTROLLING BEACH CHANGES OF A TEXAS GULF COAST BEACH A Thesis by WILLIAM NEWTON SEELIG Approved as to sty1e and content by: A~ . E. c) er, Jr, (Co-chairman) R. M. Soren en (Co-cha) rman) E...

  4. Factors controlling beach changes of a Texas gulf coast beach

    E-print Network

    Seelig, William Newton

    1973-01-01

    December 1973 Najor Subject: Civil Engineering FACTORS CONTROLLING BEACH CHANGES OF A TEXAS GULF COAST BEACH A Thesis by WILLIAM NEWTON SEELIG Approved as to sty1e and content by: A~ . E. c) er, Jr, (Co-chairman) R. M. Soren en (Co-cha) rman) E.... L. Kist er (Member) W. M. r (Member) . D. Turpin ead of Departm t} December 1973 43a414 ABSTRACT Factors Controlling Beach Changes of A Texas Gulf Coast Beach. (December 1973) William Newton Seelig, B. S. , Virginia Polytechnic Institute...

  5. Florida Red Tide Perception: Residents versus Tourists

    PubMed Central

    Nierenberg, Kate; Byrne, Margaret; Fleming, Lora E.; Stephan, Wendy; Reich, Andrew; Backer, Lorraine C.; Tanga, Elvira; Dalpra, Dana R.; Kirkpatrick, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    The west coast of Florida has annual blooms of the toxin-producing dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis with Sarasota, FL considered the epicenter for these blooms. Numerous outreach materials, including Frequently Asked Question (FAQ) cards, exhibits for local museums and aquaria, public beach signs, and numerous websites have been developed to disseminate information to the public about this natural hazard. In addition, during intense onshore blooms, a great deal of media attention, primarily via newspaper (print and web) and television, is focused on red tide. However to date, the only measure of effectiveness of these outreach methods has been counts of the number of people exposed to the information, e.g., visits to a website or number of FAQ cards distributed. No formal assessment has been conducted to determine if these materials meet their goal of informing the public about Florida red tide. Also, although local residents have the opinion that they are very knowledgeable about Florida red tide, this has not been verified empirically. This study addressed these issues by creating and administering an evaluation tool for the assessment of public knowledge about Florida red tide. A focus group of Florida red tide outreach developers assisted in the creation of the evaluation tool. The location of the evaluation was the west coast of Florida, in Sarasota County. The objective was to assess the knowledge of the general public about Florida red tide. This assessment identified gaps in public knowledge regarding Florida red tides and also identified what information sources people want to use to obtain information on Florida red tide. The results from this study can be used to develop more effective outreach materials on Florida red tide. PMID:20824108

  6. Variation of the Beach Profile, Ocean Beach, San Francisco, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, J. E.; Ho, T.; Li, A.; Perez, A.; Wong, Y.; Bissell, M.

    2006-12-01

    Ocean Beach is a 7-km-long stretch of beach that is the western boundary of the city of San Francisco with the Pacific Ocean. This beach is exposed to large winter waves produced in the North Pacific and smaller summer waves from both the North and South Pacific. Recent decades have seen an increased rate of erosion at the south end of the beach that has led to the partial collapse of a parking lot, and continued erosion threatens both public and private infrastructure. To gain an understanding of the variation in beach profiles we established six cross-shore profiles approximately 1 km apart. Each profile represents a part of the beach that experiences different wave conditions, caused by refraction across the San Francisco Bar, and thus has a different morphologic response to offshore sea conditions. The six sub-aerial profiles were measured using a total station one week apart in August 2006. All profiles increased in elevation and five of the six profiles showed the early formation or continued growth of berms. The same profiles will be re-analyzed in the autumn to determine further change, and compared to data collected by a 2004 SF-ROCKS group that also studied Ocean Beach. We will relate beach profile change to wave conditions measured at an offshore buoy to determine what wave conditions cause profile accretion or erosion. The results of this study will shed light on the processes occurring at Ocean Beach and will help us to understand why the south end of the beach is eroding.

  7. American beach law and policies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gerard J. Mangone

    2010-01-01

    The beaches of the United States are subject to profound physical changes and some bitter legal and political disputes. A misinterpreted public trust doctrine went far in allowing government control over the foreshore, further strengthened by doctrines of prescription, dedication, and custom to increase public access to the beach and even the dry sands regarded as private property. But the

  8. Inverse Problems, Design and Optimization Symposium Miami, Florida, U.S.A., April 16-18,2007

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Inverse Problems, Design and Optimization Symposium Miami, Florida, U.S.A., April 16-18,2007 A TWO, Design and Optimization, Miami Beach : United States (2007)" DOI : 10.1080%2f17415970802166733 #12;Inverse Problems, Design and Optimization Symposium Miami, Florida, U.S.A., April 16-18,2007 Each

  9. Florida Aquarium

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Web page features information for visitors, calendar of events, guide to the aquarium, activities, education and community programs, conservation initiatives, and information on employment, internships, membership and donors. The Florida Aquarium is a not-for-profit educational and cultural attraction whose mission allows people of all ages and backgrounds to engage in experiences that inspire a sense of wonder, understanding and stewardship of aquatic environments. Located in Tampa, Florida.

  10. Estimating Peak Demand for Beach Parking Spaces

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christopher F. Dumas; John C. Whitehead; James H. Herstine; Robert B. Buerger; Jeffery M. Hill

    2006-01-01

    The United States Army Corps of Engineers planning guidance stipulates that in order for local beach communities to qualify for Federal cost share funds for Hurricane and Storm Damage Reduction beach renourishment projects, the community must provide public beach access and parking to satisfy peak demand. This study presents a method for estimating peak demand for beach parking spaces in

  11. Recent Hawaii Beach Nourishment Projects Scott Sullivan

    E-print Network

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Recent Hawaii Beach Nourishment Projects Scott Sullivan Vice President, Sea Engineering, Inc. Abstract Hawaii is blessed with beautiful natural sand beaches, but over time many of these beaches have relegated beach maintenance to a relatively low priority. With Hawaii's population increasing, and nature

  12. PAH concentrations in Coquina (Donax spp.) on a sandy beach shoreline impacted by a marine oil spill.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Richard A; Vestal, Alexandra; Welch, Christina; Barnes, Gracie; Pelot, Robert; Ederington-Hagy, Melissa; Hileman, Fredrick

    2014-06-15

    The BP MC252 well failure in the Gulf of Mexico, April 2010 caused concern for crude oil and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs) exposure along the sandy beaches of the Florida Panhandle. We began collections of Coquina clams (Donax spp.) from the surf zone of Florida Panhandle beaches to monitor PAH contamination to compliment analysis of surf zone sand samples. These clams had higher levels of PAHs relative to ambient sand, and this allowed us to continue to monitor PAH levels after sand concentrations fell below limits of detection. PAH levels in the Coquina tissues were highly variable, perhaps indicative of the heterogeneous distribution of oil and tar on the beaches and exposure to tar particles. Overall, PAH levels decreased continuously in both sand and Coquina tissues, reaching limits of detection within one and two years respectively after oil landed on Florida Panhandle beaches. Our work suggests these surf zone molluscs may be used to monitor pollutant exposure along high energy sandy beach shorelines. PMID:24775069

  13. Coastal Erosion: Where's the Beach?

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This data tip from Bridge, the Ocean Sciences Education Teacher Resource Center archive, explores erosion and accretion of coastal sediments, the two processes that keep our beaches in a constant state of change. Both natural and not-so-natural factors influencing these processes are discussed. Learners can view a variety of weblinks on the topic and conduct their own beach profile investigation, or access profile data from a 1999 Ocean City, Maryland beach and plot the changes over time for a graphic illustration of these processes.

  14. 76 FR 54703 - Safety Zone; Myrtle Beach Triathlon, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Myrtle Beach, SC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-02

    ...USCG-2011-0001] RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Myrtle Beach Triathlon, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Myrtle Beach, SC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS...on the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina during the...

  15. Inland Transport of Aerosolized Florida Red Tide Toxins.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Pierce, Richard; Cheng, Yung Sung; Henry, Michael S; Blum, Patricia; Osborn, Shannon; Nierenberg, Kate; Pederson, Bradley A; Fleming, Lora E; Reich, Andrew; Naar, Jerome; Kirkpatrick, Gary; Backer, Lorraine C; Baden, Daniel

    2010-02-01

    Florida red tides, an annual event off the west coast of Florida, are caused by the toxic dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis. K. brevis produces a suite of potent neurotoxins, brevetoxins, which kill fish, sea birds, and marine mammals, as well as sickening humans who consume contaminated shellfish. These toxins become part of the marine aerosol, and can also be inhaled by humans and other animals. Recent studies have demonstrated a significant increase in symptoms and decrease lung function in asthmatics after only one hour of beach exposure during an onshore Florida red tide bloom.This study constructed a transect line placing high volume air samplers to measure brevetoxins at sites beginning at the beach, moving approximately 6.4 km inland. One non-exposure and 2 exposure studies, each of 5 days duration, were conducted. No toxins were measured in the air during the non-exposure period. During the 2 exposure periods, the amount of brevetoxins varied considerably by site and by date. Nevertheless, brevetoxins were measured at least 4.2 kilometers from the beach and/or 1.6 km from the coastal shoreline. Therefore, populations sensitive to brevetoxins (such as asthmatics) need to know that leaving the beach may not discontinue their environmental exposure to brevetoxin aerosols. PMID:20161504

  16. An Alternative Approach to Water Regulations for Public Health Protection at Bathing Beaches

    PubMed Central

    Abdelzaher, Amir M.; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M.; Phillips, Matthew C.; Elmir, Samir M.; Fleming, Lora E.

    2013-01-01

    New approaches should be considered as the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) moves rapidly to develop new beach monitoring guidelines by the end of 2012, as these guidelines serve as the basis by which states and territories with coasts along the oceans and Great Lakes can then develop and implement monitoring programs for recreational waters. We describe and illustrate one possible approach to beach regulation termed as the “Comprehensive Toolbox within an Approval Process (CTBAP).” The CTBAP consists of three components. The first is a “toolbox” consisting of an inventory of guidelines on monitoring targets, a series of measurement techniques, and guidance to improve water quality through source identification and prevention methods. The second two components are principles of implementation. These include first, “flexibility” to encourage and develop an individualized beach management plan tailored to local conditions and second, “consistency” of this management plan to ensure a consistent national level of public health protection. The results of this approach are illustrated through a case study at a well-studied South Florida recreational marine beach. This case study explores different monitoring targets based on two different health endpoints (skin versus gastrointestinal illness) and recommends a beach regulation program for the study beach that focuses predominately on source prevention. PMID:23431320

  17. Supplement 11, Authors: A To Z

    E-print Network

    Segal, Dorothy B.; Doss, Mildred A.; Humphrey, Judith M.

    1961-01-01

    . Wundsch. See Ztschr. Fischerei, Neudamm u. Berlin, n.F., v. 6 (1-7), Sept., 1957. Florida Dairy News.?The Florida Dairy News. Jacksonville. Florida Nat.?The Florida Naturalist. Daytona Beach. Fraedslurit. B?nadarf?lage Is.?Fraedslurit. B?- nadarf...]. (?????????? ?????? ??????????? ?? ???????? ?????? ???????? (????, ???? 1956 ?.). Riga. Mater. 3. Nauchn. Konf Infekts, i Invaz. /?aboJev. Sel'skokh. Zhivotn. (5-7 Mar., 1957). ?Materialy 3-i Nauchnoi Konferenstii po Infektsionnym i Invazionnym ZabolevaniiaTii bei skokhoziaistvennykh Zhivotnykh (5-7 Marta 1957 g...

  18. Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological LaboratorySeptember-October 2008 Volume 12, Number 5 Miami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, Florida

    E-print Network

    Miami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, Florida AOML is an environmental research laboratory of NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research located on Virginia Key in Miami, Florida KeynotesKeynotes AOML AOML

  19. Understanding Variability in Beach Slope to Improve Forecasts of Storm-induced Water Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doran, K. S.; Stockdon, H. F.; Long, J.

    2014-12-01

    The National Assessment of Hurricane-Induced Coastal Erosion Hazards combines measurements of beach morphology with storm hydrodynamics to produce forecasts of coastal change during storms for the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic coastlines of the United States. Wave-induced water levels are estimated using modeled offshore wave height and period and measured beach slope (from dune toe to shoreline) through the empirical parameterization of Stockdon et al. (2006). Spatial and temporal variability in beach slope leads to corresponding variability in predicted wave setup and swash. Seasonal and storm-induced changes in beach slope can lead to differences on the order of a meter in wave runup elevation, making accurate specification of this parameter essential to skillful forecasts of coastal change. Spatial variation in beach slope is accounted for through alongshore averaging, but temporal variability in beach slope is not included in the final computation of the likelihood of coastal change. Additionally, input morphology may be years old and potentially very different than the conditions present during forecast storm. In order to improve our forecasts of hurricane-induced coastal erosion hazards, the temporal variability of beach slope must be included in the final uncertainty of modeled wave-induced water levels. Frequently collected field measurements of lidar-based beach morphology are examined for study sites in Duck, North Carolina, Treasure Island, Florida, Assateague Island, Virginia, and Dauphin Island, Alabama, with some records extending over a period of 15 years. Understanding the variability of slopes at these sites will help provide estimates of associated water level uncertainty which can then be applied to other areas where lidar observations are infrequent, and improve the overall skill of future forecasts of storm-induced coastal change. Stockdon, H. F., Holman, R. A., Howd, P. A., and Sallenger Jr, A. H. (2006). Empirical parameterization of setup,swash, and runup. Coastal engineering, 53(7), 573-588.

  20. Beryllium technology workshop, Clearwater Beach, Florida, November 20, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Longhurst, G.R.

    1991-12-01

    This report discusses the following topics: beryllium in the ITER blanket; mechanical testing of irradiated beryllium; tritium release measurements on irradiated beryllium; beryllium needs for plasma-facing components; thermal conductivity of plasma sprayed beryllium; beryllium research at the INEL; Japanese beryllium research activities for in-pile mockup tests on ITER; a study of beryllium bonding of copper alloy; new production technologies; thermophysical properties of a new ingot metallurgy beryllium product line; implications of beryllium:steam interactions in fusion reactors; and a test program for irradiation embrittlement of beryllium at JET.

  1. Week 5, A 'Sweet As' Beach and Ride Murdering Beach at sunset.

    E-print Network

    Bardsley, John

    Week 5, A 'Sweet As' Beach and Ride Murdering Beach at sunset. I'm starting to get used Point trailhead, we turned off on a steep road down to Murdering Beach. Apparently a murder did occur for the sunset. #12;Tidal Pool at Murdering Beach Also this week, I brought the camera along on what has become

  2. Summer Beach Time Means Water Safety

    MedlinePLUS

    ... news/fullstory_153177.html Summer Beach Time Means Water Safety Expert offers tips for dealing with rip ... rip current is created when the backrushing of water from the beach is channeled in a direction ...

  3. Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological LaboratoryJanuary-February 2009 Volume 13, Number 1 Miami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, Florida

    E-print Network

    Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological LaboratoryJanuary-February 2009 Volume 13, Number 1 Miami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, Florida AOML is an environmental research laboratory of NOAA's Office of Oceanic

  4. Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological LaboratoryMarch-April 2008 Volume 12, Number 2 Miami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, Florida

    E-print Network

    Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological LaboratoryMarch-April 2008 Volume 12, Number 2 Miami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, Florida AOML is an environmental research laboratory of NOAA's Office of Oceanic

  5. Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological LaboratoryJanuary-February 2008 Volume 12, Number 1 Miami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, Florida

    E-print Network

    Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological LaboratoryJanuary-February 2008 Volume 12, Number 1 Miami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, Florida AOML is an environmental research laboratory of NOAA's Office of Oceanic

  6. Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological LaboratoryJuly-August 2008 Volume 12, Number 4 Miami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, Florida

    E-print Network

    Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological LaboratoryJuly-August 2008 Volume 12, Number 4 Miami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, FloridaMiami, Florida AOML is an environmental research laboratory of NOAA's Office of Oceanic

  7. Valuing Beach Renourishment: Is it Preservation?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rebecca P. Judge; Laura Osborne; Kerry Smith

    1995-01-01

    A proposed plan to preserve beach and beach access along the Cape Hatteras National Seashore thorugh beach re-nourishment offers the opportunity to apply contingent valuation techniques to explore the implications of three sources of preference heterogeneity for measures of people's willingness to pay. Preferences are modeled as functions of: (a) attitudes, socio-economic and demographic characteristics; (b) past experience with the

  8. A Study of Sandy Beach Zonation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Steve K.

    1991-01-01

    Describes the study of sandy beach zonations as a seashore activity for either high school or lower-level college courses in biology, ecology, or marine biology. Students first draw a profile of a beach scene and then collect specimens from the zones of the shore. In a laboratory, students identify their specimens and relate them to the beach

  9. Inside the "Long Beach Way"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Lynn

    2007-01-01

    This article features Long Beach Unified School District, the 2003 winner of a prestigious prize in urban education. The district of more than 90,000 students is the first winner of the award to return to the competition as a finalist. Its reappearance on the list after earning the prize in 2003 raises interesting questions about how districts…

  10. Post-storm beach and dune recovery: Implications for barrier island resilience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houser, Chris; Wernette, Phil; Rentschlar, Elizabeth; Jones, Hannah; Hammond, Brianna; Trimble, Sarah

    2015-04-01

    The ability of beaches and dunes to recover following an extreme storm is a primary control of barrier island response to sea-level rise and changes in the frequency and/or magnitude of storm surges. Whereas erosion of the beach and dune occurs over hours and days, it can be years to decades before the beach and dune are able to recover to their pre-storm state. As a consequence, there are numerous descriptions of near-instantaneous beach and dune erosion due to storms, the immediate onshore transport of sand, and the initial phases of beach and dune recovery following a storm, but a paucity of data on long-term beach and dune recovery. A combination of previously published data from Galveston Island, Texas and new remotely sensed data from Santa Rosa Island, Florida is used in the present study to quantify the rate of dune recovery for dissipative and intermediate beach types, respectively. Recovery of the dune height and volume on Galveston Island was observed within two years following Hurricane Alicia (1983) and was largely complete within six years of the storm, despite extensive washover. In contrast, the dunes on Santa Rosa Island in Northwest Florida began to recover four years after Hurricane Ivan (2004), and only after the profile approached its pre-storm level and the rate of vegetation recovery (regrowth) was at a maximum. Results show that complete recovery of the largest dunes (in height and volume) will take approximately 10 years on Santa Rosa Island, which suggests that these sections of the island are particularly vulnerable to significant change in island morphology if there is also a change in the frequency and magnitude of storm events. In contrast, the areas of the island with the smallest dunes before Hurricane Ivan exhibited a rapid recovery, but no further growth in profile volume and dune height beyond the pre-storm volume and height, despite continued recovery of the largest dunes to their pre-storm height. A change in storm magnitude and/or frequency is a potential threat to barrier island resilience, particularly for those sections of the island where dune recovery has historically taken the longest time. Further study is required to determine how and why dune recovery varies for the dissipative and intermediate beaches of Galveston Island and Santa Rosa Island, respectively.

  11. Florida beachgoers are warned to stay OUT of the water: Tens of thousands of 'frenzied'

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    and a total of 36 deaths. There has never been a fatal attack in Palm Beach County, where the sharks have been seen this week. Most shark attacks across the state occur in July, August, September and October. 'ThatFlorida beachgoers are warned to stay OUT of the water: Tens of thousands of 'frenzied' sharks

  12. Ecology and management of Sheoak (Casuarina spp.), an invader of coastal Florida, U.S.A.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Casuarina spp. are invasive weeds in Florida that threaten biological diversity and beach integrity of coastal habitats. The trees include three species and their hybrids that aggressively invade riverine and coastal areas. Of the three species, C. equisetifolia and C. glauca are highly salt tol...

  13. Adaptive basis of geographic variation: genetic, phenotypic and environmental differences among beach mouse populations

    PubMed Central

    Mullen, Lynne M.; Vignieri, Sacha N.; Gore, Jeffery A.; Hoekstra, Hopi E.

    2009-01-01

    A major goal in evolutionary biology is to understand how and why populations differentiate, both genetically and phenotypically, as they invade a novel habitat. A classical example of adaptation is the pale colour of beach mice, relative to their dark mainland ancestors, which colonized the isolated sandy dunes and barrier islands on Florida's Gulf Coast. However, much less is known about differentiation among the Gulf Coast beach mice, which comprise five subspecies linearly arrayed on Florida's shoreline. Here, we test the role of selection in maintaining variation among these beach mouse subspecies at multiple levels—phenotype, genotype and the environments they inhabit. While all beach subspecies have light pelage, they differ significantly in colour pattern. These subspecies are also genetically distinct: pair-wise Fst-values range from 0.23 to 0.63 and levels of gene flow are low. However, we did not find a correlation between phenotypic and genetic distance. Instead, we find a significant association between the average ‘lightness’ of each subspecies and the brightness of the substrate it inhabits: the two most genetically divergent subspecies occupy the most similar habitats and have converged on phenotype, whereas the most genetically similar subspecies occupy the most different environments and have divergent phenotypes. Moreover, allelic variation at the pigmentation gene, Mc1r, is statistically correlated with these colour differences but not with variation at other genetic loci. Together, these results suggest that natural selection for camouflage—via changes in Mc1r allele frequency—contributes to pigment differentiation among beach mouse subspecies. PMID:19656790

  14. Factors affecting the presence of human-associated and fecal indicator real-time quantitative PCR genetic markers in urban-impacted recreational beaches.

    PubMed

    Molina, Marirosa; Hunter, Shayla; Cyterski, Mike; Peed, Lindsay A; Kelty, Catherine A; Sivaganesan, Mano; Mooney, Thomas; Prieto, Lourdes; Shanks, Orin C

    2014-11-01

    Urban runoff can carry a variety of pollutants into recreational beaches, often including bacterial pathogens and indicators of fecal contamination. To develop complete recreational criteria and risk assessments, it is necessary to understand conditions under which human contamination could be present at beaches solely impacted by urban runoff. Accurately estimating risk requires understanding sources, concentrations, and transport mechanisms of microbial contaminants in these environments. By applying microbial source tracking methods and empirical modeling, we assessed the presence and level of human contamination at urban runoff impacted recreational beaches. We also identified environmental parameters and pollution sources that can influence the concentration and transport of culturable and molecular fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) in systems impacted solely by urban runoff. Water samples and physico-chemical parameters were collected from shoreline locations from three South Carolina (SC) beaches (five locations per beach) and two Florida (FL) beaches (three locations per beach). Each SC beach was directly impacted by swashes or tidal creeks receiving stormwater runoff from the urbanized area and therefore were designated as swash drain associated (SDA) beaches, while FL beaches were designated as non-swash drain associated (NSDA). Sampling in swash drains (SD; three sites per SD) directly impacting each SC beach was also conducted. Results indicate that although culturable (enterococci) and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) (EC23S857, Entero1, and GenBac3) FIB concentrations were, on average, higher at SD locations, SDA beaches did not have consistently higher molecular FIB signals compared to NSDA beaches. Both human-associated markers (HF183 and HumM2) were concomitantly found only at SDA beaches. Bacteroidales species-specific qPCR markers (BsteriF1 and BuniF2) identified differences in the Bacteroidales community, depending on beach type. The marker for general Bacteroidales was most abundant at SD locations and exhibited a high correlation with both culturable and other molecular markers. Combining molecular information with predictive modeling allowed us to identify both alongshore movement of currents and SD outflow as significant influences on the concentration of molecular and culturable indicators in the bathing zone. Data also suggests that combining methodologies is a useful and cost effective approach to help understand transport dynamics of fecal contamination and identify potential sources of contamination at marine beaches. PMID:25061692

  15. Valuing visitors' economic benefits of public beach access points

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chi-Ok Oh; Anthony W. Dixon; James W. Mjelde; Jason Draper

    2008-01-01

    An increase in the population of coastal counties and popularity of coastal beaches as tourism destinations create difficulties for management agencies responsible for providing public beach access. The objective of this paper is to determine non-resident visitors to South Carolina beaches economic value for public beach access. Visitors are willing to pay an extra $6.60 per day for additional beach

  16. Contact With Beach Sand Among Beachgoers and Risk of Illness

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christopher D. Heaney; Elizabeth Sams; Steve Wing; Steve Marshall; Kristen Brenner; Alfred P. Dufour; Timothy J. Wade

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies of beach sand fecal contamination have triggered interest among scientists and in the media. Although evidence shows that beach sand can harbor high concentrations of fecal indicator organisms, as well as fecal pathogens, illness risk associated with beach sand contact is not well understood. Beach visitors at 7 US beaches were enrolled in the National Epidemiological and Environmental

  17. FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY FOUNDATION, INC.

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY FOUNDATION, INC. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION June 30, 2010 and 2009 #12;FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY FOUNDATION, INC. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS To the Board of Directors Florida Atlantic University Foundation, Inc. Boca Raton, Florida We have audited

  18. FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY FOUNDATION, INC.

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY FOUNDATION, INC. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION June 30, 2011 and 2010 #12;FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY FOUNDATION, INC. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AUDITORS' REPORT To the Board of Directors Florida Atlantic University Foundation, Inc. Boca Raton, Florida

  19. INSTRUMENTS 250 Long Beach Boulevard

    E-print Network

    Kleinfeld, David

    66180-M INSTRUMENTS 250 Long Beach Boulevard Stratford, GT 06497-0872 Phone: (203) 377-8282 Fax TO FAX NO. 203-378-2457 #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS i iNTRODUCTiON 3 li SUMMARY OF HAZARDS 4 IM RADIATION 4 11 HOUSING OPTICS 12 V.I COLLIMATED BEAMS 12 V.2 IMAGING THE FILAMENT 14 V.3 REAL LENSES 14 V.3a Spherical

  20. 77 FR 5793 - Beaches Environmental Assessment and Coastal Health Act; Availability of BEACH Act Grants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-06

    ...coastal recreation waters, including the Great Lakes. EPA encourages coastal and Great Lakes states and tribes that have received BEACH...EPA also encourages eligible coastal and Great Lakes tribes to apply for BEACH Act grants to...

  1. Florida Environments Online

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Florida Environments Online contains both digital full text materials and research bibliographies about the ecology and environment of Florida. Digitized materials include more than 200 seminal texts on species and ecosystems selected by scientific experts throughout the state of Florida and digitized specifically for the Linking Florida's Natural Heritage project. They also include the publications of the Florida Geological Society, and agricultural documents created by the Agricultural Experiment Station/Extension Service (IFAS) and the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Affairs, as well as engineering documents created by the UF Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station.

  2. MONITORING AND MODELING NEARSHORE DREDGE DISPOSAL FOR INDIRECT BEACH NOURISHMENT, OCEAN BEACH, SAN

    E-print Network

    MONITORING AND MODELING NEARSHORE DREDGE DISPOSAL FOR INDIRECT BEACH NOURISHMENT, OCEAN BEACH, SAN disposal was performed during the summer of 2005 at Ocean Beach, San Francisco, CA, a high energy tidal attack during the winter months has had a severe impact on existing sewage infrastructure. Although

  3. A value capture property tax for financing beach nourishment projects: an application to Delaware's ocean beaches

    Microsoft Academic Search

    George R. Parsonsa

    We propose and apply a value capture property tax for financing beach nourishment projects. Our application is to beaches in the state ofDelaware. Using a hedonic price function we estimate the implicit value ofproximity to the beach. Using these results we then inf er a property tax schedule that taxes homeowners roughly in proportion to the benefits they receive from

  4. NOWCASTING AND FORECASTING BEACH BACTERIA CONCENTRATIONS USING EPA VIRTUAL BEACH SOFTWARE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evidence shows that traditional persistence-based beach closure decision making is inadequate, beaches are closed when they could be open and kept open when they should be closed. Intense interest is now focused on efforts to nowcast beach conditions using surrogate variables, su...

  5. 78 FR 35596 - Special Local Regulation; Long Beach Regatta, Powerboat Race, Atlantic Ocean, Long Beach, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-13

    ...Regulation; Long Beach Regatta, Powerboat Race, Atlantic Ocean, Long Beach, NY AGENCY...during the Long Beach Regatta Powerboat Race scheduled for August 24-25, 2013. This...158 for the Battle on the Bay Powerboat Race. No comments or requests for public...

  6. 77 FR 13519 - Safety Zone; Virginia Beach Oceanfront Air Show, Atlantic Ocean, Virginia Beach, VA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-07

    ...Atlantic Ocean in Virginia Beach, VA. In recent years...below the air show from hazards associated with the air...vicinity of Virginia Beach, Virginia. This safety...Engineers, Virginia Marine Resource Commission, and the...Safety Zone; Virginia Beach Oceanfront Air...

  7. 7. GROUND VIEW OF PIER, LOOKING EAST FROM BEACH; SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. GROUND VIEW OF PIER, LOOKING EAST FROM BEACH; SHOWING 27TH BENT LANDWARD TO MAXWELL'S RESTAURANT, NEPTUNE'S GALLEY (RIGHT OF CENTER) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

  8. 8. GROUND VIEW OF PIER, LOOKING SOUTH FROM BEACH; SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. GROUND VIEW OF PIER, LOOKING SOUTH FROM BEACH; SHOWING 17TH BENT TO END; NEPTUNE'S GALLEY TO END OF PIER - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

  9. Beach monitoring criteria: reading the fine print.

    PubMed

    Nevers, Meredith B; Whitman, Richard L

    2011-12-15

    Beach monitoring programs aim to decrease swimming-related illnesses resulting from exposure to harmful microbes in recreational waters, while providing maximum beach access. Managers are advised by the U.S. EPA to estimate microbiological water quality based on a 5-day geometric mean of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) concentrations or on a jurisdiction-specific single-sample maximum; however, most opt instead to apply a default single-sample maximum to ease application. We examined whether re-evaluation of the U.S. EPA ambient water quality criteria (AWQC) and the epidemiological studies on which they are based could increase public beach access without affecting presumed health risk. Single-sample maxima were calculated using historic monitoring data for 50 beaches along coastal Lake Michigan on various temporal and spatial groupings to assess flexibility in the application of the AWQC. No calculation on either scale was as low as the default maximum (235 CFU/100 mL) that managers typically use, indicating that current applications may be more conservative than the outlined AWQC. It was notable that beaches subject to point source FIB contamination had lower variation, highlighting the bias in the standards for these beaches. Until new water quality standards are promulgated, more site-specific application of the AWQC may benefit beach managers by allowing swimmers greater access to beaches. This issue will be an important consideration in addressing the forthcoming beach monitoring standards. PMID:22059560

  10. Beach monitoring criteria: reading the fine print

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nevers, Meredith B.; Whitman, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    Beach monitoring programs aim to decrease swimming-related illnesses resulting from exposure to harmful microbes in recreational waters, while providing maximum beach access. Managers are advised by the U.S. EPA to estimate microbiological water quality based on a 5-day geometric mean of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) concentrations or on a jurisdiction-specific single-sample maximum; however, most opt instead to apply a default single-sample maximum to ease application. We examined whether re-evaluation of the U.S. EPA ambient water quality criteria (AWQC) and the epidemiological studies on which they are based could increase public beach access without affecting presumed health risk. Single-sample maxima were calculated using historic monitoring data for 50 beaches along coastal Lake Michigan on various temporal and spatial groupings to assess flexibility in the application of the AWQC. No calculation on either scale was as low as the default maximum (235 CFU/100 mL) that managers typically use, indicating that current applications may be more conservative than the outlined AWQC. It was notable that beaches subject to point source FIB contamination had lower variation, highlighting the bias in the standards for these beaches. Until new water quality standards are promulgated, more site-specific application of the AWQC may benefit beach managers by allowing swimmers greater access to beaches. This issue will be an important consideration in addressing the forthcoming beach monitoring standards.

  11. 75 FR 16201 - FPL Energy Point Beach, LLC; Point Beach Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2; Exemption

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-31

    ...NRC-2010-0123] FPL Energy Point Beach, LLC; Point Beach Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2; Exemption 1.0 Background FPL Energy Point Beach, LLC (FPLE...NRC) to M. S. Fertel (Nuclear Energy Institute) dated June...

  12. Florida Panther Society

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    With only 30 to 50 individual cats remaining in Florida's wild areas, Florida panthers are a conservation concern. The Florida Panther Society is a non-governmental organization dedicated to the recovery of the Florida panther population. The Society's Webpage offers background information on panthers, genetic restoration efforts, the state's panther population, field notes on current research/ restoration activities, and photographs of some of the remaining individuals.

  13. Florida Panther Net

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    With only 30 to 50 individual cats remaining in Florida's wild areas, Florida panthers are a conservation concern. The state's Florida Panther Net Website offers additional information, including natural history information, notes from the field, photographs, and a series of educational materials.

  14. Florida Information Resource Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Francis C.

    1986-01-01

    The Florida Information Resource Network (FIRN) is an effort by the Florida education community and the Florida Legislature to provide an electronic link among all agencies, institutions, and schools in the public education system. The communications link, perhaps one of the most advanced in the nation, has three purposes: (1) to provide equal…

  15. Mangos of Florida, country contribution: Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The book chapter presents a review of the historical importance of mango in Florida; geographical distribution of mangos in Florida; statistical data including total and seasonal production, main cultivars and their descriptors; cultural practices (i.e. propagation, fertilization, pruning); pests an...

  16. Assessment of swimming associated health effects in marine bathing beach: an example from Morib beach (Malaysia).

    PubMed

    Praveena, Sarva Mangala; Pauzi, Norfasmawati Mohd; Hamdan, Munashamimi; Sham, Shaharuddin Mohd

    2015-03-15

    A survey among beachgoers was conducted to determine the swimming associated health effects experienced and its relationship with beach water exposure behaviour in Morib beach. For beach water exposure behaviour, the highest frequency of visit among the respondents was once a year (41.9%). For ways of water exposure, whole body exposure including head was the highest (38.5%). For duration of water exposure, 30.8% respondents prefer to be in water for about 30 min with low possibilities of accidental ingestion of beach water. A total of 30.8% of beachgoers in Morib beach were reported of having dermal symptoms. Bivariate analysis showed only water activity, water contact and accidental ingestion of beach water showed significant association with swimming associated health effects experienced by swimmers. This study output showed that epidemiological study can be used to identify swimming associated health effects in beach water exposed to faecal contamination. PMID:25597267

  17. PREDICTING BACTERIAL CONCENTRATION ON THE NATION'S BEACHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A classical example of the failure of institutions and environmental technology to protect the nation's aesthetic, recreational, and public health values is represented by the July-August, 1999 Huntington Beach, California beach closure. This multi-million dollar regional public ...

  18. Effects of beach cast cleaning on beach quality, microbial food web, and littoral macrofaunal biodiversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malm, Torleif; Råberg, Sonja; Fell, Sabine; Carlsson, Per

    2004-06-01

    At the end of the summer, drifting filamentous red algae cover shallow bottoms and accumulate in huge cast walls on the open shores of the non-tidal central Baltic Sea. The hypotheses that beach cleaning increases water clarity, decreases the organic content of the sand, and increases the species diversity in the shallow zone closest to the shore, were tested through field investigations and experiments. Cleaned shorelines were compared with un-cleaned shorelines at two sites with different intensity of beach cleaning in a rural area of SE Sweden. The results show that water clarity was significantly increased off the intensively cleaned beach but not off the moderately cleaned one. Similarly, the total leakage of nitrogenous compounds decreased off the intensively cleaned beach, but not off the moderately cleaned. The organic content of the sand was lower on both cleaned beaches compared with nearby un-cleaned beaches. The total animal biomass was significantly lower on the intensively cleaned beach compared with the un-cleaned beach, but the moderately cleaned beach gave no such effect. The difference in biodiversity and community structure between cleaned and un-cleaned beaches was insignificant. The most obvious difference in species composition was a much higher number of planktivore opossum shrimps of the genus Mysis and Praunus on the un-cleaned beaches. The bacterial production and the amount of ciliates larger than 20 mm were also higher on un-cleaned beaches, indicating that the microbial food web off the un-cleaned beaches is stimulated by the discharge of decomposing algal material. The conclusion of the study is that mechanical cleaning reduces the organic content of the beach sand and may change the water quality and microbial production, but the effect on the macrofaunal biodiversity is insignificant.

  19. Posted: 5:43 p.m. Friday, Sept. 7, 2012 Florida political scientists give Obama speech

    E-print Network

    Belogay, Eugene A.

    Posted: 5:43 p.m. Friday, Sept. 7, 2012 Florida political scientists give Obama speech mixed marks By John Lantigua Palm Beach Post Staff Writer President Obama's 39-minute acceptance speech by the conventioneers, as expected. But in the estimation of many other political observers, Obama, known for his

  20. Dynamics of Shengjini beach (Albania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gashi, Ferim; Nikolli, Pal

    2015-04-01

    Dynamics of Shengjini beach (Albania) Pal Nikolli , Ferim GASHI Through archaeological and historical data, presentations of ancient topographic, cartographic materials (topographic maps obtained at different periods from 1870 to 1990), aerial photographs (2007), satellite images (2014) and direct measurements, paper defines and analyzes the position of the coastline of Shengjini beach (Lezha) from century XVI until today. The coastline of the Shengjini city (port) to Drin River estuary is oriented north-south direction and is approximately 10.5 km long. This part of the coast is sandy and sediment comes mainly from the River Drin and distributed by currents along the coast. In this paper are make provision for the position of the coastline in the future and analyzed the possibilities of human intervention in the coastal environment , etc. This work forms the basis for the issuance of necessary data required for various projections at the coastal environment Shëngjini. Results of this study will have a significant impact on state policies for integrated management of the coastal zone in the study and development of tourism. Key words: GIS, Remonte Sennsing, cartography, management of coastal zone, tourism, environment.

  1. Horseshoe crab (Limulus polyphemus) reproductive activity on Delaware Bay beaches: Interactions with beach characteristics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, D.R.; Pooler, P.S.; Loveland, R.E.; Botton, M.L.; Michels, S.F.; Weber, R.G.; Carter, D.B.

    2002-01-01

    We used results from a survey of horseshoe crab reproductive activity that was conducted in 1999 throughout Delaware Bay to examine the relationship between estimates of spawning females and egg deposition and analyze how that relationship varies with geography, time within a spawning season, beach morphology, and wave energy. We found that beach morphology and wave energy interacted with density of spawning females to explain variation in the density and distribution of eggs and larvae. For example, the quantity of eggs in surface sediment (i.e., eggs that are potentially available to foraging shorebirds) was associated with the density of spawning females, beach morphology, and wave energy. The association between beach morphology and live eggs in surface sediment was strong especially in late May (Percent Reduction in Error = 86% from regression tree model) where egg density was an order of magnitude higher on beaches <15 m wide (3.38*105 m-2; 90% CI: 2.29*105, 4.47*105) compared to wider beaches (1.49*104 m-2; 90% CI: 4.47*103, 2.53*104). Results also indicate that, among bay-front beaches, horseshoe crabs prefer to spawn on narrow beaches, possibly because of reduced wave energy. At peak periods of spawning activity, density of spawning females was inversely related to foreshore width on mid-latitude beaches within Delaware Bay (t = -2.68, 7 df, p = 0.03). Because the distribution of eggs across the foreshore varied with beach morphology and widened as the spawning season progressed, methods used to sample eggs need to be robust to variation in beach morphology and applicable regardless of when the samples are taken. Because beach morphology and wave energy were associated with the quantity of eggs in surface sediment, certain beach types may be critical to the conservation of shorebird foraging habitat.

  2. Parasailing fatalities in southwest Florida.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Barbara C; Harding, Brett E

    2009-12-01

    Parasailing is a recreational sport that is generally considered to be of little risk to the participants. Typically, the passenger launches from a motorboat with a specially designed winch that pulls him or her back to the boat at the end of the ride. The sport is not regulated at the federal, state, or county level. There have been few reports of injuries to parasailors. Additionally, there have been only 2 fatalities reported to the United States Coast Guard in a 10-year review. We report the details of these 2 deaths, those of a mother and daughter riding in a tandem parasail, which occurred on Fort Myers Beach in 2001, as well as an additional case of a parasailing fatality that occurred in southwest Florida in 1999. These cases illustrate the injuries seen in such fatalities and the hazards posed by adverse weather conditions and faulty equipment, as well as the impairment of passenger judgment by drugs and/or alcohol. PMID:19901809

  3. A combined assessment of beach occupancy and public perceptions of beach quality: A case study in the Costa Brava, Spain

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elisabet Roca; Claudia Riera; Míriam Villares; Rosa Fragell; Rosa Junyent

    2008-01-01

    The main objective of this paper is to present an approach that contributes to evaluate beach quality based on a combined analysis of beach occupancy and the perception of beach users. The study area is a major Mediterranean tourist destination in NE Spain. Six beaches that fulfilled different environmental and social criteria were assessed. Sampling took place during 2004 and

  4. Valuation of water quality and consumer choice and recognition of beach eco-certification in Tampa Bay area beaches

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andy Krueger

    2005-01-01

    The Clean Beaches Council (CBC) established the first environmental certification program - the Blue Wave Campaign - for beaches in the U.S. in 1998. Certification is awarded on an annual basis to beaches that meet specific criteria set forth by the CBC. Participating in award schemes or certification programs is thought to confer two major benefits to a beach community:

  5. Shaping Solutions FOR Florida's Future

    E-print Network

    Jawitz, James W.

    .............................................................................................................................................................................................. 10 Building the Roadmap Florida Today, Florida Tomorrow Extension Service has delivered science-based information to foster healthy people, a healthy environment to improve the lives of Floridians as we face the challenges of tomorrow and beyond. Florida Extension

  6. Genetic structure of the southeastern United States loggerhead turtle nesting aggregation: evidence of additional structure within the peninsular Florida recovery unit

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brian M. Shamblin; Mark G. Dodd; Dean A. Bagley; Llewellyn M. Ehrhart; Anton D. Tucker; Chris Johnson; Raymond R. Carthy; Russell A. Scarpino; Erin McMichael; David S. Addison; Kristina L. Williams; Michael G. Frick; Stefanie Ouellette; Anne B. Meylan; Matthew H. Godfrey; Sally R. Murphy; Campbell J. Nairn

    2011-01-01

    The southeastern United States supports one of two large loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta) nesting aggregations worldwide and is therefore critical to global conservation and recovery efforts for the species. Previous\\u000a studies have established the presence of four demographically distinct nesting populations (management units) corresponding\\u000a to beaches from (1) North Carolina through northeastern Florida, (2) peninsular Florida, (3) the Dry Tortugas,

  7. Florida Red Tide Current Status

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This Fish and Wildlife Research Institute website provides links to several Florida-based red tide sites. These sites include the current status of Florida's red tide, a photo gallery of red tide distribution maps, and regional Florida red tide statuses. The site expands further on its research and contains information on the Florida manatee, Florida panther, freshwater, geographic information systems/mapping, habitat, saltwater and wildlife. This is a nice resource for a broad overview of Florida ecosystems and natural resources.

  8. Florida Heritage Collection

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Recently launched by the libraries of the State University System (SUS) of Florida, this site contains some 48,000 pages of materials on Florida's history, culture, arts, literatures, sciences, and social sciences. The collection may be browsed by Florida county, title, or author or searched by a number of options. Item records include author, title, date published, a description, series, notes, a summary, and links to the electronic version (in .pdf or JPEG formats). Users can mark selected records and then email or print them. A user guide and tutorial are provided, as is a Florida timeline which links to related materials.

  9. Macrodebris and microplastics from beaches in Slovenia.

    PubMed

    Laglbauer, Betty J L; Franco-Santos, Rita Melo; Andreu-Cazenave, Miguel; Brunelli, Lisa; Papadatou, Maria; Palatinus, Andreja; Grego, Mateja; Deprez, Tim

    2014-12-15

    The amount of marine debris in the environment is increasing worldwide, which results in an array of negative effects to biota. This study provides the first account of macrodebris on the beach and microplastics in the sediment (shoreline and infralittoral) in relation to tourism activities in Slovenia. The study assessed the quality and quantity of macrodebris and the quality, size and quantity of microplastics at six beaches, contrasting those under the influences of tourism and those that were not. Beach cleanliness was estimated using the Clean Coast Index. Tourism did not seem to have an effect on macrodebris or microplastic quantity at beaches. Over 64% of macrodebris was plastic, and microplastics were ubiquitous, which calls for classification of plastics as hazardous materials. Standard measures for marine debris assessment are needed, especially in the form of an all-encompassing debris index. Recommendations for future assessments are provided for the Adriatic region. PMID:25440193

  10. A Day at the Beach, Anyone?

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Anthony D. Fredericks

    2004-07-01

    A field trip to the shore can engage students in real-world science and offer plentiful opportunities for interdisciplinary learning. This field trip "action plan" ensures that a day at the beach goes smoothly for students and chaperones alike.

  11. Surf zone flushing on embayed beaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelle, Bruno; Coco, Giovanni

    2013-05-01

    Abstract Using a numerical model, we show that the surf zone of embayed <span class="hlt">beaches</span> systematically flushes out more floating material (simulated using passive tracers) than on open <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, with most exits occurring through the headland rips. For obliquely incident waves, a headland rip acts as a persistent conduit for transporting floating material out of the surf zone and into the inner shelf region. Wave angle and embayment size determine which headland rip (upwave or downwave) flushes out more the surf zone material. For narrow embayed <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, passive drifters exit the surf zone through the upwave headland rip. For wider embayed <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, the longshore current has enough room to develop and is further deflected against the downwave headland where most drifters exit the surf zone. Our results indicate that wave-exposed rugged coasts strongly enhance exchange of floating matter (e.g., pollutants and nutrients) at the ocean/continent interface.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=USGSPUBS&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70135877"><span id="translatedtitle">Monitoring <span class="hlt">beach</span> changes using GPS surveying techniques</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Morton, Robert; Leach, Mark P.; Paine, Jeffrey G.; Cardoza, Michael A.</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>The adaptation of Global Positioning System (GPS) surveying techniques to <span class="hlt">beach</span> monitoring activities is a promising response to this challenge. An experiment that employed both GPS and conventional <span class="hlt">beach</span> surveying was conducted, and a new <span class="hlt">beach</span> monitoring method employing kinematic GPS surveys was devised. This new method involves the collection of precise shore-parallel and shore-normal GPS positions from a moving vehicle so that an accurate two-dimensional <span class="hlt">beach</span> surface can be generated. Results show that the GPS measurements agree with conventional shore-normal surveys at the 1 cm level, and repeated GPS measurements employing the moving vehicle demonstrate a precision of better than 1 cm. In addition, the nearly continuous sampling and increased resolution provided by the GPS surveying technique reveals alongshore changes in <span class="hlt">beach</span> morphology that are undetected by conventional shore-normal profiles. The application of GPS surveying techniques combined with the refinement of appropriate methods for data collection and analysis provides a better understanding of <span class="hlt">beach</span> changes, sediment transport, and storm impacts.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25123815"><span id="translatedtitle">An holistic approach to <span class="hlt">beach</span> erosion vulnerability assessment.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Alexandrakis, George; Poulos, Serafim ?</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Erosion is a major threat for coasts worldwide, <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in particular, which constitute one of the most valuable coastal landforms. Vulnerability assessments related to <span class="hlt">beach</span> erosion may contribute to planning measures to counteract erosion by identifying, quantifying and ranking vulnerability. Herein, we present a new index, the <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Vulnerability Index (BVI), which combines simplicity in calculations, easily obtainable data and low processing capacity. This approach provides results not only for different <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, but also for different sectors of the same <span class="hlt">beach</span> and enables the identification of the relative significance of the processes involved. It functions through the numerical approximation of indicators that correspond to the mechanisms related to the processes that control <span class="hlt">beach</span> evolution, such as sediment availability, wave climate, <span class="hlt">beach</span> morhodynamics and sea level change. The BVI is also intended to be used as a managerial tool for <span class="hlt">beach</span> sustainability, including resilience to climate change impact on <span class="hlt">beach</span> erosion. PMID:25123815</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPA-EIMS&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=258391"><span id="translatedtitle">Advanced Decision-Support for Coastal <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Health: Virtual <span class="hlt">Beach</span> 3.0</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Virtual <span class="hlt">Beach</span> is a free decision-support system designed to help <span class="hlt">beach</span> managers and researchers construct, evaluate, and operate site-specific statistical models that can predict levels of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) based on environmental conditions that are more readily mea...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=FEDREG&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-07-19/pdf/2010-17512.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">75 FR 41926 - Noise Exposure Map Notice New Smyrna <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Municipal Airport, New Smyrna <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-07-19</p> <p>...Aviation Administration Noise Exposure Map Notice New Smyrna <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Municipal Airport...its determination that the Noise Exposure Maps submitted by the City of New Smyrna <span class="hlt">Beach</span>...FAA's determination on the noise exposure maps is July 8, 2010. FOR FURTHER...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20383268"><span id="translatedtitle">Changes in Work Habits of Lifeguards in Relation to <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Red Tide.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Nierenberg, Kate; Kirner, Karen; Hoagland, Porter; Ullmann, Steven; Leblanc, William G; Kirkpatrick, Gary; Fleming, Lora E; Kirkpatrick, Barbara</p> <p>2010-05-01</p> <p>The marine dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis, is responsible for <span class="hlt">Florida</span> red tides. Brevetoxins, the neurotoxins produced by K. brevis blooms, can cause fish kills, contaminate shellfish, and lead to respiratory illness in humans. Although several studies have assessed different economic impacts from <span class="hlt">Florida</span> red tide blooms, no studies to date have considered the impact on <span class="hlt">beach</span> lifeguard work performance. Sarasota County experiences frequent <span class="hlt">Florida</span> red tides and staffs lifeguards at its <span class="hlt">beaches</span> 365 days a year. This study examined lifeguard attendance records during the time periods of March 1 to September 30 in 2004 (no bloom) and March 1 to September 30 in 2005 (bloom). The lifeguard attendance data demonstrated statistically significant absenteeism during a <span class="hlt">Florida</span> red tide bloom. The potential economic costs resulting from red tide blooms were comprised of both lifeguard absenteeism and presenteeism. Our estimate of the costs of absenteeism due to the 2005 red tide in Sarasota County is about $3,000. On average, the capitalized costs of lifeguard absenteeism in Sarasota County may be on the order of $100,000 at Sarasota County <span class="hlt">beaches</span> alone. When surveyed, lifeguards reported not only that they experienced adverse health effects of exposure to <span class="hlt">Florida</span> red tide but also that their attentiveness and abilities to take preventative actions decrease when they worked during a bloom, implying presenteeism effects. The costs of presenteeism, which imply increased risks to beachgoers, arguably could exceed those of absenteeism by an order of magnitude. Due to the lack of data, however, we are unable to provide credible estimates of the costs of presenteeism or the potential increased risks to bathers. PMID:20383268</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AGUFM.H41B0498K"><span id="translatedtitle">Influence of <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Scraping on <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Profile Morphology: Fire Island, New York</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kratzmann, M.; Hapke, C.</p> <p>2007-12-01</p> <p>Fire Island is part of a barrier island system located just south of Long Island, New York. The island is 50 km long, oriented southwest-northeast, and varies in width from 150 meters to 1 kilometer. Established communities on Fire Island are part of Fire Island National Seashore (FIIS) which is managed by the National Park Service. The island is densely populated, and thus mitigating coastal erosion caused by large-scale storm waves has become an important issue. Severe nor'easter storms in 1991, 1992, and 1993 caused substantial erosion and property damage. This prompted communities within FIIS to conduct a pilot study in which the preventative, non-structural practice of <span class="hlt">beach</span> scraping was employed as a method of erosion control. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> scraping is the anthropogenic movement of sand from the berm to the back <span class="hlt">beach</span> creating an artificial foredune. Currently, there is no published research that explores the morphologic influence of <span class="hlt">beach</span> scraping on Fire Island, although the practice is still in place today for a number of communities. This study assesses changes caused by <span class="hlt">beach</span> scraping using a temporally robust <span class="hlt">beach</span> profile dataset of over 150 profiles, spanning thirteen years. Three study areas were chosen based on location (western, central, and eastern parts of Fire Island) and data availability in scraped and adjacent control areas. Analyzed characteristics include <span class="hlt">beach</span> width, <span class="hlt">beach</span> volume, slope (dune, beachface, global), berm crest elevation, and dune crest elevation. Initial results indicate a detectable difference in the behavior of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> between scraped and control areas. Seasonal signals show <span class="hlt">beach</span> width decreasing substantially westward from the scraped profile location, which is in the direction of net littoral transport. Anthropogenic relocation of berm material to the foredune zone during scraping places sediment in the back <span class="hlt">beach</span> area that might otherwise be mobilized by storm waves, therefore depriving downcoast <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of sediment. Longer-term comparisons (decadal) indicate that the <span class="hlt">beach</span> is both widening and increasing in volume in the western study area (by 30-50%), which corresponds spatially to a persistent accretional cell that has been identified in current studies along this section of Fire Island.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=USGSPUBS&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70106982"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> science in the Great Lakes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Nevers, Meredith B.; Byappanahalli, Murulee N.; Edge, Thomas A.; Whitman, Richard L.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Monitoring <span class="hlt">beach</span> waters for human health has led to an increase and evolution of science in the Great Lakes, which includes microbiology, limnology, hydrology, meteorology, epidemiology, and metagenomics, among others. In recent years, concerns over the accuracy of water quality standards at protecting human health have led to a significant interest in understanding the risk associated with water contact in both freshwater and marine environments. Historically, surface waters have been monitored for fecal indicator bacteria (fecal coliforms, Escherichia coli, enterococci), but shortcomings of the analytical test (lengthy assay) have resulted in a re-focusing of scientific efforts to improve public health protection. Research has led to the discovery of widespread populations of fecal indicator bacteria present in natural habitats such as soils, <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand, and stranded algae. Microbial source tracking has been used to identify the source of these bacteria and subsequently assess their impact on human health. As a result of many findings, attempts have been made to improve monitoring efficiency and efficacy with the use of empirical predictive models and molecular rapid tests. All along, <span class="hlt">beach</span> managers have actively incorporated new findings into their monitoring programs. With the abundance of research conducted and information gained over the last 25 years, “<span class="hlt">Beach</span> Science” has emerged, and the Great Lakes have been a focal point for much of the ground-breaking work. Here, we review the accumulated research on microbiological water quality of Great Lakes <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and provide a historic context to the collaborative efforts that have advanced this emerging science.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=FEDREG&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-01-11/pdf/2010-260.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">75 FR 1373 - <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> Environmental Assessment and Coastal Health Act</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-01-11</p> <p>...coastal recreation waters, including the Great Lakes. EPA encourages coastal and Great Lakes States and Tribes that have received <span class="hlt">BEACH</span>...EPA also encourages eligible coastal and Great Lakes Tribes to apply for 2010 <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> Act...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-HHH&redirectUrl=http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/ca2890.photos.193739p/"><span id="translatedtitle">32. OLD HIGHWAY 101 ENDERT'S <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> ROAD) ROAD VIEW. NOTE ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>32. OLD HIGHWAY 101 ENDERT'S <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> ROAD) ROAD VIEW. NOTE <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> TO LEFT. LOOKING NW. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li class="active"><span>10</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_10 --> <div id="page_11" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li class="active"><span>11</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="201"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPA-EIMS&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=66368"><span id="translatedtitle">USING PUBLIC-DOMAIN MODELS TO ESTIMATE <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> BACTERIA CONCENTRATIONS</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Stretches of <span class="hlt">beach</span> along popular Huntington <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California are occassionally closed to swimming due to high levels of bacteria. One hypothesized source is the treated wastewater plume from the Orange County Sanitation District's (OCSD) ocean outfall. While three independent sc...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NSDL&redirectUrl=http://sofia.usgs.gov/index.html"><span id="translatedtitle">South <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Information Access</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The South <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Information Access (SOFIA) is part of the United States Geological Survey (USGS) place-based studies program. The program enables the USGS to assist resource managers in resolving environmental problems in ecosystem sites. This website provides the latest news, fact sheets, reports, poster presentations, a data exchange, and science forum regarding South <span class="hlt">Florida</span> ecosystems. <span class="hlt">Florida</span> time scales and geologic maps are provided for background information. The site is searchable, or can be browsed by region, program, or subject such as wildlife, ecosystem information, hydrology, and geochemistry.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=USGSPUBS&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70000410"><span id="translatedtitle">Depositional settings of sand <span class="hlt">beaches</span> along whitewater rivers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Vincent, K.R.; Andrews, E.D.</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>The numbers and sizes of sand <span class="hlt">beaches</span> suitable for recreation along selected whitewater rivers in the western United States depend on sand concentrations, range of discharge and the size, frequency and type of depositional settings. River-width expansions downstream from constrictions are the predominant depositional setting for sand <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in the upper Grand Canyon and along five Wild and Scenic Rivers in Idaho, but not along other rivers. <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> located upstream from constrictions are rare, in general, except in the Grand Canyon. <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> found in expansions without constrictions dominate depositional sites along the Yampa and Green Rivers, are fairly common along the rivers in Idaho, but are relatively rare in the Grand Canyon. The magnitude of flow expansion is a reliable predictor of <span class="hlt">beach</span> size. <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> located on the inside of curves are uncommon, in general, but can be important recreation sites. The mid-channel bar setting is the least important from a recreation standpoint because that setting is rare and <span class="hlt">beaches</span> there are typically small, and emergent only at low flow. The frequency of <span class="hlt">beaches</span> is highly variable among rivers and the concentration of sand in transport is only partially responsible. Of the rivers studied, the unregulated Yampa River carries the highest concentrations of suspended sand and has among the most <span class="hlt">beaches</span> (1.2 <span class="hlt">beaches</span> km-1). Emergent sand <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are essentially nonexistent along the Deschutes River and are rare along other Oregon rivers, yet these rivers transport some sand. Sand <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are fairly common (0.8-1.1 <span class="hlt">beaches</span> km-1) along the regulated Colorado River, but are comparatively rare (0.6 <span class="hlt">beaches</span> km-1) along the unregulated Middle Fork Salmon River. The suspended sand concentrations in study reaches of these two rivers are similar, and the difference in the frequency of <span class="hlt">beaches</span> may be largely because the processes that create <span class="hlt">beach</span>-deposition settings are less active along the Middle Fork Salmon.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ECSS..150..142V"><span id="translatedtitle">Burrowing inhibition by fine textured <span class="hlt">beach</span> fill: Implications for recovery of <span class="hlt">beach</span> ecosystems</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Viola, Sloane M.; Hubbard, David M.; Dugan, Jenifer E.; Schooler, Nicholas K.</p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Beach</span> nourishment is often considered the most environmentally sound method of maintaining eroding shorelines. However, the ecological consequences are poorly understood. Fill activities cause intense disturbance and high mortality and have the potential to alter the diversity, abundance, and distribution of intertidal macroinvertebrates for months to years. Ecological recovery following fill activities depends on successful recolonization and recruitment of the entire sandy intertidal community. The use of incompatible sediments as fill material can strongly affect ecosystem recovery. We hypothesized that burrowing inhibition of intertidal animals by incompatible fine fill sediments contributes to ecological impacts and limits recovery in <span class="hlt">beach</span> ecosystems. We experimentally investigated the influence of intertidal zone and burrowing mode on responses of <span class="hlt">beach</span> invertebrates to altered sediment texture (28-38% fines), and ultimately the potential for colonization and recovery of <span class="hlt">beaches</span> disturbed by <span class="hlt">beach</span> filling. Using experimental trials in fill material and natural <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand, we found that the mismatched fine fill sediments significantly inhibited burrowing of characteristic species from all intertidal zones, including sand crabs, clams, polychaetes, isopods, and talitrid amphipods. Burrowing performance of all five species we tested was consistently reduced in the fill material and burrowing was completely inhibited for several species. The threshold for burrowing inhibition by fine sediment content in middle and lower <span class="hlt">beach</span> macroinvertebrates varied by species, with highest sensitivity for the polychaete (4% fines, below the USA regulatory limit of 10% fines), followed by sand crabs and clams (20% fines). These results suggest broader investigation of thresholds for burrowing inhibition in fine fill material is needed for <span class="hlt">beach</span> animals. Burrowing inhibition caused by mismatched fill sediments exposes <span class="hlt">beach</span> macroinvertebrates to stresses, which could depress recruitment and survival at all intertidal zones. Our results suggest use of incompatible fine fill sediments from dredging projects creates unsuitable intertidal habitat that excludes burrowing macroinvertebrates and could delay <span class="hlt">beach</span> ecosystem recovery. Through effects on <span class="hlt">beach</span> invertebrates that are prey for shorebirds and fish, the ecological impacts of filling with mismatched fine sediments could influence higher trophic levels and extend beyond the <span class="hlt">beach</span> itself.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-STC&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6112329"><span id="translatedtitle">Stratigraphy of the Upper Pleistocene Miami Limestone of <span class="hlt">Florida</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Johnson, R.A.</p> <p>1993-03-01</p> <p>The upper Pleistocene Miami Limestone is probably the most stratigraphically-complex formation in the Cenozoic of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. The Miami overlies and vertically/laterally grades into the upper Pleistocene Ft. Thompson Formation to the west in southeast Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> County (west of I-95); to the west in Broward County (west of the Turnpike); and to the north in south Broward County (along U.S. 27). The Miami overlies and very locally vertically grades into the Ft. Thompson in all of Dade County. The Miami overlies and vertically/laterally grades into the upper Pleistocene Anastasia Formation to the north and east in southeast Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> County (east of I-95), and to the northeast in east Broward County (east of the Turnpike). The Miami laterally grades into the upper Pleistocene Key Largo Limestone to the southeast in extreme southeast Dade County, and overlies and locally vertically grades into the Key Largo in the Lower Keys, south Monroe County. The Miami unconformably overlies the Pliocene Tamiami Formation and pinches out to the west in northeast mainland Monroe and southeast Collier Counties, and also pinches out to the north in east-central Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> County. In all areas, the Miami Limestone is either overlain unconformably by very discontinuous undifferentiated surficial sediments or forms land surface.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=ERIC&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=wave+AND+energy&pg=7&id=ED326415"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beaches</span> in Motion. Interaction and Environmental Change. Secondary.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Lee County School District, Ft. Myers, FL. Dept. of Environmental Education and Instructional Development Services.</p> <p></p> <p>The terms "high energy" and "low energy" refer to the amount of energy a wave has that reaches the face of a <span class="hlt">beach</span>. In this student guide, two types of <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are investigated. The objective is to be able to identify whether a <span class="hlt">beach</span> is of high or low energy. Background information is provided, as well as instructions and worksheets for activities…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NSDL&redirectUrl=http://serc.carleton.edu/NAGTWorkshops/sedimentary/SGP2014/activities/84346.html"><span id="translatedtitle">Grand Strand Geology and its impact on <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Nourishment</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p>Martin Farley</p> <p></p> <p>Brief analysis of the geologic setting of the Grand Strand (Myrtle <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, South Carolina, and vicinity) coast and the limited occurrence of sand suitable for <span class="hlt">beach</span> re-nourishment. Students use a USGS Fact Sheet to examine the <span class="hlt">beach</span>, near offshore, and edge of Coastal Plain geology.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/26658961"><span id="translatedtitle">Numerical modelling of tide-induced <span class="hlt">beach</span> water table fluctuations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>L. Li; D. A. Barry; C. B. Pattiaratchi</p> <p>1997-01-01</p> <p>Field studies have shown that the elevation of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> groundwater table varies with the tide and such variations affect significantly <span class="hlt">beach</span> erosion or accretion. In this paper, we present a BEM (Boundary Element Method) model for simulating the tidal fluctuation of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> groundwater table. The model solves the two-dimensional flow equation subject to free and moving boundary conditions,</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/41005321"><span id="translatedtitle">The Southern Oscillation Index, wave climate, and <span class="hlt">beach</span> rotation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Roshanka Ranasinghe; Rodney McLoughlin; Andrew Short; Graham Symonds</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>Short embayed <span class="hlt">beaches</span> bounded by headlands are a common feature along the southern and central coastline of New South Wales, Australia. Many of these embayed <span class="hlt">beaches</span> have experienced severe erosion at their southern end over the last decade. Previous studies have suggested that this erosion may be the result of an oscillatory medium-term phenomenon known as <span class="hlt">beach</span> rotation. The present</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPA-EIMS&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=231202"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> Sand Analysis for Indicators of Microbial Contamination</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Traditional <span class="hlt">beach</span> monitoring has focused on water quality, with little attention paid to health risks associated with <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand. Recent research has reported that fecal indicator bacteria, as well as human pathogens can be found in <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand and may constitute a risk to human h...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-HHH&redirectUrl=http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/ca1561.photos.014187p/"><span id="translatedtitle">103. VIEW OF <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> STRUCTURES ON NORTHWEST SIDE OF PIER, ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>103. VIEW OF <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> STRUCTURES ON NORTHWEST SIDE OF PIER, LOOKING SOUTHEAST; PACIFIC ELECTRIC RAILWAY CAR (UPPER LEFT), CONCESSION STANDS (LOWER LEFT), BANDSHELL (RIGHT), AND PIER IN BACKGROUND Photograph #5352-HB. Photographer unknown, c. 1914 - Huntington <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Orange County, CA</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NSDL&redirectUrl=http://ww4.doh.wa.gov/scripts/esrimap.dll?name=bioview&BCmd=Map&BStep=1"><span id="translatedtitle">Recreational Shellfish <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Closures Due to Biotoxins or Pollution</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p>Washington State Department of Health</p> <p></p> <p>This map represents the Health Status of <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in the state of Washington. The interactive map allows users to click on counties, water bodies, and <span class="hlt">beaches</span> to view seasons and limits. The page also includes links to text bulletins regarding <span class="hlt">beach</span> closures, descriptions of marine biotoxins and associated health effects, and a factsheet of shellfish program publications.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014SPIE.9233E..02H"><span id="translatedtitle">Monitoring of <span class="hlt">beach</span> enteromorpha variation with near shore video</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hu, Yali; Yu, Xinsheng; Yan, Zhijin; Yi, Weidong</p> <p>2014-07-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Beach</span> is an important coastal protective barrier and tourism resources. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> environment monitoring can help <span class="hlt">beach</span> managers to make feasible decisions. Digital image of video monitoring technology can provide high resolution information of temporal and spatial variation of near shore in real time. The application of Video monitoring technology has been implemented in Qingdao's Shilaoren <span class="hlt">beach</span>. The clustering method based on Gaussian mixture model is applied to extract <span class="hlt">beach</span> enteromorpha changs for the digital images. Analysis results show that, the period of enteromorpha in Qingdao's Shilaoren <span class="hlt">beach</span> was mainly from the early July to the mid-August in 2011, and the decline of enteromorpha is mainly associated with the rising temperature in the mid-August. Storm has significant impact on the <span class="hlt">beach</span> enteromorpha. Tourists' activity space on the <span class="hlt">beach</span> will decrease due to the enteromorpha covering on the <span class="hlt">beach</span>, which affects <span class="hlt">beach</span> tourism activities. Therefore, it's necessary to make preventive measures to avoid enteromorpha piling up on the <span class="hlt">beach</span>, which is of great importance to the bathing <span class="hlt">beach</span> environment and tourism development.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://www.mse.uiuc.edu/faculty/kriven/Kriven_CVcondensed.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Condensed Resume of Prof. Waltraud M. Kriven Waltraud M. Kriven received a Ph.D in 1976 in Solid State Chemistry from the</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Shim, Moonsub</p> <p></p> <p>1988 and 1991) from the American Ceramic Society Cements Division, for co-authoring the best research on Geopolymers at the ACERS Annual Meetings, the Cocoa <span class="hlt">Beach</span> and <span class="hlt">Daytona</span> <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Conferences and Expositions</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=FEDREG&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-07-28/pdf/2011-19117.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">76 FR 45282 - Announcement of Funding Awards for the HUD-Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing (HUD-VASH) Program...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-07-28</p> <p>...Avenue.... <span class="hlt">Daytona</span> <span class="hlt">Beach</span>.......... FL 32114 $173,742 25 HOUSING AUTHORITY SARASOTA......... 40 South Pineapple Ave..... Sarasota............... FL 34236 $241,566 25 HOUSING AUTHORITY WEST PALM <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> 1715...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NSDL&redirectUrl=http://www.cpalms.org/Public/PreviewResourceUrl/Preview/21422"><span id="translatedtitle">Natural Disasters in <span class="hlt">Florida</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p>Claudia Markham-Ahl</p> <p>2011-10-18</p> <p>The students will translate the information they have gained into a poster/picture of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s natural disasters, label the storms, and list on the poster at least three safety practices to use with each storm.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=ERIC&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=sus&pg=4&id=EJ260035"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> International University.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Beranek, Charles R.</p> <p>1982-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Florida</span> International University is one of nine public universities in a state university system that provides computer support by the SUS Computer Network. An administrative computer user's committee was established to aid in the determination of universitywide priorities. (MLW)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PhDT........30S"><span id="translatedtitle">Hail Formation in <span class="hlt">Florida</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Stanley, Matthew</p> <p></p> <p>Hail poses a substantial threat to life and property in the state of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. These losses could be minimized through better understanding of the relationships between atmospheric variables that impact hail formation in <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. Improving hail forecasting in <span class="hlt">Florida</span> requires analyzing a number of meteorological parameters and synoptic data related to hail formation. NOAA archive data was retrieved to create a database that was used to categorize text files of hail days. The text files were entered into the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Earth System Research Laboratory website to create National Centers for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research Reanalysis maps of atmospheric variables for <span class="hlt">Florida</span> hail days as well as days leading to the hail event. These data were then analyzed to determine the relationship between variables that affect hail formation, in general, across different regions and seasons in <span class="hlt">Florida</span> using Statistical Product and Service Solutions. The reasoning for the differing factors affecting hail formation between regions, seasons and hail sizes were discussed, as well as forecasting suggestions relating to region and month in <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. The study found that the majority of all hail that occurs in <span class="hlt">Florida</span> is during the wet season. A low Lifted Index, high Precipitable Water and lower than average Sea Level Pressure, in most cases, is present during hail days in <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. Furthermore, results show that Vector Wind magnitude increases as hail size increases. Additionally, several atmospheric variables useful to studying hail events, such as Lifted Index, Precipitable Water, Sea Level Pressure, Vector Wind and Temperature have significant correlations with each other depending on the region and season being observed. Strong correlations between low Lifted Index, high Precipitable Water values and the occurrence of hail events are discussed, as well as the relationship between temperature anomalies at various pressure levels and the occurrence of hail events.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/42624395"><span id="translatedtitle">Birds and <span class="hlt">Beaches</span>, Dogs and Leashes: Dog Owners' Sense of Obligation to Leash Dogs on <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> in Victoria, Australia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Kathryn J. H. Williams; Michael A. Weston; Stacey Henry; Grainne S. Maguire</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Domesticated dogs threaten the conservation of <span class="hlt">beach</span>-nesting birds in Australia through disturbance, and destruction of eggs and chicks. Leashing of dogs can improve conservation outcomes, but few dogs are leashed on <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. We surveyed dog owners to explore their sense of obligation to leash dogs on <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Dog owners were more likely to feel obliged to leash their dog when</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=FEDREG&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-03-24/pdf/2010-6473.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">75 FR 14206 - FPL Energy Point <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, LLC; Point <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2; Environmental Assessment...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-03-24</p> <p>...issued to FPL Energy Point <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, LLC (FPLE, the licensee...operation of the Point <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Nuclear Plant, Units...increased radiological hazard beyond those previously...historical and cultural resources. There would be no impact...Plants [regarding Point <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Nuclear Plant,...</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li class="active"><span>11</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_11 --> <div id="page_12" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li class="active"><span>12</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="221"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NSDL&redirectUrl=http://www.maine.gov/doc/nrimc/mgs/explore/marine/sites/apr02.htm"><span id="translatedtitle">Mile and Half Mile <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> at Reid State Park</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>This guide introduces visitors to the sediments and geologic histories of Mile and Half Mile <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Reid State Park on the coast of Maine. Topics include the source of the sand presently found on the <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, the origin and migration of <span class="hlt">beach</span> deposits, dunes, and marsh peat deposits as sea level has risen, and some history of the area. Some suggested activities for visitors include observing grain size sorting of <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands, observing the size and angle of waves washing ashore, and making measurements of <span class="hlt">beach</span> cusps and berms. References and links to additional information are included.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://repository.tamu.edu/handle/1969.1/6736"><span id="translatedtitle">Preconditioning Outside Air: Cooling Loads from Building Ventilation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Kosar, D.</p> <p>1998-01-01</p> <p>.7 Arkansas Fort Smith Little Rock Key West 1 21.6 I 3.5 Miami 17.6 2.7 Monteomem 9.4 1.6 I <span class="hlt">Florida</span> <span class="hlt">Daytona</span> <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Jacksonville 1 Tallahassee 11.6 1 1.7 I 6.9 7.3 1.6 1.6 12.3 12.2 I Georgia 1 I 1.7 1.8 Tampa 14.2 I 2.3 I Augusta 7.7 1.3 I...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=https://facultystaff.richmond.edu/~ggilfoyl/research/rootcheat.ps"><span id="translatedtitle">A root Cheat Sheet A. Stephen <span class="hlt">Beach</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Gilfoyle, Jerry</p> <p></p> <p>A root Cheat Sheet A. Stephen <span class="hlt">Beach</span> June 9, 1998 Abstract This is a quick guide to root programming, but has no experience with root or C++. Its goal is to get the user up and running quickly? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2 Basic Questions 4 2.1 What is root</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOVIMAGE-SCICINEMA&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/sciencecinema/biblio/987568"><span id="translatedtitle">Cosmology at the <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Lecture: Wayne Hu</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/sciencecinema/">ScienceCinema</a></p> <p>Wayne Hu</p> <p>2010-01-08</p> <p>Wayne Hu lectures on Secondary Anisotropy in the CMB. The lecture is the first in a series of 3 he delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the <span class="hlt">Beach</span>" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://registrar.fsu.edu/bulletin/undergrad/pdf/2012_gen_bulletin.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> State University General Bulletin</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Hull, Elaine</p> <p></p> <p>...........................................13 Sexual Harassment Policy..............................13 <span class="hlt">Florida</span> State University Statement Information ................................................19 Policy for the Use of Photographs and Videos</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://registrar.fsu.edu/bulletin/grad/pdf/2013_grad_bulletin.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">FLORIDA</span> STATE UNIVERSITY GENERAL BULLETIN</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Ronquist, Fredrik</p> <p></p> <p>Sexual Harassment Policy................................9 <span class="hlt">Florida</span> State University Statement for Students Information ................................................15 Policy for the Use of Photographs and Videos</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/11627447350p606h.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Hydrologic processes on tree islands in the Everglades (<span class="hlt">Florida</span>, USA): tracking the effects of tree establishment and growth</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Pamela L. Sullivan; René M. Price; Michael S. Ross; Leonard J. Scinto; Susana L. Stoffella; Eric Cline; Thomas W. Dreschel; Fred H. Sklar</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>The hydrodynamics of tree islands during the growth of newly planted trees has been found to be influenced by both vegetation\\u000a biomass and geologic conditions. From July 2007 through June 2009, groundwater and surface-water levels were monitored on\\u000a eight recently planted tree islands at the Loxahatchee Impoundment Landscape Assessment (LILA) facility in Boynton <span class="hlt">Beach</span>,\\u000a <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, USA. Over the 2-year study,</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=TEKTRAN&redirectUrl=http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=269714"><span id="translatedtitle">Sugarcane Variety Census: <span class="hlt">Florida</span> 2010</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The <span class="hlt">Florida</span> sugarcane industry produces about 25% of all sugar produced in the U.S. Varieties originate from two sources, a private breeding and selection program of the United States Sugar Corporation in Clewiston, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> and a public program at Canal Point, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> supported by the USDA-Agricultu...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://hastings.ifas.ufl.edu/documents/FYN_Handbook_vSept09.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Yards & Neighborhoods Handbook</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Watson, Craig A.</p> <p></p> <p>"that the use of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>-friendly landscaping and other water use and pollution prevention measures-FRIENDLY LANDSCAPES? <span class="hlt">Florida</span>-Friendly Landscapes protect <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s unique natural resources by conserving water, reducing waste and pollution, creating wildlife habitat, and preventing erosion. Any landscape can</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=TEKTRAN&redirectUrl=http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=249034"><span id="translatedtitle">Sugarcane Variety Census: <span class="hlt">Florida</span> 2008</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The <span class="hlt">Florida</span> sugarcane industry produces about 25% of all sugar produced in the U.S. Varieties originate from two sources, a private breeding and selection program of the United States Sugar Corporation in Clewiston, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> and a public program at Canal Point, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> supported by the USDA-Agricultu...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=TEKTRAN&redirectUrl=http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=222398"><span id="translatedtitle">Sugarcane Variety Census: <span class="hlt">Florida</span> 2007</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The <span class="hlt">Florida</span> sugarcane industry produces about 25% of all sugar produced in the U.S. Varieties originate from two sources, a private breeding and selection program of the United States Sugar Corporation in Clewiston, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> and a public program at Canal Point, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> supported by the USDA-Agricultu...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFMOS51B1318P"><span id="translatedtitle">Swash-zone velocity profiles and bed stress on a natural <span class="hlt">beach</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Puleo, J. A.; Lanckriet, T.; Wang, P.</p> <p>2010-12-01</p> <p>The swash zone, where waves wash up and down the <span class="hlt">beach</span>, is a difficult region of the nearshore to quantify velocity. Water depths in the swash zone can range from zero to over a meter and flows can be turbulent and bubble-laden. Swash flows are often assumed to be depth uniform partially because current meters typically cannot be placed closer than a few centimeters above the bed, although some previous field research has shown flow variability within elevations several centimeters above the bed. The swash-zone boundary layer, where flow momentum is transferred to the bed, must extend below elevations accessible to conventional current meters. Laser Doppler and video-based techniques have shown the shape of this boundary layer over smooth and rough impermeable and mobile granular beds in the laboratory, but to the author’s knowledge, the swash-zone boundary layer below 2-3 cm has never been measured on a natural <span class="hlt">beach</span>. During August 16-19, 2010 a swash-zone study was conducted at several <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in west-central <span class="hlt">Florida</span> in an effort to measure the swash-zone boundary layer and bed shear stress. A new acoustic velocity profiling sensor, the Nortek Vectrino-II, has the capability to measure x, y and z velocity at 1mm increments over 30 bins at the finest setting. During the study 3 Vectrino-II’s were deployed with different profiling ranges in an effort to capture the boundary layer structure. Utilizing the velocity profile, bed stress is estimated using several different techniques including the “law of the wall” approach and nearbed velocity gradients. Preliminary results of the swash-zone boundary layer structure, friction velocity and bed stress as a function of swash phase will be discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11931245"><span id="translatedtitle">Attractiveness of <span class="hlt">beach</span> ball decoys to adult Stomoxys calcitrans (Diptera: Muscidae).</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Cilek, J E</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>The attractiveness of inflated <span class="hlt">beach</span> balls covered with adhesive and used as decoys to trap adult stable flies was investigated on <span class="hlt">Florida</span> panhandle <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Decoys were painted either solid black, solid white, or a mixed pattern that consisted of three equally spaced white circles (20 cm diameter) on a solid black background. Another set of decoys (referred to as plain) were unpainted and retained the manufacturer's original color scheme. The plain decoy consisted of a separate blue, yellow, and red diamond-shaped panel. Each color panel was separated by a white panel of similar size and orientation. Plain decoys collected significantly (<0.05) more stable flies than other treatments but no significant difference was noted between colored panels. The mixed pattern decoy captured significantly fewer flies than the plain decoy but significantly more flies (nearly twice) when compared with solid white or black decoys. No difference in preference was observed when fly abundance on the black background was compared with that on white circles and total abundance from both areas appeared to be additive compared with either area alone. No significant differences were found in the number of flies trapped on solid white versus black decoys. When trapping efficiency was compared with Alsynite translucent fiberglass cylinders covered with adhesive-treated cellophane sheets, the decoy trap caught significantly more (>10 times) flies per square centimeter. Alsynite cylinders are considered standard tools when sampling fly populations. Adhesive-treated <span class="hlt">beach</span> ball decoys may be an alternative method for luring stable flies away from human hosts in recreation areas, or from animals, thereby reducing biting annoyance from these pests. PMID:11931245</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..1710102P"><span id="translatedtitle">Integrated protecting plan for <span class="hlt">beach</span> erosion. A case study in Plaka <span class="hlt">beach</span>, E. Crete, Greece</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Petrakis, Stelios; Alexandrakis, George; Kozyrakis, George; Hatziyanni, Eleni; Kampanis, Nikolaos</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>Coastal zones are among the most active areas on Earth, being subjected to extreme wind / wave conditions, thus vulnerable to erosion. In Greece and Crete in particular, <span class="hlt">beach</span> zones are extremely important for the welfare of the inhabitants, since, apart for the important biological and archaeological value of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> zones, the socio-economic value is critical since a great number of human activities are concentrated in such areas (touristic facilities, fishing harbors etc.). The present study investigates the erosional procedures observed in Plaka <span class="hlt">beach</span>, E. Crete, Greece, a highly touristic developed area with great archaeological interest and proposes a cost-effective solution. The factors taken into consideration for the proposed solution in reducing the erosion of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> were the study of the climatological, geological and geomorphological regime of the area, the recent (~70 years) shifting of the coastline through the study of topographic maps, aerial photographs and satellite images, the creation of detailed bathymetric and seabed classification maps of the area and finally, a risk analysis in terms of erosional phenomena. On the basis of the above, it is concluded that the area under investigation is subjected to an erosional rate of about 1 m/10 years and the total land-loss for the past 70 years is about 4600 m2. Through the simulation of the wave regime we studied 3 possible scenarios, the "do-nothing" scenario, the construction of a detached submerged breakwater at the depth of 3 meters and, finally, the armoring of the existing <span class="hlt">beach</span>-wall through the placement of appropriate size and material boulders, forming an artificial slope for the reducing of the wave breaking energy and a small scale nourishment plan. As a result, through the modeling of the above, the most appropriate and cost-effective solution was found to be the third, armoring of the existing coastal wall and nourishment of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> periodically, thus the further undermining of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> will be reduced and part of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> can be replaced, and providing aesthetic and economic value to the <span class="hlt">beach</span> in order to maintain the coastal protection programme. Acknowledgements This work was performed in the framework of the PEFYKA project within the KRIPIS ?ction of the GSRT. The project is funded by Greece and the European Regional Development Fund of the European Union under the NSRF and the O.P. Competitiveness and Entrepreneurship. It has also been supported by the "Estimation of the vunlerability of coastal areas to climatic change and sea level rise. Pilot study in Crete isl. Programme for the promotion of the exchange and scientific cooperation between Greece and Germany" programme IKYDA2013.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://www.fred.ifas.ufl.edu/economic-impact-analysis/pdf/Craft_Brewing_FL_2014.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Economic Contributions of the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Craft Brewing Industry to the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Economy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Florida, University of</p> <p></p> <p>Economic Contributions of the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Craft Brewing Industry to the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Economy Timothy G...................................................................... 3 The <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Craft Brewing Industry...........................................................................................22 Appendix A. Craft Brewing Establishments Operating in <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, 2013</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-STC&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1097276"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Hydrogen Initiative</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Block, David L</p> <p>2013-06-30</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Hydrogen Initiative (FHI) was a research, development and demonstration hydrogen and fuel cell program. The FHI program objectives were to develop <span class="hlt">Florida?s</span> hydrogen and fuel cell infrastructure and to assist DOE in its hydrogen and fuel cell activities The FHI program funded 12 RD&D projects as follows: Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure and Rental Car Strategies -- L. Lines, Rollins College This project analyzes strategies for <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s early stage adaptation of hydrogen-powered public transportation. In particular, the report investigates urban and statewide network of refueling stations and the feasibility of establishing a hydrogen rental-car fleet based in Orlando. Methanol Fuel Cell Vehicle Charging Station at <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Atlantic University ? M. Fuchs, EnerFuel, Inc. The project objectives were to design, and demonstrate a 10 kWnet proton exchange membrane fuel cell stationary power plant operating on methanol, to achieve an electrical energy efficiency of 32% and to demonstrate transient response time of less than 3 milliseconds. Assessment of Public Understanding of the Hydrogen Economy Through Science Center Exhibits, J. Newman, Orlando Science Center The project objective was to design and build an interactive Science Center exhibit called: ?H2Now: the Great Hydrogen Xchange?. On-site Reformation of Diesel Fuel for Hydrogen Fueling Station Applications ? A. Raissi, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Solar Energy Center This project developed an on-demand forecourt hydrogen production technology by catalytically converting high-sulfur hydrocarbon fuels to an essentially sulfur-free gas. The removal of sulfur from reformate is critical since most catalysts used for the steam reformation have limited sulfur tolerance. Chemochromic Hydrogen Leak Detectors for Safety Monitoring ? N. Mohajeri and N. Muradov, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Solar Energy Center This project developed and demonstrated a cost-effective and highly selective chemochromic (visual) hydrogen leak detector for safety monitoring at any facility engaged in transport, handling and use of hydrogen. Development of High Efficiency Low Cost Electrocatalysts for Hydrogen Production and PEM Fuel Cell Applications ? M. Rodgers, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Solar Energy Center The objective of this project was to decrease platinum usage in fuel cells by conducting experiments to improve catalyst activity while lowering platinum loading through pulse electrodeposition. Optimum values of several variables during electrodeposition were selected to achieve the highest electrode performance, which was related to catalyst morphology. Understanding Mechanical and Chemical Durability of Fuel Cell Membrane Electrode Assemblies ? D. Slattery, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Solar Energy Center The objective of this project was to increase the knowledge base of the degradation mechanisms for membranes used in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. The results show the addition of ceria (cerium oxide) has given durability improvements by reducing fluoride emissions by an order of magnitude during an accelerated durability test. Production of Low-Cost Hydrogen from Biowaste (HyBrTec?) ? R. Parker, SRT Group, Inc., Miami, FL This project developed a hydrogen bromide (HyBrTec?) process which produces hydrogen bromide from wet-cellulosic waste and co-produces carbon dioxide. Eelectrolysis dissociates hydrogen bromide producing recyclable bromine and hydrogen. A demonstration reactor and electrolysis vessel was designed, built and operated. Development of a Low-Cost and High-Efficiency 500 W Portable PEMFC System ? J. Zheng, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> State University, H. Chen, Bing Energy, Inc. The objectives of this project were to develop a new catalyst structures comprised of highly conductive buckypaper and Pt catalyst nanoparticles coated on its surface and to demonstrate fuel cell efficiency improvement and durability and cell cost reductions in the buckypaper based electrodes. Development of an Interdisciplinary Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology Academic Program ? J. Politano, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Institute of Technology, Melbourne, FL This project developed a hydrogen and fuel cel</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/3189908"><span id="translatedtitle">Holocene cemented <span class="hlt">beach</span> deposits in Belize</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Eberhard Gischler; Anthony J. Lomando</p> <p>1997-01-01</p> <p>Two types of cemented <span class="hlt">beach</span> deposits occur on reef islands off the coast of Belize. These are (1) intertidal beachrock that is dominantly cemented by marine aragonite and high-magnesium-calcite cements, and (2) supratidal cayrock that is cemented mainly by vadose low-magnesium-calcite cements. Besides differences in position relative to present sea level and resulting early diagenesic features, beachrock and cayrock can</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://oaktrust.library.tamu.edu//handle/1969.1/150229"><span id="translatedtitle">Back to the <span class="hlt">Beach</span>: Flamingo Collected </span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Flamingo</p> <p></p> <p>encompassed Martin's rigid shaft in his palm, drew it forth carefully, then slid the black pants off the older man's legs. "Feel it in BACK TO THE <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> FLAMINGO your every cell. So powerful. So intense. So wonderful. Tell me." Martin opened his mouth... the bed. grasped him in a crushing embrace. Sonny laughed delightedly as they tumbled together, intertwining arms and legs in an exciting, erotic confusion. Then the blonds mouth was on his dark lover's, making the Cuban weak, helpless again...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002AGUFMOS62E..11T"><span id="translatedtitle">Wave Reflection on a Steep <span class="hlt">Beach</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Thornton, E. B.; Stanton, T. P.; Reniers, A. R.</p> <p>2002-12-01</p> <p>Wave reflection was measured during the RIPEX/Steep<span class="hlt">Beach</span> experiment conducted at the Sand City <span class="hlt">Beach</span> in Monterey Bay, California during April/May 2001. The morphology is a barred shoreline, cut by rip channels spaced 100-200 m apart. The <span class="hlt">beach</span> slope is steep at 1:5, and the slope offshore of the bar is 1:20. Measuring wave reflection in the dissipative surf zone is complicated because the wave field is not spatially homogeneous and the nodes of the reflected waves pose difficulties in analysis. The inverse approach by Dickson et.al. (1995) is extended to the case of local pressure/velocity (puv) measurements, to avoid having to assume spatial homogeniety. In this inverse approach, the various expected puv cross-spectra and energy density spectra are modeled for a reflective wave field and compared with actual measurements. The unknown coefficients as a function of frequency are reflection coefficient, phase difference, mean incident wave direction, and incident wave energy of the model, and are determined iteratively in a least square sense. The estimated reflection coefficients increase towards the shoreline inside the surf zone, decrease with increasing frequency and vary with the tidal stage. Dickson, W.S., T.H.C. Herbers, and E.B. Thornton, 1995, Wave Reflection from Breakwater, J. Waterway, Port, Coastal and Ocean Engineering, Vol. 121 (5), 262-268.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://www.fred.ifas.ufl.edu/economic-impact-analysis/pdf/Craft_Brewing_FL_2014_ES.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Economic Contributions of the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Craft Brewing Industry to the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Economy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Florida, University of</p> <p></p> <p>Economic Contributions of the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Craft Brewing Industry to the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Economy Timothy G Contributions of the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Craft Brewing Industry to the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Economy Executive Summary The <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Brewers Guild (FBG) commissioned this study of the economic impact of the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> craft brewing industry</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li class="active"><span>12</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_12 --> <div id="page_13" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li class="active"><span>13</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="241"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-HHH&redirectUrl=http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/ca1561.photos.014193p/"><span id="translatedtitle">109. VIEW OF SOUTHEAST SIDE OF PIER TAKEN FROM <span class="hlt">BEACH</span>, ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>109. VIEW OF SOUTHEAST SIDE OF PIER TAKEN FROM <span class="hlt">BEACH</span>, LOOKING WEST. VIEW SHOWS ART DECO BUILDINGS ADDED IN 1931 AND 5TH TEE ADDED IN 1940 Photograph #5369-HB. Photographer unknown, c. 1945, based on clothing of sunbathers; view probably taken in mid-1945 after the U.S. Army vacated the pier and it was reopened to the public. - Huntington <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Orange County, CA</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=ERIC&redirectUrl=http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED394905.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Teacher Education Program Reviews at University of North <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> State University, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Atlantic University, University of South <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, March 1994-April 1995.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>England, David A.</p> <p></p> <p>This report offers the review of four joint teacher education reviews conducted in the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> State University System (SUS). Institutions reviewed are: University of North <span class="hlt">Florida</span> (UNF), <span class="hlt">Florida</span> State University (FSU), <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Atlantic University (FAU), and the University of South <span class="hlt">Florida</span> (USF). Joint teams were composed of the National Council…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=ERIC&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=model-driven&pg=6&id=EJ845832"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s Online Option</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Tucker, Bill</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Education reform often appears a zero-sum battle, one that pits crusaders demanding accountability and choice against much of the traditional education establishment, including teachers unions. The political skirmishes in <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, including court fights over vouchers and charter schools, and ongoing struggles over a parade of different merit pay…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NSDL&redirectUrl=http://www.floridamemory.com/Collections/folklife/"><span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Folklife Collection</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>With generous funding from the Institute of Museum and Library Services, the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> State Archives has recently finished an ambitious two-year project to enhance access to a number of items in the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Folklife Collection by creating The <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Memory Project website. No doubt the site will be of great interest to folklorists and the general public, as it contains an online index with descriptions of 50,000 photographic images and close to 5,000 audio recordings. Additionally, visitors can peruse over 10,000 of these photographic images by performing detailed searches. Visitors can also look through the audio section for a number of real finds, including a WPA recording of a work song performed by Zora Neale Hurston along with other folk song recordings. The site also includes five separate educational units, which may be used in the classroom, or perused at the discretion of each visitor. The units include discussions of the history of net making and net fishing in <span class="hlt">Florida</span> and the creation of Seminole dolls by noted doll maker Mary B. Billie.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=ERIC&redirectUrl=http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED198376.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Driver Education Handbook.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Mick, Susan H.</p> <p></p> <p>This student edition contains the same basic information as the official <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Driver Handbook, but the reading difficulty of the material has been sharply reduced. It also provides activity-oriented exercises and review tests on this material. Introductory materials include a complete listing of all activities given, some vocabulary exercises…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=ERIC&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Grasslands&pg=4&id=ED371920"><span id="translatedtitle">The Seminoles of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Covington, James W.</p> <p></p> <p>This book gives a complete account of the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Seminoles from their entrance into the state almost 300 years ago, through the great chiefdoms of Micanopy, Osceola, and Billy Bowlegs, to the current political reality of democratic tribal elections. After moving into the peninsula from Georgia and Alabama, the Seminoles fought three wars against…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=ERIC&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=reading+AND+writing+AND+connection&pg=3&id=ED472805"><span id="translatedtitle">Discovering <span class="hlt">Florida</span> through Literature.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Knowles, Liz; Smith, Martha</p> <p></p> <p>Noting that a student's study of a state becomes more meaningful when children's and young adult literature is used as an enhancement, this book offers <span class="hlt">Florida</span>-related works of literature to broaden the study of the state. The book is organized by category: history, historical fiction, biographies, plants, animals, fiction, geography, and travel.…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=ERIC&redirectUrl=http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED468854.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Educational Facilities, 2000.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Office of Educational Facilities.</p> <p></p> <p>This publication describes <span class="hlt">Florida</span> school and community college facilities completed in 2000, including photographs and floor plans. The facilities profiled are:J. R. Arnold High School (Bay County); Falcon Cove Middle School (Broward); Floranada Elementary School (Broward); Lyons Creek Middle School (Broward); Parkside Elementary School…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=ERIC&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=maya&pg=7&id=EJ403313"><span id="translatedtitle">The Maya of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Burns, Allan F.</p> <p>1989-01-01</p> <p>Discusses the Maya people who fled Guatemala due to a civil war and illegally entered the U.S. and settled in <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. Presents a picture of their living conditions, employment opportunities, cultural traditions, community development, and family organization. Discusses a Kanjobal Association and the CORN-MAYA program, and explains immigration…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=ERIC&redirectUrl=http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED468853.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Educational Facilities, 1999.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Office of Educational Facilities.</p> <p></p> <p>This publication describes <span class="hlt">Florida</span> school and community college facilities completed in 1999, including photographs and floor plans. The facilities profiled are: Buchholz High School (Alachua County); Gator Run Elementary School (Broward); Corkscrew Elementary School (Collier); The 500 Role Models Academy of Excellence (Miami-Dade); Caribbean…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NSDL&redirectUrl=http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2001/10/30/archive/main316383.shtml"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s Red Tide Infestation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p>CBS News</p> <p></p> <p>This CBS news article reports a toxic algae bloom that spread along the <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s west coast in 2001, threatening the wildlife of Tampa Bay's estuary. The article briefly discusses the cause of the red tide and its affect on the shellfish industry.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3769389"><span id="translatedtitle">Shifts in the Microbial Community Composition of Gulf Coast <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> Following <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Oiling</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Newton, Ryan J.; Huse, Susan M.; Morrison, Hilary G.; Peake, Colin S.; Sogin, Mitchell L.; McLellan, Sandra L.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Microorganisms associated with coastal sands serve as a natural biofilter, providing essential nutrient recycling in nearshore environments and acting to maintain coastal ecosystem health. Anthropogenic stressors often impact these ecosystems, but little is known about whether these disturbances can be identified through microbial community change. The blowout of the Macondo Prospect reservoir on April 20, 2010, which released oil hydrocarbons into the Gulf of Mexico, presented an opportunity to examine whether microbial community composition might provide a sensitive measure of ecosystem disturbance. Samples were collected on four occasions, beginning in mid-June, during initial <span class="hlt">beach</span> oiling, until mid-November from surface sand and surf zone waters at seven <span class="hlt">beaches</span> stretching from Bay St. Louis, MS to St. George Island, FL USA. Oil hydrocarbon measurements and NOAA shoreline assessments indicated little to no impact on the two most eastern <span class="hlt">beaches</span> (controls). Sequence comparisons of bacterial ribosomal RNA gene hypervariable regions isolated from <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands located to the east and west of Mobile Bay in Alabama demonstrated that regional drivers account for markedly different bacterial communities. Individual <span class="hlt">beaches</span> had unique community signatures that persisted over time and exhibited spatial relationships, where community similarity decreased as horizontal distance between samples increased from one to hundreds of meters. In contrast, sequence analyses detected larger temporal and less spatial variation among the water samples. Superimposed upon these <span class="hlt">beach</span> community distance and time relationships, was increased variability in bacterial community composition from oil hydrocarbon contaminated sands. The increased variability was observed among the core, resident, and transient community members, indicating the occurrence of community-wide impacts rather than solely an overprinting of oil hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria onto otherwise relatively stable sand population structures. Among sequences classified to genus, Alcanivorax, Alteromonas, Marinobacter, Winogradskyella, and Zeaxanthinibacter exhibited the largest relative abundance increases in oiled sands. PMID:24040219</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24040219"><span id="translatedtitle">Shifts in the microbial community composition of Gulf Coast <span class="hlt">beaches</span> following <span class="hlt">beach</span> oiling.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Newton, Ryan J; Huse, Susan M; Morrison, Hilary G; Peake, Colin S; Sogin, Mitchell L; McLellan, Sandra L</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Microorganisms associated with coastal sands serve as a natural biofilter, providing essential nutrient recycling in nearshore environments and acting to maintain coastal ecosystem health. Anthropogenic stressors often impact these ecosystems, but little is known about whether these disturbances can be identified through microbial community change. The blowout of the Macondo Prospect reservoir on April 20, 2010, which released oil hydrocarbons into the Gulf of Mexico, presented an opportunity to examine whether microbial community composition might provide a sensitive measure of ecosystem disturbance. Samples were collected on four occasions, beginning in mid-June, during initial <span class="hlt">beach</span> oiling, until mid-November from surface sand and surf zone waters at seven <span class="hlt">beaches</span> stretching from Bay St. Louis, MS to St. George Island, FL USA. Oil hydrocarbon measurements and NOAA shoreline assessments indicated little to no impact on the two most eastern <span class="hlt">beaches</span> (controls). Sequence comparisons of bacterial ribosomal RNA gene hypervariable regions isolated from <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands located to the east and west of Mobile Bay in Alabama demonstrated that regional drivers account for markedly different bacterial communities. Individual <span class="hlt">beaches</span> had unique community signatures that persisted over time and exhibited spatial relationships, where community similarity decreased as horizontal distance between samples increased from one to hundreds of meters. In contrast, sequence analyses detected larger temporal and less spatial variation among the water samples. Superimposed upon these <span class="hlt">beach</span> community distance and time relationships, was increased variability in bacterial community composition from oil hydrocarbon contaminated sands. The increased variability was observed among the core, resident, and transient community members, indicating the occurrence of community-wide impacts rather than solely an overprinting of oil hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria onto otherwise relatively stable sand population structures. Among sequences classified to genus, Alcanivorax, Alteromonas, Marinobacter, Winogradskyella, and Zeaxanthinibacter exhibited the largest relative abundance increases in oiled sands. PMID:24040219</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012Geomo.139...16S"><span id="translatedtitle">Dune recovery after storm erosion on a high-energy <span class="hlt">beach</span>: Vougot <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Brittany (France)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Suanez, Serge; Cariolet, Jean-Marie; Cancouët, Romain; Ardhuin, Fabrice; Delacourt, Christophe</p> <p>2012-02-01</p> <p>On 10th March 2008, the high energy storm Johanna hit the French Atlantic coast, generating severe dune erosion on Vougot <span class="hlt">Beach</span> (Brittany, France). In this paper, the recovery of the dune of Vougot <span class="hlt">Beach</span> is analysed through a survey of morphological changes and hydrodynamic conditions. Data collection focused on the period immediately following storm Johanna until July 2010, i.e. over two and a half years. Results showed that the dune retreated by a maximum of almost 6 m where storm surge and wave attack were the most energetic. Dune retreat led to the creation of accommodation space for the storage of sediment by widening and elevating space between the pre- and post-storm dune toe, and reducing impacts of the storm surge. Dune recovery started in the month following the storm event and is still ongoing. It is characterised by the construction of "secondary" embryo dunes, which recovered at an average rate of 4-4.5 cm per month, although average monthly volume changes varied from - 1 to 2 m 3.m - 1 . These embryo dunes accreted due to a large aeolian sand supply from the upper tidal <span class="hlt">beach</span> to the existing foredune. These dune-construction processes were facilitated by growth of vegetation on low-profile embryo dunes promoting backshore accretion. After more than two years of survey, the sediment budget of the <span class="hlt">beach</span>/dune system showed that more than 10,000 m 3 has been lost by the upper tidal <span class="hlt">beach</span>. We suggest that seaward return currents generated during the storm of 10th March 2008 are responsible for offshore sediment transport. Reconstitution of the equilibrium <span class="hlt">beach</span> profile following the storm event may therefore have generated cross-shore sediment redistribution inducing net erosion in the tidal zone.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=CFR2014&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title33-vol3/pdf/CFR-2014-title33-vol3-sec334-930.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 334.930 - Anaheim Bay Harbor, Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-07-01</p> <p>...Harbor, Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>. 334.930 Section 334.930...Harbor, Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>. (a) The restricted area...the United States Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California, and the...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=CFR2012&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title33-vol3/pdf/CFR-2012-title33-vol3-sec334-930.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 334.930 - Anaheim Bay Harbor, Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-07-01</p> <p>...Harbor, Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>. 334.930 Section 334.930...Harbor, Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>. (a) The restricted area...the United States Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California, and the...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=CFR2013&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title33-vol3/pdf/CFR-2013-title33-vol3-sec334-930.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 334.930 - Anaheim Bay Harbor, Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-07-01</p> <p>...Harbor, Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>. 334.930 Section 334.930...Harbor, Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>. (a) The restricted area...the United States Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California, and the...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=FEDREG&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-05-28/pdf/2013-12541.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">78 FR 31840 - Safety Zone; USO Patriotic Festival Air Show, Atlantic Ocean; Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, VA</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-05-28</p> <p>...Patriotic Festival Air Show, Atlantic Ocean; Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, VA AGENCY...on the navigable waters of the Atlantic Ocean in Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, VA. This...host an air show event over the Atlantic Ocean in Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, VA. In...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=FEDREG&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-01-10/pdf/2011-167.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">76 FR 1359 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, NC</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-01-10</p> <p>...the 2011 Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span>/Quintiles Marathon will be transiting across the bridge...the 2011 Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span>/Quintiles Marathon. DATES: This deviation is effective...The Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span>/Quintiles Marathon Committee on behalf of the North...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=CFR&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title40-vol24/pdf/CFR-2010-title40-vol24-sec227-10.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">40 CFR 227.10 - Hazards to fishing, navigation, shorelines or <span class="hlt">beaches</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-07-01</p> <p>...Hazards to fishing, navigation, shorelines or <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. 227...Hazards to fishing, navigation, shorelines or <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. ...with fishing or navigation. (b) Wastes...present a hazard to shorelines or <span class="hlt">beaches</span>...</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li class="active"><span>13</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_13 --> <div id="page_14" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li class="active"><span>14</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="261"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://oaktrust.library.tamu.edu//handle/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2009-08-3250"><span id="translatedtitle">Shoreline Management at Padre Island National Seashore: An Investigation of Angler Relationships to the <span class="hlt">Beach</span> </span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Aldrich, Chelsea L.</p> <p>2010-01-14</p> <p>usage of the <span class="hlt">beach</span>, park management receives vocal opposition from local and visiting anglers who do not want their long-standing rights to the <span class="hlt">beach</span> to be affected. To better inform management decisions and policies surrounding the <span class="hlt">beach</span> area...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=CFR2011&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title33-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title33-vol3-sec334-930.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 334.930 - Anaheim Bay Harbor, Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-07-01</p> <p>... Anaheim Bay Harbor, Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>. 334.930 Section... Anaheim Bay Harbor, Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>. (a) The restricted...west jetties at the United States Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California,...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014E%26ES...17a2106L"><span id="translatedtitle">Hyperspectral image classifier based on <span class="hlt">beach</span> spectral feature</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Liang, Zhang; Lianru, Gao; Bing, Zhang</p> <p>2014-03-01</p> <p>The seashore, especially coral bank, is sensitive to human activities and environmental changes. A multispectral image, with coarse spectral resolution, is inadaptable for identify subtle spectral distinctions between various <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. To the contrary, hyperspectral image with narrow and consecutive channels increases our capability to retrieve minor spectral features which is suit for identification and classification of surface materials on the shore. Herein, this paper used airborne hyperspectral data, in addition to ground spectral data to study the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Qingdao. The image data first went through image pretreatment to deal with the disturbance of noise, radiation inconsistence and distortion. In succession, the reflection spectrum, the derivative spectrum and the spectral absorption features of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> surface were inspected in search of diagnostic features. Hence, spectra indices specific for the unique environment of seashore were developed. According to expert decisions based on image spectrums, the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are ultimately classified into sand <span class="hlt">beach</span>, rock <span class="hlt">beach</span>, vegetation <span class="hlt">beach</span>, mud <span class="hlt">beach</span>, bare land and water. In situ surveying reflection spectrum from GER1500 field spectrometer validated the classification production. In conclusion, the classification approach under expert decision based on feature spectrum is proved to be feasible for <span class="hlt">beaches</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010HESS...14.1341C"><span id="translatedtitle">Tidal propagation in an oceanic island with sloping <span class="hlt">beaches</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chang, Y.-C.; Jeng, D.-S.; Yeh, H.-D.</p> <p>2010-07-01</p> <p>In this study, a new analytical solution for describing the tide-induced groundwater fluctuations in oceanic islands with finite length and different slopes of the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> is developed. Unlike previous solutions, the present solution is not only applicable for a semi-infinite coastal aquifer, but also for an oceanic island with finite length and different sloping <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. The solution can be used to investigate the effect of higher-order components and <span class="hlt">beach</span> slopes on the water table fluctuations. The results demonstrate the effect of higher-order components increases with the shallow water parameter or amplitude parameter and the water table level increases as <span class="hlt">beach</span> slopes decrease.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010HESSD...7.1407C"><span id="translatedtitle">Tidal propagation in an oceanic island with sloping <span class="hlt">beaches</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chang, Y. C.; Jeng, D. S.; Yeh, H. D.</p> <p>2010-02-01</p> <p>In this study, a new analytical solution for describing the tide-induced groundwater fluctuations in oceanic islands with finite length and different slopes of the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> is developed. Unlike previous solutions, the present solution is not only applicable for a semi-infinite coastal aquifer, but also for an oceanic island with finite length and different sloping <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. The solution can be used to investigate the effect of higher-order components and <span class="hlt">beach</span> slopes on the water table fluctuations. The results demonstrate the effect of higher-order components increases with the shallow water parameter or amplitude parameter and the water table level increases as <span class="hlt">beach</span> slopes decrease.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASA-TRS&redirectUrl=http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20090021319"><span id="translatedtitle">Hydrogen Research at <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Universities</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Block, David L.; T-Raissi, Ali</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>This final report describes the R&D activities and projects conducted for NASA under the 6-year NASA Hydrogen Research at <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Universities grant program. Contained within this report are summaries of the overall activities, one-page description of all the reports funded under this program and all of the individual reports from each of the 29 projects supported by the effort. The R&D activities cover hydrogen technologies related to production, cryogenics, sensors, storage, separation processes, fuel cells, resource assessments and education. In the span of 6 years, the NASA Hydrogen Research at <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Universities program funded a total of 44 individual university projects, and employed more than 100 faculty and over 100 graduate research students in the six participating universities. Researchers involved in this program have filed more than 20 patents in all hydrogen technology areas and put out over 220 technical publications in the last 2 years alone. This 6 year hydrogen research program was conducted by a consortium of six <span class="hlt">Florida</span> universities: <span class="hlt">Florida</span> International University (FIU) in Miami, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> State University (FSU) and <span class="hlt">Florida</span> A&M University (FAMU) in Tallahassee, University of Central <span class="hlt">Florida</span> (UCF) in Orlando, University of South <span class="hlt">Florida</span> (USF) in Tampa, and University of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> (UF) in Gainesville. The <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Solar Energy Center (FSEC) of the University of Central <span class="hlt">Florida</span> managed the research activities of all consortium member universities except those at the University of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. This report does not include any of the programs or activities conducted at the University of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, but can be found in NASA/CR-2008-215440-PART 1-3.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9391969"><span id="translatedtitle">Winter mortality of common loons in <span class="hlt">Florida</span> coastal waters.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Forrester, D J; Davidson, W R; Lange, R E; Stroud, R K; Alexander, L L; Franson, J C; Haseltine, S D; Littell, R C; Nesbitt, S A</p> <p>1997-10-01</p> <p>Diagnostic findings are presented for 434 common loons (Gavia immer) found sick or dead on <span class="hlt">Florida</span> <span class="hlt">beaches</span> from 1970 through 1994, primarily during the months of December to April. The most commonly recognized problem was an emaciation syndrome (66%), followed by oiling (18%), aspergillosis (7%), trauma (5%) and miscellaneous disease entities (1%). The cause-of-death for 3% of the birds was not determined. Many of the carcasses examined (n = 173) were obtained during an epizootic which occurred from January to March of 1983 in which more than 13,000 loons were estimated to have died. An emaciation syndrome, characterized by severe atrophy of pectoral muscles, loss of body fat and hemorrhagic enteritis, was the primary finding in this epizootic. It was postulated to have a complex etiologic basis involving synergistic effects and energy costs of migration, molting and replacement of flight feathers, food resource changes, salt-loading, intestinal parasitism, environmental contaminants, and inclement weather. PMID:9391969</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NSDL&redirectUrl=http://digital.lib.usf.edu/ohp-flcitrus"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Citrus Industry Oral Histories</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>What's so special about oranges? They are a major cash crop for <span class="hlt">Florida</span> and other warm weather places, and this fascinating oral history project from the University of South <span class="hlt">Florida</span> (USF) explores the very nature of this industry. Working together with the USF's Patel Center for Global Studies, oral historian William Mansfield conducted 20 interviews regarding the impact of globalization on the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> citrus industry. Visitors can listen to or read the interviews, as well as look over the online exhibition, "Selling Sunshine: <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s Citrus Industry." The exhibition details <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s unique relationship with the citrus industry, incorporating documents, promotional material, and post cards with its information. The website hosts a remarkable collection that will be of interest to oral historians, folks with an interest in <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, and many others.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPA-EIMS&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=165685"><span id="translatedtitle">MEETING IN MEXICO: NOWCASTING AND FORECASTING <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> BACTERIA CONCENTRATION USING EPA'S VIRTUAL <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> SOFTWARE</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><span class="hlt">Beaches</span> in the United States of (North) America are subject to closure when bacterial counts exceed water quality criteria. Many authorities base these decisions on water samples that typically require at least 18 hours to analyze. This persistence approach, or model, often leads...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NSDL&redirectUrl=http://www.fknms.nos.noaa.gov"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Keys NMS: Coral Reefs</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Keys National Marine Sanctuary's page with information on coral reefs and links to information on research, restoration and monitoring. Wealth of information on the protection of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s coral reefs and the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Keys as a whole. Includes an in-class activity for grades K-5, as well as information on a Keys field experience and teacher workshops. Information on safe diving and snorkeling. Education materials available for purchase, including the Seagrass Toolbox.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=USGSPUBS&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/sim3167"><span id="translatedtitle">Geospatial characteristics of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s coastal and offshore environments: Coastal habitats, artificial reefs, wrecks, dumping grounds, harbor obstructions and offshore sand resources</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Demopoulos, Amanda W.J.; Foster, Ann M.; Jones, Michal L.; Gualtieri, Daniel J.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>The Geospatial Characteristics GeoPDF of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s Coastal and Offshore Environments is a comprehensive collection of geospatial data describing the political boundaries and natural resources of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. This interactive map provides spatial information on bathymetry, sand resources, coastal habitats, artificial reefs, shipwrecks, dumping grounds, and harbor obstructions. The map should be useful to coastal resource managers and others interested in marine habitats and submerged obstructions of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s coastal region. In particular, as oil and gas explorations continue to expand, the map may be used to explore information regarding sensitive areas and resources in the State of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. Users of this geospatial database will have access to synthesized information in a variety of scientific disciplines concerning <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s coastal zone. This powerful tool provides a one-stop assembly of data that can be tailored to fit the needs of many natural resource managers. The map was originally developed to assist the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation, and Enforcement (BOEMRE) and coastal resources managers with planning <span class="hlt">beach</span> restoration projects. The BOEMRE uses a systematic approach in planning the development of submerged lands of the Continental Shelf seaward of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s territorial waters. Such development could affect the environment. BOEMRE is required to ascertain the existing physical, biological, and socioeconomic conditions of the submerged lands and estimate the impact of developing these lands. Data sources included the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, BOEMRE, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Department of Environmental Protection, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Geographic Data Library, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Natural Areas Inventory, and the State of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, Bureau of Archeological Research. Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) compliant metadata are provided as attached xml files for all geographic information system (GIS) layers.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=USGSPUBS&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/sim3166"><span id="translatedtitle">Geospatial characteristics of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s coastal and offshore environments: Distribution of important habitats for coastal and offshore biological resources and offshore sand resources</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Demopoulos, Amanda W.J.; Foster, Ann M.; Jones, Michal L.; Gualtieri, Daniel J.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>The Geospatial Characteristics GeoPDF of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s Coastal and Offshore Environments is a comprehensive collection of geospatial data describing the political boundaries and natural resources of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. This interactive map provides spatial information on bathymetry, sand resources, and locations of important habitats (for example, Essential Fish Habitats (EFH), nesting areas, strandings) for marine invertebrates, fish, reptiles, birds, and marine mammals. The map should be useful to coastal resource managers and others interested in marine habitats and submerged obstructions of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s coastal region. In particular, as oil and gas explorations continue to expand, the map can be used to explore information regarding sensitive areas and resources in the State of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. Users of this geospatial database will have access to synthesized information in a variety of scientific disciplines concerning <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s coastal zone. This powerful tool provides a one-stop assembly of data that can be tailored to fit the needs of many natural resource managers. The map was originally developed to assist the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation, and Enforcement (BOEMRE) and coastal resources managers with planning <span class="hlt">beach</span> restoration projects. The BOEMRE uses a systematic approach in planning the development of submerged lands of the Continental Shelf seaward of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s territorial waters. Such development could affect the environment. BOEMRE is required to ascertain the existing physical, biological, and socioeconomic conditions of the submerged lands and estimate the impact of developing these lands. Data sources included the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, BOEMRE, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Department of Environmental Protection, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Geographic Data Library, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Natural Areas Inventory, and the State of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, Bureau of Archeological Research. Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) compliant metadata are provided as attached xml files for all geographic information system (GIS) layers.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006AGUFMOS41C0629A"><span id="translatedtitle">Parametric Wave Transformation Models on Natural <span class="hlt">Beaches</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Apotsos, A. A.; Raubenheimer, B.; Elgar, S.; Guza, R. T.</p> <p>2006-12-01</p> <p>Seven parametric models for wave height transformation across the surf zone [e.g., Thornton and Guza, 1983] are tested with observations collected between the shoreline and about 5-m water depth during 2 experiments on a barred <span class="hlt">beach</span> near Duck, NC, and between the shoreline and about 3.5-m water depth during 2 experiments on unbarred <span class="hlt">beaches</span> near La Jolla, CA. Offshore wave heights ranged from about 0.1 to 3.0 m. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> profiles were surveyed approximately every other day. The models predict the observations well. Root-mean-square errors between observed and simulated wave heights are small in water depths h > 2 m (average rms errors < 10%), and increase with decreasing depth for h < 2 m (average rms errors > 20%). The lowest rms errors (i.e., the most accurate predictions) are achieved by tuning a free parameter, ?, in each model. To tune the models accurately to the data considered here, observations are required at 3 to 5 locations, and must span the surf zone. No tuned or untuned model provides the best predictions for all data records in any one experiment. The best fit ?'s for each model-experiment pair are represented well with an empirical hyperbolic tangent curve based on the inverse Iribarren number. In 3 of the 4 data sets, estimating ? for each model using an average curve based on the predictions and observations from all 4 experiments typically improves model-data agreement relative to using a constant or previously determined empirical ?. The best fit ?'s at the 4th experiment (conducted off La Jolla, CA) are roughly 20% smaller than the ?'s for the other 3 experiments, and thus using the experiment-averaged curve increases prediction errors. Possible causes for the smaller ?'s at the 4th experiment will be discussed. Funded by ONR and NSF.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=USGSPUBS&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/sir20125190"><span id="translatedtitle">Evaluation of potential sources and transport mechanisms of fecal indicator bacteria to <span class="hlt">beach</span> water, Murphy Park <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Door County, Wisconsin</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Juckem, Paul F.; Corsi, Steven R.; McDermott, Colleen; Kleinheinz, Gregory; Fogarty, Lisa R.; Haack, Sheridan K.; Johnson, Heather E.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Fecal Indicator Bacteria (FIB) concentrations in <span class="hlt">beach</span> water have been used for many years as a criterion for closing <span class="hlt">beaches</span> due to potential health concerns. Yet, current understanding of sources and transport mechanisms that drive FIB occurrence remains insufficient for accurate prediction of closures at many <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Murphy Park <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, a relatively pristine <span class="hlt">beach</span> on Green Bay in Door County, Wis., was selected for a study to evaluate FIB sources and transport mechanisms. Although the relatively pristine nature of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> yielded no detection of pathogenic bacterial genes and relatively low FIB concentrations during the study period compared with other Great Lakes <span class="hlt">Beaches</span>, its selection limited the number of confounding FIB sources and associated transport mechanisms. The primary sources of FIB appear to be internal to the <span class="hlt">beach</span> rather than external sources such as rivers, storm sewer outfalls, and industrial discharges. Three potential FIB sources were identified: sand, swash-zone groundwater, and Cladophora mats. Modest correlations between FIB concentrations in these potential source reservoirs and FIB concentrations at the <span class="hlt">beach</span> from the same day illustrate the importance of understanding transport mechanisms between FIB sources and the water column. One likely mechanism for transport and dispersion of FIB from sand and Cladophora sources appears to be agitation of Cladophora mats and erosion of <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand due to storm activity, as inferred from storm indicators including turbidity, wave height, current speed, wind speed, sky visibility, 24-hour precipitation, and suspended particulate concentration. FIB concentrations in <span class="hlt">beach</span> water had a statistically significant relation (p-value ‹0.05) with the magnitude of these storm indicators. In addition, transport of FIB in swash-zone groundwater into <span class="hlt">beach</span> water appears to be driven by groundwater recharge associated with multiday precipitation and corresponding increased swash-zone groundwater discharge at the <span class="hlt">beach</span>, as indicated by an increase in the specific conductance of <span class="hlt">beach</span> water. Understanding the dynamics of FIB sources (sand, swash-zone groundwater, and Cladophora) and transport mechanisms (dispersion and erosion from storm energy, and swash-zone groundwater discharge) is important for improving predictions of potential health risks from FIB in <span class="hlt">beach</span> water.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NSDL&redirectUrl=http://ufdc.ufl.edu/aerials"><span id="translatedtitle">Aerial Photography: <span class="hlt">Florida</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Millions of people fly over <span class="hlt">Florida</span> each year, but how many of them really see anything? The University of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Map & Digital Imagery Library contains over 160,000 aerial photographs of the Sunshine State, and it is a tremendous resource for agronomists, ecologists, geographers, and historians. These particular aerial images were originally created to assist farmers in accurately assessing their farms and to provide information on soil conservation. This collection contains 120 maps that range from 1937 to 1990, and visitors to the site can use a Google Maps interface to search the maps by location. Alternately, visitors can use the "Flights By County" to look through the maps in places like Hillsborough and Alachua County.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NSDL&redirectUrl=http://merrick.library.miami.edu/specialCollections/asm0567/"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Documents Collection</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Created as part of the University of Miami Libraries Digital Collections, this rather remarkable offering includes an assortment of documents related to various aspects of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>ââ?¬â?¢s history, life, and culture from 1777 to the 1920s. The range of materials here includes correspondence diaries, invoices, receipts, reports, and other documents. Key highlights cover a range from the Seminole Wars to the early days of Miami history. The user interface here is quite useful as visitors can use the Location Map & Timeline to browse around from Pensacola down to the Keys. Also, visitors can use the Subject Index area to look around from "Abstracts of Title" to "Yulee, David Levy." First-time visitors may wish to start by looking at the signature of Napoleon B. Broward and then wandering on over to a unique deed from the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> East Coast Railway.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NSDL&redirectUrl=http://home.fmhi.usf.edu/"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Mental Health Institute</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The mission of the Louis de le Parte <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Mental Health Institute is "to improve the lives of people with mental, addictive, and developmental disorders through research, training, and education." The Institute was created by the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> legislature in 1967 and its work encompasses a range of mental health issues coupled with a rigorous outreach program. The materials here are divided into six thematic areas, including Publications/Reports, Research, and State & Local Partners. In the Publications/Reports area, visitors can learn about the Instituteâ??s scholarly activities through its quarterly newsletter and then browse through news briefs and Medicaid studies if so desired. Moving along, the Research area contains updates and reports on work in eight different areas, including autism, child welfare, and veteran's mental health affairs. Finally, the site also includes a section where visitors can contact the Institute to ask questions about its academic work and mission.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://www.fau.edu/hr/files/OvertimeRequestForm.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">FLORIDA</span> ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY OVERTIME FORM</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Fernandez, Eduardo</p> <p></p> <p><span class="hlt">FLORIDA</span> ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY OVERTIME FORM SECTION I - ADVANCE APPROVAL (THIS SECTION MUST HOURS APPROVED TO BE WORKED: _________________ PAY PERIOD: ____________ JUSTIFICATION REASONS. £ APPROVED £ DISAPPROVED _________________ IMMEDIATE SUPERVISOR DATE £ APPROVED £ DISAPPROVED</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005AGUSMNB33A..15P"><span id="translatedtitle">The Mayflies of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> - Revisited</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Pescador, M. L.; Richard, B. A.</p> <p>2005-05-01</p> <p>The last comprehensive review of the mayfly fauna of the state of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> was the book The Mayflies of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>: Revised Edition by L. Berner and M. L. Pescador published in 1988. In the years since then, many changes have occurred in Ephemeroptera taxonomy and much more has been learned about the mayfly fauna and its distribution in <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. We have recently reviewed and updated what is known of the taxonomy of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> mayfly taxa and have produced the Guide to the Mayfly (Ephemeroptera) Nymphs of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> for the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Department of Environmental Protection. Presently, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> has 76 mayfly species representing 41 genera in 15 families. Seven species have been newly recorded in the state and one new species is to be established. Species diversity is much higher in the Panhandle region of the state than in the Peninsula with 75 of the 76 known species present in the Panhandle and 27 of the 76 known species present in the Peninsula. <span class="hlt">Florida</span> appears to have 5 endemic species and 10 species recorded only in the Southeast. Mayfly diversity "hotspots" in <span class="hlt">Florida</span> are discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPA-EIMS&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=84925"><span id="translatedtitle">WATER QUALITY ASSESSMENT OF LAKE TEXOMA <span class="hlt">BEACHES</span>, 1999-2001</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>A biological and inorganic assessment of five <span class="hlt">beaches</span> on Lake Texoma was conducted from September 1999 through July 2001. Water samples for each <span class="hlt">beach</span> site were divided into two groups, a swimming season and non-swimming season. Water properties such as temperature, alkalinity,...</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li class="active"><span>14</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_14 --> <div id="page_15" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li class="active"><span>15</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="281"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~dst/Stop-Narconon/Newport-Beach/orozco_files/PlanningCommission.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">May 20, 2004 TO: Newport <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Planning Commission</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Touretzky, David S.</p> <p></p> <p>May 20, 2004 TO: Newport <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Planning Commission We respectfully request the assistance of the city Planning Commission regarding a major community concern. AT ISSUE The city of Newport <span class="hlt">Beach</span> has the required Conditonal Use Permits and Planning Commission approval; overwhelming negative impact</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/59451676"><span id="translatedtitle">A study on the reconstruction of Los Acantilados <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Argentina</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>A. Algera; B. Burger; W. M. Hartog; Q. C. De Rijke</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>The city of Mar del Plata is situated some 400 km South of Buenos Aires, the capital of Argentina. The city has two main incomes, namely industry and tourism. In summer, <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of this Atlantic Ocean faced destination are packed with typical Argentine <span class="hlt">beach</span> tents, which can be rented, and people from all over Argentina come to Mar del Plata.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/52552412"><span id="translatedtitle">Against the Tide: The Battle for America's <span class="hlt">Beaches</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Ann E. Gibbs</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Beaches</span> play an important role in America's livelihood and economy. More than one-half of all Americans live within an hour's drive of the <span class="hlt">beach</span>, and coastal towns depend on tourist revenue for their survival. Catastrophic events in coastal areas,such as hurricanes, earthquakes, landslides, and tsunamis, cost the nation more than $30 billion per year and have serious economic consequences for</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/12424791"><span id="translatedtitle">Snowy Plover reproductive success in <span class="hlt">beach</span> and river habitats</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>M. A. Colwell; C. B. Millett; J. J. Meyer; J. N. Hall; S. J. Hurley; S. E. McAllister; A. N. Transou; R. R. LeValley</p> <p></p> <p>Poor reproductive success has contributed to the decline and low population size of the federally listed Western Snowy Plover (Charadrius alexandrinus nivosus), especially where it breeds on coastal <span class="hlt">beaches</span> used by humans for recreation. From 2001-2004, we compared reproductive success of color-marked plovers breeding on ocean <span class="hlt">beaches</span> with those on gravel bars of the lower Eel River in coastal northern</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/49260790"><span id="translatedtitle">Geospatial analysis of barrier island <span class="hlt">beach</span> availability to tourists</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Byungyun Yang; Marguerite Madden; Jinwon Kim; Thomas R. Jordan</p> <p></p> <p>This study geospatially analyzes <span class="hlt">beach</span> availability for global recreational tourism management with focus on a case study of Jekyll Island off the coast of Georgia, USA. Aerial digital imagery in combination with Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data and geographic information system (GIS) mapping and analysis are employed to delineate accurate shorelines with regard to accessible and available <span class="hlt">beach</span> area.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-HHH&redirectUrl=http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/ri0347.photos.146640p/"><span id="translatedtitle">270. OFFICERS' QUARTERS (FORMER SUMMER COTTAGES) AT DOG PATCH <span class="hlt">BEACH</span>, ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>270. OFFICERS' QUARTERS (FORMER SUMMER COTTAGES) AT DOG PATCH <span class="hlt">BEACH</span>, C. 1939. VIEW NORTH DOWN GREENWICH ROAD TOWARD FORMER SUMMER COTTAGES, CONVERTED TO OFFICER'S QUARTERS, OVER-LOOKING DOG PATCH <span class="hlt">BEACH</span>. - Quonset Point Naval Air Station, Roger Williams Way, North Kingstown, Washington County, RI</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/56369492"><span id="translatedtitle">Tidal propagation in an oceanic island with sloping <span class="hlt">beaches</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Y.-C. Chang; D.-S. Jeng; H.-D. Yeh</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>In this study, a new analytical solution for describing the tide-induced groundwater fluctuations in oceanic islands with finite length and different slopes of the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> is developed. Unlike previous solutions, the present solution is not only applicable for a semi-infinite coastal aquifer, but also for an oceanic island with finite length and different sloping <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. The solution can be used</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/49369010"><span id="translatedtitle">Appraisal of storm <span class="hlt">beach</span> buffer width for cyclonic waves</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>F.-C. Lee; John R.-C. Hsu; W.-H. Lin</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>The loss of <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand from berm and dune due to high waves and surge is a universal phenomenon associated with sporadic storm activities. To protect the development in a coastal hazard zone, hard structures or coastal setback have been established in many countries around the world. In this paper, the requirement of a storm <span class="hlt">beach</span> buffer, being a lesser</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=USGSPUBS&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70030902"><span id="translatedtitle">Composite analysis for Escherichia coli at coastal <span class="hlt">beaches</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Bertke, E.E.</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>At some coastal <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, concentrations of fecal-indicator bacteria can differ substantially between multiple points at the same <span class="hlt">beach</span> at the same time. Because of this spatial variability, the recreational water quality at <span class="hlt">beaches</span> is sometimes determined by stratifying a <span class="hlt">beach</span> into several areas and collecting a sample from each area to analyze for the concentration of fecal-indicator bacteria. The average concentration of bacteria from those points is often used to compare to the recreational standard for advisory postings. Alternatively, if funds are limited, a single sample is collected to represent the <span class="hlt">beach</span>. Compositing the samples collected from each section of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> may yield equally accurate data as averaging concentrations from multiple points, at a reduced cost. In the study described herein, water samples were collected at multiple points from three Lake Erie <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and analyzed for Escherichia coli on modified mTEC agar (EPA Method 1603). From the multiple-point samples, a composite sample (n = 116) was formed at each <span class="hlt">beach</span> by combining equal aliquots of well-mixed water from each point. Results from this study indicate that E. coli concentrations from the arithmetic average of multiple-point samples and from composited samples are not significantly different (t = 1.59, p = 0.1139) and yield similar measures of recreational water quality; additionally, composite samples could result in a significant cost savings.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPA-EIMS&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=152804"><span id="translatedtitle">RECREATIONAL <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> WATER QUALITY MONITORING WITH QUANTITATIVE POLYMERASE CHAIN</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Recreational <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are an important economic and aesthetic asset to communities, states and the nation as a whole. Considerable resources are expended each year in monitoring the water at these <span class="hlt">beaches</span> for fecal indicator bacteria as a means of determining if it is safe for pu...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://daf.csulb.edu/offices/ppfm/ehs/programs/hazcom/hazcom_program.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, LONG <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> Hazard Communication Program</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Sorin, Eric J.</p> <p></p> <p>CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, LONG <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> Hazard Communication Program 1.0 REFERENCE California Code: a. Any hazardous waste regulated by the Solid Waste Disposal Act, amended by the Resource of Regulations, Title 8, Section 5194. 2.0 POLICY It is the policy of California State University, Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span></p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=USGSPUBS&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70103400"><span id="translatedtitle">Geographic setting influences Great Lakes <span class="hlt">beach</span> microbiological water quality</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Haack, Sheridan K.; Fogarty, Lisa R.; Stelzer, Erin A.; Fuller, Lori M.; Brennan, Angela K.; Isaacs, Natasha M.; Johnson, Heather E.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Understanding of factors that influence Escherichia coli (EC) and enterococci (ENT) concentrations, pathogen occurrence, and microbial sources at Great Lakes <span class="hlt">beaches</span> comes largely from individual <span class="hlt">beach</span> studies. Using 12 representative <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, we tested enrichment cultures from 273 <span class="hlt">beach</span> water and 22 tributary samples for EC, ENT, and genes indicating the bacterial pathogens Shiga-toxin producing E. coli (STEC), Shigella spp., Salmonella spp, Campylobacter jejuni/coli, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and 108–145 samples for Bacteroides human, ruminant, and gull source-marker genes. EC/ENT temporal patterns, general Bacteroides concentration, and pathogen types and occurrence were regionally consistent (up to 40 km), but <span class="hlt">beach</span> catchment variables (drains/creeks, impervious surface, urban land cover) influenced exceedances of EC/ENT standards and detections of Salmonella and STEC. Pathogen detections were more numerous when the EC/ENT <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Action Value (but not when the Geometric Mean and Statistical Threshold Value) was exceeded. EC, ENT, and pathogens were not necessarily influenced by the same variables. Multiple Bacteroides sources, varying by date, occurred at every <span class="hlt">beach</span>. Study of multiple <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in different geographic settings provided new insights on the contrasting influences of regional and local variables, and a broader-scale perspective, on significance of EC/ENT exceedances, bacterial sources, and pathogen occurrence.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=ERIC&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Cherry&pg=3&id=EJ847215"><span id="translatedtitle">At Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Success Is Measured by Degrees</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Fain, Paul</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>The California State University campus at Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span> graduated 8,720 students last month. Each one got the opportunity to walk the stage, and F. King Alexander, the university's president, shook every hand. California State at Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span> has made graduating a greater number of its 38,000 students its top priority. The slogan "Graduation Begins…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPA-EIMS&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=241934"><span id="translatedtitle">Virtual <span class="hlt">Beach</span> v2.2 User Guide</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Virtual <span class="hlt">Beach</span> version 2.2 (VB 2.2) is a decision support tool. It is designed to construct site-specific Multi-Linear Regression (MLR) models to predict pathogen indicator levels (or fecal indicator bacteria, FIB) at recreational <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. MLR analysis has outperformed persisten...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPA-EIMS&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=189109"><span id="translatedtitle">Tracer Studies In Laboratory <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Simulating Tidal Influences</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Bioremediation of oil spills on tidally influenced <span class="hlt">beaches</span> commonly involves the addition of a nutrient solution to the contaminated region of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> at low tide to stimulate the growth of indigenous oil-degrading bacteria. Maximizing the residentce time of nutrients in the be...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASA-TRS&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19950008270&hterms=movement+sun&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D90%26Ntt%3Dmovement%2Bsun"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s propagation report</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Helmken, Henry; Henning, Rudolf</p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>One of the key goals of the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Center is to obtain a maximum of useful information on propagation behavior unique to its subtropical weather and subtropical climate. Such weather data is of particular interest when it is (or has the potential to become) useful for developing and implementing techniques to compensate for adverse weather effects. Also discussed are data observations, current challenges, CDF's, sun movement, and diversity experiments.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NSDL&redirectUrl=http://www.fl-seafood.com"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Seafood & Aquaculture</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Official web site of the Bureau of Seafood and Aquaculture Marketing, offering seafood information for both consumers and the industry to help buy, sell and market <span class="hlt">Florida</span> seafood and aquaculture products. Provides promotional materials, supplier directories, and training for retailers, food service, wholesalers, processors, fishermen and aquaculturists. Also includes internet links, recipes, news, calendar of seafood festivals, brochures, clip art, audio and video. Includes both freshwater and marine species culture.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NSDL&redirectUrl=http://www.cfmemory.org/"><span id="translatedtitle">Central <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Memory</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The Central <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Memory project was started in 2002 by The University of Central <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Library, The Orange County Regional History Center, and The Orange County Library System. The intent of the project is "to provide an online platform and focal point for gathering, preserving, and disseminating the documents, artifacts, and stories of the history of Central <span class="hlt">Florida</span>." Over the past few years, the project has been awarded with additional funding grants from the Institute of Museum and Library Services. Currently, the project site contains over 80,000 images, along with maps, plans, and other documents. Visitors to the homepage will find three primary sections of note: "Collection", "Share", and "Learn". In the "Collection" area, visitors can make their way through postcards, maps, and the "most recent" additions to the site. For people looking for a more organized experience, there's the "Learn" area. Here they can find thematic collections like "Dreams and Schemes", "Roads, Rivers and Rails", and "Critters, Crackers and Cottages". For those looking for a sample search, words like "Deland", "Stetson University", "Orlando", and "pineapple" will return a host of compelling items.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3202074"><span id="translatedtitle">Pore Water Transport of Enterococci out of <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Sediments</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Phillips, Matthew C.; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M.; Reniers, Adrianus J. H. M.; Wang, John D.; Kiger, Russell T.; Abdel-Mottaleb, Noha</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Enterococci are used to evaluate the safety of <span class="hlt">beach</span> waters and studies have identified <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands as a source of these bacteria. In order to study and quantify the release of microbes from <span class="hlt">beach</span> sediments, flow column systems were built to evaluate flow of pore water out of <span class="hlt">beach</span> sediments. Results show a peak in enterococci (average of 10% of the total microbes in core) released from the sand core within one pore water volume followed by a marked decline to below detection. These results indicate that few enterococci are easily removed and that factors other than simple pore water flow control the release of the majority of enterococci within <span class="hlt">beach</span> sediments. A significantly larger quantity and release of enterococci were observed in cores collected after a significant rain event suggesting the influx of fresh water can alter the release pattern as compared to cores with no antecedent rainfall. PMID:21945015</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/45357372"><span id="translatedtitle">Drowning and <span class="hlt">Beach</span>-Safety Management (BSM) along the Mediterranean <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> of Israel: A Long-Term Perspective</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Daniel Hartmann</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>Along the 190 km of the Israeli Mediterranean coast, of which only about two-thirds is accessible to bathing activities, there are about 100 statutory surf bathing <span class="hlt">beaches</span> guarded by professional sea lifeguards. The rest of the accessible Israeli Mediterranean coastline is divided into two additional legal categories, which are not guarded: (A) <span class="hlt">beaches</span> where bathing is forbidden by governmental ordinance</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li class="active"><span>15</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_15 --> <div id="page_16" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li class="active"><span>16</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="301"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/42560912"><span id="translatedtitle">Public access to ocean <span class="hlt">beaches</span>: If you find a parking space, how do you get to the <span class="hlt">beach</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>David J. Brower; William Dreyfoos</p> <p>1979-01-01</p> <p>The public presently owns, or has the right to use, a substantial portion of the nation's ocean <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. However, the public cannot, in fact, use many of these <span class="hlt">beaches</span> because there is no legal access to them. As the coast develops, more and more areas become closed to the public. The states are now being encouraged to plan for access</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=FEDREG&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-04-21/pdf/2010-9127.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">75 FR 20802 - Safety Zone; New York Air Show at Jones <span class="hlt">Beach</span> State Park, Atlantic Ocean off of Jones <span class="hlt">Beach</span>...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-04-21</p> <p>...provide for the safety of navigation and protection of the...running east along the shoreline of Jones <span class="hlt">Beach</span> State...Harbors, Marine safety, Navigation (water), Reporting...PART 165--REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED ACCESS...running east along the shoreline of Jones <span class="hlt">Beach</span>...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1995EnGeo..25..143D"><span id="translatedtitle">Geologic impact of Hurricane Andrew on Everglades coast of southwest <span class="hlt">Florida</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Davis, R. A.</p> <p>1995-04-01</p> <p>Hurricane Andrew, one of the strongest storms of the century, crossed the southern part of the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> peninsula on 24 August 1992. Its path crossed the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Everglades and exited in the national park across a mangrove-dominated coast onto the shallow, low-energy, inner shelf. The storm caused extensive breakage and defoliation in the mangrove community; full recovery will take decades. It produced no extensive sedimentation unit; only local and ephemeral ebb-surge deposits. The discontinuous shelly storm <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridge was breached at multiple locations, and it moved landward a few meters. After seven months, there was little geologic indication that the storm had passed. It is likely that the stratigraphic record in this area will not contain any recognizable features of the passage of Hurricane Andrew.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-STC&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20014824"><span id="translatedtitle">Ecological risk assessment: Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Vernon, K.J.; Kuo, J.</p> <p>1999-07-01</p> <p>Ecological risk assessment offers a means of quantifying the probability and degree of hazard posed toward the well-being of ecological resources by a myriad of physical, chemical and biological agents generated from human activity. In this paper, the authors discuss the results of a screening-level ecological risk assessment conducted in a unique coastal setting-the Seal <span class="hlt">beach</span> National Wildlife Refuge, which is located within the US Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California. Evaluation of activities formerly conducted by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration indicated the presence of various organic and inorganic chemical contaminants in subsurface soil and groundwater resources located beneath the weapons station, as well as potential pathways for introduction of those contaminants to the ecological resources of the wildlife refuge. Completion of the screening-level assessment identified inorganic contaminants-antimony, arsenic, beryllium, and manganese-as the primary risk drivers, leading to a recommendation for definitive characterization of the extent of chemical degradation of the subsurface environs and concurrent performance of a full-scale ecological risk assessment. It is the author's understanding that both of the recommended studies were initiated and were nearing completion at the time of the submittal of this paper.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001CSR....21..563L"><span id="translatedtitle">Hydrodynamic variability on megatidal <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, Normandy, France</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Levoy, Franck; Monfort, Olivier; Larsonneur, Claude</p> <p>2001-04-01</p> <p>Several experiments aimed at characterising the hydrodynamics of megatidal <span class="hlt">beaches</span> outside the surf zone were carried out between 1990 and 1994 on the Cotentin coast of the Cherbourg Peninsula in Normandy. The database was established from the records of several electromagnetic current meters and pressure sensors and from field surveys. The mean spring tidal range on these <span class="hlt">beaches</span> varies between 9.3 and 11.4 m. The results show the prevalence of strong longshore currents, with velocities up to 0.5 m s -1, on the low- and mid-tidal <span class="hlt">beach</span> zones. Mostly oriented northward, these currents reflect both a progressive tidal wave and a strong longshore gradient in water level between the Channel Islands embayment and the English Channel. While varying largely during a typical tidal cycle, these longshore velocities are maximum at high tide, reflecting the progressive nature of the tides. This high-tide maximum velocity increases by a factor of 1.5 between the mean tide and mean spring tide, and between the mid- and low-tidal zones due to bed friction effects. Cross-shore velocities are generally weak (<0.1 m s -1), but sometimes stronger in smaller water depths. In the low-tidal zone, they are commonly oriented onshore at the beginning of the rising tide and offshore during the falling tide. This circulation results from a west-east cross-shore gradient in water level that is particularly important around the mean water level. Towards high tides, weak offshore steady flows were observed in the presence of waves. Site-specific relationships were defined in order to characterise the modulation of significant wave height by sea level fluctuations both on the shoreface and in the intertidal zone. The water depth variability during the tidal cycle induces fluctuations in the dissipation by bottom friction, resulting in wave height changes. The influence of tidal currents on the wave height proved to be very small in this context. The tidal fluctuations also influence the instantaneous near-bed currents induced by simultaneous action of non-breaking waves and the tides. During stormy conditions, wave-induced gravity orbital motions dominate the steady flows in the mid-tidal zone, outside the surf zone. At this location, the shallow water friction effect results in weak steady longshore currents, and low water depths explain strong orbital motions. The opposite conditions prevail in the low-tidal zone, where the steady tidal currents are stronger than gravity orbital velocities during a few hours around high tide. Outside this period, with the decrease in water depth and in steady current intensity due to friction effects, the tidal and gravity wave-induced currents have comparable intensities. In both the low- and mid-tidal zones, infragravity motions are weak outside the surf zone. The foregoing results show that outside the surf zone, these megatidal <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are characterised by wave-dominated mid-tidal zones and tide-dominated low-tidal zones during spring tides. We suggest the term "mixed wave-tide-dominated" for these <span class="hlt">beaches</span> with very large tidal ranges.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://www.fau.edu/mediarelations/pdf/heraldtrib_wallace_campaigns.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">FLORIDA</span> IS KEY TO CAMPAIGNS</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Belogay, Eugene A.</p> <p></p> <p>is its voter mix. <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s hodgepodge of establishment Republicans, Tea Party conservatives conferences in Orlando. That has the major Republican candidates setting a course for the Sunshine State and Republican political consultant. What <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s Republican primary has that many states can't replicate</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/57942791"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s Prepaid College Tuition Program</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Joseph F. Gauff Jr</p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>A continuing goal for the State of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> is to allow parents, grandparents, other relatives, and organizations to purchase tuition in advance, appliable toward any public university of community college in the State of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, and to guarantee a child's college tuition when they are ready for college. The program also provides for prepaid dormitory expense as an adiitional option</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=TEKTRAN&redirectUrl=http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=199710"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> actions toward HLB control</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The <span class="hlt">Florida</span> citrus industry has suffered major disease setbacks in 2005-2006. The fall 2005 discovery of huanglongbing (HLB) in <span class="hlt">Florida</span> was just a few months before the decision to halt the citrus canker eradication program because of the predicted massive spread of citrus canker over much of south...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://entomology.ifas.ufl.edu/stocks/white_website/presentations/Whitefly.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Invasive Whitefly Pests of <span class="hlt">Florida</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Watson, Craig A.</p> <p></p> <p>Invasive Whitefly Pests of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> #12;· General Whitefly Introduction · Other Problems Whiteflies · Managing Whiteflies Outline #12;· 1500 species worldwide, at least 60 have been reported from in Madeira, Comoros, Mauritius, Reunion, Taiwan, Hawaii, Portugal · Found in <span class="hlt">Florida</span> in 2011 · Not much</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://spo.nmfs.noaa.gov/Circulars/CIRC239.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">REPORT OF THE BUREAU OF COMMERCIAL FISHERIES BIOLOGICAL STATION, ST. PETERSBURG <span class="hlt">BEACH</span>, <span class="hlt">FLORIDA</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Primary productivity 15 Red-tide program. · · · . . . · . 17 Plankton ecology proj ect · 17 Offshore. · · . · · · · · · · . . 18 1963 red-tide outbreak. . . · · · · . . · · · . · 19 Occurrence and distribution of zooplankton chemistry, faunal production, hy- drology, plankton, bottom communities, water circulation dynamics, reefs</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://cirp.usace.army.mil/Downloads/PDF/Brutsche_Thesis_Fort%20Myers%20Beach.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">First Year Sedimentological Characteristics and Morphological Evolution of an Artificial Berm at Fort Myers <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, <span class="hlt">Florida</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>US Army Corps of Engineers</p> <p></p> <p>First Year Sedimentological Characteristics and Morphological Evolution of an Artificial Berm Methods and Data Analysis 29 Results and Discussion 34 Sedimentological Characteristics of the Artificial Project Area 45 Control Area Northwest of Berm 47 Discussion of Sedimentological Characteristics 49</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://spo.nwr.noaa.gov/mfr634/mfr6342.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Fishery Management and Local Communities: The Case of Madeira <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, <span class="hlt">Florida</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>to the literature which includes social and anthropologi cal relationships. Literature Review This section provides a brief review of the literature in sociology and anthropol o, or on directly related fisheries dependent services and industries (for example, boatyards, ice suppliers, tackle</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://nfrec.ifas.ufl.edu/fl_bull_test/FLBT_Pictures_4_2013.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Bull Test ID 1140 2013 <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bull Test</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Jawitz, James W.</p> <p></p> <p>Bull Test ID 1140 2013 <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1141 2013 <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1142 2013 <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1143 2013 <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1144 2013 <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1145 2013 <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1146 2013 <span class="hlt">Florida</span></p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://nfrec.ifas.ufl.edu/fl_bull_test/FLBT_Pictures_1_2013.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Bull Test ID 1077 2013 <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bull Test</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Jawitz, James W.</p> <p></p> <p>14th Annual <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1077 2013 <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1078 2013 <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1079 2013 <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1080 2013 <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1081 2013 <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1082 2013 <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bull Test #12</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://nfrec.ifas.ufl.edu/fl_bull_test/FLBT_Pictures_5_2013.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Bull Test ID 1160 2013 <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bull Test</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Jawitz, James W.</p> <p></p> <p>Bull Test ID 1160 2013 <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1161 2013 <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1162 2013 <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1163 2013 <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1164 2013 <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1165 2013 <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1166 2013 <span class="hlt">Florida</span></p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://nfrec.ifas.ufl.edu/fl_bull_test/FLBT_Pictures_3_2013.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Bull Test ID 1118 2013 <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bull Test</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Jawitz, James W.</p> <p></p> <p>Bull Test ID 1118 2013 <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1119 2013 <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1120 2013 <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1121 2013 <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1122 2013 <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1123 2013 <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1124 2013 <span class="hlt">Florida</span></p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://nfrec.ifas.ufl.edu/fl_bull_test/FLBT_Pictures_6_2013.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Bull Test ID 1181 2013 <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bull Test</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Jawitz, James W.</p> <p></p> <p>Bull Test ID 1181 2013 <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1182 2013 <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1183 2013 <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1184 2013 <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1185 2013 <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1186 2013 <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1187 2013 <span class="hlt">Florida</span></p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://nfrec.ifas.ufl.edu/fl_bull_test/FLBT_Pictures_2_2013.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Bull Test ID 1098 2013 <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bull Test</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Jawitz, James W.</p> <p></p> <p>Bull Test ID 1098 2013 <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1099 2013 <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1100 2013 <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1101 2013 <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1102 2013 <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1103 2013 <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1104 2013 <span class="hlt">Florida</span></p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-STC&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5872891"><span id="translatedtitle">Coastline development and change in Alabama and the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Panhandle</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Lamb, G.M.</p> <p>1987-09-01</p> <p>Although evidence of sea level rise has caused concern about erosion of the coasts, some coastal areas are accreting. As an investigator approaches a study of any particular stretch of coast, it soon becomes apparent that one problem in determining what is happening, or what has happened to a <span class="hlt">beach</span>, is the problem of deciding upon a time frame. There are daily, seasonal, and much longer term changes that must be dealt with and understood. On the Alabama coast, there is evidence of both deposition and erosion over relatively long time periods, as well as evidence of cyclical changes. Maps over a 150-year period show steady growth of Perdido Key from <span class="hlt">Florida</span> into Alabama. Aerial photographs over a 50-year period show an eroded portion of Dauphin Island being built up by deposition, and then eroding again. A prime factor that is pertinent, but seldom considered, is the slower movement associated with tectonics or isostatic adjustment. Previous studies cite evidence of modern up-arching of parts of the Gulf coastal plain accompanying the well-documented subsidence of the Mississippi delta area. First-order leveling reports indicated that many of the coastline areas that are the scenes of most extensive erosion are areas in which the land is subsiding. Other areas, which are neutral or possibly rising slightly, are relatively free from erosional problems. This latter point is particularly important in understanding the Gulf Coast of Alabama and the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Panhandle.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/56091791"><span id="translatedtitle">High Resolution Measurements of <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Face Morphology Using Stereo Video Cameras</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>L. Clarke; R. Holman</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>High resolution measurements of <span class="hlt">beach</span> elevation are computed using images from a pair of video cameras viewing the same scene from different angles. Given the camera positions and camera calibration data, the <span class="hlt">beach</span> face can be accurately reconstructed from 3-D coordinates computed at positions corresponding to every image pixel. Measurements of subaerial <span class="hlt">beach</span> morphology at Duck <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, North Carolina and</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li class="active"><span>16</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_16 --> <div id="page_17" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="321"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://www.sccoos.org/docs/beachdraft.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Managing <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Amenities to Reduce Exposure to Coastal Hazards: Storm Water Pollution</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Linwood Pendleton</p> <p>2001-01-01</p> <p>Despite posted warnings and educational campaigns warning about the health risks associated with storm water pollution, swimmers continue to swim in coastal areas polluted by storm water run-off. This study uses a simple spatial model of <span class="hlt">beach</span> visitation to show how <span class="hlt">beach</span> amenities and storm drains influence the way in which <span class="hlt">beach</span> goers choose to locate themselves at <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/59095387"><span id="translatedtitle">The distribution and abundance of marine debris on isolated <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of northern New South Wales, Australia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Kathryn H Taffs; Murray C Cullen</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Beach</span> debris items were collected and categorized during surveys of five isolated <span class="hlt">beaches</span> on the northern New South Wales coastline in September 2003. The selected <span class="hlt">beaches</span> covered more than 21 km of contiguous coastline. Litter density and distribution per 500 m segment was calculated. The highest density of litter was found on the most isolated <span class="hlt">beaches</span> with little public access</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/26639912"><span id="translatedtitle">Visual diagnosis of solid waste contamination of a tourist <span class="hlt">beach</span>: Pernambuco, Brazil</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Maria Christina Barbosa de Araújo; Monica Ferreira da Costa</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>The solid waste accumulation patterns on Tamandaré <span class="hlt">beach</span>, Pernambuco State (Brazil), was assessed from February 2001 to July 2002. This <span class="hlt">beach</span> is easily accessible, frequently used, and there is a public cleaning service. The <span class="hlt">beach</span> is under the influence of three small coastal drainage basins. The study visually divided the <span class="hlt">beach</span> into 15 segments according to the level of solid</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/42561081"><span id="translatedtitle">An assessment of <span class="hlt">Beach</span> access and management issues on Galveston Island</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Valerie J. Gunter; Robert B. Ditton; Steven G. Olson</p> <p>1987-01-01</p> <p>In Texas the public's right of ingress and egress to the sandy Gulf?front <span class="hlt">beaches</span> is guaranteed by the Texas Open <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> Act passed in 1959 by the state legislature. During the early years of the Texas Open <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> Act, most of the problems centered around questions of the legality of public <span class="hlt">beach</span> access. Over the years, however, increases in coastal</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://www.biolbull.org/cgi/reprint/173/2/289.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">ORIENTATION OF THE HORSESHOE CRAB, LIMULUS POLYPHEMUS, ON A SANDY <span class="hlt">BEACH</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>MARK L. BOTTON; ROBERT E. LOVELAND</p> <p></p> <p>Adult horseshoe crabs (Limulus polyphemus) spawn on sandy intertidal <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and then return toward the water. Field experiments demonstrated that <span class="hlt">beach</span> slope was more significant than vision in this orientation behavior. Both blinded and nor mally sighted crabs showed rapid seaward orientation on <span class="hlt">beaches</span> with a seaward slope of approximately 6°. Orientation performance was poor on a flat <span class="hlt">beach</span>, al</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://faculty.ifas.ufl.edu/assembly/unit_bylaws_FMEL.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Bylaws of the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Medical Entomology Laboratory</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Jawitz, James W.</p> <p></p> <p>1 Bylaws of the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Medical Entomology Laboratory University of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> As Approved: March 16, 2009 Preamble The shared goals of the faculty and administration of the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Medical Entomology These Bylaws establish the general principles by which the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Medical Entomology Laboratory shall</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/57793452"><span id="translatedtitle">Genetic Relationships among Populations of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bass</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Brandon L. Barthel; Dijar J. Lutz-Carrillo; Kristen E. Norberg; Wesley F. Porak; Michael D. Tringali; Todd W. Kassler; William E. Johnson; Anne M. Readel; Richard A. Krause; David P. Philipp</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Florida</span> bass Micropterus floridanus are endemic to peninsular <span class="hlt">Florida</span> and co-occur with largemouth bass M. salmoides in a natural intergrade zone in the northern portions of the state. In this study, we resolved the genetic population structure among populations of largemouth bass, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> bass, and their interspecific hybrids from 48 lakes and streams across <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, and we updated and refined</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://www.fau.edu/sg/pdf/Student%20Government%20Constitution%2011%2025%2013.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Atlantic University Student Government Constitution</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Fernandez, Eduardo</p> <p></p> <p><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Atlantic University Student Government Constitution Preamble We the students of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> the principles of the Constitution and laws of the United States and of the State of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Atlantic University Student Government. Article I. Establishment</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://manatee.ifas.ufl.edu/lawn_and_garden/ffl/pdfs/BOCC%208-16-11.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span>-Friendly LandscapingTM Program</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Jawitz, James W.</p> <p></p> <p>by The Manasota Basin Board of the Southwest <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Water Management District #12;<span class="hlt">Florida</span>-Friendly Landscaping of wildlife, responsible management of yard pests, recycling yard waste, reduction of stormwater runoff · University of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> · Water Management Districts #12;<span class="hlt">Florida</span>-Friendly Landscape Guidance Models</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://www.nova.edu/cwis/oceanography/flcoos/hifi_flcoos_executivesummary.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">A HIFI AND <span class="hlt">FLORIDA</span> COOS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>and the British Virgin Islands. Passing over the central <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, it moved briefly over the Gulf of Mexico12.02.2006 1 A HIFI AND <span class="hlt">FLORIDA</span> COOS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY A GULF OF MEXICO AND OCS ENERGY DISCUSSION) AND THE <span class="hlt">FLORIDA</span> COASTAL OCEAN OBSERVING SYSTEMS (<span class="hlt">FLORIDA</span> COOS) AS AN IOOS INITIATIVE · The Gulf of Mexico Energy</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3020223"><span id="translatedtitle">Do Tropical Cyclones Shape Shorebird Habitat Patterns? Biogeoclimatology of Snowy Plovers in <span class="hlt">Florida</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Convertino, Matteo; Elsner, James B.; Muñoz-Carpena, Rafael; Kiker, Gregory A.; Martinez, Christopher J.; Fischer, Richard A.; Linkov, Igor</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Background The Gulf coastal ecosystems in <span class="hlt">Florida</span> are foci of the highest species richness of imperiled shoreline dependent birds in the USA. However environmental processes that affect their macroecological patterns, like occupancy and abundance, are not well unraveled. In <span class="hlt">Florida</span> the Snowy Plover (Charadrius alexandrinus nivosus) is resident along northern and western white sandy estuarine/ocean <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and is considered a state-threatened species. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we show that favorable nesting areas along the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Gulf coastline are located in regions impacted relatively more frequently by tropical cyclones. The odds of Snowy Plover nesting in these areas during the spring following a tropical cyclone impact are seven times higher compared to the odds during the spring following a season without a cyclone. The only intensity of a tropical cyclone does not appear to be a significant factor affecting breeding populations. Conclusions/Significance Nevertheless a future climate scenario featuring fewer, but more extreme cyclones could result in a decrease in the breeding Snowy Plover population and its breeding range. This is because the spatio-temporal frequency of cyclone events was found to significantly affect nest abundance. Due to the similar geographic range and habitat suitability, and no decrease in nest abundance of other shorebirds in <span class="hlt">Florida</span> after the cyclone season, our results suggest a common bioclimatic feedback between shorebird abundance and tropical cyclones in breeding areas which are affected by cyclones. PMID:21264268</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=USGSPUBS&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70122899"><span id="translatedtitle">Acropora corals in <span class="hlt">Florida</span>: status, trends, conservation, and prospects for recovery</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Miller, Margaret W.; Jaap, Walt C.; Chiappone, Mark; Vargas-Angel, Bernardo; Keller, Brian; Aronson, Richard B.; Shinn, Eugene A.</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>Despite representing the northern extent of Acropora spp. in the Caribbean, most of the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> reef line from Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> through the Keys was built by these species. Climatic factors appear to have bee important agents of Acropora loss within historic (century) time frames. In the recent past (1980-present), available quantitative evidence suggests dramatic declines occurred in A. cervicornis first (late 70's to 84) with collapse of A. palmata occuring later (1981-86). However, recent monitoring studies (1996-2001) show continued decline of remnant populations of A. palmata. Current trends in A. cervicornis in the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Keys are hard to assess given its exceedingly low abundance, except in Broward County, FL where recently discovered A. cervicornis thickets are thriving. While the State of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> recognizes A. palmata and A. cervicornis as endangered species (Deyrup and Franz 1994), this designation carries no management implications. The current management plan of the FKNMS provides many strategies for coral conservation, among them minimizing the threat of vessel groundings and anchor damage, and prohibitions on collection, touching, and damage from fishery and recreational users. Although Acropopra spp. are not explicitly given any special consideration, they are implicitly by Santuary management. Restoration approaches undertaken in the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Keys include rescue of fragments damaged by groudings and experimental work to culture broadcast-spawned larvae to re-seed natural substrates. Neither of these efforts have yet realized full success.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23103149"><span id="translatedtitle">Nourishment practices on Australian sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span>: a review.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Cooke, Belinda C; Jones, Alan R; Goodwin, Ian D; Bishop, Melanie J</p> <p>2012-12-30</p> <p>It is predicted that the coastal zone will be among the environments worst affected by projected climate change. Projected losses in <span class="hlt">beach</span> area will negatively impact on coastal infrastructure and continued recreational use of <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> nourishment practices such as artificial nourishment, replenishment and scraping are increasingly used to combat <span class="hlt">beach</span> erosion but the extent and scale of projects is poorly documented in large areas of the world. Through a survey of <span class="hlt">beach</span> managers of Local Government Areas and a comprehensive search of peer reviewed and grey literature, we assessed the extent of nourishment practices in Australia. The study identified 130 <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Australia that were subject to nourishment practices between 2001 and 2011. Compared to projects elsewhere, most Australian projects were small in scale but frequent. Exceptions were nine bypass projects which utilised large volumes of sediment. Most artificial nourishment, replenishment and <span class="hlt">beach</span> scraping occurred in highly urbanised areas and were most frequently initiated in spring during periods favourable to accretion and outside of the summer season of peak <span class="hlt">beach</span> use. Projects were generally a response to extreme weather events, and utilised sand from the same coastal compartment as the site of erosion. Management was planned on a regional scale by Local Government Authorities, with little monitoring of efficacy or biological impact. As rising sea levels and growing coastal populations continue to put pressure on <span class="hlt">beaches</span> a more integrated approach to management is required, that documents the extent of projects in a central repository, and mandates physical and biological monitoring to help ensure the engineering is sustainable and effective at meeting goals. PMID:23103149</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=USGSPUBS&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70148290"><span id="translatedtitle">Synthesis study of an erosion hot spot, Ocean <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Barnard, Patrick L.; Hansen, Jeff E.; Erikson, Li H.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>A synthesis of multiple coastal morphodynamic research efforts is presented to identify the processes responsible for persistent erosion along a 1-km segment of 7-km-long Ocean <span class="hlt">Beach</span> in San Francisco, California. The <span class="hlt">beach</span> is situated adjacent to a major tidal inlet and in the shadow of the ebb-tidal delta at the mouth of San Francisco Bay. Ocean <span class="hlt">Beach</span> is exposed to a high-energy wave climate and significant alongshore variability in forcing introduced by varying nearshore bathymetry, tidal forcing, and <span class="hlt">beach</span> morphology (e.g., <span class="hlt">beach</span> variably backed by seawall, dunes, and bluffs). In addition, significant regional anthropogenic factors have influenced sediment supply and tidal current strength. A variety of techniques were employed to investigate the erosion at Ocean <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, including historical shoreline and bathymetric analysis, monthly <span class="hlt">beach</span> topographic surveys, nearshore and regional bathymetric surveys, <span class="hlt">beach</span> and nearshore grain size analysis, two surf-zone hydrodynamic experiments, four sets of nearshore wave and current experiments, and several numerical modeling approaches. Here, we synthesize the results of 7 years of data collection to lay out the causes of persistent erosion, demonstrating the effectiveness of integrating an array of data sets covering a huge range of spatial scales. The key findings are as follows: anthropogenic influences have reduced sediment supply from San Francisco Bay, leading to pervasive contraction (i.e., both volume and area loss) of the ebb-tidal delta, which in turn reduced the regional grain size and modified wave focusing patterns along Ocean <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, altering nearshore circulation and sediment transport patterns. In addition, scour associated with an exposed sewage outfall pipe causes a local depression in wave heights, significantly modifying nearshore circulation patterns that have been shown through modeling to be key drivers of persistent erosion in that area.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-STC&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5321439"><span id="translatedtitle">Biomass production in <span class="hlt">Florida</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Smith, W.H.; Dowd, M.L.</p> <p>1981-08-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Florida</span> posseses climatic, land, and water resources favorable for abundant biomass production. Therefore, a statewide program has been initiated to determine adapted species for the available array of production sites. Plant resources under investigation include woody, aquatic, grasses, hydrocarbon, and root crop species. The goal is to produce a continuous stream of biomass for the various biofuel conversion options. Preliminary yields from energy cropping experiments range from about 10 to nearly 90 metric tons per hectare per year, depending on the crop and the production systems employed. (Refs. 15).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010JGRF..115.2017D"><span id="translatedtitle">Rhomboid <span class="hlt">beach</span> pattern: A laboratory investigation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Devauchelle, O.; Malverti, L.; Lajeunesse, É.; Josserand, C.; LagréE, P.-Y.; MéTivier, F.</p> <p>2010-06-01</p> <p>The formation of <span class="hlt">beach</span> rhomboid pattern by swash is investigated experimentally. This centimeter-scale structure is classically interpreted as the mark of stationary gravity waves generated by obstacles in supercritical flows. However, thanks to the use of water-based fluids of various viscosity, our experiments show that a rhomboid pattern can develop in subcritical flows. Its angle is primarily a function of the Froude number, as suggested by Woodford (1935), but our data do not support his classical model, nor do they support any of the existing theories. The slowness of the rhombus motion indicates that it is not simply the mark of a hydraulic phenomenon but rather results from the coupling between the water flow and sediment transport.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=FEDREG&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-07-22/pdf/2013-17568.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">78 FR 43881 - <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Petroleum Reprocessors Site, Davie, Broward County, <span class="hlt">Florida</span>; Notice of Settlement</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-07-22</p> <p>...CERCLA-04-2013-3758] <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Petroleum Reprocessors Site, Davie, Broward County...Tech, Inc. concerning the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Petroleum Reprocessors Site located in Davie...Submit your comments by Site name <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Petroleum Reprocesssors Site by one of the...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2825648"><span id="translatedtitle">Effects of Rainfall on E. coli Concentrations at Door County, Wisconsin <span class="hlt">Beaches</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Kleinheinz, Gregory T.; McDermott, Colleen M.; Hughes, Sarah; Brown, Amanda</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Rainfall and its associated storm water runoff have been associated with transport of many pollutants into <span class="hlt">beach</span> water. Fecal material, from a variety of animals (humans, pets, livestock, and wildlife), can wash into <span class="hlt">beach</span> water following rainfall and result in microbial contamination of the <span class="hlt">beach</span>. Many locales around the world issue pre-emptive <span class="hlt">beach</span> closures associated with rainfall. This study looked at eight <span class="hlt">beaches</span> located in Door County, Wisconsin, on Lake Michigan to determine the impact of rainfall on E. coli concentrations in <span class="hlt">beach</span> water. Water samples were collected from <span class="hlt">beach</span> water and storm water discharge pipes during rainfall events of 5?mm in the previous 24 hours. Six of the eight <span class="hlt">beaches</span> showed a significant association between rainfall and elevated <span class="hlt">beach</span> water E. coli concentrations. The duration of the impact of rainfall on <span class="hlt">beach</span> water E. coli concentrations was variable (immediate to 12 hours). Amount of rainfall in the days previous to the sampling did not have significant impact on the E. coli concentrations measured in <span class="hlt">beach</span> water. Presence of storm water conveyance pipes adjacent to the <span class="hlt">beach</span> did not have a uniform impact on <span class="hlt">beach</span> water E. coli concentrations. This study suggests that each <span class="hlt">beach</span> needs to be examined on its own with regard to rain impacts on E coli concentrations in <span class="hlt">beach</span> water. PMID:20182543</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASA-TRS&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=STS043-605-068&hterms=popcorn&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dpopcorn"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Everglades and Keys, USA</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>1991-01-01</p> <p>Though much of southern <span class="hlt">Florida</span> is covered by clouds, the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Everglades and Keys (25.0N, 82.0W) remain relatively clear in this nearly vertical view. The view covers the Gulf of Mexico port city of Ft. Myers, and Lake Okeechobee, at the top of the scene, in the north, The Everglades, in the center and the entire <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Key Chain at the bottom. Even with the many popcorn clouds, ground detail and the city of Miami is easily discerned.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=FEDREG&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-12-30/pdf/2010-32926.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">75 FR 82382 - <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> Environmental Assessment and Coastal Health Act</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-12-30</p> <p>...coastal recreation waters, including the Great Lakes. EPA encourages coastal and Great Lakes states and tribes that have received <span class="hlt">BEACH</span>...defined in CWA section 502(21) to mean the Great Lakes and marine coastal waters (including...</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_17 --> <div id="page_18" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="341"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-HHH&redirectUrl=http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/ca0546.photos.014809p/"><span id="translatedtitle">24. Photocopy of photograph (from Division of <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> and Parks, ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>24. Photocopy of photograph (from Division of <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> and Parks, State of California, Department of Natural Resources) Photographer unknown, Date unknown MAP OF SUTTER'S FORT - Sutter's Fort, L & Twenty-Seventh Streets, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NIH-MEDLINEPLUS&redirectUrl=http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_153647.html"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> Sand, Not Water, More Likely to Make You Sick</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePLUS</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... led by Tao Yan of the University of Hawaii at Manoa. Public health experts have long known ... To find out why that's the case, the Hawaii scientists created laboratory simulations of <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and seawater ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://www.fosbirds.org/ffn/pdfs/ffnv22n2p39-47depkin.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">NEST SITES OF <span class="hlt">FLORIDA</span> SANDHILL CRANES IN SOUTHWESTERN <span class="hlt">FLORIDA</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>F. CHRIS DEPKIN; LAURA A. BRANDTIAND; FRANK J. MAZZOTTI</p> <p></p> <p>We located twenty-eight nest sites of the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Sandhill Crane in southwestern <span class="hlt">Florida</span> during the 1991 breeding season. Similar to other studies, all sites were classified as palustrine emergent wetlands. Average wetland area and average maximum depth were 5.96 ha and 0.61 m, respectively. Vegetation assessments at seven of the sites yielded 82 plant species. Panicum hemitomon, Sagittaria lancifolia, Ponted-</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://www.griffith.edu.au/conference/ics2007/pdf/ICS013.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Online <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Profile Management and Analysis System (PMAS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>M. S. Harris; T. P. Tinker; E. E. Wright</p> <p></p> <p>HARRIS, M.S., TINKER, T.P., and WRIGHT, E.E. 2007. Online <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Profile Management and Analysis System (PMAS). Journal of Coastal Research, SI 50 (Proceedings of the 9th International Coastal Symposium), 62 - 66. Gold Coast, Australia, ISSN 0749.0208 Long-term <span class="hlt">beach</span> profile datasets provide coastal communities with information critical to understanding temporal and spatial variability in coastal systems. Given the economic growth</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=USGSPUBS&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/fs20133070"><span id="translatedtitle">Coastal processes influencing water quality at Great Lakes <span class="hlt">beaches</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>U.S. Geological Survey</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>In a series of studies along the Great Lakes, U.S. Geological Survey scientists are examining the physical processes that influence concentrations of fecal indicator bacteria and related pathogens at recreational <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. These studies aim to estimate human health risk, improve management strategies, and understand the fate and transport of microbes in the nearshore area. It was determined that embayed <span class="hlt">beaches</span> act as traps, accumulating Escherichia coli (E. coli) and other bacteria in the basin and even in <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand. Further, shear stress and wave run-up could resuspend accumulated bacteria, leading to water-contamination events. These findings are being used to target <span class="hlt">beach</span> design and circulation projects. In previous research, it was determined that E. coli followed a diurnal pattern, with concentrations decreasing throughout the day, largely owing to solar inactivation, but rebounding overnight. Studies at a Chicago <span class="hlt">beach</span> identified the impact of wave-induced mass transport on this phenomenon, a finding that will extend our understanding of bacterial fate in the natural environment. In another series of studies, scientists examined the impact of river outfalls on bacteria concentrations, using mechanistic and empirical modeling. Through these studies, the models can indicate range and extent of impact, given E. coli concentration in the source water. These findings have been extended to extended lengths of coastlines and have been applied in <span class="hlt">beach</span> management using empirical predictive modeling. Together, these studies are helping scientists identify and eliminate threats to human and coastal health.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18256899"><span id="translatedtitle">Marine debris contamination along undeveloped tropical <span class="hlt">beaches</span> from northeast Brazil.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Santos, Isaac R; Friedrich, Ana Cláudia; Ivar do Sul, Juliana Assunção</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>We hypothesize that floating debris leaving polluted coastal bays accumulate on nearby pristine <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. We examined composition, quantities and distribution of marine debris along approximately 150 km of relatively undeveloped, tropical <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Costa do Dendê (Bahia, Brazil). The study site is located south of Salvador City, the largest urban settlement from NE Brazil. Strong spatial variations were observed. Plastics accounted for 76% of the sampled items, followed by styrofoam (14%). Small plastic fragments resultant from the breakdown of larger items are ubiquitous all over the area. Because the dominant littoral drift in Bahia is southward, average <span class="hlt">beach</span> debris densities (9.1 items/m) along Costa do Dendê were threefold higher than densities previously observed north of Salvador City. River-dominated and stable <span class="hlt">beaches</span> had higher debris quantities than unstable, erosional <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Areas immediately south of the major regional embayments (Camamu and Todos os Santos) were the preferential accumulation sites, indicating that rivers draining populous areas are the major source of debris to the study site. Our results provide baseline information for future assessments. Management actions should focus on input prevention at the hydrographic basin level rather than on cleaning services on <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. PMID:18256899</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-STC&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5164396"><span id="translatedtitle">Health assessment for Times <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Site, Times <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, St. Louis County, Missouri, Region 7. CERCLIS No. MOD980685226. Final report</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Not Available</p> <p>1988-02-19</p> <p>The Times <span class="hlt">Beach</span> National Priorities List site is situated on the banks of the Meramec River in St. Louis County, about 30 miles southwest of St. Louis, Missouri. The roads within the City of Times <span class="hlt">Beach</span> have been contaminated with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). After the 1982 flood, the City of Times <span class="hlt">Beach</span> was evacuated and access has been restricted to only authorized personnel. Potential exposure pathways that could result from the site include ingestion of contaminated soil and fish or game animals that have bioconcentrated TCDD, dermal absorption upon contact with tainted soil, and inhalation of TCDD-entrained fugitive dusts. Flooding of Times <span class="hlt">Beach</span> in 1982, 1983, and 1985 may have resulted in the migration of some TCDD off-site into the Meramec River. The levels of TCDD at the site are of concern and warrant continued site-access control, prevention of sediment runoff, and eventual removal of the TCDD.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=TEKTRAN&redirectUrl=http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=310890"><span id="translatedtitle">Barcoding exotic whitefly in <span class="hlt">Florida</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>A portion of a mitochondrial gene has been sequenced for three recent invasive whitefly pests in <span class="hlt">Florida</span>: Fig whitefly, Bondar’s whitefly and rugose spiraling whitefly. Diagnostic tests based on these sequences remain to be developed. ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://www.sg.ufl.edu/Portals/0/Documents/Common/Resources/Pdf/SG%20Org%20Chart%20with%20Reapportionment%20Numbers.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">University of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Student Government</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Roy, Subrata</p> <p></p> <p>University of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Student Government Senate (Legislative Branch) Senate President and Senate President Pro- Tempore Student Senators Fall Senators (50) Beaty Broward Family Housing Graham Hume Jennings SGP STAAR Supervisor of Elections Executive Directors Chomp the Vote Nightlife Navigators Student</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=ERIC&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=CPR&pg=6&id=EJ235411"><span id="translatedtitle">Teaching CPR to <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s Students.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Varnes, Jill W.; Crone, Ernest G.</p> <p>1980-01-01</p> <p>A program in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) instruction for <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s school children is described. Program guidelines and support services are detailed for other schools wishing to implement such a program. (JN)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://registrar.fsu.edu/bulletin/undergrad/pdf/2013_gen_bulletin.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">FLORIDA</span> STATE UNIVERSITY GENERAL BULLETIN</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Weston, Ken</p> <p></p> <p>Sexual Harassment Policy................................9 <span class="hlt">Florida</span> State University Statement for Students ................................15 Policy for the Use of Photographs and Videos in University Publications ...........................................16 Sexual Harassment Policy..............................16 Research Facilities and Special Programs</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-STC&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5776836"><span id="translatedtitle">Naturally cooled <span class="hlt">Florida</span> house</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Not Available</p> <p>1981-07-01</p> <p>A 1750 ft/sup 2/ home in northern <span class="hlt">Florida</span> is described, constructed at a cost of $35/ft/sup 2/ (comparable to conventional homes), yet incorporating a number of passive solar and active systems. The well-planned design (emphasizing cooling rather than heating) is explained and illustrated in some detail. Notable features described include: (1) earth burning; (2) south facing greenhouse-solarium; (3) hatch-equipped attic wells which admit light and let the heat out; (4) roof overhangs above skylights; (5) solar screening over the greenhouse windows; (6) insulated drapes; (7) thermal insulation at R-28; (8) use of post-tensioned concrete (floor slab and walls); and (9) 2'' styrofoam skirting extending eight feet into the bermed earth. Use of engineering known-how to cut costs is discussed. (MJJ)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NSDL&redirectUrl=http://www.floridastateparks.org/default.cfm"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> State Parks</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The modern <span class="hlt">Florida</span> State Parks system was created in 1935, and their programs include parks all the way from the St. Augustine area to the Keys. Their homepage brings together cultural, historical, and scientific materials related to the various sites in the state system. The website includes information on each park, along with interactive features on African American sites in the state and notable battlegrounds. Along the top of the page, visitors can use sections such as "Find a Park" and "Stay the Night" to plan their journey through the state. Each park entry also contains information about the site's history, along with detailed information about ranger programs, special music events, and so on. Finally, visitors can stay in touch via Twitter and other social media.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/57957599"><span id="translatedtitle">Inhalant Use in <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Youth</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Lorena M. Siqueira; Lee A. Crandall</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>Purpose: To determine (1) the prevalence of use, (2) risk and protective factors for use of inhalants in <span class="hlt">Florida</span> youth.Methods: The <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Youth Substance Abuse Survey 2004 is a comprehensive assessment of youth substance abuse attitudes and practices obtained by sampling youth from sixty-five counties.Results: The sample consisted of 60,345 students from 6th to 12th grade; ages 10 to 19</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8769654"><span id="translatedtitle">Human Rabies--<span class="hlt">Florida</span>, 1996.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p></p> <p>1996-08-23</p> <p>On February 8, 1996, a 26-year-old man died in a hospital in Naples, <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, following progressive neurologic deterioration. Rabies had been clinically suspected on the day he was admitted (December 30, 1995) and was confirmed by CDC on January 10, 1996. This report summarizes the investigation of this case by The <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services, Collier County Public Health Unit, which indicted a dog in Mexico as the probable source of exposure. PMID:8769654</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://www.fau.edu/admissions/pdf/freshmanbrochure.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Atlantic How Will You</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Fernandez, Eduardo</p> <p></p> <p>, baseball, basketball and hockey. We have the convenience of being within 30 miles of two airports -- Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> International Airport to the north and the Fort Lauderdale/Hollywood International Airport to promote safe, healthy and sustainable communities by taking part in immersive internships with various</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009pcms.confE.129O"><span id="translatedtitle">The responses of artificial embayed <span class="hlt">beaches</span> to storm events</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ojeda, E.; Guillén, J.; Ribas, F.</p> <p>2009-09-01</p> <p>The plan-view and the profile shape of sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> largely depend on the incoming wave-energy (Wright and Short, 1984). In this sense, storm events are responsible for major changes in the configuration of sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and the cumulative effect of storms and fair-weather conditions determines the morphodynamic state of a certain <span class="hlt">beach</span>. With increasing wave energy, the <span class="hlt">beach</span> will change from the Reflective state to the Low Tide Terrace, Transverse Bar and Rip, Rhythmic Bar and <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Longshore Bar and Trough and finally to the Dissipative <span class="hlt">beach</span> state. These morphodynamic states are also observed at artificial embayed <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, although artificial groins limit alongshore sediment transport and protect sections of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> from waves approaching from a range of directions (Short and Masselink, 1999). This contribution focuses on the morphological changes of the shoreline and the submerged sandbars of artificial embayed (sandy) <span class="hlt">beaches</span> due to the effect of high-wave conditions associated to storms. We characterize the morphological response of the emerged and submerged <span class="hlt">beach</span> profile of two of the artificial embayed <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of the Barcelona city coast (NW Mediterranean). The two embayed <span class="hlt">beaches</span> under study are single-barred <span class="hlt">beaches</span> subject to the same climatic conditions but with different morphological characteristics. The study comprises more than 4 years of data, from November 2001 to March 2006, obtained through an Argus video system (Holman and Stanley, 2007). The extraction of the shoreline and barline locations is accomplished using 10-minute time-exposure video images. Shorelines were extracted directly from oblique images (see Ojeda and Guillén, [2008] for a complete description) and rectified afterwards. Sandbars were inferred from the rectified time-exposure video images based on the preferential wave breaking over shallow areas, so they required a minimum significant wave height (Hs) which allowed the occurrence of a clear wave-breaking pattern. The barline extraction was accomplished through an automated alongshore tracking of the intensity maxima across each <span class="hlt">beach</span> section (Van Enckevort and Ruessink, 2001). The mean Hs during the study period was 0.71 m and the averaged peak period was 5.7 s. The wave height time series shows a cyclic behaviour, with storm periods (October-April) separated by periods of low storm activity (May-October). The two most energetic periods affecting the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> were from October 2001 to May 2002 and from October 2003 to April 2004 (wave data were obtained from a WANA node [virtual buoy] and direct measurements of the Barcelona-Coastal buoy). Approximately 25 storm events have been identified during the study period (following Ojeda and Guillén [2008], significant storms were defined as those with Hs higher than 2.5 m during the peak of the storm and a minimum duration of 12 h with Hs greater than 1.5 m). The morphological responses of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> to the storm action determine the morphodynamic state. These responses were grouped into five categories: shoreline advance or retreat, <span class="hlt">beach</span> rotation, sandbar migration, formation of megacusps, and changes in the sandbar configuration (linear or crescentic shape). The intensity and frequency of these modifications were different in both <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Regarding the changes in the morphodynamic state of the <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, the bar at Bogatell switched more frequently among the four intermediate morphodynamic states during the study period than the bar at La Barceloneta. The bar at La Barceloneta only underwent the complete "reset" of the nearshore morphology (i.e., abrupt change of the plan-view shape of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> towards a Longshore Bar and Trough state) once, associated with the high-energy wave event occurring on November 2001. At this <span class="hlt">beach</span>, the strongest storm events produced the offshore migration of the bar and a certain decrease in the bar sinuosity, but did not generate an alongshore parallel bar. Similar storms caused different effects on the two adjacent <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and, furthermore, the effect of storms of similar characteristics at t</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=CFR2014&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2014-title33-vol1-sec110-215.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 110.215 - Anaheim Bay Harbor, California; U.S. Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California; Naval...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-07-01</p> <p>...California; U.S. Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California; Naval Explosives Anchorage...California; U.S. Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California; Naval Explosives Anchorage...Commanding Officer, Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>,...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=CFR2013&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2013-title33-vol1-sec110-215.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 110.215 - Anaheim Bay Harbor, California; U.S. Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California; Naval...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-07-01</p> <p>...California; U.S. Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California; Naval Explosives Anchorage...California; U.S. Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California; Naval Explosives Anchorage...Commanding Officer, Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>,...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=CFR2012&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2012-title33-vol1-sec110-215.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 110.215 - Anaheim Bay Harbor, California; U.S. Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California; Naval...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-07-01</p> <p>...California; U.S. Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California; Naval Explosives Anchorage...California; U.S. Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California; Naval Explosives Anchorage...Commanding Officer, Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>,...</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_18 --> <div id="page_19" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="361"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=FEDREG&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-01-20/pdf/2012-1069.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">77 FR 2966 - Rock River <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Inc.; Notice of Application Tendered for Filing With the Commission and...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-01-20</p> <p>...Regulatory Commission [Project No. 14345-000] Rock River <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Inc.; Notice of Application...Filing Date: January 5, 2012. d. Applicant: Rock River <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Inc. e. Name of Project: Rock River <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Hydroelectric Project. f....</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=FEDREG&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-08-07/pdf/2013-18994.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">78 FR 48155 - Rock River <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Inc.; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing With the Commission; Intent To...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-08-07</p> <p>...Regulatory Commission [Project No. 14345-001] Rock River <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Inc.; Notice of Application...filed: November 23, 2012. d. Applicant: Rock River <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Inc. e. Name of Project: Rock River <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Hydroelectric Project f....</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=FEDREG&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-12-11/pdf/2012-29802.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">77 FR 73636 - Rock River <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Inc.; Notice of Application Tendered for Filing With the Commission and...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-12-11</p> <p>...Regulatory Commission [Project No. 14345-001] Rock River <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Inc.; Notice of Application...filed: November 23, 2012. d. Applicant: Rock River <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Inc. e. Name of Project: Rock River <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Hydroelectric Project. f....</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009QSRv...28.3428B"><span id="translatedtitle">Late Pleistocene raised <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of coastal Estremadura, central Portugal</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Benedetti, Michael M.; Haws, Jonathan A.; Funk, Caroline L.; Daniels, J. Michael; Hesp, Patrick A.; Bicho, Nuno F.; Minckley, Thomas A.; Ellwood, Brooks B.; Forman, Steven L.</p> <p>2009-12-01</p> <p>We present new stratigraphic, sedimentological, and chronological data for a suite of tectonically raised <span class="hlt">beaches</span> dating to Marine Isotope Stages 5, 4, and 3 along the Estremadura coast of west-central Portugal. The <span class="hlt">beach</span> deposits are found in association with ancient tidal channels and coastal dunes, pollen bearing mud and peat, and Middle Paleolithic archaeological sites that confirm occupation of the coastal zone by Neanderthal populations. The significance of these deposits is discussed in terms of the archaeological record, the tectonic and geomorphic evolution of the coast, and correlation with reconstructions of global climate and eustatic sea-level change. Direct correlation between the Estremadura <span class="hlt">beach</span> sections is complicated by the tectonic complexity of the area and the age of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> deposits (which are near or beyond the limit of radiocarbon dating). Evidence from multiple sites dated by AMS radiocarbon and optical luminescence methods suggests broad synchroneity in relative sea-level changes along this coast during Marine Isotope Stage 3. Two <span class="hlt">beach</span> complexes with luminescence and radiocarbon age control date to about 35 ka and 42 ka, recording a rise in relative sea level around the time of Heinrich Event 4 at 39 ka. Depending on assumptions about eustatic sea level at the time they were deposited, we estimate that these <span class="hlt">beaches</span> have been uplifted at rates of 0.4-4.3 mm yr -1 by the combined effects of tectonic, halokinetic, and isostatic processes. Uplift rates of 1-2 mm yr -1 are likely if the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> represent sea level stands at roughly 40 m below modern, as suggested by recent eustatic sea level reconstructions. Evidence from coastal bluffs and the interior of the study area indicates extensive colluvial, fluvial, and aeolian sedimentation beginning around 31 ka and continuing into the Holocene. These geomorphic adjustments are related to concomitant changes in climate and sea level, providing context that improves our understanding of Late Pleistocene landscape change and human occupation on the western Iberian margin.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://mgg.rsmas.miami.edu/faculty/pswart/water.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Swart and Price Salinity Variations in <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bay Origin of Salinity Variations in <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bay</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Swart, Peter K.</p> <p></p> <p>Swart and Price Salinity Variations in <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bay 1 Origin of Salinity Variations in <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bay causes reductions in salinity in the coastal environment of South <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. This technique, which uses the major source of fresh waters causing depressions in the salinity in the western portion of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bay</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003ECSS...58...83D"><span id="translatedtitle">Low faunal diversity on Maltese sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span>: fact or artefact?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Deidun, Alan; Azzopardi, Marthese; Saliba, Stephen; Schembri, Patrick J.</p> <p>2003-10-01</p> <p>Eight sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> on Malta and two on Gozo were sampled for macrofauna to test the hypothesis that Maltese <span class="hlt">beaches</span> have an intrinsically low diversity. Stations distributed in the supralittoral (dry zone), mediolittoral (wet zone) and upper infralittoral (submerged zone to 1 m water depth) were sampled by sieving core samples and standardised searching during daytime, and pitfall trapping and standardised sweeping of the water column using a hand-net at night, as appropriate. Physical parameters of the sediment were measured and human occupancy of the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> was estimated. From the supralittoral and mediolittoral, 39 species represented by 1584 individuals were collected by the combined techniques of pitfall trapping, sieving and standard searching. For Ramla <span class="hlt">beach</span>, which had the highest diversity, 267 individuals representing 25 infaunal species were collected by sieving from a combined volume of 1.175 m 3 of sand, and 149 individuals representing 28 epifaunal species were collected by standardised searching from a combined area of 700 m 2 of sand during two winter and two summer sampling sessions between 1992 and 1993. For nine other <span class="hlt">beaches</span> sampled during the summer of 2000, only six macrofaunal species were collected from core samples, with overall population densities ranging from 4.13 to 45.45 individuals m -2. Only 92 individuals belonging to 12 species were collected by hand-net from the uppermost infralittoral of five <span class="hlt">beaches</span> sampled using this method during the summer of 2000. Taxa of gastropods, bivalves, decapods, mysids and staphylinid beetles generally abundant on Mediterranean sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, were entirely absent from the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> sampled. Few correlations that could explain the impoverishment of Maltese sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> were found between physical parameters and faunal abundances, and other factors such as inadequate sampling effort, human disturbance and marine pollution were also excluded; however, seasonally biased sampling may partly explain the results obtained. One factor that may explain why certain species are missing could be lack of recruitment, due to Malta's geographical isolation from the European and African mainlands.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009ECSS...85..573R"><span id="translatedtitle">Behavioural adaptations in talitrids from two Atlantic <span class="hlt">beaches</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Rossano, Claudia; Gambineri, Simone; Fanini, Lucia; Durier, Virginie; Rivault, Colette; Scapini, Felicita</p> <p>2009-12-01</p> <p>The aim of the present study was to test sun orientation and rhythmic activity of two sandhopper populations from two Atlantic macro-tidal <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. A population from Le Verger <span class="hlt">beach</span> (orientated to 346°, Ille et Vilaine, Brittany, France) and a population from Damgan (orientated to 195°, Morbihan, Brittany, France), were tested on the <span class="hlt">beach</span> under clear sky discriminating for landscape vision. For both populations locomotor activity rhythm was recorded in the laboratory. The two <span class="hlt">beaches</span> differed for climatic features, tidal range and for human use. Both talitrid populations resulted very well orientated toward the shoreline, and both used solar position and landscape vision to orient. However the multiple regression analysis of orientation with climatic features showed a different use of local cues by the two populations and a slight influence of tidal regime (ebbing and rising tide), in spite of the supralittoral zonation of sandhoppers. In the laboratory they showed a well defined rhythmic behaviour as well as a bimodal rhythmicity, explained as a tidal one. These results are a new brick in the complex picture of orientation and rhythm studies on sandy <span class="hlt">beach</span> invertebrates.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFMNH21A1396G"><span id="translatedtitle">Natural Reworking of Tsunami Evidence in Chandipur <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, India</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ghosh, T.; Mukhopadhyay, A.</p> <p>2010-12-01</p> <p>In a particular tide- or wave- dominated environment the flow energy is best understood by the size of the sand grains deposited at the respective bar or <span class="hlt">beach</span> or the depositional platform. Though the flow energy is generally fluctuating in this kind of dynamic environment, the overall set up can represent a particular domain of energy regime. A particular range of grain size is supposed to be deposited laterally and vertically as well. A specific trend of variation in grain size is also expected and can be estimated from both the hydrodynamic and aerodynamic interplay or in combination. Hence, whenever any stratum with an extra ordinary grain size is observed, that usually stimulates to think about some sudden and extraordinary energy regime, indicate a catastrophic event. In the year 2005, on Chandipur <span class="hlt">beach</span> (Orissa, India) such a stratum found with an unusual grain size, which was much coarser than the usual grains¬ extended along the <span class="hlt">beach</span> and outer flank of the main bar, exhibited many unusual features in its morphology and mineralogy indicated a possible deposit due to the great Indian Ocean tsunami of 2004. In the contrary, the same deposit is exhibiting the definite reworking due to the normal <span class="hlt">beach</span> process in 2008. It’s a definite signature of gap of information in a dynamic environment and a challenge for the palaeo-tsunami researchers. Key words: Tsunami deposit; <span class="hlt">Beach</span> dynamics; Natural reworking</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/42818835"><span id="translatedtitle">Water quality from unfertilized <span class="hlt">Florida</span> rangeland</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>J. Jeffrey Mullahey; John Capece; Frank Martin</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>Ground water wells from unfertilized <span class="hlt">Florida</span> rangelands were sampled to monitor water quality parameters. Ground water was collected (1990–92) monthly from three range sites (south <span class="hlt">Florida</span> flatwoods, slough, and freshwater pond) at the Southwest <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Research and Education Center near lmmokalee, <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. Water samples were analyzed for pH, electrical conductivity, total phosphorus (P), potassium (K), and ammonium?nitrogen (NH4?N); and water</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1992EOSTr..73..385B"><span id="translatedtitle">Andrew spares <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Coast</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bush, Susan</p> <p></p> <p>When geologists heard of the intensity of Hurricane Andrew, which struck the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> coast on August 25 and then moved on to southern Louisiana, they were expecting the same kinds of coastal damage that Hurricane Hugo brought to the Caribbean and Carolina shores in 1989. Both storms were category 4 hurricanes, having winds of 131-155 mph and surges of 13-18 feet. However, the coastal damage never materialized, leaving geologists to analyze the factors that lessened the impact of the storm. “For minimum coastal damage, you couldn't have designed a better storm,” said Orrin Pilkey, director of the Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines (PSDS) in Durham, N.C. This was due in part to the nature of the storm itself and where it hit land, and in part to the regional geology, said Rob Thieler of PSDS. Despite the huge amounts of damage to buildings, there was virtually no evidence of coastal process destruction, he said.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://entnemdept.ufl.edu/honeybee/PDF's%202011/Melitto%20JAN2011.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Establishing the Superiority of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Honey</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Jawitz, James W.</p> <p></p> <p><span class="hlt">Florida</span> melitto files Establishing the Superiority of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Honey JAN - MAR 2011 Dr. Liwei Gu. Historically, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> honeys have faced competition from low-cost, imported honey on grocery store shelves honey gets passed by. But honey is not just a food commodity. It has many other beneficial qualities</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://www.mpg.de/7023425/S003_Perspectives_008-010.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">PERSPECTIVES Max Planck Institute in <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Opened</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>PERSPECTIVES Max Planck Institute in <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Opened The Max Planck <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Institute for Neuroscience (MPFI) was inaugurated in an opening ceremony on December 6, 2012. This is the first Max Planck of Education and Research, and former Governor of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Jeb Bush. Max Planck Society President Peter Gruss</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=ERIC&redirectUrl=http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED215698.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Dissemination Capacity Building Grant. Final Report.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Kuhn, G. Michael</p> <p></p> <p>This report describes the goals, objectives, activities, and accomplishments of the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Capacity Building Project, which was undertaken to improve the information dissemination capabilities of the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> educational community and which resulted in the establishment of the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Resources in Education Exchange (FREE). A detailed statement of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://www.sg.ufl.edu/Portals/0/Documents/Judicial/Pdf/Constitution/Constitution.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">University of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Student Body Constitution</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Roy, Subrata</p> <p></p> <p>University of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Student Body Constitution Submitted by: David M. Kerner, Chairman 2009-2010 Constitution Revision Commission On Behalf of the Full Commission Adopted by the University of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Student Body on February 24th , 2010 CONSTITUTION OF THE STUDENT BODY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF <span class="hlt">FLORIDA</span> #12;We</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://hr.fsu.edu/content/NEOnline/trans/updated/FSUPDtrans.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> State University Online New Employee Orientation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Weston, Ken</p> <p></p> <p>;<span class="hlt">Florida</span> State University Police Department Finance and Administration 5/1/2010 12 Register Your Personal Department #12;<span class="hlt">Florida</span> State University Police Department Finance and Administration 5/1/2010 2 · Fully #12;<span class="hlt">Florida</span> State University Police Department Finance and Administration 5/1/2010 3 Overview · FSUPD</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/33757"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span>1 functionally antagonizes Rab11 during development and in regulating synaptic morphology</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Khodosh, Rita</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">BEACH</span> proteins comprise an evolutionarily conserved family characterized by the presence of a <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> (Beige and Chediak-Higashi) domain of unknown function. They have been shown to play a role in a number of important ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://oaktrust.library.tamu.edu//handle/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2003-THESIS-C78"><span id="translatedtitle">Experimental study to determine basic performance characteristics of recycled glass as <span class="hlt">beach</span> nourishment material </span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Cruz Castro, Oscar</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>Since significant amounts of recycled glass may be used as a substitute of materials for <span class="hlt">beach</span> nourishment in urban <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, laboratory experiments were proposed to understand the performance characteristics of glass versus natural sand. A first...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://oaktrust.library.tamu.edu//handle/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-1931"><span id="translatedtitle">Unusual sedimentation of a Galveston Bay wetland at Pine Gully, Seabrook, Texas: implications for <span class="hlt">beach</span> renourishment </span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Culver, Wesley Richard</p> <p>2009-06-02</p> <p>into Pine Gully by displacement waves from ships moving through the Houston Ship Channel. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> renourishment at Wright <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, located a half mile north of Pine Gully, occurred as Pine Gully experienced sedimentation. Construction of a breakwater...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011ECSS...92...78H"><span id="translatedtitle">Mapping <span class="hlt">beach</span> morphodynamics remotely: A novel application tested on South African sandy shores</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Harris, Linda; Nel, Ronel; Schoeman, David</p> <p>2011-03-01</p> <p>Sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> have been identified as threatened ecosystems but despite the need to conserve them, they have been generally overlooked. Systematic conservation planning (SCP) has emerged as an efficient method of selecting areas for conservation priority. However, SCP analyses require digital shapefiles of habitat and species diversity. Mapping these attributes for <span class="hlt">beaches</span> from field data can take years and requires exhaustive resources. This study thus sought to derive a methodology to classify and map <span class="hlt">beach</span> morphodynamic types from satellite imagery. Since <span class="hlt">beach</span> morphodynamics is a strong predictor of macrofauna diversity, they could be considered a good surrogate for mapping <span class="hlt">beach</span> biodiversity. A dataset was generated for 45 microtidal <span class="hlt">beaches</span> (of known morphodynamic type) by measuring or coding for several physical characteristics from imagery acquired from Google Earth. Conditional inference trees revealed <span class="hlt">beach</span> width to be the only factor that significantly predicted <span class="hlt">beach</span> morphodynamic type, giving four categories: dissipative, dissipative-intermediate, intermediate and reflective. The derived model was tested by using it to predict the morphodynamic type of 28 other <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of known classification. Model performance was good (75% prediction accuracy) but misclassifications occurred at the three breaks between the four categories. For <span class="hlt">beaches</span> around these breaks, consideration of surf zone characteristics in addition to <span class="hlt">beach</span> width ameliorated the misclassifications. The final methodology yielded a 93% prediction accuracy of <span class="hlt">beach</span> morphodynamic type. Overlaying other considerations on this classification scheme could provide additional value to the layer, such that it also describes species' spatial patterns. These could include: biogeographic regions, estuarine versus sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and short versus long <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. The classification scheme was applied to the South African shoreline as a case study. The distribution of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> morphodynamic types was partly influenced by geography. Most of the long, dissipative <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are found along the west coast of the country, the south coast <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are mostly dissipative-intermediate, and the east coast <span class="hlt">beaches</span> range from short, estuarine pocket and embayed <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in the former Transkei (south east), to longer intermediate and reflective <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in KwaZulu-Natal (in the north east). Once combined with the three biogeographic regions, and distinguishing between estuarine and sandy shores, the South African coast comprised 24 different <span class="hlt">beach</span> types. Representing shorelines in this form opens up potential for numerous spatial analyses that can not only further our understanding of sandy <span class="hlt">beach</span> ecology at large spatial scales but also aid in deriving conservation strategies for this threatened ecosystem.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/49481703"><span id="translatedtitle">Being beside the seaside: <span class="hlt">Beach</span> use and preferences among coastal residents of south-eastern Australia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Grainne S. Maguire; Kelly K. Miller; Michael A. Weston; Kirsten Young</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Beaches</span> are the most popular recreational destinations in Australia yet how they are visited and valued by Australians is poorly known. We surveyed 385 people (13.8% of 2800 coastal residents) from south-eastern Australia to examine their use of <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and the features that are important in their choice and enjoyment of a <span class="hlt">beach</span> destination. Most respondents (90.3%) nominated <span class="hlt">beaches</span> as</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_19 --> <div id="page_20" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="381"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://www.cccqld.org.au/docs/schlacher3.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Exposure of Fauna to Off-Road Vehicle (ORV) Traffic on Sandy <span class="hlt">Beaches</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Thomas A. Schlacher; Luke M. C. Thompson</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>Driving of off-road vehicles (ORVs) on sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> is common and widespread, but is not universally embraced due to putative environmental impacts on <span class="hlt">beach</span> biota. For ORVs to impact the <span class="hlt">beach</span> fauna, traffic areas must overlap with faunal habitat: a fundamental pre-requisite for impact assessments but as yet un-quantified for sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Thus, this study quantified the spatial and temporal</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25460060"><span id="translatedtitle">Response of intertidal sandy-<span class="hlt">beach</span> macrofauna to human trampling: An urban vs. natural <span class="hlt">beach</span> system approach.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Reyes-Martínez, Ma José; Ruíz-Delgado, Ma Carmen; Sánchez-Moyano, Juan Emilio; García-García, Francisco José</p> <p>2015-02-01</p> <p>Sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are subjected to intense stressors, which are mainly derived from the increasing pattern of <span class="hlt">beach</span> urbanization. These ecosystems are also a magnet for tourists, who prefer these locations as leisure and holiday destinations, and such activity further increases the factors that have an adverse effect on <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. In the study reported here the effect of human trampling on macrofauna assemblages that inhabit intertidal areas of sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> was assessed using a BACI design. For this purpose, three contrasting sectors of the same <span class="hlt">beach</span> were investigated: an urban area with a high level of visitors, a protected sector with a low density of users, and a transitional area with a high level of human occupancy. The physical variables were constant over time in each sector, whereas differences were found in the intensity of human use between sectors. Density variations and changes in the taxonomic structure of the macrofauna with time were shown by PERMANOVA analysis in the urban and transitional locations whereas the protected sector remained constant throughout the study period. The amphipod Bathyporeia pelagica appears sensitive to human trampling pressure and the use of this species as a bioindicator for these types of impact is recommended. PMID:25460060</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NSDL&redirectUrl=http://www.dos.state.fl.us/fpc/"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> State Archives Photographic Collection</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The <span class="hlt">Florida</span> State Archives Photographic Collection contains more than 790,000 photographs and nearly 2,000 movies and videos. In an on-going effort to make the collection more accessible to the public, the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> State Archives have digitized and uploaded approximately 40,000 images from their photographic collection, and plan to add more images soon. The vast collection of images is arranged into 23 different collections, chronicling the people and natural history of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> from the late nineteenth century to the present. Users may browse collections individually or search one or more collections by Title, Image Number, Year, Photographer, or Subject. Searches yield thumbnail images that may be enlarged to enhance viewing.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=USGSPUBS&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70034136"><span id="translatedtitle">Equilibrium shoreline response of a high wave energy <span class="hlt">beach</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Yates, M.L.; Guza, R.T.; O'Reilly, W. C.; Hansen, J.E.; Barnard, P.L.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Four years of <span class="hlt">beach</span> elevation surveys at Ocean <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, San Francisco, California, are used to extend an existing equilibrium shoreline change model, previously calibrated with fine sand and moderate energy waves, to medium sand and higher-energy waves. The shoreline, characterized as the cross-shore location of the mean high water contour, varied seasonally by between 30 and 60 m, depending on the alongshore location. The equilibrium shoreline change model relates the rate of horizontal shoreline displacement to the hourly wave energy E and the wave energy disequilibrium, the difference between E and the equilibrium wave energy that would cause no change in the present shoreline location. Values for the model shoreline response coefficients are tuned to fit the observations in 500 m alongshore segments and averaged over segments where the model has good skill and the estimated effects of neglected alongshore sediment transport are relatively small. Using these representative response coefficients for 0.3 mm sand from Ocean <span class="hlt">Beach</span> and driving the model with much lower-energy winter waves observed at San Onofre <span class="hlt">Beach</span> (also 0.3 mm sand) in southern California, qualitatively reproduces the small seasonal shoreline fluctuations at San Onofre. This consistency suggests that the shoreline model response coefficients depend on grain size and may be constant, and thus transportable, between sites with similar grain size and different wave climates. The calibrated model response coefficients predict that for equal fluctuations in wave energy, changes in shoreline location on a medium-grained (0.3 mm) <span class="hlt">beach</span> are much smaller than on a previously studied fine-grained (0.2 mm) <span class="hlt">beach</span>. Copyright ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://www2.sfasu.edu/msri/Theses/Miller.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">CONNECTIONS OF CARING: A STUDY OF SEATTLE AQUARIUM VOLUNTEER <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> NATURALISTS</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Coble, Theresa G.</p> <p></p> <p>CONNECTIONS OF CARING: A STUDY OF SEATTLE AQUARIUM VOLUNTEER <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> NATURALISTS By DAOUD NEIL MILLER: A STUDY OF SEATTLE AQUARIUM VOLUNTEER <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> NATURALISTS By DAOUD NEIL MILLER, Master of Arts in Counseling twelve long-term volunteer shoreline interpreters in the Seattle Aquarium <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Naturalist program</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=FEDREG&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-09-01/pdf/2011-22354.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">76 FR 54375 - Safety Zone; Thunder on the Gulf, Gulf of Mexico, Orange <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, AL</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-09-01</p> <p>...Thunder on the Gulf, Gulf of Mexico, Orange <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, AL AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS...the Gulf of Mexico for the waters off Orange <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Alabama. This action is necessary...race on the Gulf of Mexico, south of Orange <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Alabama to occur from...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/57961410"><span id="translatedtitle">A Comparison of Tourist Evaluation of <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> in Malta, Romania and Turkey</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>F. Brian Blakemore; Allan T. Williams; Claudia Coman; Anton Micallef; Ozlem Unal</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>The characteristics, perceptions, attitudes and behaviour of <span class="hlt">beach</span> users at three locations: St George's Bay, Malta, Mamaia, Romania and Olu Deniz, Turkey, were determined from questionnaire surveys. Respondents comprised locals, domestic and foreign tourists. Results for these parameters had substantial agreement both across the three <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and with previous studies. The amounts <span class="hlt">beach</span> users were willing to pay (WTP), via</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/4838250"><span id="translatedtitle">Seasonal changes in <span class="hlt">beach</span> morphology along the sheltered coastline of Perth, Western Australia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>G. Masselink; C. B. Pattiaratchi</p> <p>2001-01-01</p> <p>Seasonal change in <span class="hlt">beach</span> morphology is traditionally ascribed to a variation in the incident wave energy level with calm conditions in summer resulting in wide <span class="hlt">beaches</span> with pronounced subaerial berms and energetic conditions in winter causing narrow <span class="hlt">beaches</span> with nearshore bar morphology. The coastline of Perth, Western Australia, is characterised by a large seasonal variation in the incident wave height</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=FEDREG&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-08-23/pdf/2011-21424.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">76 FR 52596 - Proposed Establishment of Class C Airspace for Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, CA; Public Meetings</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-08-23</p> <p>...Establishment of Class C Airspace for Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, CA; Public Meetings AGENCY: Federal Aviation...establish Class C airspace at Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, CA. The purpose of these meetings is to provide...2640 N. Lakewood Blvd., Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, CA 90815, 562-597-4401. Comments:...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://www.geosci.usyd.edu.au/users/hughes/hughes_etal_2000.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Hydraulic Sorting of Heavy-Mineral Grains by Swash on a Medium-Sand <span class="hlt">Beach</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>MICHAEL G. HUGHES; JOCK B. KEENE; REBECCA G. JOSEPH</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>Hydraulic sorting of detrital mineral grains in the swash zone was investigated using data on sedimentology and flow dynamics obtained from Fishermans <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, on the east coast of Australia. The <span class="hlt">beach</span> is characteristically reflective, displaying a steep <span class="hlt">beach</span> face com- posed of medium sand and virtually no surf zone. Samples were taken from two beds enriched in heavy minerals, and</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=FEDREG&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-12-02/pdf/2013-28694.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">78 FR 72022 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, NC</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-12-02</p> <p>...Quintiles Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Full and Half Marathon. This deviation allows the bridge to...Quintiles Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Full and Half Marathon committee on behalf of the North Carolina...Quintiles Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Full and Half Marathon scheduled for Sunday, March 16,...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=FEDREG&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-02-02/pdf/2012-2285.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">77 FR 5184 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, NC</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-02-02</p> <p>...Quintiles Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Full and Half Marathon. This deviation allows the bridge to...Quintiles Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Full and Half Marathon committee on behalf of the North Carolina...Quintiles Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Full and Half Marathon scheduled for Sunday, March 18,...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=FEDREG&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-01-04/pdf/2012-31647.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">78 FR 669 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, NC</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-01-04</p> <p>...Quintiles Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Full and Half Marathon. This deviation allows the bridge to...Quintiles Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Full and Half Marathon committee on behalf of the North Carolina...Quintiles Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Full and Half Marathon scheduled for Sunday, March 17,...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NSDL&redirectUrl=http://www.priweb.org/ed/earthtrips/Edisto/edisto.html"><span id="translatedtitle">Field Trip to Edisto <span class="hlt">Beach</span> (title provided or enhanced by cataloger)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>This virtual field trip takes you to Edisto <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, a beautiful sand <span class="hlt">beach</span> about 30 miles south of Charleston, South Carolina. This particular <span class="hlt">beach</span> is a well known site for Pleistocene fossils. The field trip presnts information on beachcombing and demonstrates screening for fossils and shells through a series of pages that delve into the origin of the items found there.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/42561597"><span id="translatedtitle">An Alert System for <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Hazard Management in the Balearic Islands</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Amaya Alvarez-Ellacuria; Alejandro Orfila; Maitane Olabarrieta; Luís Gómez-pujol; Raúl Medina; Joaquín Tintoré</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>A real-time <span class="hlt">beach</span> hazard level associated with nearshore hydrodynamics is presented in this article. The suitability of the discussed alert system is illustrated via its application to fifteen <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in the Balearic Islands (Western Mediterranean Sea) providing nearshore safety conditions for <span class="hlt">beach</span> safety manager. The system provides daily forecasts of nearshore wave conditions using the deep water wave forecasts. The</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=FEDREG&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-05-01/pdf/2013-10212.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">78 FR 25383 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; West Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-05-01</p> <p>...Class E Airspace in the West Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL area, as new Standard...SIAPs) have been developed at Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> County Park Airport...operations within the West Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL airspace area. This...coordinates of the airport. DATES: Effective 0901 UTC,...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPA-EIMS&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=81156"><span id="translatedtitle">GREAT LAKES <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> CLOSURES: USING SATELLITE IMAGES TO IDENTIFY AREAS AT RISK</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Are people getting sick from swimming at Great Lakes <span class="hlt">beaches</span>? Some are. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, swimmers are experiencing an increase in bacterial borne illnesses from swimming at many popular Great Lakes <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. The <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in the Great Lak...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=FEDREG&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-11-02/pdf/2010-27590.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">75 FR 67214 - Special Local Regulations for Marine Events; Wrightsville Channel, Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, NC</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-11-02</p> <p>...of ``<span class="hlt">Beach</span> 2 Battleship Full and Half Iron Distance Triathlon,'' to be held on...the ``<span class="hlt">Beach</span> 2 Battleship Full and Half Iron Distance Triathlon'' on the waters of...the ``<span class="hlt">Beach</span> 2 Battleship Full and Half Iron Distance Triathlon'' under the...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=FEDREG&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-09-30/pdf/2011-25184.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">76 FR 60729 - Special Local Regulations for Marine Events, Wrightsville Channel; Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, NC</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-09-30</p> <p>...of ``<span class="hlt">Beach</span> 2 Battleship Full and Half Iron Distance Triathlon'', to be held on...YMCA ``<span class="hlt">Beach</span> 2 Battleship Full and Half Iron Distance Triathlon'', scheduled for...the ``<span class="hlt">Beach</span> 2 Battleship Full and Half Iron Distance Triathlon'' on the waters...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=FEDREG&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-09-15/pdf/2010-22931.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">75 FR 56024 - Special Local Regulations for Marine Events, Wrightsville Channel; Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, NC</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-09-15</p> <p>...of ``<span class="hlt">Beach</span> 2 Battleship Full and Half Iron Distance Triathlon'', to be held on...the ``<span class="hlt">Beach</span> 2 Battleship Full and Half Iron Distance Triathlon'' on the waters of...the ``<span class="hlt">Beach</span> 2 Battleship Full and Half Iron Distance Triathlon'' under the...</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_20 --> <div id="page_21" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="401"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NSDL&redirectUrl=http://specifyportal.flmnh.ufl.edu/herps/"><span id="translatedtitle">University of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Herpetology Database</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The University of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Herpetology Collection Master Database currently contains 137,936 records. The Database search engine offers fields for common and scientific name, as well as Country or Nation; State or Department; County or Province; and Collection Month and Year. Users can select up to 200 records per page, and request a Table or Report output style. Specimen loans are available to permanent staff members at institutions, but not to individuals. In addition to information about specimen loans from the Herpetology Collection at the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Museum of Natural History, the Collection site contains concise information about data requests, and specimen dissections.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASA-TRS&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=STS052-153-101&hterms=hurricane+andrew&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dhurricane%2Bandrew"><span id="translatedtitle">Central and Southern <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, USA</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>1992-01-01</p> <p>This oblique view documents conditions in South <span class="hlt">Florida</span> (27.0N, 81.0W) in the aftermath of Hurricane Andrew that severly mauled south <span class="hlt">Florida</span> on 24 Aug 92, battering Dade County with a 16.9 ft. storm surge and wind gusts of up to 169 mph. An additional feature is the band of haze running across the central portion of the state The band of air pollution has been drawn from the north by a weak cold front and was focused along the east/west axis of the front.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NSDL&redirectUrl=http://floridamemory.com/collections/churchrecords/"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Memory: WPA Church Records</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Churches and other religious institutions are the lifeblood of any community in terms of the services and support they provide to their members. This rather remarkable collection features the Works Progress Administration from the State Library of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s collections. During the 1930s and 1940s, each state created a list of known churches and synagogues to be surveyed and organized by county. Based on these lists, survey workers ventured out into the field to document church histories and record holdings by interviewing clergy and congregation members. All told, there are over 5,500 separate records contained here, chronicling everything from tiny Baptist churches to prominent south <span class="hlt">Florida</span> synagogues.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..1615494B"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> and dunal system monitoring at Su Giudeu <span class="hlt">beach</span>, Sardinia (Italy)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Balzano, Andrea; Sulis, Andrea</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>Even if coastal floods are quite rare events in Sardinia (Italy) at present, they have had dramatic consequences for coastal communities, particularly in conjunction with river flooding. However, flood risk (defined as the product of event probability, vulnerability and value of assets) is expected to increase significantly in the future, due to climate change, defence degradation and sea level rise. Sardinia island has a costal length of approximately 1.900 km including minor neighbouring islands (25% of the entire Italian coasts) and the estimation of the potential exposure of coastal communities to flooding is therefore a critical task. To date methods for achieving this have been based on modelling of coastal inundation using hydrodynamic or GIS-based models of varying complexity. The Dept of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Architecture at the University of Cagliari is carrying out a comprehensive activity of coastal flooding risk mapping at the regional scale within the framework of a scientific collaboration with the Sardinian Regional Authority for the Hydrographic District, that includes monitoring and scientific activities along the entire Sardinian coast. Bathymetry and topographical surveys, sediment characterization, waves and currents measurements, hydrodynamic and morphodynamic modelling are planned, focusing on critical extended areas. In this paper we present an overview of the entire activity programme and give an in-depth account of the ongoing monitoring survey of the dunal system of the Su Giudeu <span class="hlt">beach</span> (Southern Sardinia, 50 km far from the city of Cagliari). Su Giudeu is a sandy, bay-shaped <span class="hlt">beach</span>, extending for about 1200 m between two headlands, evolving under waves with a predominant direction of 220-240°N (Scirocco wind). The survey is expected to provide evidence of the response of the remarkable dunal system to wave runup occurring during storm events, to be used in the verification of existing numerical models of dune erosion.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=USGSPUBS&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70037186"><span id="translatedtitle">Geographic relatedness and predictability of Escherichia coli along a peninsular <span class="hlt">beach</span> complex of Lake Michigan</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Nevers, M.B.; Shively, D.A.; Kleinheinz, G.T.; McDermott, C.M.; Schuster, W.; Chomeau, V.; Whitman, R.L.</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>To determine more accurately the real-time concentration of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) in <span class="hlt">beach</span> water, predictive modeling has been applied in several locations around the Great Lakes to individual or small groups of similar <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Using 24 <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Door County, Wisconsin, we attempted to expand predictive models to multiple <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of complex geography. We examined the importance of geographic location and independent variables and the consequential limitations for potential <span class="hlt">beach</span> or <span class="hlt">beach</span> group models. An analysis of Escherichia coli populations over 4 yr revealed a geographic gradient to the <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, with mean E. coli concentrations decreasing with increasing distance from the city of Sturgeon Bay. <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> grouped strongly by water type (lake, bay, Sturgeon Bay) and proximity to one another, followed by presence of a storm or creek outfall or amount of shoreline enclosure. Predictive models developed for <span class="hlt">beach</span> groups commonly included wave height and cumulative 48-h rainfall but generally explained little E. coli variation (adj. R2 = 0.19-0.36). Generally low concentrations of E. coli at the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> influenced the effectiveness of model results presumably because of low signal-to-noise ratios and the rarity of elevated concentrations. Our results highlight the importance of the sensitivity of regressors and the need for careful methods evaluation. Despite the attractiveness of predictive models as an alternative <span class="hlt">beach</span> monitoring approach, it is likely that FIB fluctuations at some <span class="hlt">beaches</span> defy simple prediction approaches. Regional, multi-<span class="hlt">beach</span>, and individual <span class="hlt">beach</span> predictive models should be explored alongside other techniques for improving monitoring reliability at Great Lakes <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Copyright ?? 2009 by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19875791"><span id="translatedtitle">Geographic relatedness and predictability of Escherichia coli along a peninsular <span class="hlt">beach</span> complex of Lake Michigan.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Nevers, Meredith B; Shively, Dawn A; Kleinheinz, Gregory T; McDermott, Colleen M; Schuster, William; Chomeau, Vinni; Whitman, Richard L</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>To determine more accurately the real-time concentration of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) in <span class="hlt">beach</span> water, predictive modeling has been applied in several locations around the Great Lakes to individual or small groups of similar <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Using 24 <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Door County, Wisconsin, we attempted to expand predictive models to multiple <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of complex geography. We examined the importance of geographic location and independent variables and the consequential limitations for potential <span class="hlt">beach</span> or <span class="hlt">beach</span> group models. An analysis of Escherichia coli populations over 4 yr revealed a geographic gradient to the <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, with mean E. coli concentrations decreasing with increasing distance from the city of Sturgeon Bay. <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> grouped strongly by water type (lake, bay, Sturgeon Bay) and proximity to one another, followed by presence of a storm or creek outfall or amount of shoreline enclosure. Predictive models developed for <span class="hlt">beach</span> groups commonly included wave height and cumulative 48-h rainfall but generally explained little E. coli variation (adj. R2=0.19-0.36). Generally low concentrations of E. coli at the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> influenced the effectiveness of model results presumably because of low signal-to-noise ratios and the rarity of elevated concentrations. Our results highlight the importance of the sensitivity of regressors and the need for careful methods evaluation. Despite the attractiveness of predictive models as an alternative <span class="hlt">beach</span> monitoring approach, it is likely that FIB fluctuations at some <span class="hlt">beaches</span> defy simple prediction approaches. Regional, multi-<span class="hlt">beach</span>, and individual <span class="hlt">beach</span> predictive models should be explored alongside other techniques for improving monitoring reliability at Great Lakes <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. PMID:19875791</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://water.usgs.gov/wrri/AnnualReports/2010/FY2010_FL_Annual_Report.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Water Management District and <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Geologic Survey) to investigate arsenic mobilization during<span class="hlt">Florida</span> Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2010 <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2010 1 #12;Introduction The mission of the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Water</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=ERIC&redirectUrl=http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED378930.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Statewide Course Numbering System.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Office of Postsecondary Education Coordination.</p> <p></p> <p>In an effort to fulfill state policies on higher education articulation and student transfers, the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> state legislature encouraged establishment of a common Statewide Course Numbering System (SCNS) which is presented in this document. Early sections describe the establishment and development of the SCNS and logistics of its maintenance. Also…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=ERIC&redirectUrl=http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED359508.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Readability of Central <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Newspapers.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Olmstead, Phyllis M.</p> <p></p> <p>A study analyzed the readability of seven central <span class="hlt">Florida</span> newspapers (one of which is a college newspaper) and "USA Today.""Rightwriter," a grammar checker and readability computer program, was used to evaluate front page articles for each of the eight newspapers. The readability formulas invoked in the readability program included the…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=ERIC&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=florida+AND+laboratory+AND+certification&pg=2&id=ED358338"><span id="translatedtitle">Agritechnology. <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Vocational Program Guide.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Center for Instructional Development and Services.</p> <p></p> <p>This packet contains a program guide and Career Merit Achievement Plan (Career MAP) for the implementation of an agritechnology program in <span class="hlt">Florida</span> secondary and postsecondary schools. The program guide describes the program content and structure, provides a program description, lists job titles under the program, and includes a curriculum…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NSDL&redirectUrl=http://www.nps.gov/drto/"><span id="translatedtitle">Dry Tortugas National Park, <span class="hlt">Florida</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>This National Park Service (NPS) publication discusses Dry Tortugas National Park in <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. This system consists of 7 small islands off the coast of Key West. The site discusses the history of this area, as well as the marine setting of the park.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://regulations.ufl.edu/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/1008.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">REGULATIONS OF UNIVERSITY OF <span class="hlt">FLORIDA</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Pilyugin, Sergei S.</p> <p></p> <p>of the University community. (c) Interference with the freedom of movement of any member or guest of the University or use of fireworks, explosives, dangerous chemicals, ammunition, or weapons, on campus or in areas controlled by the University of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, without the written approval of the appropriate University authority</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://www.fau.edu/sg/pdf/Chapter_100_Administrative_and_General_071809__3_.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Atlantic University Student Government</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Fernandez, Eduardo</p> <p></p> <p>or sub-subsection. 100.400 No Student Government Statute shall conflict with the United States Constitution or laws, the State of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Constitution or laws, University Regulations or Policies. This codification shall also include the Student Government Constitution in its entirety. 100.200 The Student</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=ERIC&redirectUrl=http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED058953.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Parent Educator Program.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Garber, Malcolm</p> <p></p> <p>This paper describes the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Parent Educator Program as a component of Planned Variation Head Start. The program is currently being implemented in four communities embraces a philosophy of cognitive transactionalism, a philosophy molded by the work of Jean Piaget and others. This philosophy states that "the child is born with a set of sensory…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=ERIC&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=floriculture&id=ED359421"><span id="translatedtitle">Floriculture. <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Vocational Program Guide.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Center for Instructional Development and Services.</p> <p></p> <p>This program guide is intended for the implementation of a floriculture program in <span class="hlt">Florida</span> secondary and postsecondary schools. The program guide describes the program content and structure, provides a program description, describes jobs under the program, and includes a curriculum framework and student performance standards for floriculture…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NSDL&redirectUrl=http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/vis/a000000/a001200/a001234/index.html"><span id="translatedtitle">Zoom Down to Orlando, <span class="hlt">Florida</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p>Stuart Snodgrass</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>Viewing Earth from space, the Landsat 7 satellite takes images of the Earth, which allows us to look at land changes such as; urban growth, deforestation, and overall changes in the Earth itself. Here is a Landsat 7 image of Orlando, <span class="hlt">Florida</span></p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://regulations.ufl.edu/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/30376.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">REGULATIONS OF UNIVERSITY OF <span class="hlt">FLORIDA</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Pilyugin, Sergei S.</p> <p></p> <p>-resident tuition costs as set forth in Regulation 6C1-3.0375, for the audited course. (19) Off-campus educational to the University of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> shall pay a non-refundable application fee in the amount of $30.00. This fee is waived as determined by the College Board or the American College Testing Program. (3) Library overdue fines</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/j1u21n0074767569.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> erosion and geochemical factors: Influence on spawning success of horseshoe crabs ( Limulus polyphemus ) in Delaware Bay</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>M. L. Botton; R. E. Loveland; T. R. Jacobsen</p> <p>1988-01-01</p> <p>Horseshoe crab spawning activity is spatially patchy within the Delaware Estuary. This study investigated the importance of geochemical and erosional factors to the selection of breeding <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Two sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Cape May county, New Jersey, USA, were studied; one <span class="hlt">beach</span> had been subjected to considerable erosion, exposing underlying peat; the second <span class="hlt">beach</span>, less than 1 km away, had only</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://www.foundation.csulb.edu/departments/hr/job%20listings/2270.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">California State University Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Research Foundation Employment Opportunities</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Sorin, Eric J.</p> <p></p> <p>. Experience with MS software applications, database administration/management and the skills and ability experience with Microsoft with proficiency in Word, mail merge, and database experience with Filemaker Pro <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Research Foundation does not discriminate on the basis of sex in its employment as required</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://daf.csulb.edu/forms/financial/purchasing/sole_source_brand.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">CSU LONG <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> SOLE SOURCE / BRAND APPROVAL REQUISITION NUMBER: DATE</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Sorin, Eric J.</p> <p></p> <p>/services were evaluated, rejected and why? Provide brand name, model, vendor name and contact, date contacted and the specifications limit the bidding to one source and/or one brand or trade name, the ordering department mustCSU LONG <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> SOLE SOURCE / BRAND APPROVAL REQUISITION NUMBER: DATE: Please fill in the following</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_21 --> <div id="page_22" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="421"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://www.foundation.csulb.edu/forms/whistleblower_policy_form.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">California State University, Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Research Foundation Whistleblower Policy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Sorin, Eric J.</p> <p></p> <p>California State University, Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Research Foundation Whistleblower Policy Date Approved, the CSULBRF Chief Operating Officer may be consulted for guidance. The objectives of the CSULBRF Whistleblower Resources, shall reduce the concern to writing, using the Whistleblower Reporting Form. The Associate</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://www.agu.org/journals/jc/v085/iC06/JC085iC06p03264/JC085iC06p03264.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">The Statistical Prediction of <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Changes in Southern California</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>David G. Aubrey; Douglas L. Inman; Clinton D. Winant</p> <p>1980-01-01</p> <p>files and wave statistics from southern California constituted the data base for this two-faceted statistical study. First, daily <span class="hlt">beach</span> profile changes were predicted using four different spectral representations of the wave field. These profile changes were predictable using spectral representations of wave energy, radiation stress, energy flux, and wave steepness. Because of constraints on statistical reliability, a longer data set</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/n51794630t642m61.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Latitudinal biodiversity patterns of meiofauna from sandy littoral <span class="hlt">beaches</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Lech Kotwicki; Maria Szymelfenig; Marleen De Troch; Barbara Urban-Malinga; Jan Marcin W?s?awski</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>Meiofaunal samples from arctic (Bear Island, Franz Josef Land, Hopen, Kolguev), temperate (Baltic Sea, North Sea), subtropical (Tunisia, Greece), tropical (Emirates, Ghana) and antarctic sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> were collected at the medium water mark. The highest average meiofaunal density was found in the temperate zone (1300 individuals 10 cm–2) and the lowest in both polar regions: in arctic (79 individuals 10</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://microbecol.khu.ac.kr/PDF_paper/IJSEM2009_Pseudomonas_sabulinigri.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Pseudomonas sabulinigri sp. nov., isolated from black <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Bae, Jin-Woo</p> <p></p> <p>Pseudomonas sabulinigri sp. nov., isolated from black <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand Kyoung-Ho Kim,1 Seong Woon Roh,1 the name Pseudomonas sabulinigri sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is J64T (5KCTC 22137T 5JCM 14963T that strain J64T belongs to the genus Pseudomonas, forming a monophyletic group with Pseudomonas pachastrellae</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOVIMAGE-USGS&redirectUrl=http://gallery.usgs.gov/photos/01_27_2011_nr37LyxLKf_01_27_2011_4"><span id="translatedtitle">USGS Sampling Site at Henderson <span class="hlt">Beach</span> State Park</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://gallery.usgs.gov/">USGS Multimedia Gallery</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists collected environmental data and samples in coastal areas affected by the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.  Samples of water, sediments, benthic invertebrates, and microorganisms were collected by the USGS at <span class="hlt">beach</span>, barrier island,...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOVIMAGE-USGS&redirectUrl=http://gallery.usgs.gov/photos/01_27_2011_nr37LyxLKf_01_27_2011_3"><span id="translatedtitle">USGS Sediment Sampling at Henderson <span class="hlt">Beach</span> State Park</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://gallery.usgs.gov/">USGS Multimedia Gallery</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists collected environmental data and samples in coastal areas affected by the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.  Samples of water, sediments, benthic invertebrates, and microorganisms were collected by the USGS at <span class="hlt">beach</span>, barrier island,...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-HHH&redirectUrl=http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/ca0546.photos.014810p/"><span id="translatedtitle">25. Photocopy of photograph (from Division of <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> and Parks, ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>25. Photocopy of photograph (from Division of <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> and Parks, State of California, Department of Natural REsources) Photographer unknown, Date unknown SUTTER'S MAP OF FORT WITH SUPERIMPOSED OUTLINE OF FORT - Sutter's Fort, L & Twenty-Seventh Streets, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=USGSPUBS&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/gip154"><span id="translatedtitle">Seafloor off Natural Bridges State <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Santa Cruz, California</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Storlazzi, Curt D.; Golden, Nadine E.; Gibbons, Helen</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>The seafloor off Natural Bridges State <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Santa Cruz, California, is extremely varied, with sandy flats, boulder fields, faults, and complex bedrock ridges. These ridges support rich marine ecosystems; some of them form the "reefs" that produce world-class surf breaks. Colors indicate seafloor depth, from red-orange (about 2 meters or 7 feet) to magenta (25 meters or 82 feet).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://www.geol.sc.edu/gvoulgar/TechReports/CPSD_TechReport_04_01.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">South Carolina Coastal Erosion Study Myrtle <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Nearshore Experiment</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Voulgaris, George</p> <p></p> <p>South Carolina Coastal Erosion Study Myrtle <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Nearshore Experiment Dec. 10 to Dec. 15, 2003 Savannah Campus Savannah, Ga. Technical Report University of South Carolina CPSD Technical Report: CPSD/04 with the collection of offshore wave and current data as part of the U.S. Geological Survey South Carolina Coastal</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-HHH&redirectUrl=http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/hi0489.photos.195428p/"><span id="translatedtitle">20. 8" PIPELINE ON <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> AND ALONG PALI, VIEW WEST ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>20. 8" PIPELINE ON <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> AND ALONG PALI, VIEW WEST TOWARD KALAWAO. NOTE GATE VALVE (LARGER) AND BLOW-OFF VALVE (SMALLER). PIPELINE GENERALLY AT 20' ABOVE SEA LEVEL. - Kalaupapa Water Supply System, Waikolu Valley to Kalaupapa Settlement, Island of Molokai, Kalaupapa, Kalawao County, HI</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ECSS..157....1S"><span id="translatedtitle">Golden opportunities: A horizon scan to expand sandy <span class="hlt">beach</span> ecology</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Schlacher, Thomas A.; Weston, Michael A.; Schoeman, David S.; Olds, Andrew D.; Huijbers, Chantal M.; Connolly, Rod M.</p> <p>2015-05-01</p> <p>Robust ecological paradigms and theories should, ideally, hold across several ecosystems. Yet, limited testing of generalities has occurred in some habitats despite these habitats offering unique features to make them good model systems for experiments. We contend this is the case for the ocean-exposed sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> have several distinctive traits, including extreme malleability of habitats, strong environmental control of biota, intense cross-boundary exchanges, and food webs highly reliant on imported subsidies. Here we sketch broad topical themes and theoretical concepts of general ecology that are particularly well-suited for ecological studies on sandy shores. These span a broad range: the historical legacies and species traits that determine community assemblages; food-web architectures; novel ecosystems; landscape and spatial ecology and animal movements; invasive species dynamics; ecology of disturbances; ecological thresholds and ecosystem resilience; and habitat restoration and recovery. Collectively, these concepts have the potential to shape the outlook for <span class="hlt">beach</span> ecology and they should also encourage marine ecologists to embrace, via cross-disciplinary ecological research, exposed sandy <span class="hlt">beach</span> systems that link the oceans with the land.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://biology.usf.edu/ib/data/flyers/HARWOOD_BEACH_SAND_6_2014.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Microbes in <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands: integrating environment, ecology and public health</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Lajeunesse, Marc J.</p> <p></p> <p>bacteria (FIB) and waterborne pathogens, are deposited via waves, runoff, air, or animals. The fate runoff. The concept of <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand as a microbialhabitatandreservoirofFIBandpathogenshas begun. Przybyla-Kelly Great Lakes Science Center, United States Geological Survey, 1100 N. Mineral Springs Road</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-HHH&redirectUrl=http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/ca2388.photos.190949p/"><span id="translatedtitle">6. Collapsed Panama Mount on <span class="hlt">beach</span> as seen in photograph ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>6. Collapsed Panama Mount on <span class="hlt">beach</span> as seen in photograph no. 2. Exposed underside to extant Panama Mount and ammunition depot are seen at top of cliff left of center. Looking 342° NNW. - Fort Funston, Panama Mounts for 155mm Guns, Skyline Boulevard & Great Highway, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=ERIC&redirectUrl=http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED048882.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">A Development Plan for the Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> County Library System.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Little (Arthur D.), Inc., Cambridge, MA.</p> <p></p> <p>The Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> County Library System is evaluated for its program to date and for its existing public library resources in the County. Population trends are examined and a realistic program for the development of library services over a six-year period is recommended. The estimated costs for implementation of these recommendations are outlined in…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/42350069"><span id="translatedtitle">Orientation of Limulus polyphemus in the Vicinity of Breeding <span class="hlt">Beaches</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Anne Rudloe; William F. Herrnkind</p> <p>1976-01-01</p> <p>1) Horseshoe crabs, Limulus polyphemus, emerge in mating pairs on sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> to lay eggs then return offshore. Rapid offshore locomotion is exhibited during escape responses. A variety of potentially suitable orientational guideposts exist in the near?shore environment, including visual cues, bottom slope, wave surge and currents to direct such movements.2) A series of experiments was performed in which horseshoe</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFMOS23B1188R"><span id="translatedtitle">Preliminary Model Results of <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Profile Dynamics with Stratigraphy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Reniers, A. J.; Koktas, M.; Gallagher, E. L.; Wadman, H. M.; Brodie, K. L.; Johnson, B. D.; McNinch, J.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>The presence of spatial variation in grain size within the surf and swash zone is often ignored in numerical modeling whereas Upon closer inspection, a broad range of grain sizes is visible on a <span class="hlt">beach</span>. This could potentially lead to a significant mismatch between predictions and observations of profile evolution given the strong sensitivity of sediment transport formulae to the grain size. To explore this in more detail, numerical simulations with XBeach have been performed to simulate the observations of changes in <span class="hlt">beach</span> profile and stratigraphy within the swash zone at Duck, NC, under a range of wave and tidal conditions (see presentations by Wadman et al., and Gallagher et al. for complementary information on the observations at this conference). The research focus is to establish the morphodynamic response to the sediment dynamics at short and longer time scales in the presence of stratigraphy. A better understanding of the mechanisms and subsequently improved modeling will provide more accurate predictions of the morphodynamic response of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> during moderate and extreme conditions. It will also help in the interpretation of sediment layering of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> to relate to past extreme storms on geological time scales.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://www.csulb.edu/depts/enrollment/forms/financial_aid/FSADQA_SAP_MTF_13.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, LONG <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> SAP APPEAL MAXIMUM TIME FRAME</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Sorin, Eric J.</p> <p></p> <p>CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, LONG <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> SAP APPEAL ­ MAXIMUM TIME FRAME Students who have been by completing this SAP Maximum Time Frame Appeal. Your appeal must contain a description of the extenuating/units required of all students in your program). Instead, you should complete the SAP Recalculation Request form</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://www.csulb.edu/depts/enrollment/forms/financial_aid/FSADQA_SAP_SUSPENSION_13.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, LONG <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> SAP SUSPENSION APPEAL</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Sorin, Eric J.</p> <p></p> <p>CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, LONG <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> SAP SUSPENSION APPEAL Students who fail to meet one or more of the SAP Standards for two consecutive semesters are considered to be ineligible to receive financial aid. Such a student may appeal his/her eligibility status to the SAP Appeals Committee of the Financial Aid Office</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21984862"><span id="translatedtitle">Impact of erosion and accretion on the distribution of enterococci in <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gast, Rebecca J; Gorrell, Levi; Raubenheimer, Britt; Elgar, Steve</p> <p>2011-09-15</p> <p>Bacterial pathogens in coastal sediments may pose a health risk to users of <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Although recent work shows that <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands harbor both indicator bacteria and potential pathogens, it is not known how deep within <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands the organisms may persist nor if they may be exposed during natural physical processes. In this study, sand cores of approximately 1 m depth were collected at three sites across the <span class="hlt">beach</span> face in Kitty Hawk, North Carolina before, during and after large waves from an offshore hurricane. The presence of DNA from the fecal indicator bacterium Enterococci was detected in subsamples at different depths within the cores by PCR amplification. Erosion and accretion of <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand at the three sites also was determined for each sampling day. The results indicate that ocean <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands with persisting enterococci signals could be exposed and redistributed when wind, waves, and currents cause <span class="hlt">beach</span> erosion or accretion. PMID:21984862</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011CSR....31.1457G"><span id="translatedtitle">Impact of erosion and accretion on the distribution of enterococci in <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gast, Rebecca J.; Gorrell, Levi; Raubenheimer, Britt; Elgar, Steve</p> <p>2011-09-01</p> <p>Bacterial pathogens in coastal sediments may pose a health risk to users of <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Although recent work shows that <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands harbor both indicator bacteria and potential pathogens, it is neither known how deep within <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands the organisms may persist nor if they may be exposed during natural physical processes. In this study, sand cores of approximately 100 cm depth were collected at three sites across the <span class="hlt">beach</span> face in Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, before, during, and after large waves from an offshore hurricane. The presence of DNA from the fecal indicator bacterium Enterococci was detected in subsamples at different depths within the cores by PCR amplification. Erosion and accretion of <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand at the three sites were also determined for each sampling day. The results indicate that ocean <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands with persisting enterococci signals could be exposed and redistributed when wind, waves, and currents cause <span class="hlt">beach</span> erosion or accretion.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_22 --> <div id="page_23" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="441"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3391285"><span id="translatedtitle">Disentangling Diversity Patterns in Sandy <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> along Environmental Gradients</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Barboza, Francisco R.; Gómez, Julio; Lercari, Diego; Defeo, Omar</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Species richness in sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> is strongly affected by concurrent variations in morphodynamics and salinity. However, as in other ecosystems, different groups of species may exhibit contrasting patterns in response to these environmental variables, which would be obscured if only aggregate richness is considered. Deconstructing biodiversity, i.e. considering richness patterns separately for different groups of species according to their taxonomic affiliation, dispersal mode or mobility, could provide a more complete understanding about factors that drive species richness patterns. This study analyzed macroscale variations in species richness at 16 Uruguayan sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> with different morphodynamics, distributed along the estuarine gradient generated by the Rio de la Plata over a 2 year period. Species richness estimates were deconstructed to discriminate among taxonomic groups, supralittoral and intertidal forms, and groups with different feeding habits and development modes. Species richness was lowest at intermediate salinities, increasing towards oceanic and inner estuarine conditions, mainly following the patterns shown for intertidal forms. Moreover, there was a differential tolerance to salinity changes according to the habitat occupied and development mode, which determines the degree of sensitivity of faunal groups to osmotic stress. Generalized (additive and linear) mixed models showed a clear increase of species richness towards dissipative <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. All taxonomic categories exhibited the same trend, even though responses to grain size and <span class="hlt">beach</span> slope were less marked for crustaceans and insects than for molluscs or polychaetes. However, supralittoral crustaceans exhibited the opposite trend. Feeding groups decreased from dissipative to reflective systems, deposit feeders being virtually absent in the latter. This deconstructive approach highlights the relevance of life history strategies in structuring communities, highlighting the relative importance that salinity and morphodynamic gradients have on macroscale diversity patterns in sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. PMID:22792340</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004AGUSMOS43A..01B"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> Profile Behaviour in Tidal Environments: A Morphological Model</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bernabeu, A. M.; Medina, R.; Vidal, C.</p> <p>2004-05-01</p> <p>Tourism is an important economical activity in Spain that represents 10% of its GDP and provides a million jobs. Spain is the world's second more visited country, receiving 7% of world tourists. Eighty per cent of these visitors choose their destination somewhere along the 2500 km of <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Consequently, many efforts are currently addressed to their maintenance and conservation. However, the coastal management policies must be sustained by the deep knowledge of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> behaviour and the physical processes implied. A morphological model, with certain predictive capacities, to describe the <span class="hlt">beach</span> profile behaviour is proposed, integrating the wave and tide influence. It is based on the concept of the two-section (surf and shoaling) equilibrium <span class="hlt">beach</span> profile, and has been validated with field and laboratory data. The model is described by means of two parameters: the modal tidal range and the dimensionless fall velocity (? ). Tide is considered a local variable whose principal effect is the lengthening of the intertidal or surf profile. The greater the tidal range, the wider the intertidal profile. The dimensionless fall velocity defines the transition from dissipative to reflective situations in <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of any given tidal range. The morphological changes predicted by the proposed model in the surf and shoaling sections occur in the opposite direction. Whilst in the surf profile the slope close to the high tidal level becomes steeper and the concavity of whole section increases; in the shoaling profile, the upper part flattens resulting in a less concave section related to the decrease of ? . In this transition, the slope break between surf and shoaling profiles becomes smoother and difficult to identify. This work was funded by projects REN2003-02822 MAR, REN2003-03233 MAR, VEM2003-20093-C03-03 of the Spanish MCYT and PGDIT03RMA30101PR of the Galician Government (XUGA). Contribution No 304 of XM2 group.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFMEP13A0865S"><span id="translatedtitle">One dimensional modeling of anthropogenic <span class="hlt">beach</span> berm erosion</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Shakeri Majd, M.; Sanders, B. F.</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>Anthropogenic <span class="hlt">beach</span> berms (sometimes called artificial berms or artificial dunes) are in use internationally to guard against <span class="hlt">beach</span> overtopping and consequent coastal flooding. Berms can be constructed on a seasonal basis or in anticipation of a hazardous event, e.g., when a storm is expected to arrive coincident with an astronomical high tide. In either case, a common approach is to scrape sand from the foreshore with heavy equipment and deposit it on the crest of the natural <span class="hlt">beach</span> dune, thus providing added protection from the possibility of wave overtopping. Given the potential for higher sea levels globally and more extreme storm events, anthropogenic berms will surely be tested to their limits and will ultimately fail, causing flooding. A better understanding of the conditions under which these berms fail is therefore needed to support coastal flood risk management. An experimental campaign in Newport <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California was conducted to document the dynamic erosion of prototype <span class="hlt">beach</span> berms under a rising tide and mild to moderate wave conditions. Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) of the berm produced a digital model of how the berm shape evolved over time. Here, a numerical model of swash zone hydromorphodynamics based on shallow-water flow physics is presented to evaluate whether and to what extent the timing and degree of berm erosion and overtopping can be predicted from first principles. The model tightly couples flow and sediment transport within an approximate Riemann solver, and thus is of the Godunov-type variety of finite volume schemes. Additionally, the model includes an avalanching scheme to account for non-hydrodynamic slumping down the angle of repose. Results indicate that it is possible to calibrate the model for a particular event, and then successfully predict erosion for another event, but due to parameter sensitivities, it is unlikely that the model can be applied at a site without calibration (true prediction).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010EGUGA..1213468T"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> hazard and susceptibility to inundation and erosion. Case studies in the west coast of Portugal.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Trindade, Jorge; Ramos-Pereira, Ana</p> <p>2010-05-01</p> <p>Hydrodynamic forces over the <span class="hlt">beach</span> sediments are the main driving factors affecting the frequency and magnitude of morphological changes in <span class="hlt">beach</span> systems. In most of the time, this driving factors act in a foreseeable way and don't represent any danger to the coastal systems nor to its populations. However, hydrodynamic forces are also capable of induce high morphodynamic behavior on the <span class="hlt">beach</span> profiles and very often in a short period of time which endangers people and property and leads to system retreat. The most common consequences of the occurrence of this type of phenomena over the coastal landforms are costal inundation and erosion. Still, many coastal systems, and specially <span class="hlt">beach</span> systems, have recovery mechanisms and resilience levels have a very important role in the <span class="hlt">beach</span> morphodynamic state and exposure to potential damaging events assessments. The wave dominated Portuguese West coast is an high energetic environment during winter, with 2.5m mean offshore significant wave height. Waves with 5 year recurrence period can reach 9.2m and storms are frequent. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> systems are frequently associated with rocky coasts. In these cases, the subsystems present are <span class="hlt">beach</span>-dune, <span class="hlt">beach</span>-cliff and <span class="hlt">beach</span>-estuary subsystems exposed to NW Atlantic wave climate. This research aim is to access <span class="hlt">beach</span> hazard and susceptibility to inundation and erosion. Three <span class="hlt">beach</span> systems were selected and monitored applying sequential profiling methodology over a three year period (2004-2007). Sta. Rita, Azul and Foz do Lizandro <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are representative systems of the coastal stretch between Peniche and Cascais, which is a cliff dominate coast. Results from the monitoring campaigns are presented, including volume budgets, <span class="hlt">beach</span> face slope changes, berm occurrence and heights and planimetric coastline dynamics. A hazard and susceptibility assessment schema and zonation are proposed, including the parameterization of local flood (i.e. mean sea, maximum spring tide, and storm surge and run-up levels) and erosion potentials (i.e. volume budget and <span class="hlt">beach</span> planimetric dynamics).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=FEDREG&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-11-17/pdf/2010-28963.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">75 FR 70305 - NextEra Energy Point <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, LLC, Point <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2; Notice of...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-11-17</p> <p>...issue of no significant hazards consideration. The final...involves no significant hazards consideration, the Commission...involves a significant hazards consideration, then...by e-mail at MSHD.Resource@nrc.gov, or by a...NextEra Energy Point <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, LLC, P.O. Box...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://swfrec.ifas.ufl.edu/docs/pdf/veg-hort/tomato-institute/presentations/ti2010/veghort_ti_program_2010.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">2010 <span class="hlt">FLORIDA</span> TOMATO INSTITUTE PROGRAM The Ritz-Carlton, Naples, <span class="hlt">Florida</span>/September 8/PRO 53</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Jawitz, James W.</p> <p></p> <p>in Southwest <span class="hlt">Florida</span> - William Thurechek, USDA/ARS Fort Pierce. 10:50: Investigating the Q invasion of Bemisia tabaci in <span class="hlt">Florida</span>: Current Status and Update - Cindy McKenzie, USDA/ARS Fort Pierce. 11:10 Current</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://www.catalog.sdes.ucf.edu/Content/Documents/Programs/Florida_Studies_Minor.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">UNIVERSITY OF CENTRAL <span class="hlt">FLORIDA</span> 345 Undergraduate Catalog 2014-2015 <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Studies -Minor</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Wu, Shin-Tson</p> <p></p> <p>in at least three departments. Select from the following list: AMH 3422 Frontier <span class="hlt">Florida</span> 3 hrs AMH 3425 in <span class="hlt">Florida</span> 3 hrs ANT 3398 Black/Seminole Relations 3 hrs ANT 4303 Anthropology of Tourism 3 hrs LAH 4136</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://education.ufl.edu/fmti/files/2011/02/FMTI-Project-Overview.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Master Teacher Initiative Miami-Dade County Public Schools, University of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> College of Education,</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Roy, Subrata</p> <p></p> <p><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Master Teacher Initiative Partners Miami-Dade County Public Schools, University of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> PROJECT DIRECTORS Marisel Elias-Miranda Miami-Dade County Public Schools melias@dadeschools.net (305) 995</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007ECSS...72..138D"><span id="translatedtitle">Source discrimination of fine-grained deposits occurring on marine <span class="hlt">beaches</span>: The Calvados <span class="hlt">beaches</span> (eastern Bay of the Seine, France)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Dubrulle, C.; Lesueur, P.; Boust, D.; Dugué, O.; Poupinet, N.; Lafite, R.</p> <p>2007-03-01</p> <p>In tide-dominated systems, fine-grained deposits occur in intertidal areas of inner estuaries as loci of convergence of fluvial and marine material. Even in the vicinity of estuaries, mud deposits are rare on open sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. This study focuses on temporary occurrences of muddy sediments on marine <span class="hlt">beaches</span> along the Calvados coastline in Normandy, adjacent to the macrotidal Seine estuary (France). Clay mineralogy, major-minor-trace elements and radionuclides were used as particulate markers to determine the provenance of the mud deposits. The fine fraction, defined here as particles <50 ?m, was analysed, in surficial muddy sediments on seven <span class="hlt">beaches</span> between the Seine estuary and the Orne river mouth, sampled between February 2002 and June 2003. The deposits were compared to earlier Holocene relict deposits, which crop out on some <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and on the shoreface, and to Mesozoic marls and limestones, which have detached from the coastal cliffs. The use of the three types of particulate markers revealed no significant seasonal or geographical variations between the <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. The muddy deposits were made up of the same sedimentary pool of particles. The clay mineralogical and geochemical characteristics of these mud deposits enabled modern (i.e. present-day and earlier Holocene fine silts and clays) to be distinguished from ancient (i.e. Mesozoic) sediments. The use of radionuclides ( 60Co and 137Cs) confirmed the marine influence in the modern deposits, with a decreasing gradient along the Calvados <span class="hlt">beaches</span> towards the east. The presence of several specific major-minor-trace elements (e.g. Ti, P) revealed that some of the fine material originated in the Seine estuary. Despite the occurrence of easily erodable rocks (i.e. clays, marls and limestones) in the coastal cliffs, this source represented a limited supply, which is only of local significance. Small rivers, such as the Orne, Dives and Touques which discharge in the study area act as secondary suppliers of fine-grained material to this system. In spite of the exposed coastal setting where strong tidal currents and waves occur, the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> have become a distal part of the Seine estuarine system and form a temporary sink for strongly mixed fine material mainly of riverine (Seine River) and open marine (Bay of the Seine and the Central English Channel) origins. This is consistent with the infilling of the estuary, the reduction in accommodation space in its inner part, and the offshore shifting of the depocentre of the mud.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://seagrant.noaa.gov/Portals/0/Documents/network_resources/planning/strategic_plans/florida_sp.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Sea Grant College Program Strategic Plan 20092013</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>1 <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Sea Grant College Program Strategic Plan 20092013 Science Serving <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s Coast Introduction <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Sea Grant's Strategic Plan for 2009 to 2013 reflects Grant's role and strategies for addressing critical coastal and marine issues in the framework of four</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://www.fred.ifas.ufl.edu/economic-impact-analysis/pdf/FE67500.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Economic Impacts of the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Environmental Horticulture Industry in 20051</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Florida, University of</p> <p></p> <p>FE675 Economic Impacts of the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Environmental Horticulture Industry in 20051 Sponsored;1 Economic Impacts of the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Environmental Horticulture Industry in 2005 Sponsored Project Report................................................................................................................................. 5 Introduction: The <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Environmental Horticulture Industry</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://wfrec.ifas.ufl.edu/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/ALS5932-2012.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">ALS 5932 Plant Communities of the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Panhandle Summer 2012</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Watson, Craig A.</p> <p></p> <p>of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. Pineapple Press, Inc. Sarasota, FL. Nelson, G. 1996. The Shrubs & Woody Vines of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. Pineapple Press, Inc., Sarasota, FL. #12;3 Nelson, G. 2000. The Ferns of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. Pineapple Press, Inc</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://www.cohpa.ucf.edu/media/550269/vita_1-2014_smith_asst_prof.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">JO ANN SMITH, PHD, CRA University of Central <span class="hlt">Florida</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Wu, Shin-Tson</p> <p></p> <p>Technology, University of Central <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, August 2001 MA Instructional Technology, University of Central <span class="hlt">Florida</span> May 1982 BA English, minor in Business, University of Central <span class="hlt">Florida</span> II. RESEARCH AREAS and Learning · Research on Collaboration · Public and Nonprofit Research Organizations and Leadership</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=USGSPUBS&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/wdrFL994"><span id="translatedtitle">Water Resources Data for <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, 1999, Volume 4: Northwest <span class="hlt">Florida</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Franklin, Marvin; Meadows, Paul; Alvarez, Ernie</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>This report series for the 1999 water year for the State of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> consists of records for continuous or daily discharge for 354 streams, periodic discharge for 17 streams, continuous or daily stage for 121 streams, periodic stage for 1 stream, peak stage and discharge for 38 streams; continuous or daily elevations for 21 lakes, and periodic elevations for 42 lakes; continuous ground-water levels for 408 wells, and periodic ground-water levels for 1,715 wells; quality-of-water for 131 surface-water sites and 198 wells. This volume (Volume 4, Northwest <span class="hlt">Florida</span>) contains records of continuous or daily discharge for 54 streams, periodic discharge for 1 stream, continuous or daily stage for 15 streams, periodic stage for 1 stream, peak stage and discharge for 30 streams; continuous or daily elevations for 1 lake, periodic elevations for 1 lake; continuous ground-water levels for 1 well, periodic ground-water levels for 0 wells; and quality-of-water for 2 surface-water sites and 0 wells. These data represent the National Water Data System records collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating local, State, and Federal agencies in <span class="hlt">Florida</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=ERIC&redirectUrl=http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED461589.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Folk Festival: Asian and Pacific Island Traditions in <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. Resource Materials for Teachers.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Smith. KC, Ed.</p> <p></p> <p>This information and activity booklet discusses the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Folk Festival, a celebration that offers students and teachers an opportunity to hear music, taste foods, see folk art demonstrations, observe dance, and listen to stories that celebrate <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s cultural and ethnic legacies. The booklet offers resources for learning about <span class="hlt">Florida</span>…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=ERIC&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Dead+AND+body&pg=2&id=ED435123"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> School Laws. Chapters 228-246 <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Statutes. 1998 Edition.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee.</p> <p></p> <p>This volume of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> School Laws contains chapters 228 through 246 of the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Statutes, which comprise "The <span class="hlt">Florida</span> School Code." The laws contain those statutes specifically applicable to public schools, community colleges, postsecondary institutions, all other institutions and agencies included as a part of the state system of education,…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://www.masternaturalist.ifas.ufl.edu/docs/Presentations%20-%20Web/Aruba/Saturday/AM/1100%20Deyrup.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">NATIVE BEES OF <span class="hlt">FLORIDA</span> 2014 <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Master Naturalist Program Conference, 29 March</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Jawitz, James W.</p> <p></p> <p>NATIVE BEES OF <span class="hlt">FLORIDA</span> 2014 <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Master Naturalist Program Conference, 29 March Photo by Tim Lethbridge #12;Native Bees of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Andrenidae- sand bees: ground nesters, non-social and generally small Apidae-very diverse family, generally large and hairy. Honey bees and bumble bees are social, but most</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://www.fau.edu/mediarelations/pdf/sunsentinel_gehrke-white_consumer.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">South <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Sun-Sentinel.com Consumer confidence rebounds in <span class="hlt">Florida</span> in July</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Belogay, Eugene A.</p> <p></p> <p>South <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Sun-Sentinel.com Consumer confidence rebounds in <span class="hlt">Florida</span> in July July 31, 2012 with their consumer confidence rebounding in July after plummeting a month earlier, according to a monthly University a year ago. That moved up five points to 66 -- a good sign that <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s economy continues to rebound</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://www.nursing.ucf.edu/research/LFF-UCFgrant.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Lupus Foundation of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> University of Central <span class="hlt">Florida</span> College of Nursing</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Wu, Shin-Tson</p> <p></p> <p>Lupus Foundation of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> & University of Central <span class="hlt">Florida</span> College of Nursing Martha Manuel Emerson Investigator Award GRANT ANNOUNCEMENT The Lupus Foundation of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> (LFF) is now accepting of the grant is to advance lupus-related research by nurses. Area of Research: The research topic must</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://www.fred.ifas.ufl.edu/economic-impact-analysis/pdf/PinellasPub.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">ECONOMIC IMPACTS OF THE <span class="hlt">FLORIDA</span> BOTANICAL GARDENS AND RELATED CULTURAL ATTRACTIONS IN PINELLAS COUNTY <span class="hlt">FLORIDA</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Florida, University of</p> <p></p> <p>1 ECONOMIC IMPACTS OF THE <span class="hlt">FLORIDA</span> BOTANICAL GARDENS AND RELATED CULTURAL ATTRACTIONS IN PINELLAS of the four-county study region ECONOMIC IMPACTS OF THE <span class="hlt">FLORIDA</span> BOTANICAL GARDENS AND RELATED CULTURAL associated with construction, operations and tourism in the Heritage Village, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Botanical Gardens</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_23 --> <div id="page_24" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="461"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://www.fau.edu/mediarelations/pdf/sunsentinel_fleshler_thousands.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">South <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Sun-Sentinel.com Thousands of sharks share South <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s surf</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Fernandez, Eduardo</p> <p></p> <p>South <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Sun-Sentinel.com Thousands of sharks share South <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s surf January 18, 2013|By David Fleshler, Sun Sentinel The sharks stream in the thousands up South <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s coast, a sight University, is conducting the first systematic study of the migrations of blacktip sharks, a pattern that has</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://www.fred.ifas.ufl.edu/economic-impact-analysis/pdf/FE53800.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Economic Impacts of the Forest Industry in <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, 2003 Final Report to the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Forestry Association</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Florida, University of</p> <p></p> <p>1 Economic Impacts of the Forest Industry in <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, 2003 Final Report to the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Forestry was made possible by a grant provided by the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Forestry Association, Tallahassee, FL, under-Division of Forestry, represented by Eric Ford. Collaboration for the survey of forest product manufacturers</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-STC&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5257068"><span id="translatedtitle">Characterization and environmental studies of Pompano <span class="hlt">Beach</span> anaerobic digestion facility. Semi-annual report</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Sengupta, S; Farooq, S; Gerrish, H P; Wong, K F; Daly, Jr, E L; Chriswell, C</p> <p>1980-02-01</p> <p>Anaerobic digestion of municipal waste has been demonstrated to be feasible in bench scale experiments by Pfeffer (1974). Approximately, 50% reduction in mass and production of 6000 ft/sup 3/ of gas/ton have been estimated. The gas composition is estimated to be 50% methane and 50% carbon monoxide. The technical and economic feasibility of anaerobic digestion with an ultimate objective of commercialization are discussed. A plant has been built at Pompano <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> on an existing shredding and landfill operation site. The plant design capacity is 100 tons/day. Two digesters have been constructed to be used in parallel. The process consists of primary shredding, metal separation, secondary shredding, air classification and digestion of light fraction. Sewage sludge was used to seed the initial mixture in the digester. The output slurry is vacuum filtered and the filter cake disposed on an existing landfill. The filtrate is recycled. Excess filtrate is sprayed on the landfill. At present the output gas is being flared. A flow chart for the plant is presented. It is imperative that environmental investigations be conducted on new energy technology prior to commercialization. A project was initiated to characterize all input and output streams and to assess the potential for ground water contamination by landfill disposal of effluents. Detailed chemical, biological and physical characterization efforts supported by leaching and modelling studies are being conducted to achieve the stated objectives. Some mutagenic studies were also conducted. The environmental investigations were started in August 1978. Sengupta et al (1979a) reported the first year's efforts.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25121188"><span id="translatedtitle">Climate-change impacts on sandy-<span class="hlt">beach</span> biota: crossing a line in the sand.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Schoeman, David S; Schlacher, Thomas A; Defeo, Omar</p> <p>2014-08-01</p> <p>Sandy ocean <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are iconic assets that provide irreplaceable ecosystem services to society. Despite their great socioeconomic importance, <span class="hlt">beaches</span> as ecosystems are severely under-represented in the literature on climate-change ecology. Here, we redress this imbalance by examining whether <span class="hlt">beach</span> biota have been observed to respond to recent climate change in ways that are consistent with expectations under climate change. We base our assessments on evidence coming from case studies on <span class="hlt">beach</span> invertebrates in South America and on sea turtles globally. Surprisingly, we find that observational evidence for climate-change responses in <span class="hlt">beach</span> biota is more convincing for invertebrates than for highly charismatic turtles. This asymmetry is paradoxical given the better theoretical understanding of the mechanisms by which turtles are likely to respond to changes in climate. Regardless of this disparity, knowledge of the unique attributes of <span class="hlt">beach</span> systems can complement our detection of climate-change impacts on sandy-shore invertebrates to add rigor to studies of climate-change ecology for sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. To this end, we combine theory from <span class="hlt">beach</span> ecology and climate-change ecology to put forward a suite of predictive hypotheses regarding climate impacts on <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and to suggest ways that these can be tested. Addressing these hypotheses could significantly advance both <span class="hlt">beach</span> and climate-change ecology, thereby progressing understanding of how future climate change will impact coastal ecosystems more generally. PMID:25121188</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=USGSPUBS&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70025043"><span id="translatedtitle">Rotala rotundifolia (Lythraceae) new to <span class="hlt">Florida</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Burks, K.C.; Hall, D.W.; Vandiver, V.V., Jr.; Jacono, C.C.</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>Naturalized populations of the Asian amphibious species Rotala rotundifolia are documented for three peninsular <span class="hlt">Florida</span> counties. Distinguishing characters and a comment on invasive potential are also provided.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://www.nova.edu/cwis/oceanography/flcoos/fl_ocean_coastal_economies_report_ph1.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s Ocean and Coastal Economies Report</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Phase I <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s Ocean and Coastal Economies Report Professor Judith Kildow, Principal .......................................................................................... 7 2.1 Ocean Economy 3 Ocean Economy</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013Geomo.199..106D"><span id="translatedtitle">Global patterns in sandy <span class="hlt">beach</span> macrofauna: Species richness, abundance, biomass and body size</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Defeo, Omar; McLachlan, Anton</p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p>Global patterns in species richness in sandy <span class="hlt">beach</span> ecosystems have been poorly understood until comparatively recently, because of the difficulty of compiling high-resolution databases at continental scales. We analyze information from more than 200 sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> around the world, which harbor hundreds of macrofauna species, and explore latitudinal trends in species richness, abundance and biomass. Species richness increases from temperate to tropical sites. Abundance follows contrasting trends depending on the slope of the <span class="hlt">beach</span>: in gentle slope <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, it is higher at temperate sites, whereas in steep-slope <span class="hlt">beaches</span> it is higher at the tropics. Biomass follows identical negative trends for both climatic regions at the whole range of <span class="hlt">beach</span> slopes, suggesting decreasing rates in carrying capacity of the environment towards reflective <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Various morphodynamic variables determine global trends in <span class="hlt">beach</span> macrofauna. Species richness, abundance and biomass are higher at dissipative than at reflective <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, whereas a body size follows the reverse pattern. A generalized linear model showed that large tidal range (which determines the vertical dimension of the intertidal habitat), small size of sand particles and flat <span class="hlt">beach</span> slope (a product of the interaction among wave energy, tidal range and grain size) are correlated with high species richness, suggesting that these parameters represent the most parsimonious variables for modelling patterns in sandy <span class="hlt">beach</span> macrofauna. Large-scale patterns indicate a scaling of abundance to a body size, suggesting that dissipative <span class="hlt">beaches</span> harbor communities with highest abundance and species with the smallest body sizes. Additional information for tropical and northern hemisphere sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> (underrepresented in our compilation) is required to decipher more conclusive trends, particularly in abundance, biomass and body size. Further research should integrate meaningful oceanographic variables, such as temperature and primary production, in deciphering latitudinal trends.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://flrec.ifas.ufl.edu/pdfs/jobs/Horticulture_Manager.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">PALM <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> ZOO The Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Zoo is looking for a hands-on Horticulture Manager. This full-time position is filled by</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Mazzotti, Frank</p> <p></p> <p>PALM <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> ZOO The Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Zoo is looking for a hands-on Horticulture Manager. This full, and installation of flora · Provide technical horticulture expertise during new exhibit development · Assist WCC the horticulture in an ecologically friendly manner · Develops and maintains SOPs and emergency management protocol</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=USGSPUBS&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/fs20073065"><span id="translatedtitle">Phage therapy for <span class="hlt">Florida</span> corals?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Kellogg, Christina A.</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>Coral disease is a major cause of reef decline in the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Keys. Bacterium has been defined as the most common pathogen (disease-causing organism). Although much is being done to catalog coral diseases, map their locations, determine the causes of disease, or measure the rates of coral demise, very little research has been directed toward actually preventing or eliminating the diseases affecting coral and coral reef decline.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://oaktrust.library.tamu.edu//handle/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-1987-THESIS-S974"><span id="translatedtitle">Effects of the Alvenus oil spill on Jamaica <span class="hlt">beach</span> macrofauna </span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Sweet, Merrill Henry</p> <p>1987-01-01</p> <p>EFFECTS OF THE ALVENUS OIL SPILL ON JAMAICA <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> MACROFAUNA A Thesis by MERRILL HENRY SWEET Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M U n i v e r s i t y in p a r t i a l f u l f i l l m e n t of the requirement f o r the degree....\\ Bright^ (Member) Timothy C. H a l l (Head of Department) August 1987 i i i ABSTRACT E f f e c t s of the Alvenus Oil S p i l l on Jamaica <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Macrofauna. (August 1987) M e r r i l l Henry Sweet, B.S., Texas A&M U n i v e r s i t y Chair...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007ECSS...74...77I"><span id="translatedtitle">Marine macrophytes directly enhance abundances of sandy <span class="hlt">beach</span> fauna through provision of food and habitat</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ince, Rebecca; Hyndes, Glenn A.; Lavery, Paul S.; Vanderklift, Mathew A.</p> <p>2007-08-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Beach</span>-cast wrack is a prominent feature of <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of south-western Australia. We examined the fauna of these <span class="hlt">beaches</span> to explore the generalisation [Polis, G.A., Hurd, S.D., 1995. Extraordinarily high spider densities on islands: flow of energy from the marine to terrestrial food webs and the absence of predation. Ecology 92, 4382-4386] that <span class="hlt">beach</span>-cast wrack from highly productive marine ecosystems subsidises low productivity of terrestrial ecosystems, to establish whether this generalisation is relevant to oligotrophic marine systems. We sampled three <span class="hlt">beaches</span> with high and three <span class="hlt">beaches</span> with low volumes of <span class="hlt">beach</span>-cast wrack to determine if: (1) the presence of wrack influences the abundance of macroinvertebrates; (2) wrack acts as a food source for <span class="hlt">beach</span> macroinvertebrates; and (3) the influence of wrack varies between zones above the high water mark. We measured wrack volume and composition, sediment characteristics, the abundance of different epibenthic and infaunal macroinvertebrates taxa, and ?13C and ?15N of macrophytes and macroinvertebrates. The mean volume of wrack on high-wrack <span class="hlt">beaches</span> was 0.27-1.07 m 3 wrack m -2 compared to 0.00-0.09 m 3 wrack m -2 on low-wrack <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. There were no significant differences in sediment grain size, moisture content or loss on ignition between the two types of <span class="hlt">beaches</span> or zones. Epibenthic fauna and infauna were consistently abundant on high-wrack <span class="hlt">beaches</span> (20-291 and 0.5-3.5 individuals 0.64 m -2, respectively), but either absent or extremely rare in low-wrack <span class="hlt">beaches</span> (0-3 and 0-0.1 individuals 0.64 m -2, respectively). Within high-wrack <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, there were no significant differences in the abundance of epifauna or infauna among <span class="hlt">beaches</span> or between zones. The ?13C values of macroinvertebrates at all sites were most similar to red and brown algae, with the exception of beetles from two <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, which were closest to seagrasses. Mixing model (Isosource) results for mesograzing amphipods and dipteran flies suggested carbon was assimilated mostly from the seagrass Posidonia spp., the dune grass Spinifex longifolia and red algae for amphipods and from brown algae, red algae and dune vegetation for dipteran flies. We conclude that the presence of marine-derived wrack plays a major role in subsidising production of macroinvertebrates on <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of south-western Australia. We suggest that marine subsidies can play a role in supporting terrestrial production, even in oligotrophic marine environments.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..15.5520A"><span id="translatedtitle">Coastal geomorphological study of pocket <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Crete, with the use of planview indices.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Alexandrakis, George; Karditsa, Aikaterini; Poulos, Serafim; Kampanis, Nikos</p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p>The formation of pocket <span class="hlt">beaches</span> is a result of a large number of processes and mechanisms that vary on space and time scales. This study aims in defining the planform characteristics of pocket <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Crete Isl. and to determine their sheltering effect, embaymentization and their status of equilibrium. Thus, data from 30 pocket <span class="hlt">beaches</span> along the coastline of Crete, with different geomorphological and hydrodynamical setting, were collected. Planform parameters were applied and coastal planview indices from the bibliography were applied. The parameters included: length and orientation of the headlands between the pocket <span class="hlt">beach</span>; length between the bay entrance and the center of the <span class="hlt">beach</span>; lengths of the i) embayed shoreline, ii) embayed <span class="hlt">beach</span>, iii) <span class="hlt">beach</span> segment located at the shadow of a headland; linear distance and orientation between the edges of the embayed <span class="hlt">beach</span>; direction of the incident wave energy flux; wave crest obliquity to the control line; <span class="hlt">beach</span> area, maximum <span class="hlt">beach</span> width and headland orientation and river/ torrent catchment areas in <span class="hlt">beach</span> zones that an active river system existed (Bowman et al.2009). For the morphological mapping of the study areas, 1:5000 orthophoto maps were used. Wave regime has been calculated with the use of prognostic equations and utilising local wind data (mean annual frequency of wind speed and direction), provided by the Wind and Wave Atlas of the Eastern Mediterranean Sea. The diffraction and refraction of the waves has been simulated with the use of numerical models. The study shows that Cretan pocket <span class="hlt">beaches</span> display a wide range of indentation, suggesting that is the result of several parameters that include tectonics, coastal hydrodynamics and river catchment areas. The more indented bays are, the shorter their <span class="hlt">beaches</span> become, while low-indented pocket <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are the widest and the longest ones. <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> with headland with large length appear to be more protected and receive smaller amount of wave energy. Most of the Cretan pocket <span class="hlt">beaches</span> have limited sediment supply for the mainland, while they appear to be in an unstable status. D. Bowman, J. Guillén, L. López, V. Pellegrino (2009), Planview Geometry and morphological characteristics of pocket <span class="hlt">beaches</span> on the Catalan coast (Spain). Geomorphology, 108, 191-199</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFMOS31A1701W"><span id="translatedtitle">Modeling the Economics of <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Nourishment Decisions in Response to Coastal Erosion</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ware, M.; Ashton, A. D.; Hoagland, P.; Jin, D.; Kite-Powell, H.; Lorenzo-Trueba, J.</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Beaches</span> are constantly moving and changing. The dynamic transformations of <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are mostly the result of the erosion of sand, which can occur through movements alongshore caused by waves, movements off-shore due to storms, or submersion due to sea-level rise. Predicted climate change impacts include potential changes in storminess and accelerated sea-level rise, which will lead to increased coastal erosion. At the same time, the number of people residing in coastal communities is increasing. The risks from eroding <span class="hlt">beaches</span> (increased coastal flooding, damage to infrastructure, and displaced residents) are therefore increasing in number and scale; and coastal residents are taking actions to protect their homes. One such action is <span class="hlt">beach</span> nourishment, where sand is added to a resident's property in order to widen the <span class="hlt">beach</span>. We have developed an economic model of <span class="hlt">beach</span> nourishment decision-making to investigate the relationship between the optimal volume and timing of <span class="hlt">beach</span> nourishment and factors such as property value, erosion rate, and initial <span class="hlt">beach</span> width. In this model, waterfront property owners nourish a <span class="hlt">beach</span> when the losses in net rental income exceed the costs incurred from nourishing the <span class="hlt">beach</span>. (Rental income is a function of property value, which in turn depends upon the width of the <span class="hlt">beach</span>.) It is assumed that erosion and sea-level rise are related. We examine different nourishment scenarios, including one-time nourishment in the first year; constant annual nourishment; and a myopic decision process in which the homeowner nourishes the <span class="hlt">beach</span> if property losses from erosion over the next five years are expected to exceed the cost of nourishment. One-time nourishment delays property flooding for both constant and accelerating sea level rise; however, this delay is more substantial under constant sea level rise. With continual nourishment, the <span class="hlt">beach</span> can be maintained under constant sea-level rise, provided that the erosion rate is comparable to the additional width from nourishment each year. In contrast, for practical nourishment volumes, erosion from accelerating sea-level rise eventually out-competes <span class="hlt">beach</span> nourishment and inundation occurs. Under the myopic decision-making model, with both constant and accelerating sea-level rise, nourishment does not take place until a property is critically endangered. The <span class="hlt">beach</span> slope, nourishment volume, property value, and initial <span class="hlt">beach</span> width all are found to be important factors in determining when nourishment should start and how frequently it should occur thereafter. These models can be used by policy-makers to formulate better coastal management policies, by coastal geologists to understand human impacts on <span class="hlt">beach</span> dynamics, and by the insurance industry to realistically anticipate human risk-taking and decision-making.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://oaktrust.library.tamu.edu//handle/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-1971-THESIS-M398"><span id="translatedtitle">Properties and stability of a Texas barrier <span class="hlt">beach</span> inlet </span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Mason, Curtis</p> <p>1971-01-01</p> <p>of 1929. Comparison of the 1930 snd 1935 shorelines presented in Figure 9, indicates that significant erosion of the gulf shoreline occurred in the intervening years, with about three hundred fifty yards of <span class="hlt">beach</span> lost on either side of the inlet.... Although a hurricane did strike the coast in 1932, examination of additional charts revealed that continued erosion occurred only from the Brazos River to about PIGURE 9. ? BROWN CEDAR CUT SHORELINE CONTOURS, 1930 AND 1935 29 ten miles west of Brown...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40016980"><span id="translatedtitle">Towards a common Mediterranean framework for <span class="hlt">beach</span> nourishment projects</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>J. van der Salm; O. Unal</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>Integrated Coastal Zone Management as a strategy for achieving conservation and sustainable multiple use of the coastal zone\\u000a includes various types of management initiatives. Due to natural phenomena such as tides and winds and to social and economic\\u000a activities, coastal areas undergo transformation. Coastal erosion and the disappearance of <span class="hlt">beaches</span> as a result of wrong planning\\u000a decisions and lack of</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2771205"><span id="translatedtitle">Microbial Load from Animal Feces at a Recreational <span class="hlt">Beach</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Wright, Mary E.; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M.; Elmir, Samir; Fleming, Lora E.</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>The goal of this study was to quantify the microbial load (enterococci) contributed by the different animals that frequent a <span class="hlt">beach</span> site. The highest enterococci concentrations were observed in dog feces with average levels of 7.4 × 106 CFU/g; the next highest enterococci levels were observed in birds averaging 3.3 × 105 CFU/g. The lowest measured levels of enterococci were observed in material collected from shrimp fecal mounds (2.0 CFU/g). A comparison of the microbial loads showed that 1 dog fecal event was equivalent to 6,940 bird fecal events or 3.2 × 108 shrimp fecal mounds. Comparing animal contributions to previously published numbers for human bather shedding indicates that one adult human swimmer contributes approximately the same microbial load as one bird fecal event. Given the abundance of animals observed on the <span class="hlt">beach</span>, this study suggests that dogs are the largest contributing animal source of enterococci to the <span class="hlt">beach</span> site. PMID:19664785</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26082422"><span id="translatedtitle">Microplastic resin pellets on an urban tropical <span class="hlt">beach</span> in Colombia.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Acosta-Coley, Isabel; Olivero-Verbel, Jesus</p> <p>2015-07-01</p> <p>Microplastics are a problem in oceans worldwide. The current situation in Latin America is not well known. This paper reports, for the first time, the presence of microplastics on an urban Caribbean <span class="hlt">beach</span> in Cartagena, Colombia. Pellet samples were collected from a tourist <span class="hlt">beach</span> over a 5-month period covering both dry and rainy seasons. Pellets were classified by color and their surface analyzed by stereomicroscopy, and some were characterized by infrared spectroscopy. The most abundant pellets were white, presenting virgin surfaces, with few signs of oxidation. This is congruent with a short residence time in the marine environment and primary sources possibly located nearby. The frequency of white pellets did not change with sampling period. Surface features identified in the pellets included cracks, material loss, erosion, adhesion, granulation, color change, and glazed surfaces. Reticulated granular pellets exhibited the greatest degradation, easily generating submicroplastics. Sample composition was mostly polyethylene, followed by polypropylene. This pollution problem must be addressed by responsible authorities to avoid pellet deposition in oceans and on <span class="hlt">beaches</span> around the world. Graphical abstract ?. PMID:26082422</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015MinPe.109...53P"><span id="translatedtitle">Geochemistry of <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands from Sithonia Peninsula (Chalkidiki, Northern Greece)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Papadopoulos, A.; Christofides, G.; Pe-Piper, G.; Koroneos, A.; Papadopoulou, L.</p> <p>2015-02-01</p> <p>Thirty <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand samples from the granitic shoreline of the Sithonia Plutonic Complex (SPC) were analyzed for their REE and major element contents. The obtained results are compared with the adjacent SPC rock-types, in order to determine any enrichments or depletions. Among the samples enriched in REE, three are seasonal deposits of heavy minerals and their concentrations are controlled by the action of sea-waves. The available geochemical characteristics were also used to confirm the parental rocks of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands, which are the SPC rock-types. The heavy fractions (total, total magnetic and total non-magnetic) of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands were correlated with the REE concentrations, revealing a strong correlation between the heavy non-magnetic fraction and REE content. Among the minerals of the heavy non-magnetic fraction, monazite seems to control the REE content in the heavy mineral-enriched samples, whereas in the rest of the samples allanite, belonging to the heavy magnetic fraction may be the most important REE mineral.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-STC&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5480047"><span id="translatedtitle">Method and apparatus for building up <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and protecting shorelines</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Laier, J.E.</p> <p>1987-12-01</p> <p>This patent describes a system for controlling erosion of a <span class="hlt">beach</span> at a seabed through sedimentation of sand caused by wave action. The system comprises interconnected compartments disposed under the water on the seabed in an array extending generally parallel to the shoreline of the <span class="hlt">beach</span>. The compartments are formed by plural flexible wall portions, each formed of an open mesh, buoyant material. The wall portions are anchored to the seabed in a generally vertical orientation by anchoring means. The anchoring means comprises means for holding the wall portions on the seabed. The wall portions flex towards the <span class="hlt">beach</span> with incoming waves. The anchoring means also comprise means for precluding the wall portions from flexing backwards substantially beyond the vertical orientation with backwash waves. The mesh of the wall portions decrease the velocity of the water flowing therethrough on backwash waves, whereupon sand suspended in the water is enabled to drop out of suspension within the compartments during the backwash waves to settle therein and thus automatically fill the compartments.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22980239"><span id="translatedtitle">Bacteriological monitoring and sustainable management of <span class="hlt">beach</span> water quality in Malaysia: problems and prospects.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Dada, Ayokunle Christopher; Asmat, Ahmad; Gires, Usup; Heng, Lee Yook; Deborah, Bandele Oluwaseun</p> <p>2012-05-01</p> <p>Despite the growing demand of tourism in Malaysia, there are no resolute efforts to develop <span class="hlt">beaches</span> as tourist destinations. With no incentives to monitor public <span class="hlt">beaches</span> or to use them in a sustainable manner, they might eventually degenerate in quality as a result of influx of pollutants. This calls for concerted action plans with a view to promoting their sustainable use. The success of such plans is inevitably anchored on the availability of robust quality monitoring schemes. Although significant efforts have been channelled to collation and public disclosure of bacteriological quality data of rivers, <span class="hlt">beach</span> water monitoring appears left out. This partly explains the dearth of published information related to <span class="hlt">beach</span> water quality data. As part of an on-going nation-wide surveillance study on the bacteriological quality of recreational <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, this paper draws on a situation analysis with a view to proffering recommendations that could be adapted for ensuring better <span class="hlt">beach</span> water quality in Malaysia. PMID:22980239</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_24 --> <div id="page_25" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="481"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=USGSPUBS&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/fs20133071"><span id="translatedtitle">Research on pathogens at Great Lakes <span class="hlt">beaches</span>: sampling, influential factors, and potential sources</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>U.S. Geological Survey</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>The overall mission of this work is to provide science-based information and methods that will allow <span class="hlt">beach</span> managers to more accurately make <span class="hlt">beach</span> closure and advisory decisions, understand the sources and physical processes affecting <span class="hlt">beach</span> contaminants, and understand how science-based information can be used to mitigate and restore <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and protect the public. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in collaboration with many Federal, State, and local agencies and universities, has conducted research on <span class="hlt">beach</span> health issues in the Great Lakes Region for more than a decade. The work consists of four science elements that align with the USGS <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Health Initiative Mission: real-time assessments of water quality; coastal processes; pathogens and source tracking; and data analysis, interpretation, and communication. The ongoing or completed research for the pathogens and source tracking topic is described in this fact sheet.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24880683"><span id="translatedtitle">From a millennium base line to 2012: <span class="hlt">beach</span> litter changes in Wales.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Williams, A T; Randerson, P; Alharbi, O A</p> <p>2014-07-15</p> <p>Forty-five <span class="hlt">beaches</span> at 41 bathing area locations in Wales were analysed for litter in 2000 and 2012, via a standard seven category checklist. Fourteen resorts, 2 urban, 11 village, 15 rural 3 remote, were graded, A to D. A grade <span class="hlt">beach</span> numbers changed from 5 to19; B, 27 to 24; C, 9 to 2; D, 4 to 0, many <span class="hlt">beaches</span> maintaining their current status. Assuming trend continuance within the next 12 years, the A:B grade ratio would approach equilibrium of 44:56, with no grade C or D <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Recreational litter was ubiquitous; fishing materials prevalent along Cardigan Bay. New water treatment plant investment reduced sewage related debris. Despite apparent increased awareness of <span class="hlt">beach</span> litter, improving visitor behaviour through information/education should be a future priority. Removing a few gross items could improve <span class="hlt">beach</span> grades at little cost to local authorities and benefits to the Welsh economy. PMID:24880683</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24768173"><span id="translatedtitle">Effect of coastal urbanization on sandy <span class="hlt">beach</span> coleoptera Phaleria maculata (Kulzer, 1959) in northern Chile.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>González, Sergio A; Yáñez-Navea, Katherine; Muñoz, Mauricio</p> <p>2014-06-15</p> <p>The beetle Phaleria maculata is a common inhabitant of the upper intertidal fringe of Chilean <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Anthropogenic intervention in coastal areas has increased intensely, leading to changes in the flora and fauna of sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. To examine the impact of human activities on P. maculata, we studied several <span class="hlt">beaches</span> along the northern Chilean coast. <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> were characterized based on morphodynamics and the level of intervention, leading to the estimation of an "Urbanization Index" based on various indicators. The analysis showed a significant inverse correlation between the rate of urbanization and night sky quality. Larval and adult beetles were almost absent on <span class="hlt">beaches</span> with high levels of urbanization. The results of simple and multiple correlations based on nMDS ordination showed an inverse relationship between increases in urbanization and the abundance of beetles. Because darkling beetles are very sensitive to human interventions on sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, we suggest that they are ideal indicator organisms for the health of these environments. PMID:24768173</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://oaktrust.library.tamu.edu//handle/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-1986-THESIS-C433"><span id="translatedtitle">Analysis of morphological and volumetric patterns along the <span class="hlt">beach</span> of South Padre Island </span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Chaffey, Scott Allen</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>) Richard Rezak ( Member ) E, Glenn Carls (Member) Wilford D. Gardner ( Member ) Robert O. Reid (Head of Department) May 1986 Analysis of Morphological and Volumic Patterns Along the <span class="hlt">Beach</span> of south Padre Island. (May 1986) Scott Allen Chaf fey, B... morphological and volumetric changes of the <span class="hlt">beach</span>. Also, aerial photographs from July. 1962, to December, 1981, were digitized and plotted to show the morphological and volumetric changes observed along South Padre Island <span class="hlt">beach</span> during the past two decades...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/41011072"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> tar on bermuda: Recent observations and implications for global monitoring</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>James N Butler; Peter G Wells; Sharon Johnson; John J Manock</p> <p>1998-01-01</p> <p>Petroleum residues (pelagic tar) have been reported from <span class="hlt">beaches</span> all over the world since the 1960s, and have been quantitatively measured at a few locations. At the south-facing open ocean <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of Bermuda, rapid exchange of tar with the sea makes it possible to use the quantity of <span class="hlt">beach</span> tar as a measure of open-ocean petroleum pollution. Brief surveys conducted</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://www.duxburybeach.com/tech%20comm%20reports/SolutionsDuxBeFINAL2-13-08PubPDF.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">COMPREHENSIVE BARRIER <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> MANAGEMENT: BALANCING STORM RESTORATION, RECREATIONAL USE, AND COASTAL RESOURCE PROTECTION USING PROGRESSIVE PRACTICES</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>DUXBURY BEACH; James F. O'Connell</p> <p></p> <p>Through years of research, creative on-the-<span class="hlt">beach</span> experiments, and consultation with coastal experts, the Duxbury <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Reservation, Inc (DBR), the non-profit steward and owner of the 4.5 mile undeveloped portion of a 6 mile long barrier <span class="hlt">beach</span>, has developed many successful, innovative practices in preserving the landward storm damage protection and wildlife habitat interests, while hosting extensive recreational and ORV uses</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=ERIC&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Aeronautics+AND+History&pg=2&id=EJ235018"><span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Institute of Technology Story.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Aviation/Space, 1980</p> <p>1980-01-01</p> <p>Described is the history of the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Institute of Technology (FIT), Melborne, <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. FIT offers 45 undergraduate degree programs, 16 masters degree programs and seven doctoral degree programs in the areas of science and engineering, management, humanities, psychology, aeronautics, applied technology, marine technology, and medical research.…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://webfiles.ehs.ufl.edu/BBPSOPS.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">University Of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bloodborne Pathogen Program</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Slatton, Clint</p> <p></p> <p>University Of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bloodborne Pathogen Program Standard Operating Procedures Revised Page 1 of 12 keep in lab #12;University Of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bloodborne Pathogen Program Standard Operating with the bloodborne pathogen standard. These worksheets will assist you in tailoring the Exposure Control Plan to your</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://hr.ufl.edu/wp-content/uploads/forms/eeo/vet_survey_2009.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Veteran Status Survey University of <span class="hlt">Florida</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Mazzotti, Frank</p> <p></p> <p>Veteran Status Survey University of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> The University of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> is a federal contractor subject to the Vietnam Era Veterans Readjustment Assistant Act of 1974 (VEVRA), as amended, which requires the university to report employee veteran status annually. This survey is requested of all employees. Please</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=ERIC&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Automation&pg=4&id=EJ843155"><span id="translatedtitle">Collection Assessment: The <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Community College Experience</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Perrault, Anna H.; Dixon, Jeannie</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>Beginning in 1994, a series of collection analysis and assessment projects of community college library/LRC collections in <span class="hlt">Florida</span> has been conducted by the College Center for Library Automation (CCLA). The purpose of the assessments conducted through LINCC, the network for <span class="hlt">Florida</span> community colleges, was to provide data for improvement of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=TEKTRAN&redirectUrl=http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=180696"><span id="translatedtitle">SOME INSECT PESTS NEW TO <span class="hlt">FLORIDA</span> SUGARCANE</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The number of insect and mite species attacking sugarcane in <span class="hlt">Florida</span> has increased over time. Five new pest species were discovered during the 31-year period 1964 to 1995, one species indigenous to <span class="hlt">Florida</span> with no previous association with sugarcane and four invasive species entirely new to the Eve...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=ERIC&redirectUrl=http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED397819.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Lessons Learned from the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Teletraining Project.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Martin, Barbara L.; And Others</p> <p></p> <p>The <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Teletraining Project (FTP) was funded by the Department of Defense to test the feasibility of using a video teletraining network (VTT) (two-way audio/two-way compressed video) to present military instruction to reservists in <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. The program was to be conducted by two-year community colleges in collaboration with armed forces…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=ERIC&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=has&pg=3&id=EJ899901"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Has Power-Library Schools</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Reynolds-Mixon, Sharon</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>In this article, the author talks about the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Power-Library School (FPLS) program. She describes the why, who, what and how of the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Power-Library School initiative, as well as the favorable results for schools. Schools successfully completing this process see relationships among staff and community members strengthened. Library media…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://generalcounsel.usf.edu/policies-and-procedures/pdfs/bot-policy-06-003-debt-management.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH <span class="hlt">FLORIDA</span> DEBT MANAGEMENT POLICY</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Meyers, Steven D.</p> <p></p> <p>BY THIS POLICY 2 IV. FINANCING OBJECTIVES 2 V. RESPONSIBILITIES 3 VI. DEBT MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES 3 VII. DEBT objectives. Debt, particularly tax-exempt debt, provides a low cost source of capital to fund investments It is the policy of the University of South <span class="hlt">Florida</span> that debt financing conform to the authority granted by <span class="hlt">Florida</span></p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=ERIC&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=hammons&pg=5&id=ED391098"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Tech Prep Education Evaluation Model.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Hammons, Frank T.</p> <p></p> <p>This document provides a process for evaluation of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s tech prep programs. It first summarizes the philosophy guiding tech prep activities in <span class="hlt">Florida</span> and then it outlines the tech prep evaluation process. The evaluation process section includes the following: the goals and objectives of the process; its characteristics; the continuous…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://www.fau.edu/ssw/pdf/Student-Orientation-Signature-Forms.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Atlantic University School of Social Work</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Fernandez, Eduardo</p> <p></p> <p><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Atlantic University School of Social Work Checklist of Orientation Content for Social Work/8/08 #12;<span class="hlt">Florida</span> Atlantic University School of Social Work Acknowledgement of Risk in the Social Work Field Placement This document is designed to inform you of the potential risks associated with the social work</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://spo.nmfs.noaa.gov/mfr337-8/mfr337-83.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">THREAD HERRING DISTRIBUTION OFF <span class="hlt">FLORIDA</span>'S WEST COAST</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>THREAD HERRING DISTRIBUTION OFF <span class="hlt">FLORIDA</span>'S WEST COAST Brian S. Kinne a r and Charles M. Fuss Jr. The thread herring (Opisthonema oglinum) is essentially a coastal pelagic species. Data suggest a seasonal concentrations of thread herring occur near Ft. Myers. <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. during the winter. The prospects for a commer</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASA-TRS&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19920055508&hterms=mortality&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dmortality"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Scrub Jay mortality on roadsides</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Dreschel, Thomas W.; Smith, Rebecca B.; Breininger, David R.</p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>Brevard County, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> supports two of the three largest remaining <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Scrub Jay (Aphelocoma coerulescens coerulescens) populations, with about 1870 birds on Kennedy Space Center and 920 birds on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (Breininger 1989). Between 24 may and 5 June 1989, four Scrub Jay carcasses were collected on two roadsides in Brevard County apparently killed by vehicles.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/59040756"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span>: Kress Building in Downtown Tampa</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Chet Smolski; G. E. McKay</p> <p>1978-01-01</p> <p>The four story building to the left of this photo is known as the Kress Building in downtown Tampa, <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. Originally opened in 1900 on Franklin Street, the store was soon relocated to <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Avenue in 1908. That store was demolished in 1929. That same year, the most recent building was built in the Renaissance Revival architectural style by G.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://soils.ifas.ufl.edu/docs/pdf/academic/papers/Atkin-Michael.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">NITRATE LEACHING IN <span class="hlt">FLORIDA</span> URBAN ENVIRONMENTS</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Ma, Lena</p> <p></p> <p>....................................................................................3 Background- Nitrate Behavior in Soil and <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Groundwater Vulnerability.......4 Urban Ecology and application of fertilizer. Fertilizer nitrogen is a pollutant in <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s shallow groundwater. Excessive abortions, and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Average groundwater background nitrate concentrations are less than 2</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_25 --> <center> <div class="footer-extlink text-muted"><small>Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. 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