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1

Artificial Reefs: Proceedings of a Conference Held September 13-15, 1979 in Daytona Beach, Florida.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Conference on Artificial Reefs, held in Daytona Beach, Florida on September 13-15, 1979, dealt with a variety of perspectives on artificial reefs as an improvement on the natural habitat of fish, in various coastal areas. Subjects considered were: sit...

D. Y. Aska

1981-01-01

2

78 FR 33969 - Special Local Regulations; Daytona Beach Grand Prix of the Sea, Atlantic Ocean; Daytona Beach, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Grand Prix of the Sea, Atlantic Ocean; Daytona Beach, FL AGENCY...on the waters of the Atlantic Ocean east of Daytona Beach, Florida...Room W12-140 on the ground floor of the Department of Transportation...on the waters of the Atlantic Ocean east of Daytona Beach,...

2013-06-06

3

Trends in Alcohol Knowledge and Drinking Patterns Among Students Who Visited Daytona Beach, Florida, During Spring Break, 1981-1983.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Assesses changes in student knowledge of and patterns related to drinking. Using data collected from college students visiting Daytona Beach, Florida, during spring break, found that trends toward increased consumption of alcoholic beverages among college students which occurred prior to 1981 have now stabilized and are beginning to reverse…

Gonzalez, Gerardo M.

1986-01-01

4

Aerial gamma ray and magnetic survey: Gainesville and Daytona Beach quadrangles, Florida. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Gainesville and Daytona Beach quadrangles cover 9250 square miles of land in north-central Florida. The area includes moderately thick sections of platform sediments covering the pre-Cretaceous Peninsular Arch. Surficial materials are composed of Tertiary or more recent deposits. A search of available literature revealed no known significant uranium deposits. Sixty-four uranium anomalies were detected and are discussed briefly in this report. All appear to be related to culture. One well-defined group of anomalies appear to have higher uranium concentrations and are closely associated with the Hawthorne Formation. These few anomalies are considered significant and suggest that more detailed local resource studies should concentrate in this area. Magnetic data appear to suggest complexities in the Paleozoic and older basement material. While some linear features appear related to known diabase dikes, several isolated features are not accounted for by known information.

Not Available

1981-03-01

5

77 FR 50062 - Safety Zone; Embry-Riddle Wings and Waves, Atlantic Ocean; Daytona Beach, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Safety Zone; Embry-Riddle Wings and Waves, Atlantic Ocean; Daytona Beach, FL AGENCY...Florida during the Embry-Riddle Wings and Waves air show. The event is scheduled to take...T07-0653 Safety Zone; Embry Riddle Wings and Waves, Atlantic Ocean, Daytona Beach,...

2012-08-20

6

International Business Courses and Programs at Daytona Beach Community College. 1994-1995 Annual Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Center for International Business Education at Florida's Daytona Beach Community College (DBCC) was established to help internationalize business programs at the college. This report provides an overview of progress made at DBCC in 1994-95, discussing international business courses and programs developed and resources that have been committed…

Delaney, Evelyn

7

Motorcycle casualties sustained during daytona beach bike week 2000: lessons learned  

Microsoft Academic Search

Study objective: In March 2000, an estimated 500,000 people attended an annual motorcycle rally in Daytona Beach, FL, where approximately 64,000 residents live year-round. The media reported 15 deaths during this 10-day event. To more comprehensively assess the extent of trauma and need for emergency medical care, we investigated all motorcycle crashes, regardless of outcome. Methods: Motorcycle-related crash data from

Dafna Kanny; Richard A. Schieber; Bruce H. Jones; George W. Ryan; Bonita J. Sorensen

2003-01-01

8

Fort Myers Beach Channel, Florida. Navigation.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The planned project will extend the existing navigation channel at Fort Myers Beach, Fort Myers, Lee County, Florida about 2,000 feet easterly. This extension will facilitate shrimp boat and barge traffic movement to and from terminal facilities located b...

1971-01-01

9

Analysis of Buoy Coating Specimens Exposed in Seawater at Daytona Beach, Florida.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Eighteen premium antifouling marine coatings systems are being examined to determine extended service life potential. Premium systems were selected to contain combinations of (1) substrate, (2) pretreatments, (3) anticorrosive tiecoats, (4) antifouling to...

R. J. Dick B. J. Merrell L. J. Nowacki J. R. Sherrard

1975-01-01

10

76 FR 28130 - Coastal Bank, Cocoa Beach, Florida; Notice of Appointment of Receiver  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...OF THE TREASURY Office of Thrift Supervision Coastal Bank, Cocoa Beach, Florida; Notice of Appointment of Receiver Notice is...Deposit Insurance Corporation as sole Receiver for Coastal Bank, Cocoa Beach, Florida, (OTS No. 15445) on May 6, 2011....

2011-05-13

11

The Effects of an Education Campaign on Beach User Perceptions of Beach-Nesting Birds in Pinellas County, Florida  

Microsoft Academic Search

Much of the suitable habitat for birds that nest on beaches in Florida is managed by municipal and county governments whose primary goal is human recreation. Birds attempting to nest on these beaches are exposed to higher levels of human disturbance and predation by human-associated species than birds on more natural, protected beaches. An education program about the birds was

Alison A. Ormsby; Elizabeth A. Forys

2010-01-01

12

Extended Evaluation of Potential Weir Sites for Wetland Conservation in Tiger Bay and Bennett Swamp, Volusia COunty, Florida, Phase II.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Municipal water demand in Volusia County, Florida, is expected to more than double from 45.7 million gallons per day (mgd) in 1988 to 95 mgd by 2010 (Williams 1997). Most of this increase is from the Daytona Beach metropolitan area. The communities in thi...

R. J. Freeman

2009-01-01

13

Aquifer coefficients determined from multiple well effects, Fernandina Beach, Florida.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

On September 30, 1977, a large industrial plant in Fernandina Beach, Florida, shut down six artesian wells that had been pumping continuously for several weeks from the Floridan aquifer. Two wells continued pumping until November 20, 1977, at which time the shutdown wells were restarted. A transmissivity of 30 000 ft2 day-1 (2800 m2 day-1) and a storage coefficient of between 2.5 x 10-4 and 4.0 x 10-4 were computed.-from Author

Bentley, C. B.

1979-01-01

14

Characteristics of a chronically, rapidly eroding beach: Long Key, Pinellas County, Florida  

Microsoft Academic Search

Long Key, on the central western coast of Florida, has been nourished repeatedly since 1975. Following nourishment, the beach has rapidly eroded. This study documents rates, processes, and mechanisms for the rapid erosion. To better understand the beach performance, it is crucial to quantify the background erosion rate when artificial beach fill is at its minimum. This year long study

Alyssa L Saint John

2004-01-01

15

ASSESSMENT OF OFFSHORE SAND RESOURCES FOR BEACH NOURISHMENT ALONG THE SOUTHWEST COAST OF FLORIDA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Regional sand resource investigations along the west coast of Florida (from Pinellas County to Collier County) identify types of primary depositional settings that are commonly explored for beach nourishment projects and indicate future availability of sand for beach restoration. Because the nature of sedimentary deposits determines sand quality and its potential use for beach nourishment, it is necessary to understand

Charles W. Finkl; Jeffrey L. Andrews; Lindino Benedet

16

NIOSH Health Hazard Evaluation Report: HETA No. 2004-0334-3017, Transportation Security Administration: Palm Beach International Airport, West Palm Beach, Florida, October 2006.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

On July 22, 2004, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) received a health hazard evaluation (HHE) request from the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) at the Palm Beach International Airport in West Palm Beach, Florida...

2006-01-01

17

Integrated solid waste management of Palm Beach County, Florida  

SciTech Connect

The subject document reports the results of an in-depth investigation of the fiscal year 1992 cost of the Palm Beach County, Florida integrated municipal solid waste management system (IMSWMS), the energy consumed to operate the system, and the environmental performance requirements for each of the system`s waste-processing and disposal facilities. Actual data from records kept by participants is reported in this document. Every effort was made to minimize the use of assumptions, and no attempt is made to interpret the data reported. Analytical approaches are documented so that interested analysts may perform manipulation or further analysis of the data. As such, the report is a reference document for MSW management professionals who are interested in the actual costs and energy consumption for a one-year period, of an operating IMSWMS.

NONE

1995-11-01

18

HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS WASTE CHARACTERIZATION STUDY FOR PALM BEACH COUNTY, FLORIDA: A MITE PROGRAM EVALUATION  

EPA Science Inventory

The objectives of the Household hazardous Waste Characterization Study (the HHW Study) were to quantify the annual household hazardous waste (HHW) tonnages disposed in Palm Beach County, Florida's (the county) residential solid waste (characterized in this study as municipal soli...

19

Hurricane Opal: Beach and Dune Erosion and Structural Damage Along the Panhandle Coast of Florida.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report is a follow-up to an executive summary prepared in December 1995 entitled 'Hurricane Opal: Executive Summary of a Report on Structural Damage and Beach and Dune Erosion Along the Panhandle Coast of Florida' (FL Bureau of Beaches and Coastal Sy...

M. E. Leadon N. T. Nguyen R. R. Clark

1998-01-01

20

Spatiotemporal patterns of annual sea turtle nesting behaviors along an East Central Florida beach  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Florida coastline from Melbourne Beach to Wabasso Beach is one the most important nesting areas for loggerhead turtles (Caretta caretta) in the Western Hemisphere and for green turtles (Chelonia mydas) in the United States. In this study, we quantified the spatial patterns of numerous loggerhead (N?400,000) and green turtle (N?14,000) and less numerous (N?100) leatherback (Dermochelys coriacea) beach ascents

John F. Weishampel; Dean A. Bagley; Llewellyn M. Ehrhart; Brian L. Rodenbeck

2003-01-01

21

HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS WASTE CHARACTERIZATION STUDY FOR PALM BEACH COUNTY, FLORIDA - A MITE PROGRAM EVALUATION  

EPA Science Inventory

The objectives of the Household Hazardous Waste Characterization Study (the HHW Study) were to: 1) Quantity the annual household hazardous waste (HHW) tonnages disposed in Palm Beach County Florida?s (the County) residential solid waste (characterized in this study as municipal s...

22

Assessing municipal vulnerability to predicted sea level rise: City of Satellite Beach, Florida  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the fall of 2009 the City of Satellite Beach (City), Florida, authorized a study designed to assess municipal vulnerability\\u000a to rising sea level and facilitate discussion of potential adaptation strategies. The project is one of the first in Florida\\u000a to seriously address the potential consequences of global sea level rise, now forecast to rise a meter or more by

Randall W. Parkinson; Tara McCue

2011-01-01

23

Accelerated beach erosion in the south Atlantic coastal zone: is mitigation of artificially renourished beaches in SE Florida a rational practice or folly  

Microsoft Academic Search

The natural erosion of sandy beaches is a world wide problem that is often exacerbated by the structural controls that are designed to mitigate shoreline recession. As seen elsewhere, the deployment of groins and other erosion-control structures has met meager success along the Atlantic coast of south Florida. Artificial renourishment, placement of sand on the beach from land or offshore

C. W. Jr. Finkl; P. A. Matlack

1985-01-01

24

Black Immigrant Mothers in Palm Beach County, Florida, and Their Children's Readiness for School  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This report compares the circumstances and characteristics of Black immigrant mothers in Palm Beach County, Florida, to those of Latina immigrant and Black native-born mothers, focusing on those living in distressed areas. The study also compares the early developmental outcomes of their children. When controlling for parental and child…

Rich, Lauren; Spielberger, Julie; D'Angelo, Angela Valdovinos

2012-01-01

25

Bridging Cultural Chasms between Providers and HIV-Positive Haitians in Palm Beach County, Florida  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article discusses special challenges faced by HIV-positive Haitian immigrants, one of the groups targeted by the Care System Assessment Demonstration Project in Palm Beach County, Florida. The article examines the following issues: structural health care access barriers; language and literacy; health beliefs and practices and their intersection with Western medicine; health care-seeking attitudes, emotions, and behaviors; bridging cultural chasms;

Miriam Potocky; Karen Dodge; Michael Greene

2007-01-01

26

Investigating the Influence of Wave Climate on Beach Morphodynamics at Matanzas Inlet, Florida Atlantic Coast  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Barrier island systems, common to the East coast of North America, are characterized by long, straight beaches interrupted by tidal inlets that serve to exchange fluid and sediment between estuaries and oceans. These inlets often build ebb tidal deltas that disrupt the nearshore wave field responsible for longshore sediment transport, whose gradients result in erosion, accretion, and shoreline change. The development of numerical models to simulate coastal geomorphic response to wave climate, sea level rise, and terrestrial sedimentary inputs will be aided by data sets documenting oceanic forcing and beach morphologic change at inlets. To better understand the natural seasonal variability in beach morphology at an inlet-influenced barrier island site, we have developed a field-based monitoring program at Matanzas Inlet, on the Florida Atlantic coast. This site was selected, in part, because it is the only inlet (of 19 along the Florida Atlantic coast) that has not experienced substantial anthropogenic modification. Monthly, differential GPS beach surveys (beginning in January 2009) document intertidal beach change within the ~2.5 km adjacent to the mouth of Matanzas Inlet. Time series data of volumetric beach change and shoreline position are compared to wave height, period, and direction data from a nearby NDBC buoy (Station 41012). Initial results suggest that gross beach volumetric change is correlated with deep-water wave direction; highly oblique waves correspond greatest gross morphologic variability. In addition, increasing wave periods, associated with more stable and orthogonal wave directions correspond to decreased intertidal beach erosion culminating in net accretion. Preliminary observations of changes in shoreline location render a persistent zone of accretion, during a period of mild, summer wave climate, located on the north side of the inlet. This may be due to the growth of the inlet’s ebb-tidal delta providing a natural trap for southward-directed longshore sediment transport.

Malone, K. K.; Adams, P. N.

2009-12-01

27

Proceedings of the 2010 CIAE Pre-Conference (59th, Clearwater Beach, Florida, October 24-26, 2010)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The 2010 International Pre-Conference of the Commission on International Adult Education (CIAE), American Association for Adult & Continuing (AAACE), was successfully conducted from October 24-26, at the Hilton Clearwater Beach Resort, Clearwater Beach, Florida. This publication includes the papers presented during the conference. These are: (1)…

Commission for International Adult Education (NJ1), 2010

2010-01-01

28

Altitude of water table, surficial aquifer, Palm Beach County, Florida, April 24-26, 1984  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water levels in Palm Beach County, Florida, were measured in April 1984 to determine the altitude of the water table in the surficial aquifer. A total of 104 wells and 50 surface-water measurement sites were used to contour the altitude of the water table at 2 and 4-foot intervals. The water-level measurements made in April represent low-water levels near the end of south Florida 's dry season. Contours of the water table at this time ranged from 22 feet above sea level in the north-central part of the county to 2 feet near the coast. (USGS)

Miller, Wesley L.

1985-01-01

29

Care system assessment demonstration project, Palm Beach County, Florida: methodology, findings, and recommendations.  

PubMed

Palm Beach County, Florida was one of three sites selected nationally for the Care System Assessment Demonstration Project. The special focus of the Palm Beach project was Black women (both U.S.-born and foreign-born). The CSAD consists of two complementary components: (1) Rapid Assessment, Response, and Evaluation (RARE), which examines the research topic from the perspectives of the affected population (i.e., HIV-positive Black women who are not in care); and (2) Care System Assessment, which examines the research topic from the perspectives of people within the HIV/AIDS care system (e.g., health care providers, planners, HIV-positive Black women in care). This article presents the methods, findings, and recommendations from the Palm Beach County site. PMID:17938468

Dodge, Karen; Potocky-Tripodi, Miriam

2007-08-01

30

Bridging cultural chasms between providers and HIV-positive Haitians in Palm Beach County, Florida.  

PubMed

This article discusses special challenges faced by HIV-positive Haitian immigrants, one of the groups targeted by the Care System Assessment Demonstration Project in Palm Beach County, Florida. The article examines the following issues: structural health care access barriers; language and literacy; health beliefs and practices and their intersection with Western medicine; health care-seeking attitudes, emotions, and behaviors; bridging cultural chasms; and lessons learned. PMID:17938469

Potocky-Tripodi, Miriam; Dodge, Karen; Greene, Michael

2007-08-01

31

Airborne radioactivity survey of parts of Atlantic Ocean beach, Virginia to Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The accompanying maps show the results of an airborne radioactivity survey along the Atlantic Ocean beach from Cape Henry, Virginia to Cape Fear, North Carolina and from Savannah Bach Georgia to Miami Beach, Florida. The survey was made March 23-24, 1953, as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. The survey was made with scintillation detection equipment mounted in a Douglas DC-3 aircraft and consisted of one flight line, at a 500-foot altitude, parallel to the beach. The vertical projection of the flight line coincided approximately with the landward limit of the modern beach. The width of the zone on the ground from which anomalous radiation is measured at the normal 500 foot flight altitude varies with the areal extent radioactivity of the source. For strong sources of radioactivity the width of the zone would be as much as 1,400 feet. The location of the flight lines is shown on the index map below. No abnormal radioactivity was detected along the northern flight line between Cape Henry, Virginia and Cape Fear, North Carolina. Along the southern flight line fourteen areas of abnormal radioactivity were detected between Savannah Beach, Georgia and Anastasia Island, Florida as shown on the map on the left. The abnormal radioactivity is apparently due to radioactive minerals associated with "black sand" deposits with occur locally along the beach in this region. The present technique of airborne radioactivity measurement does not permit distinguishing between activity sue to thorium and that due to uranium. An anomaly, therefore, may represent radioactivity due entirely to one or to a combination of these elements. It is not possible to determine the extent or radioactive content of the materials responsible for the abnormal radioactivity. The information given on the accompanying map indicates only those localities of greater-than-average radioactivity and, therefore suggest areas in which uranium and thorium deposits are more likely to occur.

Moxham, R.M.; Johnson, R.W.

1953-01-01

32

Proceedings of the 1998 Photovoltaic Performance and Reliability Workshop; Cocoa Beach, Florida; November 3-5, 1998  

SciTech Connect

This proceedings is the compilation of all papers presented at the 11th PV Performance and Reliability Workshop held at the Doubletree Hotel in Cocoa Beach, Florida, on November 3-5, 1998. The workshop was hosted by the Florida Solar Energy Center. This year's workshop included presentations from 29 speakers and had 110 attendees.

Kroposki, B.

1998-12-17

33

Florida Red Tide and Human Health: A Pilot Beach Conditions Reporting System to Minimize Human Exposure  

PubMed Central

With over 50% of the US population living in coastal counties, the ocean and coastal environments have substantial impacts on coastal communities. While may of the impacts are positive, such as tourism and recreation opportunities, there are also negative impacts, such as exposure to harmful algal blooms (HABs) and water borne pathogens. Recent advances in environmental monitoring and weather prediction may allow us to forecast these potential adverse effects and thus mitigate the negative impact from coastal environmental threats. One example of the need to mitigate adverse environmental impacts occurs on Florida’s west coast, which experiences annual blooms, or periods of exuberant growth, of the toxic dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis. K. brevis produces a suite of potent neurotoxins called brevetoxins. Wind and wave action can break up the cells, releasing toxin that can then become part of the marine aerosol or sea spray. Brevetoxins in the aerosol cause respiratory irritation in people who inhale it. In addition, asthmatics who inhale the toxins report increase upper and lower airway lower symptoms and experience measurable changes in pulmonary function. Real-time reporting of the presence or absence of these toxic aerosols will allow asthmatics and local coastal residents to make informed decisions about their personal exposures, thus adding to their quality of life. A system to protect public health that combines information collected by an Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) has been designed and implemented in Sarasota and Manatee Counties, Florida. This system is based on real-time reports from lifeguards at the eight public beaches. The lifeguards provide periodic subjective reports of the amount of dead fish on the beach, apparent level of respiratory irritation among beach-goers, water color, wind direction, surf condition, and the beach warning flag they are flying. A key component in the design of the observing system was an easy reporting pathway for the lifeguards to minimize the amount of time away from their primary duties. Specifically, we provided a Personal Digital Assistant for each of the eight beaches. The portable unit allows the lifeguards to report from their guard tower. The data are transferred via wireless Internet to a website hosted on the Mote Marine Laboratory Sarasota Operations of the Coastal Ocean Observation Laboratories (SO COOL) server. The system has proven to be robust and well received by the public. The system has reported variability from beach to beach and has provided vital information to users to minimize their exposure to toxic marine aerosols.

Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Currier, Robert; Nierenberg, Kate; Reich, Andrew; Backer, Lorraine C.; Stumpf, Richard; Fleming, Lora; Kirkpatrick, Gary

2008-01-01

34

Accelerated beach erosion in the south Atlantic coastal zone: is mitigation of artificially renourished beaches in SE Florida a rational practice or folly  

SciTech Connect

The natural erosion of sandy beaches is a world wide problem that is often exacerbated by the structural controls that are designed to mitigate shoreline recession. As seen elsewhere, the deployment of groins and other erosion-control structures has met meager success along the Atlantic coast of south Florida. Artificial renourishment, placement of sand on the beach from land or offshore borrows, is a relatively new nonstructural attempt to reduce shoreline retreat. Our study of sandy shores lying downdrift of jettied inlets identifies restricted sand bypassing that results in classical shoreline offsets. Many of the beaches that were previously renourished are again classified, by the Corps of Engineers, as critically eroded and local governments are now requesting additional rounds of renourishment. Attempts to stabilize renourished shores by planting dune grass, beach scraping, and scarp reduction, as in the Port Everglades area, have failed. Sediment loss at the John U. Lloyd Beach since 1976, for example, is in excess of 500,000 m/sup 3/. In this area, erosion is accelerated and chronic. The severity of localized erosion is highlighted here by assuming a worst case scenario without renourishment or structural control. Hurricane-induced storm surge and overwash could, before renourishment is attempted in 1986 or 1987, cut through the barrier even sooner. Such a breach would expose the port facilities to direct effects of the sea. Joint studies by geoscientists and planners are needed to determine whether continued renourishment of eroded beaches in developed areas is essential, practical, or even advisable.

Finkl, C.W. Jr.; Matlack, P.A.

1985-01-01

35

Earliest art in the Americas: incised image of a proboscidean on a mineralized extinct animal bone from Vero Beach, Florida  

Microsoft Academic Search

A fragmented fossil bone incised with the figure of a proboscidean was recently found at Vero Beach, Florida near the location where Late Pleistocene fauna and human bones were recovered from 1913 to 1916. This engraving may represent the oldest and only existing example of Terminal Pleistocene art depicting a proboscidean in the Americas. Because of the uniqueness, rarity, and

Barbara A. Purdy; Kevin S. Jones; John J. Mecholsky; Gerald Bourne; Richard C. Hulbert; Bruce J. MacFadden; Krista L. Church; Michael W. Warren; Thomas F. Jorstad; Dennis J. Stanford; Melvin J. Wachowiak; Robert J. Speakman

2011-01-01

36

State Route 44 from Interstate Route 95 to U.S. Route 1 in New Smyra Beach, Volusia County, Florida.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The project is for the proposed relocation and reconstruction of State Route 44 from the intersection with Interstate Route 95 eastwardly to the intersection with U.S. Route 1 in the City of New Smyrna Beach, Volusia County, Florida, a distance of 3.5 mil...

1973-01-01

37

Prototype demonstration studies of production of methane from municipal solid waste at Pompano Beach, Florida  

SciTech Connect

A prototype demonstration plant for the production of methane from anaerobic digestion of municipal solid waste in amounts up to 100 tons per day is built at Pompano Beach, Florida. The plant is capable of producing 6000 ft/sup 3/ of gas per ton of municipal waste. Approximately half of the gas is methane, the other half CO/sub 2/ along with some trace gases. In this plant the raw municipal solid waste is shredded, ferrous metals removed magnetically and air classified to obtain an organic-rich light weight fraction, which is periodically mixed with sewage sludge and fed into the anaerobic digester. The processed effluent is filtered in a vacuum filter and the emerging filter cake is disposed on the nearby existing sanitary landfill. The filtrate is recirculated into the digester. Various gas, solid and liquid streams coming out of the digester are analyzed for physical, chemical and biological pollution parameters.

Faroog, S.; Daly, E.; Dasgupta, A.; Gerrish, M.P.; Sengupta, S.; Wong, K.F.

1980-12-01

38

PROCEEDINGS OF THE WORKSHOP: MICROBIAL DEGRADATION OF POLLUTANTS IN MARINE ENVIRONMENTS HELD AT PENSACOLA BEACH, FLORIDA ON 9-14 APRIL 1978  

EPA Science Inventory

The international workshop, held April 10-14, 1978, at Pensacola Beach, Florida, focuses on pertinent issues related to the scientific investigation of microbial degradation of organic chemicals in aquatic environments. Participants discuss methodological criteria for these inves...

39

Proceedings of the Workshop: Microbial Degradation of Pollutants in Marine Environments Held at Pensacola Beach, Florida on 9-14 April 1978.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The international workshop, held April 10-14, 1978, at Pensacola Beach, Florida, focuses on pertinent issues related to the scientific investigation of microbial degradation of organic chemicals in aquatic environments. Participants discuss methodological...

A. W. Bourquin P. H. Pritchard

1979-01-01

40

Health assessment for Piper Aircraft Corporation, Indian River County, Vero Beach, Florida, Region 4. CERCLIS No. FLD004054284. Preliminary report  

SciTech Connect

The Piper Aircraft Corporation/Vero Beach Water and Sewer Department National Priorities List Site covers 8 acres in Vero Beach, Indiana River County, Florida. The facility began assembling and painting light aircraft in 1957. Chemicals utilized in these operations are stored on-site in underground storage tanks. In 1978, routine sampling and analysis of the city water supply revealed the presence of four volatile organic compounds: trichloroethene, 1,1-dichloroethene, cis/trans-1,2-dichloroethene and vinyl chloride. Based on available information, the site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of exposure to hazardous substance via contaminated groundwater, aerated groundwater that is being discharged to the surface water, and air contaminants released from the groundwater aeration process.

Not Available

1989-04-19

41

The Benthic Fauna and Sediments of the Nearshore Zone Off Panama City Beach, Florida.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This study presents: (1) basic data on the benthic fauna and surface sediments of the nearshore zone of Panama City Beach, Fla., before restoration of the beach, and (2) the results of a study on the effect of Hurricane Eloise on the benthic fauna in the ...

C. H. Saloman

1976-01-01

42

Palm Beach County, Florida Estuarine Natural Resources Inventory and Resource Enhancement Study.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Palm Beach County Department of Environmental Resources Management (ERM) began an inventory of intracoastal habitats in 1990 in the Lake Worth Lagoon Natural Resources Inventory and Resource Enhancement Study. Continuation of the resource inventory includ...

1992-01-01

43

Marine Accident Report - Sinking of the U.S. Fishing Vessel SANTO ROSARIO about 35 Nautical Miles East of New Smyrna Beach, Florida, July 23, 1984.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

About 0430 on July 23, 1984, the 70.5-foot-long U.S. fishing vessel SANTO ROSARIO, while fishing for calico scallops about 35 nautical miles east of New Smyrna Beach, Florida, capsized and sank. Three crewmembers were rescued by a fishing vessel nearby, b...

1986-01-01

44

Interagency Workshop on In-situ Water-Quality Sensing (2nd): Biological Sensors, Held at Pensacola Beach, Florida on April 28-30, 1980.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The 2nd Interagency Workshop on In-Situ Water-Quality Sensing: Biological Sensors, was convened at Pensacola Beach, Florida during the period April 2-30, 1980. The purpose of the workshop was to review the potential of biological mechanisms and organisms ...

E. D. Kennedy

1980-01-01

45

Confirmation of putative stormwater impact on water quality at a Florida beach by microbial source tracking methods and structure of indicator organism populations  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effect of a stormwater conveyance system on indicator bacteria levels at a Florida beach was assessed using microbial source tracking methods, and by investigating indicator bacteria population structure in water and sediments. During a rain event, regulatory standards for both fecal coliforms and Enterococcus spp. were exceeded, contrasting with significantly lower levels under dry conditions. Indicator bacteria levels were

M. J. Brownell; V. J. Harwood; R. C. Kurz; S. M. McQuaig; J. Lukasik; T. M. Scott

2007-01-01

46

PROCEEDINGS AND SUMMARY REPORT: WORKSHOP ON THE FATE, TRANSPORT, AND TRANSFORMATION OF MERCURY IN AQUATIC AND TERRESTRIAL ENVIRONMENTS, MAY 8-10, 2001, WEST PALM BEACH, FLORIDA  

EPA Science Inventory

The Workshop on the Fate, Transport, and Transformation of Mercury in Aquatic and Terrestrial Environments was held on May 8-10, 2001 in West Palm Beach, Florida. The workshop was conducted by the USEPA's Office of Research and Development and cosponsored by the U.S. Geological S...

47

Impact of trichloroethylene contaminated groundwater discharged to the main canal and Indian River lagoon, Vero Beach, Florida  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater highly contaminated with trichloroethylene (TCE) from a leaky storage tank was detected in Vero Beach, Florida in 1978. Aware of this problem, the local and state authorities gave permission to pump out the contaminated water as a means of reducing concentrations in the aquifer. The water was air sprayed to strip the organic compounds and subsequently discharged and mixed by means of a hydraulic pump in the drainage canal. The average discharge rate of contaminated water into the canal was approximately 0.2 million gallons per day. This project was initiated to determine the spatial distribution of pollutants in the canal and river as well as rainfall and canal flow rate effects on water, sediment, and biological organisms. Prior to flushing the well, a baseline survey of trichloroethylene and other related compounds in the canal and river was performed.

Wang, T.; Lenahan, R.; Kanik, M.

1985-04-01

48

77 FR 8258 - Notice of Proposals To Engage in or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...or control voting securities or assets of a company...Georgia 30309: 1. Gateway Financial Holdings of Florida, Inc., Daytona Beach...through its subsidiary, Gateway Asset Holdings, Daytona...CertusHoldings, Inc., Atlanta,...

2012-02-14

49

Results of the followup site verification survey at Eglin Air Force Base, Fort Walton Beach, Florida  

Microsoft Academic Search

Air Force Research, Development, Testing, and Evaluation (RDT and E) of depleted uranium (DU) as a conventional munitions component beam at Eglin Air Force Base (AFB), Florida. The relatively small volumes of depleted uranium waste (DUW) generated during these efforts were disposed of at commercial disposal sites. However, as the utility of DU as a munition component became well established,larger

R. D. Foley; L. M. Floyd

1989-01-01

50

Results of the baseline radiological survey at Eglin Air Force Base, Fort Walton Beach, Florida  

Microsoft Academic Search

Air Force Research, Development, Testing, and Evaluation (RDT and E) of depleted uranium (DU) as a conventional munitions component began at Eglin Air Force Base (AFB), Florida. The relatively small volumes of depleted uranium waste (DUW) generated during these efforts were disposed of at commercial disposal sites. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was awarded a management contract by the US

R. D. Foley; R. F. Carrier

1989-01-01

51

Comparison of Elements in Bottlenose Dolphins Stranded on the Beaches of Texas and Florida in the Gulf of Mexico over a One-Year Period  

Microsoft Academic Search

.   We analyzed tissue samples from bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) that had stranded on beaches in Texas and Florida over a 1-year period starting in September 1991. The concentrations of\\u000a 10 elements plus methyl mercury (MeHg) were determined in brain, kidney, and liver, and we examined these results for differences\\u000a based upon age, site, sex, and tissue type. A strong

J. P. Meador; D. Ernest; A. A. Hohn; K. Tilbury; J. Gorzelany; G. Worthy; J. E. Stein

1999-01-01

52

Health assessment for Wilson Concepts of Florida, Inc. , Pompano Beach, Florida, Region 4. CERCLIS No. FLD041184383. Preliminary report  

SciTech Connect

The Wilson Concepts site in northeastern Broward County, Florida has been manufacturing precision-machined parts since 1976. Waste cleaners, coolants, and lubricants were discharged directly onto the ground or overflowed from underground holding tanks subsequently spilling into an on-site dry-well storm drain. Carter and Crawley, a computer parts manufacturing company, began operation at the site on January 3, 1989. The 1986 analytic results reported in the NUS Site Screening Investigation (EPA, 1986) indicated that ground water on-site contains elevated concentrations. The soil and subsurface soil contamination levels did not exceed health concern screening levels. Based on the available information, this site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of exposure to hazardous substances via inhalation, ingestion, and dermal absorption of contaminants. The contaminants include vinyl chloride, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, cyanide, copper, 1,1-dichloroethene, lead, nickel, and 1,1-dichloroethane in ground water and 1,1,1-trichloroethane, 1,1-dichloroethane and 1,1-dichloroethene in storm water. To date, the population identified to be of greatest concern is on-site workers.

Not Available

1990-05-31

53

Hydrogeologic and Hydraulic Characterization of the Surficial Aquifer System, and Origin of High Salinity Groundwater, Palm Beach County, Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Previous studies of the hydrogeology of the surficial aquifer system in Palm Beach County, Florida, have focused mostly on the eastern one-half to one-third of the county in the more densely populated coastal areas. These studies have not placed the hydrogeology in a framework in which stratigraphic units in this complex aquifer system are defined and correlated between wells. Interest in the surficial aquifer system has increased because of population growth, westward expansion of urbanized areas, and increased utilization of surface-water resources in the central and western areas of the county. In 2004, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the South Florida Water Management District, initiated an investigation to delineate the hydrogeologic framework of the surficial aquifer system in Palm Beach County, based on a lithostratigraphic framework, and to evaluate hydraulic properties and characteristics of units and permeable zones within this framework. A lithostratigraphic framework was delineated by correlating markers between all wells with data available based primarily on borehole natural gamma-ray geophysical log signatures and secondarily, lithologic characteristics. These correlation markers approximately correspond to important lithostratigraphic unit boundaries. Using the markers as guides to their boundaries, the surficial aquifer system was divided into three main permeable zones or subaquifers, which are designated, from shallowest to deepest, zones 1, 2, and 3. Zone 1 is above the Tamiami Formation in the Anastasia and Fort Thompson Formations. Zone 2 primarily is in the upper part or Pinecrest Sand Member of the Tamiami Formation, and zone 3 is in the Ochopee Limestone Member of the Tamiami Formation or its correlative equivalent. Differences in the lithologic character exist between these three zones, and these differences commonly include differences in the nature of the pore space. Zone 1 attains its greatest thickness (50 feet or more) and highest transmissivity in coastal areas. Zone 2, the most transmissive and extensive zone, is thickest (80 feet or more) and most transmissive in the inland eastern areas near Florida's Turnpike. In this area, zone 1 is absent, and the semiconfining unit above zone 2 extends to the land surface with a thickness commonly ranging from 50 to 100 feet. The thickness of zone 2 decreases to zero in most wells near the coast. Zone 3 attains its greatest thickness (100 feet or more) in the southwestern and south-central areas; zone 3 is equivalent to the gray limestone aquifer. The distribution of transmissivity was mapped by zone; however, zones 2 and 3 were commonly combined in aquifer tests. Maximum transmissivities for zone 1, zones 2 and 3, and zone 3 were 90,000, 180,000, and 70,000 ft2/d (feet-squared per day), respectively. The northern extent of the area with transmissivity greater than 50,000 ft2/d for zones 2 and 3 in the inland northeastern area along Florida's Turnpike has not been defined based on available data and could extend 5 to 10 miles farther north than mapped. Based on the thickness of zone 2 and a limited number of aquifer tests, a large area of zone 2 with transmissivity greater than 10,000 ft2/d, and possibly as much as 30,000 ft2/d, extends to the west across Water Conservation Area 1 from the inland southeastern area into the south-central area and some of the southwestern area. In contrast to the Biscayne aquifer present to the south of Palm Beach County, zones 2 and 3 are interpreted to be present principally in the Tamiami Formation and are commonly overlain by a thick semiconfining unit of moderate permeability. These zones have been referred to as the 'Turnpike' aquifer in the inland eastern areas of Palm Beach County, and the extent of greatest thickness and transmissivity follows, or is adjacent to, Florida's Turnpike. Where it is thick and transmissive, zone 1 may be considered equivalent to the Biscayne aquifer. Areas

Reese, Ronald S.; Wacker, Michael A.

2009-01-01

54

Saltwater intrusion in the shallow aquifer in Martin and Palm Beach counties, Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Urban growth has been rapid in recent years in Palm Beach and Martin Counties, Fla. The withdrawal of large quantities of fresh ground water in the vicinity of the coast has reduced or locally reversed the natural seaward hydraulic gradient and, in places, allowed saltwater to advance landward in the aquifer, displacing freshwater. Maps show the position of the saltwater front in eight urban areas adjacent to the coast. The saltwater front, as shown on the profiles, is based on a chloride concentration of 250 mg/liter which is recommended as a limit for water that is considered potable. The chloride concentration of native freshwater almost always is less than 50 mg/liter in the coastal aquifer. (Woodard-USGS)

Scott, W. B.; Land, L. F.; Rodis, H. G.

1977-01-01

55

Ineffectiveness of mass trapping for mosquito control in St. Andrews State Park, Panama City Beach, Florida.  

PubMed

ABSTRACT. Mass trapping with multiple CO2- and octenol-supplemented Mosquito Magnet X traps (MM-X), operated 24 h/day, 7 days/wk, from March through November 2008, at St. Andrews State Park on northwest Florida's Gulf Coast, did not significantly reduce mosquito numbers compared to nontreated control sites. Anopheles crucians, Aedes taeniorhynchus, Culex salinarius, and Culex erraticus were the predominant species. Culex coronator was also collected for the first time in the park. Failure to reduce a late season outbreak of Ae. taeniorhynchus within the trapping area required adulticide application to achieve mosquito control. PMID:20402350

Smith, John P; Cope, Eric H; Walsh, Jimmy D; Hendrickson, Charles D

2010-03-01

56

Hydrogeology and the distribution of salinity in the Floridan aquifer system, Palm Beach County, Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The virtually untapped Floridan aquifer system is considered to be a supplemental source of water for public use in the highly populated coastal area of Palm Beach County. A recent study was conducted to delineate the distribution of salinity in relation to the local hydrogeology and assess the potential processes that might control (or have affected) the distribution of salinity in the Floridan aquifer system. The Floridan aquifer system in the study area consists of the Upper Floridan aquifer, middle confining unit, and Lower Floridan aquifer and ranges in age from Paleocene to Oligocene. Included at its top is part of a lowermost Hawthorn Group unit referred to as the basal Hawthorn unit. The thickness of this basal unit is variable, ranging from about 30 to 355 feet; areas where this unit is thick were paleotopographic lows during deposition of the unit. The uppermost permeable zones in the Upper Floridan aquifer occur in close association with an unconformity at the base of the Hawthorn Group; however, the highest of these zones can be up in the basal unit. A dolomite unit of Eocene age generally marks the top of the Lower Floridan aquifer, but the top of this dolomite unit has a considerable altitude range: from about 1,200 to 2,300 feet below sea level. Additionally, where the dolomite unit is thick, its top is high and the middle confining unit of the Floridan aquifer system, as normally defined, probably is not present. An upper zone of brackish water and a lower zone of water with salinity similar to that of seawater (saline-water zone) are present in the Floridan aquifer system. The brackish-water and saline-water zones are separated by a transition zone (typically 100 to 200 feet thick) in which salinity rapidly increases with depth. The transition zone was defined by using a salinity of 10,000 mg/L (milligrams per liter) of dissolved-solids concentration (about 5,240 mg/L of chloride concentration) at its top and 35,000 mg/L of dissolved-solids concentration (about 18,900 mg/L of chloride concentration) at its base. The base of the brackish-water zone and the top of the saline-water zone were approximately determined mostly by means of resistivity geophysical logs. The base of the brackish-water zone in the study area ranges from about 1,600 feet below sea level near the coast to almost 2,200 feet below sea level in extreme southwestern Palm Beach County. In an area that is peripheral to Lake Okeechobee, the boundary unexpectedly rises to perhaps as shallow as 1,800 feet below sea level. In an upper interval of the brackish-water zone within the Upper Floridan aquifer, chloride concentration of water ranges from 490 to 8,000 mg/L. Chloride concentration correlates with the altitude of the basal contact of the Hawthorn Group, with concentration increasing as the altitude of this contact decreases. Several areas of anomalous salinity where chloride concentration in this upper interval is greater than 3,000 mg/L occur near the coast. In most of these areas, salinity was found to decrease with depth from the upper interval to a lower interval within the brackish-water zone: a reversal of the normal salinity trend within the zone. These areas are also characterized by an anomalously low altitude of the base of the brackish-water zone, and a much greater thickness of the transition zone than normal. These anomalies could be the result of seawater preferentially invading zones of higher permeability in the Upper Floridan aquifer during Pleistocene high stands of sea level and incomplete flushing of this high salinity water by the present-day flow system.

Reese, R. S.; Memberg, S. J.

2000-01-01

57

Choctawhatchee Beach Mouse, Perdido Key Beach Mouse and Alabama Beach Mouse Recovery Plan.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The old field mouse (Peromyscus polionotus) is distributed throughout northeastern Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, South Carolina, and Florida. Certain subspecies occur on beaches and dunes of the Atlantic coast of Florida and the Gulf Coast of Alabama and...

1987-01-01

58

Results of the baseline radiological survey at Eglin Air Force Base, Fort Walton Beach, Florida  

SciTech Connect

Air Force Research, Development, Testing, and Evaluation (RDT and E) of depleted uranium (DU) as a conventional munitions component began at Eglin Air Force Base (AFB), Florida. The relatively small volumes of depleted uranium waste (DUW) generated during these efforts were disposed of at commercial disposal sites. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was awarded a management contract by the US Air Force to oversee the repackaging, transportation, and disposal of the DUW. The ORNL Measurement Applications and Development (MAD) group participated in the contract administration by providing advice in planning, site radiological baseline characterization surveys, radiation safety audits, and a followup site verification survey. The reason for these baseline surveys was to determine the radiological conditions on: (1) two areas where uranium had been handled, and (2) a section of public roadway over which the radioactive material would be hauled from one site to another on the base. The findings of this survey constitute the radiological baseline for the repackaging operation. 3 refs., 13 figs., 7 tabs.

Foley, R.D.; Carrier, R.F.

1989-03-01

59

Results of the followup site verification survey at Eglin Air Force Base, Fort Walton Beach, Florida  

SciTech Connect

Air Force Research, Development, Testing, and Evaluation (RDT and E) of depleted uranium (DU) as a conventional munitions component beam at Eglin Air Force Base (AFB), Florida. The relatively small volumes of depleted uranium waste (DUW) generated during these efforts were disposed of at commercial disposal sites. However, as the utility of DU as a munition component became well established,larger volumes of DUW from RDT and E efforts were produced. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was awarded a management contract by the US Air Force to oversee the repackaging, transportation, and disposal of the DUW. The baseline surveys were carried out to determine the radiological conditions on: (1) the two areas where uranium had been handled, and (2) the section of public roadway on the base over which the radioactive material was hauled from one site to another. The findings of that survey constitute the radiological baseline for the repackaging operation. After removal of the radioactive waste material, the followup site verification survey was conducted on the same three areas (i.e., the two areas where DUW had been handled and the public roadway over which it was hauled). The results of this survey characterize the radiological conditions on those areas subsequent to the repackaging, removal,and disposal operations. Data from the baseline study are included in the figures, tables, and text of this report for ease of comparison with the followup data and are referred to as baseline data. 4 refs., 15 figs., 9 tabs.

Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.

1989-03-01

60

A Study of the Courses, Programs and Facilities at the Okaloosa-Walton Junior College/University of West Florida Joint Center in Fort Walton Beach. Report and Recommendations of the Postsecondary Education Planning Commission, 1987. Report 9.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 1987, a task force was convened to determine the need for further expansion of the Okaloosa-Walton Junior College/University of West Florida (OWJC/UWF) Joint Center, and, if warranted, to select a permanent site for the facility. The task force undertook a study involving: (1) collection of demographic data on the Greater Fort Walton Beach area…

Florida State Postsecondary Education Planning Commission, Tallahassee.

61

Confirmation of putative stormwater impact on water quality at a Florida beach by microbial source tracking methods and structure of indicator organism populations.  

PubMed

The effect of a stormwater conveyance system on indicator bacteria levels at a Florida beach was assessed using microbial source tracking methods, and by investigating indicator bacteria population structure in water and sediments. During a rain event, regulatory standards for both fecal coliforms and Enterococcus spp. were exceeded, contrasting with significantly lower levels under dry conditions. Indicator bacteria levels were high in sediments under all conditions. The involvement of human sewage in the contamination was investigated using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays for the esp gene of Enterococcus faecium and for the conserved T antigen of human polyomaviruses, all of which were negative. BOX-PCR subtyping of Escherichia coli and Enterococcus showed higher population diversity during the rain event; and higher population similarity during dry conditions, suggesting that without fresh inputs, only a subset of the population survives the selective pressure of the secondary habitat. These data indicate that high indicator bacteria levels were attributable to a stormwater system that acted as a reservoir and conduit, flushing high levels of indicator bacteria to the beach during a rain event. Such environmental reservoirs of indicator bacteria further complicate the already questionable relationship between indicator organisms and human pathogens, and call for a better understanding of the ecology, fate and persistence of indicator bacteria. PMID:17544051

Brownell, M J; Harwood, V J; Kurz, R C; McQuaig, S M; Lukasik, J; Scott, T M

2007-06-01

62

Physical, Chemical, and Biological Characteristics of Nearshore Zone of Sand Key, Florida, Prior to Beach Restoration. Volume 2.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The study defines some of the major physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of the nearshore zone off Sand Key, Florida before restoration by dredging. Results of a supplemental study on the effects of hydraulic dredging for emergency restorati...

C. H. Saloman

1974-01-01

63

Physical, Chemical, and Biological Characteristics of Nearshore Zone of Sand Key, Florida, Prior to Beach Restoration. Volume I.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Continuing erosion along the gulf side of Sand Key, Fl., has reduced desirable beach area and rendered shore installations vulnerable to storm damage. Authorized by the River and Harbor Act of 1966, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers plans to restore the da...

C. H. Saloman

1974-01-01

64

PROCEEDINGS: ADVANCES IN PARTICLE SAMPLING AND MEASUREMENT (DAYTONA BEACH, FL, OCTOBER 1979)  

EPA Science Inventory

The proceedings consist of 20 reports of research on equipment and techniques for sampling and characterizing particulate emissions and other aerosols. The inhalable particle size range (up to 15 micrometers) is emphasized, and the basis for selecting this range as a standard is ...

65

Comparison of elements in bottlenose dolphins stranded on the beaches of Texas and Florida in the Gulf of Mexico over a one-year period.  

PubMed

We analyzed tissue samples from bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) that had stranded on beaches in Texas and Florida over a 1-year period starting in September 1991. The concentrations of 10 elements plus methyl mercury (MeHg) were determined in brain, kidney, and liver, and we examined these results for differences based upon age, site, sex, and tissue type. A strong inverse relationship between total mercury (Hg) and the percentage that was MeHg was found in liver, kidney, and brain tissue, presumably due to demethylation of MeHg. A threshold concentration was found for total Hg in brain tissue, indicating that most Hg was present as MeHg up to about 8 years of age. Increases in total Hg after this age were accompanied by an increase in the ratio of total Hg to MeHg, indicating demethylation. Strong relationships were found between total Hg in liver and age and between total Hg and selenium in liver, which have been observed before in many fish- and squid-eating marine mammals. The only difference based on sex of the animals was observed for MeHg, which was higher in females and contrary to the pattern often observed for organic contaminants. Several elements (copper, Hg, lead, zinc) exhibited intersite differences, which were not consistent. Bottlenose dolphin from Florida exhibited the highest levels of MeHg and total Hg, while animals from Texas exhibited the highest levels of lead, copper, and zinc. The essential elements copper and zinc were expected to be the same for the Texas and Florida animals; however, observed differences may indicate population differences in basic physiological levels, dietary intake, or health status. PMID:9828266

Meador, J P; Ernest, D; Hohn, A A; Tilbury, K; Gorzelany, J; Worthy, G; Stein, J E

1999-01-01

66

The application of peptide nucleic acid probes for rapid detection and enumeration of eubacteria, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in recreational beaches of S. Florida.  

PubMed

A novel chemiluminescent in situ hybridization technique using peptide nucleic acids (PNA) was adapted for the detection of bacteria in beach sand and recreational waters in South Florida. The simultaneous detection and enumeration of eubacteria and the novel indicators, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, was achieved within 6-8 h of processing. Following 5 h of incubation on TSA, soybean peroxidase-labeled peptide nucleic acid probes (Boston Probes, Boston, MA) targeting species-specific 16S rRNA sequences of P. aeruginosa and S. aureus were used to hybridize microcolonies of the target species in-situ. In addition, a universal probe for 16S rRNA sequences was used to target the eubacteria. Probes were detected after a light generating reaction with a chemiluminescent substrate and their presence recorded on Polaroid film. The probes showed limited cross-reactivity with mixed indigenous bacteria extracted from seawater and sand by shaking with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Specificity and cross-reactivity was tested on the reference bacterial genera Pseudomonas, Staphylococcus, Vibrio, Shigella, Salmonella, Acinetobacter, Enterobacter, Escherichia and Citrobacter. These tests confirmed that the probes were specific for the microorganisms of interest and were unaffected by high salt levels. The results of the PNA chemiluminescent in situ hybridization were compared with traditional plate count methods (PCM) for total 'freshwater' eubacteria, S. aureus and P. aeruginosa. Counts of eubacteria and S. aureus were comparable with numbers obtained from traditional plate counts but levels of P. aeruginosa were higher with PNA than with PCM. It is possible that PNA is more sensitive than PCM because it can detect microcolonies on the agar surface that never fully develop with the plate count method. We conclude that the in situ hybridization technique used here represents an important potential tool for the rapid monitoring of novel indicator organisms in beaches and recreational waters. PMID:15063055

Esiobu, Nwadiuto; Mohammed, Renuka; Echeverry, Andrea; Green, Melissa; Bonilla, Tonya; Hartz, Aaron; McCorquodale, Don; Rogerson, Andrew

2004-05-01

67

Collaborative Governance of HIV Health Services Planning Councils in Broward and Palm Beach Counties of South Florida  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study uses the collaborative governance concept to examine efforts of HIV Health Services Planning Councils in two South\\u000a Florida Counties. The study employs qualitative methods such as interviews and document reviews in collecting data from various\\u000a relevant sources. The results reveal more similarities than differences in the Councils’ efforts toward addressing the HIV\\/AIDS\\u000a problem. The Councils are similar in

James K. Agbodzakey

2012-01-01

68

Description and evaluation of the effects of urban and agricultural development on the surficial aquifer system, Palm Beach County, Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The surficial aquifer system in Palm Beach County was studied during 1982-85 to determine the effects of increased urban and agricultural development on groundwater levels, flow directions, and quality. The surficial aquifer system and its geologic matrix are divisible into three zones on the bases of relative permeabilities and lithologic characteristics. The two greatest water users in the county, public supply utilities and agricultural irrigators, increased total water withdrawals by 123 and 50%, respectively, during 1970-80. By 1980, 76% of public supply withdrawals were from zones I and II of the surficial aquifer system, whereas groundwater pumpage for irrigation decreased to 9% of the total irrigation water used. Increases in groundwater withdrawals for public supply were greatest in the southeast and central coastal parts of the county and served as an indicator for potential changes of flow directions and water quality in the surficial aquifer system. Residual seawater, emplaced in the aquifer system during the Pleistocene Epoch, is still prevalent in the central and western parts of Palm Beach County where low permeabilities in the geologic matrix have retarded its dilution. Chemical analyses of canal-water and groundwater samples collected in April 1984 were used to evaluate the effects of groundwater/surface water exchange on the quality of water during canal conveyance across the area containing residual seawater. (USGS)

Miller, W. L.

1988-01-01

69

77 FR 63722 - Special Local Regulations; Palm Beach World Championship, Atlantic Ocean; Jupiter, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Special Local Regulations; Palm Beach World Championship, Atlantic Ocean; Jupiter...Jupiter, Florida during the Palm Beach World Championship, a high speed power boat race. The Palm Beach World Championship is scheduled to take...

2012-10-17

70

The Beach  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This radio broadcast explores the science, history and culture of the beach; the problems of beach erosion as a result of sea levels, storms and overdevelopment; and where the best beaches are and why they are the best. The show discusses the natural fluctuations of the amount of sand on beaches, how beaches rebuild themselves, efforts at beach replenishment, the formation of barrier islands, the value of dune grass, and what the sand is composed of at various beaches. The 1998 broadcast is 49 minutes in length.

71

Recycled Glass Cullet as an Alternative Beach Fill Material: Results of Biological and Chemical Analyses  

Microsoft Academic Search

MAKOWSKI, C. and RUSENKO, K., 2007. Recycled glass cullet as an alternative beach fill material: results of biological and chemical analyses. Journal of Coastal Research, 23(3), 545-552. West Palm Beach (Florida), ISSN 0749- 0208. Florida's critically eroded beaches pose a myriad of social and environmental concerns, prompting an effort to explore alternatives to more traditional sand sources. One alternative involves

Christopher Makowski; Kirt Rusenko

2007-01-01

72

A Gathering Storm: How Palm Beach County Schools Fail Poor and Minority Children.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report takes a hard look at the day-to-day workings of Palm Beach County (Florida) schools to explain why the systemic change model of Florida's current reform legislation is likely to fail the students in greatest need of improved schooling. The Palm Beach County School District is the 4th largest district in Florida, and the 15th largest in…

Carmona, Lisa A.; Wheelock, Anne; First, Joan

73

A Gathering Storm: How Palm Beach County Schools Fail Poor and Minority Children.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This report takes a hard look at the day-to-day workings of Palm Beach County (Florida) schools to explain why the systemic change model of Florida's current reform legislation is likely to fail the students in greatest need of improved schooling. The Palm Beach County School District is the 4th largest district in Florida, and the 15th largest…

Carmona, Lisa A.; Wheelock, Anne; First, Joan

74

Recovery Plan: Anastasia Island Beach Mouse ('Peromyscus polionotus phasma') and Southeastern Beach Mouse ('Peromyscus polionotus niveiventris').  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Anastasia Island beach mouse is listed as an endangered species, and is restricted to Anastasia Island, St. Johns County, Florida and a recently introduced population at Guana River State Park, Flagler County. The only two healthy populations are conf...

1993-01-01

75

Education Conference of the Gulf of Mexico Accord (1st, Daytona Beach, FL, September 28-30, 1995). Interim Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Under the auspices of the North American Free Trade Agreement, five states in the United States and six states in Mexico established the Gulf of Mexico Accord to create a working partnership to foster economic development in the Gulf of Mexico. The agreement addresses six major sectors: investment; communication and transportation; health;…

Day, Philip R., Jr.

76

BEACH Watch  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Environmental Protection Agency has released data from the third annual National Health Protection Survey of Beaches for the 1999 swimming season. Based on voluntarily returned surveys, the site offers information on water quality at 1,891 beaches in the US. Using an interactive map, users can find out if the water at a selected beach is being monitored, who is responsible for monitoring, and if any advisories or closures have been issued. Initial entries for each beach include basic monitoring information, contact information, and a map. Users can also read the submitted survey form in full. Additional resources at the BEACH Watch site include summary results from the survey, a fact sheet, technical reports and reference, brochures amd pamphlets, a FAQ, and related links.

77

FLORIDA HAZARDOUS WASTE AND SANITARY LANDFILL REPORT, COUNTY DATA. GENERATOR DATA AND CHARACTERISTICS OF SANITARY LANDFILLS. PART 8. COUNTIES: OSCEOLA, PALM BEACH, PASCO, PINELLAS  

EPA Science Inventory

The report provides data on the use of sanitary landfills (Subtitle D facilities) for hazardous waste disposal in Florida by small quantity generators. It consists of eleven parts including a part called Study Area Data which contains the data aggregated across the counties cover...

78

33 CFR 165.761 - Security Zones; Port of Palm Beach, Port Everglades, Port of Miami, and Port of Key West, Florida.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Florida. A fixed security zone encompasses all waters between Watson Park and Star Island on the MacArthur Causeway south to the Port of Miami...to 25°46.88ⲠN, 080°10.84ⲠW, and ending on Watson Park at 25°47.00ⲠN, 080°10.67ⲠW. The...

2013-07-01

79

Airborne Laser Swath Mapping: Quantifying changes in sandy beaches over time scales of weeks to years  

Microsoft Academic Search

The University of Florida (UF) and the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP) are collaborating on a program to improve the quantitative monitoring of Florida's beaches, which are subject to erosion and catastrophic damage from seasonal storms. Each year, a segment of the Florida coastline will be mapped using Airborne Laser Swath Mapping (ALSM) technology (also referred to as LIDAR).

R. L. Shrestha; W. E. Carter; M. Sartori; B. J. Luzum; K. C. Slatton

2005-01-01

80

Relationships Between Sand and Water Quality at Recreational Beaches  

PubMed Central

Enterococci are used to assess the risk of negative human health impacts from recreational waters. Studies have shown sustained populations of enterococci within sediments of beaches but comprehensive surveys of multiple tidal zones on beaches in a regional area and their relationship to beach management decisions are limited. We sampled three tidal zones on eight South Florida beaches in Miami-Dade and Broward counties and found that enterococci were ubiquitous within South Florida beach sands although their levels varied greatly both among the beaches and between the supratidal, intertidal and subtidal zones. The supratidal sands consistently had significantly higher (p<0.003) levels of enterococci (average 40 CFU/g dry sand) than the other two zones. Levels of enterococci within the subtidal sand correlated with the average level of enterococci in the water (CFU/100mL) for the season during which samples were collected (rs= 0.73). The average sand enterococci content over all the zones on each beach correlated with the average water enterococci levels of the year prior to sand samplings (rs=0.64) as well as the average water enterococci levels for the month after sand samplings (rs=0.54). Results indicate a connection between levels of enterococci in beach water and sands throughout South Florida’s beaches and suggest that the sands are one of the predominant reservoirs of enterococci impacting beach water quality. As a result, beaches with lower levels of enterococci in the sand had fewer exceedences relative to beaches with higher levels of sand enterococci. More research should focus on evaluating beach sand quality as a means to predict and regulate marine recreational water quality.

Phillips, Matthew C.; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M.; Piggot, Alan M.; Klaus, James S.; Zhang, Yifan

2011-01-01

81

Cost and performance of membranes for organic control in small systems: Flagler Beach and Punta Gorda, Florida. Final report, 1 June 1986-28 February 1989  

Microsoft Academic Search

This project documented the performance and cost of low-pressure membrane technology to remove THM precursors from drinking water. A 12,500-gpd membrane pilot plant was operated for one year at both ground-water and surface-water source test sites in Florida. Use of this type of membrane technology on such surface water will require lower membrane flux, lower recovery, more-frequent membrane cleanings, and

J. S. Taylor; L. A. Mulford; W. M. Barrett; S. J. Duranceau; D. K. Smith

1989-01-01

82

Implementation of Forensic DNA Analysis on Casework Evidence at the Palm Beach County Sheriff's Office Crime Laboratory: Historical Perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

Palm Beach County is the largest of the 64 counties in the state of Florida, USA, with most of the area uninhabited and the population concentrated near the coastal region. The Serology\\/DNA Section of the Palm Beach County Sheriff's Office (PBSO) Crime Laboratory serves a community of approximately one million residents, and an additional million tourists visit Palm Beach County

Cecelia A. Crouse

2001-01-01

83

Preparing for Changing Educational Roles: Creating and Learning from within the Public Schools.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the Professional Development Schools (PDS) initiative to simultaneously restructure schools and teacher education programs. Outlines program components. Presents steps to develop an inclusive PDS through the University of Central Florida-Daytona Beach, Volusia County School District, and the Florida Inclusion Network, including public…

Little, Mary E.

2000-01-01

84

Anastasia Island Beach Mouse ('Peromyscus polionotus phasma'). 5-Year Review: Summary and Evaluation.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Anastasia Island beach mouse is listed as an endangered species, and is restricted to Anastasia Island, St. Johns County, Florida and a recently introduced population at Guana River State Park, Flagler County. The only two healthy populations are conf...

2008-01-01

85

Impact of Hurricanes on Habitat Occupancy and Spatial Distribution of Beach Mice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent ; increases in hurricane activity along the Gulf of Mexico lend urgency to understanding storm impacts on beach mice (Peromyscus polionotus) that occupy dune systems along this coast in Florida and Alabama. We documented changes in occupancy patterns of the Santa Rosa beach mouse (P. p. leucocephalus) from Hurricane Ivan and examined predictors of habitat use before and after

Alexander J. Pries; Lyn C. Branch; Deborah L. Miller

2009-01-01

86

Viability analysis of endangered Gulf Coast beach mice ( Peromyscus polionotus) populations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Beach mice, endangered subspecies of oldfield mice (Peromyscus polionotus), occur in a few, isolated populations along the Gulf Coast of Alabama and Florida, USA. To provide information needed for the management of these species, we conducted population viability analyses (PVA) using a stochastic differential equation (Wiener-drift) model applied to long-term demographic data for four populations of beach mice. In the

Madan K. Oli; Nicholas R. Holler; Michael C. Wooten

2001-01-01

87

BEACHES HEALTH SURVEY  

EPA Science Inventory

Baterial samples were taken at swimming beaches (primarily freshwater beaches) in Region 10 while evaluating potential bacterial sources (e.g., people, cattle, pets, septic systems, runoff, birds). For each beach selected, the preferred sampling is: background, low/no use period...

88

Comprehensive Housing Market Analysis: Sebastian-Vero Beach, Floria As of April 1, 2008.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Sebastian-Vero Beach, Florida Housing Market Area (HMA) consists of Indian River County on the Atlantic coast of Florida. The HMA is located approximately 125 miles north of Miami- Fort Lauderdale and 75 miles south of Cape Canaveral. Major industries...

2008-01-01

89

Adapting to Rising Sea Level: A Florida Perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

Global climate change and concomitant rising sea level will have a profound impact on Florida’s coastal and marine systems. Sea-level rise will increase erosion of beaches, cause saltwater intrusion into water supplies, inundate coastal marshes and other important habitats, and make coastal property more vulnerable to erosion and flooding. Yet most coastal areas are currently managed under the premise that

Randall W. Parkinson

2009-01-01

90

World Beach Project  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Sometimes visiting a website makes you want to dash out, leave your computer behind, and get busy doing whatever the site's talking about. The World Beach Project is one of those sites. It's a gallery of art made by all kinds of people, using stones gathered on beaches all over the world. Visitors to this site can browse images of these creations, and read a little bit about how each work came about. For example, there are 64 projects in North America, and 232 in Europe and visitors can travel (via the artwork) from the beaches of England to Malaysia to Mexico in seconds. The World Beach Project was devised by artist-in-residence Sue Lawty in association with the Victoria & Albert Museum. Detailed instructions are provided so that anyone can participate in the World Beach Project, or, from the map, simply click the button labeled "I want to add my beach project to the map".

91

Florida Law  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This fine collection from the University of Florida's George A. Smathers Libraries documents the laws and legal heritage of Florida. It has digitized texts from the holdings of the University of Florida's Lawton Chiles Legal Information Center and the P. K. Yonge Library of Florida History as well as other sources. This omnibus collection features the Journal of the Florida House of Representatives, a variety of general texts on Florida laws, and the Florida Water Law collection. This last collection is particularly fascinating as it brings together over 7,000 documents related to long-term water management plans across the Sunshine State. Moving on, the Florida Historical Legal Documents section of the site contains primary source materials that survey changes in Florida law from 1822 through 1845, when the area became a state. Finally, the House Journal section brings together the official record of actions taken by the House and its committees.

2011-01-01

92

Miami Beach: Biscayne Point  

Microsoft Academic Search

Biscayne Point in Miami Beach is a residential neighborhood made up of three man made islands in Biscayne Bay. The Biscayne Point islands are a part of the North Beach, which is the are north of 63rd Ave and Collins. This aerial photograph looks down the furthest extending island in Biscayne Point.

Chet Smolski

1978-01-01

93

Beach and Dune.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The flora, vegetation, and microenvironment of beach and dune are sufficiently different to warrant their separate treatment in this chapter. Beach is defined here as the expanse of sandy substrate between mean tide and the foredune or, in the absence of ...

M. G. Barbour A. F. Johnson

1977-01-01

94

Changes in College Student Drinking and Alcohol Knowledge: A Decade of Progress, 1981-1991.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Compared drinking patterns and level of alcohol knowledge in two samples of college students who visited Daytona Beach, Florida, during their spring breaks in 1981 and 1991 (n=3,368). Found significant reductions between 1981 and 1991 in number of students who were drinkers and amount they consumed. Significant increases in alcohol knowledge were…

Gonzalez, Gerardo M.; Broughton, Elizabeth A.

1994-01-01

95

LANDSAT Image Analysis for Terrain Investigations  

Microsoft Academic Search

A study was conducted to evaluate terrain conditions in the vicinity of Daytona Beach, Florida to facilitate selection of suitable landfill sites. LANDSAT computer compatible tapes (CCT's) were analyzed using various techniques available on the General Electric IMAGE 100 system. Atmospheric haze correction was performed by normalizing the hazy images to a standard spectral reflectance which was obtained for the

B. E. Ruth; R. L. Ferguson; H. K. Brooks

1977-01-01

96

Field Trip: Multimedia and the Curriculum.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Describes the development of the Academy of Communications and Multimedia Technology--a school-to-work program integrating English, social studies, and mathematics with multimedia, art, and television production--at Mainland High School in Daytona Beach, Florida. Discusses the program's goals, student recruitment, roles of business partners (such…

McBroom, George

1997-01-01

97

Florida Coastal Engineering and Bird Conservation Geographic Information System (GIS) Manual.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report describes a Geographic Information System (GIS) that displays approximately 500 sand placement events in Florida between 1959 and 2006. These events include: beach nourishment projects, renourishment events, dune restoration projects, emergenc...

C. A. Lott P. A. Durkee P. P. Kelly W. A. Gierhart

2009-01-01

98

An Examination of the Influence of Freshwater Canal Discharges on Salinity in Selected Southeastern Florida Estuaries.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Monthly determinations of surface and bottom water salinity were made within the canal (or stream) estuary complexes of six southeastern Florida coastal zones (St. Lucie River and Estuary, Loxahatchee River and Estuary, West Palm Beach Canal and Estuary, ...

B. I. Birnhak

1974-01-01

99

Virginia Beach, Virginia - Beach Erosion Control Project.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Continued nourishment is proposed of 3-1/3 miles of Virginia Beach shoreline by hydraulic dredge and truck haul. Environmental impacts include the removal of approximately 2 acres of marsh, turbidity increases during dredging, loss of benthic life in chan...

1973-01-01

100

Beaches and Coastal Environments  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a This chapter summarizes the rationale for using microbial source tracking (MST) methods at beach sites and coastal water bodies\\u000a (Sect. 20.1), as MST methods are especially useful for evaluating waters impacted by nonpoint sources of pollution. This chapter\\u000a also describes the most common traditional and alternative MST markers used at beach sites (Sect. 20.2). Two case studies\\u000a are presented (Sect.

Helena M. Solo-Gabriele; Alexandria B. Boehm; Troy M. Scott; Christopher D. Sinigalliano

101

Aerosolized Red Tide Toxins (Brevetoxins) and Asthma: Continued health effects after 1 hour beach exposure  

PubMed Central

Blooms of the toxic dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis, produce potent neurotoxins in marine aerosols. Recent studies have demonstrated acute changes in both symptoms and pulmonary function in asthmatics after only 1 hour of beach exposure to these aerosols. This study investigated if there were latent and/or sustained effects in asthmatics in the days following the initial beach exposure during periods with and without an active Florida red tide. Symptom data and spirometry data were collected before and after 1 hour of beach exposure. Subjects kept daily symptom diaries and measured their peak flow each morning for 5 days following beach exposure. During non-exposure periods, there were no significant changes in symptoms or pulmonary function either acutely or over 5 days of follow-up. After the beach exposure during an active Florida red tide, subjects had elevated mean symptoms which did not return to the pre-exposure baseline for at least 4 days. The peak flow measurements decreased after the initial beach exposure, decreased further within 24 hours, and continued to be suppressed even after 5 days. Asthmatics may continue to have increased symptoms and delayed respiratory function suppression for several days after 1 hour of exposure to the Florida red tide toxin aerosols.

Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Fleming, Lora E; Bean, Judy A; Nierenberg, Kate; Backer, Lorraine C; Cheng, Yung Sung; Pierce, Richard; Reich, Andrew; Naar, Jerome; Wanner, Adam; Abraham, William M; Zhou, Yue; Hollenbeck, Julie; Baden, Daniel G

2010-01-01

102

Effects of Coastal Lighting on Foraging Behaviorof Beach Mice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction of artificial light into wildlife habitat represents a rapidly expanding form of human encroachment, particularly in coastal systems. Light pollution alters the behavior of sea turtles during nesting; therefore, long-wavelength lights—low-pressure sodium vapor and bug lights—that minimize impacts on turtles are required for beach lighting in Florida (U.S.A.). We investigated the effects of these two kinds of lights on

BRITTANY L. BIRD; LYN C. BRANCH; DEBORAH L. MILLER

2004-01-01

103

Best Beaches in the USA  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Dr. Stephen Leatherman, professor and director of the Laboratory for Coastal Research at the University of Maryland, College Park, has released his annual list of America's best beaches. "Dr. Beach" considered fifty different factors, including current, wave size, smell, views and vistas, and intensity of beach use, to rate the twenty finest public beaches of 650 nation wide. This site features photos of the winners, a complete list of the Beach Rating Scale Criteria, and Dr. Leatherman's selections for the five best Walking, Wild, and Romantic Beaches.

Leatherman, Stephen.

1997-01-01

104

Geomorphology of Puget Sound Beaches.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this report is to synthesize information about the geomorphology and dynamics of Puget Sound's beaches. It summarizes important peer-reviewed literature relevant to these beach environments and assemblies background information that should ...

D. Finlayson

2006-01-01

105

Miami, Florida--New City in the New World  

PubMed Central

The land of Florida was one of the first areas explored in the New World during the Age of Discovery; Miami is one of the newest major cities to develop in our present age. Members of the Medical Library Association are invited to come to the 1967 Annual Convention on Miami Beach and to enjoy both the past and the present in Miami and in Florida.

Richmond, Joy S.

1967-01-01

106

Volume Transport Through Tidal Channels in the Middle Florida Keys  

Microsoft Academic Search

SMITH, N.P. and LEE, T.N., 2003. Volume transports through tidal channels in the middle Florida Keys. Journal of Coastal Research, 19(2), 254-260. West Palm Beach (Florida), ISSN 0749-0208. Shipboard acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) data from six synoptic surveys are combined with current meter, bottom pressure and wind data to describe tidal and low-frequency exchanges through four tidal channels in

Ned P. Smitht; Thomas N. Leet

2003-01-01

107

Public Perceptions of Florida Red Tide Risks  

PubMed Central

This research integrates theoretical frameworks of risk perception, social amplification of risk, and the role of place-specific contexts in order to explore the various perceptions surrounding Florida red tides. Florida red tides are naturally occurring events that are increasing in frequency, duration, and severity. This has implications for public health, the local economy, and ecosystem health. While many of the negative impacts of Florida red tides are not easily controlled, some of the secondary impacts may be mitigated through individuals’ responses. However, public perception and consequent reactions to Florida red tides have not been investigated. This research uses questionnaire surveys, and semi-structured interviews, to explore the various perceptions of the risk surrounding red tides. Surveys and interviews were conducted along two Florida west coast beaches. The results indicate that the underlying foundations of the social amplification of the risk framework are applicable to understanding how individuals form perceptions of risk relative to red tide events. There are key differences between the spatial locations of individuals and corresponding perceptions, indicating that place-specific contexts are essential to understanding how individuals receive and interpret risk information. The results also suggest that individuals may be lacking efficient and up-to-date information about Florida red tides and their impacts because of inconsistent public outreach. Overall, social and spatial factors appear to be influential as to whether individuals amplify or attenuate the risks associated with Florida red tides.

Kuhar, Sara E.; Nierenberg, Kate; Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Tobin, Graham A.

2009-01-01

108

Florida Aquarium  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Web page features information for visitors, calendar of events, guide to the aquarium, activities, education and community programs, conservation initiatives, and information on employment, internships, membership and donors. The Florida Aquarium is a not-for-profit educational and cultural attraction whose mission allows people of all ages and backgrounds to engage in experiences that inspire a sense of wonder, understanding and stewardship of aquatic environments. Located in Tampa, Florida.

109

Supporting Low-Income Parents of Young Children: The Palm Beach County Family Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

For more than a decade, Florida's Palm Beach County has been building an infrastructure of prevention and early intervention services to promote and support the healthy development and school readiness of children from birth to age 8. The county began this effort with a set of programs focused on serving families in four targeted geographic areas…

Spielberger, Julie; Rich, Lauren; Gouvea, Marcia; Winje, Carolyn; Scannell, Molly; Harden, Allen; Berg, Kristin

2009-01-01

110

Improving School Readiness: A Brief Report from the Palm Beach County Family Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|For more than a decade, Florida's Palm Beach County has been building a system of prevention and early intervention services to promote and support the healthy development and school readiness of children from birth to age 8. The county began this effort with a set of programs focused on serving families in four targeted geographic areas that…

Spielberger, Julie; Gouvea, Marcia; Rich, Lauren

2012-01-01

111

Palm Beach School Board Acquisition of Relocatable Classrooms Examined. OPPAGA Special Review.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This report, responding to a Florida legislative request, examines the Palm Beach County School Board's planned purchase of concrete relocatable classrooms. The report presents a number of findings and recommendations. Concrete units are more expensive than models with metal stud walls; both types meet state building code standards. The district…

Florida State Legislature, Tallahassee. Office of Program Policy Analysis and Government Accountability.

112

Supporting Low-Income Parents of Young Children: The Palm Beach County Family Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|For more than a decade, Florida's Palm Beach County has been building an infrastructure of prevention and early intervention services to promote and support the healthy development and school readiness of children from birth to age 8. The county began this effort with a set of programs focused on serving families in four targeted geographic areas…

Spielberger, Julie; Rich, Lauren; Gouvea, Marcia; Winje, Carolyn; Scannell, Molly; Harden, Allen; Berg, Kristin

2009-01-01

113

Recreational exposure to aerosolized brevetoxins during Florida red tide events  

Microsoft Academic Search

During two separate Karenia brevis red tide events, we measured the levels of brevetoxins in air and water samples, conducted personal interviews, and performed pulmonary function tests on people before and after they visited one of two Florida beaches. One hundred and twenty-nine people participated in the study, which we conducted during red tide events in Sarasota and Jacksonville, FL,

Lorraine C Backer; Lora E Fleming; Alan Rowan; Yung-Sung Cheng; Janet Benson; Richard H Pierce; Julia Zaias; Judy Bean; Gregory D Bossart; David Johnson; Raul Quimbo; Daniel G Baden

2003-01-01

114

Adapting to Rising Sea Level: A Florida Perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

Global climate change and concomitant rising sea level will have a profound impact on Florida's coastal and marine systems. Sea-level rise will increase erosion of beaches, cause saltwater intrusion into water supplies, inundate coastal marshes and other important habitats, and make coastal property more vulnerable to erosion and flooding. Yet most coastal areas are currently managed under the premise that

Randall W. Parkinson

2009-01-01

115

Species profiles: life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (south Florida). Florida pompano. [Trachinotus carolinus  

SciTech Connect

Florida pompano is a marine species that is especially common along the Florida coast. Florida pompano is an excellent food fish, so it supports an important commercial and recreational fishery. Larvae live in the open sea, but juveniles use waters along beaches as nursery grounds. Juvenile pompano eat planktonic but mostly benthic invertebrates. Adults feed on invertebrates and fish. Pompano prefer temperatures of 28 to 32/sup 0/C, and adults apparently prefer salinities of 28 to 37 ppt. Pompano died at dissolved oxygen concentrations of 2.5 ppM.

Gilbert, C.

1986-04-01

116

Beach ridges and prograded beach deposits as palaeoenvironment records  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Beach ridges are landforms commonly developed on prograded coasts with beach shorelines. A sequence of beach ridges, coupled with their subsurface deposits, can be regarded as a time series of coastal evolution. Methodological advances in field surveying and chronology applicable to beach ridges have led to detailed palaeoenvironmental reconstructions to be derived from such sequences. This paper reconsiders the basic aspects of beach ridges and deposits, which need to be properly understood for their comprehensive interpretation in a palaeo-environmental context. It also reviews case studies in which beach-ridge sequences have been used to unveil past sea-level history, catastrophic events, and climate changes. Proposed formative processes of beach ridges include: 1) progradation of sandy beach and berm formations in relation to fairweather waves, coupled with aeolian foredune accumulation; 2) building of gravel ridges by storm waves; 3) welding of longshore bars. Beach-ridge formation through sea-level oscillation is thought to be questionable and caution is suggested for this process when undertaking palaeoenvironmental reconstruction. Beach deposit stratification is known to dip either landwards or seawards, but landward dips are uncommon. Seaward dipping stratification is formed in relation to beachface progradation, and is usually dissected in places by erosion surfaces resulting from episodic beach retreat. The boundary between the foreshore and the underlying shoreface is well defined only in the case that longshore bars lead to complex bedding structure relative to that of the foreshore. Reliable chronology of beach ridges can be determined by radiocarbon and optically-stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating. Radiocarbon dating of articulated shells, which are considered not to be extensively reworked, provides robust results, but OSL dating is more useful as it enables direct dating of sediment grains. It is noted that there are restrictions in chronological resolution and continuity inherent to beach ridge and beach deposits. The plan-view geomorphic expression of beach ridges typically consists of ridge sets with multi-decadal intervals, whereas their internal sedimentary structures define shorter time scales. Records of beach sedimentation and erosion are likely to be reworked by episodic high-magnitude beach retreat, and the resultant record of the net progradation is likely to be sporadic and discontinuous. The height of sandy beach ridges is often variable due to differing degrees of aeolian sand accumulation, and they are thus not used as sea-level indicators unless purely wave-built. Gravel ridge height is a relatively reliable indicator of sea level, but can vary in response to storminess fluctuations. Subsurface sediment facies boundaries are preferred as sea-level indicators, and those proposed include: boundaries of aeolian/beach, foreshore/shoreface, and upper/lower shorefaces. Catastrophic events are expressed in both erosional and depositional records. Erosion surfaces, or scarp imprints, revealed in a cross section of beach deposits, indicate storm or tsunami events. However, erosional events are likely to rework previous records of sedimentation and even other erosional events, and thus the apparent history decoded from the resultant deposits tends to be biased. Several attempts for estimating the frequency and intensity of prehistoric cyclones rely on assumed relationships between the level of coarse sand beach ridges and cyclone inundation. The formative process of coarse sand ridges remains uncertain and needs to be clarified, as it constitutes the fundamental basis of these attempts. The growth rates of beach-ridge systems are expected to reflect fluctuations in river sediment discharge to the coast and in aeolian sand flux due to onshore winds, both of which are affected by climate change. Assessment of the growth rate is potentially improved by ground-penetrating radar survey of subsurface structure and by detailed chronology. Orientation of beach ridges reflects long-term trends in wave dir

Tamura, Toru

2012-09-01

117

Respect the Beach Program  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Interdisciplinary coastal education program from Surfrider Foundation incorporates science processes, oceanography, watershed ecology and environmental awareness in lessons for K-12 students and community groups. Include: teaching guides, classroom lectures, handouts, video, hands-on projects. Beachology, for grades K-6, studies sand processes, beach ecology, human impacts. Watershed Works, for grades 5-12, explains links between coast and watershed. The Snowrider Project educates alpine communities about hydrologic cycle. Available online as PDF documents.

2012-04-03

118

Oak Bluffs Town Beach, Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The project consists of the restoration and protection of approximately 1200 feet of public beach at Ocean Beach Park, Dukes County, Massachusetts. Beach raising, widening and groin construction will correct natural deterioration currently taking place. T...

1971-01-01

119

Centerville Beach Split Pipe Repair.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A storm on the coast of northern California 1-10 March 1977 removed a significant amount of beach sand that was covering and protecting two 21 Q cables at the U.S. Naval Facility, Centerville Beach. As a result it was discovered that several feet of split...

1977-01-01

120

South Florida Aquatic Environments  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Interactive content highlights three imperiled south Florida ecosystems: the Everglades, Florida Bay, and Florida Keys. Provides introduction, definition, and image of each habitat type within the ecosystems; outlines threats to ecosystems and conservation issues. Other features include: introduced species and their impacts; biological profiles for marine and freshwater fishes from the Florida Museum's ichthyology collection; and Florida-related word search and crossword puzzles.

121

Carbonate slope and platform accumulations: Lower Florida Keys  

SciTech Connect

Approximately 500 km of high-resolution seismic-reflection data off the lower Florida Keys reveal (1) a linear reef and trough seaward of the more shallow platform margin reefs and (2) possible late Pleistocene to early Holocene reef and beach-dune deposits 80-100 m below sea level. The linear reef and sand-filled trough are an extension of a reef-and-trough system that extends more than 300 km along the southeast Florida reef tract. In the study area, the outer reef is shallow (-10 m at its top), has relief of up to 30 m, and is separated from the platform margin reef by a 0.5-km-wide, 30-m-deep sediment-filled trough. The outer reef trend is locally broken, and reefs vary in size. Farther north near Miami, the outer reef has lower relief, and the trough separating it from the platform margin is narrower. A 6-m-long rock core recovered from the crest of the outer reef trend in the lower Florida Keys, off Sand Key reef, reveals a Pleistocene massive coral facies that has a thin (< 1 m) Holocene reef veneer. Farther seaward, where the sea floor slopes into the Straits of Florida, thick (5-8 m) fringing-reef and barrier beach-dune deposits are buried beneath thin Holocene slope deposits 80-100 m below sea level. Beach-dune accumulations are distinguished from reef buildups by the presence of seaward and landward seismic reflections. Fringing-reef buildups, in contrast, are massive and lack reflectors. Both beach-dune and reef buildups are overlain by thin Holocene slope sediments. The beach-dune deposits are probably indicative of a paleoshoreline that existed between 9,000 and 15,000 yr ago.

Shinn, E.A.; Lidz, B.H.; Kindinger, J.L. (Geological Survey, St. Petersburg, FL (USA)); Hine, A.C. (Univ. of South Florida, St. Petersburg (USA))

1990-05-01

122

Evaluation of Shared Lane Markings in Miami Beach, Florida. Summary.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

On urban streets, bicyclists must often ride in the narrow gap between traffic and parked cars, where they may become victims of a dooring crash, in which the door of a parked car opens suddenly into the bicyclists path. The bicyclist can be injured by st...

C. A. Martell R. Srinivasan W. W. Hunter

2012-01-01

123

Beryllium technology workshop, Clearwater Beach, Florida, November 20, 1991.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report discusses the following topics: beryllium in the ITER blanket; mechanical testing of irradiated beryllium; tritium release measurements on irradiated beryllium; beryllium needs for plasma-facing components; thermal conductivity of plasma spray...

G. R. Longhurst

1991-01-01

124

Concepts in gravel beach dynamics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The dominant processes in gravel beach dynamics are reviewed, highlighting some common themes which unify the various components of the gravel beach system, the repercussions of which impart on how gravel beach dynamics might be understood conceptually. In particular, gravel beach dynamics are thought to be highly dependent on the temporal and spatial variation in grain size, and the continual adjustments made by an active beach step, both of which act not only as the expression of changing morphodynamic conditions, but also as a controlling influence. Morphodynamics, the notion that the exchanges on beaches between the hydrodynamics, sediment transport, and morphological change takes the form of reciprocal relationships which are mediated through feedback mechanisms (in such a way that they cannot be thought of or studied independently) is not a new one. Yet it appears that for the gravel beach, morphodynamics must be re-defined to describe conditions where variations in sediment size are thought to deserve parity, rather than as merely a sequent entity or boundary condition. 'Morpho-sedimentary-dynamics' is a phrase coined to intuit such cause and effect, detailing the co-evolution of morphology, hydro-hydraulics and sediment properties whilst acknowledging causative pluralism, feedbacks and multiplier effects. This is the recommended conceptual framework within which to crystallise thought and organise further research for the gravel beach. Essentially, it increases the minimum number of parameters needed to describe the state of the gravel beach as a physical system. Therefore, it is advised that simplicity will be most expedient in our future modelling efforts, if complexity is to be adequately encapsulated.

Buscombe, Daniel; Masselink, Gerhard

2006-11-01

125

76 FR 54703 - Safety Zone; Myrtle Beach Triathlon, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Myrtle Beach, SC  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Myrtle Beach, SC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary...Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Myrtle Beach, SC in the Federal Register (76 FR 124...Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Myrtle Beach, SC. (a) Regulated Area. The following...

2011-09-02

126

Rhythmic Patterns of Beach Topography.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Rhythmic patterns of topography may be apparent simultaneously in a longshore alternation of cuspate projections and arcuate embayments along the beach face, in a rhythmic longshore bar composed of an alternate series of arcs and cusps, and in longshore u...

J. L. van Beek

1974-01-01

127

Do Tropical Cyclones Shape Shorebird Habitat Patterns? Biogeoclimatology of Snowy Plovers in Florida  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundThe Gulf coastal ecosystems in Florida are foci of the highest species richness of imperiled shoreline dependent birds in the USA. However environmental processes that affect their macroecological patterns, like occupancy and abundance, are not well unraveled. In Florida the Snowy Plover (Charadrius alexandrinus nivosus) is resident along northern and western white sandy estuarine\\/ocean beaches and is considered a state-threatened

Matteo Convertino; James B. Elsner; Rafael Muñoz-Carpena; Gregory A. Kiker; Christopher J. Martinez; Richard A. Fischer; Igor Linkov; Richard K. F. Unsworth

2011-01-01

128

First international conference on nonlinear problems in aviation & aerospace  

SciTech Connect

The International Conference on Nonlinear Problems in Aviation and Aerospace was held at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Daytona Beach, Florida on May 9-11, 1996. This conference was sponsored by the International Federation of Nonlinear Analysts, International Federation of Information Processing, and Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. Over one hundred engineers, scientists, and mathematicians from seventeen countries attended. These proceedings include keynote addresses, invited lectures, and contributed papers presented during the conference.

Sivasundaram, S. [ed.

1994-12-31

129

Popham Beach, Maine: An example of engineering activity that saved beach property without harming the beach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Beach and property erosion on coasts is a widespread and chronic problem. Historical approaches to this issue, including seawalls and sand replenishment, are often inappropriate or too expensive. In Maine, seawalls were banned in 1983 and replenishment is too costly to employ. Replacement of storm-damaged buildings is also not allowed, and a precedent case on Popham Beach, Maine required that the owner remove an unpermitted building from a site where an earlier structure was damaged. When the most popular park in Maine, Popham Beach State Park, experienced inlet associated erosion that threatened park infrastructure (a bathhouse), temporary measures were all that the law allowed. Because it was clear that the inlet channel causing the erosion would eventually change course, the state opted to erect a temporary seawall with fallen trees at the site. This may or may not have slowed the erosion temporarily, but reassured the public that "something was being done". Once a storm cut a new tidal inlet channel and closed off the old one, tidal water still entered the former channel and continued to threaten the bathhouse. To ultimately save the property, beach scraping was employed. Sand was scraped from the lower beach to construct a sand berm that deflected the tidal current away from the endangered property. This action created enough time for natural processes to drive the remains of the former spit onto the beach and widen it significantly. Whereas many examples of engineering practices exist that endanger instead of saving beaches, this example is one of an appropriate engineering effort to rescue unwisely located beach-front property.

Kelley, Joseph T.

2013-10-01

130

Systematic Beach Changes on the Outer Banks, North Carolina.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A beach-profile transition model is derived from analysis of 291 semidiurnal beach profiles measured on the Outer Banks, North Carolina, which allows prediction of successive beach profiles in terms of beach width, sediment storage, and surface configurat...

C. J. Sonu J. L. Van Beek

1970-01-01

131

Landing Techniques in Beach Volleyball  

PubMed Central

The aims of the present study were to establish a detailed and representative record of landing techniques (two-, left-, and right-footed landings) in professional beach volleyball and compare the data with those of indoor volleyball. Beach volleyball data was retrieved from videos taken at FIVB World Tour tournaments. Landing techniques were compared in the different beach and indoor volleyball skills serve, set, attack, and block with regard to sex, playing technique, and court position. Significant differences were observed between men and women in landings following block actions (?2(2) = 18.19, p < 0.01) but not following serve, set, and attack actions. Following blocking, men landed more often on one foot than women. Further differences in landings following serve and attack with regard to playing technique and position were mainly observed in men. The comparison with landing techniques in indoor volleyball revealed overall differences both in men (?2(2) = 161.4, p < 0.01) and women (?2(2) = 84.91, p < 0.01). Beach volleyball players land more often on both feet than indoor volleyball players. Besides the softer surface in beach volleyball, and therefore resulting lower loads, these results might be another reason for fewer injuries and overuse conditions compared to indoor volleyball. Key Points About 1/3 of all jumping actions in beach volleyball result in a landing on one foot. Especially following block situations men land on one foot more often than women. Landing techniques are related to different techniques and positions. Landings on one foot are less common in beach volleyball than indoor volleyball. This could be a reason for fewer injuries and overuse conditions.

Tilp, Markus; Rindler, Michael

2013-01-01

132

77 FR 50019 - Safety Zone; Cocoa Beach Air Show, Atlantic Ocean, Cocoa Beach, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Cocoa Beach Air Show, Atlantic Ocean, Cocoa Beach, FL AGENCY...on the waters of the Atlantic Ocean located east of Cocoa Beach...Room W12-140 on the ground floor of the Department of Transportation...maneuvers over the Atlantic Ocean east of Cocoa Beach,...

2012-08-20

133

Beaches Forever cartoon advertisement with kids  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cartoon drawing created by Meradel Gale who volunteered for Beaches Forever, Inc. during the 1968 petition campaign. This cartoon depicts two children carrying a beach ball who encounter a sign that reads \\

1968-01-01

134

Hurricane & Tropical Storm Impacts over the South Florida Metropolitan Area: Mortality & Government  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since 1985, the South Florida Metropolitan area (SFMA), which covers the counties of Miami-Dade, Broward, and Palm Beach, has been directly affected by 9 tropical cyclones: four tropical storms and 5 hurricanes. This continuous hurricane and tropical storm activity has awakened the conscience of the communities, government, and private sector, about the social vulnerability, in terms of age, gender, ethnicity,

I. C. Colon Pagan

2007-01-01

135

Ecology and management of Sheoak (Casuarina spp.), an invader of coastal Florida, U.S.A.  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The Casuarina spp. are invasive weeds in Florida that threaten biological diversity and beach integrity of coastal habitats. The trees include three species and their hybrids that aggressively invade riverine and coastal areas. Of the three species, C. equisetifolia and C. glauca are highly salt tol...

136

RAINFALL AND RUNOFF AS A SOURCE OF ORGANIC CARBON ADDITIONS TO BAYOU TEXAR, FLORIDA  

EPA Science Inventory

Rainfall and Runoff as a Source of Organic Carbon Additions to Bayou Texar, Florida (Abstract). To be presented at the16th Biennial Conference of the Estuarine Research Foundation, ERF 2001: An Estuarine Odyssey, 4-8 November 2001, St. Pete Beach, FL. 1 p. (ERL,GB R852). T...

137

Initial Evaluation of the Effects of Aerosolized Florida Red Tide Toxins (Brevetoxins) in Persons with Asthma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Florida red tides annually occur in the Gulf of Mexico, resulting from blooms of the marine dinoflagellate Karenia brevis. K. brevis produces highly potent natural polyether toxins, known as brevetoxins, that activate voltage-sensitive sodium channels. In experimental animals, brevetoxins cause significant bronchoconstriction. A study of persons who visited the beach recreationally found a significant increase in self-reported respiratory symptoms after

Lora E. Fleming; Barbara Kirkpatrick; Lorraine C. Backer; Judy A. Bean; Adam Wanner; Dana Dalpra; Robert Tamer; Julia Zaias; Yung Sung Cheng; Richard Pierce; Jerome Naar; William Abraham; Richard Clark; Yue Zhou; Michael S. Henry; David Johnson; Gayl Van De Bogart; Gregory D. Bossart; Mark Harrington; Daniel G. Baden

2005-01-01

138

Body composition of Brazilian beach volleyball players  

Microsoft Academic Search

The development of a beach volleyball athlete is the result of highly planned training process, and should consider the specificity of this sport and the demands regarding body composition. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the values and distribution of fat mass among Brazilian beach volleyball players. The sample consisted of 16 male beach volleyball players from the

A Medeiros; I Mesquita; J Oliveira; A C C Loureiro; J Afonso; L Z Monteiro; J M Castro

2010-01-01

139

Differentiating Experts' Anticipatory Skills in Beach Volleyball  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In this study, we examined how perceptual-motor expertise and watching experience contribute to anticipating the outcome of opponents' attacking actions in beach volleyball. To this end, we invited 8 expert beach volleyball players, 8 expert coaches, 8 expert referees, and 8 control participants with no beach volleyball experience to watch videos…

Canal-Bruland, Rouwen; Mooren, Merel; Savelsbergh, Geert J. P.

2011-01-01

140

Florida Butterfly Tutorials  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Two tutorials introduce common butterflies of Florida, including the cloudless sulphur, giant swallowtail, Gulf fritillary, longtailed skipper, zebra longwing, black swallowtail, monarch, viceroy, European cabbage butterfly and Florida atala. Covers both caterpillars and adults. Requires Microsoft Windows. $15.

0002-11-30

141

Florida Panther Society  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

With only 30 to 50 individual cats remaining in Florida's wild areas, Florida panthers are a conservation concern. The Florida Panther Society is a non-governmental organization dedicated to the recovery of the Florida panther population. The Society's Webpage offers background information on panthers, genetic restoration efforts, the state's panther population, field notes on current research/ restoration activities, and photographs of some of the remaining individuals.

142

'Florida Elyana' strawberry  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

'Florida Elyana' strawberry (Fragaria xananassa Duch.) is a new strawberry cultivar released by the University of Florida. It is a short-day plant. It is susceptible to surface cracking from exposure to rain. However, it performs well under protected culture. It is the first Florida-bred cultivar de...

143

Florida's Civil War soldiers  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this thesis is to chronicle the actions of the soldiers of Florida during the Civil War, both within and without Florida. As there has not been a great deal written on this topic, it is hoped that this thesis will contribute to the discussion and perhaps lead others to study this field.The soldiers of Florida during the

Jennifer J Hawley

2005-01-01

144

Florida Panther Net  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

With only 30 to 50 individual cats remaining in Florida's wild areas, Florida panthers are a conservation concern. The state's Florida Panther Net Website offers additional information, including natural history information, notes from the field, photographs, and a series of educational materials.

145

USE OF COMPOSITE DATA SETS FOR SOURCE-TRACKING ENTEROCCOCCI IN THE WATER COLUMN AND SHORELINE INTERSTITIAL WATERS ON PENSACOLA BEACH, FL  

EPA Science Inventory

Genthner, Fred J., Joseph B. James, Diane F. Yates and Stephanie D. Friedman. Submitted. Use of Composite Data Sets for Source-Tracking Enterococci in the Water Column and Shoreline Interstitial Waters on Pensacola Beach Florida. Mar. Pollut. Bull. 33 p. (ERL,GB 1212). So...

146

Florida Digital Newspaper Library  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

With generous funding from Florida's Library Services and Technology Act Grants Program, the Institute for Museum and Library Services (IMLS), and other organizations, the Florida Digital Newspaper Library exists "to provide access to the news and history of Florida." On this site, visitors can browse through over 800,000 pages of historic Florida newspapers dating back to the early 19th century. Currently the archive contains current Florida newspapers digitized from 2005 to the present, dozens of historic newspapers, and the "Historic News Accounts of Florida", which features articles from newspapers published outside the state which deal with life in Florida. On the site's homepage, visitors can use a simple search engine, perform an advanced search, or look through the "New Items" section. Some of the papers in this archive include the Alachua Advocate, the Apopka Chief, and the Wakulla County News.

147

Quantifying Beach Response to Episodic Large Wave Events, a Predictive Empirical Model, Ocean Beach, San Francisco, CA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Predicting beach response on an event scale is extremely difficult due to highly variable spatial and temporal conditions, lack of data on antecedent beach morphology, generic model shortcomings, and uncertainty of local forcing parameters. Each beach system is unique and classical beach erosion models may not be applicable to many high-energy beaches, especially those receiving large long-period waves. Therefore, developing

J. E. Hansen; P. L. Barnard

2006-01-01

148

Oil spill cleanup south Pinellas County beaches Madeira Beach  

Microsoft Academic Search

Photographs of oil pollution in or near coastal areas of Pinellas County, Florida. A collision between two barges and a freighter in 1993 caused oil to spill into Tampa Bay, the Gulf of Mexico, and local waterways. Dr. Richard A. Davis photographed the images in this collection.

Richard A. Davis

1993-01-01

149

77 FR 13519 - Safety Zone; Virginia Beach Oceanfront Air Show, Atlantic Ocean, Virginia Beach, VA  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Oceanfront Air Show, Atlantic Ocean, Virginia Beach, VA...waters of the Atlantic Ocean in Virginia Beach, VA...West Building Ground Floor, Room W12-140, 1200...W12-140 on the ground floor of the Department of Transportation...event over the Atlantic Ocean in Virginia Beach,...

2012-03-07

150

78 FR 35596 - Special Local Regulation; Long Beach Regatta, Powerboat Race, Atlantic Ocean, Long Beach, NY  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Powerboat Race, Atlantic Ocean, Long Beach, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice...waters of the Atlantic Ocean off Long Beach, NY during the Long Beach Regatta Powerboat...Safety Zone; Patchogue Bay, Patchogue, NY, in the Federal Register (73 FR...

2013-06-13

151

Implications of the cementation of beach sediments for the recreational use of the beach  

Microsoft Academic Search

Beach sediment cementation (beachrock formation) is a sedimentary process that can transform significant sections of beaches into rock outcrops. This contribution reports the results of two questionnaire surveys (one focusing on foreign tourists and the other on local people) carried out in coastal resorts of the island of Lesbos (Greece), on the perceptions of beach users regarding the impacts of

Michalis I. Vousdoukas; Adonis F. Velegrakisa; Areti Kontogianni; Efstratia-Natalia Makrykosta

2009-01-01

152

USING HYDROGRAPHIC DATA AND THE EPA VIRTUAL BEACH MODEL TO TEST PREDICTIONS OF BEACH BACTERIA CONCENTRATIONS  

EPA Science Inventory

A modeling study of 2006 Huntington Beach (Lake Erie) beach bacteria concentrations indicates multi-variable linear regression (MLR) can effectively estimate bacteria concentrations compared to the persistence model. Our use of the Virtual Beach (VB) model affirms that fact. VB i...

153

The Different Faces of San Francisco's Ocean Beach: Analyzing Sand Size and Beach Shape  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ocean Beach is located along the western edge of San Francisco adjacent to the Pacific Ocean. Erosion along the southern part of the beach is threatening a nearby highway and water treatment plant. To better understand this beach and the processes that form it, our SF-ROCKS research group collected data from seven locations along its length. We used an auto-level

K. Grove; R. Labit; S. Lui; I. Rodriquez; C. Yi; M. Yu

2004-01-01

154

Beach Changes at Long Beach Island, New Jersey, 1962-73.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Beach profile line data collected from 32 profile sites along Long Beach Island, New Jersey. A total of 2,158 profile line surveys were examined, using empirical eigenfunction analysis and other measures of beach variability. Most profile lines have shown...

M. C. Miller D. G. Aubrey J. Karpen

1980-01-01

155

110. PLAN AND ELEVATION OF HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: PIER ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

110. PLAN AND ELEVATION OF HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: PIER APPROACH TO MID-SECTION Sheet 1 of 9 (#3252) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

156

111. PLAN AND ELEVATION OF HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: PIER ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

111. PLAN AND ELEVATION OF HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: PIER MID-SECTION TO END Sheet 2 of 9 (#3253) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

157

BEACH ROAD SHOWING THE LAWN WITH KIAWE TREES BETWEEN THE ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

BEACH ROAD SHOWING THE LAWN WITH KIAWE TREES BETWEEN THE ROAD AND THE BEACH. BEACH ROAD IS 14' WIDE. VIEW FACING SOUTH. - Hickam Field, Fort Kamehameha Historic Housing, Along Worchester Avenue & Hope Street, Honolulu, Honolulu County, HI

158

125. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: MODIFIED RAMP ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

125. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: MODIFIED RAMP DETAILS Sheet 6A of 11 (#3279) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

159

120. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: LAYOUT OF ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

120. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: LAYOUT OF EXISTING PIER Sheet 2 of 11 (#3274) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

160

122. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: LAYOUT OF ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

122. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: LAYOUT OF EXTENSION TO PIER Sheet 4 of 11 (#3276) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

161

127. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: FRAMING DETAILS ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

127. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: FRAMING DETAILS Sheet 8 of 11 (#3281) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

162

10. GROUND VIEW OF PIER, LOOKING SOUTH FROM BEACH; SHOWING ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

10. GROUND VIEW OF PIER, LOOKING SOUTH FROM BEACH; SHOWING (LEFT-RIGHT) CAPTAIN'S GALLEY'S GALLEY TO END OF PIER - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

163

121. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: LAYOUT OF ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

121. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: LAYOUT OF EXISTING PIER Sheet 3 of 11 (#3275) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

164

123. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: REPAIR DETAILS ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

123. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: REPAIR DETAILS Sheet 5 of 11 (#3277) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

165

126. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: EXTENSION DETAILS ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

126. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: EXTENSION DETAILS Sheet 7 of 11 (#3280) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

166

124. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: RAMP DETAILS ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

124. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: RAMP DETAILS Sheet 6 of 11 (#3278) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

167

128. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: BOAT LANDING ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

128. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: BOAT LANDING DETAILS Sheet 9 of 11 (#3282) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

168

8. GROUND VIEW OF PIER, LOOKING SOUTH FROM BEACH; SHOWING ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

8. GROUND VIEW OF PIER, LOOKING SOUTH FROM BEACH; SHOWING 17TH BENT TO END; NEPTUNE'S GALLEY TO END OF PIER - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

169

130. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: LIGHTING DETAILS. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

130. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: LIGHTING DETAILS. Sheet 11 of 11 (#3284) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

170

129. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: LIGHTING DIAGRAM. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

129. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: LIGHTING DIAGRAM. Sheet lO of 11 (#3283) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

171

Residues of polychlorinated biphenyls and DDT in water and sediment of the Indian River Lagoon, Florida - 1977 to 1978  

Microsoft Academic Search

Water and sediment samples collected during 1977 to 1978 from the Indian River lagoon between Vero Beach, Indian River County, and Fort Pierce, Saint Lucie County, Florida were analyzed for PCBs and DDT. Sample locations were chosen on the basis of proximity to major tributaries, sewage outfalls, or municipal area. Concentrations in water samples were below 0.01 ppB sigma DDT

T. C. Wang; R. S. Johnson; J. L. Bricker

1980-01-01

172

Florida Heritage Collection  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Recently launched by the libraries of the State University System (SUS) of Florida, this site contains some 48,000 pages of materials on Florida's history, culture, arts, literatures, sciences, and social sciences. The collection may be browsed by Florida county, title, or author or searched by a number of options. Item records include author, title, date published, a description, series, notes, a summary, and links to the electronic version (in .pdf or JPEG formats). Users can mark selected records and then email or print them. A user guide and tutorial are provided, as is a Florida timeline which links to related materials.

173

Geophysical and Geotechnical Determination of Sand Resources on the Florida Atlantic Continental Shelf: Preliminary Results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The State of Florida is committed to maintaining beaches to sustain beach width and protect coastal infrastructure. Nearshore sand resources must be identified and cataloged for potential beach nourishment projects in response to sea-level rise and increased tropical storm activity. Given the vast length of Florida coastline, application of a variety of remote sensing techniques are required for measuring large areas in a short amount of time. The study area encompasses a shelf area of about 2,053,220 ha (20,532 km2) from Miami to the Georgia State line (about 653 km shoreline length) and extends up to 27 km offshore to about the 45 m isobath offshore Jacksonville. The continental shelf along the east coast of the Florida peninsula contains a wide range of seafloor environments that lie above the Florida-Hatteras Slope on the shoreface and inner, middle, and outer shelf floors. This study used Airborne Laser Bathymetry (ALB), 3D digital terrain models based on reformatted NOAA bathymetric data, sidescan sonar, and seismic reflection profiling to map seafloor geomorphological conditions that range from coralline-algal reef systems to drowned karst, submerged paleo shorelines (drowned beach ridge plains), and buried paleo channels. Seatruthing of morphosedimentary features is achieved via jetprobe and vibracore surveys in the study of inter-reefal sand troughs, ebb-tidal deltas, transverse bars, shoals, sand waves, ridges, and banks. Preliminary results, which visualize seafloor topography as color-ramped morphoforms, indicate the presence of sedimentary deposits that may constitute viable sand resources for shore protection in the form of beach renourishment. Use of ALB and reformatted NOAA bathymetric data in the form of 3D terrain models permits classification of submarine landform topologies that was heretofore not possible using isobaths. The combination of multiple remote sensing methods showed the spatial distribution of morphosedimentary features and provided the ability to assess sand resource potential on the shelf. Sand resources on the Florida Atlantic continental shelf amount to something on the order of about 85 x 109 m3. These potential sand volumes, based on average 3 m depth assumptions, break down to about 1 x 109 m3 for the southeast (Miami, Broward, Palm Beach counties), 4.3 x 109 m3 for the central (Martin, St. Lucie, Indian River, Brevard counties), and 78.5 x 109 m3 for the northeast (Volusia, Flagler, St. Johns, Duval, Nassau counties) Florida shelf areas. It is effective to use multiple remote sensing methods to locate large sand bodies, but more detailed geotechnical surveys are required to better estimate these sand resource potentials.

Finkl, C. W.; Andrews, J. L.; Suthard, B. C.; Robertson, W.

2007-12-01

174

Refraction of Dispersive Waves on a Beach.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Refraction of dispersive type waves on a beach is predicted adequately by use of Snell's Law. Amplitudes of the refracted waves on a beach are predicted adequately by a modified form of Green's Law when the amplitude at one point '7' e.g., the toe of the ...

J. R. Evans D. G. True

1965-01-01

175

Plastics and beaches: A degrading relationship  

Microsoft Academic Search

Plastic debris in Earth’s oceans presents a serious environmental issue because breakdown by chemical weathering and mechanical erosion is minimal at sea. Following deposition on beaches, plastic materials are exposed to UV radiation and physical processes controlled by wind, current, wave and tide action. Plastic particles from Kauai’s beaches were sampled to determine relationships between composition, surface textures, and plastics

Patricia L. Corcoran; Mark C. Biesinger; Meriem Grifi

2009-01-01

176

PREDICTING BACTERIAL CONCENTRATION ON THE NATION'S BEACHES  

EPA Science Inventory

A classical example of the failure of institutions and environmental technology to protect the nation's aesthetic, recreational, and public health values is represented by the July-August, 1999 Huntington Beach, California beach closure. This multi-million dollar regional public ...

177

Edge waves on complex beach profiles  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to interpret field data in terms of edge wave modes, investigators usually assume that the beach profile is linear, allowing the use of simple analytical solutions for edge wave structure and wavelength. The validity of this assumption is checked by using a numerical model to find the edge wave modes on a typical concave beach. Results show that

R. A. Holman; A. J. Bowen

1979-01-01

178

International Tourism and U.S. Beaches.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Travel and tourism is the Nation's largest industry, employer, and foreign-revenue earner, and U.S. beaches are the leading tourist destination. Clearly, beach tourism plays a key role in the U.S. economy. Although domestic tourism is sometimes thought to...

J. R. Houston

1996-01-01

179

Suprabenthic biodiversity of Catalan beaches (NW Mediterranean)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An analysis of the suprabenthos has been carried out on 13 diverse type beaches in Catalonian coast (NE of Spain). A total of 29 717 specimens, belonging to 145 species and eight different zoological groups (mysids, amphipods, cumaceans, isopods, tanaidaceans, decapods, pycnogonids, and teleostean fishes) were obtained. The suprabenthos of Catalan beaches were characterized by a mean density of 40 ind. m -2, by the abundance of Mysids (75% of the total density) and by the higher diversity of Amphipods (64 species). Five population species were considered as typical of suprabenthic assemblages: Schistomysis assimilis, Mesopodopsis slabberi, Atylus guttatus, Pontocrates altamarinus, and Cumopsis goodsir. Four main types of beaches with different number of suprabenthic species and densities and three main faunistic groups are described and related to environmental physical factors of the analysed beaches (morphodynamics, exposure, etc.). The macrofaunal trend about to that the species richness decrease from dissipative to reflective beaches is confirmed for the suprabenthic communities.

Munilla, T.; San Vicente, C.

2005-03-01

180

A field data assessment of contemporary models of beach cusp formation  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Cusp formation was observed during an instrumented, daily profiled, time series of a reflective beach in Canaveral National Seashore, Florida on January 5, 1988. The monitored cusp embayment formed by erosion of the foreshore and the cusp series had a mean spacing of approximately 28 m. During this time, inshore fluid flows were dominated by two standing edge waves at frequencies of 0.06 Hz (primary) and 0.035 Hz (secondary) whereas incident waves were broadbanded at 0.12-0.16 Hz. Directly measured flows (and indirectly estimated swash excursion) data support both the standing wave subharmonic model and the self-organization model of cusp formation in this study.

Allen, J. R.; Psuty, N. P.; Bauer, B. O.; Carter, R. W. G.

1996-01-01

181

Genetic structure of the southeastern United States loggerhead turtle nesting aggregation: evidence of additional structure within the peninsular Florida recovery unit  

Microsoft Academic Search

The southeastern United States supports one of two large loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta) nesting aggregations worldwide and is therefore critical to global conservation and recovery efforts for the species. Previous\\u000a studies have established the presence of four demographically distinct nesting populations (management units) corresponding\\u000a to beaches from (1) North Carolina through northeastern Florida, (2) peninsular Florida, (3) the Dry Tortugas,

Brian M. Shamblin; Mark G. Dodd; Dean A. Bagley; Llewellyn M. Ehrhart; Anton D. Tucker; Chris Johnson; Raymond R. Carthy; Russell A. Scarpino; Erin McMichael; David S. Addison; Kristina L. Williams; Michael G. Frick; Stefanie Ouellette; Anne B. Meylan; Matthew H. Godfrey; Sally R. Murphy; Campbell J. Nairn

2011-01-01

182

Horseshoe crab (Limulus polyphemus) reproductive activity on Delaware Bay beaches: Interactions with beach characteristics  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We used results from a survey of horseshoe crab reproductive activity that was conducted in 1999 throughout Delaware Bay to examine the relationship between estimates of spawning females and egg deposition and analyze how that relationship varies with geography, time within a spawning season, beach morphology, and wave energy. We found that beach morphology and wave energy interacted with density of spawning females to explain variation in the density and distribution of eggs and larvae. For example, the quantity of eggs in surface sediment (i.e., eggs that are potentially available to foraging shorebirds) was associated with the density of spawning females, beach morphology, and wave energy. The association between beach morphology and live eggs in surface sediment was strong especially in late May (Percent Reduction in Error = 86% from regression tree model) where egg density was an order of magnitude higher on beaches <15 m wide (3.38*105 m-2; 90% CI: 2.29*105, 4.47*105) compared to wider beaches (1.49*104 m-2; 90% CI: 4.47*103, 2.53*104). Results also indicate that, among bay-front beaches, horseshoe crabs prefer to spawn on narrow beaches, possibly because of reduced wave energy. At peak periods of spawning activity, density of spawning females was inversely related to foreshore width on mid-latitude beaches within Delaware Bay (t = -2.68, 7 df, p = 0.03). Because the distribution of eggs across the foreshore varied with beach morphology and widened as the spawning season progressed, methods used to sample eggs need to be robust to variation in beach morphology and applicable regardless of when the samples are taken. Because beach morphology and wave energy were associated with the quantity of eggs in surface sediment, certain beach types may be critical to the conservation of shorebird foraging habitat.

Smith, D. R.; Pooler, P. S.; Loveland, R. E.; Botton, M. L.; Michels, S. F.; Weber, R. G.; Carter, D. B.

2002-01-01

183

The recreational value of beaches in the Nelson Mandela Bay area, South Africa  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using beach visitation data collected via the administration of a questionnaire to 226 respondents, this paper estimates a random utility model of beach recreation. The relative value of selected attributes of beaches is estimated, and the recreational values of lost access to four Blue Flag beaches in the Nelson Mandela Bay area, namely Kings beach, Humewood beach, Hobie beach and

Mario Du Preez; Deborah Ellen Lee; Stephen Gerald Hosking

2011-01-01

184

Hydrologic almanac of Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This first edition is a ready reference source of information on various facts and features about water in Florida. It is aimed primarily to help bust politicians, writers, agency officials, water managers, planners, consultants, educators, hydrologists, engineers, scientists, and the general public answer questions that arise on comparative and statistical aspects on the hydrology of Florida. It contains statistical comparative data, much of which was especially prepared for the almanac, a glossary of technical terms, tabular material, and conversion factors. Also included is a selective bibliography of 174 reports on water in Florida. (USGS)

Heath, Richard C.; Conover, Clyde Stuart

1981-01-01

185

South Florida Information Access  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The South Florida Information Access (SOFIA) is part of the United States Geological Survey (USGS) place-based studies program. The program enables the USGS to assist resource managers in resolving environmental problems in ecosystem sites. This website provides the latest news, fact sheets, reports, poster presentations, a data exchange, and science forum regarding South Florida ecosystems. Florida time scales and geologic maps are provided for background information. The site is searchable, or can be browsed by region, program, or subject such as wildlife, ecosystem information, hydrology, and geochemistry.

186

Organochlorine pesticides in anhingas, white ibises, and apple snails collected in Florida, 1989–1991  

Microsoft Academic Search

Apple snails (Pomacea paludosa) and eggs and nestlings of anhingas (Anhinga anhinga) and white ibises (Eudocimus albus) were collected in Palm Beach County, Florida from 1989–1991 and analyzed for organochlorine pesticide (OCP) residues. Pesticide residues were not detected in the apple snails. Residues of DDT, with maximum concentrations of 1,200 µg\\/kg wet weight occurred in 50% of the ibis samples

D. G. Rumbold; M. C. Bruner; M. B. Mihalik; E. A. Marti; L. L. White

1996-01-01

187

Indicators of microbial beach water quality: Preliminary findings from Teluk Kemang beach, Port Dickson (Malaysia).  

PubMed

This study aims to determine the concentrations of total coliforms and Escherichia coli (E. coli) in beach water, Teluk Kemang beach. This study was also aimed to determine relationship between total coliforms, E. coli and physicochemical parameters. As perceived health symptoms among beach visitors are rarely incorporated in beach water studies, this element was also assessed in this study. A total of eight water sampling points were selected randomly along Teluk Kemang beach. Total coliforms concentrations were found between 20 and 1940cfu/100ml. E. coli concentrations were between 0 and 90cfu/100ml. Significant correlations were found between total coliforms and E. coli with pH, temperature and oxidation reduction potential. Skin and eyes symptoms were the highest reported though in small numbers. Microbiological water quality in Teluk Kemang public beach was generally safe for recreational activities except sampling location near with sewage outfall. PMID:24050128

Praveena, Sarva Mangala; Chen, Kwan Soo; Ismail, Sharifah Norkhadijah Syed

2013-09-16

188

BEACH CHANGES ON THE OUTER BANKS OF NORTH CAROLINA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Relationships between surf-zone processes and subaerial beach changes are considered as they occur on Bodie Island, North Carolina. The processes include: wave height, wave period, wave direction, and still-water level. Measurements of beach change include: beach thickness, width, and slope, as well as the size and sorting of the beach-face sediment. Analysis reveals that changes in these beach characteristics are

ROBERT DOLAN

1966-01-01

189

Morphology and composition of beach-cast Posidonia oceanica litter on beaches with different exposures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Posidonia oceanica seagrass litter is commonly found along sandy shores in the Mediterranean region, forming structures called banquettes, which are often removed in order to allow the beach to be used for tourism. This paper evaluates the relationship between the morphology and composition of banquettes and beach exposure to dominant waves. A Real Time Kinematic Differential Global Positioning System was used to evaluate the variability of banquettes and beach morphology over a period of 1 year. Banquette samples, collected at two different levels of the beach profile (i.e. foreshore and backshore), were used to evaluate the contribution of leaves, rhizomes and sediments to the total weight. Banquettes showed a higher volume, thickness and cross-shore length on exposed beaches, whereas narrower litter deposits were found on the sheltered beach. On exposed beaches, banquettes were deposited in beach zones characterized by changes in elevation. These changes in elevation were mainly due to the deposition and erosion of sediments and secondly to the deposition and or erosion of leaf litter. On sheltered beaches, the variability in beach morphology was low and was restricted to areas where the banquettes were located. The leaf/sediment ratio changed along the cross-shore profile. On the backshore, banquettes were a mixture of sediments and leaves, whereas leaves were the main component on the foreshore, independently of the beach exposure. The processes which control the morphodynamics in the swash zone could explain the variability of banquette composition along the cross-shore profile. Finally, this study highlighted that Posidonia oceanica seagrass litter plays an important role in the geomorphology of the beachface and its removal can have a harmful impact on the beaches.

Simeone, Simone; De Falco, Giovanni

2012-05-01

190

Made in Florida  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Everyday, you enjoy things you may not realize were made in Florida. Behind every product and technology you use, there is a world of manufacturing. Today, in Florida, more than 16,000 different companies and 400,000 people work in the manufacturing field.This means that not just jobs, but manufacturing careers are being Made in Florida, by people like you, right now. If you get satisfaction by making something, get excited about using new technology, or you work well with teams of people, then the manufacturing industry may be the place for you, with a challenging job, great pay, and excellent benefits. The diversity of Manufacturing in Florida includes: Food, Beverages, Pharmaceuticals, Medical Devices and Instruments, Metals and Plastics, Electronics and Technical instruments, Aerospace components, Transportation, Household goods, Mining, Industrial and Construction Components.

2010-05-31

191

MONITORING FLORIDA'S WATERS  

EPA Science Inventory

GIS plays an important role as a management tool for the multi-dimensional Status Monitoring Network (SMN) program to monitor Florida's freshwater resources. By pulling together basin assessments, statistical analysis, surface water and groundwater analytical data, background is...

192

Florida Mental Health Institute  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Florida Mental Health Institute, dedicated to research, training and program development for improving psychological wellbeing, has four main divisions: Aging and Mental Health, Child and Family Studies, Community Mental Health, and Mental Health Law and Policy.

193

Florida: Drug Threat Assessment.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report is a strategic assessment that addresses the status and outlook of the drug threat to Florida. Analytical judgment determined the threat posed by each drug type or category, taking into account the most current quantitative and qualitative inf...

2003-01-01

194

What Is the Impact of Beach Debris?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents a marine education activity. Students construct a web of changes that shows potential problems caused by solid waste on beaches. They then determine whether each change is an increase or a decrease from previous conditions. (Author/SOE)

Fortner, Rosanne W.; Jax, Dan

2003-01-01

195

What Is the Impact of Beach Debris?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Presents a marine education activity. Students construct a web of changes that shows potential problems caused by solid waste on beaches. They then determine whether each change is an increase or a decrease from previous conditions. (Author/SOE)|

Fortner, Rosanne W.; Jax, Dan

2003-01-01

196

Fate of Petroleum Hydrocarbons in Beach Sand.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The fate of the petroleum hydrocarbons from Chevron bunker fuel has been studied in natural beaches, sand-containing lysimeters, and laboratory experiments. The importance of various physical, chemical and biological processes for the dispersal and degrad...

1972-01-01

197

Beach and Nearshore Sedimentation, Western Lake Michigan.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Systematic measurement of barometric pressure, wind speed, wind direction, wave period, breaker height, angle of wave approach, and long-shore current velocity at Illinois Beach State Park in 1974 and Sheboygan, Wisconsin in summer 1972 shows the relation...

R. A. Davis W. T. Fox

1975-01-01

198

Surf zone flushing on embayed beaches  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Abstract Using a numerical model, we show that the surf zone of embayed <span class="hlt">beaches</span> systematically flushes out more floating material (simulated using passive tracers) than on open <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, with most exits occurring through the headland rips. For obliquely incident waves, a headland rip acts as a persistent conduit for transporting floating material out of the surf zone and into the inner shelf region. Wave angle and embayment size determine which headland rip (upwave or downwave) flushes out more the surf zone material. For narrow embayed <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, passive drifters exit the surf zone through the upwave headland rip. For wider embayed <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, the longshore current has enough room to develop and is further deflected against the downwave headland where most drifters exit the surf zone. Our results indicate that wave-exposed rugged coasts strongly enhance exchange of floating matter (e.g., pollutants and nutrients) at the ocean/continent interface.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Castelle, Bruno; Coco, Giovanni</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">199</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2850072"> <span id="translatedtitle">Changes in Work Habits of Lifeguards in Relation to <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Red Tide</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The marine dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis, is responsible for <span class="hlt">Florida</span> red tides. Brevetoxins, the neurotoxins produced by K. brevis blooms, can cause fish kills, contaminate shellfish, and lead to respiratory illness in humans. Although several studies have assessed different economic impacts from <span class="hlt">Florida</span> red tide blooms, no studies to date have considered the impact on <span class="hlt">beach</span> lifeguard work performance. Sarasota County experiences frequent <span class="hlt">Florida</span> red tides and staffs lifeguards at its <span class="hlt">beaches</span> 365 days a year. This study examined lifeguard attendance records during the time periods of March 1 to September 30 in 2004 (no bloom) and March 1 to September 30 in 2005 (bloom). The lifeguard attendance data demonstrated statistically significant absenteeism during a <span class="hlt">Florida</span> red tide bloom. The potential economic costs resulting from red tide blooms were comprised of both lifeguard absenteeism and presenteeism. Our estimate of the costs of absenteeism due to the 2005 red tide in Sarasota County is about $3,000. On average, the capitalized costs of lifeguard absenteeism in Sarasota County may be on the order of $100,000 at Sarasota County <span class="hlt">beaches</span> alone. When surveyed, lifeguards reported not only that they experienced adverse health effects of exposure to <span class="hlt">Florida</span> red tide but also that their attentiveness and abilities to take preventative actions decrease when they worked during a bloom, implying presenteeism effects. The costs of presenteeism, which imply increased risks to beachgoers, arguably could exceed those of absenteeism by an order of magnitude. Due to the lack of data, however, we are unable to provide credible estimates of the costs of presenteeism or the potential increased risks to bathers.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nierenberg, Kate; Kirner, Karen; Hoagland, Porter; Ullmann, Steven; LeBlanc, William G; Kirkpatrick, Gary; Fleming, Lora E.; Kirkpatrick, Barbara</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">200</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19837439"> <span id="translatedtitle">Elevated sedimentation on coral reefs adjacent to a <span class="hlt">beach</span> nourishment project.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An increasingly common method to restore eroding <span class="hlt">beaches</span> is nourishment, a process by which lost sand is replaced with terrestrial or offshore sediments to widen <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. The southeastern <span class="hlt">Florida</span> coastline contains shore-parallel coral reef communities adjacent to eroding <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Scleractinian corals and other reef-associated organisms are known to demonstrate sensitivity to elevated sedimentation levels. Sediment traps were used to examine spatio-temporal sedimentation patterns and assess the effects of nourishment (dredge and fill) activities. Several environmental variables correlated with among-site spatial variability of sediment parameters. Intra-annual variability correlated with wind velocity and direction. Nourishment activities showed localized effects, with sites in close proximity to dredging areas exhibiting significantly higher collection rates and lower percent fines than control sites. A regional increase in sedimentation occurred while nourishment activities were ongoing. Due to concurrent impacts of hurricanes, only one during-construction sampling interval revealed substantially higher collection rates relative to corresponding pre-construction sampling intervals. PMID:19837439</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jordan, L K B; Banks, K W; Fisher, L E; Walker, B K; Gilliam, D S</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-10-17</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return 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title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">201</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1427/"> <span id="translatedtitle">Nowcasting <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Advisories at Ohio Lake Erie <span class="hlt">Beaches</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Data were collected during the recreational season of 2007 to test and refine predictive models at three Lake Erie <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. In addition to E. coli concentrations, field personnel collected or compiled data for environmental and water-quality variables expected to affect E. coli concentrations including turbidity, wave height, water temperature, lake level, rainfall, and antecedent dry days and wet days. At Huntington (Bay Village) and Edgewater (Cleveland) during 2007, the models provided correct responses 82.7 and 82.1 percent of the time; these percentages were greater than percentages obtained using the previous day?s E. coli concentrations (current method). In contrast, at Villa Angela during 2007, the model provided correct responses only 61.3 percent of the days monitored. The data from 2007 were added to existing datasets and the larger datasets were split into two (Huntington) or three (Edgewater) segments by date based on the occurrence of false negatives and positives (named ?season 1, season 2, season 3?). Models were developed for dated segments and for combined datasets. At Huntington, the summed responses for separate best models for seasons 1 and 2 provided a greater percentage of correct responses (85.6 percent) than the one combined best model (83.1 percent). Similar results were found for Edgewater. Water resource managers will determine how to apply these models to the Internet-based ?nowcast? system for issuing water-quality advisories during 2008.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Francy, Donna S.; Darner, Robert A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">202</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=258391"> <span id="translatedtitle">Advanced Decision-Support for Coastal <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Health: Virtual <span class="hlt">Beach</span> 3.0</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Virtual <span class="hlt">Beach</span> is a free decision-support system designed to help <span class="hlt">beach</span> managers and researchers construct, evaluate, and operate site-specific statistical models that can predict levels of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) based on environmental conditions that are more readily mea...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">203</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB199298F"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> Erosion Control Improvements Waikiki <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Oahu, Hawaii. (Fort Derussy Sector).</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Waikiki <span class="hlt">Beach</span> borders the eastern end of Mamala Bay on the south coast of the island of Oahu, Hawaii. The plan of improvement consists of contruction of a rubblemound groin alongside the existing box culvert at the eastern end of Fort DeRussy <span class="hlt">Beach</span>. This ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1971-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">204</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013Geomo.199...36P"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> changes from sediment delivered by streams to pocket <span class="hlt">beaches</span> during a major flood</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The significance of sediment delivered via storm-associated stream discharge in altering sediment characteristics, <span class="hlt">beach</span> form, and volume is evaluated on pocket <span class="hlt">beaches</span> with different basin characteristics and wave exposures. The focus is on changes on three <span class="hlt">beaches</span> on Elba Island, Italy caused by a flood event in September 2002 that had an estimated recurrence interval of 200 years. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> profiles and foreshore sediment samples were gathered in 1999 and 2000 to identify pre-storm characteristics, in September 2002 to reveal the immediate effects of the storm, and in 2003 and 2004 to reveal post-storm recovery. Foreshore sediments were finer and better sorted and contained no pebbles prior to the flood. Coarsening of the sand and granule fraction was evident after the flood, along with pebble accumulations, especially near major streams. Mean size, sorting values and percent pebbles one and two years after the flood were generally greater than pre-flood conditions but less than immediately after the flood. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> profiles reveal conspicuous erosion immediately after the flood, when sediment delivered by streams is transported to subaqueous deltas. Thereafter, sediment moves onshore and alongshore to adjacent <span class="hlt">beaches</span> to restore subaerial volumes. The location of streams within a compartment, relative to the location of capes and headlands, is important in determining the movement of sediment added to the <span class="hlt">beach</span> by streams. The sites are all sheltered from the highest-energy waves from the west, facilitating longshore transport to the west. Where the largest stream is located at the east end of a compartment, sediment discharged from it is source material for the downdrift <span class="hlt">beaches</span> to the west. Where the largest stream is at the west end of the compartment, the ability to supply sediment to the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> to the east is restricted. Hence, broad-scale geologic controls (headlands and capes) enhance or diminish the ability of streams to influence <span class="hlt">beach</span> change throughout the pocket. The inability of <span class="hlt">beaches</span> on two of the sites to migrate landward, due to human development of uplands, will be an issue in the future. Lack of sediment to replenish <span class="hlt">beaches</span> through erosion of the upland, places increased emphasis on the role of coastal streams in the <span class="hlt">beach</span> sediment budget. Changing watershed attributes to allow more sediment discharge during high-energy, low-frequency events (e.g. devoting more land to agriculture) would be a way of helping to restore <span class="hlt">beach</span> sediment.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pranzini, Enzo; Rosas, Valentina; Jackson, Nancy L.; Nordstrom, Karl F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">205</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.floridaplants.com/eflora/cover.htm"> <span id="translatedtitle">E-Flora <span class="hlt">Florida</span>: Illustrated Atlas of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Plants</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">E-Flora <span class="hlt">Florida</span> is edited and maintained by Leigh Fulghum of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Plants Online, and offers illustrations and links to the Atlas of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Vascular Plants' distribution maps for roughly 40 species of mostly marshy/aquatic plants. Though limited by species coverage, several online glossaries, bibliographies, and other reference materials fill out the E-Flora site.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">206</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2000JGR...10516999F"> <span id="translatedtitle">Undertow over a barred <span class="hlt">beach</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The spatial distribution of the mean cross-shore flow (undertow) over a barred <span class="hlt">beach</span> is examined with field data obtained on three energetic wave days during the Duck94 experiment. The vertical structure of the undertow is modeled using a turbulent eddy viscosity closure and includes the important effects of wave breaking (described using the roller concept) and convective acceleration of the current. Other than a more realistic description of observed turbulence variations, a depth-dependent eddy viscosity (compared with a constant) does not improve the agreement between predicted and observed undertow profiles. The effect of using different boundary conditions is investigated by extending the formulations of Stive and Wind [1986] and Svendsen et al. [1987] to include random waves by ensemble averaging over the wave height distribution. The contribution of breaking wave rollers to the surface mass flux can be of the same order or greater than the contribution associated with the organized wave motion. The largest discrepancies between model predictions and observations occur over the sandbar, where the mass transport of the breaking waves appears to be underestimated.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Faria, A. F. Garcez; Thornton, E. B.; Lippmann, T. C.; Stanton, T. P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">207</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008ECSS...79...17D"> <span id="translatedtitle">Long or short? Investigating the effect of <span class="hlt">beach</span> length and other environmental parameters on macrofaunal assemblages of Maltese pocket <span class="hlt">beaches</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Despite numerous published studies that have evaluated the influence of different physical parameters, including <span class="hlt">beach</span> slope, sediment organic content and grain size, on <span class="hlt">beach</span> macrofaunal assemblages, very few studies have investigated the influence of <span class="hlt">beach</span> length on biotic attributes of the same assemblages. Four <span class="hlt">beaches</span> on the Maltese Islands were sampled using pitfall traps at night for eight consecutive seasons during 2001-2003. Macrofaunal collections were dominated by arthropods, mostly isopods (especially Tylos europaeus) and tenebrionid beetles (especially Phaleria spp.). The environmental variables of <span class="hlt">beach</span> slope, exposure to wave action, sediment organic content, mean particle diameter, log <span class="hlt">beach</span> length, <span class="hlt">beach</span> width and the <span class="hlt">beach</span> deposit index (BDI) were regressed against a number of biotic parameters, including log individual abundance, total species, Shannon-Wiener ( H') diversity index value and the psammophilic fraction of the total species collected, whilst BIO-ENV and NMDS were used to identify the physical parameter which could best explain observed biotic patterns. RELATE was used to assess the long-term persistence of macrofaunal assemblages on <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of different lengths. Results from this study suggest that, whilst the influence of <span class="hlt">beach</span> length and <span class="hlt">beach</span> width on individual abundance and total species number is unimportant, these '<span class="hlt">beach</span>-area' parameters may affect the taxonomic composition of a <span class="hlt">beach</span> assemblage, mainly in terms of the psammophilic fraction of assemblages, as well as the permanence of macrofaunal assemblages on a <span class="hlt">beach</span>. Shorter and narrower <span class="hlt">beaches</span> were found to be more prone to sporadic and random events of colonisation by euryoecious species. In the absence of human disturbance and mass mortality events, <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of limited dimensions can still maintain stable macrofaunal assemblages. Individual abundance and total species number could not be related to a single or small suite of physical parameters. The study further highlights the need to include biological interactions, the degree of human disturbance and other variables such as environmental heterogeneity and the connectivity of the individual <span class="hlt">beaches</span> when assessing inter-<span class="hlt">beach</span> differences in macrofaunal assemblages.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Deidun, A.; Schembri, P. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">208</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.fsec.ucf.edu/en/index.php"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Solar Energy Center</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An institute of the University of Central <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Solar Energy Center (FSEC) is the largest and most active state-supported renewable energy and energy efficiency research, training, testing and certification institute in the United States. FSEC's mission is to research and develop energy technologies that enhance <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s economy and environment, and to educate the public, students and practitioners on the results of the research. Their website contains educational resources for children and adults, including workshops and courses about working with solar energy systems, energy gauge rater training, and building science training and certification. Also available are useful guides about home energy ratings, maximizing energy efficiency in the home, energy efficient home-design tips, and information about solar energy.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-04-04</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">209</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://coastalmanagement.com.au/papers/C&P2003-pbbps.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">PROCESSES TO DEVELOP AN INTEGRATED AND MULTIFUNCTIONAL COASTAL MANAGEMENT STRATEGY FOR PALM <span class="hlt">BEACH</span>, GOLD COAST</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Despite ongoing nourishment and groyne construction over 3 decades, the central section of Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> is still very vulnerable to storm erosion. Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> is in the central area of Gold Coast City and despite narrow <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, these <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and surf attract a large number of users and supports 3 surf clubs. The Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Protection Strategy (PBBPS) has</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. Tomlinson; J. McGrath; L. A. Jackson; G. Stuart; A. Robertson; M. DaGata; B. Corbett</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">210</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=66368"> <span id="translatedtitle">USING PUBLIC-DOMAIN MODELS TO ESTIMATE <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> BACTERIA CONCENTRATIONS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Stretches of <span class="hlt">beach</span> along popular Huntington <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California are occassionally closed to swimming due to high levels of bacteria. One hypothesized source is the treated wastewater plume from the Orange County Sanitation District's (OCSD) ocean outfall. While three independent sc...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">211</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ADA019936"> <span id="translatedtitle">Techniques in Evaluating Suitability of Borrow Material for <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Nourishment.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Selection of borrow material for use in <span class="hlt">beach</span> restoration and periodic nourishment requires analysis of the textural differences between the potential borrow and native <span class="hlt">beach</span> materials. Three quantitative techniques proposed for such analysis are reviewed...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">W. R. James</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1975-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">212</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22652414"> <span id="translatedtitle">A multi-<span class="hlt">beach</span> study of Staphylococcus aureus, MRSA, and enterococci in seawater and <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Incidences of Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA) have risen worldwide prompting a need to better understand routes of human exposure and whether standard bacterial water quality monitoring practices adequately account for this potential threat. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> water and sand samples were analyzed during summer months for S. aureus, enterococci, and MRSA at three southern California <span class="hlt">beaches</span> (Avalon, Doheny, Malibu Surfrider). S. aureus frequently was detected in samples of seawater (59%, n = 328) and <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand (53%, n = 358). MRSA sometimes was detected in seawater (1.6%, n = 366) and sand (2.7%, n = 366) at relatively low concentrations. Site specific differences were observed, with Avalon <span class="hlt">Beach</span> presenting the highest concentrations of S. aureus and Malibu Surfrider the lowest in both seawater and sand. S. aureus concentrations in seawater and sand were correlated to each other and to a variety of other parameters. Multiple linear regression on the combined <span class="hlt">beach</span> data indicated that significant explanatory variables for S. aureus in seawater were S. aureus in sand, water temperature, enterococci in seawater, and the number of swimmers. In sand, S. aureus concentrations were related to S. aureus in seawater, water temperature, enterococci in seawater, and inversely to surf height classification. Only the correlation to water temperature held for individually analyzed <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and for S. aureus concentrations in both seawater and sand. To provide context for these results, the prevalence of S. aureus in sand was compared to published fomite studies, and results suggested that <span class="hlt">beach</span> prevalence was similar to that in homes. PMID:22652414</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Goodwin, Kelly D; McNay, Melody; Cao, Yiping; Ebentier, Darcy; Madison, Melissa; Griffith, John F</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-04-21</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">213</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.plantatlas.usf.edu/default.asp"> <span id="translatedtitle">Atlas of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Vascular Plants</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This online atlas provides information on the occurrence and distribution of plants in the State of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. Records are based on collections in the four major <span class="hlt">Florida</span> institutional herbaria: the University of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> State University, Fairchild Tropical Gardens, and the University of South <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. There are also records from the New York Botanical Garden, Harvard University, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The collection is browsable by county or by an alphabetical listing of families, and searchable by scientific name. An advanced search feature lets users search by text string, taxonomic category, county, nativity, wetland status, and several other parameters.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">214</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/51943398"> <span id="translatedtitle">The responses of artificial embayed <span class="hlt">beaches</span> to storm events</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The plan-view and the profile shape of sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> largely depend on the incoming wave-energy (Wright and Short, 1984). In this sense, storm events are responsible for major changes in the configuration of sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and the cumulative effect of storms and fair-weather conditions determines the morphodynamic state of a certain <span class="hlt">beach</span>. With increasing wave energy, the <span class="hlt">beach</span> will change</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">E. Ojeda; J. Guillén; F. Ribas</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">215</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/55179625"> <span id="translatedtitle">Recreational impacts on Colorado River <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Glen Canyon, Arizona</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recreational impact was measured on eight <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Glen Canyon National Recreation Area and 15 <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Grand Canyon National Park using permanently located transects and plots. Recreational impact indices included densities of human trash and charcoal and a measure of sand discoloration due to charcoal. Significant increases in the indices occurred on several Glen Canyon <span class="hlt">beaches</span> over a seven-month</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Steven W. Carothers; Robert A. Johnson; Robert Dolan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">216</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=231202"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> Sand Analysis for Indicators of Microbial Contamination</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Traditional <span class="hlt">beach</span> monitoring has focused on water quality, with little attention paid to health risks associated with <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand. Recent research has reported that fecal indicator bacteria, as well as human pathogens can be found in <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand and may constitute a risk to human h...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">217</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=84730"> <span id="translatedtitle">POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION (PCR) TECHNOLOGY IN VISUAL <span class="hlt">BEACH</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In 2000, the US Congress passed the <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> Environmental Assessment and Coastal Health Act under which the EPA has the mandate to manage all significant public <span class="hlt">beaches</span> by 2008. As a result, EPA, USGS and NOAA are developing the Visual <span class="hlt">Beach</span> program which consists of software eq...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">218</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ww4.doh.wa.gov/scripts/esrimap.dll?name=bioview&BCmd=Map&BStep=1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Recreational Shellfish <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Closures Due to Biotoxins or Pollution</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This map represents the Health Status of <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in the state of Washington. The interactive map allows users to click on counties, water bodies, and <span class="hlt">beaches</span> to view seasons and limits. The page also includes links to text bulletins regarding <span class="hlt">beach</span> closures, descriptions of marine biotoxins and associated health effects, and a factsheet of shellfish program publications.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Health, Washington S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">219</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.floridamemory.com/Collections/folklife/"> <span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Folklife Collection</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">With generous funding from the Institute of Museum and Library Services, the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> State Archives has recently finished an ambitious two-year project to enhance access to a number of items in the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Folklife Collection by creating The <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Memory Project website. No doubt the site will be of great interest to folklorists and the general public, as it contains an online index with descriptions of 50,000 photographic images and close to 5,000 audio recordings. Additionally, visitors can peruse over 10,000 of these photographic images by performing detailed searches. Visitors can also look through the audio section for a number of real finds, including a WPA recording of a work song performed by Zora Neale Hurston along with other folk song recordings. The site also includes five separate educational units, which may be used in the classroom, or perused at the discretion of each visitor. The units include discussions of the history of net making and net fishing in <span class="hlt">Florida</span> and the creation of Seminole dolls by noted doll maker Mary B. Billie.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">220</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=plantation&pg=4&id=ED468854"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Educational Facilities, 2000.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|This publication describes <span class="hlt">Florida</span> school and community college facilities completed in 2000, including photographs and floor plans. The facilities profiled are:J. R. Arnold High School (Bay County); Falcon Cove Middle School (Broward); Floranada Elementary School (Broward); Lyons Creek Middle School (Broward); Parkside Elementary School…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Office of Educational Facilities.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return 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Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">221</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=293628"> <span id="translatedtitle">Sugarcane borer in <span class="hlt">Florida</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The sugarcane borer, Diatraea saccharalis, is one of the most important of the above-ground pests of sugarcane in <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. This article presents information pertaining to the borer’s biology, damage to cane, scouting, biological control, cultural control and chemical control. ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">222</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=227071"> <span id="translatedtitle">Adapting Bulls to <span class="hlt">Florida</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The adaptation of bulls used for natural breeding purposes to the Gulf Coast region of the United States including all of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> is an important topic. Nearly 40% of the U.S. cow/calf population resides in the Gulf Coast and Southeast. Thus, as A.I. is relatively rare, the number of bulls used for ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">223</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFMOS31A1620R"> <span id="translatedtitle">Where Has All the Oil Gone? The use of trace metals as potential indicators of oil contamination in marine sediments and <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report initial results to determine if select trace metals are effective indicators for the magnitude and spatial extent of Deep Water Horizon (DWH) oil contamination in Gulf of Mexico marine sediments and <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands. Since crude oil is known to have elevated concentrations of nickel and vanadium, contamination can be detected even after the degradation of oil by measuring enrichment of these metals within marine sediments and <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands. A sample of crude oil from the Macondo Prospect, source of the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill, was fully digested and analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) at the College of Marine Science, University of South <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. Results indicate the crude oil is enriched in nickel, vanadium, and cobalt, with concentrations of 0.86 ppm, 2.76 ppm, and 84 ppb, respectively. With this known trace metal enrichment in DWH oil, Gulf of Mexico marine sediments from 400 and 1100m water depth near DeSoto Canyon and <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands from Pensacola, FL were examined for enrichment of V, Ni, and Co. Both marine sediment and <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand samples were partially digested with HNO3 before analysis via ICP-MS. With marine sediments, the visually contaminated layer at or near the surface typically exhibited an enrichment in Ni, V, and Co compared to the pristine control sediments. Vanadium and nickel enrichment in marine sediments varied from 10 to 32% and 0 to 22%, respectively. Visible contamination in <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands was found between 20-60cm beneath the surface and, likewise, showed Ni, V, and Co enrichment up to 33%, 45%, and 100%. This data shows that enrichment of V, Ni, and Co in marine sediments and <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands may be an effective proxy for contamination even after the degradation of oil. Marine sediments and <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands will continue to be monitored for trace metal enrichment in an effort to assess the continuing impacts of the DWH spill on the Gulf of Mexico.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Roeder, T. K.; Hastings, D. W.; Holzinger, C.; Playle, E.; Brooks, G.; Huettel, M. H.; Kostka, J. E.; Larson, R. A.; Flower, B. P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">224</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-04-21/pdf/2010-9127.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">75 FR 20802 - Safety Zone; New York Air Show at Jones <span class="hlt">Beach</span> State Park, Atlantic Ocean off of Jones <span class="hlt">Beach</span>...</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...State Park, Atlantic Ocean off of Jones <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Wantagh...maneuvers over the Atlantic Ocean off of Jones <span class="hlt">Beach</span> State...West Building Ground Floor, Room W12-140, 1200...W12-140 on the ground floor of the Department of...specified area of the Atlantic Ocean off of Jones <span class="hlt">Beach</span>...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-04-21</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">225</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/41401279"> <span id="translatedtitle">Influence of Nearshore Water Dynamics and Pollution Sources on <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Monitoring Outcomes at Two Adjacent Lake Michigan <span class="hlt">Beaches</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> closings are a growing concern in coastal regions because of serious public health and economic ramifications. Two <span class="hlt">beach</span> sites separated by 150 m of shoreline on Lake Michigan were monitored in the summer of 2003 and 2004 for E. coli densities to evaluate the potential outcome of relocating an existing <span class="hlt">beach</span> to a site immediately to the south. Under</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Caitlin O. Scopel; Josh Harris; Sandra L. McLellan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">226</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFMOS33C1681C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Study of <span class="hlt">beach</span> cusps via high resolution TLS acquisitions on the pocket <span class="hlt">beach</span> of Porsmilin (Brittany)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> cusps are rhythmic shoreline features made up of series of horns and embayments. Their build-up occurs in specific conditions (steep beachface, low-energy wave conditions...). These features can notably be characterized by the cusp spacing ? and their prominence ? (difference in beachface gradient between embayment and horn). At present, two main theories confront to explain the formation of such features on natural <span class="hlt">beaches</span> : standing edge waves (special class of waves propagating longshore) and self-organisation hypothesis. - Standing edge wave theory proposes that the superimposition of incident waves and standing edge waves generates longshore variations of swash height linked with the position of edge wave nodes and anti-nodes. These variations of swash height result in regular zones of erosion. Depending on the context, different types of edge-waves may occur. The predicted <span class="hlt">beach</span> cusp spacing is : ? = (g T^2 tan?) / ? for a sub-harmonic edge wave model ? = (g T^2 tan?) / 2? for a synchronous edge wave model with : ? : <span class="hlt">beach</span> cusp spacing (m) g : gravitational acceleration (9.81 m/s) T : incident wave period (s) tan? : <span class="hlt">beach</span> gradient - Self-organisation theory suggests that a combination of interactions and feedbacks between swash flow and <span class="hlt">beach</span> topography leads to the growth of morphologic irregularities of a given wavelength (because of flow divergence or convergence), resulting in <span class="hlt">beach</span> cusp formation and maintaining. The predicted <span class="hlt">beach</span> cusp spacing is then : ? = f S with : ? : <span class="hlt">beach</span> cusp spacing (m) S : horizontal extent of the swash flow (m) f : empirical constant (~1.5) Three multitemporal Terrestrial Laser Scan acquisitions have been carried out for three consecutive days on the sandy <span class="hlt">beach</span> of Porsmilin (Brittany, France) with a spatial resolution varying from few centimetres to few metres. Moreover the hydrodynamic conditions have been obtained thanks to the Previmer project website (http://www.previmer.org/), notably based on WaveWatch3 and MARS-2D models. This study proposes to profit from the high resolution and accuracy of Terrestrial Laser data to measure the geometry and the spacing of <span class="hlt">beach</span> cusps, to compare the measured parameters to the predicted ones (with both theories) and thus to attempt to identify the hydrodynamic process which sparks off their formation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chabrol, C.; Jaud, M.; Delacourt, C.; Allemand, P.; Augereau, E.; Cuq, V.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">227</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AGUSMOS23G..05F"> <span id="translatedtitle">Nowcasting and Forecasting <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Bacteria Concentration Using EPA's Virtual <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Software</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Beaches</span> in the United States of (North) America are subject to closure when bacterial counts exceed water quality criteria. Many authorities base these decisions on water samples that typically require at least 18 hours to analyze. This persistence approach, or model, often leads to erroneous decisions due to the great variability in bacterial concentrations. <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> are closed when they could be open and vice versa, their true status unknown until the next day. Studies show that mathematical models based on multi-variable linear regression (MLR) principles can produce better estimates, or nowcasts, using real-time explanatory variables, such as turbidity, cloud cover, and rainfall. To make such models generally available, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is developing a program called Virtual <span class="hlt">Beach</span> (VB). VB is public-domain software for developing site-specific predictive models. It features capabilities that make it possible with reasonable effort to develop, and compare the performance of, static and dynamic MLR models. The results of tests on 2006 Huntington <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Lake Erie <span class="hlt">beach</span> data are presented. In addition to nowcasting, the work begins to address the question, can weather and water forecasts be used to forecast <span class="hlt">beach</span> conditions in advance? A preliminary affirmative answer is provided based on an analysis of the Huntington <span class="hlt">Beach</span> data, with weather forecasts for nearby Cleveland-Hopkins international airport, and NOAA lake condition forecasts. We encourage those engaged in <span class="hlt">beach</span> monitoring and management to request VB, applying the nowcast and forecast models developed with it to their locations of interest. Disclaimer: Although this work was reviewed by EPA and approved for presentation, it may not necessarily reflect official Agency policy.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Frick, W. E.; Ge, Z.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">228</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://icesjms.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/reprint/59/5/897.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Is <span class="hlt">beach</span>-spawning success for capelin, Mallotus villosus (Muller), a function of the <span class="hlt">beach</span>?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">sediment grain-size distributions were captured by variations in the overall rate constant (k) and inflection point (I) of the logistic equation fitted to the cumulative percentage grain-size distributions. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> orientation explained 57% of the variation in egg concentration among <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Orientation and k explained 61% and additional exploratory models explained 80-86% of the variation. Our findings build upon previous reports</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Brian S. Nakashima; Christopher T. Taggart</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">229</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/42345097"> <span id="translatedtitle">Nonlinear periodic waves on a <span class="hlt">beach</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">High-order Boussinesq-type equations for long periodic nonlinear waves climbing a sloping <span class="hlt">beach</span> are derived and investigated in shallow water approximation. Potential and surface elevation for wave motion are expanded in Fourier series up to the third harmonic inclusively. Coefficients of these series are explicitly presented as polynomials of Bessel functions. One may speculate that the obtained expression are the first</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. Shermenev</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">230</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/59041866"> <span id="translatedtitle">Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>: Eden Roc Renaissance Hotel</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Eden Roc Renaissance Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span> was completed in 1956. Designed by architect Morris Lapidus after completing the Fontainebleu, the Eden Roc’s neighbor. Lapidus used curvy and innovative designs that were widely criticized at the time they were being built. At the time it was built, the Eden Roc was considered a vision of the Italian Renaissance. Today the style</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chet Smolski; Morris Lapidus</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1978-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">231</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/42440485"> <span id="translatedtitle">Biodegradation of Pyrene in Marine <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Sediments</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The potential of chitosan (0.1% dry weight equivalent) as a bioremediation additive for removal of the recalcitrant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) pyrene in marine <span class="hlt">beach</span> sediments was investigated using an open irrigation system over a 63-day period. Osmocote, a slow release fertilizer, was used as the key nutrient supplement at a concentration of 1% in sediment (dry weight equivalent). Osmocote</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">H. Li; R. Xu; J. P. Obbard</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">232</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB85117356"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> Cleaning Trials: Pendine Sands, 1983.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Techniques for the removal of stranded water-in-oil emulsion were compared in a series of trials held on Pendine sands during the period 7-11 November 1983. The report describes various techniques for scraping the <span class="hlt">beach</span> to transfer the oily waste into tre...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">P. R. Morris B. W. J. Lynch J. F. Nightingale D. H. Thomas</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">233</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/54715949"> <span id="translatedtitle">Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span> search and rescue experiment</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In May, 1998, the NASA Search and Rescue Mission conducted a SAR crash detection test in the swampy area south and west of Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span>. A number of aircraft parts were hidden in the dense foliage. The radar used was the Navy P-3 with the ERIM XLC and UHF SAR, providing fine resolution imagery with full polarimetry and an IFSAR</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Houra Rais; Arthur W. Mansfield; Barton D. Huxtable; Kancham Chotoo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">234</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=animals+AND+islands&pg=5&id=ED249068"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beaches</span>, Dunes, and Barrier Islands. Habitat Pac.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The materials in this educational packet are designed for use with students in grades 4 through 7. They consist of a leader overview, teaching guides and student data sheets for three activities, and a poster. The leader overview describes the nature of <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, dunes, and barrier islands, tracing their development, settlement, and management and…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fish and Wildlife Service (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">235</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB2011101931"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cliffwood <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Fossil Preserve Environmental Assessment.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Fossil Preserve built as part of the Cliffwood <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Shore Protection project in the mid 1970's is important to scientists. The Township of Aberdeen now wants the Preserve filled to halt further cliff erosion and avoid safety problems. Before filling ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1982-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">236</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/14803250"> <span id="translatedtitle">Tar pollution of Sierra Leone <span class="hlt">beaches</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">THE widespread occurrence of pelagic tar and plastic wastes in parts of the Pacific and Atlantic oceans has been described previously1. Extensive and considerable fouling of the sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of Sierra Leone by tar lumps has now been observed at Lumley, Sussex, No. 2, Toke and Mamah villages (Fig. 1) during the past 14 months (June, 1973 to July, 1974).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wazir Okera</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1974-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">237</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/reprint/99/6/e1.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Solar Protection of Children at the <span class="hlt">Beach</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background. Excessive sun exposure during childhood has been associated with subsequent development of skin cancers. Children have been ad- vised to avoid sun exposure, use protective clothing, and apply sunscreen lotions, but how completely these rec- ommendations are followed has not been studied. Objective. To determine the extent of sun protection among children visiting lake <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, the methods used, and</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ardis L. Olson; Allen J. Dietrich; Carol Hill Sox; Marguerite M. Stevens; Charlotte Woodruff Winchell; Tim A. Ahles</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">238</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=new+AND+york+AND+times&pg=6&id=EJ767525"> <span id="translatedtitle">An Interview with Beatrice <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Szekely</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|This article presents an interview with Beatrice <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Szekely, a comparative education scholar that specialized in the Soviet Union. She was editor of the journal "Soviet Education" from 1970 to 1989. During the interview, Szekely talked about how she became personally involved in Russian/Soviet studies of education. She related that her…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Steiner-Khamsi, Gita</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">239</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/3006712"> <span id="translatedtitle">Edge waves along a sloping <span class="hlt">beach</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We construct a family of explicit rotational solutions to the nonlinear governing equations for water waves, describing edge waves propagating over a plane-sloping <span class="hlt">beach</span>. A detailed analysis of the edge wave dynamics and of the run-up pattern is made possible by the use of the Lagrangian approach to the water motion.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Adrian Constantin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">240</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/41004377"> <span id="translatedtitle">Intertidal <span class="hlt">beach</span> profile estimation using video images</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper, we present a technique suitable for measurement of intertidal bathymetry over a broad range of length scales (101 to 103 m) and time scales (days to decades). A series of time-averaged images of the swash zone are used to map contour lines of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> surface. In each image, contours are identified using bands of maximum brightness</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nathaniel G. Plant; Rob A. Holman</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return 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onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">241</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://merrick.library.miami.edu/specialCollections/asm0567/"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Documents Collection</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Created as part of the University of Miami Libraries Digital Collections, this rather remarkable offering includes an assortment of documents related to various aspects of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>âÂÂs history, life, and culture from 1777 to the 1920s. The range of materials here includes correspondence diaries, invoices, receipts, reports, and other documents. Key highlights cover a range from the Seminole Wars to the early days of Miami history. The user interface here is quite useful as visitors can use the Location Map & Timeline to browse around from Pensacola down to the Keys. Also, visitors can use the Subject Index area to look around from "Abstracts of Title" to "Yulee, David Levy." First-time visitors may wish to start by looking at the signature of Napoleon B. Broward and then wandering on over to a unique deed from the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> East Coast Railway.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">242</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1257563"> <span id="translatedtitle">Initial Evaluation of the Effects of Aerosolized <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Red Tide Toxins (Brevetoxins) in Persons with Asthma</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> red tides annually occur in the Gulf of Mexico, resulting from blooms of the marine dinoflagellate Karenia brevis. K. brevis produces highly potent natural polyether toxins, known as brevetoxins, that activate voltage-sensitive sodium channels. In experimental animals, brevetoxins cause significant bronchoconstriction. A study of persons who visited the <span class="hlt">beach</span> recreationally found a significant increase in self-reported respiratory symptoms after exposure to aerosolized <span class="hlt">Florida</span> red tides. Anecdotal reports indicate that persons with underlying respiratory diseases may be particularly susceptible to adverse health effects from these aerosolized toxins. Fifty-nine persons with physician-diagnosed asthma were evaluated for 1 hr before and after going to the <span class="hlt">beach</span> on days with and without <span class="hlt">Florida</span> red tide. Study participants were evaluated with a brief symptom questionnaire, nose and throat swabs, and spirometry approved by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. Environmental monitoring, water and air sampling (i.e., K. brevis, brevetoxins, and particulate size distribution), and personal monitoring (for toxins) were performed. Brevetoxin concentrations were measured by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry, high-performance liquid chromatography, and a newly developed brevetoxin enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Participants were significantly more likely to report respiratory symptoms after <span class="hlt">Florida</span> red tide exposure. Participants demonstrated small but statistically significant decreases in forced expiratory volume in 1 sec, forced expiratory flow between 25 and 75%, and peak expiratory flow after exposure, particularly those regularly using asthma medications. Similar evaluation during nonexposure periods did not significantly differ. This is the first study to show objectively measurable adverse health effects from exposure to aerosolized <span class="hlt">Florida</span> red tide toxins in persons with asthma. Future studies will examine the possible chronic effects of these toxins among persons with asthma and other chronic respiratory impairment.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fleming, Lora E.; Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Backer, Lorraine C.; Bean, Judy A.; Wanner, Adam; Dalpra, Dana; Tamer, Robert; Zaias, Julia; Cheng, Yung Sung; Pierce, Richard; Naar, Jerome; Abraham, William; Clark, Richard; Zhou, Yue; Henry, Michael S.; Johnson, David; Van De Bogart, Gayl; Bossart, Gregory D.; Harrington, Mark; Baden, Daniel G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">243</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.fl-seafood.com"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Seafood & Aquaculture</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Official web site of the Bureau of Seafood and Aquaculture Marketing, offering seafood information for both consumers and the industry to help buy, sell and market <span class="hlt">Florida</span> seafood and aquaculture products. Provides promotional materials, supplier directories, and training for retailers, food service, wholesalers, processors, fishermen and aquaculturists. Also includes internet links, recipes, news, calendar of seafood festivals, brochures, clip art, audio and video. Includes both freshwater and marine species culture.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">244</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://floridakeys.noaa.gov/"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Keys NMS: Coral Reefs</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Keys National Marine Sanctuary's page with information on coral reefs and links to information on research, restoration and monitoring. Wealth of information on the protection of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s coral reefs and the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Keys as a whole. Includes an in-class activity for grades K-5, as well as information on a Keys field experience and teacher workshops. Information on safe diving and snorkeling. Education materials available for purchase, including the Seagrass Toolbox.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-11-04</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">245</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://sflwww.er.usgs.gov/"> <span id="translatedtitle">SOFIA: South <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Information Access</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">One of the US Geological Survey's Ecosystem Programs, the South <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Ecosystem Program is an intergovernmental effort "to reestablish and maintain the ecosystem of south <span class="hlt">Florida</span>," including the region's water regime, hydrology, and geochemical and biological processes. To restore south <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s ecosystems, the Program relies on the collaboration of over a dozen agencies, and information is disseminated via SOFIA, the South <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Information Access Website. At the site, users will find background information, proposed and current research programs, links to collaborating agencies, publications, and data.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">246</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005AGUSMNB33A..15P"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Mayflies of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> - Revisited</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The last comprehensive review of the mayfly fauna of the state of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> was the book The Mayflies of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>: Revised Edition by L. Berner and M. L. Pescador published in 1988. In the years since then, many changes have occurred in Ephemeroptera taxonomy and much more has been learned about the mayfly fauna and its distribution in <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. We have recently reviewed and updated what is known of the taxonomy of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> mayfly taxa and have produced the Guide to the Mayfly (Ephemeroptera) Nymphs of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> for the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Department of Environmental Protection. Presently, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> has 76 mayfly species representing 41 genera in 15 families. Seven species have been newly recorded in the state and one new species is to be established. Species diversity is much higher in the Panhandle region of the state than in the Peninsula with 75 of the 76 known species present in the Panhandle and 27 of the 76 known species present in the Peninsula. <span class="hlt">Florida</span> appears to have 5 endemic species and 10 species recorded only in the Southeast. Mayfly diversity "hotspots" in <span class="hlt">Florida</span> are discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pescador, M. L.; Richard, B. A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">247</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6300725"> <span id="translatedtitle">Characterization and environmental studies of Pompano <span class="hlt">Beach</span> anaerobic digestion facility. Semi-annual report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report summarizes the results of routine monitoring of gas quality, airborne particulates, and solid and liquid phases of the Refcom facility at Pompano <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. The plant produces methane from municipal wastes by anaerobic digestion. Bacteriological analysis of residual liquids and process streams were performed. Leaching studies with selected soils, filtrates and bottom layer muck were also conducted. A two-dimensional time model was developed. The first appendix contains the results of trace organic analysis of effluents from the facility. The results of environental studies on methane production are presented in the second appendix. The third appendix describes the gas analysis procedure and the gas composition of gas produced at the facility.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sengupta, S.; Wong, K.F.V.; Gerrish, H.P.; Nemerow, N.; Daly, E.L. Jr.; Chriswell, C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1981-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">248</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006AGUFMOS41C0623H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Quantifying <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Response to Episodic Large Wave Events, a Predictive Empirical Model, Ocean <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, San Francisco, CA</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Predicting <span class="hlt">beach</span> response on an event scale is extremely difficult due to highly variable spatial and temporal conditions, lack of data on antecedent <span class="hlt">beach</span> morphology, generic model shortcomings, and uncertainty of local forcing parameters. Each <span class="hlt">beach</span> system is unique and classical <span class="hlt">beach</span> erosion models may not be applicable to many high-energy <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, especially those receiving large long-period waves. Therefore, developing an empirical model is the best way to predict future <span class="hlt">beach</span> response at a given site. Based on 12 closely spaced (temporally) GPS topographic surveys during the winter of 2005-2006 at Ocean <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, in San Francisco, California, we have developed a predictive empirical model that relates sub-aerial <span class="hlt">beach</span> response to observed wave height, period, and direction. The model will provide important information to coastal managers, who will be able to better predict and mitigate possible loss from a forecasted wave event. Ocean <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, located immediately south of the Golden Gate in San Francisco, is a high-energy, intermediate- slope <span class="hlt">beach</span> that is exposed to waves generated in both the North and South Pacific. Winter breaking wave heights frequently reach 4 m and can exceed 7 m, with periods sometimes greater than 20 s. Our observations demonstrate that large seasonal variations in the sub-aerial <span class="hlt">beach</span> profile are likely forced by several single large wave events. These events have led to the partial destruction of a recreational parking lot at the south end of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> where an erosion hot spot is currently located, and continued erosion will threaten other parts of public infrastructure. This study, in combination with other ongoing research at Ocean <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, will provide valuable insight that will not only aid local personnel in their management decisions but also contribute to a better understanding of sediment transport at high-energy <span class="hlt">beaches</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hansen, J. E.; Barnard, P. L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">249</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9391969"> <span id="translatedtitle">Winter mortality of common loons in <span class="hlt">Florida</span> coastal waters.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Diagnostic findings are presented for 434 common loons (Gavia immer) found sick or dead on <span class="hlt">Florida</span> <span class="hlt">beaches</span> from 1970 through 1994, primarily during the months of December to April. The most commonly recognized problem was an emaciation syndrome (66%), followed by oiling (18%), aspergillosis (7%), trauma (5%) and miscellaneous disease entities (1%). The cause-of-death for 3% of the birds was not determined. Many of the carcasses examined (n = 173) were obtained during an epizootic which occurred from January to March of 1983 in which more than 13,000 loons were estimated to have died. An emaciation syndrome, characterized by severe atrophy of pectoral muscles, loss of body fat and hemorrhagic enteritis, was the primary finding in this epizootic. It was postulated to have a complex etiologic basis involving synergistic effects and energy costs of migration, molting and replacement of flight feathers, food resource changes, salt-loading, intestinal parasitism, environmental contaminants, and inclement weather. PMID:9391969</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Forrester, D J; Davidson, W R; Lange, R E; Stroud, R K; Alexander, L L; Franson, J C; Haseltine, S D; Littell, R C; Nesbitt, S A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">250</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/58920512"> <span id="translatedtitle">Paleoenvironmental reconstruction of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bay, South <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, using benthic foraminifera</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Efforts that are underway to rehabilitate the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bay ecosystem to a more natural state are best guided by a comprehensive understanding of the natural versus human-induced variability that has existed within the ecosystem. Benthic foraminifera, which are well-known paleoenvironmental indicators, were identified in 203 sediment samples from six sediment cores taken from <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bay, and analyzed to understand the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jie Cheng</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">251</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/58920805"> <span id="translatedtitle">Paleoenvironmental Reconstruction of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bay, South <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, Using Benthic Foraminifera</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Efforts that are underway to rehabilitate the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bay ecosystem to a more natural state are best guided by a comprehensive understanding of the natural versus human-induced variability that has existed within the ecosystem. Benthic foraminifera, which are well-known paleoenvironmental indicators, were identified in 203 sediment samples from six sediment cores taken from <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bay, and analyzed to understand the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jie Cheng</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">252</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/41004195"> <span id="translatedtitle">Origin of <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridges and swales</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Sandy <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridges occur in four main categories: (1) Swash-built, (2) Settling lag, (3) Eolian, (4) Storm surge. Ridges in the first two classes are geometrically regular, only a few tens of centimeters above adjacent swales, and commonly in ridge sets and systems (tens to hundreds of ridges each). Individual sets (of 5–25 ridges) tend to stand 0.5 m to</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">William F. Tanner</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">253</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2000SPIE.4050..169R"> <span id="translatedtitle">Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span> search and rescue experiment</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In May, 1998, the NASA Search and Rescue Mission conducted a SAR crash detection test in the swampy area south and west of Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span>. A number of aircraft parts were hidden in the dense foliage. The radar used was the Navy P-3 with the ERIM XLC and UHF SAR, providing fine resolution imagery with full polarimetry and an IFSAR capability. This paper reports preliminary results of this test.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rais, Houra; Mansfield, Arthur W.; Huxtable, Barton D.; Chotoo, Kancham</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">254</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://actionbioscience.org/environment/Jensen_McLellan.html"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> Closings: Science versus Public Perception</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The issue-focused, peer-reviewed article addresses how <span class="hlt">beach</span> closings are on the rise, but the public is not being given accurate information to help them get involved in solving the problem. The media, the publics primary information source, must provide information based on factual scientific evidence, not be swayed by economic and political factors, and work with scientists to obtain data and facts.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Erika Jensen and Sandra McLellan (Great Lakes WATER Institute;)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">255</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/3189908"> <span id="translatedtitle">Holocene cemented <span class="hlt">beach</span> deposits in Belize</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Two types of cemented <span class="hlt">beach</span> deposits occur on reef islands off the coast of Belize. These are (1) intertidal beachrock that is dominantly cemented by marine aragonite and high-magnesium-calcite cements, and (2) supratidal cayrock that is cemented mainly by vadose low-magnesium-calcite cements. Besides differences in position relative to present sea level and resulting early diagenesic features, beachrock and cayrock can</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Eberhard Gischler; Anthony J. Lomando</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">256</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=adn&pg=5&id=ED179138"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s Nurses Speak to Educators.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|A questionnaire was sent to 5000 <span class="hlt">Florida</span> hospitals to obtain information from non-members of the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Nurses Association (FNA) and to compare the data with that of FNA members on questions relevant to nursing education. Among findings from the 22-item survey, 84 percent of which were returned, were that 80 percent disagreed that licensing…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">McCulloch, Etta S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">257</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.aoml.noaa.gov/sfros/database/Publications/Salinity%20Patterns%20Estuarine,%20Coastal%20and%20Shelf%20Science%202006.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Salinity patterns of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bay</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The salinity of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bay has undergone dramatic changes over the past century. Salinity values reached their most extreme, up to 70, in the late 1980s, concurrent with ecological changes in <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bay including a mass seagrass die-off. In this study, surface salinity was measured at approximately monthly intervals between 1998 and 2004. The 7-year data set was analyzed to</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Christopher R. Kelble; Elizabeth M. Johns; William K. Nuttle; Thomas N. Lee; Ryan H. Smith; Peter B. Ortner</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">258</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/39874920"> <span id="translatedtitle">Thermal regimes of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> lakes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Water column temperatures were determined monthly for 24 lakes and bimonthly for 5 lakes in peninsular <span class="hlt">Florida</span> during 1979. Three geographical groups (north, central, south) were delineated from mean monthly water column temperatures for individual lakes. On a monthly basis, northern lakes were least similar to southern lakes, while central <span class="hlt">Florida</span> lakes displayed greater affinity to the southern than to</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">John R. Beaver; Thomas L. Crisman; James S. Bays</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1981-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">259</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1984EnMan...8..353C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Recreational impacts on Colorado River <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Glen Canyon, Arizona</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recreational impact was measured on eight <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Glen Canyon National Recreation Area and 15 <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Grand Canyon National Park using permanently located transects and plots. Recreational impact indices included densities of human trash and charcoal and a measure of sand discoloration due to charcoal. Significant increases in the indices occurred on several Glen Canyon <span class="hlt">beaches</span> over a seven-month period. Sand discoloration became significantly higher over all Glen Canyon <span class="hlt">beaches</span> during the same time period. All indices were significantly higher in Glen Canyon than on similar Grand Canyon <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. These differences are probably due to differences in: (a) level of impacts tolerated by the respective management regimes and, (b) in the number of user days among the two National Park Service administrative units. Management alternatives are presented for reversing the present trends of recreational impact on Glen Canyon <span class="hlt">beaches</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Carothers, Steven W.; Johnson, Robert A.; Dolan, Robert</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">260</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5321439"> <span id="translatedtitle">Biomass production in <span class="hlt">Florida</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> posseses climatic, land, and water resources favorable for abundant biomass production. Therefore, a statewide program has been initiated to determine adapted species for the available array of production sites. Plant resources under investigation include woody, aquatic, grasses, hydrocarbon, and root crop species. The goal is to produce a continuous stream of biomass for the various biofuel conversion options. Preliminary yields from energy cropping experiments range from about 10 to nearly 90 metric tons per hectare per year, depending on the crop and the production systems employed. (Refs. 15).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Smith, W.H.; Dowd, M.L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1981-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return 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src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">261</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/ca1561.photos.014193p/"> <span id="translatedtitle">109. VIEW OF SOUTHEAST SIDE OF PIER TAKEN FROM <span class="hlt">BEACH</span>, ...</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p class="result-summary">109. VIEW OF SOUTHEAST SIDE OF PIER TAKEN FROM <span class="hlt">BEACH</span>, LOOKING WEST. VIEW SHOWS ART DECO BUILDINGS ADDED IN 1931 AND 5TH TEE ADDED IN 1940 Photograph #5369-HB. Photographer unknown, c. 1945, based on clothing of sunbathers; view probably taken in mid-1945 after the U.S. Army vacated the pier and it was reopened to the public. - Huntington <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Orange County, CA</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">262</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.usgs.gov/sim/3167/"> <span id="translatedtitle">Geospatial characteristics of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s coastal and offshore environments: Coastal habitats, artificial reefs, wrecks, dumping grounds, harbor obstructions and offshore sand resources</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Geospatial Characteristics GeoPDF of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s Coastal and Offshore Environments is a comprehensive collection of geospatial data describing the political boundaries and natural resources of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. This interactive map provides spatial information on bathymetry, sand resources, coastal habitats, artificial reefs, shipwrecks, dumping grounds, and harbor obstructions. The map should be useful to coastal resource managers and others interested in marine habitats and submerged obstructions of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s coastal region. In particular, as oil and gas explorations continue to expand, the map may be used to explore information regarding sensitive areas and resources in the State of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. Users of this geospatial database will have access to synthesized information in a variety of scientific disciplines concerning <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s coastal zone. This powerful tool provides a one-stop assembly of data that can be tailored to fit the needs of many natural resource managers. The map was originally developed to assist the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation, and Enforcement (BOEMRE) and coastal resources managers with planning <span class="hlt">beach</span> restoration projects. The BOEMRE uses a systematic approach in planning the development of submerged lands of the Continental Shelf seaward of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s territorial waters. Such development could affect the environment. BOEMRE is required to ascertain the existing physical, biological, and socioeconomic conditions of the submerged lands and estimate the impact of developing these lands. Data sources included the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, BOEMRE, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Department of Environmental Protection, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Geographic Data Library, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Natural Areas Inventory, and the State of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, Bureau of Archeological Research. Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) compliant metadata are provided as attached xml files for all geographic information system (GIS) layers.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Demopoulos, Amanda W.J.; Foster, Ann M.; Jones, Michal L.; Gualtieri, Daniel J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">263</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012Geomo.139...16S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dune recovery after storm erosion on a high-energy <span class="hlt">beach</span>: Vougot <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Brittany (France)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">On 10th March 2008, the high energy storm Johanna hit the French Atlantic coast, generating severe dune erosion on Vougot <span class="hlt">Beach</span> (Brittany, France). In this paper, the recovery of the dune of Vougot <span class="hlt">Beach</span> is analysed through a survey of morphological changes and hydrodynamic conditions. Data collection focused on the period immediately following storm Johanna until July 2010, i.e. over two and a half years. Results showed that the dune retreated by a maximum of almost 6 m where storm surge and wave attack were the most energetic. Dune retreat led to the creation of accommodation space for the storage of sediment by widening and elevating space between the pre- and post-storm dune toe, and reducing impacts of the storm surge. Dune recovery started in the month following the storm event and is still ongoing. It is characterised by the construction of "secondary" embryo dunes, which recovered at an average rate of 4-4.5 cm per month, although average monthly volume changes varied from - 1 to 2 m3.m- 1. These embryo dunes accreted due to a large aeolian sand supply from the upper tidal <span class="hlt">beach</span> to the existing foredune. These dune-construction processes were facilitated by growth of vegetation on low-profile embryo dunes promoting backshore accretion. After more than two years of survey, the sediment budget of the <span class="hlt">beach</span>/dune system showed that more than 10,000 m3 has been lost by the upper tidal <span class="hlt">beach</span>. We suggest that seaward return currents generated during the storm of 10th March 2008 are responsible for offshore sediment transport. Reconstitution of the equilibrium <span class="hlt">beach</span> profile following the storm event may therefore have generated cross-shore sediment redistribution inducing net erosion in the tidal zone.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Suanez, Serge; Cariolet, Jean-Marie; Cancouët, Romain; Ardhuin, Fabrice; Delacourt, Christophe</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">264</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24040219"> <span id="translatedtitle">Shifts in the microbial community composition of gulf coast <span class="hlt">beaches</span> following <span class="hlt">beach</span> oiling.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Microorganisms associated with coastal sands serve as a natural biofilter, providing essential nutrient recycling in nearshore environments and acting to maintain coastal ecosystem health. Anthropogenic stressors often impact these ecosystems, but little is known about whether these disturbances can be identified through microbial community change. The blowout of the Macondo Prospect reservoir on April 20, 2010, which released oil hydrocarbons into the Gulf of Mexico, presented an opportunity to examine whether microbial community composition might provide a sensitive measure of ecosystem disturbance. Samples were collected on four occasions, beginning in mid-June, during initial <span class="hlt">beach</span> oiling, until mid-November from surface sand and surf zone waters at seven <span class="hlt">beaches</span> stretching from Bay St. Louis, MS to St. George Island, FL USA. Oil hydrocarbon measurements and NOAA shoreline assessments indicated little to no impact on the two most eastern <span class="hlt">beaches</span> (controls). Sequence comparisons of bacterial ribosomal RNA gene hypervariable regions isolated from <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands located to the east and west of Mobile Bay in Alabama demonstrated that regional drivers account for markedly different bacterial communities. Individual <span class="hlt">beaches</span> had unique community signatures that persisted over time and exhibited spatial relationships, where community similarity decreased as horizontal distance between samples increased from one to hundreds of meters. In contrast, sequence analyses detected larger temporal and less spatial variation among the water samples. Superimposed upon these <span class="hlt">beach</span> community distance and time relationships, was increased variability in bacterial community composition from oil hydrocarbon contaminated sands. The increased variability was observed among the core, resident, and transient community members, indicating the occurrence of community-wide impacts rather than solely an overprinting of oil hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria onto otherwise relatively stable sand population structures. Among sequences classified to genus, Alcanivorax, Alteromonas, Marinobacter, Winogradskyella, and Zeaxanthinibacter exhibited the largest relative abundance increases in oiled sands. PMID:24040219</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Newton, Ryan J; Huse, Susan M; Morrison, Hilary G; Peake, Colin S; Sogin, Mitchell L; McLellan, Sandra L</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-09-10</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">265</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/es8019758"> <span id="translatedtitle">Summer E. coli patterns and responses along 23 Chicago <span class="hlt">beaches</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Concentrations of E. coli in recreational <span class="hlt">beach</span> water are highly variable both locally and temporally, but a broader understanding of these fluctuations may be explained through coastal observations. Currently, <span class="hlt">beach</span> contamination study approaches tend to be site-specific underthe belief that politically delineated <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are unique and management of <span class="hlt">beaches</span> cannot be regionally oriented. E. coli data collected over five years from 23 Chicago <span class="hlt">beaches</span> clearly identified ambient linked patterns at the regional scale. Temporal fluctuations were similar, with all <span class="hlt">beaches</span> having simultaneous peaks and troughs of E. coli concentrations. Spatially, E. coli concentrations for <span class="hlt">beaches</span> more closely situated were more closely correlated, indicating spatial autocorrelation. Julian day, wave height, and barometric pressure explained up to 40% of the variation, a value comparable to individual, less parsimonious site-specific models. Day of sampling could explain the majority of the variation in E. coli concentrations, more so than <span class="hlt">beach</span>, depth, or time of day. Comparing <span class="hlt">beaches</span> along a targeted coastline allows a better understanding of inherent background regional fluctuations and, ultimately, better predictions of E. coli concentrations in coastal recreational water.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Whitman, R. L.; Nevers, M. B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">266</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70015997"> <span id="translatedtitle">Changes along a seawall and natural <span class="hlt">beaches</span>: Fourchon, LA</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper compares shoreline and <span class="hlt">beach</span> morphology changes and responses to storms from 1985 to 1988 along sections of a rapidly eroding coast at the Bayou Lafourche headland, Louisiana. A <span class="hlt">beach</span> consisting of a cement-filled bag seawall and nourishment was compared with natural <span class="hlt">beaches</span> to the west and east of the project. Local patterns of <span class="hlt">beach</span> response could be attributed to several recent processes and historical conditions. Hurricane Gilbert, which made landfall in Mexico, caused about 70% of the sediment loss on both the artificially-stablized and the natural shorelines over this three-year period.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mossa, Joann; Nakashima, Lindsay, D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">267</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-01-10/pdf/2011-167.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">76 FR 1359 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, NC</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...the 2011 Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span>/Quintiles Marathon will be transiting across the bridge...the 2011 Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span>/Quintiles Marathon. DATES: This deviation is effective...The Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span>/Quintiles Marathon Committee on behalf of the North...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-10</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">268</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title36-vol1/pdf/CFR-2013-title36-vol1-sec3-17.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">36 CFR 3.17 - What regulations apply to swimming areas and <span class="hlt">beaches</span>?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">... false What regulations apply to swimming areas and <span class="hlt">beaches</span>? 3.17 Section...3.17 What regulations apply to swimming areas and <span class="hlt">beaches</span>? (a) The superintendent may designate areas as swimming areas or swimming <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">269</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2009-title36-vol1/pdf/CFR-2009-title36-vol1-sec3-17.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">36 CFR 3.17 - What regulations apply to swimming areas and <span class="hlt">beaches</span>?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">... false What regulations apply to swimming areas and <span class="hlt">beaches</span>? 3.17 Section...3.17 What regulations apply to swimming areas and <span class="hlt">beaches</span>? (a) The superintendent may designate areas as swimming areas or swimming <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">270</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title36-vol1/pdf/CFR-2010-title36-vol1-sec3-17.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">36 CFR 3.17 - What regulations apply to swimming areas and <span class="hlt">beaches</span>?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">... false What regulations apply to swimming areas and <span class="hlt">beaches</span>? 3.17 Section...3.17 What regulations apply to swimming areas and <span class="hlt">beaches</span>? (a) The superintendent may designate areas as swimming areas or swimming <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">271</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=198803"> <span id="translatedtitle">Using a watershed-centric approach to identify potentially impacted <span class="hlt">beaches</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Beaches</span> can be affected by a variety of contaminants. Of particular concern are <span class="hlt">beaches</span> impacted by human fecal contamination and urban runoff. This poster demonstrates a methodology to identify potentially impacted <span class="hlt">beaches</span> using Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Since h...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">272</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/909972"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">FLORIDA</span> TOWER FOOTPRINT EXPERIMENTS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Footprint experiments were a series of field programs in which perfluorocarbon tracers were released in different configurations centered on a flux tower to generate a data set that can be used to test transport and dispersion models. These models are used to determine the sources of the CO{sub 2} that cause the fluxes measured at eddy covariance towers. Experiments were conducted in a managed slash pine forest, 10 km northeast of Gainesville, <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, in 2002, 2004, and 2006 and in atmospheric conditions that ranged from well mixed, to very stable, including the transition period between convective conditions at midday to stable conditions after sun set. There were a total of 15 experiments. The characteristics of the PFTs, details of sampling and analysis methods, quality control measures, and analytical statistics including confidence limits are presented. Details of the field programs including tracer release rates, tracer source configurations, and configuration of the samplers are discussed. The result of this experiment is a high quality, well documented tracer and meteorological data set that can be used to improve and validate canopy dispersion models.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">WATSON,T.B.; DIETZ, R.N.; WILKE, R.; HENDREY, G.; LEWIN, K.; NAGY, J.; LECLERC, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">273</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1995EnGeo..25..143D"> <span id="translatedtitle">Geologic impact of Hurricane Andrew on Everglades coast of southwest <span class="hlt">Florida</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Hurricane Andrew, one of the strongest storms of the century, crossed the southern part of the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> peninsula on 24 August 1992. Its path crossed the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Everglades and exited in the national park across a mangrove-dominated coast onto the shallow, low-energy, inner shelf. The storm caused extensive breakage and defoliation in the mangrove community; full recovery will take decades. It produced no extensive sedimentation unit; only local and ephemeral ebb-surge deposits. The discontinuous shelly storm <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridge was breached at multiple locations, and it moved landward a few meters. After seven months, there was little geologic indication that the storm had passed. It is likely that the stratigraphic record in this area will not contain any recognizable features of the passage of Hurricane Andrew.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Davis, R. A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">274</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=education+AND+grading+AND+scale&pg=2&id=EJ882952"> <span id="translatedtitle">State Education Finance and Governance Profile: <span class="hlt">Florida</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This article presents the state education finance and governance profile of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. The state of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> has 67 regular school districts as well as additional special districts comprised of developmental research schools and other schools that serve special populations. In 1973, the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Legislature adopted the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Education Finance…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wright, Rebecca</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">275</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/57793452"> <span id="translatedtitle">Genetic Relationships among Populations of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bass</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> bass Micropterus floridanus are endemic to peninsular <span class="hlt">Florida</span> and co-occur with largemouth bass M. salmoides in a natural intergrade zone in the northern portions of the state. In this study, we resolved the genetic population structure among populations of largemouth bass, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> bass, and their interspecific hybrids from 48 lakes and streams across <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, and we updated and refined</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Brandon L. Barthel; Dijar J. Lutz-Carrillo; Kristen E. Norberg; Wesley F. Porak; Michael D. Tringali; Todd W. Kassler; William E. Johnson; Anne M. Readel; Richard A. Krause; David P. Philipp</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">276</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013Geomo.199...95D"> <span id="translatedtitle">Beyond <span class="hlt">beach</span> width: Steps toward identifying and integrating ecological envelopes with geomorphic features and datums for sandy <span class="hlt">beach</span> ecosystems</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Our understanding of ecological responses to climatic and anthropogenic forcing lags far behind that of physical or geomorphic responses for <span class="hlt">beach</span> ecosystems. Reconciling geomorphic features of <span class="hlt">beaches</span> with ecological features, such as intertidal zones and mobile biota that are not described by <span class="hlt">beach</span> width alone, could help address this issue. First, although intertidal zones characterized by distinct groups of mobile burrowing animals are described for <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, the locations and elevations of these zones do not coincide with standard shoreline datums. Second, intertidal zonation on <span class="hlt">beaches</span> is extremely dynamic due to the combination of unstable sandy substrate and a highly mobile biota; shifting strongly with tides, waves, storms, and <span class="hlt">beach</span> conditions. We propose that <span class="hlt">beach</span> biota use ecological "envelopes" of cross-shore habitat to cope with constantly changing <span class="hlt">beach</span> conditions. We estimated the extent of these "envelopes" for a variety of taxa on tidal to daily, semi-lunar and seasonal to annual time scales, using literature values on cross-shore animal movements and a field study of the positions of intertidal beds of two species of typical mid and upper shore <span class="hlt">beach</span> invertebrates. Daily or tidal cross-shore movement varied most (1 m to 100 m) with daily "envelopes" covering 7% to 85% of the available <span class="hlt">beach</span> width. Semi-lunar movement (12 m) and envelopes (28%) were relatively small, while estimated annual "envelopes" were large, averaging 61% of <span class="hlt">beach</span> width. The large scope of annual ecological envelopes relative to <span class="hlt">beach</span> widths reflects how intertidal animals escape seasonally extreme or episodically harsh conditions. Intertidal bed positions of a talitrid amphipod and an opheliid polychaete correlated well with selected <span class="hlt">beach</span> features in our field study suggesting that incorporation of ecological envelopes in models of shoreline evolution may be feasible. Describing ecological zones in terms of more dynamic shoreline features, such as total water level (TWL) that incorporate wave setup and runup, may be particularly applicable to upper intertidal biota whose distributions closely followed the high tide strand line (HTS), a feature which tracks total water level (TWL). Developing a TWL approach may also provide new insights on habitat availability for <span class="hlt">beach</span> nesting wildlife and coastal strand vegetation. Conservation of <span class="hlt">beach</span> ecosystems could be enhanced by incorporating sufficient <span class="hlt">beach</span> habitat to accommodate the dynamic ecological envelopes used by mobile intertidal invertebrates and wildlife.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dugan, Jenifer E.; Hubbard, David M.; Quigley, Brenna J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">277</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1984STIN...8516013M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Control technology for integrated circuit fabrication at Micro-Circuit Engineering, Incorporated, West Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, <span class="hlt">Florida</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A survey to assess control technology for integrated circuit fabrication was conducted. Engineering controls included local and general exhaust ventilation, shielding, and personal protective equipment. Devices or work stations that contained toxic materials that were potentially dangerous were controlled by local exhaust ventilation. Less hazardous areas were controlled by general exhaust ventilation. Process isolation was used in the plasma etching, low pressure chemical vapor deposition, and metallization operations. Shielding was used in ion implantation units to control X-ray emissions, in contact mask alignes to limit ultraviolet (UV) emissions, and in plasma etching units to control radiofrequency and UV emissions. Most operations were automated. Use of personal protective equipment varied by job function.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mihlan, G. I.; Mitchell, R. I.; Smith, R. K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">278</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=43759"> <span id="translatedtitle">PROCEEDINGS OF THE WORKSHOP: BIODEGRADATION KINETICS, NAVARRE <span class="hlt">BEACH</span>, <span class="hlt">FLORIDA</span>, 18-20 OCTOBER 1983</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The ORD internal report is a summary of proceedings of the Workshop on Biodegradation Kinetics organized to examine future directions and focus of scientific investigations of the kinetic aspects of microbial degradation rates of organic chemicals in natural environments. Positio...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">279</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ADA215515"> <span id="translatedtitle">Transducer Workshop (15th). Held in Cocoa <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> on June 20-22, 1989.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The committee apprises the telemetry group of significant progress in the field of transducers used in telemetry systems: Maintains any necessary liaison between the TG and the National Bureau of Standards and their transducers program or other related te...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">280</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-10-05/pdf/2011-25716.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">76 FR 61744 - Xpedite Systems, LLC Deerfield <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, <span class="hlt">Florida</span>; Notice of Negative Determination on Reconsideration</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...there was a contract between Xpedite and AppLabs, an Indian company to do customer development work. Xpedite's Sales staff are promoting custom development work on Xpedite's platform to gain customers that need custom data transfers....</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-10-05</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return 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id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">281</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/458493"> <span id="translatedtitle">Beating corrosion and other challenges in <span class="hlt">Florida`s</span> wetlands</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Not even <span class="hlt">Florida`s</span> high water table and extensive wetlands could stop the new 16-inch products pipeline recently completed between Tampa and Orlando by Central <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Pipeline Corp. Overcoming these hostile conditions required selecting a comprehensive corrosion-resistant technology as well as special construction techniques. Based on more than 45 years of experience with many types of coatings for a multitude of pipeline projects, coal tar enamel was specified for the portions of the project where open trench construction was to take place. The fact that coal tar enamel is approved as an internal coating for pipelines carrying potable water helped convince the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) that this method of providing corrosion resistance is an environmentally acceptable pipeline coating as well.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Arnold, J. [Central Florida Pipeline Corp., Tampa, FL (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">282</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=EISDE730002F"> <span id="translatedtitle">Bethany <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Sussex County, Delaware. Bethany <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant Project C-10-56.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The report is the final Environmental Impact Statement for a proposed sewerage project to serve the southern <span class="hlt">beach</span> areas of Sussex County, Delaware. The plant is considered large enough to handle the project growth of the area. The only impact involves th...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1972-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">283</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=165685"> <span id="translatedtitle">MEETING IN MEXICO: NOWCASTING AND FORECASTING <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> BACTERIA CONCENTRATION USING EPA'S VIRTUAL <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> SOFTWARE</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Beaches</span> in the United States of (North) America are subject to closure when bacterial counts exceed water quality criteria. Many authorities base these decisions on water samples that typically require at least 18 hours to analyze. This persistence approach, or model, often leads...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">284</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=163365"> <span id="translatedtitle">NOWCASTING AND FORECASTING <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> BACTERIA CONCENTRATION USING THE EPA VIRTUAL <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> SOFTWARE</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Beaches</span> are subject to closure when bacterial counts exceed water quality criteria. Many authorities base these decisions on sample counts, which typically require a day or more to analyze. Sometimes called the persistence model, because conditions are assumed to persist, experie...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">285</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-05-09/pdf/2012-11196.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">77 FR 27120 - Safety Zone; Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Oceanfront Air Show, Atlantic Ocean, Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, VA</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...safety zone on the Atlantic Ocean in the vicinity of Virginia...traffic movement on the Atlantic Ocean to protect mariners from the...Transportation, West Building Ground Floor, Room W12-140, 1200 New...Oceanfront Air Show, Atlantic Ocean, Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, VA in...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-05-09</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">286</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16528231"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mortality associated with Hurricane Katrina--<span class="hlt">Florida</span> and Alabama, August-October 2005.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">On August 25, 2005, Hurricane Katrina made landfall between Hallandale <span class="hlt">Beach</span> and Aventura, <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, as a Category 1 hurricane, with sustained winds of 80 mph. Storm effects, primarily rain, flooding, and high winds, were substantial; certain areas reported nearly 12 inches of rainfall. After crossing southern <span class="hlt">Florida</span> and entering the Gulf of Mexico, the hurricane strengthened and made landfall in southeastern Louisiana on August 29 as a Category 3 hurricane, with sustained winds of 125 mph. Katrina was one of the strongest hurricanes to strike the United States during the past 100 years and was likely the nation's costliest natural disaster to date. This report summarizes findings and recommendations from a review of mortality records of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s Medical Examiners Commission (FMEC) and the Alabama Department of Forensic Science (ADFS). CDC was invited by the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Department of Health (FDOH) and the Alabama Department of Public Health (ADPH) to assess the mortality related to Hurricane Katrina. The mortality review was intended to provide county-based information that would be used to 1) define the impact of the hurricane, 2) describe the etiology of deaths, and 3) identify strategies to prevent or reduce future hurricane-related mortality. Combined, both agencies identified five, 23, and 10 deaths, respectively, that were directly, indirectly, or possibly related to Hurricane Katrina. Information from the characterization of these deaths will be used to reduce hurricane-related mortality through early community awareness of hurricane-related risk, prevention measures, and effective communication of a coordinated hurricane response plan. PMID:16528231</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-03-10</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">287</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006AGUFMOS41C0629A"> <span id="translatedtitle">Parametric Wave Transformation Models on Natural <span class="hlt">Beaches</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Seven parametric models for wave height transformation across the surf zone [e.g., Thornton and Guza, 1983] are tested with observations collected between the shoreline and about 5-m water depth during 2 experiments on a barred <span class="hlt">beach</span> near Duck, NC, and between the shoreline and about 3.5-m water depth during 2 experiments on unbarred <span class="hlt">beaches</span> near La Jolla, CA. Offshore wave heights ranged from about 0.1 to 3.0 m. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> profiles were surveyed approximately every other day. The models predict the observations well. Root-mean-square errors between observed and simulated wave heights are small in water depths h > 2 m (average rms errors < 10%), and increase with decreasing depth for h < 2 m (average rms errors > 20%). The lowest rms errors (i.e., the most accurate predictions) are achieved by tuning a free parameter, ?, in each model. To tune the models accurately to the data considered here, observations are required at 3 to 5 locations, and must span the surf zone. No tuned or untuned model provides the best predictions for all data records in any one experiment. The best fit ?'s for each model-experiment pair are represented well with an empirical hyperbolic tangent curve based on the inverse Iribarren number. In 3 of the 4 data sets, estimating ? for each model using an average curve based on the predictions and observations from all 4 experiments typically improves model-data agreement relative to using a constant or previously determined empirical ?. The best fit ?'s at the 4th experiment (conducted off La Jolla, CA) are roughly 20% smaller than the ?'s for the other 3 experiments, and thus using the experiment-averaged curve increases prediction errors. Possible causes for the smaller ?'s at the 4th experiment will be discussed. Funded by ONR and NSF.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Apotsos, A. A.; Raubenheimer, B.; Elgar, S.; Guza, R. T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">288</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/sir20125190"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evaluation of potential sources and transport mechanisms of fecal indicator bacteria to <span class="hlt">beach</span> water, Murphy Park <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Door County, Wisconsin</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Fecal Indicator Bacteria (FIB) concentrations in <span class="hlt">beach</span> water have been used for many years as a criterion for closing <span class="hlt">beaches</span> due to potential health concerns. Yet, current understanding of sources and transport mechanisms that drive FIB occurrence remains insufficient for accurate prediction of closures at many <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Murphy Park <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, a relatively pristine <span class="hlt">beach</span> on Green Bay in Door County, Wis., was selected for a study to evaluate FIB sources and transport mechanisms. Although the relatively pristine nature of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> yielded no detection of pathogenic bacterial genes and relatively low FIB concentrations during the study period compared with other Great Lakes <span class="hlt">Beaches</span>, its selection limited the number of confounding FIB sources and associated transport mechanisms. The primary sources of FIB appear to be internal to the <span class="hlt">beach</span> rather than external sources such as rivers, storm sewer outfalls, and industrial discharges. Three potential FIB sources were identified: sand, swash-zone groundwater, and Cladophora mats. Modest correlations between FIB concentrations in these potential source reservoirs and FIB concentrations at the <span class="hlt">beach</span> from the same day illustrate the importance of understanding transport mechanisms between FIB sources and the water column. One likely mechanism for transport and dispersion of FIB from sand and Cladophora sources appears to be agitation of Cladophora mats and erosion of <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand due to storm activity, as inferred from storm indicators including turbidity, wave height, current speed, wind speed, sky visibility, 24-hour precipitation, and suspended particulate concentration. FIB concentrations in <span class="hlt">beach</span> water had a statistically significant relation (p-value ‹0.05) with the magnitude of these storm indicators. In addition, transport of FIB in swash-zone groundwater into <span class="hlt">beach</span> water appears to be driven by groundwater recharge associated with multiday precipitation and corresponding increased swash-zone groundwater discharge at the <span class="hlt">beach</span>, as indicated by an increase in the specific conductance of <span class="hlt">beach</span> water. Understanding the dynamics of FIB sources (sand, swash-zone groundwater, and Cladophora) and transport mechanisms (dispersion and erosion from storm energy, and swash-zone groundwater discharge) is important for improving predictions of potential health risks from FIB in <span class="hlt">beach</span> water.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Juckem, Paul F.; Corsi, Steven R.; McDermott, Colleen; Kleinheinz, Gregory; Fogarty, Lisa R.; Haack, Sheridan K.; Johnson, Heather E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">289</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/39680667"> <span id="translatedtitle">High Metabolic Rates in <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Cast Communities</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Metabolic hotspots at land–water interfaces are important in supporting biogeochemical processes. Here we confirm the generality\\u000a of land–aquatic interfaces as biogeochemical hot spots by extending this concept to marine <span class="hlt">beach</span> cast materials. In situ atmospheric\\u000a pCO2, from a respiration chamber (10 cm in diameter and 20 cm high) inserted into wrack deposits, was determined using a high-precision\\u000a (±1 ppm) non-dispersive infrared gas analyzer</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Grey T. Coupland; Carlos M. Duarte; Diana I. Walker</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">290</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=AD686681"> <span id="translatedtitle">Measurements of <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Process Variables, Outer Banks, North Carolina.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A series of <span class="hlt">beach</span>-process experiments was conducted on Bodie Island, North Carolina, during 1963-1964 by members of the Coastal Studies Institute staff. Included were essentially continuous and simultaneous measurements of subaerial-<span class="hlt">beach</span> and inshore-bott...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. Dolan J. C. Ferm D. S. McArthur</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1969-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">291</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40155439"> <span id="translatedtitle">Competitive interactions in macroinfaunal animals of exposed sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The influence of biotic interactions in structuring macroinfaunal communities of exposed sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, an unstable habitat characterized by strong physical forces, is generally considered negligible. We investigated the hypothesis that competitive interactions during burrowing could potentially affect the intertidal distribution and abundance of macroinfaunal animals of sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> using two species of invertebrates, a hippid crab, Emerita analoga, and a</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jenifer E. Dugan; Eduardo Jaramillo; David M. Hubbard; Heraldo Contreras; Cristian Duarte</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">292</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=EISWA730821F"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ediz Hook <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Erosion Control, Port Angeles, Washington.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The project involves new rock revetment and <span class="hlt">beach</span> nourishment of about 10,000 feet of the seaward shore of Ediz Hook. Material for the revetment would come from existing quarries in the Puget Sound Area, and <span class="hlt">beach</span> nourishment material would come from a so...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1972-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">293</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=sexual+AND+desire&pg=7&id=EJ960100"> <span id="translatedtitle">Bodies that Matter: Performing White Possession on the <span class="hlt">Beach</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Beaches</span> remain important places within indigenous coastal peoples' territories, although the silence about our ownership is deafening. Many authors have argued that within Australian popular culture the <span class="hlt">beach</span> is a key site where racialized and gendered transgressions, fantasies, and desires are played out, but none have elucidated how these…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Moreton-Robinson, Aileen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">294</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/61336235"> <span id="translatedtitle">External costs of coastal <span class="hlt">beach</span> pollution: an hedonic approach</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A technique for inputing a monetary value to the loss in <span class="hlt">beach</span> recreational services that would result from a hypothetical oil spill in the Georges Bank area combines an oil-spill risk analysis model with a hedonic pricing model of the market for tourist accommodations on Cape Cod and Martha's Vineyard. The estimate of <span class="hlt">beach</span> pollution costs associated with offshore oil</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wilman</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">295</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=national+AND+sovereignty&pg=2&id=EJ960100"> <span id="translatedtitle">Bodies that Matter: Performing White Possession on the <span class="hlt">Beach</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|<span class="hlt">Beaches</span> remain important places within indigenous coastal peoples' territories, although the silence about our ownership is deafening. Many authors have argued that within Australian popular culture the <span class="hlt">beach</span> is a key site where racialized and gendered transgressions, fantasies, and desires are played out, but none have elucidated how these…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Moreton-Robinson, Aileen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">296</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=hawks&pg=6&id=ED303291"> <span id="translatedtitle">Falcon <span class="hlt">Beach</span> School Closure Review. Research 87-01.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Falcon <span class="hlt">Beach</span> School is a small school experiencing declining school enrollment and increasing operational costs. In February, 1987, Falcon <span class="hlt">Beach</span> School was announced as a candidate for closure. The Planning and Research Branch of Manitoba Education conducted an economic and social analysis of the school operations. This research report provides…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Manitoba Dept. of Education, Winnipeg. Planning and Research Branch.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">297</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2010-title33-vol1-sec110-74b.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 110.74b - Apollo <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Fla.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Apollo <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Fla. 110.74b Section 110...Special Anchorage Areas § 110.74b Apollo <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Fla. Beginning at a point approximately...northwesterly to latitude 27°46â²39.9â³ N., longitude...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">298</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2009-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2009-title33-vol1-sec110-74b.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 110.74b - Apollo <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Fla.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...2009-07-01 2009-07-01 false Apollo <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Fla. 110.74b Section 110...Special Anchorage Areas § 110.74b Apollo <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Fla. Beginning at a point approximately...northwesterly to latitude 27°46â²39.9â³ N., longitude...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">299</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2013-title33-vol1-sec110-74b.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 110.74b - Apollo <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Fla.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Apollo <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Fla. 110.74b Section 110...Special Anchorage Areas § 110.74b Apollo <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Fla. Beginning at a point approximately...northwesterly to latitude 27°46â²39.9â³ N., longitude...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">300</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=surface+AND+wave&pg=4&id=ED237312"> <span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">Beach</span>--A Natural Protection from the Sea.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">beach</span> and sand dunes are the first line of defense protecting the land from the sea. The effectiveness of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> is caused by its sloping surface which dissipates the energy of waves and by the flexibility of the slope which changes as the waves change. The process and rate of accretion and erosion are dependent on the size and frequency of…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sensabaugh, William M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1983-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> 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title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">301</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=241934"> <span id="translatedtitle">Virtual <span class="hlt">Beach</span> v2.2 User Guide</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Virtual <span class="hlt">Beach</span> version 2.2 (VB 2.2) is a decision support tool. It is designed to construct site-specific Multi-Linear Regression (MLR) models to predict pathogen indicator levels (or fecal indicator bacteria, FIB) at recreational <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. MLR analysis has outperformed persisten...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">302</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=152804"> <span id="translatedtitle">RECREATIONAL <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> WATER QUALITY MONITORING WITH QUANTITATIVE POLYMERASE CHAIN</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recreational <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are an important economic and aesthetic asset to communities, states and the nation as a whole. Considerable resources are expended each year in monitoring the water at these <span class="hlt">beaches</span> for fecal indicator bacteria as a means of determining if it is safe for pu...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">303</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60359962"> <span id="translatedtitle">Special development problems of Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span> unit, Wilmington field</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span> unit of California's Wilmington field presents some special challenges arising out of the characteristics, history, and operational constraints of the unit. A base map shows the areas in the Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span> unit.The Wilmington field is a NW.-SE. trending anticline in the Los Angeles Basin and is about 10 miles long and 3 miles wide. It is broken</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">S. E. Szasz; W. A. Adent; J. H. Fantozzi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1969-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">304</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.klohn.com/news/technicalpapers/CGS_08_Trackpacking_final.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Compaction of Upstream Construction Tailings Dam <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> Using Dozers</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Upstream construction tailings dams in the oilsands mining industry rely on a compacted shell and <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of non- liquefiable sand to contain the pond and internal loose <span class="hlt">beach</span> deposits. Compaction energy to densify the sand in the shell is provided by dozers which densify the sand through the vibration of trafficking repeatedly across the sand surface, together with the downward</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Scott Martens; Tyler Lappin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">305</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/49481563"> <span id="translatedtitle">Managing erosion-induced problems in NW Mediterranean urban <span class="hlt">beaches</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The applicability of recommendations of the Eurosion project to define a policy to manage coastal erosion has been tested at the “<span class="hlt">beach</span>” scale in the Mediterranean coast. Thus, a favourable sediment status has been defined for these <span class="hlt">beaches</span> taking into account their main functions: recreation and protection. Because they act at two different seasons, this status needs to be seasonally</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">José A. Jiménez; Vicenç Gracia; Herminia I. Valdemoro; E. Tonatiuh Mendoza; Agustín Sánchez-Arcilla</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">306</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ADA304326"> <span id="translatedtitle">Coastal Engineering Research Center. The Economic Value of <span class="hlt">Beaches</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Travel and tourism is America's leading industry, employer, producer of new jobs, and earner of foreign exchange; and <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are the leading factor in travel and tourism. Few in America realize that <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are a key driver of America's economy and its c...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. R. Houston</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">307</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB95212254"> <span id="translatedtitle">Numerical Model on <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Response Behind Coastal Kelp Fields.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A numerical model is constructed here to perform simple analysis on <span class="hlt">beach</span> response behind coastal kelp fields. The model is restricted to two-dimensional <span class="hlt">beach</span> profile and is only applicable to short duration storm wave events. The model links two sub-mod...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">H. Wang A. Toerum</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">308</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB231654"> <span id="translatedtitle">Threatened Wildlife of South <span class="hlt">Florida</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The 34 endangered or otherwise threatened wildlife species (as classified by the Department of the Interior) of south <span class="hlt">Florida</span> are identified and described. The listing includes 23 species or subspecies of birds, six of mammals, and three of reptiles. Elev...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. P. Rodgers J. P. Crowder</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1974-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">309</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB185812"> <span id="translatedtitle">Tourism in East Central <span class="hlt">Florida</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report summarizes a research effort to project tourism as an industry in East Central <span class="hlt">Florida</span> and present such key planning factors as employment, population supported, retail sales, motel and restaurant data and total investment. The approach used i...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1969-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">310</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=42127"> <span id="translatedtitle">WASTEWATER IRRIGATION AT TALLAHASSEE, <span class="hlt">FLORIDA</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Municipal wastewater from the City of Tallahassee, <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, which has received secondary treatment was used to demonstrate the effectiveness of wastewater renovation without pollution of groundwater or surface water through land application to forage crops by sprinkler irrigation...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">311</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3202074"> <span id="translatedtitle">Pore Water Transport of Enterococci out of <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Sediments</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Enterococci are used to evaluate the safety of <span class="hlt">beach</span> waters and studies have identified <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands as a source of these bacteria. In order to study and quantify the release of microbes from <span class="hlt">beach</span> sediments, flow column systems were built to evaluate flow of pore water out of <span class="hlt">beach</span> sediments. Results show a peak in enterococci (average of 10% of the total microbes in core) released from the sand core within one pore water volume followed by a marked decline to below detection. These results indicate that few enterococci are easily removed and that factors other than simple pore water flow control the release of the majority of enterococci within <span class="hlt">beach</span> sediments. A significantly larger quantity and release of enterococci were observed in cores collected after a significant rain event suggesting the influx of fresh water can alter the release pattern as compared to cores with no antecedent rainfall.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Phillips, Matthew C.; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M.; Reniers, Adrianus J. H. M.; Wang, John D.; Kiger, Russell T.; Abdel-Mottaleb, Noha</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">312</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21945015"> <span id="translatedtitle">Pore water transport of enterococci out of <span class="hlt">beach</span> sediments.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Enterococci are used to evaluate the safety of <span class="hlt">beach</span> waters and studies have identified <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands as a source of these bacteria. In order to study and quantify the release of microbes from <span class="hlt">beach</span> sediments, flow column systems were built to evaluate flow of pore water out of <span class="hlt">beach</span> sediments. Results show a peak in enterococci (average of 10% of the total microbes in core) released from the sand core within one pore water volume followed by a marked decline to below detection. These results indicate that few enterococci are easily removed and that factors other than simple pore water flow control the release of the majority of enterococci within <span class="hlt">beach</span> sediments. A significantly larger quantity and release of enterococci were observed in cores collected after a significant rain event suggesting the influx of fresh water can alter the release pattern as compared to cores with no antecedent rainfall. PMID:21945015</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Phillips, Matthew C; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M; Reniers, A J H M; Wang, John D; Kiger, Russell T; Abdel-Mottaleb, Noha</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-09-25</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">313</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://proceedings.esri.com/library/userconf/proc03/p0545.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s Wetland WebGIS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Our objective was to develop an interactive information and visualization framework for <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s wetlands. We standardized and integrated 2130 geo-referenced point observations of 78 different physical, chemical, and biological attributes collected in <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s wetlands from 1987 to present. A WebGIS tool was created with ArcIMS to augment these point observations with other GIS layers such as soils, geology, land use,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">S. Grunwald; K. R. Reddy</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">314</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40098502"> <span id="translatedtitle">Social context, sexual practices, and risks for HIV transmission among men who have sex with men: The south <span class="hlt">beach</span> health survey</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In a population-based sample of 193 men who had sex with men in South <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Miami-Dade County, <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, two indicators of\\u000a social context—choice of sexual relationships and perceived HIV-infection status—were used to analyze residents who engaged\\u000a in certain sexual practices with their partners. The vast majority (88.6%) of respondents reported engagement in anal sex\\u000a during the previous 12 months; 20.2%</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Steven P. Kurtz; Robert D. Webster; Abraham K. Buckley; William W. Darrow</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">315</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB2013110333"> <span id="translatedtitle">Healthcare Inspection: Follow-Up Assessment of Radiation Therapy, VA Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Healthcare System, Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The VA Office of Inspector General (OIG) Office of Healthcare Inspections conducted a review in follow up of its March 2011 report on radiation therapy (RT) at the VA Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Healthcare System (facility) in Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, CA. OIG also assessed the validit...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">316</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23460426"> <span id="translatedtitle">The relationship between sandy <span class="hlt">beach</span> nematodes and environmental characteristics in two Brazilian sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> (Guanabara Bay, Rio de Janeiro).</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We investigated if the differences in density and nematode communities of intertidal sediments from two Brazilian sheltered sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> were related to environmental characteristics. The upper tide level (UTL) and the low tide level (LTL) of both <span class="hlt">beaches</span> were surveyed in January (austral summer) and June 2001 (austral winter) during low-spring tides, by collecting samples of nematodes and sediments. Differences in density between <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, tidal level and seasons, and nematode community structure were investigated. Sediments from both <span class="hlt">beaches</span> were composed of medium to very coarse sand. The highest nematode densities were found at the UTL, and significant differences between <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, tidal levels and months were found. A total of 54 genera were found and the genera composition on both sheltered <span class="hlt">beaches</span> was similar to other exposed worldwide sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. The density and structure of the nematode community at both <span class="hlt">beaches</span> clearly varied along the spatial and temporal scales. Gravel percentage was the most important variable explaining the spatial distribution of the nematodes, determining the four sub-communities; this suggests that the sediment characteristics influence the nematode community, rather than physical hydrodynamic forces. Temperature and salinity were suggested to be important variables affecting the temporal variation. PMID:23460426</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Maria, Tatiana F; Paiva, Paulo; Vanreusel, Ann; Esteves, André M</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-03-05</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">317</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=56125"> <span id="translatedtitle">THE VISUAL <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> NUMERICAL MODEL: A DIAGNOSTIC AND PROGNOSTIC MODELING APPROACH TO ACHIEVING US <span class="hlt">BEACHES</span> AESTHETIC AND PUBLIC HEALTH PROTECTION</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Under the <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> Act of 2000, EPA has committed to a program to monitor <span class="hlt">beach</span> water quality and develop strategies, including modeling, for timely notification of the public when bacterial contamination poses a risk to bathers. EPA's goal is to manage 100% of significant public be...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">318</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/45357372"> <span id="translatedtitle">Drowning and <span class="hlt">Beach</span>-Safety Management (BSM) along the Mediterranean <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> of Israel: A Long-Term Perspective</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Along the 190 km of the Israeli Mediterranean coast, of which only about two-thirds is accessible to bathing activities, there are about 100 statutory surf bathing <span class="hlt">beaches</span> guarded by professional sea lifeguards. The rest of the accessible Israeli Mediterranean coastline is divided into two additional legal categories, which are not guarded: (A) <span class="hlt">beaches</span> where bathing is forbidden by governmental ordinance</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Daniel Hartmann</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">319</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=86118"> <span id="translatedtitle">USING TODAY'S DATA TO CLOSE THE <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> TODAY. QUANTITATIVE POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION (QPCR) RAPID <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> CLOSING TOOL</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recreational <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are an important economic and aesthetic asset to communities, states and the nation as a whole. Considerable resources are expended each year in the measurement of fecal indicator bacteria concentrations in the water at these <span class="hlt">beaches</span> to determine whether thes...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">320</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=116418"> <span id="translatedtitle">USING TODAY'S DATA TO CLOSE THE <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> TODAY. QUANTITATIVE POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION (QPCR) RAPID <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> CLOSINGS TOOL</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recreational <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are an important economic and aesthetic asset to communities, states and the nation as a whole. Considerable resources are expended each year in the measurement of fecal indicator bacteria concentrations in the water at these <span class="hlt">beaches</span> to determine whether thes...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" 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id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">321</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://dx.doi.org/10.1061/40549(276)236"> <span id="translatedtitle">Probabilistic assessment of <span class="hlt">beach</span> and dune changes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The recent availability of spatially-dense airborne lidar data makes assessment of the vulnerability of <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and dunes to storm impacts practical over long reaches of coast. As an initial test, elevations of the tops (D high) and bases (Dlow) of foredune ridges along a 55-km reach on the northern Outer Banks, NC were found to have considerable spatial variability suggesting that different parts of the barrier island would respond differently to storms. Comparing statistics of storm wave runup to D high and Dlow, we found that net erosion due to overwash and dune retreat should be greatest at the northern and southern ends of the study area and least in the central section. This predicted spatial pattern of storm-induced erosion is similar to the spatial pattern of long-term erosion of the shoreline which may be controlled by additional processes (such as gradients in longshore transport) as well as the cross-shore processes considered here. However, consider feedback where at erosional hot spots there is a deficit of sand (caused by gradients in longshore transport) which lead to lower dunes and enhanced erosional cross-shore processes, such as overwash. Hence, the erosional hot spots would be exacerbated, further increasing the vulnerability of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> and dunes to net erosion.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sallenger, Jr. , A. H.; Stockdon, H.; Haines, J.; Krabill, W.; Swift, R.; Brock, J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">322</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB2010111828"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report, FY 2007.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The mission of the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Water Resources Research Center at the University of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> is to facilitate communication and collaboration between <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s Universities and the state agencies that are responsible for managing <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s water resources. A p...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">323</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB2010111829"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report, FY 2008.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The mission of the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Water Resources Research Center at the University of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> is to facilitate communication and collaboration between <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s Universities and the state agencies that are responsible for managing <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s water resources. A p...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">324</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.sccoos.org/docs/beachdraft.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Managing <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Amenities to Reduce Exposure to Coastal Hazards: Storm Water Pollution</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Despite posted warnings and educational campaigns warning about the health risks associated with storm water pollution, swimmers continue to swim in coastal areas polluted by storm water run-off. This study uses a simple spatial model of <span class="hlt">beach</span> visitation to show how <span class="hlt">beach</span> amenities and storm drains influence the way in which <span class="hlt">beach</span> goers choose to locate themselves at <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Linwood Pendleton</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">325</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/42561564"> <span id="translatedtitle">Assessing the Utility of <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Ecolabels for Use by Local Management</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Ecolabels for <span class="hlt">beaches</span> have been around since 1985 and have grown rapidly over the past decade. However, effects from ecolabels on <span class="hlt">beach</span> ecology and local coastal cultures are unknown. This study reviews the literature on tourism ecolabels and environmental certification for <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, analyzes the criteria of the most prominent <span class="hlt">beach</span> ecolabel, and identifies considerations and proposes recommendations for local management</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Justin Boevers</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">326</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10098779"> <span id="translatedtitle">Presence of Campylobacter and Salmonella in sand from bathing <span class="hlt">beaches</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The purpose of this study was to determine the presence of thermophilic Campylobacter spp. and Salmonella spp. in sand from non-EEC standard and EEC standard designated <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in different locations in the UK and to assess if potentially pathogenic strains were present. Campylobacter spp. were detected in 82/182 (45%) of sand samples and Salmonella spp. in 10/182 (6%). Campylobacter spp. were isolated from 46/92 (50%) of samples from non-EEC standard <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and 36/90 (40%) from EEC standard <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. The prevalence of Campylobacter spp. was greater in wet sand from both types of <span class="hlt">beaches</span> but, surprisingly, more than 30% of samples from dry sand also contained these organisms. The major pathogenic species C. jejuni and C. coli were more prevalent in sand from non-EEC standard <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. In contrast, C. lari and urease positive thermophilic campylobacters, which are associated with seagulls and other migratory birds, were more prevalent in sand from EEC standard <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Campylobacter isolates were further characterized by biotyping and serotyping, which confirmed that strains known to be of types associated with human infections were frequently found in sand on bathing <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. PMID:10098779</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bolton, F J; Surman, S B; Martin, K; Wareing, D R; Humphrey, T J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">327</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1992EOSTr..73..385B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Andrew spares <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Coast</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">When geologists heard of the intensity of Hurricane Andrew, which struck the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> coast on August 25 and then moved on to southern Louisiana, they were expecting the same kinds of coastal damage that Hurricane Hugo brought to the Caribbean and Carolina shores in 1989. Both storms were category 4 hurricanes, having winds of 131-155 mph and surges of 13-18 feet. However, the coastal damage never materialized, leaving geologists to analyze the factors that lessened the impact of the storm. “For minimum coastal damage, you couldn't have designed a better storm,” said Orrin Pilkey, director of the Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines (PSDS) in Durham, N.C. This was due in part to the nature of the storm itself and where it hit land, and in part to the regional geology, said Rob Thieler of PSDS. Despite the huge amounts of damage to buildings, there was virtually no evidence of coastal process destruction, he said.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bush, Susan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">328</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6770334"> <span id="translatedtitle">Residues of polychlorinated biphenyls and DDT in water and sediment of the Indian River Lagoon, <span class="hlt">Florida</span>--1977-78.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Water and sediment samples collected during 1977-78 from the Indian River lagoon between Vero <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Indian River County, and Fort Pierce, Saint Lucie County, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> were analyzed for PCBs and DDT. Sample locations were chosen on the basis of proximity to major tributaries, sewage outfalls, or municipal area. Concentrations in water samples were below 0.01 ppb sigma DDT and 0.5 ppb PCBs. Small amounts of PCBs and DDT were found in most sediment samples, ranging from less than 1.0 ppb to 0.63 ppm Aroclor 1254 and from less than 0.1 ppb to 0.081 ppm sigma DDT. Samples from the Taylor Creek tributary and from the Fort Pierce power plant and municipal docking area contained higher PCB concentrations then did samples from other locations. DDT and PCB levels in most samples indicate little contamination by these compounds of the Indian River Waterway between Vero <span class="hlt">Beach</span> and Fort Pierce. PMID:6770334</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wang, T C; Johnson, R S; Bricker, J L</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1980-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">329</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1984MarGR...7..307B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Sea level change and <span class="hlt">beach</span> process — A case study in south Zhejiang <span class="hlt">beach</span> -</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper describes changes in sea level off the coast of China in history and at present. The evidence concerning low sea level during the last glacial phase, Holocene marine transgression which was discovered from sea bottom in East China Sea and China's bordering seas, and their adjacent coastal areas, where, by drilling, relic sediment, peat deposite, and mollusc shell fossils have been obtained, and their dates are deduced through measurement of radiocarbon (C14), identified that low sea level about 15000 years ago stood in the depth of 150 m below the present level in East China Sea, and that the subsequent transgression carried the sea up to the present sea level 6000 years ago, when the present China's coast and other continent's coasts were outlined. Due to a number of factors, the sea level oscillates seasonally in the border sea of China. Averagely speaking, the annual range of the seasonal changes in sea level is about 35 m off the south Zhejiang coast, where the highest value of 20 cm occurs in September, and the lowest of-15 cm occurs in March. The reason may be mainly due to the seasonal variations of climate and river run-off, as well as the Taiwan Warm Current. Similar seasonal oscillations in sea level also occur in Bohai Gulf, Yellow Sea, East China Sea and the South China Sea. The <span class="hlt">beach</span> process of south Zhejiang is strongly affected by the seasonal oscillations in sea level. The width of <span class="hlt">beach</span> is 4 to 6 km, the slope is approximately in 1 : 1000. If the sea level rises or falls 1 cm, the <span class="hlt">beach</span> submergence or emergence is led to be about 10 m in width. As a result, the relative equilibrium of <span class="hlt">beach</span> will be changed by the seasonal oscillations in sea level.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Baocan, Wang; Qingxiang, Jin; Zhisheng, Lao</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">330</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013GML....33..263P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Confirmation of <span class="hlt">beach</span> accretion by grain-size trend analysis: Camposoto <span class="hlt">beach</span>, Cádiz, SW Spain</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An application of the grain size trend analysis (GSTA) is used in an exploratory approach to characterize sediment transport on Camposoto <span class="hlt">beach</span> (Cádiz, SW Spain). In May 2009 the mesotidal <span class="hlt">beach</span> showed a well-developed swash bar on the upper foreshore, which was associated with fair-weather conditions prevailing just before and during the field survey. The results were tested by means of an autocorrelation statistical test (index I of Moran). Two sedimentological trends were recognized, i.e. development towards finer, better sorted and more negatively skewed sediment (FB-), and towards finer, better sorted and less negatively or more positively skewed sediment (FB+). Both vector fields were compared with results obtained from more classical approaches (sand tracers, microtopography and current measurements). This revealed that both trends can be considered as realistic, the FB+ trend being identified for the first time in a <span class="hlt">beach</span> environment. The data demonstrate that, on the well-developed swash bar, sediment transported onshore becomes both finer and better sorted towards the coast. On the lower foreshore, which exhibits a steeper slope produced by breaking waves, the higher-energy processes winnow out finer particles and thereby produce negatively skewed grain-size distributions. The upper foreshore, which has a flatter and smoother slope, is controlled by lower-energy swash-backwash and overwash processes. As a result, the skewness of the grain-size distributions evolves towards less negative or more positive values. The skewness parameter appears to be distributed as a function of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> slope and, thus, reflects variations in hydrodynamic energy. This has novel implications for coastal management.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Poizot, Emmanuel; Anfuso, Giorgio; Méar, Yann; Bellido, Carlos</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">331</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB2012107438"> <span id="translatedtitle">Standardization of Crash Analysis in <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, Summary.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Department of Transportation has released a report that identifies existing crash analysis practices, problems, and needs in <span class="hlt">Florida</span> to help inform future efforts to standardize crash analysis methods and tools.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. Gan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">332</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB2012107437"> <span id="translatedtitle">Standardization of Crash Analysis in <span class="hlt">Florida</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Department of Transportation has released a report that identifies existing crash analysis practices, problems, and needs in <span class="hlt">Florida</span> to help inform future efforts to standardize crash analysis methods and tools.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. Gan D. Saha K. Haleem P. Alluri</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">333</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.nasa.gov/centers/kennedy/news/releases/2013/release-20130628.html"> <span id="translatedtitle">NASA and Space <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Begin Partnership Discussions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://search.nasa.gov/search/advSearch.jsp">NASA Website</a></p> <p class="result-summary">NASA has selected Space <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, the aerospace economic development agency for the state of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, for negotiations toward a partnership agreement to maintain and operate the historic Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">334</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB86243367"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Acid Deposition Study. Phase 3 Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Acid Deposition Study's overall objective is to assess and/or develop the information needed to place the acid deposition issue in the proper perspective as to its magnitude, variability, sources, effects, and control options in <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. Opera...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">335</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Museum of Natural History</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Enter the lobby of the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Museum of Natural History, and you are greeted by the skeletons of a Mastodon and Mammoth, both found in a North <span class="hlt">Florida</span> river. Permanent exhibits in the Museum also include Butterfly Rainforest, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Fossils-Evolution of Life and Land, Waterways and Wildlife, and People and Environments which is based extensively on the Museum's archaeological and ecological research. There are a number of online exhibits including South <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Aquatic Environments, and Fossil Horses in Cyberspace where one can learn about paleontology and evolution by exploring stratigraphy, geological time scales and the rich fossil record of horses. Traveling Inquiry Boxes are available at low cost, and include a collection of objects with participatory lessons and activities that are designed to be flexible. Many of the research collections are searchable online, and step by step outlines of several exhibit designs are viewable online as well. The Museum, in conjunction with the University of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, has established the Katharine Ordway Chair of Ecosystem Conservation, and the Center for Lepidoptera and Biodiversity which fosters research on insects. The Museum produces and rents several traveling exhibits. Full information is available online.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">336</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012ECSS..107...81G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mechanical grooming and <span class="hlt">beach</span> award status are associated with low strandline biodiversity in Scotland</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> grooming and <span class="hlt">beach</span> award status are both shown to be associated with low macroinvertebrate taxon richness in Scotland. Previous studies in California have revealed that mechanical raking to remove wrack from sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> has negative ecological consequences for coastal ecosystems. In the current study the presence and absence of eight common taxa that inhabit <span class="hlt">beached</span> wrack on sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Scotland was assessed at 60 sites, 24 of which were groomed and 29 of which were in receipt of a <span class="hlt">beach</span> award. On average 4.86 of the eight taxa were found to be present on ungroomed <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, whereas only 1.13 taxa were present on groomed <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Thus, <span class="hlt">beach</span> grooming seems to be having a major effect on the biodiversity of <span class="hlt">beach</span> macroinvertebrates in Scotland. Fewer macroinvertebrate taxa were also found on award (1.5) compared to non-award (4.38) <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. It was also revealed that award <span class="hlt">beaches</span> were much more likely to be groomed than non-award <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, with 69% of award <span class="hlt">beaches</span> surveyed being groomed compared to only 6% of non-award <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. This pattern is surprising as the awarding bodies discourage the removal of seaweed and regulations state that <span class="hlt">beached</span> wrack should only be removed if it constitutes a nuisance. It is concluded that award status, not nuisance level, has the main factor driving most <span class="hlt">beach</span> grooming and that this has resulted in the substantial loss of macroinvertebrate biodiversity from award <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Scotland. In conclusion it is shown that <span class="hlt">beach</span> grooming has a substantial negative impact upon strandline macroinvertebrate biodiversity in Scotland and that grooming is much more likely to occur on award <span class="hlt">beaches</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gilburn, Andre S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">337</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1985JGR....90..945H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Setup and swash on a natural <span class="hlt">beach</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Wave setup and swash statistics were calculated from 154 runup time series measured on a moderately steep <span class="hlt">beach</span> under incident waves varying from 0.4 to 4.0 m significant wave height. When scaled by the incident wave height, setup, swash height, and total runup (the sum of setup and half the swash height) were found to vary linearly with the surf zone similarity parameter ?0 = ?(H0/L0)-1/2. The foreshore slope appeared the appropriate value for the calculation of ?0, although the setup data showed some influence of an offshore bar at low tide. For low Irribaren numbers the swash height in the incident frequency band becomes saturated, while for high Irribaren numbers, no such signs of saturations were seen. Thus the infragravity band appears to become dominant in the swash below some value of ?0. For these data, that value is approximately 1.75, although there is considerable scatter associated with that estimate.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Holman, R. A.; Sallenger, A. H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">338</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2812993"> <span id="translatedtitle">Presence of Pathogens and Indicator Microbes at a Non-Point Source Subtropical Recreational Marine <span class="hlt">Beach</span> ? †</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Swimming in ocean water, including ocean water at <span class="hlt">beaches</span> not impacted by known point sources of pollution, is an increasing health concern. This study was an initial evaluation of the presence of indicator microbes and pathogens and the association among the indicator microbes, pathogens, and environmental conditions at a subtropical, recreational marine <span class="hlt">beach</span> in south <span class="hlt">Florida</span> impacted by non-point sources of pollution. Twelve water and eight sand samples were collected during four sampling events at high or low tide under elevated or reduced solar insolation conditions. The analyses performed included analyses of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) (fecal coliforms, Escherichia coli, enterococci, and Clostridium perfringens), human-associated microbial source tracking (MST) markers (human polyomaviruses [HPyVs] and Enterococcus faecium esp gene), and pathogens (Vibrio vulnificus, Staphylococcus aureus, enterovirus, norovirus, hepatitis A virus, Cryptosporidium spp., and Giardia spp.). The enterococcus concentrations in water and sand determined by quantitative PCR were greater than the concentrations determined by membrane filtration measurement. The FIB concentrations in water were below the recreational water quality standards for three of the four sampling events, when pathogens and MST markers were also generally undetectable. The FIB levels exceeded regulatory guidelines during one event, and this was accompanied by detection of HPyVs and pathogens, including detection of the autochthonous bacterium V. vulnificus in sand and water, detection of the allochthonous protozoans Giardia spp. in water, and detection of Cryptosporidium spp. in sand samples. The elevated microbial levels were detected at high tide and under low-solar-insolation conditions. Additional sampling should be conducted to further explore the relationships between tidal and solar insolation conditions and between indicator microbes and pathogens in subtropical recreational marine waters impacted by non-point source pollution.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Abdelzaher, Amir M.; Wright, Mary E.; Ortega, Cristina; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M.; Miller, Gary; Elmir, Samir; Newman, Xihui; Shih, Peter; Bonilla, J. Alfredo; Bonilla, Tonya D.; Palmer, Carol J.; Scott, Troy; Lukasik, Jerzy; Harwood, Valerie J.; McQuaig, Shannon; Sinigalliano, Chris; Gidley, Maribeth; Plano, Lisa R. W.; Zhu, Xiaofang; Wang, John D.; Fleming, Lora E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">339</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www2.fiu.edu/~seagrass/"> <span id="translatedtitle">South <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Seagrass Ecosystems Home Page</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This site features information from the Seagrass Ecosystems Research Lab in south <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. An abundance of information is at your fingertips. Follow the recent research links to view modeled data from all over southern <span class="hlt">Florida</span> and the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Keys. The information links feature sights loaded with publications and research information, and even a dichotomous key for <span class="hlt">Florida</span> SAV. Also featured is a video where you can actually swim with scientists as they conduct a transect study.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-09-02</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">340</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ccop.cancer.gov/ccop-network/sites/florida-pediatric-ccop"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Pediatric CCOP - National Cancer Institute</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.cancer.gov">Cancer.gov</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In 1983, NCI awarded the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Association of Pediatric Tumor Programs (FAPTP) a grant to establish the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Pediatric Community Clinical Oncology Program (FLCCOP) in a consortium of four <span class="hlt">Florida</span> community hospitals. Subsequently, acknowledging the FLCCOP's outstanding performance and growth, the NCI approved additional grant awards in 1987, 1990, 1995, 2000, and 2005. In June 2010, FAPTP was awarded a seventh NCI grant to continue the FLCCOP in 6 <span class="hlt">Florida</span> community hospitals and one hospital in Puerto Rico through May 2015.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> 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href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">341</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2825648"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effects of Rainfall on E. coli Concentrations at Door County, Wisconsin <span class="hlt">Beaches</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Rainfall and its associated storm water runoff have been associated with transport of many pollutants into <span class="hlt">beach</span> water. Fecal material, from a variety of animals (humans, pets, livestock, and wildlife), can wash into <span class="hlt">beach</span> water following rainfall and result in microbial contamination of the <span class="hlt">beach</span>. Many locales around the world issue pre-emptive <span class="hlt">beach</span> closures associated with rainfall. This study looked at eight <span class="hlt">beaches</span> located in Door County, Wisconsin, on Lake Michigan to determine the impact of rainfall on E. coli concentrations in <span class="hlt">beach</span> water. Water samples were collected from <span class="hlt">beach</span> water and storm water discharge pipes during rainfall events of 5?mm in the previous 24 hours. Six of the eight <span class="hlt">beaches</span> showed a significant association between rainfall and elevated <span class="hlt">beach</span> water E. coli concentrations. The duration of the impact of rainfall on <span class="hlt">beach</span> water E. coli concentrations was variable (immediate to 12 hours). Amount of rainfall in the days previous to the sampling did not have significant impact on the E. coli concentrations measured in <span class="hlt">beach</span> water. Presence of storm water conveyance pipes adjacent to the <span class="hlt">beach</span> did not have a uniform impact on <span class="hlt">beach</span> water E. coli concentrations. This study suggests that each <span class="hlt">beach</span> needs to be examined on its own with regard to rain impacts on E coli concentrations in <span class="hlt">beach</span> water.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kleinheinz, Gregory T.; McDermott, Colleen M.; Hughes, Sarah; Brown, Amanda</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">342</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB92198910"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ecosystems of the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Keys: A Bibliography.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The bibliography was originally prepared for the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Keys National Marine Sanctuary located in Key Largo, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> by the NOAA Regional Library in Miami, <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. It was prepared with the idea that it would be used by scientists and educators intereste...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">L. Pikula S. Elswick</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">343</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=hydrologic&pg=4&id=ED099225"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hydrology of Southeast <span class="hlt">Florida</span> and Associated Topics.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|This booklet deals with the hydrology of southeastern <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. It is designed to provide the citizen, teacher, or student with hydrological information, to promote an understanding of water resources, and to initiate conservation practices within <span class="hlt">Florida</span> communities. The collection of articles within the booklet deal with <span class="hlt">Florida</span> water resources…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Monsour, William, Comp.; Moyer, Maureen, Comp.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">344</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/50129444"> <span id="translatedtitle">Sustainable fisheries: the South <span class="hlt">Florida</span> experience</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The South <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Ecosystem is defined using the extent of the natural watershed as is reflected by the boundaries of the South <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Water Management District. This area encompasses approximately 46000 km 2 and includes 16 counties and starts at the city of Orlando and continues southward to Key West. The major ecosystems described within this area include <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bay</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nancy B. Thompson; James Bohnsack; Joan Browder; John Hunt; Thomas Schmidt</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">345</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5080203"> <span id="translatedtitle">Troubled waters: a <span class="hlt">Florida</span> nightmare</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Results of studies of pollution of groundwater in <span class="hlt">Florida</span> are reported. Vast amounts of the underground water were found to be polluted with ethylene dibromide (EDB) used by <span class="hlt">Florida</span> farmers since the 1950s as an insecticide. Pollution levels of water in the middle of the citrus belt were found to be as high as 775 ppB when 0.02 ppB has been set by the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Agriculture Department as the level for concern. EDB can be removed using activated charcoal filters, or new wells can tap aquifers separated from contaminated ones by beds of impermeable clay. Evidences of contamination of water in specific sites by cresote, sulfuric acid, and heavy metals such as lead and arsenic are mentioned.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cooper, W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">346</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.usf.edu/~isb/projects/atlas/mapindex.html"> <span id="translatedtitle">Atlas of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Vascular Plants</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Richard Wunderlin and Bruce Hansen of the Institute of Systematic Botany (University of South <span class="hlt">Florida</span>) and Edwin L. Bridges of Fairchild Tropical Garden created the monumental Atlas of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Vascular Plants. The searchable Atlas is organized by Pteridophytes, Gymnosperms, Monocots, and Dicots. Although not illustrated, the Atlas includes maps of the distribution (by county) of "each of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s over 4,000 plant species." These maps are arranged alphabetically by family, genus, and species, within each of the four major plant groups. In addition to the online version, "a fully searchable version that also includes information on endangered species, native status, wetland species, synonymy and more is available on a fully searchable, multi-platform CD-ROM."</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wunderlin, Richard P., 1939-.; Hansen, Bruce F.; Bridges, Edwin L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">347</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6530029"> <span id="translatedtitle">Species profiles: life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (South <span class="hlt">Florida</span>). Striped mullet. [Mugil cephalus</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This species profile provides a literature summary of the taxonomy, morphology, distribution, life history, biological and physical environments, and environmental requirements of the striped mullet. The striped mullet (Mugil cephalus) is a valuable food fish and baitfish. About 31 million pounds were landed in <span class="hlt">Florida</span> in 1981. Striped mullet are caught with hook and line, trammel nets, gill nets, and seines, and by snagging. Some striped mullet spawn along <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, but they usually spawn offshore in relatively deep (to 1800 m) cool waters. Juveniles spend their first year in salt marshes, estuaries, and coastal waters. Striped mullet usually avoid water colder than 16/sup 0/C. 37 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Collins, M.R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">348</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/databases/herps/intro.htm"> <span id="translatedtitle">University of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Herpetology Collection</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The University of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Herpetology Collection Master Database currently contains 137,936 records. The Database search engine offers fields for common and scientific name, as well as Country or Nation; State or Department; County or Province; and Collection Month and Year. Users can select up to 200 records per page, and request a Table or Report output style. Specimen loans are available to permanent staff members at institutions, but not to individuals. In addition to information about specimen loans from the Herpetology Collection at the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Museum of Natural History, the Collection site contains concise information about data requests, and specimen dissections.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">349</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cit.wcu.edu/WebFiles/PDFs/psds_Mathematical_1994.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mathematical Modeling of <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Behavior Doesn't Work</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">I ABSTRACT The use of mathematical,modeling to predict the behavior of <span class="hlt">beaches</span> does not work. Some of the major assumptions behind the models , by studying its past behavior. Keywords: Engineering and environmental geol-</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Orrin H. Pilkey</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">350</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/md0997.photos.082508p/"> <span id="translatedtitle">11. <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> TOILET BUILDING, OFFICE AND FIRST AID BUILDING, PLANS, ...</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p class="result-summary">11. <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> TOILET BUILDING, OFFICE AND FIRST AID BUILDING, PLANS, ELEVATIONS AND SECTIONS Drawing No. 103-07 - Glen Echo Park, Crystal Swimming Pool, 7300 McArthur Boulevard, Glen Echo, Montgomery County, MD</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">351</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/md0997.photos.082515p/"> <span id="translatedtitle">18. SAND <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> WITH SUNBATHERS AND UMBRELLAS. VIEW FROM SOUTHEAST. ...</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p class="result-summary">18. SAND <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> WITH SUNBATHERS AND UMBRELLAS. VIEW FROM SOUTHEAST. NORTHWEST ELEVATION OF REFRESHMENT STAND Photocopy of 1930-1940 photograph - Glen Echo Park, Crystal Swimming Pool, 7300 McArthur Boulevard, Glen Echo, Montgomery County, MD</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">352</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB2009104558"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beached</span> Shipwreck Archeology: Case Studies from Channel Islands National Park.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This study reports on investigations of the material remains of three shipwreck scatters on <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Channel Island National Park. Documentation and analyses of these vessels, three Pacific Coast lumber schooners built by the Hall Brothers Shipyard of P...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. A. Russell</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">353</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB81100653"> <span id="translatedtitle">Draft Environmental Assessment Desalting Demonstration Plant, Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Virginia.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This Environmental Assessment was part of Kaiser Engineers' study, Desalting Demonstration Plant Feasibility Study, Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Virginia. Product water from the proposed plant would provide availability of a greatly needed new domestic potable water s...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1979-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">354</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/ut0343.photos.159524p/"> <span id="translatedtitle">2. VIEW SHOWING NATURAL SAND <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> ON KIDNEY LAKE, LOOKING ...</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p class="result-summary">2. VIEW SHOWING NATURAL SAND <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> ON KIDNEY LAKE, LOOKING WEST - High Mountain Dams in Upalco Unit, Kidney Lake Dam, Ashley National Forest, 4.7 miles North of Miners Gulch Campground, Mountain Home, Duchesne County, UT</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">355</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/ca2388.photos.190950p/"> <span id="translatedtitle">7. Alternate view of collapsed Panama Mount on <span class="hlt">beach</span>. Note ...</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p class="result-summary">7. Alternate view of collapsed Panama Mount on <span class="hlt">beach</span>. Note concrete ring, metal rail and exposed rebar. Looking 320° NW. - Fort Funston, Panama Mounts for 155mm Guns, Skyline Boulevard & Great Highway, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">356</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AGUFMOS54B..02S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mapping Submarine Groundwater Discharge - how to investigate spatial discharge variability on coastal and <span class="hlt">beach</span> scales</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) is now increasingly recognized as an important component in the water balance, water quality and ecology of the coastal zone. A multitude of methods are currently employed to study SGD, ranging from point flux measurements with seepage meters to methods integrating over various spatial and temporal scales such as hydrological models, geophysical techniques or surface water tracer approaches. From studies in a large variety of hydrogeological settings, researchers in this field have come to expect that SGD is rarely uniformly distributed. Here we discuss the application of: (a) the mapping of subsurface electrical conductivity in a discharge zone on a <span class="hlt">beach</span>; and (b) the large-scale mapping of radon in coastal surface water to improving our understanding of SGD and its spatial variability. On a <span class="hlt">beach</span> scale, as part of intercomparison studies of a UNESCO/IAEA working group, mapping of subsurface electrical conductivity in a <span class="hlt">beach</span> face have elucidated the non-uniform distribution of SGD associated with rock fractures, volcanic settings and man-made structures (e.g., piers, jetties). Variations in direct point measurements of SGD flux with seepage meters were linked to the subsurface conductivity distribution. We demonstrate how the combination of these two techniques may complement one another to better constrain SGD measurements. On kilometer to hundred kilometer scales, the spatial distribution and regional importance of SGD can be investigated by mapping relevant tracers in the coastal ocean. The radon isotope Rn-222 is a commonly used tracer for SGD investigations due to its significant enrichment in groundwater, and continuous mapping of this tracer, in combination with ocean water salinity, can be used to efficiently infer locations of SGD along a coastline on large scales. We use a surface-towed, continuously recording multi-detector setup installed on a moving vessel. This tool was used in various coastal environments, e.g. in <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, Brazil, Mauritius and Australia's Great Barrier Reef lagoon. From shore-parallel transects along the Central Great Barrier Reef coastline, numerous processes and locations of SGD were identified, including terrestrially-derived fresh SGD and the recirculation of seawater in mangrove forests, as well as riverine sources. From variations in the inverse relationship of the two tracers radon and salinity, some aspects of regional freshwater input into the lagoon during the tropical wet season could be assessed. Such surveys on coastal scales can be a useful tool to obtain an overview of locations and processes of SGD on an unknown coastline.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Stieglitz, T. C.; Burnett, W. C.; Rapaglia, J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">357</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=hospital+AND+facility+AND+design&pg=5&id=ED217902"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Community Colleges Committed to <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Mental Health Hospitals.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">These three papers discuss the role of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s community colleges in developing training programs for mental health service employees in the state. Following introductory material, Robert Ashburn presents an overview of the Unit Treatment Rehabilitation (UTR) training program, which was designed to improve the quality of mental health care in…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ashburn, Robert; And Others</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">358</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ftp2.uk.vim.org/sites/www.journalofmaps.com/student_edition/07_05_Pintado.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Wave-Sediment Interactions on an High Energy <span class="hlt">Beach</span> System</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Please click here to download the map associated with this article.The North coast of Northern Ireland is exposed to high-energy swells and frequent storm events and therefore <span class="hlt">beach</span> systems found along this coast tend largely to be dissipative in character. Bedrock-framed coastlines formed by basalt cliffs, shore platforms and smaller sandy embayments dominate this study area. West Strand <span class="hlt">beach</span> at</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Emilia Guisado Pintado</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">359</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/11421653"> <span id="translatedtitle">Marine debris contamination along undeveloped tropical <span class="hlt">beaches</span> from northeast Brazil</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We hypothesize that floating debris leaving polluted coastal bays accumulate on nearby pristine <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. We examined composition,\\u000a quantities and distribution of marine debris along ?150 km of relatively undeveloped, tropical <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Costa do Dendê (Bahia,\\u000a Brazil). The study site is located south of Salvador City, the largest urban settlement from NE Brazil. Strong spatial variations\\u000a were observed. Plastics accounted for</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Isaac R. Santos; Ana Cláudia Friedrich; Juliana Assunção Ivar do Sul</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">360</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19541858"> <span id="translatedtitle">Contact with <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand among beachgoers and risk of illness.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recent studies of <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand fecal contamination have triggered interest among scientists and in the media. Although evidence shows that <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand can harbor high concentrations of fecal indicator organisms, as well as fecal pathogens, illness risk associated with <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand contact is not well understood. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> visitors at 7 US <span class="hlt">beaches</span> were enrolled in the National Epidemiological and Environmental Assessment of Recreational Water (NEEAR) Study during 2003-2005 and 2007 and asked about sand contact on the day of their visit to the <span class="hlt">beach</span> (digging in the sand, body buried in the sand). Then, 10-12 days after their visit, participants were telephoned to answer questions about any health symptoms experienced since the visit. The authors completed 27,365 interviews. Digging in the sand was positively associated with gastrointestinal illness (adjusted incidence proportion ratio (aIPR) = 1.13, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.02, 1.25) and diarrhea (aIPR = 1.20, 95% CI: 1.05, 1.36). The association was stronger between those buried in the sand and gastrointestinal illness (aIPR = 1.23, 95% CI: 1.05, 1.43) and diarrhea (aIPR = 1.24, 95% CI: 1.01, 1.52). Nonenteric illnesses did not show a consistent association with sand contact activities. Sand contact activities were associated with enteric illness at <span class="hlt">beach</span> sites. Variation in <span class="hlt">beach</span>-specific results suggests that site-specific factors may be important in the risk of illness following sand exposure. PMID:19541858</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Heaney, Christopher D; Sams, Elizabeth; Wing, Steve; Marshall, Steve; Brenner, Kristen; Dufour, Alfred P; Wade, Timothy J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-06-18</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return 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showDiv("page_20");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">361</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013Geomo.198...69R"> <span id="translatedtitle">The role of fringing coral reefs on <span class="hlt">beach</span> morphodynamics</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper examines the degree of energy dissipation provided by a fringing coral reef, and its role on the morphodynamics of adjacent <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in terms of volumetric sediment transport. Morphological data were collected from the microtidal Mexican Caribbean <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of Puerto Morelos, fringed by a reef, and Cancun, without a reef, from September 2007 to May 2011. Being exposed to the same offshore wave conditions, the morphodynamics of the coral reef-fronted <span class="hlt">beach</span> were compared with those of the adjacent <span class="hlt">beach</span> without a coral reef. Spatio-temporal changes in <span class="hlt">beach</span> morphology were determined applying empirical orthogonal functions (EOF) to the shorelines extracted from the topographic data, and it was concluded that Puerto Morelos was considerably less dynamic than Cancun. The longshore energy fluxes were larger in Cancun, and the subaerial morphological differences in both <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and under the same offshore conditions demonstrated that Puerto Morelos was particularly stable under shore-normal easterly waves. A calibrated phase-averaged wave model was implemented to determine the amount of wave energy dissipation across the coral reef. For energetic shore-normal waves the model determined that the semi-emerged coral reef was capable of reducing up to 85% of the incident wave height. The reef-crest height controlled the amount of wave energy dissipation, and the distance between the reef-crest and the shore determined the vulnerability of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> to morphological changes. Reef-crest degradation by 1 m resulted in a 10% increase in incoming wave energy, which resulted in 0.9 m3/h/m of sand being mobilised along the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> closer to the reef.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ruiz de Alegria-Arzaburu, Amaia; Mariño-Tapia, Ismael; Enriquez, Cecilia; Silva, Rodolfo; González-Leija, Mariana</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">362</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/54070489"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Impacts of Back<span class="hlt">Beach</span> Barriers on Sandy <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Morphology Along the California Coast and Implications for Coastal Change with Future Sea-Level Rise</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Coastal squeeze, or foreshore narrowing, is a result of marine encroachment, such as sea-level rise in the presence of a back-<span class="hlt">beach</span> barrier, terrestrial encroachment, such as coastal development, or both. In California, the permanent coastal population increased by almost 10 million people between 1980 and 2003, and an additional 130 million beachgoers visit Southern California <span class="hlt">beaches</span> each year. <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> in</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">E. L. Harden</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">363</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18256899"> <span id="translatedtitle">Marine debris contamination along undeveloped tropical <span class="hlt">beaches</span> from northeast Brazil.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We hypothesize that floating debris leaving polluted coastal bays accumulate on nearby pristine <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. We examined composition, quantities and distribution of marine debris along approximately 150 km of relatively undeveloped, tropical <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Costa do Dendê (Bahia, Brazil). The study site is located south of Salvador City, the largest urban settlement from NE Brazil. Strong spatial variations were observed. Plastics accounted for 76% of the sampled items, followed by styrofoam (14%). Small plastic fragments resultant from the breakdown of larger items are ubiquitous all over the area. Because the dominant littoral drift in Bahia is southward, average <span class="hlt">beach</span> debris densities (9.1 items/m) along Costa do Dendê were threefold higher than densities previously observed north of Salvador City. River-dominated and stable <span class="hlt">beaches</span> had higher debris quantities than unstable, erosional <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Areas immediately south of the major regional embayments (Camamu and Todos os Santos) were the preferential accumulation sites, indicating that rivers draining populous areas are the major source of debris to the study site. Our results provide baseline information for future assessments. Management actions should focus on input prevention at the hydrographic basin level rather than on cleaning services on <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. PMID:18256899</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Santos, Isaac R; Friedrich, Ana Cláudia; Ivar do Sul, Juliana Assunção</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-02-07</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">364</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006AGUSMOS31A..15R"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> - nearshore Profile Changes in Relation to Sediment Fluxes in a Placer Mining <span class="hlt">Beach</span> of the SW coast of India</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">beach</span> and nearshore profile changes in a placer mining <span class="hlt">beach</span> of the Chavara, SW coast of India were monitored for a period of more than two years with the objective of studying the <span class="hlt">beach</span> building processes in relation to the sediment fluxes in the area. This study was done concurrently with the studies on hydrodynamics, sedimentary dynamics and hydrodynamic modelling by Hameed et al. (2005), Prakash et al. (2005) and Black et al. (2005) under a major project on sediment budgeting for this coast. The <span class="hlt">beach</span>- nearshore profiles (Fig. 1) have a distinct character with a very steep face at 1:30 above 5 m depth, and then a much lower-gradient profile at 1:500 out to 10 m depth. The gradient is actually much steeper than equivalent temperate <span class="hlt">beaches</span> for similar grain sizes. The <span class="hlt">beach</span> has maximum width during the fair weather months of November-February. The profiles reach the nadir during the southwest monsoon and the lowest width of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> is observed in the months of May-June- July, when the wave intensity is at its maximum (Hameed et al., 2005). Cumulative volume change for the period June 1999 to September 2001 (Fig. 2) indicates a more or less steady condition on an annual basis with the quantum of annual change not exceeding 70 m3/m. This matches very well with the cross- shore sediment fluxes computed by Black et al. (2005) for this location. Considerable spatial variation is observed in the <span class="hlt">beach</span>- nearshore profile changes. The stations of maximum volume changes lie on the northern part of the mining site. This is attributed to the intensive <span class="hlt">beach</span> building processes that takes place in these stretches during fair weather periods under the influence of northerly longshore currents. At stations fronted by rock walls on either side of mining sites, the magnitude of the volume change is very nominal. The study amply demonstrates the unfavourable conditions for development of <span class="hlt">beach</span> in rock wall fronted <span class="hlt">beaches</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rajith, K.; Kurian, N.; Thomas, K.; Prakash, T.; Hameed, T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">365</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/39710504"> <span id="translatedtitle">Preliminary hydrodynamic results of a field experiment on a barred <span class="hlt">beach</span>, Truc Vert <span class="hlt">beach</span> on October 2001</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A field experiment conducted on a sandy barred <span class="hlt">beach</span>, situated on the southern part of the French Atlantic coastline, allowed us to investigate the impact of the intertidal bar on the wave-energy dissipation on the <span class="hlt">beach</span> face in presence of a high-energy long-incoming swell (significant wave height of about 1.7 to 3.0 m in 56 m water depth and significant</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">N. Sénéchal; H. Dupuis; P. Bonneton</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">366</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=minority+AND+nurse&pg=7&id=ED307262"> <span id="translatedtitle">Public Health Education in <span class="hlt">Florida</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|This report documents issues related to the work of the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Comprehensive Health Professions Education Plan. Public health education prepares students for initial employment or advancement in a number of positions. While the public health work force is primarily employed in various units in local, state, and federal governments, industry also…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">367</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Toxicology&pg=7&id=ED307262"> <span id="translatedtitle">Public Health Education in <span class="hlt">Florida</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report documents issues related to the work of the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Comprehensive Health Professions Education Plan. Public health education prepares students for initial employment or advancement in a number of positions. While the public health work force is primarily employed in various units in local, state, and federal governments, industry also…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">368</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntj.tax.org/wwtax/ntjrec.nsf/9cd27ebf749da99c8525686c00686d78/$file/v41n1001.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">FLORIDA</span>'S SALES TAX ON SERVICES</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">other aspects of the tax, the levy trig- During its 1987 session, the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> leg- gered an enormous storm of protest, with islature enacted a sales and use tax on a opponents attacking it as unfair, unwise, broad range of services consumed in the and unconstitutional. In December 1987, state. Because the tax systematically sought less than six months after</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">WALTER HELLERSTEIN</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">369</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=flesch-kincaid&id=ED359508"> <span id="translatedtitle">Readability of Central <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Newspapers.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|A study analyzed the readability of seven central <span class="hlt">Florida</span> newspapers (one of which is a college newspaper) and "USA Today.""Rightwriter," a grammar checker and readability computer program, was used to evaluate front page articles for each of the eight newspapers. The readability formulas invoked in the readability program included the…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Olmstead, Phyllis M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">370</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=floriculture&id=ED359421"> <span id="translatedtitle">Floriculture. <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Vocational Program Guide.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|This program guide is intended for the implementation of a floriculture program in <span class="hlt">Florida</span> secondary and postsecondary schools. The program guide describes the program content and structure, provides a program description, describes jobs under the program, and includes a curriculum framework and student performance standards for floriculture…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Center for Instructional Development and Services.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">371</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFMEP51D..07A"> <span id="translatedtitle">Investigating the Geomorphic Behavior of the Cape Canaveral Coast Through High-Resolution <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Monitoring, Sediment Analysis, Oceanographic Observations, and Numerical Modeling</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The salient of Cape Canaveral interrupts a relatively straight, sandy, passive margin coastline that extends nearly 400 km from the St. Johns River mouth to the St. Lucie Inlet along the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Atlantic coast. OSL dating indicates that the modern cape has been prograding rapidly since the LGM and subtle topographic features, inland from the modern cape, suggest that this salient has persisted over several sea level cycles since the early Pleistocene. Dynamic shoreline change over the past decade at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is threatening critical NASA infrastructure and has prompted officials to develop a mitigation strategy through a partnership among researchers from the U.S. Geological Survey, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, private coastal engineering firms, and the University of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. Since May 2009, the research team has assembled data on decadal to event-scale shoreline change (dGPS), <span class="hlt">beach</span> and nearshore morphodynamics (dGPS and Argus), <span class="hlt">beach</span> sedimentary character (grain size analysis), wave climate and transformation (ADCP), and inner shelf bathymetry (Echo Sounding) in an effort to assess dune vulnerability and flooding risk. In addition, SWAN numerical modeling simulations offer insight into the influence of irregular bathymetry (cape-associated shoals) on the alteration of spatial patterns of wave energy flux during a decadal shift in deep-water wave climate. <span class="hlt">Beach</span>-fx, modeling of cross-shore profile evolution is being applied to evaluate the performance of alternative protective measures, estimate project costs, and examine ecological influences of the proposed alternative protective measures. By combining contemporaneous data of coastal geomorphic and sedimentary response to wave forcing with numerical model results that explore a range of climate scenarios, we aim to develop a useful understanding of the coastal geomorphic behavior at KSC that can be used to make a mitigation recommendation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Adams, P. N.; Jaeger, J. M.; MacKenzie, R. A.; Kline, S. W.; Maibauer, B. J.; Plant, N. G.; Gravens, M. B.; Pierro, T. P.; Shaffer, J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">372</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009EGUGA..11.1409P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Storm impact and recovery patterns in natural and urbanised <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Cadiz (SW Spain)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A <span class="hlt">beach</span> monitoring program was carried out in Cadiz Province (SW Spain), within the MICORE (FP7/2007-2013, grant n° 202798) and the RESISTE (CGL 2008-00458/BTE) projects. In detail, the present paper deals with morphological changes produced by a short-duration storm event and successive <span class="hlt">beach</span> recovery in two different mesotidal, quartz-rich sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. By one hand, Cortadura <span class="hlt">beach</span>, located in Cadiz town, is backed by a promenade and shows a smooth, dissipative <span class="hlt">beach</span> profile composed by fine sands. On the other hand, Camposoto <span class="hlt">beach</span>, located at Sancti Petri sandspit, is a natural <span class="hlt">beach</span> backed by dune ridges and saltmarshes, and shows an intermediate-reflective <span class="hlt">beach</span> profile composed by medium sands. Both <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, which are about 5 km apart, are broadly exposed to the same offshore wave energy and have the same orientation. In order to obtain morphological and volumetric <span class="hlt">beach</span> changes, topographic surveys were carried out by the means of a DGPS. Furthermore, morphodynamic numerical models have been used in order to estimate topographical changes. At the end of summer period (14th October 2008), <span class="hlt">beaches</span> presented an accretionary state characterised by a small (at Cortadura) and a well developed (at Camposoto) berm. At the beginning of November, the investigated <span class="hlt">beaches</span> recorded the impact of a short duration storm approaching from the SW, characterized by significant wave height values of about 2.5 m. Field surveys evidenced maximum topographical changes of about 0.50 and 1.0 m respectively at Cortadura and Camposoto <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, berm erosion and accretion at low foreshore areas (i.e. <span class="hlt">beach</span> pivoting) and <span class="hlt">beach</span> flattening being the patterns observed at both <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> recovery took place in following days, the surveys carried out on 19th November 2008 revealing a faster and more comprehensive recovery of the natural area: a small, flat bar was observed on the low foreshore at Cortadura, and a well developed berm at Camposoto <span class="hlt">beach</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Plomaritis, T. A.; Anfuso, G.; Benavente, J.; Del Río, L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">373</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007ECSS...71..318K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Salinity patterns of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bay</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The salinity of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bay has undergone dramatic changes over the past century. Salinity values reached their most extreme, up to 70, in the late 1980s, concurrent with ecological changes in <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bay including a mass seagrass die-off. In this study, surface salinity was measured at approximately monthly intervals between 1998 and 2004. The 7-year data set was analyzed to quantify the effects of precipitation, runoff, evaporation, and climatic variability on salinity in <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bay. Overall mean Bay-wide salinity varied from a low of 24.2 just after the passing of Hurricane Irene in October 1999 to a high of 41.8 near the end of a drought period in July 2001. Bay-wide mean salinity exhibited dramatic decreases, up to -0.5 per day, whereas increases were slower, with a maximum rate of 0.1 per day. The freshwater budget for <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bay was slightly negative on an annual basis with significant positive monthly values observed during the peak of the rainy season (August through October) and significant negative monthly values observed during the peak of the dry season (March through May). This resulted in a minimum mean monthly Bay-wide salinity in January and a maximum monthly mean in July. Mean salinity for the overall Bay and for each of its four sub-regions could be predicted with reasonable accuracy utilizing a mass balance box model. There was no monotonic trend in salinity over this 7-year study; however, meteorological phenomena, such as tropical cyclones and El Nino-Southern Oscillation, dramatically altered the salinity patterns of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bay on interannual time scales.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kelble, Christopher R.; Johns, Elizabeth M.; Nuttle, William K.; Lee, Thomas N.; Smith, Ryan H.; Ortner, Peter B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">374</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009pcms.confE.129O"> <span id="translatedtitle">The responses of artificial embayed <span class="hlt">beaches</span> to storm events</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The plan-view and the profile shape of sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> largely depend on the incoming wave-energy (Wright and Short, 1984). In this sense, storm events are responsible for major changes in the configuration of sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and the cumulative effect of storms and fair-weather conditions determines the morphodynamic state of a certain <span class="hlt">beach</span>. With increasing wave energy, the <span class="hlt">beach</span> will change from the Reflective state to the Low Tide Terrace, Transverse Bar and Rip, Rhythmic Bar and <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Longshore Bar and Trough and finally to the Dissipative <span class="hlt">beach</span> state. These morphodynamic states are also observed at artificial embayed <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, although artificial groins limit alongshore sediment transport and protect sections of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> from waves approaching from a range of directions (Short and Masselink, 1999). This contribution focuses on the morphological changes of the shoreline and the submerged sandbars of artificial embayed (sandy) <span class="hlt">beaches</span> due to the effect of high-wave conditions associated to storms. We characterize the morphological response of the emerged and submerged <span class="hlt">beach</span> profile of two of the artificial embayed <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of the Barcelona city coast (NW Mediterranean). The two embayed <span class="hlt">beaches</span> under study are single-barred <span class="hlt">beaches</span> subject to the same climatic conditions but with different morphological characteristics. The study comprises more than 4 years of data, from November 2001 to March 2006, obtained through an Argus video system (Holman and Stanley, 2007). The extraction of the shoreline and barline locations is accomplished using 10-minute time-exposure video images. Shorelines were extracted directly from oblique images (see Ojeda and Guillén, [2008] for a complete description) and rectified afterwards. Sandbars were inferred from the rectified time-exposure video images based on the preferential wave breaking over shallow areas, so they required a minimum significant wave height (Hs) which allowed the occurrence of a clear wave-breaking pattern. The barline extraction was accomplished through an automated alongshore tracking of the intensity maxima across each <span class="hlt">beach</span> section (Van Enckevort and Ruessink, 2001). The mean Hs during the study period was 0.71 m and the averaged peak period was 5.7 s. The wave height time series shows a cyclic behaviour, with storm periods (October-April) separated by periods of low storm activity (May-October). The two most energetic periods affecting the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> were from October 2001 to May 2002 and from October 2003 to April 2004 (wave data were obtained from a WANA node [virtual buoy] and direct measurements of the Barcelona-Coastal buoy). Approximately 25 storm events have been identified during the study period (following Ojeda and Guillén [2008], significant storms were defined as those with Hs higher than 2.5 m during the peak of the storm and a minimum duration of 12 h with Hs greater than 1.5 m). The morphological responses of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> to the storm action determine the morphodynamic state. These responses were grouped into five categories: shoreline advance or retreat, <span class="hlt">beach</span> rotation, sandbar migration, formation of megacusps, and changes in the sandbar configuration (linear or crescentic shape). The intensity and frequency of these modifications were different in both <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Regarding the changes in the morphodynamic state of the <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, the bar at Bogatell switched more frequently among the four intermediate morphodynamic states during the study period than the bar at La Barceloneta. The bar at La Barceloneta only underwent the complete "reset" of the nearshore morphology (i.e., abrupt change of the plan-view shape of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> towards a Longshore Bar and Trough state) once, associated with the high-energy wave event occurring on November 2001. At this <span class="hlt">beach</span>, the strongest storm events produced the offshore migration of the bar and a certain decrease in the bar sinuosity, but did not generate an alongshore parallel bar. Similar storms caused different effects on the two adjacent <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and, furthermore, the effect of storms of similar characteristics at t</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ojeda, E.; Guillén, J.; Ribas, F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">375</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFMEP22A..01H"> <span id="translatedtitle">On bedstate, bottom stress, <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, and acoustics</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The oscillatory near-bed flow generated by surface gravity waves propagating over sandy mobile sediments leads to the formation of bedforms of varying geometry and roughness in continental shelf and nearshore environments. Acoustic imaging instruments have revealed the evolution of the bed during high-energy wave events through a sequence of different characteristic bedform patterns: the nearshore bedstate storm cycle. The evolution of the bed and the associated sediment transport are driven by the bottom stress. Critically, the thickness of the turbulent boundary layer under waves is only O(10 cm), and obtaining direct estimates of stress within this thin layer above mobile beds has represented a longstanding measurement hurdle in coastal and continental shelf oceanography and engineering. New high-resolution acoustic Doppler sensors are being developed to probe the turbulent wave bottom boundary layer as the bed evolves. The goal is to obtain redundant estimates of bottom stress from the vertical structure of the nearbed flow and turbulence throughout the bedstate cycle. Such knowledge will provide a much-needed basis for two-way coupled flow and sediment dynamics models of bedform development during storms, and ultimately for including the bedstate cycle in predictive models of <span class="hlt">beach</span> evolution via the feedbacks between bed roughness and circulation. The presentation will summarize the key features of the bedstate storm cycle, and recent progress toward determining bottom stress above evolving beds using advanced acoustic Doppler sensors.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hay, A. E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">376</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011Geomo.135...97T"> <span id="translatedtitle">Medium timescale <span class="hlt">beach</span> rotation; gale climate and offshore island influences</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> profile surveys, gale climate and atmospheric variations were utilized to assess medium timescale morphological change at South Sands, Tenby, West Wales. Due to <span class="hlt">beach</span> aspect in relation to offshore islands, gale wave height decreased as wave direction rotated eastwards (r = 0.83) and westwards (r = 0.88). Similarly, wave heights were in attuned to variations in positive (r = 0.68) and negative (r = - 0.72) NAO Index, showing a wave height reduction occurred during weakly negative/positive or transitory phases; morphological change was attuned to atmospheric variation at a 2-year timelag. Shelter from offshore islands is given to waves from the predominant southwesterly direction and was confirmed by negligible correlation with South Sands morphology. However, outside the shelter of these offshore islands, correlation was found between south-eastward rotating wave directions (135°-180°) and morphological change, which resulted in southern and central <span class="hlt">beach</span> erosion and accretion to the north. With a southwesterly rotation (243°-256°) the opposite was true. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> rotation expressed by volume change within the sub-aerial zone had a negative phased relationship between <span class="hlt">beach</span> extremities (r = - 0.94) and a timelagged association within the intertidal zone (r = 0.55). Analyses resulted in the development of two medium timescale rotation models based on incident wave direction and climatic variability. Results have global implications for headland bays in the lee of offshore islands, as well as macro-tidal <span class="hlt">beach</span> areas; and consequently similar models could inform local, regional and national <span class="hlt">beach</span> management strategies</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Thomas, T.; Phillips, M. R.; Williams, A. T.; Jenkins, R. E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">377</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3737961"> <span id="translatedtitle">Heart Rate and Motion Analysis by GPS in <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Soccer</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Although <span class="hlt">beach</span> soccer has become increasingly popular in recent years very little scientific research has been conducted into the sport. A pilot study was carried out with the aim of examining the physiological (heart rate) and physical (motion analysis) responses of <span class="hlt">beach</span> soccer players during competitive matches. Ten players (age 25.5 ± 0.5 years; height 1.80 ± 0.08 m; weight 78.2 ± 5.6 kg.) were studied over five <span class="hlt">beach</span> soccer matches. The physiological demands were analysed by measuring heart rate (HR) using telemetric devices, while the physical profile was evaluated by recording motion and speed by means of GPS devices. During competitive matches, players obtained a HRmean of 165.2 bpm (86.5% HRmax), with 59.3% of the time participating (TP) corresponding to values above 90% of the HRmax. The distance covered per minute of participation was 97.7 m, with 9.5% of this distance corresponding to high-intensity running and 2.5% to sprint; the work:rest ratio was 1.4:1 and the maximum speed 21.7 km·h-1. These results showed that <span class="hlt">beach</span> soccer is an intermittent physical activity of greater intensity than other team games. It requires a major contribution from the anaerobic system as emphasis is placed on players making quick bursts of high-intensity activity separated by brief rest periods. Key points The distance covered per minute of play is around 100 m. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> soccer is an intermittent sport with a work:rest ratio of 1.4:1. The playing surface in <span class="hlt">beach</span> soccer is an important handicap to obtain maximum speeds. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> soccer has a high physiological intensity, with more than half of the game is spent at intensities above 90 % of the HRmax.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Castellano, Julen; Casamichana, David</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">378</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ADA366974"> <span id="translatedtitle">Monmouth <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, New Jersey: <span class="hlt">Beach</span>-Fill 'Hot Spot' Erosion Evaluation. Report 2. Functional Design of Shore-Protection Alternatives for <span class="hlt">Beach</span>-Fill Longevity.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The U.S. Army Engineer District, New York, is constructing Section I- Sea Bright to Ocean Township, New Jersey, of the Atlantic Coast of New Jersey - Sandy Hook to Barnegat Inlet <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Erosion Control Project. Within the initial portion of this project, a...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">S. J. Smith G. L. Williams N. C. Kraus</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">379</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23182894"> <span id="translatedtitle">Macrofaunal sediment selectivity considerations for <span class="hlt">beach</span> nourishment programmes.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Nowadays, <span class="hlt">beach</span> nourishment is widely considered as a better alternative compared to the construction of hard structures to protect a sandy coast against detrimental erosive effects, both from an ecological and an engineering perspective. The rare studies conducted on the ecological impact of <span class="hlt">beach</span> nourishment are short-term, post hoc monitoring investigations of the benthic macrofauna. Little is known of the biological processes during and after nourishment. To allow swift recolonization after nourishment, the characteristics of the nourished <span class="hlt">beach</span> have to match the habitat demands of the benthic macrofauna. The sediment preference of the key intertidal species Scolelepis squamata, Eurydice pulchra, Bathyporeia pilosa and Bathyporeia sarsi, which dominate many West European sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, was investigated through laboratory experiments, both in single-species as well as combined-species treatments. While the former aimed at developing guidelines for impact mitigation of <span class="hlt">beach</span> nourishment, the latter aimed at elucidating the role of biotic interactions in sediment preference. Results of the experiments indicated that B. pilosa and E. pulchra prefer the finest sediment, while B. sarsi had a broader preference and also occurred in medium-coarse sediments. However, the sediment preference of E. pulchra for fine sediments was not confirmed by other field and experimental studies. The polychaete S. squamata had the broadest preference and even showed a high occurrence in coarse sediments that are not naturally occurring on the sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> where the animals were caught for this experiment. However, this polychaete is a cosmopolitan species, not only occurring on fine-grained <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, but also on coarse-grained <span class="hlt">beaches</span> worldwide. The preferences imply that <span class="hlt">beach</span> nourishment with coarse sediment will have a major effect on B. pilosa while effects of coarse sediments on S. squamata will be minor. Finally, interspecific competition with the sympatrically occurring amphipod B. sarsi was found to change the sediment selection of the amphipod B. pilosa towards the coarser sediments where B. sarsi occurred in lower frequencies. PMID:23182894</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Van Tomme, J; Vanden Eede, S; Speybroeck, J; Degraer, S; Vincx, M</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-11-14</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">380</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6374991"> <span id="translatedtitle">New <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridge type: severely limited fetch, very shallow water</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The southern end of Laguna Madre (Texas) north of the Rio Grande mouth is marked by very shallow water, wide tidal flats, lunettes, islands made of <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridges, and lesser features. The number and variety of islands in the lagoon is remarkable. The lunettes (clay dunes) are made primarily of quartz sand and coarse silt. They are common 5-10 m high, irregular in shape, and steep sided. They were deposited from wind transport and did not migrate. Those that are islands in the lagoon predate present position of sea level. Islands made of <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridges were built from the lagoon side. Photoanalysis, field work, and granulometry all show that this sand was not moved into these ridges by Gulf of Mexico waves. Trenches in 12 <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridges showed horizontal bedding but neither low-angle nor steep cross-bedding (quite unlike swash-built <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridges). The ridges were built by wind-tide lag effects, not from the swash. Therefore, these <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridges are a new type, in addition to swash-built, eolian, and storm-surge ridges. Growth of the ridges appears to be completed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tanner, W.F.; Demirpolat, S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' 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src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">381</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFMEP33A0907H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Seasonal Berm Behavior on a Coastal Lagoon Pocket <span class="hlt">Beach</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Coastal lagoon <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are typically characterized by a seasonal berm that separates the lagoon mouth from the open ocean during summer months and is temporarily breached and eroded offshore as a result of higher wave energy during winter months. Seasonal morphodynamic changes on a coastal lagoon pocket <span class="hlt">beach</span> in Santa Cruz, California were monitored from August 2010 to April 2011. Monthly total station GPS surveys were conducted on Younger Lagoon Reserve <span class="hlt">beach</span> in conjunction with monthly grain size analyses. A time series comparison of <span class="hlt">beach</span> profiles extracted from shore-normal transects reveals that the berm fronting the lagoon mouth did not erode with increasing wave energy during the winter months as expected, but either stayed fixed while the foreshore steepened or migrated horizontally across shore. Berm height is likely maintained by wave overtopping of the berm crest at the lagoon mouth during high tides or storm events. Foreshore steepening occurs in conjunction with an increase in coarse sediment fraction and is consistent with increasing wave energy and turbulent swash interaction. Cross-shore sediment transport in the foreshore fronting the lagoon mouth is likely enhanced by infiltration and exfiltration of water on the shoreface due to the position of the water table with respect to the maximum swash runup. Coastal lagoon <span class="hlt">beach</span> berm behavior and the subsequent extent of lagoon-ocean mixing has important implications for coastal water quality and lagoon ecosystem dynamics.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Harden, L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">382</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB83141978"> <span id="translatedtitle">An Ecological Characterization of the Lower Everglades, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bay and the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Keys.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A conceptual model of the study area identifies four major ecological zones; terrestrial and freshwater wetlands, estuarine and saltwater wetlands, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bay and mangrove islands and the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Keys. These zones are delineated by differences in basic p...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">N. S. Schomer R. D. Drew</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1982-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">383</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB94129491"> <span id="translatedtitle">Health Hazard Evaluation Report HETA 89-0343-2348, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Hospital, Orlando, <span class="hlt">Florida</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In response to a request from the hospital management, a study was made regarding employee exposure to aerosolized ribavirin (36791045) at <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Hospital (SIC-8062) located in Orlando, <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. Concern was voiced about several spontaneous abortions whic...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">S. Deitchman D. Wall</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">384</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB93119345"> <span id="translatedtitle">Health Hazard Evaluation Report HETA 91-104-2229, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Hospital, Orlando, <span class="hlt">Florida</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In response to a request by hospital management to evaluate employee exposures to aerosolized ribavirin (36791045) (AR), an investigation was made at <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Hospital (SIC-8062), Orlando, <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. The hospital was an 801 bed medical center and teaching ho...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. Decker R. A. Shults</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">385</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=61043"> <span id="translatedtitle">AN EMAP APPROACH FOR ASSESSING THE ECOLOGICAL CONDITION OF COASTAL <span class="hlt">BEACHES</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Using the approach established by EPA's Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP), a pilot shoreline monitoring survey was conducted in August and September 1999, encompassing the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> panhandle from Perdido Key, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> to Port St. Joe, <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. The objective of...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">386</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=AD633109"> <span id="translatedtitle">Seasonal Variations in <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Profiles Along the Outer Banks of North Carolina.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">These studies were undertaken to investigate relationships between surf-zone processes and the sedimentary and morphologic characteristics of a natural <span class="hlt">beach</span>. Specifically, continuous measurements over a six-month period were made of <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand levels, wa...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. Dolan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1965-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">387</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title33-vol3/pdf/CFR-2013-title33-vol3-sec334-748.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 334.748 - Wynnhaven <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Fla., at Eglin AFB; restricted area.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">... false Wynnhaven <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Fla., at Eglin AFB; restricted area. 334.748 Section...334.748 Wynnhaven <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Fla., at Eglin AFB; restricted area. (a) The area...During times of high security threats against Eglin AFB, all entry, transit,...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">388</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB261424"> <span id="translatedtitle">Use of Outer Bars of Inlets as Sources of <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Nourishment Material.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Outer bars of inlets appear to contain large quantities of high quality material which can be used for <span class="hlt">beach</span> nourishment purposes without significant adverse effects on adjacent <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Although the effective utilization of outer bar material will requir...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">T. L. Walton R. G. Dean</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1976-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">389</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB2011112167"> <span id="translatedtitle">Health Consultation. Federal Way and Des Moines <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Sediment Evaluation Pierce and King Counties, Washington.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Washington State Department of Health (DOH) conducted this health consultation to evaluate whether contaminants found at Federal Way and Des Moines <span class="hlt">beach</span> sediment sites pose a health hazard to people who use the <span class="hlt">beach</span> for wading, swimming, picnicking,...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">E. Diaz</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">390</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title33-vol3/pdf/CFR-2013-title33-vol3-sec263-26.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 263.26 - Small <span class="hlt">beach</span> erosion control project authority (Section 103).</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">... 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Small <span class="hlt">beach</span> erosion control project authority (Section 103). 263.26 Section...PROGRAMS Shore Protection Policy § 263.26 Small <span class="hlt">beach</span> erosion control project authority (Section 103). (a)...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">391</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title33-vol2/pdf/CFR-2010-title33-vol2-sec165-1155.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 165.1155 - Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila <span class="hlt">Beach</span>...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila <span class="hlt">Beach</span>...security zone: all waters of the Pacific...the Port, Los Angeles-Long...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">392</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title33-vol2/pdf/CFR-2013-title33-vol2-sec165-1155.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 165.1155 - Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila <span class="hlt">Beach</span>...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila <span class="hlt">Beach</span>...security zone: all waters of the Pacific...the Port, Los Angeles-Long...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">393</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2009-title33-vol2/pdf/CFR-2009-title33-vol2-sec165-1155.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 165.1155 - Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila <span class="hlt">Beach</span>...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila <span class="hlt">Beach</span>...security zone: all waters of the Pacific...the Port, Los Angeles-Long...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">394</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ADA046195"> <span id="translatedtitle">Chigger (Acarina: Trombiculidae) Surveys of the West Coast <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> of Sabah and Sarawak.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Leptotrombidium (Leptotrombidium) arenicola Traub, a vector of scrub typhus, had previously been found to occur in the coastal vegetation behind the edge of open sand along the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of Peninsular Malaysia. Surveys of the west coast <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of Sabah and...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. L. Dohany O. W. Phang G. Rapmund</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1977-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">395</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/42419929"> <span id="translatedtitle">Exotic fishes of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> — 1994</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Twenty?three exotic fishes are reproducing in the freshwater lakes, rivers, and canals of <span class="hlt">Florida</span>; 18 are established (i.e., have permanent populations), and 5 are possibly established (i.e., reproducing but permanence is questionable). Ten exotic fishes previously reported as reproducing have been eliminated by fisheries managers, habitat alteration, or natural causes, and 42 additional species have been collected without evidence of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Paul L. Shafland</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">396</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://madeinflorida.org/salary-information/"> <span id="translatedtitle">Made in <span class="hlt">Florida</span>: Salary Information</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This web page from the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Advanced Technological Education Center for Manufacturing (FLATE) provides salary information for several different technical careers. Entry level, mid-level and advanced salary levels are included for jobs such as manufacturing production technicians, industrial engineering technicians and computer software engineers. The webpage also shares which careers are attainable with two and four-year degrees. The information is also available for download in PDF format.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-08-09</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">397</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2001/ast30aug_1/"> <span id="translatedtitle">Desert Dust Kills <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Fish</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This news article details a red tide event that was spread across the Atlantic by a combination of storms in the Sahara Desert region and easterly trade winds that spread fertilized or nutrient overloaded soils to the Gulf of Mexico and <span class="hlt">Florida</span> coastal regions. The article includes options to listen to the story via streaming audio and downloading capability. It also features colorful pictures and animations provided by NASA satellites. Related weblinks are included.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Barry, Patrick L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-07-07</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">398</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-10-19/pdf/2010-26305.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">75 FR 64368 - SBA North <span class="hlt">Florida</span> District Advisory Council</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SBA North <span class="hlt">Florida</span> District Advisory Council AGENCY: U...for the next meeting of the SBA North <span class="hlt">Florida</span> District Advisory Council. The meeting...announces the meeting of the SBA North <span class="hlt">Florida</span> District Advisory Council. The SBA...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-10-19</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">399</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2009-title7-vol9/pdf/CFR-2009-title7-vol9-sec1006-2.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">7 CFR 1006.2 - <span class="hlt">Florida</span> marketing area.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...2009-01-01 2009-01-01 false <span class="hlt">Florida</span> marketing area. 1006.2 Section...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MILK IN THE <span class="hlt">FLORIDA</span> MARKETING AREA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 1006.2 <span class="hlt">Florida</span> marketing area. The marketing...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">400</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB2012104670"> <span id="translatedtitle">Tracking Costs of Alternatively Fueled Buses in <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, Summary Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this project, the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Department of Transportation (FDOT) engaged researchers from the University of South <span class="hlt">Florida</span> to establish a mechanism to capture relevant field data on the performance of alternatively fueled transit vehicles in <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. The p...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. Kilpakov S. L. Reich</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">401</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB86243326"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Acid Deposition Study. Monitoring Program. Phase 1. Summary Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In November 1980, the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Electric Power Coordinating Group, Inc. (FCG) Executive Committee approved the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Acid Deposition Study. The <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Acid Deposition Study's overall objective is to assess and/or develop the information needed to place t...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1982-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">402</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.floridaplants.com/youngn.htm"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Plants Online: Young Naturalist's Page</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Hosted by <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Plants Online and edited by Botanist Leigh Fulghum, this Young Naturalist website provides links to a wide variety of educational sites for students, teachers, and parents. The Young Naturalist site focuses on <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s natural history, but connects to resources useful for students in other geographic regions as well. The natural history resources are organized by such categories as Animals, Insects, Plants, Habitats, and more. The site also links to samples of artist Susan Trammel's collection of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> native botanical watercolors.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">403</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ces.fau.edu/"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Center For Environmental Studies</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Based at <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Atlantic University in Boca Raton, the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Center for Environmental Studies collects and disseminates research and educational materials related to water-dominated ecosystems, especially the Everglades. Scholars working in the field of ecology will want to read about their current multi-year research projects, which include working to coordinate ecological restoration efforts in South <span class="hlt">Florida</span> and to alleviate the effects of agriculture on the complex ecosystems in the region. One of the more valuable features on the Web site is a searchable database of over 600 Web sites related to water ecosystems. The database is searchable by organization type, geographic scope, language, and location. The site also contains a list of upcoming academic conferences around the world and those sponsored in conjunction with the work of the Center. Educators and students alike will want to peruse the educational opportunities available for both groups under the Education and Outreach area of the site, many of which offer professional development or academic credit.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">404</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.briarcliff.edu/departments/biol/BIOL%2052IR/linkages.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Linkages between the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Keys National Marine Sanctuary and the South <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Ecosystem Restoration Initiative</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Keys National Marine Sanctuary is a large, multiple-use marine protected area, including a network of fully protected marine zones, which was designated in 1990 to protect the coral reef ecosystem surrounding the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Keys. The South <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Ecosystem Restoration (SFER) Initiative was formed in 1993 to restore more natural flows to the ecosystem, restore and enhance the natural</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Brian D. Keller; Billy D. Causey</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">405</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/48390655"> <span id="translatedtitle">Plastic Pollution at a Sea Turtle Conservation Area in NE Brazil: Contrasting Developed and Undeveloped <span class="hlt">Beaches</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Sea turtles are highly susceptible to plastic ingestion and entanglement. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> debris were surveyed along the most important\\u000a sea turtle nesting <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Brazil (Costa dos Coqueiros, Bahia State). No significant differences among developed and undeveloped\\u000a <span class="hlt">beaches</span> were observed in terms of total number of items. Local sources (tourism activities) represented 70% of debris on developed\\u000a <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, where cigarette butts,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Juliana Assunção Ivar do Sul; Isaac R. Santos; Ana Cláudia Friedrich; Alexandre Matthiensen; Gilberto Fillmann</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">406</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/51925203"> <span id="translatedtitle">Storm impact and recovery patterns in natural and urbanised <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Cadiz (SW Spain)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A <span class="hlt">beach</span> monitoring program was carried out in Cadiz Province (SW Spain), within the MICORE (FP7\\/2007-2013, grant n° 202798) and the RESISTE (CGL 2008-00458\\/BTE) projects. In detail, the present paper deals with morphological changes produced by a short-duration storm event and successive <span class="hlt">beach</span> recovery in two different mesotidal, quartz-rich sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. By one hand, Cortadura <span class="hlt">beach</span>, located in Cadiz town,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">T. A. Plomaritis; G. Anfuso; J. Benavente; L. Del Río</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">407</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2771205"> <span id="translatedtitle">Microbial Load from Animal Feces at a Recreational <span class="hlt">Beach</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The goal of this study was to quantify the microbial load (enterococci) contributed by the different animals that frequent a <span class="hlt">beach</span> site. The highest enterococci concentrations were observed in dog feces with average levels of 7.4 × 106 CFU/g; the next highest enterococci levels were observed in birds averaging 3.3 × 105 CFU/g. The lowest measured levels of enterococci were observed in material collected from shrimp fecal mounds (2.0 CFU/g). A comparison of the microbial loads showed that 1 dog fecal event was equivalent to 6,940 bird fecal events or 3.2 × 108 shrimp fecal mounds. Comparing animal contributions to previously published numbers for human bather shedding indicates that one adult human swimmer contributes approximately the same microbial load as one bird fecal event. Given the abundance of animals observed on the <span class="hlt">beach</span>, this study suggests that dogs are the largest contributing animal source of enterococci to the <span class="hlt">beach</span> site.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wright, Mary E.; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M.; Elmir, Samir; Fleming, Lora E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">408</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://sofia.usgs.gov/virtual_tour/index.html"> <span id="translatedtitle">South <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Information Access: Virtual Tour</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Southern <span class="hlt">Florida</span> contains some of the most unique landscape and biology in the US. The US Geological Society and Southern <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Information Access (SOFIA) maintains the South <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Virtual Tour in hopes of sharing the beauty of the area and promoting its protection. Visitors can tour sixteen areas (e.g., the Everglades and the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Keys); view images (still and 360 degree), illustrations, and maps; and read simple but informative descriptions about the landscape and biota. The site is easy to navigate and enjoyable to explore.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">409</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/26640085"> <span id="translatedtitle">Seasonal evolution of <span class="hlt">beach</span> waste and litter during the bathing season on the Catalan coast</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> waste and litter composition and evolution on popular urban (located in the main nucleus of the municipality) and urbanized (located in residential areas outside the main nucleus) <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of the Costa Brava (Catalan coast) were assessed during the bathing season. Waste and litter production (amount and composition) were affected by urbanization and varied during the summer. Urban <span class="hlt">beaches</span> had</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Eduard Ariza; José A. Jiménez; Rafael Sardá</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">410</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/11649332"> <span id="translatedtitle">CAUSAS Y CONSECUENCIAS DE LA EROSIÓN DE PLAYAS CAUSES AND CONSEQUENCES OF <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> EROSION</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Both natural and anthropic causes are very important to <span class="hlt">beach</span> erosion. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> erosion rate is highly variable in time and space. Hurricanes may give and immediate response to <span class="hlt">Beach</span> erosion, while the polar ice melting and terrain subsidence due to tectonic causes may take longer time for wide reduction of littoral fringes. Industrial development activities may generate consequences highly vulnerable</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Arturo Carranza-Edwards</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">411</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/41006079"> <span id="translatedtitle">An investigation of the performance of a data-driven model on sand and shingle <span class="hlt">beaches</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA) is used as the basis for predicting <span class="hlt">beach</span> profile changes over a timescale of years. In particular, datasets of wave measurements and <span class="hlt">beach</span> profiles at two locations with different sediment types and wave exposure are used. The study sites are located in Christchurch Bay (South Coast of England) in which the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">José M. Horrillo-Caraballo; Dominic E. Reeve</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">412</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/49274185"> <span id="translatedtitle">Food web structure of sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span>: Temporal and spatial variation using stable isotope analysis</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The food web structure of two sandy <span class="hlt">beach</span> ecosystems with contrasting morphodynamics (dissipative vs. reflective) was examined using stable carbon (?13C) and nitrogen (?15N) isotope analysis. Organic matter sources (POM: particulate organic matter; SOM: sediment organic matter) and consumers (zooplankton, benthic invertebrates and fishes) were sampled seasonally in both sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Food webs significantly differed between <span class="hlt">beaches</span>: even though both</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Leandro Bergamino; Diego Lercari; Omar Defeo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">413</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2009-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2009-title33-vol1-sec110-214.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 110.214 - Los Angeles and Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span> harbors, California.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...2009-07-01 2009-07-01 false Los Angeles and Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span> harbors, California... Anchorage Grounds § 110.214 Los Angeles and Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span> harbors, California...directed by the Captain of the Port Los Angeles-Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, the pilot stations...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">414</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2010-title33-vol1-sec110-214.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 110.214 - Los Angeles and Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span> harbors, California.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Los Angeles and Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span> harbors, California... Anchorage Grounds § 110.214 Los Angeles and Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span> harbors, California...directed by the Captain of the Port Los Angeles-Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, the pilot stations...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">415</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-04-11/pdf/2012-8558.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">77 FR 21662 - Amendment of Class D Airspace; Cocoa <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...12-ASO-11] Amendment of Class D Airspace; Cocoa <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration...airspace at Cape Canaveral Skid Strip, Cocoa <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL, by correcting the geographic...descriptor of Cape Canaveral Skid Strip, Cocoa <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL. Also, the geographic...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-04-11</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">416</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/41771559"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> Sands Along the California Coast are Diffuse Sources of Fecal Bacteria to Coastal Waters</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) are nearly ubiquitous in California (CA) <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands. Sands were collected from 55 <span class="hlt">beaches</span> along the CA coast. Ninety-one percent of the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> had detectable enterococci (ENT) while 62% had detectable E. coli (EC) in their sands. The presence of a putative bacterial source (such as a river), the degree of wave shelter, and surrounding land</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. B. Boehm; K. Yamahara; B. Layton</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">417</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-02-02/pdf/2012-2285.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">77 FR 5184 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, NC</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Quintiles Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Full and Half Marathon. This deviation allows the bridge to...Quintiles Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Full and Half Marathon committee on behalf of the North Carolina...Quintiles Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Full and Half Marathon scheduled for Sunday, March 18,...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-02-02</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">418</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-01-04/pdf/2012-31647.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">78 FR 669 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, NC</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Quintiles Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Full and Half Marathon. This deviation allows the bridge to...Quintiles Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Full and Half Marathon committee on behalf of the North Carolina...Quintiles Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Full and Half Marathon scheduled for Sunday, March 17,...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-04</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">419</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/41414972"> <span id="translatedtitle">The age and stratigraphic context of the Easington Raised <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, County Durham, UK</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Easington Raised <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, in Shippersea Bay, County Durham, is the most northerly known interglacial <span class="hlt">beach</span> deposit in England. It lies directly on Magnesian Limestone bedrock at 33m O.D. and is covered by glacial sediments attributed to the Devensian. Detailed sedimentological analysis suggests that it is an interglacial <span class="hlt">beach</span>, which is supported by the presence of pebbles bored by marine</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bethan J. Davies; David R. Bridgland; David H. Roberts; Colm Ó. Cofaigh; Stephen M. Pawley; Ian Candy; Beatrice Demarchi; Kirsty E. H. Penkman; William E. N. Austin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">420</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-05-28/pdf/2013-12541.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">78 FR 31840 - Safety Zone; USO Patriotic Festival Air Show, Atlantic Ocean; Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, VA</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Festival Air Show, Atlantic Ocean; Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, VA AGENCY...navigable waters of the Atlantic Ocean in Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, VA. This...Room W12-140 on the ground floor of the Department of Transportation...show event over the Atlantic Ocean in Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, VA....</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-05-28</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a 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showDiv("page_23");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">421</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://econ.appstate.edu/RePEc/pdf/wp0911.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Measuring the Economic Effects of Sea Level Rise on <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Recreation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We develop estimates of the economic effects of climate change-induced sea level rise on recreation at seventeen southern North Carolina <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. We estimate the relationship between recreation behavior and <span class="hlt">beach</span> width and simulate the effects of sea level rise on recreation site choice and trip frequency. We find that reductions in <span class="hlt">beach</span> width due to increased erosion from sea-level rise</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">John C. Whitehead; Ben Poulter; Christopher F. Dumas; Okmyung Bin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">422</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.nicholas.duke.edu/hawaii/readings/Marine%20Pollution%20Bulletin%202004%20McDermid.pdf/at_download/file"> <span id="translatedtitle">Quantitative analysis of small-plastic debris on <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in the Hawaiian archipelago</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Small-plastic <span class="hlt">beach</span> debris from nine coastal locations throughout the Hawaiian Archipelago was analyzed. At each <span class="hlt">beach</span>, replicate 20 l samples of sediment were collected, sieved for debris between 1 and 15 mm in size, sorted by type, counted and weighed. Small-plastic debris occurred on all of the <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, but the greatest quantity was found at three of the most remote</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Karla J. McDermid; Tracy L. McMullen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">423</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/52148240"> <span id="translatedtitle">A Comprehensive Study on Coastline Process and Sedimentary Dynamics, Sardinera <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Mona Island, P.R</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Sardinera <span class="hlt">beach</span> in Mona Island, Puerto Rico, has a great recreational and ecological value and is an important research place to gather information on shoreline processes in an area far from the main land and with only scarce man made influences. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> rock exposures present along the shoreline in Sardinera <span class="hlt">Beach</span> have increased considerably during the last decade. A new</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. M. Rodriguez-Delga; W. R. Ramirez</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">424</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60067804"> <span id="translatedtitle">THUMS and the Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Unit as of April 1, 1967</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">On Feb. 9, 1965, the City of Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span> opened bids for the right to participate in the development of approximately 86% of the nation's largest undeveloped oil reserve. On April 1, 1965, the Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Unit became effective. Interested parties include the City of Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, the State of California, 15 oil operators, and over 10,000 townlot owners. Two</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1967-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">425</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=81156"> <span id="translatedtitle">GREAT LAKES <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> CLOSURES: USING SATELLITE IMAGES TO IDENTIFY AREAS AT RISK</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Are people getting sick from swimming at Great Lakes <span class="hlt">beaches</span>? Some are. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, swimmers are experiencing an increase in bacterial borne illnesses from swimming at many popular Great Lakes <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. The <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in the Great Lak...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">426</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://dspace.dsto.defence.gov.au/dspace/bitstream/1947/3789/1/DSTO-GD-0299%20PR.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Methods of Obtaining Soil Strength Data for Modelling Vehicle Trafficability on <span class="hlt">Beaches</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Estimates of vehicle mobility or trafficability over <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are useful for the planning of amphibious operations. If the bearing capacity of a <span class="hlt">beach</span> is too small, then <span class="hlt">beach</span> matting, which is heavy and bulky, needs to be transported. If the bearing capacity is large enough then the matting can be left behind, saving space and time. Bearing capacity also effects</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">P. J. Mulhearn</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">427</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.priweb.org/ed/earthtrips/Edisto/edisto.html"> <span id="translatedtitle">Field Trip to Edisto <span class="hlt">Beach</span> (title provided or enhanced by cataloger)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This virtual field trip takes you to Edisto <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, a beautiful sand <span class="hlt">beach</span> about 30 miles south of Charleston, South Carolina. This particular <span class="hlt">beach</span> is a well known site for Pleistocene fossils. The field trip presnts information on beachcombing and demonstrates screening for fossils and shells through a series of pages that delve into the origin of the items found there.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">428</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/48803960"> <span id="translatedtitle">Studies concerning heterotrophic bacteria decomposing macromolecular compounds at two marine <span class="hlt">beaches</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The potential capability to decompose macromolecular compounds was confirmed in heterotrophic bacteria isolated from two sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> located on the southern Baltic coast. Proteolytic bacteria were the most numerous group, whereas lipolytic organisms were rare among bacteria inhabiting the studied <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. All studied physiological groups of bacteria were considerably more numerous in the sand of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> subject to stronger</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zbigniew Mudryk; Piotr Skórczewski; Piotr Perli?ski; Milena Wielgat</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">429</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40285644"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mechanisms of enrichment of natural radioactivity along the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of the Camargue, France</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A field study was carried out along the Golfe du Lion, that focussed on the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of the Camargue, to locate the main areas where enriched U and Th are found, and to better understand the processes that concentrate radioactivity on <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Indeed enriched areas are observed on some Camargue <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, where high-dose rates are recorded due to excess U</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">C. Vassas; L. Pourcelot; C. Vella; J. Carpéna; J.-P. Pupin; P. Bouisset; L. Guillot</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">430</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70013416"> <span id="translatedtitle">SEISMIC-REFLECTION STUDIES OF SINKHOLES AND LIMESTONE DISSOLUTION FEATURES ON THE NORTHEASTERN <span class="hlt">FLORIDA</span> SHELF.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">High-resolution seismic-reflection profiles show that the shelf off northern <span class="hlt">Florida</span> is underlain by solution deformed limestone of Oligocene, Eocene, Paleocene and late Cretaceous age. Dissolution and collapse features are widely scattered. They are expressed in three general forms: as sinkholes that presently breach the sea floor, such as Red Snapper Sink and the Crescent <span class="hlt">Beach</span> submarine spring; as sinkholes that have breached the seafloor in the past but are now filled with shelf sands; and as dissolution collapse structures that originate deep within the section and have caused buckling and folding of overlying Eocene, Oligocene, and to a lesser extent, Neogene strata. Although deformation caused by solution and collapse can be shown to be a continuous process, the major episode of karstification occurred in the late Oligocene and early Miocene when the shelf was exposed to subaerial conditions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Popenoe, Peter; Kohout, F. A.; Manheim, F. T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">431</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70013382"> <span id="translatedtitle">BRADWELL BAY WILDERNESS AND THE SOPCHOPPY RIVER WILDERNESS STUDY AREA, <span class="hlt">FLORIDA</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A survey to determine the mineral-resource potential, especially for oil, phosphate, fuller's earth, sand, and peat, was conducted in the Bradwell Bay Wilderness and the Sopchoppy River Wilderness Study Area, <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. On the basis of this survey, the entire area was concluded to offer little promise for the occurrence of mineral resources except the commodity peat. Approximately 136,000 tons of demonstrated peat resources, on a dry weight basis, are available in areas of substantiated peat resource potential from bay swamps in the area, but the deposits are shallow and widespread. Large quantities of quartz sand are available in ancient <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridges and in deposits that were originally laid down in a shallow nearshore marine environment.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cameron, Cornelia, C.; Mory, Peter, C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">432</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/48710358"> <span id="translatedtitle">Marine Macrophyte Wrack Inputs and Dissolved Nutrients in <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Sands</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We investigated the role of sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in nearshore nutrient cycling by quantifying macrophyte wrack inputs and examining\\u000a relationships between wrack accumulation and pore water nutrients during the summer dry season. Macrophyte inputs, primarily\\u000a giant kelp Macrocystis pyrifera, exceeded 2.3 kg m?1 day?1. Mean wrack biomass varied 100-fold among <span class="hlt">beaches</span> (range?=?0.41 to 46.43 kg m?1). Mean concentrations of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN), primarily NOx?-N, and</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jenifer E. Dugan; David M. Hubbard; Henry M. Page; Joshua P. Schimel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">433</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013PhFl...25a2102P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Runup and boundary layers on sloping <span class="hlt">beaches</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The present study is devoted to discrepancies between experimental and theoretical runup heights on an inclined plane, which have occasionally been reported in the literature. In a new study on solitary wave-runup on moderately steep slopes, in a wave tank with 20 cm water depth, detailed observations are made for the shoreline motion and velocity profiles during runup. The waves are not breaking during runup, but they do break during the subsequent draw-down. Both capillary effects and viscous boundary layers are detected. In the investigated cases the onshore flow is close to the transitional regime between laminar and turbulent boundary layers. The flow behaviour depends on the amplitude of the incident wave and the location on the <span class="hlt">beach</span>. Stable laminar flow, fluctuations (Tollmien-Schlichting waves), and formation of vortices are all observed. Comparison with numerical simulations showed that the experimental runup heights were markedly smaller than predictions from inviscid theory. The observed and computed runup heights are discussed in the context of preexisting theory and experiments. Similar deviations are apparent there, but have often been overlooked or given improper physical explanations. Guided by the absence of turbulence and irregular flow features in parts of the experiments we apply laminar boundary layer theory to the inundation flow. Outer flows from potential flow models are inserted in a nonlinear, numerical boundary layer model. Even though the boundary layer model is invalid near the moving the shoreline, the computed velocity profiles are found to compare well with experiments elsewhere, until instabilities are observed in the measurements. Analytical, linear boundary layer solutions are also derived both for an idealized swash zone motion and a polynomial representation of the time dependence of the outer flow. Due to lacking experimental or theoretical descriptions of the contact point dynamics no two-way coupling of the boundary layer model and the inviscid runup models is attempted. Instead, the effect of the boundary layer on the maximum runup is estimated through integrated losses of onshore volume transport and found to be consistent with the differences between inviscid theory and experiments.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pedersen, G. K.; Lindstrøm, E.; Bertelsen, A. F.; Jensen, A.; Laskovski, D.; Sælevik, G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">434</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19875791"> <span id="translatedtitle">Geographic relatedness and predictability of Escherichia coli along a peninsular <span class="hlt">beach</span> complex of Lake Michigan.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">To determine more accurately the real-time concentration of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) in <span class="hlt">beach</span> water, predictive modeling has been applied in several locations around the Great Lakes to individual or small groups of similar <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Using 24 <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Door County, Wisconsin, we attempted to expand predictive models to multiple <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of complex geography. We examined the importance of geographic location and independent variables and the consequential limitations for potential <span class="hlt">beach</span> or <span class="hlt">beach</span> group models. An analysis of Escherichia coli populations over 4 yr revealed a geographic gradient to the <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, with mean E. coli concentrations decreasing with increasing distance from the city of Sturgeon Bay. <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> grouped strongly by water type (lake, bay, Sturgeon Bay) and proximity to one another, followed by presence of a storm or creek outfall or amount of shoreline enclosure. Predictive models developed for <span class="hlt">beach</span> groups commonly included wave height and cumulative 48-h rainfall but generally explained little E. coli variation (adj. R2=0.19-0.36). Generally low concentrations of E. coli at the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> influenced the effectiveness of model results presumably because of low signal-to-noise ratios and the rarity of elevated concentrations. Our results highlight the importance of the sensitivity of regressors and the need for careful methods evaluation. Despite the attractiveness of predictive models as an alternative <span class="hlt">beach</span> monitoring approach, it is likely that FIB fluctuations at some <span class="hlt">beaches</span> defy simple prediction approaches. Regional, multi-<span class="hlt">beach</span>, and individual <span class="hlt">beach</span> predictive models should be explored alongside other techniques for improving monitoring reliability at Great Lakes <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. PMID:19875791</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nevers, Meredith B; Shively, Dawn A; Kleinheinz, Gregory T; McDermott, Colleen M; Schuster, William; Chomeau, Vinni; Whitman, Richard L</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-10-29</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">435</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22real+estate%22&pg=5&id=EJ847102"> <span id="translatedtitle">Budget Cuts Cast Shadow over <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s Universities</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|While colleges across the nation are coping with the recession, public universities in <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, a state with finances that resemble a Ponzi scheme, have spent years doing without. The recession hit <span class="hlt">Florida</span> early, and in a big way. Without an income tax, state government has long depended on property and sales taxes. As real estate and tourism…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fain, Paul</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">436</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.avocadosource.com/Journals/FSHSP/FSHSP_VOL_72_PG_349-353_1959.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">EVALUATION OF INDICES FOR <span class="hlt">FLORIDA</span> AVOCADO MATURITY</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Maturity standards for the shipment of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> avocados are based on minimum fruit weights and diameters, and earliest picking dates for each variety. Members of the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> avocado industry are interested in evaluating other maturity indices for the purpose of refining present standards; such evaluation was the objective of this investigation. The study included the evaluation of specific gravity and</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Thurman T. Hatton; Carl W. Campbell</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">437</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=power+AND+of+AND+the+AND+media&pg=2&id=EJ899901"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Has Power-Library Schools</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|In this article, the author talks about the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Power-Library School (FPLS) program. She describes the why, who, what and how of the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Power-Library School initiative, as well as the favorable results for schools. Schools successfully completing this process see relationships among staff and community members strengthened. Library media…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Reynolds-Mixon, Sharon</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">438</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://222.aslo.org/lo/toc/vol_44/issue_4/1045.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Patterns of groundwater discharge into <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bay</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Natural chemical tracers of groundwater discharge ( 222 Rn and CH4) were surveyed to evaluate possible patterns of groundwater interactions with surface water in <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bay. Radon and methane concentrations in water samples collected from wells, solution holes, canals, and <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bay showed a significant correlation, despite the fact that these two trace gases have independent sources. Groundwater flux was</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. Reide Corbett; Jeffrey Chanton; William Burnett; Kevin Dillon; Christine Rutkowski; James W. Fourqurean</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">439</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title40-vol18/pdf/CFR-2012-title40-vol18-sec81-407.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">40 CFR 81.407 - <span class="hlt">Florida</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Environment 18 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. 81.407 Section 81.407 Protection of Environment...Areas Where Visibility Is an Important Value § 81.407 <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. Area name Acreage Public Law establishing...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">440</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=180696"> <span id="translatedtitle">SOME INSECT PESTS NEW TO <span class="hlt">FLORIDA</span> SUGARCANE</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The number of insect and mite species attacking sugarcane in <span class="hlt">Florida</span> has increased over time. Five new pest species were discovered during the 31-year period 1964 to 1995, one species indigenous to <span class="hlt">Florida</span> with no previous association with sugarcane and four invasive species entirely new to the Eve...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous 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showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">441</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22automation%22&pg=3&id=EJ843155"> <span id="translatedtitle">Collection Assessment: The <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Community College Experience</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Beginning in 1994, a series of collection analysis and assessment projects of community college library/LRC collections in <span class="hlt">Florida</span> has been conducted by the College Center for Library Automation (CCLA). The purpose of the assessments conducted through LINCC, the network for <span class="hlt">Florida</span> community colleges, was to provide data for improvement of…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Perrault, Anna H.; Dixon, Jeannie</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">442</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=COM7410905"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Sea Grant Program Directory-1974.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The directory lists all personnel involved in the State University System of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Sea Grant Program with headings for each major section shown at the bottom of the first page of that section. For users in <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s coastal zone it is recommended that t...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1974-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">443</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED517466.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Lessons for Tennessee from <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s Education Revolution</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Jeb Bush campaigned for governor on a clear and bracing set of education reforms in 1998. Having won office, he immediately pursued a dual-track strategy for reforming <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s K-12 education system: standards and accountability for public schools, choice and options for parents. <span class="hlt">Florida</span> lawmakers followed those reforms with additional measures.…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ladner, Matthew</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">444</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB249688"> <span id="translatedtitle">Characterization Studies of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Phosphate Slimes.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Federal Bureau of Mines, in cooperation with phosphate companies in the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> land pebble area, made a comprehensive study of the phosphate slimes, or waste clays, produced in the mining of phosphate rock in <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. The slimes, or waste clays, repr...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">I. L. Feld J. T. McLendon L. W. Clements W. E. Lamont</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1975-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">445</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=175406"> <span id="translatedtitle">BIOLOGICAL CONTROL CONTAINMENT FACILITIES IN <span class="hlt">FLORIDA</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s tropical environment is ideal for the establishment of exotic organisms from numerous other areas of the world. Many of the most serious insect pests and weeds in <span class="hlt">Florida</span> are exotic, and were either accidentally or intentionally introduced into the state. Most exotic plants were intentiona...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">446</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=media+AND+in+AND+academics&pg=7&id=EJ899901"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Has Power-Library Schools</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this article, the author talks about the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Power-Library School (FPLS) program. She describes the why, who, what and how of the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Power-Library School initiative, as well as the favorable results for schools. Schools successfully completing this process see relationships among staff and community members strengthened. Library media…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Reynolds-Mixon, Sharon</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">447</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40425793"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> cement: incipient CaCO 3cemented beachrock development in the upper intertidal zone, North Uist, Scotland</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Beachrock has only rarely been observed previously along high latitude coasts. On several <span class="hlt">beaches</span> on North Uist, NW Scotland at over 57°N there is evidence of small-scale <span class="hlt">beach</span> cementation. An area of <span class="hlt">beach</span> cement at the back of Traigh Ear, as well as unconsolidated sands from the <span class="hlt">beach</span> and the adjacent Traigh Hornais, have been studied using SEM, XRD and</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. Kneale; H. A. Viles</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">448</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/51334002"> <span id="translatedtitle">Microstructural Observations of the San Gregorio Fault, Moss <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, CA</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Seal Cove Strand of the San Gregorio Fault at Moss <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Ca. is an active, large-offset, dominantly strike-slip fault which is exceptionally well exposed. It cuts the Miocene Purisima Formation at the surface, juxtaposing moderately lithified sandstone and conglomerate interbeds in the hanging wall with mudstones in the footwall. Previous and ongoing work shows that styles of deformation and</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">S. H. Baer; H. J. Tobin; G. L. Gettemy</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">449</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.geosci.usyd.edu.au/users/hughes/weir_etal_2006.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> face and berm morphodynamics fronting a coastal lagoon</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This study documents two different modes of berm development: (1) vertical growth at spring tides or following significant <span class="hlt">beach</span> cut due to substantial swash overtopping, and (2) horizontal progradation at neap tides through the formation of a proto-berm located lower and further seaward of the principal berm. Concurrent high-frequency measurements of bed elevation and the associated wave runup distribution reveal</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Felicia M. Weir; Michael G. Hughes; Tom E. Baldock</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">450</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB277128"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> Nourishment Along the Southeast Atlantic and Gulf Coasts.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A short history of some of the monitored <span class="hlt">beach</span> fills along the southeast Atlantic and Gulf Coasts is given and some of the methods which have been used in nourishment projects are discussed in an effort to help resolve this often unanswered question -- wi...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">T. L. Walton J. A. Purpura</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1977-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">451</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://wave.oregonstate.edu/Education/REU/2004_REU/Fujii.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Wave Transformation and Undertow Over a Barred <span class="hlt">Beach</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The mean cross-shore flow (undertow) over a barred <span class="hlt">beach</span> is examined by calibrating an existing wave and circulation model which will provide predictions that will be compared to in-situ measurements. The wave model applied to the experiment is a linear shoaling model with wave breaking dissipation according to Dally, Dean, and Dalrymple (2002); following the calibration of the wave model</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Emi Fujii; H. Özkan-Haller; Joe Long</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">452</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/57406188"> <span id="translatedtitle">Disentangling Diversity Patterns in Sandy <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> along Environmental Gradients</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Species richness in sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> is strongly affected by concurrent variations in morphodynamics and salinity. However, as in other ecosystems, different groups of species may exhibit contrasting patterns in response to these environmental variables, which would be obscured if only aggregate richness is considered. Deconstructing biodiversity, i.e. considering richness patterns separately for different groups of species according to their taxonomic</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Francisco R. Barboza; Julio Gómez; Diego Lercari; Omar Defeo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">453</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/56325527"> <span id="translatedtitle">Carbonate <span class="hlt">Beaches</span>: A Balance Between Biological and Physical Processes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Carbonate <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are a unique example of the interaction between biological processes, creating the sediments, and physical processes, moving and often removing the sediments. On the sediment supply side, carbonate sediments are born, not made. They exist in dynamic equilibrium between production and destruction. Following the creation of carbonate sediment in coral reef and lagoon environments, the sediments are moved</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. Nairn; M. Risk</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">454</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/42690211"> <span id="translatedtitle">Influence of Dams on Downstream <span class="hlt">Beaches</span>: Eressos, Lesbos, Eastern Mediterranean</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Small water storage dams are nowadays regarded as the ideal solution for the water-thirsty islands of the Greek Archipelago. Several of these dams have been already constructed and more are planned for the near future. However, dams can also create problems to coastal areas, particularly to the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> found at the lower reaches of the dammed rivers. The present contribution</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. F. Velegrakis; M. I. Vousdoukas; O. Andreadis; G. Adamakis; E. Pasakalidou; R. Meligonitis; G. Kokolatos</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">455</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=220110"> <span id="translatedtitle">Empirical Modeling of Microbial Indicators at a South Carolina <span class="hlt">Beach</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Public concerns about water quality at <span class="hlt">beaches</span> have prompted the development of multiple linear regression and other models that can be used to "nowcast" levels of bacterial indicators. Hydrometeorological and biogeochemical data from summer, 2009 were used to develop empirical m...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">456</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Harari&id=ED316132"> <span id="translatedtitle">International Integration of California State University, Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Center for International Education was designed to stimulate, plan, organize, develop, and administer a series of programs and services to deepen the international dimensions of the instructional, research, and public service functions of the California State University at Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span>. It works with varied university constituencies, the…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Harari, Maurice</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">457</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006AGUFMED51D..03N"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Chemistry of Sand: Not All <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> Are Created Equal</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In South Carolina, the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> can be a natural laboratory for scientific inquiry. By middle school most students have visited one of the state's <span class="hlt">beaches</span> through field trips or family vacations. These fun experiences can be a platform for scientific inquiry and investigation. Many students can describe a <span class="hlt">beach</span> where the sand was perfect for building sand castles, too sharp to walk on, or just right on a hot summer day. With a dissecting microscope and some weak acid, these observations can be turned into an engaging activity for students to explore the chemical and/or mineralogical make-up of the sand. This presentation will describe an experiment where students use a microscope to draw sand samples and identify some common grains. The students form hypotheses about the amount of carbonate in the samples and test these hypotheses using the weak acid. By the end of the lab students should be able to identify several indications that a chemical reaction has occurred and be able to form and test a hypothesis. They should also understand that sand from different <span class="hlt">beaches</span> may have different mineralogical compositions. This activity incorporates the following National Science Content Standards: Abilities necessary to do scientific inquiry; understandings about scientific inquiry; properties and changes of properties in matter; chemical reactions; and populations, resources, and environments. The activity was developed with the support of the National Science Foundation's Graduate Teaching Fellows in K-12 Education Program, Award # 0440568.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Newton, A. J.; Brooker, D.; Lyons, J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">458</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009AGUSMOS23A..01Z"> <span id="translatedtitle">Plastics Distribution and Degradation on Lake Huron <span class="hlt">Beaches</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The resistivity of plastic debris to chemical and mechanical weathering processes poses a serious threat to the environment. Numerous marine <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are littered with plastic fragments that entangle and become ingested by organisms including birds, turtles and plankton. Although many studies have been conducted to determine the amount and effects of plastics pollution on marine organisms, relatively little is known about the distribution and quantity of polymer types along lacustrine <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Plastic particles sampled from selected <span class="hlt">beaches</span> on Lake Huron were analyzed using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) to determine polymer composition. The majority of the plastic fragments are industrial pellets composed of polypropylene and polyethylene. Varying degrees of oxidation are indicated by multiple irregular peaks in the lower wavenumber region on the FTIR spectra. The oxidized pellets also represent the plastic particles with the most pronounced surface textures, as identified using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Crazes and flakey, fibrous, or granular textures are consistent with chemical weathering processes, whereas gauges and pits occur through abrasion during mechanical weathering. Further textural and compositional analysis will indicate which polymer types are more resistant to weathering processes. Additional investigation of the distribution of plastic debris along the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of Lake Huron will indicate the amount and primary transport directions of resistant plastic debris polluting one of Ontario's Great Lakes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zbyszewski, M.; Corcoran, P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">459</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/56380053"> <span id="translatedtitle">Documenting the global impacts of <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand mining</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">For centuries, <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand has been mined for use as aggregate in concrete, for heavy minerals, and for construction fill. The global extent and impact of this phenomenon has gone relatively unnoticed by academics, NGOs, and major news sources. Most reports of sand mining activities are found at the very local scale (if the mining is ever documented at all).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. Young; A. Griffith</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">460</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/51894860"> <span id="translatedtitle">Black, magnetic spherules from Pleistocene and recent <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Magnetic spherules have been discovered in the natural concentrates of ilmenite and other heavy minerals that occur in <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands of both Pleistocene and recent age. The spherules range in size from 80 to 650 . Those in any given deposit match the grain size of the matrix sand. The spherules consist mainly of magnetite (FeFe 2 O 4 ),</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Marco T. Einaudi; Ursula B. Marvin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1967-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">461</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/55267507"> <span id="translatedtitle">Predicting flooding probability for <span class="hlt">beach</span>\\/dune systems</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The determination of the risk from flooding that shorefront communities face is an important component of coastal management that has not been resolved successfully. Wave runup offers one way of quantifying the risk of coastal flooding that results from overtopping by storm waves. The calculation of runup probabilities uses wave frequency analysis and an average <span class="hlt">beach</span>\\/dune profile for a given</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Paul A. Garès</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">462</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22Inventory+Control%22&id=EJ662855"> <span id="translatedtitle">Wireless Time Tracking Improves Productivity at CSU Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|Describes California State University Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span>'s implementation of new maintenance management software, which integrated maintenance, inventory control, and key control and allows technicians to enter and receive information through handheld wireless devices for more accurate time accounting. The school estimates a 10 percent increase in…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Charmack, Scott; Walsh, Randy</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">463</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1985EOSTr..66..484B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Anchored in the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Current</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">I once spent a week aboard a vessel anchored in the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> current, in water 830 m deep, far from the sight of land. We were there to measure transport variations, and I recall the numbing hourly routine of profiling the current with an instrument that traveled down a weighted line suspended from the ship. In much sharper focus I remember the mighty current that ceaselessly swept past the vessel. The current raised a foaming bow wave and strummed the anchor cable with a note that permeated the quiet ship, giving the strange experience of being underway with silent engines while going nowhere.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Brooks, David A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">464</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://science1.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2001/ast30aug_1/"> <span id="translatedtitle">Desert Dust Kills <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Fish</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) article discusses the connection between dust storms in Africa, and red tides along the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> coast. Red tides are blooms of toxic algae that kill fish, birds, and mammals, as well as cause health problems in humans. Storm activity in the Sahara Desert region kicks up topsoil that winds transport into the Gulf of Mexico. These clouds fertilize the water with iron, which bacteria named Trichodesmium use to create nitrogen. The nitrogen makes the water a friendly environment for the toxic algae. This article discusses this process and research that is going on to help solve the problem. Audio version is available as well.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">465</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.swfwmd.state.fl.us/"> <span id="translatedtitle">Southwest <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Water Management District</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The mission of the Southwest <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Water Management District is to manage the water and water-related resources within its boundaries. Central to the mission is maintaining the balance between the water needs of current and future users while protecting and maintaining the natural systems that provide the District with its existing and future water supply. The website includes an Information and Education page, which offers activities, newsletters, virtual field trips, and other resources for K-12 students and teachers. Also provided on the site are various datasets, brochures, publications, reports, textual references and links.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">466</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6598443"> <span id="translatedtitle">Low-energy <span class="hlt">Beach</span> ridge sedimentation in the Mississippi River delta plain</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Regressive <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridge plains, such as Cheniere Caminada, Cheniere Caillou, and Cheniere Ronquille, are common depositional features within the Mississippi River delta plain in southeastern Louisiana. Vibracored sequences indicate <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridge formation is a 3 stage process: Stage 1: Distributary Progradation, followed by Stage 2: Longshore Transport Interception, and completed by Stage 3: <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Ridge Progradation. Cheniere Caminada is the largest <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridge plain and is associated with the Late Lafourche delta. Radiocarbon dates indicate <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridge building began approximately 720 years BP, when the Bayou Lafourche distributaries built seaward of the older, retreating Bayou Blue shoreline and intercepted westward longshore sediment transport, resulting in the progradation of Cheniere Caminada. Near the fan apex, <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridges are 7-8 m thick and thin westward 2-3 m thick against the levees of Bayou Moreau. A typical <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridge vertical sequence coarsens upward, with shoreface silty sands overlain by a thin cap of <span class="hlt">beach</span>, washover, and aeolian sands. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> ridge progradation in this area ceased approximately 300 years BP with the abandonment of Bayou Lafourche. The documentation of multiple regressive <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridge plains suggest these deposits are stratigraphically more significant in the Mississippi River delta plain than recognized previously. The regressive <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridge sequence documented in this study both stratigraphically and genetically contrasts with the classic transgressive chenier ridges of southwestern Louisiana.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gerdes, R.G.; Penland, S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">467</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3185335"> <span id="translatedtitle">Impact of erosion and accretion on the distribution of enterococci in <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Bacterial pathogens in coastal sediments may pose a health risk to users of <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Although recent work shows that <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands harbor both indicator bacteria and potential pathogens, it is not known how deep within <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands the organisms may persist nor if they may be exposed during natural physical processes. In this study, sand cores of approximately 1 m depth were collected at three sites across the <span class="hlt">beach</span> face in Kitty Hawk, North Carolina before, during and after large waves from an offshore hurricane. The presence of DNA from the fecal indicator bacterium Enterococci was detected in subsamples at different depths within the cores by PCR amplification. Erosion and accretion of <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand at the three sites also was determined for each sampling day. The results indicate that ocean <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands with persisting enterococci signals could be exposed and redistributed when wind, waves, and currents cause <span class="hlt">beach</span> erosion or accretion.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gast, Rebecca J.; Gorrell, Levi; Raubenheimer, Britt; Elgar, Steve</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">468</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004AGUSMOS43A..01B"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> Profile Behaviour in Tidal Environments: A Morphological Model</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Tourism is an important economical activity in Spain that represents 10% of its GDP and provides a million jobs. Spain is the world's second more visited country, receiving 7% of world tourists. Eighty per cent of these visitors choose their destination somewhere along the 2500 km of <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Consequently, many efforts are currently addressed to their maintenance and conservation. However, the coastal management policies must be sustained by the deep knowledge of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> behaviour and the physical processes implied. A morphological model, with certain predictive capacities, to describe the <span class="hlt">beach</span> profile behaviour is proposed, integrating the wave and tide influence. It is based on the concept of the two-section (surf and shoaling) equilibrium <span class="hlt">beach</span> profile, and has been validated with field and laboratory data. The model is described by means of two parameters: the modal tidal range and the dimensionless fall velocity (? ). Tide is considered a local variable whose principal effect is the lengthening of the intertidal or surf profile. The greater the tidal range, the wider the intertidal profile. The dimensionless fall velocity defines the transition from dissipative to reflective situations in <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of any given tidal range. The morphological changes predicted by the proposed model in the surf and shoaling sections occur in the opposite direction. Whilst in the surf profile the slope close to the high tidal level becomes steeper and the concavity of whole section increases; in the shoaling profile, the upper part flattens resulting in a less concave section related to the decrease of ? . In this transition, the slope break between surf and shoaling profiles becomes smoother and difficult to identify. This work was funded by projects REN2003-02822 MAR, REN2003-03233 MAR, VEM2003-20093-C03-03 of the Spanish MCYT and PGDIT03RMA30101PR of the Galician Government (XUGA). Contribution No 304 of XM2 group.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bernabeu, A. M.; Medina, R.; Vidal, C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">469</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..14..279D"> <span id="translatedtitle">Morphological developments after a <span class="hlt">beach</span> and shoreface nourishment at Vlugtenburg <span class="hlt">beach</span>, the Netherlands</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">For the last decades Dutch coastal policy requires sand nourishments to mitigate the effects of coastal erosion. Over time, the nourishment strategy has evolved from direct protection approach to a feeder approach; instead of placing the sand on the <span class="hlt">beach</span> or dune where it directly benefits safety, sand is placed on the shoreface or alongshore concentrated. Subsequently natural processes redistribute the sand over the profile and alongshore. With the shift in nourishment approach, a study was started to investigate in detail how nourished sand is redistributed in space and time. Here we present results from a high resolution bathymetric survey campaign conducted at Vlugtenburg <span class="hlt">beach</span> at the south west coast of the Netherlands. At this site a <span class="hlt">beach</span> and shoreface nourishment of 5.4 million m3 was installed in spring 2009, moving the shoreline approximately 250 m forward. Since the completion of the project, a total of 22 profiles were measured monthly extending from the dunefoot to 9 m below mean sea level. These surveys are executed using walking GPS surveys for the subaerial part and jetski surveys for the subaqueous part. Observations show that the morphodynamic evolution can be characterized by two stages; first a period of rapid changes followed by a period of more stable topography. In the first period, 12 to 15 months after construction, a large cross shore (offshore) movement of the nourished sand is found. The cross shore movement results from a rapid adaptation of the construction profile (characterized by a steep foreshore slope from -2 to -4 m) to a more natural profile with a large subtidal bar. A sediment budget analysis over all 28 surveys up to present shows a gradual loss of volume. As topographic changes below the -8 m and above +3 m are small, it is most likely that the majority of the sediment deficit can be contributed to alongshore losses. Furthermore, the domain itself is subdivided in various coastal sections, revealing that the cross shore volumetric changes within the domain are significantly larger than the alongshore losses. As a consequence of the adaptation process the high waterline has retreated approximately 50 m over the last 2 years. The observed changes are correlated with nearby wave data to investigate the impact of storm events. It is observed that in autumn when wave forcing is strong, the profile adaptation is accelerated. The impact of storm events is visible most clearly in the active marine zone (+1 to -4m). Higher up the profile the volume changes are much more gradual. The findings of this study show the impact of the cross shore location of a nourishment in the profile. If the man-made profile consists of steep unnatural slopes in the active marine zone, a fast cross shore adaptation can be expected.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">de Schipper, M. A.; de Vries, S.; Ranasinghe, R.; Reniers, A. J. H. M.; Stive, M. J. F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">470</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/59316923"> <span id="translatedtitle">Improving the development of an effective <span class="hlt">beach</span> safety intervention through an observational study of risky <span class="hlt">beach</span> behaviour</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> safety is determined largely by the choices people make about where they will swim: it is safest to swim in areas that are patrolled by lifeguards or lifesavers, and swimming outside these areas is risky. Our previous research demonstrated that while most NSW beachgoers are aware of this, a significant proportion report swimming outside patrolled areas. This study examined</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A Williamson; J Hatfield; S Sherker; R Brander; A Hayen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">471</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/48631545"> <span id="translatedtitle">Assessing the Carrying Capacity of the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Keys</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In 1996, the State of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> mandated a study of the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Keys, the most populated portion of Monroe County, explicitly calling for a carrying capacity analysis to function as a basis for determining building permit allocation in the future. The <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Keys Carrying Capacity Study, conducted by the State of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> and the US Army Corps of Engineers, has</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Alice L. Clarke</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">472</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=dance+AND+injuries&pg=2&id=EJ999969"> <span id="translatedtitle">An Analysis of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Physical Educators' Knowledge of Bicycle Laws</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|Bicycling among youth is a popular activity, but like all modes of travel it is not without risk. <span class="hlt">Florida</span> has a particularly high rate of bicycle-related fatalities and injuries. To reduce such risks, the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Department of Transportation and <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Department of Education have developed a youth bicycle safety educational program (<span class="hlt">Florida</span>…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Connaughton, Daniel P.; Egberts, John B.; Spengler, J. O.; Zhang, James J.; Jin, Liyan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">473</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007ECSS...73..148D"> <span id="translatedtitle">Nitrogen sources and sinks in a wastewater impacted saline aquifer beneath the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Keys, USA</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Groundwater wells surrounding a high volume advance treatment wastewater (ATW) disposal well in the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Keys were monitored for nitrate, nitrite, and ammonium concentrations over a 14 month period. Nutrient concentrations in the shallow subsurface (9 m) show a bimodal distribution between the low salinity wastewater plume and the ambient brackish to saline groundwaters. High NO3- concentrations are found within the ATW plume while the highest NH4+ concentrations are found in shallow wells outside of the plume. Evidence suggests that the overlying mud layer unique to this study site contributes the bulk of the NH4+ observed in these wells. NO3- concentrations at 9 m wells varied by a factor of four in response to concurrent variations in ATW NO3- loads over the coarse of the study. Estimated NO3- uptake rates varied from 32 ± 29 to 98 ± 69 and did not directly correlate with ATW NO3- loading as we hypothesized. We estimate that 70 ± 34% of the NO3- from the treatment plant is removed from solution in the subsurface of the study site. Considerable decreases in NO3- concentration and enrichment of 15NO3- was observed in many wells, indicating significant denitrification or anaerobic ammonium oxidation is occurring in the subsurface. Dissolved inorganic nitrogen concentrations, distributions, and 15N compositions indicate that denitrification is likely the dominant mechanism for N removal in the ATW plume at Key Colony <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, <span class="hlt">Florida</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dillon, Kevin S.; Chanton, Jeffrey P.; Smith, Leslie K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">474</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFM.H42A..07O"> <span id="translatedtitle">Challenges in Projecting Sea Level Rise impacts on the Coastal Environment of South <span class="hlt">Florida</span> (Invited)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Due to flat topography, a highly transmissive groundwater aquifer, and a growing population with the associated infrastructure, South <span class="hlt">Florida’s</span> coastal environment is one of the most vulnerable areas to sea level rise. Current projections of sea level rise and the associated storm surges will have direct impacts on coastal <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and infrastructure, flood protection, freshwater aquifers, and both the isolated and regional wetlands. Uncertainties in current projections have made it difficult for regional and local governments to develop adaptation strategies as such measures will depend heavily on the temporal and spatial patterns of sea level rise in the coming decades. We demonstrate the vulnerability of both the built and natural environments of the coastal region and present the current efforts to understand and predict the sea level rise estimate that management agencies could employ in planning of adaptation strategies. In particular, the potential vulnerabilities of the flood control system as well as the threat to the water supply wellfields in the coastal belt will be presented. In an effort to understand the historical variability of sea level rise, we present linkages to natural phenomena such as Atlantic Multi-Decadal Oscillation, and the analytical methods we have developed to provide probabilistic projections of both mean sea level rise and the extremes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Obeysekera, J.; Park, J.; Irizarry-Ortiz, M. M.; Barnes, J. A.; Trimble, P.; Said, W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">475</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013GeoRL..40..349F"> <span id="translatedtitle">Eddy impacts on the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Current</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><p label="1">The Gulf Stream in the Atlantic carries warm water northwards and forms both the return closure of the subtropical gyre as well as the upper limb of the meridional overturning circulation. Recent time series recorded east of the Bahamas at 26°N indicate that from May 2009 to April 2011, in contrast with past observations, the northward flowing Antilles Current covaried with the Gulf Stream in the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Straits—the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Current—even though the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> and Antilles Currents are separated by banks and islands spanning 150 km. The peak-to-trough amplitude of transport variations during this period was 15 × 106 m3 s-1 for the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Current and 12 × 106 m3 s-1 for the Antilles Current, at time scales of 50 days to a year. From satellite observations, we show that the fluctuations in both the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> and Antilles Currents between May 2009 and April 2011 are driven by eddy activity east of the Bahamas. Since the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Current time series is a critical time series for the state of the oceans, and often compared to climate models, this newly identified source of variability needs careful consideration when attributing the variability of the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Current to changes in the larger-scale circulations (e.g., gyre and overturning) or wind forcing.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Frajka-Williams, E.; Johns, W. E.; Meinen, C. S.; Beal, L. M.; Cunningham, S. A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">476</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5185969"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Energy Research and Development Agenda</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">To maximize the positive impact on <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, research and development efforts must focus on issues of special interest to the state. <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s situation varies from that of many other states because of its prospects for continued rapid population growth, its high dependence on petroleum, and its warm, humid climate. Although <span class="hlt">Florida</span> can benefit from energy studies done elsewhere, attention should be directed toward studies focusing on the state's specific characteristics and needs. The <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Energy Research and Development Task Force recommends that energy efficiency and renewable energy resources receive a strong emphasis in state-sponsored research and development programs. The Task Force considers these two alternatives, along with the intelligent use of conventional fuels, to be the important sources of energy to support the continued growth <span class="hlt">Florida</span> will experience. Implementation of the Task Force recommendations presented herein will provide a beginning toward an economically sound and a politically workable solution for <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s energy needs. Moreover, the program should improve economic development by encouraging emerging energy technologies and by lessening <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s dependence on non-renewable energy sources.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Not Available</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1983-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">477</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5257068"> <span id="translatedtitle">Characterization and environmental studies of Pompano <span class="hlt">Beach</span> anaerobic digestion facility. Semi-annual report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Anaerobic digestion of municipal waste has been demonstrated to be feasible in bench scale experiments by Pfeffer (1974). Approximately, 50% reduction in mass and production of 6000 ft/sup 3/ of gas/ton have been estimated. The gas composition is estimated to be 50% methane and 50% carbon monoxide. The technical and economic feasibility of anaerobic digestion with an ultimate objective of commercialization are discussed. A plant has been built at Pompano <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> on an existing shredding and landfill operation site. The plant design capacity is 100 tons/day. Two digesters have been constructed to be used in parallel. The process consists of primary shredding, metal separation, secondary shredding, air classification and digestion of light fraction. Sewage sludge was used to seed the initial mixture in the digester. The output slurry is vacuum filtered and the filter cake disposed on an existing landfill. The filtrate is recycled. Excess filtrate is sprayed on the landfill. At present the output gas is being flared. A flow chart for the plant is presented. It is imperative that environmental investigations be conducted on new energy technology prior to commercialization. A project was initiated to characterize all input and output streams and to assess the potential for ground water contamination by landfill disposal of effluents. Detailed chemical, biological and physical characterization efforts supported by leaching and modelling studies are being conducted to achieve the stated objectives. Some mutagenic studies were also conducted. The environmental investigations were started in August 1978. Sengupta et al (1979a) reported the first year's efforts.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sengupta, S.; Farooq, S.; Gerrish, H.P.; Wong, K.F.; Daly, E.L. Jr.; Chriswell, C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1980-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">478</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/381202"> <span id="translatedtitle">NRRI summary of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Public Service Commission: Fraud control policies of seven major <span class="hlt">Florida</span> utilities</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Public Service Commission (PSC) Staff recently completed an audit of fraud control policies and programs at the State`s largest regulated electric and local telephone utilities. The purpose of the audit was to examine the ability of <span class="hlt">Florida`s</span> largest regulated utilities to deter, detect, and resolve occurrences of fraud. The Staff audited the state`s seven largest regulated electric and local telephone utilities: <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Power Corporation, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Power and Light, Gulf Power Corporation, Tampa Electric Company, GTE-<span class="hlt">Florida</span>, BellSouth Telecommunications (Southern Bell), and Sprint United/Centel. The audit scope was limited to fraudulent acts committed by employees, contractors, suppliers, or agents of the seven utilities. Information regarding the utilities` fraud control policies and programs was obtained through surveys, document requests, and interviews with managers and officers.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">NONE</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-12-31</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">479</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/vh24236250573557.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bay: A history of recent ecological changes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bay is a unique subtropical estuary at the southern tip of the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> peninsula. Recent ecological changes (seagrass\\u000a die-off, algal blooms, increased turbidity) to the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bay ecosystem have focused the attention of the public, commercial\\u000a interests, scientists, and resource managers on the factors influencing the structure and function of <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bay. Restoring\\u000a <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Bay to some historic condition</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">James W. Fourqurean; Michael B. Robblee</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">480</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003EAEJA.....7245V"> <span id="translatedtitle">Changing land- and seascape environments at Cape Sable, a coastal wetland complex in south <span class="hlt">florida</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Cape Sable, a large coastal wetland complex at the southern tip of the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> peninsula (U.S.), is currently undergoing dramatic changes in land- and seascape in response to historical sea level rise. The rise in sea level is progressively inundating a low marl ridge that has separated interior freshwater marshes of the Everglades from marine waters, leading to rapid widening of both natural tidal creeks and constructed canals. The linear rate of widening (0.7 to 1.2 meter per year since 1922) reflects a system out of equilibrium, in which the channels are seeking to accommodate the volume of water in the tidal prism. Rising sea level has enlarged the tidal prism by expanding the intertidal zone into former low-lying uplands. Opening of the channels has resulted in the creation and erosive widening of secondary channels into adjacent wetlands, further enlarging the tidal prism and tendency to widening. In the vicinity of some tidal inlets, the shoreline has eroded over 310 meters (since 1922; an overall rate of 4.6 m/yr), although erosion occur in steps in response to hurricanes (category 5 hurricanes in 1935, 1960 and 1992). In addition to changing channel morphology and <span class="hlt">beach</span> erosion, rising sea level has shifted the mangrove/ freshwater marsh ecotone boundary inland significantly. Continued sea-level rise will inundate the marl ridge and accelerate erosion and breakup of the Cape Sable <span class="hlt">beach</span> shoreline. The coastal red mangrove wetland could possibly keep pace with accelerated sea level rise, but hurricane setbacks negate this effect in south <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. Category 4 and 5 hurricanes devastate the red mangrove forests and set into motion a phase of root-peat substrate decay and subsidence which has caused stepwise loss of both coastal and interior forests during the past 70 years of rapidly rising sea level. Changes in the coastal wetland environments of south <span class="hlt">Florida</span>, in which critical habitats are imminently threatened, are driven by nonlinear processes that comprise sea level rise, catastrophic hurricane events and geological factors such as bedrock topography and sediment type.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Vlaswinkel, B.; Wanless, H.; Rankey, E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img 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showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">481</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009AIPC.1157...19P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Adapting to Rising Sea Level: A <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Perspective</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Global climate change and concomitant rising sea level will have a profound impact on <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s coastal and marine systems. Sea-level rise will increase erosion of <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, cause saltwater intrusion into water supplies, inundate coastal marshes and other important habitats, and make coastal property more vulnerable to erosion and flooding. Yet most coastal areas are currently managed under the premise that sea-level rise is not significant and the shorelines are static or can be fixed in place by engineering structures. The new reality of sea-level rise and extreme weather due to climate change requires a new style of planning and management to protect resources and reduce risk to humans. Scientists must: (1) assess existing coastal vulnerability to address short term management issues and (2) model future landscape change and develop sustainable plans to address long term planning and management issues. Furthermore, this information must be effectively transferred to planners, managers, and elected officials to ensure their decisions are based upon the best available information. While there is still some uncertainty regarding the details of rising sea level and climate change, development decisions are being made today which commit public and private investment in real estate and associated infrastructure. With a design life of 30 yrs to 75 yrs or more, many of these investments are on a collision course with rising sea level and the resulting impacts will be significant. In the near term, the utilization of engineering structures may be required, but these are not sustainable and must ultimately yield to ``managed withdrawal'' programs if higher sea-level elevations or rates of rise are forthcoming. As an initial step towards successful adaptation, coastal management and planning documents (i.e., comprehensive plans) must be revised to include reference to climate change and rising sea-level.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Parkinson, Randall W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">482</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013Geomo.199..106D"> <span id="translatedtitle">Global patterns in sandy <span class="hlt">beach</span> macrofauna: Species richness, abundance, biomass and body size</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Global patterns in species richness in sandy <span class="hlt">beach</span> ecosystems have been poorly understood until comparatively recently, because of the difficulty of compiling high-resolution databases at continental scales. We analyze information from more than 200 sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> around the world, which harbor hundreds of macrofauna species, and explore latitudinal trends in species richness, abundance and biomass. Species richness increases from temperate to tropical sites. Abundance follows contrasting trends depending on the slope of the <span class="hlt">beach</span>: in gentle slope <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, it is higher at temperate sites, whereas in steep-slope <span class="hlt">beaches</span> it is higher at the tropics. Biomass follows identical negative trends for both climatic regions at the whole range of <span class="hlt">beach</span> slopes, suggesting decreasing rates in carrying capacity of the environment towards reflective <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Various morphodynamic variables determine global trends in <span class="hlt">beach</span> macrofauna. Species richness, abundance and biomass are higher at dissipative than at reflective <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, whereas a body size follows the reverse pattern. A generalized linear model showed that large tidal range (which determines the vertical dimension of the intertidal habitat), small size of sand particles and flat <span class="hlt">beach</span> slope (a product of the interaction among wave energy, tidal range and grain size) are correlated with high species richness, suggesting that these parameters represent the most parsimonious variables for modelling patterns in sandy <span class="hlt">beach</span> macrofauna. Large-scale patterns indicate a scaling of abundance to a body size, suggesting that dissipative <span class="hlt">beaches</span> harbor communities with highest abundance and species with the smallest body sizes. Additional information for tropical and northern hemisphere sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> (underrepresented in our compilation) is required to decipher more conclusive trends, particularly in abundance, biomass and body size. Further research should integrate meaningful oceanographic variables, such as temperature and primary production, in deciphering latitudinal trends.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Defeo, Omar; McLachlan, Anton</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">483</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70013994"> <span id="translatedtitle">CLEAR LAKE ROADLESS AREA, <span class="hlt">FLORIDA</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">On the basis of a mineral survey the Clear Lake Roadless Area, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> was concluded to offer little or no promise for the occurrence of mineral resources. The only commodity that has been mined in the area is clayey sand used in stabilizing roads and in highway construction. No peat more than a few inches thick occurs in the area. Limestone underlies all of the Clear Lake area but is under thick overburden. The region has been explored for heavy minerals and phosphate, but no resources have been found. There appears to be little promise for discovery of oil and gas in the Clear Lake area. However, the area and nearby lands have not been thoroughly tested for oil and gas, and the possibilities for discovery cannot be ruled out.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Patterson, Sam, H.; Crandall, Thomas, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">484</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70047482"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hydrologic conditions: Dade County, <span class="hlt">Florida</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Thin layers of dense limestone of low permeability that occur near the top of the Biscayne aquifer in the vicinity of the north end of Levee 30 in Dade County, <span class="hlt">Florida</span> are of hydrologic importance because they retard the downward infiltration of ponded water in Conservation Area No. 3. This retarding effect frequently results in high head differentials across the levee. Tests made in a small area adjacent to Levee 30 indicate that the coefficient of transmissibility of the aquifer is 3,600,000 gpd (gallons per day) per foot, and the coefficient of vertical permeability of the dense limestones is 13 gpd per square foot. If ground-water flow beneath the levee is laminar, the total inflow to the Levee 30 Canal from Conservation Area No. 3 will be about 350 mgd (million gallons per day), or 540 cfs (cubic feet per second), per mile length of levee when the head difference across the levee is 10 feet.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kohout, Francis Anthony; Klein, Howard; Sherwood, C. B.; Leach, Stanley D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1964-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">485</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://dx.doi.org/10.1061/40926(239)133"> <span id="translatedtitle">Regional <span class="hlt">beach</span>/cliff system dynamics along the california coast</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The coast of California is comprised of both sandy shorelines and cliffed coastline, and in many areas these features spatially coincide. In order to better understand the regional trends of change along the California coast, the U.S. Geological Survey is quantifying both sandy shoreline change and coastal cliff retreat for the state. The resulting database was used to examine the dynamics of the <span class="hlt">beach</span>/cliff system. We found inconsistent evidence of a relationship between rates of cliff retreat and shoreline change on the spatial scale of 100-km cells. However, when the data are correlated within individual regions, a strong relationship exists between the geomorphology of the coast and the behavior of the <span class="hlt">beach</span>/cliff system. Areas of high-relief coast show negative correlations, indicating that higher rates of cliff retreat correlate with lower rates of shoreline erosion. In contrast, low- to moderate-relief coasts show strong positive correlations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hapke, C. J.; Reid, D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">486</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5491617"> <span id="translatedtitle">Nontoxic foul-release coatings</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) under project RP-1689-9 evaluated 30 non-toxic coatings for biofouling control on steel and concrete surfaces of cooling water intakes and piping. Seven coatings were evaluated at seven sites for 2 year. The remaining 23 coatings were exposed for a variety of time lengths at the Battelle Marine Laboratory at <span class="hlt">Daytona</span> <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. Accelerated corrosion tests and inspection of the test panels to determine coating life were also conducted. Results of several utility conducted tests were also solicited. Silicone-based coatings performed the best with predicted lives of 2 to 4 year. Although the non-toxic coatings can be fouled by biogrowth, the rate of fouling is less and the coating can be easily cleaned. A cost-benefit methodology is presented to aid utilities to assess the potential use of non-toxic foul-release coatings at power plant cooling systems. 12 refs., 16 figs., 35 tabs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Not Available</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">487</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/55512752"> <span id="translatedtitle">Wave variance partitioning in the trough of a barred <span class="hlt">beach</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The wave-induced velocity field in the nearshore is composed of contributions for incident wind waves (f>0.05 Hz), surface infragravity waves (f<0.05 Hz, ||kappa||<(sigma2\\/gbeta) and shear waves (fsigma2\\/gbeta), where f is the frequency, sigma=2pif, kappa is the radial alongshore wavenumber (2pi\\/L, L being the alongshore wavelengths), beta is the <span class="hlt">beach</span> slope, and g is the acceleration due to gravity. Using an</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Peter A. Howd; Joan Oltman-Shay; Robert A. Holman</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">488</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/42576950"> <span id="translatedtitle">Europe's City <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> as Post-Fordist Placemaking</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">City <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are produced by spreading sand, deckchairs and umbrellas onto industrial brownfields, parking lots, rights-of-way or other under-utilized open spaces. Where major reinvestment projects are lacking, these informal developments offer great amenity. This approach to placemaking is post-Fordist. It is highly flexible, even mobile. It involves complex, temporary networks of people and resources. It focuses on ‘soft’ content—services, programmes,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Quentin Stevens; Mhairi Ambler</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">489</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/53127795"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> protection by a system of permeable groins</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A new type of permeable groin (called System of Groins Maltec-Savard - SGMS) has been installed at three eroded sites located in the coastal area on the north shore of the St. Lawrence, Quebec, Canada. In this area, the narrow sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> with sandy or sand-silty cliff of variable height (10-15~m) are exposed to obliquely incident waves arriving from both</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">B. Boczar-Karakiewicz; W. Romanczyk; N. Roy</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">490</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/39683625"> <span id="translatedtitle">Predicting flooding probability for <span class="hlt">beach</span>\\/dune systems</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The determination of the risk from flooding that shorefront communities face is an important component of coastal management\\u000a that has not been resolved successfully. Wave runup offers one way of quantifying the risk of coastal flooding that results\\u000a from overtopping by storm waves. The calculation of runup probabilities uses wave frequency analysis and an average <span class="hlt">beach</span>\\/dune\\u000a profile for a given</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Paul A. Garès</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">491</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ERSSB858"> <span id="translatedtitle">Pesticide Use in <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s Grapefruit Packinghouses.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A USDA survey of 103 <span class="hlt">Florida</span> grapefruit packinghouses showed that 74 reported postharvest pesticide applications, most often using imazalil, sodium orthophenylphenate (SOPP), and thia bendazole (TBZ). These three postharvest pesticides were applied to the...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. C. Buzby J. M. Love</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">492</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=36645"> <span id="translatedtitle">PESTICIDE POISONINGS REPORTED BY <span class="hlt">FLORIDA</span> CITRUS FIELDWORKERS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In a 1981 survey of 1811 <span class="hlt">Florida</span> citrus fieldworkers, 25 pesticide related poisoning incidents involving 29 fieldworkers were reported. Suspected poisonings were categorized into possible and confirmed poisonings, and from these reports it was possible to project an estimated 438...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">493</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title40-vol23/pdf/CFR-2013-title40-vol23-sec131-43.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">40 CFR 131.43 - <span class="hlt">Florida</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS WATER QUALITY STANDARDS Federally Promulgated Water Quality Standards § 131.43 <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. (a...attain the DPV, which is an applicable water quality criterion for the water segments...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">494</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title40-vol23/pdf/CFR-2013-title40-vol23-sec131-44.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">40 CFR 131.44 - <span class="hlt">Florida</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS WATER QUALITY STANDARDS Federally Promulgated Water Quality Standards § 131.44 <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. ...Administrative Code, Chapter 62-302, Surface Water Quality Standards, Section 62-302.540,...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">495</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.teachersdomain.org/resource/midlit10.sci.splglades/"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s Everglades: The River of Grass</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this lesson designed to enhance literacy skills, students learn about the unique environment of southern <span class="hlt">Florida</span>'s Everglades and gain insights into the interrelatedness of living things, nonliving things, and climate.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Foundation, Wgbh E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-12-13</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">496</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB232850"> <span id="translatedtitle">Stormwater Management Plan for Volusia County, <span class="hlt">Florida</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The report is concerned with the management of storm water in Volusia County, <span class="hlt">Florida</span>. The report examines existing storm water conditions, identifies major drainage basins, sub-basins, and drainage outfalls. It also identifies needs for more detailed inv...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1974-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">497</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB235214"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Exotic Vertebrates of South <span class="hlt">Florida</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Species of introduced exotic vertebrates of south <span class="hlt">Florida</span> (Lake Okeechobee southward) are identified and described. The principal factors responsible for their introductions are explored and recommendations are made for alleviation of current problems cau...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. P. Crowder</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1974-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">498</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB259441"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evaluation of the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Water Supply Program.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Environmental Protection Agency has conducted an evaluation of the <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Water Supply Program. This report presents the findings, conclusions, and recommendations, with supporting data and explanatory text, resulting from this evaluation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1973-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">499</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-11-07/pdf/2011-28702.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">76 FR 68804 - <span class="hlt">Florida</span> Disaster #FL-00064</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of <span class="hlt">FLORIDA</span> dated 10/27/2011. Incident: Severe Storms and Tornadoes. Incident Period: 10/18/2011. Effective Date: 10/27/2011. Physical Loan Application Deadline Date:...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-11-07</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">500</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=64500"> <span id="translatedtitle">ECOLOGICAL CONDITION OF SOUTH <span class="hlt">FLORIDA</span> ESTUARIES</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An assessment of the ecological condition of south <span class="hlt">Florida</span> estuaries based on regional probabilistic monitoring was conducted during the summer of 1995. Samples and data were collected on water and sediment quality, benthos, and fish tissue contaminants. Elevated concentrations o...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> </div><!-- page_25 div --> <!-- Column 1 end --> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <!-- BEGIN: footer --> <div id="footer_inner" class="osti" style="margin-left:auto;margin-right:auto;"> <div class="osti twoColLiqRtHdr"> <div id="container" class="osti"> <div id="mainContent" class="osti"> <div id="footer" class="osti"> Search capabilities provided by <a href="http://www.osti.gov">DOE/OSTI</a><br> Websites by Topic maintained by <a href="http://www.cendi.gov/">CENDI</a><br> <div align="center"><span style="font-weight:bold; font-size:9px; color:#666; line-height:14px">Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. <br> Their policies may differ from this site.</span></div> <div align="center"><a href="http://www.science.gov/disclaimer.html">Privacy & Security</a><br></div> <table align="center" cellpadding="2" cellspacing="0" height="14" width="178"> <tbody> <tr> <td width="124"><div align="center"><a href="http://www.usa.gov"><img src="http://www.science.gov/images/USAgov.jpg" alt="USA.gov" border="0" height="14" width="42"></a></div></td> <td width="129"><div align="center"><a href="http://worldwidescience.org"><img src="http://www.science.gov/images/wws.jpg" alt="WorldWideScience.org" border="0" height="14" width="108"></a></div></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <a href="http://www.usajobs.gov/">USAJOBS</a> :: <a href="http://www.grants.gov/">Grants</a> :: <a href="http://www.regulations.gov/search/Regs/home.html#home">Regulations.gov</a><br> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <!-- END: footer --> </body> </html>