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1

Campus Planning Study for Daytona Beach Junior College, Daytona Beach, Florida.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Major considerations and findings are presented in regard to the updating of a long range campus plan for the development of buildings, parking areas, drives and sidewalks at Daytona Beach Junior College. Following a consideration of the background and program of the college, a site analysis is presented. Plans and recommendations are offered…

Caudill, Rowlett and Scott, Architects, Houston, TX.

2

Daytona Beach Activities Schedule  

E-print Network

Highlights · Daytona Beach · Activities Schedule · Birthdays · Manners TheELIWeekly Daytona Beach A day of fun in the sun! WHAT: Come for a day of surf, sun, and sand at world famous Daytona Beach. We will drive to the beach in the morning and spend the day sunning, swimming, and having fun! After the beach

Pilyugin, Sergei S.

3

Daytona Beach Student Voices  

E-print Network

Highlights Daytona Beach Student Voices Birthdays Manners TheELIWeekly Daytona Beach Fun in the sun! Join us for a day of surf, sun, and sand at Daytona Beach. We will drive to the beach in the morning and spend the day sunning, swimming, and having fun! After the beach, we will stop at a restaurant

Pilyugin, Sergei S.

4

Daytona Beach Fall 2012 Dates  

E-print Network

Highlights Daytona Beach Fall 2012 Dates Birthdays Manners TheELIWeekly Daytona Beach Fun in the sun! Join us for a day of surf, sun, and sand at Daytona Beach. We will be going to the beach to Gainesville around 10:30pm. Transportation: Bus passes for Daytona Beach are now sold out! If you bought

Pilyugin, Sergei S.

5

Large wave at Daytona Beach, Florida, explained as a squall-line surge  

USGS Publications Warehouse

On a clear calm evening during July 1992, an anomalously large wave, reportedly 6 m high struck the Daytona Beach, Florida area. It is hypothesized that a squall line and associated pressure jump, travelling at the speed of a free gravity wave, coupled resonantly with the sea surface forming the large wave or "squall-line surge'. The wave was forced along the length of the squall line, with the greatest amplitude occurring at the water depth satisfying the resonant condition. -from Authors

Sallenger, A.H., Jr.; List, J.H.; Gelfenbaum, G.; Stumpf, R.P.; Hansen, M.

1995-01-01

6

78 FR 33969 - Special Local Regulations; Daytona Beach Grand Prix of the Sea, Atlantic Ocean; Daytona Beach, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Beach Grand Prix of the Sea, Atlantic Ocean; Daytona Beach, FL AGENCY...regulation on the waters of the Atlantic Ocean east of Daytona Beach, Florida...will be held on the waters of the Atlantic Ocean east of Daytona Beach,...

2013-06-06

7

Trends in Alcohol Knowledge and Drinking Patterns Among Students Who Visited Daytona Beach, Florida, During Spring Break, 1981-1983.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Assesses changes in student knowledge of and patterns related to drinking. Using data collected from college students visiting Daytona Beach, Florida, during spring break, found that trends toward increased consumption of alcoholic beverages among college students which occurred prior to 1981 have now stabilized and are beginning to reverse…

Gonzalez, Gerardo M.

1986-01-01

8

77 FR 50062 - Safety Zone; Embry-Riddle Wings and Waves, Atlantic Ocean; Daytona Beach, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Embry-Riddle Wings and Waves, Atlantic Ocean; Daytona Beach, FL AGENCY...safety zone on the waters of the Atlantic Ocean east of Daytona Beach, Florida...host an air show event over the Atlantic Ocean in Daytona Beach, FL. In...

2012-08-20

9

Excerpts from Daytona Beach Community College Institutional Audit.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study was conducted by Daytona Beach Community College's (DBCC's) Mid-Florida Research and Business Center to determine the market for the educational services which fall within the mission of DBCC, to identify target populations within that market, to explore educational needs and perceived desires, and to examine community opinions of DBCC and…

Daytona Beach Community Coll., FL. Mid-Florida Research and Business Center.

10

The Daytona Beach Wave of 3-4 July 1992: A Shallow-Water Gravity Wave Forced by a Propagating Squall Line  

Microsoft Academic Search

An unexpected run-up of the ocean along Daytona Beach, Florida, on 3-4 July 1992 was associated with at least one large ocean wave. The wave, which reached a height of about 3 m above normal tide, injured 75 people and damaged property along Daytona Beach. Analyses of meteorological and oceanographic observations are consistent with the hypothesis that a squall line

Dean D. Churchill; Sam H. Houston; Nicholas A. Bond

1995-01-01

11

Quanta, a Learning Community at Daytona Beach Community College and the Use of the Myers-Briggs Type Inventory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In fall 1984, a program was implemented at Daytona Beach Community College (Florida) with the dual purpose of integrating subject material between courses and establishing a close community of learners to cooperate in the mastery of subject matter. In the fall semester, participating students enroll in a block of three courses; English I,…

Bushnell, Jay R.

12

A Survey of the Characteristics and Motivating Factors of Male Students Enrolled in Selected Certificate Occupational Curricula at Daytona Beach Junior College.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A questionnaire was administered to 167 male students enrolled in occupational programs at Daytona Beach Junior College (Florida) to determine what factors influenced their enrollment. The responses of 121 students under 27 years of age were analyzed. Specific findings indicate that the typical student is a high school graduate, white, and between…

Hawthorne, William R.

13

A Report on the Intellectual Development of Students in the QUANTA Learning Community at Daytona Beach Community College, 1989-1990.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report summarizes the results of a research study conducted to assess the intellectual development of students in the QUANTA Learning Community at Daytona Beach Community College (DBCC) (Florida) in the 1989-90 academic year. QUANTA is a freshman interdisciplinary program with 75 students and three faculty. Three courses--English, psychology,…

Avens, Cynthia; Zelley, Richard

14

Modifications in the DACUM Process of Curriculum Development at Daytona Beach Community College.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process has helped Daytona Beach Community College (DBCC) resolve several important issues in competency-based instruction. DACUM involves expert workers in defining and describing their jobs. A panel of workers and supervisors identify general areas of competence required in their jobs; specify skills within…

Klingman, Peter D.; Gardner, W. Aubrey

15

Daytona Beach Community College's Leadership Development Institute: Cultivating Leaders from within  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many industries in the U.S., including higher education, will face employee shortages in the coming years, due in large part to the departure of baby-boomers from the workforce. In anticipation of this reduction in the workforce, and knowing that competition for those in the job market will be fierce, Daytona Beach Community College has created a…

Quinton, Rita

2006-01-01

16

The Daytona Beach Wave of 3-4 July 1992: A Shallow-Water Gravity Wave Forced by a Propagating Squall Line.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An unexpected run-up of the ocean along Daytona Beach, Florida, on 3-4 July 1992 was associated with at least one large ocean wave. The wave, which reached a height of about 3 m above normal tide, injured 75 people and damaged property along Daytona Beach. Analyses of meteorological and oceanographic observations are consistent with the hypothesis that a squall line generated a long water wave. The critical evidence is that the propagation speed of the squall line matched the shallow-water wave speed that prevailed along the direction of motion of the squall line. The squall line exerted force on the ocean for at least 3 h. The issues of recurrence and public safety are discussed.

Churchill, Dean D.; Houston, Sam H.; Bond, Nicholas A.

1995-01-01

17

Service Learning at Daytona.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes Daytona Beach Junior College's (DBJC's) service learning concept whereby students earn academic credits through work experience. Examines the advantages of the Daytona Plan for students, employers, and the college. Discusses the administrative organization of Daytona's co-op career center and its integration with the rest of DBJC. (CAM)

Polk, Charles H.; And Others

1980-01-01

18

Debra J. DiChiara, MSN, RN University of Central Florida College of Nursing  

E-print Network

Debra J. DiChiara, MSN, RN University of Central Florida College of Nursing: Daytona Beach Campus of Central Florida Nursing Ed Instructor 2004 BSN University of Central Florida Nursing Nurse Education 1980 AA Daytona State College Liberal Arts Nurse 1978 ADN Daytona State College Nursing Registered Nurse

Wu, Shin-Tson

19

Florida: Clearwater Beach and Pier 60  

Microsoft Academic Search

Clearwater Beach, a year-round vacation spot, spans 3 miles along the coast of Florida. With its clean white sand and various attractions, this beach, located just 20 miles from the Tampa International Airport, makes the perfect vacation spot for any age group. Amenities on the beach and around the beach include: parasailing, pirate ship cruises, restaurants, and a range from

Chet Smolski

1978-01-01

20

IN FLORIDA-76% OUT-OF-STATE 24% EDUCATION 76%  

E-print Network

Assistant Professor, School of Management, Daytona State College, Daytona Beach, FL Associate and Communication, Daytona State College, Daytona Beach, FL Communications Coach, School of Business and Economics College, Daytona Beach, FL Assistant Professor, Department of English, Communications and Modern

Wu, Shin-Tson

21

Sarah Landreville, MSN, RN University of Central Florida College of Nursing  

E-print Network

Sarah Landreville, MSN, RN University of Central Florida College of Nursing: Regional Campus, FL Nursing 2002 ADN Daytona Beach Community College Daytona Beach, FL Nursing II. LICENSURE/CERTIFICATION RN Florida, 9189388 Psychiatric & Mental Health Nursing ANCC Board Certified, Exp. 10/2014 III

Wu, Shin-Tson

22

Leslee A. D'Amato-Kubiet MSN, ARNP University of Central Florida School of Nursing  

E-print Network

. International Speedway Blvd. Bldg 140 Suite 309 Daytona Beach, FL 32120 (386) 506-4067 (386) 506-4079--Fax ACADEMIC APPOINTMENTS: 2005- Present University of Central Florida, Lab Coordinator/Instructor Daytona Beach, Eastern Regional Campus. CLINCAL/ADMINISTRATION APPOINTMENTS: 2003-2005 Preceptor ARNP students

Wu, Shin-Tson

23

Daytona Beach Activities Schedule  

E-print Network

to Gainesville would be 10:30 PM. COST: This is a van trip so you must purchase a transportation pass for $25 4:15 PM Basketball (Forest) Meet at NRN Garage Free Wednesday 7:00 PM Coffee Talk (Max and Michele) Meet at Kay's Coffee on Archer Road Free (Bring money for coffee and food if you like.) Thursday 5

Pilyugin, Sergei S.

24

The Florida Beach Case and the Road to Judicial Takings  

Microsoft Academic Search

In Stop the Beach Renourishment v. Florida Department of Environmental Protection, the U.S. Supreme Court unanimously upheld a state beach restoration project against landowner claims of an unconstitutional taking of the property. This result was not nearly as surprising as the fact that the Court granted certiorari on a case that turned on an obscure aspect of Florida property law:

Michael C. Blumm; Elizabeth B. Dawson

2011-01-01

25

Visitors' Motivation for Attending the South Beach Wine and Food Festival, Miami Beach, Florida  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this study was to identify the major factors that motivated visitors to attend the South Beach Wine and Food Festival in Miami Beach, Florida, and determine whether these factors varied among the visitors from the United States, Canada, South America, Europe, and Asia. A survey of 475 visitors to South Florida was conducted in February 2006. Forty?four

Yvette Reisinger

2008-01-01

26

Quinacrine sterilization (QS) in a private practice in Daytona Beach, Florida: a preliminary report  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: To affirm that WS can be performed safely and effectively in a U.S. private office practice. Methods: The U.S. FDA Modernization Act of 1997 Pharmacy Compounding Provisions made it possible for American physicians to begin offering WS to their patients. These provisions became effective November 21, 1998. This series was initiated in October 2000. The standard protocol recommended by

R. B. Whitney

1998-01-01

27

Quinacrine sterilization (QS) in a private practice in Daytona Beach, Florida: a preliminary report  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: To affirm that QS can be performed safely and effectively in a U.S. private office practice. Methods: The U.S. FDA Modernization Act of 1997 Pharmacy Compounding Provisions made it possible for American physicians to begin offering QS to their patients. These provisions became effective November 21, 1998. This series was initiated in October 2000. The standard protocol recommended by

R. B. Whitney

2003-01-01

28

Emerging transportation planning methods: based on a seminar held in Daytona Beach, Florida in December 1976  

Microsoft Academic Search

The planning committee for the seminar consisted of representatives from the Office of the Secretary, the Federal Highway Administration, the Transportation Systems Center, and the Urban Mass Transportation Administration. Three basic subjects were chosen for indepth examination: (1) transportation demand forecasting techniques; (2) transportation evaluation methods; and (3) transportation\\/land use interactions. One full day was devoted to each of these

W. F. Brown; R. B. Dial; D. S. Gendell; E. Weiner

1978-01-01

29

A Conference on Validation and Dissemination (Daytona Beach, Florida, May 2-4, 1979).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document reports the activities of the Southeastern Teacher Corps Network's May 1979 conference on the validation of programs and the dissemination of information. Concerns of the meeting were: the establishment of procedures for program validation processes, the increased awareness of naturalistic data-gathering techniques for educational…

Dansker, Judith

30

Economic Impact of THE PLAYERS Championship Golf Tournament at Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida, March 20051  

E-print Network

FE698 Economic Impact of THE PLAYERS Championship Golf Tournament at Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida at the Sawgrass Stadium Golf course in Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida. This event is part of the PGA TOUR and is operated by PGA TOUR, Inc., which is also headquartered in Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida. In 2005, the TPC

Florida, University of

31

Rip Channel Morphodynamics at Pensacola Beach, Florida  

E-print Network

that there are rip current hot spots at Pensacola Beach, forced by a ridge and swale topography offshore, but the annual evolution/behavior of these hotspots (i.e. location, size, frequency, and orientation) have not been examined in detail. Remote imagery from...

Labude, Daniel

2012-08-15

32

Economic Impact of THE PLAYERS Championship Golf Tournament at Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida, May 2007  

E-print Network

1 Economic Impact of THE PLAYERS Championship Golf Tournament at Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida, May, for the first time since it was relocated to Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida, THE PLAYERS® Championship (TPC) golf, and this continued to be the case in 2007 with a purse totaling $9 million. Ponte Vedra Beach is located in the north

Florida, University of

33

Journal of Coastal Research 22 5 13001304 West Palm Beach, Florida September 2006 Fractal Analysis of Maine's Glaciated Shoreline Tests  

E-print Network

Journal of Coastal Research 22 5 1300­1304 West Palm Beach, Florida September 2006 Fractal Analysis(5), 1300­1304. West Palm Beach (Florida), ISSN 0749-0208. Average fractal dimensions (D) are calculated

Perfect, Ed

34

Integrated solid waste management of Palm Beach County, Florida  

SciTech Connect

The subject document reports the results of an in-depth investigation of the fiscal year 1992 cost of the Palm Beach County, Florida integrated municipal solid waste management system (IMSWMS), the energy consumed to operate the system, and the environmental performance requirements for each of the system`s waste-processing and disposal facilities. Actual data from records kept by participants is reported in this document. Every effort was made to minimize the use of assumptions, and no attempt is made to interpret the data reported. Analytical approaches are documented so that interested analysts may perform manipulation or further analysis of the data. As such, the report is a reference document for MSW management professionals who are interested in the actual costs and energy consumption for a one-year period, of an operating IMSWMS.

NONE

1995-11-01

35

33 CFR 334.605 - Meloy Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Miami Beach, Florida; restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Miami Beach, Florida; restricted area. 334.605...Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Miami Beach, Florida; restricted area. (a) The...Commander, U.S. Coast Guard Base Miami Beach or his/her designated...

2013-07-01

36

HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS WASTE CHARACTERIZATION STUDY FOR PALM BEACH COUNTY, FLORIDA: A MITE PROGRAM EVALUATION  

EPA Science Inventory

The objectives of the Household hazardous Waste Characterization Study (the HHW Study) were to quantify the annual household hazardous waste (HHW) tonnages disposed in Palm Beach County, Florida's (the county) residential solid waste (characterized in this study as municipal soli...

37

Implementation Study of the Comprehensive Services Program of Palm Beach County, Florida. Final Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Comprehensive Services Program of Palm Beach County, Florida, was an ambitious and innovative effort to improve the school readiness of low-income children in Palm Beach County by identifying needs early and providing early intervention services to support physical, cognitive, and emotional health and development. Services were delivered to…

Lyons, Sandra; Karlstrom, Mikael; Haywood, Thomas

2007-01-01

38

Journal of Coastal Research 26 1 184198 West Palm Beach, Florida January 2010 Limits of Wave Runup and Corresponding Beach-Profile  

E-print Network

. ADDITIONAL INDEX WORDS: Beach erosion, nearshore sediment transport, wave breaking, cross-shore sediment of beach erosion. The limit of wave runup is also a key parameter in the application of the stormJournal of Coastal Research 26 1 184­198 West Palm Beach, Florida January 2010 Limits of Wave Runup

US Army Corps of Engineers

39

Economic Impact of THE PLAYERS Championship Golf Tournament at Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida, March 2005  

E-print Network

in Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida. This event is part of the PGA TOUR and is operated by PGA TOUR Inc. Ponte headquarters of the PGA TOUR. The Food and Resource Economics Department (FRED) at the University of Florida was asked by PGA TOUR to conduct an economic impact analysis of this sports event for 2005, which took place

Florida, University of

40

Florida (Pensacola Beach) dune restoration Project General Project DescriPtion  

E-print Network

of wildlife habitat and private property due to hurricanes, sea level rise, oil spills and other threatsFlorida (Pensacola Beach) dune restoration Project General Project DescriPtion The project 2010. The primary dunes are the first natural line of defense for coastal Florida to prevent the loss

41

South Florida Sun-Sentinel.com Palm Beach County high schools show improvement in latest grades  

E-print Network

South Florida Sun-Sentinel.com Palm Beach County high schools show improvement in latest grades ratings awarded to the local high schools, these areas gained some of the bragging rights associated there." High schools across Florida on Tuesday received report cards for the 2009-10 school year, based

Belogay, Eugene A.

42

Assessing municipal vulnerability to predicted sea level rise: City of Satellite Beach, Florida  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the fall of 2009 the City of Satellite Beach (City), Florida, authorized a study designed to assess municipal vulnerability\\u000a to rising sea level and facilitate discussion of potential adaptation strategies. The project is one of the first in Florida\\u000a to seriously address the potential consequences of global sea level rise, now forecast to rise a meter or more by

Randall W. Parkinson; Tara McCue

2011-01-01

43

REPORT OF THE BUREAU OF COMMERCIAL FISHERIES BIOLOGICAL STATION, ST. PETERSBURG BEACH, FLORIDA  

E-print Network

REPORT OF THE BUREAU OF COMMERCIAL FISHERIES BIOLOGICAL STATION, ST. PETERSBURG BEACH, FLORIDA OF COMMERCIAL FISHERIES Circular 239 #12;CONTENTS Page Report of the Station Chief. · . . . . . . . . . · 1 Hydrogen-ion and dissolved oxygen 11 Tampa Bay as a nursery. . . · . · . · · 11 Commercially important

44

Black Immigrant Mothers in Palm Beach County, Florida, and Their Children's Readiness for School  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report compares the circumstances and characteristics of Black immigrant mothers in Palm Beach County, Florida, to those of Latina immigrant and Black native-born mothers, focusing on those living in distressed areas. The study also compares the early developmental outcomes of their children. When controlling for parental and child…

Rich, Lauren; Spielberger, Julie; D'Angelo, Angela Valdovinos

2012-01-01

45

Customization of the Achievement Testing Program for Palm Beach County Florida County Schools; Symposium.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document contains five papers describing the customization of the achievement testing program for Palm Beach County (Florida) Schools. They are as follows: "Customized Achievement Testing Programs" (S. Jean Jolly); "Using the Rasch Model to Develop Curriculum-Referenced Norms" (R. Robert Rentz); "Matching Standardized Achievement Test Items…

Jolly, S. Jean; And Others

46

South Florida Sun-Sentinel.com Job growth is expanding in West Palm Beach, Miami  

E-print Network

Florida, said Vitner, a nationally known economist who tracks regional and U.S. economic trends. State's fears of a second U.S. recession. "At least we turned the corner and are creating jobs,'' Stronge said in Palm Beach and Broward counties, according to new projections released Monday by a leading economist

Belogay, Eugene A.

47

Palm Beach Post investigation: What Florida lawmakers are worth  

E-print Network

, and the gap is growing. The disparity in Florida echoes a nationwide trend. According to an analysis from $29,169 for whites down to $1,050 for African-Americans. The average net worth of Florida. Rick Scott, for one, a former health care executive, spent $73 million of his reported $218 million net

Belogay, Eugene A.

48

Investigating the Influence of Wave Climate on Beach Morphodynamics at Matanzas Inlet, Florida Atlantic Coast  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Barrier island systems, common to the East coast of North America, are characterized by long, straight beaches interrupted by tidal inlets that serve to exchange fluid and sediment between estuaries and oceans. These inlets often build ebb tidal deltas that disrupt the nearshore wave field responsible for longshore sediment transport, whose gradients result in erosion, accretion, and shoreline change. The development of numerical models to simulate coastal geomorphic response to wave climate, sea level rise, and terrestrial sedimentary inputs will be aided by data sets documenting oceanic forcing and beach morphologic change at inlets. To better understand the natural seasonal variability in beach morphology at an inlet-influenced barrier island site, we have developed a field-based monitoring program at Matanzas Inlet, on the Florida Atlantic coast. This site was selected, in part, because it is the only inlet (of 19 along the Florida Atlantic coast) that has not experienced substantial anthropogenic modification. Monthly, differential GPS beach surveys (beginning in January 2009) document intertidal beach change within the ~2.5 km adjacent to the mouth of Matanzas Inlet. Time series data of volumetric beach change and shoreline position are compared to wave height, period, and direction data from a nearby NDBC buoy (Station 41012). Initial results suggest that gross beach volumetric change is correlated with deep-water wave direction; highly oblique waves correspond greatest gross morphologic variability. In addition, increasing wave periods, associated with more stable and orthogonal wave directions correspond to decreased intertidal beach erosion culminating in net accretion. Preliminary observations of changes in shoreline location render a persistent zone of accretion, during a period of mild, summer wave climate, located on the north side of the inlet. This may be due to the growth of the inlet’s ebb-tidal delta providing a natural trap for southward-directed longshore sediment transport.

Malone, K. K.; Adams, P. N.

2009-12-01

49

Thousands of migrating sharks spotted along South Florida coast, beaches  

E-print Network

the currents of the Atlantic Ocean to carry them and water temperatures to guide them. Tens of thousands, there have been no bites in Palm Beach County waters," he said. "Our data has shown that the bulk and water temperatures." Kajiura and graduate student Shari Tellman have conducted aerial surveys

Fernandez, Eduardo

50

Journal of Coastal Research SI 59 118-129 West Palm Beach, Florida 2011 Long-Term Evolution of a Long-Term Evolution Model  

E-print Network

Journal of Coastal Research SI 59 118-129 West Palm Beach, Florida 2011 Long-Term Evolution. 118-129. West Palm Beach (Florida), ISSN 0749-0208. This paper reviews the 25-plus year history, preservation of the regional shape of the shoreline, and the interaction between the beach berm and the dunes

US Army Corps of Engineers

51

Journal of Coastal Research SI 59 86-97 West Palm Beach, Florida 2011 Seasonal Change in Nearshore and Channel Morphology at  

E-print Network

Journal of Coastal Research SI 59 86-97 West Palm Beach, Florida 2011 Seasonal Change of Coastal Research, Special Issue, No. 59, pp. 86-97. West Palm Beach (Florida), ISSN 0749-0208. Packery and adjacent beach is attributed to location in the southeast corner of Corpus Christi Bay, receiving augmented

US Army Corps of Engineers

52

Proceedings of the 2010 CIAE Pre-Conference (59th, Clearwater Beach, Florida, October 24-26, 2010)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The 2010 International Pre-Conference of the Commission on International Adult Education (CIAE), American Association for Adult & Continuing (AAACE), was successfully conducted from October 24-26, at the Hilton Clearwater Beach Resort, Clearwater Beach, Florida. This publication includes the papers presented during the conference. These are: (1)…

Commission for International Adult Education (NJ1), 2010

2010-01-01

53

Alongshore variation in the rip current hazard at Pensacola Beach, Florida  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many drowning and near drownings at Pensacola Beach, Florida are attributed to rip currents, the strong seaward-flowing currents\\u000a that extend from the shoreline to the line of breakers and sometimes beyond. While surf forecasts assume that the rip hazard\\u000a is uniform alongshore and that the (erosion) rips are ephemeral features, evidence is presented to suggest that the rip hazard\\u000a at

Chris Houser; Gemma Barrett; Daniel Labude

2011-01-01

54

Formation of 'Beach Rock' at Siesta Key, Florida and its influence on barrier island development  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Seaward-dipping strata of carbonate-cemented shell debris located along the coast of Siesta Key on the Gulf Coast of the Florida peninsula have long been interpreted to be beachrock equivalent in age to the Pleistocene Anastasia Formation (Stage 5e) of the east coast of Florida. Detailed examination of thin sections along with radiometric dating and isotopic analyses demonstrates clearly that this is a Holocene deposit that is not beachrock but was lithified in a meteoric environment. Whole rock dates, dates from shells only, and from cement only demonstrate that these beach deposits were in place by at least 1800 yr BP and might have been there as long ago as 4300 yr BP. This means that some type of barrier island was in place at that time. Previous investigations have depicted Siesta Key as having a maximum age of 3000 yr with these deposits being located about 2 km landward of the beach deposits. This suggests that the beach deposits might have been the site of the original position of Siesta Key. These data also indicate that sea level must have been near its present position at the time that these foreshore beach deposits were deposited; sometime between 1800 and 4300 yr ago. This scenario indicates that sea level along this coastal reach probably reached its present level at least about 2000 yr ago. ?? 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Spurgeon, D.; Davis, R.A., Jr.; Shinnu, E.A.

2003-01-01

55

Proceedings of the ASHRAE/DOE/BTECC Conference, Thermal Performance of the Exterior Envelopes of Buildings VII, Clearwater Beach, Florida, December 7-11, 1998  

E-print Network

of the Exterior Envelopes of Buildings VII, Clearwater Beach, Florida, December 7-11, 1998 The research reported in Clearwater Beach, FL. INTEGRATED PERFORMANCE OF AN AUTOMATED VENETIAN BLIND/ ELECTRIC LIGHTING SYSTEM

56

Airborne radioactivity survey of parts of Atlantic Ocean beach, Virginia to Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The accompanying maps show the results of an airborne radioactivity survey along the Atlantic Ocean beach from Cape Henry, Virginia to Cape Fear, North Carolina and from Savannah Bach Georgia to Miami Beach, Florida. The survey was made March 23-24, 1953, as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. The survey was made with scintillation detection equipment mounted in a Douglas DC-3 aircraft and consisted of one flight line, at a 500-foot altitude, parallel to the beach. The vertical projection of the flight line coincided approximately with the landward limit of the modern beach. The width of the zone on the ground from which anomalous radiation is measured at the normal 500 foot flight altitude varies with the areal extent radioactivity of the source. For strong sources of radioactivity the width of the zone would be as much as 1,400 feet. The location of the flight lines is shown on the index map below. No abnormal radioactivity was detected along the northern flight line between Cape Henry, Virginia and Cape Fear, North Carolina. Along the southern flight line fourteen areas of abnormal radioactivity were detected between Savannah Beach, Georgia and Anastasia Island, Florida as shown on the map on the left. The abnormal radioactivity is apparently due to radioactive minerals associated with "black sand" deposits with occur locally along the beach in this region. The present technique of airborne radioactivity measurement does not permit distinguishing between activity sue to thorium and that due to uranium. An anomaly, therefore, may represent radioactivity due entirely to one or to a combination of these elements. It is not possible to determine the extent or radioactive content of the materials responsible for the abnormal radioactivity. The information given on the accompanying map indicates only those localities of greater-than-average radioactivity and, therefore suggest areas in which uranium and thorium deposits are more likely to occur.

Moxham, R.M.; Johnson, R.W.

1953-01-01

57

Florida Red Tide and Human Health: A Pilot Beach Conditions Reporting System to Minimize Human Exposure  

PubMed Central

With over 50% of the US population living in coastal counties, the ocean and coastal environments have substantial impacts on coastal communities. While may of the impacts are positive, such as tourism and recreation opportunities, there are also negative impacts, such as exposure to harmful algal blooms (HABs) and water borne pathogens. Recent advances in environmental monitoring and weather prediction may allow us to forecast these potential adverse effects and thus mitigate the negative impact from coastal environmental threats. One example of the need to mitigate adverse environmental impacts occurs on Florida’s west coast, which experiences annual blooms, or periods of exuberant growth, of the toxic dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis. K. brevis produces a suite of potent neurotoxins called brevetoxins. Wind and wave action can break up the cells, releasing toxin that can then become part of the marine aerosol or sea spray. Brevetoxins in the aerosol cause respiratory irritation in people who inhale it. In addition, asthmatics who inhale the toxins report increase upper and lower airway lower symptoms and experience measurable changes in pulmonary function. Real-time reporting of the presence or absence of these toxic aerosols will allow asthmatics and local coastal residents to make informed decisions about their personal exposures, thus adding to their quality of life. A system to protect public health that combines information collected by an Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) has been designed and implemented in Sarasota and Manatee Counties, Florida. This system is based on real-time reports from lifeguards at the eight public beaches. The lifeguards provide periodic subjective reports of the amount of dead fish on the beach, apparent level of respiratory irritation among beach-goers, water color, wind direction, surf condition, and the beach warning flag they are flying. A key component in the design of the observing system was an easy reporting pathway for the lifeguards to minimize the amount of time away from their primary duties. Specifically, we provided a Personal Digital Assistant for each of the eight beaches. The portable unit allows the lifeguards to report from their guard tower. The data are transferred via wireless Internet to a website hosted on the Mote Marine Laboratory Sarasota Operations of the Coastal Ocean Observation Laboratories (SO COOL) server. The system has proven to be robust and well received by the public. The system has reported variability from beach to beach and has provided vital information to users to minimize their exposure to toxic marine aerosols. PMID:18501955

Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Currier, Robert; Nierenberg, Kate; Reich, Andrew; Backer, Lorraine C.; Stumpf, Richard; Fleming, Lora; Kirkpatrick, Gary

2008-01-01

58

Geomorphology of the Southeast Florida continental reef tract (Miami-Dade, Broward, and Palm Beach Counties, USA)  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes the geomorphology of the northern, relict, portion of the Florida reef tract that extends along the southeast\\u000a Florida (USA) continental coast northward to latitude N26° 43.1?. The descriptions are based on high-resolution Laser Airborne\\u000a Depth Sounding bathymetric data along Miami-Dade, Broward, and Palm Beach Counties as well as chirp subbottom-profiles and\\u000a reef cores. The SE Florida continental

K. W. Banks; B. M. Riegl; E. A. Shinn; W. E. Piller; R. E. Dodge

2007-01-01

59

Florida red tide and human health: a pilot beach conditions reporting system to minimize human exposure.  

PubMed

With over 50% of the US population living in coastal counties, the ocean and coastal environments have substantial impacts on coastal communities. While many of the impacts are positive, such as tourism and recreation opportunities, there are also negative impacts, such as exposure to harmful algal blooms (HABs) and water borne pathogens. Recent advances in environmental monitoring and weather prediction may allow us to forecast these potential adverse effects and thus mitigate the negative impact from coastal environmental threats. One example of the need to mitigate adverse environmental impacts occurs on Florida's west coast, which experiences annual blooms, or periods of exuberant growth, of the toxic dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis. K. brevis produces a suite of potent neurotoxins called brevetoxins. Wind and wave action can break up the cells, releasing toxin that can then become part of the marine aerosol or sea spray. Brevetoxins in the aerosol cause respiratory irritation in people who inhale it. In addition, asthmatics who inhale the toxins report increase upper and lower airway symptoms and experience measurable changes in pulmonary function. Real-time reporting of the presence or absence of these toxic aerosols will allow asthmatics and local coastal residents to make informed decisions about their personal exposures, thus adding to their quality of life. A system to protect public health that combines information collected by an Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) has been designed and implemented in Sarasota and Manatee Counties, Florida. This system is based on real-time reports from lifeguards at the eight public beaches. The lifeguards provide periodic subjective reports of the amount of dead fish on the beach, apparent level of respiratory irritation among beach-goers, water color, wind direction, surf condition, and the beach warning flag they are flying. A key component in the design of the observing system was an easy reporting pathway for the lifeguards to minimize the amount of time away from their primary duties. Specifically, we provided a Personal Digital Assistant for each of the eight beaches. The portable unit allows the lifeguards to report from their guard tower. The data are transferred via wireless Internet to a website hosted on the Mote Marine Laboratory Sarasota Operations of the Coastal Ocean Observation Laboratories (SO COOL) server. The system has proven to be robust and well received by the public. The system has reported variability from beach to beach and has provided vital information to users to minimize their exposure to toxic marine aerosols. PMID:18501955

Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Currier, Robert; Nierenberg, Kate; Reich, Andrew; Backer, Lorraine C; Stumpf, Richard; Fleming, Lora; Kirkpatrick, Gary

2008-08-25

60

Daytona Ave UniversityWay  

E-print Network

2E Daytona Hall HADNL 3D · Faculty Offices· Classrooms (101-104) · Student Center N S W E updated 08 HALRC HASRO HAIRD HAWR Ironwood Hall HAIRD 3E Learning Resource Center HALRC 3F Mesquite Hall HAMSQ 3E Palo Verde HAPV 2E Saguaro Hall HASRO 3F · Science Labs (101-102)· Gym · Administration · Lecture Rooms

61

Journal of Coastal Research SI 59 150-155 West Palm Beach, Florida 2011 Analysis of Packery Channel Public Access Boat Ramp Shoreline  

E-print Network

Journal of Coastal Research SI 59 150-155 West Palm Beach, Florida 2011 Analysis of Packery of Coastal Research, Special Issue, No. 59, pp. 150-155. West Palm Beach (Florida), ISSN 0749 is the likely mechanism for failure. Typical sources of hydrodynamic forcing that can lead to toe erosion

US Army Corps of Engineers

62

Journal of Coastal Research SI 59 61-75 West Palm Beach, Florida 2011 Lack of Evidence for Onshore Sediment Transport from Deep  

E-print Network

: Coastal erosion, sediment budget, Fire Island, depth of closure, cross-shore transport, longshore Journal of Coastal Research SI 59 61-75 West Palm Beach, Florida 2011 Lack of Evidence, Journal of Coastal Research, Special Issue, No. 59, pp. 61-75. West Palm Beach (Florida), ISSN 0749

US Army Corps of Engineers

63

First account of apochlorotic diatoms from intertidal sand of a south Florida beach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During the period January to December 2004, monthly intertidal sand samples were collected from John U. Lloyd State Park beach, Florida. This study is the first to report on spatial and temporal distributions of heterotrophic (apochlorotic) diatoms in a sub-tropical beach, or indeed any sandy beach. Two non-pigmented, apochlorotic diatom morphotypes (strains III and IV) were consistently isolated from two intertidal beach sites and neither conformed to the morphologies of described species. Apochlorotic diatoms were found throughout the year and formed significant peaks in April, attaining total diatom counts of 71.1 and 94.9 cells g -1 wet sand, for the upper tidal zone and lower tidal zone, respectively. Valve morphology is described in detail for the two diatom morphotypes isolated from the beach sites (strains III and IV). Growth responses to changes in salinity (reflecting those of the intertidal zone) were examined in the laboratory for these diatoms. Both morphotypes were euryhaline, tolerating salinities between 10 and 50, and maximum growth rates were achieved at salinities between 20 and 40. Diatoms grew equally well whether grown in the light or the dark and showed no evidence of pigments when viewed by epifluorescence microscopy. The ability of diatoms to burrow into agar and carrageenan at different concentrations was tested. Both morphotypes were observed to develop burrows through non-nutrient agar up to twice the standard concentration (30 g agar l -1). The ease with which these heterotrophic diatoms formed burrows suggests that they were digesting these complex carbohydrates (i.e. phycocolloids) as a nutrient source. Strain IV, however, failed to burrow in a different phycocolloid, carrageenan. Similar degradative actions in the field might have implications for the breakdown of recalcitrant materials or allow diatoms to effectively compete with bacteria for carbon and nutrients.

Blackburn, Michele V.; Hannah, Fiona; Rogerson, Andrew

2009-10-01

64

Atlantic coastline of Florida as seen from the Apollo 7 spacecraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Atlantic coastline of Florida from Daytona Beach southward to Palm Beach area, as seen from the Apollo 7 spacecraft during its 17th revolution of the earth. Photographed from an altitude of 123 nautical miles, at ground elapsed time of 27 hours and 12 minutes. Cape Kennedy area is in center of picture. Small cumulus cloud puffs cover part of the Kennedy Space Center's Launch Complex 39, although the Vehicle Assembly Building and crawlerways can be seen. The city of Orlando, some 50 miles inland from Cape Kennedy, is also in the photograph.

1968-01-01

65

MISR Views Southern Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

These MISR nadir-camera images of southern Florida were acquired on October 18, 2000 (Terra orbit 4446). The view on the left includes Daytona Beach near the top and the Florida Keys at the bottom. Orlando appears as a grayish patch near the top of the image, just to the east of the greenish Lake Apopka, Florida's fourth largest and most polluted lake. On the coast is Cape Canaveral, home of the Kennedy Space Center.

The large body of water in the middle of the land area is Lake Okeechobee. On the western (Gulf of Mexico) coast, Charlotte Harbor and Fort Myers are visible. Along the eastern (Atlantic) coast, partially obscured by clouds, are Palm Beach, Fort Lauderdale, and Miami. Further to the east, the shallow waters and reefs of the Little Bahama and Great Bahama Banks appear in striking blue and green colors.

The two righthand images show the Florida Everglades and the Keys in more detail. Like the lefthand view, the top image is a natural color composite of blue, green, and red band imagery. On the bottom is a false color composite comprised of green, red, and near-infrared data. Near-infrared light is invisible to the human eye. The high reflectance of plants in this part of the electromagnetic spectrum, displayed here in shades of red, is the basis of many satellite-based techniques for detecting and characterizing land surface vegetation.

2000-01-01

66

Accelerated beach erosion in the south Atlantic coastal zone: is mitigation of artificially renourished beaches in SE Florida a rational practice or folly  

SciTech Connect

The natural erosion of sandy beaches is a world wide problem that is often exacerbated by the structural controls that are designed to mitigate shoreline recession. As seen elsewhere, the deployment of groins and other erosion-control structures has met meager success along the Atlantic coast of south Florida. Artificial renourishment, placement of sand on the beach from land or offshore borrows, is a relatively new nonstructural attempt to reduce shoreline retreat. Our study of sandy shores lying downdrift of jettied inlets identifies restricted sand bypassing that results in classical shoreline offsets. Many of the beaches that were previously renourished are again classified, by the Corps of Engineers, as critically eroded and local governments are now requesting additional rounds of renourishment. Attempts to stabilize renourished shores by planting dune grass, beach scraping, and scarp reduction, as in the Port Everglades area, have failed. Sediment loss at the John U. Lloyd Beach since 1976, for example, is in excess of 500,000 m/sup 3/. In this area, erosion is accelerated and chronic. The severity of localized erosion is highlighted here by assuming a worst case scenario without renourishment or structural control. Hurricane-induced storm surge and overwash could, before renourishment is attempted in 1986 or 1987, cut through the barrier even sooner. Such a breach would expose the port facilities to direct effects of the sea. Joint studies by geoscientists and planners are needed to determine whether continued renourishment of eroded beaches in developed areas is essential, practical, or even advisable.

Finkl, C.W. Jr.; Matlack, P.A.

1985-01-01

67

RECOLLECTION OF HELIANTHUS ARGOPHYLLUS, SOURCE OF THE PlArg GENE FOR DOWNY MILDEW RESISTANCE, SURVIVING FOR 25 YEARS ON DAYTONA BEACH, FLORIDA  

Microsoft Academic Search

The genus Helianthus, besides constituting the basic genetic stock from which cultivated sunflower originated, continues to contribute unique characteristics for cultivated sunflower improvement. Genetic diversity of the wild species has allowed the crop to become and remain economically viable by contributing genes for resistance (tolerance) to pests and environmental stresses. However, there is a continued need to collect, maintain, and

GERALD J. SEILER; TOM J. GULYA; LAURA FREDRICK MAREK

68

Curriculum Change in Black Colleges VIII. A Report on a Cooperative Academic Planning Curriculum Development Workshop (Bethune-Cookman College, Daytona Beach, Florida, June 5-8, 1974).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication includes the proceedings of the June 5-8, 1974 curriculum development workshop of the Cooperative Academic Planning (CAP) program. Emphasis is placed on curriculum change and improvement. Topics discussed include indicators for academic planning; competency-based education; research centers as a mechanism for strengthening…

Calbert, Roosevelt; Epps, Willie J.

69

The ecological condition of Gulf of Mexico resources from Perdido Key to Port St. Joe, Florida, USA: part I. coastal beach resources.  

PubMed

Using the approach established by EPA's Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP), a shoreline monitoring survey was conducted in August and September 1999, encompassing the Florida Panhandle from Perdido Key, Florida to Port St. Joe, Florida. The objective of this survey was to demonstrate the use of a probabilistic survey for monitoring and estimating the condition of swimmable beach areas. Thirty stations were sampled using a probabilistic sampling design. Hydrographic data were collected in addition to samples for water chemistry. Bacterial indicators, enterococci and fecal coliforms, were enumerated from the water according to the EPA Beaches Environmental Assessment Closure and Health (BEACH) Program and Florida state guidelines. Additional criteria for site condition included the presence or absence of primary and secondary dunes, anthropogenic debris and vegetation. Based on EMAP evaluation guidelines and Florida state criteria, a baseline assessment of the condition of the Gulf of Mexico beach resources surveyed is presented. PMID:16957844

Smith, Lisa M; Didonato, Eva M; Harwell, Linda C; Nestlerode, Janet A; Summers, J Kevin

2007-05-01

70

PROCEEDINGS OF THE WORKSHOP: MICROBIAL DEGRADATION OF POLLUTANTS IN MARINE ENVIRONMENTS HELD AT PENSACOLA BEACH, FLORIDA ON 9-14 APRIL 1978  

EPA Science Inventory

The international workshop, held April 10-14, 1978, at Pensacola Beach, Florida, focuses on pertinent issues related to the scientific investigation of microbial degradation of organic chemicals in aquatic environments. Participants discuss methodological criteria for these inves...

71

The Ecological Condition of Gulf of Mexico Resources from Perdido Key to Port St. Joe, Florida, USA: Part I. Coastal Beach Resources  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using the approach established by EPA's Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP), a shoreline monitoring survey\\u000a was conducted in August and September 1999, encompassing the Florida Panhandle from Perdido Key, Florida to Port St. Joe,\\u000a Florida. The objective of this survey was to demonstrate the use of a probabilistic survey for monitoring and estimating the\\u000a condition of swimmable beach areas.

Lisa M. Smith; Eva M. Didonato; Linda C. Harwell; Janet A. Nestlerode; J. Kevin Summers

2007-01-01

72

Daytona And The Fourth-Generation Language Cymbal  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Daytona™ data management system is used by AT&T to solve a wide spectrum of data management problems. For example, Daytona is managing a 4 terabyte data warehouse whose largest table contains over 10 billion rows. Daytona's architecture is based on translating its high-level query language Cymbal™ (which includes SQL as a subset) completely into C and then compiling that

Rick Greer

1999-01-01

73

University of Gloucestershire Student Visit to the University of Central Florida, Department of Criminal Justice  

E-print Network

officers, Daytona Beach UCF Police Department canine demonstration, Orlando"Behind bars" at the American with Sheriff Demings, Orlando Tour of OCSO's Crime Scene Unit, Orlando Meeting with Volusia County Beach Patrol

Foroosh, Hassan

74

Evaluation of a cavity-riddled zone of the shallow aquifer near Riviera Beach, Palm Beach County, Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The shallow aquifer near Riviera Beach, Palm Beach County, Fla., contains a cavity-riddled zone extending north and south about 5 miles inland from the Atlantic Ocean. The zone lies at approximately 60 feet below land surface and varies from 15 to 50 feet in thickness. It is approximately 3 miles in width. Aquifer material is calcareous quartz sand-stone in the cavity zone, whereas the remainder of the consolidated aquifer material is primarily limestone. The zone is overlain by several thin clay beds which provide varying degrees of confinement. The transmissivity of the cavity-riddled zone of the aquifer in the area of investigation is approximately 11,000 square feet per day. Preliminary evaluation indicates that large volumes of water of suitable quality for public supply can be developed from the zone, except in an area adjacent to a landfill where leachate has adversely affected water quality. (USGS)

Fischer, John North, Jr.

1980-01-01

75

Quality of water recovered from a municipal effluent injection well in the Floridan aquifer system, Pompano Beach, Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Approximately 69 million gallons of backflow from an injection well used for the disposal of secondary treated municipal effluent in the Floridan aquifer system near Pompano Beach, Florida, was periodically sampled for inorganic quality from March 1975 through March 1977. Analyses of the backflow effluent showed a concomitant increase in dissolved solids and a change in ionic composition as a function of cumulative volume of backflow. Both the increase in dissolved solids and the change in major ionic composition were directly related to an estimated 6 to 7 percent mixing of the moderately saline water in the Florida aquifer system with the injected system with the injected effluent. Although an estimated 3.5 billion gallons of effluent was injected into the aquifer system during the 16-year operation of the Collier Manor treatment plant, only 65 to 70 million gallons was backflowed before the chloride concentration approached 250 milligrams per liter. (USGS)

McKenzie, D.J.; Irwin, G.A.

1984-01-01

76

Department of Mechanical Engineering Colloquium Seminar Series  

E-print Network

-Riddle Aeronautical University Daytona Beach, Florida, USA We report on a series of benchmark high-fidelity numerical and Aerodynamics Computational Laboratory Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University Daytona Beach, Florida, USA

Barthelat, Francois

77

Journal of Coastal Research 22 4 894905 West Palm Beach, Florida July 2006 Comparing Mean High Water and High Water Line  

E-print Network

erosion, lidar, coastal mapping, shoreline change. INTRODUCTION Many coastal areas are populated heavilyJournal of Coastal Research 22 4 894­905 West Palm Beach, Florida July 2006 Comparing Mean High West Lorain Street Oberlin, OH 44074, U.S.A. laura.moore@oberlin.edu Coastal and Marine Geology

78

Journal of Coastal Research 24 6 16011607 West Palm Beach, Florida November 2008 Geologic Evidence of Hurricane Katrina Recovered from the  

E-print Network

of Hurricane Katrina Recovered from the Pearl River Marsh, MS/LA Carl A. Reese , Thomas P. Strange , Whitney D Palm Beach (Florida), ISSN 0749-0208. Hurricane Katrina made its final landfall on August 29, 2005.S.A. ABSTRACT REESE, C.A.; STRANGE, T.P.; LYNCH, W.D., and LIU, K.B., 2008. Geologic evidence of Hurricane

Liu, Kam-biu

79

PROCEEDINGS AND SUMMARY REPORT: WORKSHOP ON THE FATE, TRANSPORT, AND TRANSFORMATION OF MERCURY IN AQUATIC AND TERRESTRIAL ENVIRONMENTS, MAY 8-10, 2001, WEST PALM BEACH, FLORIDA  

EPA Science Inventory

The Workshop on the Fate, Transport, and Transformation of Mercury in Aquatic and Terrestrial Environments was held on May 8-10, 2001 in West Palm Beach, Florida. The workshop was conducted by the USEPA's Office of Research and Development and cosponsored by the U.S. Geological S...

80

Effect of a Shore-Oblique Ridge on Beach and Bar Morphodynamics at Kennedy Space Center, Cape Canaveral, Florida  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Processes linking beach and bar response to external wave forcing are poorly understood where spatial complexities, such as inner shelf shoals, are present. At NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Cape Canaveral, Florida, two persistant surfzone sand bars occur in a region that also includes cape-associated shoals and multiple shore-oblique ridges at depths below the fair-weather wave base of sediment transport. These features transform incoming deep-water waves, redistributing the spatial pattern of wave energy along- and cross-shore. To observe beach and sandbar response in this complex environment we have collected and georectified hourly beach images at KSC since April 2010. Comparisons of imagery to monthly differential GPS surveys reveal that a double-bar system, with ~25-50 m spacing between crests, has persisted over the last 2 years. Welding of the inner and outer bars occurs intermittently. The preferred welding location coincides with a dune overwash area that has been an erosion hotspot (EHS) over the last decade. Strong nor'easter activity in November 2011 activated wave breaking across a large (~10 km long, ~500 m wide, ~5 m tall) shore-oblique subaqueous ridge that intersects the nearshore system at the EHS. Our observations allow testing of a hypothesis that the ridge controls nearshore morphodynamics through two mechanisms: 1) by focusing, dissipating, and shadowing wave energy, especially during storm events and 2) by providing a sediment source to the nearshore system. The former mechanism is supported through image and survey analysis that shows beach and bar behavior differ updrift and downdrift of the ridge-beach intersection. Three ADCPs were deployed during the early 2010-2011 and late 2011-2012 winter nor'easter seasons to measure wave transformation and current structures in this region. During the most recent deployment, an instrument on the ridge's leeward side was nearly completely buried, yet measured bottom currents (< 50 cm/s) do not imply that significant sediment transport should occur. Rather, we hypothesize that wave breaking over the ridge entrained sediment that was subsequently deposited on the leeward side. This finding suggests that the ridge is mobile and may be a source of sediment to the dynamic nearshore system.

Kline, S. W.; Adams, P. N.; Plant, N. G.; MacKenzie, R. A.; Jaeger, J. M.

2012-12-01

81

Hydrostratigraphic Framework and Selection and Correlation of Geophysical Log Markers in the Surficial Aquifer System, Palm Beach County, Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The surficial aquifer system is the major source of freshwater for public water supply in Palm Beach County, Florida, yet many previous studies of the hydrogeology of this aquifer system have focused only on the eastern one-half to one-third of the county in the more densely populated coastal area (Land and others, 1973; Swayze and others, 1980; Swayze and Miller, 1984; Shine and others, 1989). Population growth in the county has resulted in the westward expansion of urbanized areas into agricultural areas and has created new demands on the water resources of the county. Additionally, interest in surface-water resources of central and western areas of the county has increased. In these areas, plans for additional surface-water storage reservoirs are being made under the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan originally proposed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the South Florida Water Management District (1999), and stormwater treatment areas have been constructed by the South Florida Water Management District. Surface-water and ground-water interactions in the Everglades are thought to be important to water budgets, water quality, and ecology (Harvey and others, 2002). Most of the previous hydrogeologic and ground-water flow simulation studies of the surficial aquifer system have not utilized a hydrostratigraphic framework, in which stratigraphic or sequence stratigraphic units, such as those proposed in Cunningham and others (2001), are delineated in this stratigraphically complex aquifer system. A thick zone of secondary permeability mapped by Swayze and Miller (1984) was not subdivided and was identified as only being within the Anastasia Formation of Pleistocene age. Miller (1987) published 11 geologic sections of the surficial aquifer system, but did not delineate any named stratigraphic units in these sections. This limited interpretation has resulted, in part, from the complex facies changes within rocks and sediments of the surficial aquifer system and the seemingly indistinct and repetitious nature of the most common lithologies, which include sand, shell, sandstone, and limestone. Model construction and layer definition in a simulation of ground-water flow within the surficial aquifer system of Palm Beach County utilized only the boundaries of one or two major hydrogeologic zones, such as the Biscayne aquifer and surficial aquifer system; otherwise layers were defined by average elevations rather than geologic structure or stratigraphy (Shine and others, 1989). Additionally, each major permeable zone layer in the model was assumed to have constant hydraulic conductivity with no allowance for the possibility of discrete (thin) flow zones within the zone. The key to understanding the spatial distribution and hydraulic connectivity of permeable zones in the surficial aquifer system beneath Palm Beach County is the development of a stratigraphic framework based on a consistent method of county-wide correlation. Variability in hydraulic properties in the system needs to be linked to the stratigraphic units delineated in this framework, and proper delineation of the hydrostratigraphic framework should provide a better understanding and simulation of the ground-water flow system. In 2004, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the South Florida Water Management District, initiated an investigation to develop a hydrostratigraphic framework for the surficial aquifer system in Palm Beach County.

Reese, Ronald S.; Wacker, Michael A.

2007-01-01

82

Sea Turtle Program, Volusia County, Florida, USA 2013 Volunteer Summer Internships  

E-print Network

440 South Beach Street Daytona Beach, FL 32114 Attn: Stacey Bell or sbell@volusia.org Please visit www of the beach environment. Self starters and eager learners are highly encouraged to apply. Deadline for all opportunities include monitoring other coastal wildlife, coordinating beach clean up events, responding

Ma, Lena

83

Ineffectiveness of mass trapping for mosquito control in St. Andrews State Park, Panama City Beach, Florida.  

PubMed

ABSTRACT. Mass trapping with multiple CO2- and octenol-supplemented Mosquito Magnet X traps (MM-X), operated 24 h/day, 7 days/wk, from March through November 2008, at St. Andrews State Park on northwest Florida's Gulf Coast, did not significantly reduce mosquito numbers compared to nontreated control sites. Anopheles crucians, Aedes taeniorhynchus, Culex salinarius, and Culex erraticus were the predominant species. Culex coronator was also collected for the first time in the park. Failure to reduce a late season outbreak of Ae. taeniorhynchus within the trapping area required adulticide application to achieve mosquito control. PMID:20402350

Smith, John P; Cope, Eric H; Walsh, Jimmy D; Hendrickson, Charles D

2010-03-01

84

University of Rhode Island inAdvance October 25, 2007  

E-print Network

-874- 4854. Men's basketball team in Daytona Beach tournament Show your Rhody pride and cheer on the URI Men's Basketball team at the Glenn Wilkes Classic in Daytona Beach, Florida, on November 16, 17, and 18. Learn more

Rhode Island, University of

85

University of Rhode Island inAdvance November 8, 2007  

E-print Network

19. Men's basketball team in Daytona Beach tournament Show your Rhody pride and cheer on the URI Men's Basketball team at the Glenn Wilkes Classic in Daytona Beach, Florida, on November 16, 17, and 18. Learn more

Rhode Island, University of

86

36 CFR Appendix B to Part 72 - List of Eligible Jurisdictions  

...Danville, Virginia Dayton, Ohio Daytona Beach, Florida Denison, Texas Denver...Ohio Lompoc, California Long Beach, California Long Branch, New...Mississippi Miami, Florida Miami Beach, Florida Middletown, Ohio...

2014-07-01

87

Report: Joint Conference: Second Annual Region IV Conference on Adult Education and Second Regional Institute Southeastern Region Adult Basic Education Staff Development Project. (Daytona Beach, Florida, February 14-18, 1970).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two simultaneous conferences on Adult Education and Adult Basic Education were held because it was considered that interaction between the two conference groups would be mutually beneficial. The defined goal of this joint institute was: the identification of problems, strategies, and priorities as they relate to an on-going plan for staff…

Southern Regional Education Board, Atlanta, GA.

88

Determining discharge-coefficient ratings for selected coastal control structures in Broward and Palm Beach counties, Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Discharges through 10 selected coastal control structures in Broward and Palm Beach Counties, Florida, are presently computed using the theoretical discharge-coefficient ratings developed from scale modeling, theoretical discharge coefficients, and some field calibrations whose accuracies for specific sites are unknown. To achieve more accurate discharge-coefficient ratings for the coastal control structures, field discharge measurements were taken with an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler at the coastal control structures under a variety of flow conditions. These measurements were used to determine computed discharge-coefficient ratings for the coastal control structures under different flow regimes: submerged orifice flow, submerged weir flow, free orifice flow, and free weir flow. Theoretical and computed discharge-coefficient ratings for submerged orifice and weir flows were determined at seven coastal control structures, and discharge ratings for free orifice and weir flows were determined at three coastal control structures. The difference between the theoretical and computed discharge-coefficient ratings varied from structure to structure. The theoretical and computed dischargecoefficient ratings for submerged orifice flow were within 10 percent at four of seven coastal control structures; however, differences greater than 20 percent were found at two of the seven structures. The theoretical and computed discharge-coefficient ratings for submerged weir flow were within 10 percent at three of seven coastal control structures; however, differences greater than 20 percent were found at four of the seven coastal control structures. The difference between theoretical and computed discharge-coefficient ratings for free orifice and free weir flows ranged from 5 to 32 percent. Some differences between the theoretical and computed discharge-coefficient ratings could be better defined with more data collected over a greater distribution of measuring conditions.

Tillis, G. M.; Swain, E. D.

1998-01-01

89

Journal of Coastal Research 21 3 522534 West Palm Beach, Florida May 2005 Beach Profile Equilibrium and Patterns of Wave Decay and  

E-print Network

and erosion. The rate of wave- energy dissipation was greater at the main breaker line and in the swash zone or greater derived previously for regular waves. ADDITIONAL INDEX WORDS: Beach profile, equilibrium, cross-shore with morphological evolution in the near- shore. Under this concept, if the incident waves and water level remain

US Army Corps of Engineers

90

Journal of Coastal Research 21 3 553578 West Palm Beach, Florida May 2005 Seasonal to Interannual Morphodynamics along a  

E-print Network

recorded wave year in the region, resulted in net beach erosion along much of the littoral cell control monuments, a nested sampling scheme con- sisting of cross-shore topographic beach profiles, three meters to approximately 100 kilometers and cross-shore length scales of approximately 1 meter

91

CLASS XI NRLI Beach Management  

E-print Network

SESSION February 2012 06 REPORT BY CLASS XI NRLI Beach Management for Migrating Shore Birds and Human Recreation At the Holiday Inn, Fort Myers Beach, Project Team member Bruce Delaney welcomedthe,emotions,andpeople. this issue Welcome to Ft Myers Beach P.1 Florida Bay P.2 Difficult Dynamics P.3 Fieldtrip to Carlos Pointe P

Florida, University of

92

Project Summary This objective of this proposal is to provide new community resource to satisfy a  

E-print Network

. Residential campuses in Daytona Beach, Florida, and Prescott, Arizona, provide education in a traditional community. Our facilities The Daytona Beach campus, where this hardware will be housed and maintained, is located next to, and upon, the Daytona Beach International Airport. The 185-acre campus serves roughly 5

93

Florida  

...     View Larger Image These Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) nadir-camera ... Orlando appears as a grayish patch near the top of the image, just to the east of the greenish Lake Apopka, Florida's fourth largest ...

2014-05-15

94

Annotated bibliography of the geology and hydrology of the surficial aquifers in Dade, Broward, and Palm Beach counties, Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

References and abstracts from 149 hydrologic and geologic investigations concerning the surficial aquifers of southeast Florida have been compiled to prepare an annotated bibliography. The references are listed alphabetically by the author 's name. (USGS)

Causaras, C.R.

1982-01-01

95

Variations in Nearshore Bar Morphology: Implications for Rip Current Development at Pensacola Beach, Florida from 1951 to 2004  

E-print Network

that the rip-scale variation in bar morphology (~100-250m) is superimposed on an alongshore variation consistent with the scale of the transverse ridges (~1000m). From the outer bar to the shoreline, and as the bar migrates landward, the variation becomes... ............................................................................................. 35 3.1 Beach State Classification .............................................................. 35 3.2 Shoreline ......................................................................................... 38 3.3 Inner Bar...

Barrett, Gemma Elizabeth

2012-10-19

96

The Early Childhood Cluster Initiative of Palm Beach County, Florida. Early Implementation Study and Evaluability Assessment. Executive Summary  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report summarizes findings from the first year of an implementation study of the Early Childhood Cluster Initiative (ECCI). ECCI is a prekindergarten program in ten elementary schools and a community child care center in Palm Beach County, based on the design of the High/Scope Perry Preschool model. The initiative is characterized by low…

Spielberger, Julie; Goyette, Paul

2006-01-01

97

Assessing the Impact of Urban Runoff in Recreational Beaches in South Carolina and Florida Using Culturable and QPCR Fecal Indicator  

EPA Science Inventory

Urban/suburban runoff carries a variety of pollutants that often includes bacterial pathogens and indicators of fecal contamination. The objective of this study was to assess the microbial water quality of recreational beaches impacted solely by urban runoff through the use of cu...

98

Florida  

... of view angle enables scientists to assess the climate impact of different types of cloud fields. The plume from a large brush fire ... Florida. MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Science Mission ...

2014-05-15

99

Journal of Coastal Research 25 1 822 West Palm Beach, Florida January 2009 Geomorphologic Evolution of Barrier Islands along the  

E-print Network

Evolution of Barrier Islands along the Northern U.S. Gulf of Mexico and Implications for Engineering Design, G.W., 2009. Geomorphologic evolution of barrier islands along the northern U.S. Gulf of Mexico, Alabama, and Florida panhandle) processes and barrier islands that are pertinent to their geomorphologic

US Army Corps of Engineers

100

Collaborative Governance of HIV Health Services Planning Councils in Broward and Palm Beach Counties of South Florida  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study uses the collaborative governance concept to examine efforts of HIV Health Services Planning Councils in two South\\u000a Florida Counties. The study employs qualitative methods such as interviews and document reviews in collecting data from various\\u000a relevant sources. The results reveal more similarities than differences in the Councils’ efforts toward addressing the HIV\\/AIDS\\u000a problem. The Councils are similar in

James K. Agbodzakey

2012-01-01

101

77 FR 50065 - Safety Zone; Jacksonville Sea and Sky Spectacular, Atlantic Ocean; Jacksonville Beach, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Jacksonville Sea and Sky Spectacular, Atlantic Ocean; Jacksonville Beach, FL AGENCY...safety zone on the waters of the Atlantic Ocean east of Jacksonville Beach, Florida...host an air show event over the Atlantic Ocean in Jacksonville Beach, FL....

2012-08-20

102

78 FR 22814 - Special Local Regulations; Miami Super Boat Grand Prix, Atlantic Ocean; Miami Beach, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Miami Super Boat Grand Prix, Atlantic Ocean; Miami Beach, FL AGENCY: Coast...special local regulation on the Atlantic Ocean east of Miami Beach, Florida...will be held on the waters of the Atlantic Ocean east of Miami Beach,...

2013-04-17

103

Beach Mice1 Brittany L. Bird, Lyn C. Branch, Mark E. Hostetler2  

E-print Network

WEC 165 Beach Mice1 Brittany L. Bird, Lyn C. Branch, Mark E. Hostetler2 1. This document is WEC 165/Christine Taylor Waddill, Dean. Beach mice, as their name indicates, live on beaches in Florida and Alabama. Beach live with beach mice in these dune habitats, including the six-lined racer, monarch butterflies, snowy

Branch, Lyn C.

104

Approach for delineation of contributing areas and zones of transport to selected public-supply wells using a regional ground-water flow model, Palm Beach County, Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Rapid urban development and population growth in Palm Beach County, Florida, have been accompanied with the need for additional freshwater withdrawals from the surficial aquifer system. To maintain water quality, County officials protect capture areas and determine zones of transport of municipal supply wells. A multistep process was used to help automate the delineation of wellhead protection areas. A modular ground-water flow model (MODFLOW) Telescopic Mesh Refinement program (MODTMR) was used to construct an embedded flow model and combined with particle tracking to delineate zones of transport to supply wells; model output was coupled with a geographic information system. An embedded flow MODFLOW model was constructed using input and output file data from a preexisting three-dimensional, calibrated model of the surficial aquifer system. Three graphical user interfaces for use with the geographic information software, ArcView, were developed to enhance the telescopic mesh refinement process. These interfaces include AvMODTMR for use with MODTMR; AvHDRD to build MODFLOW river and drain input files from dynamically segmented linear (canals) data sets; and AvWELL Refiner, an interface designed to examine and convert well coverage spatial data layers to a MODFLOW Well package input file. MODPATH (the U.S. Geological Survey particle-tracking postprocessing program) and MODTOOLS (the set of U.S. Geological Survey computer programs to translate MODFLOW and MODPATH output to a geographic information system) were used to map zones of transport. A steady-state, five-layer model of the Boca Raton area was created using the telescopic mesh refinement process and calibrated to average conditions during January 1989 to June 1990. A sensitivity analysis of various model parameters indicates that the model is most sensitive to changes in recharge rates, hydraulic conductivity for layer 1, and leakance for layers 3 and 4 (Biscayne aquifer). Recharge (58 percent); river (canal) leakance (29 percent); and inflow through the northern, western, and southern prescribed flux model boundaries (10 percent) represent the major inflow components. Principal outflow components in the Boca Raton well field area include well discharge (56 percent), river (canal) leakance (27 percent), and water that discharges along the coast (10 percent). A particle-tracking analysis using MODPATH was conducted to better understand well-field ground-water flow patterns and time of travel. MODTOOLS was used to construct zones-of-transport spatial data for municipal supply wells. Porosity estimates were uniformly increased to study the effect of porosity on zones of transport. Where porosity was increased, the size of the zones of transport were shown to decrease.

Renken, R. A.; Patterson, R. D.; Orzol, L. L.; Dixon, Joann

2001-01-01

105

Gingrich Palm Beach County supporters 'disappointed but not discouraged'  

E-print Network

Gingrich Palm Beach County supporters 'disappointed but not discouraged' 2012-02-01 17:16:03 PALM BEACH COUNTY, Fla. -- As expected Newt Gingrich lost in Florida by a landslide. The polls predicted of three created a "Palm Beach County for Newt Gingrich 2012" Facebook page in November. Shortly afterwards

Belogay, Eugene A.

106

A Pilot Study Related to Identification, Placement, and Curriculum Development for Academically Underprepared Students in Florida Junior Colleges.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated the limitation of using only achievement test batteries to identify and place academically underprepared students, and suggests curriculum innovations to deal more adequately with the problem. Ninety students at Daytona Beach and Santa Fe junior colleges provided data by completing a series of physical, psychological, and…

Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Task Force on Testing.

107

The Beach  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Have you ever wondered what sand is made of? Where does it come from? How can we keep our beaches clean? Let's work together using the internet to find out a little bit more about the beach. Web Quest Links Introduction Task Resources Evaluation Conclusion Teacher Guide TASK Dear students, Miss Kaysha was at the beach last week and she saw lots of sand. She wants to know how it got there and what it is made of. She also saw ...

2009-04-26

108

Beach Erosion  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Why Files article considers beach erosion. Topics covered are: the nature and extent of beach losses, the role of beaches in protecting coasts, some measures -good and bad- to prevent coastal erosion, predicted effects of global warming and sea-level changes on beaches and the impact of melting ice sheets on global ocean volume. Some glaciologists using new calculations, think that instead of possibly collapsing in 100 years, as was considered possible 10 years ago, that the West Antarctic Ice Sheet is more likely to collapse in perhaps 5,000 years at the soonest. Five scientists were interviewed for this article.

Tenenbaum, David

1999-07-22

109

ENTEROCOCCI IN THE WATER COLUMN AND SHORELINE INTERSTITIAL WATERS AT BEACHES ON THE GULF OF MEXICO AND SANTA ROSA SOUND, PENSACOLA, FLORIDA  

EPA Science Inventory

Interstitial water in the swash zone, that area of a beach where waves continuously wash up on the sand, is suspected of accumulating microbes. If pathogens are concentrated in the interstitial water or if they grow, they may pose a health risk, especially for children. This st...

110

The Early Childhood Cluster Initiative of Palm Beach County, Florida. Early Implementation Study And Evaluability Assessment. Final Report. Chapin Hall Working Paper  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication reports findings from the first year of an implementation study of the Early Childhood Cluster Initiative (ECCI). ECCI is a prekindergarten program in ten elementary schools and a community child care center in Palm Beach County, based on the design of the High/Scope Perry Preschool model. The initiative is characterized by low…

Spielberger, Julie; Goyette, Paul

2006-01-01

111

The University's campuses are located on the Gold and Treasure Coasts of Southeast Florida. The region's temperate climate, beautiful beaches, innovative industries and unique cultural opportunities provide a  

E-print Network

of Education, the College of Engineering and Computer Science, the Graduate College, the Christine E. Lynn, the Division of Colleges and Universities of the Florida Board of Education has classified FAU as a research-division and graduate-level work, on the theory that freshmen and sophomores could be served by the community college

Fernandez, Eduardo

112

Geophysical and Geotechnical Determination of Sand Resources on the Florida Atlantic Continental Shelf: Preliminary Results  

Microsoft Academic Search

The State of Florida is committed to maintaining beaches to sustain beach width and protect coastal infrastructure. Nearshore sand resources must be identified and cataloged for potential beach nourishment projects in response to sea-level rise and increased tropical storm activity. Given the vast length of Florida coastline, application of a variety of remote sensing techniques are required for measuring large

C. W. Finkl; J. L. Andrews; B. C. Suthard; W. Robertson

2007-01-01

113

76 FR 24813 - Safety Zone; Fourth Annual Offshore Challenge, Sunny Isles Beach, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...a temporary safety zone in the Atlantic Ocean east of Sunny Isles Beach, Florida...boat races will be held in the Atlantic Ocean offshore of Sunny Isles Beach...safety zone. All waters of the Atlantic Ocean east of Sunny Isles Beach,...

2011-05-03

114

For first time since 2007, food stamp use drops in state, Palm Beach County  

E-print Network

For first time since 2007, food stamp use drops in state, Palm Beach County March 13, 2013|By Donna in Palm Beach County fell in February, according to data from the Florida Department of Children from last year when the number of food stamp recipients in Palm Beach County jumped nearly 14 percent

Fernandez, Eduardo

115

Losing shuttle program to hurt Space Coast far worse than Palm Beach County  

E-print Network

Losing shuttle program to hurt Space Coast far worse than Palm Beach County By JEFF OSTROWSKI Palm Beach Post Staff Writer Updated: 5:07 p.m. Sunday, July 3, 2011 Posted: 4:59 p.m. Sunday, July 3, 2011 agency Space Florida. For many in Palm Beach County's aerospace industry, the shuttle's demise merits

Belogay, Eugene A.

116

Effects of lowering interior canal stages on salt-water intrusion into the shallow aquifer in Southeast Palm Beach County, Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Land in southeast Palm Beach County is undergoing a large-scale change in use, from agricultural to residential. To accommodate residential use, a proposal has been made by developers to the Board of the Lake Worth Drainage District to lower the canal stages in the interior part of the area undergoing change. This report documents one of the possible effects of such lowering. Of particular interest to the Board was whether the lower canal stages would cause an increase in salt-water intrusion into the shallow aquifer along the coast. The two main tools used in the investigation were a digital model for aquifer evaluation and an analytical technique for predicting the movement of the salt-water front in response to a change of ground-water flow into the ocean. The method of investigation consisted of developing a digital ground-water flow model for three east-west test strips. They pass through the northern half of municipal well fields in Lake Worth, Delray Beach, and Boca Raton. The strips were first modeled with no change in interior canal stages. Then they were modeled with a change in canal stages of 2 to 4 feet (0.6 to 1.6 metres). Also, two land development schemes were tested. One was for a continuation of the present level of land development, simulated by continuing the present pumpage rates. The second scheme was for land development to continue until the maximum allowable densities were reached, simulated by increasing the pumping rates. The results of the test runs for an east-west strip through Lake Worth show that lowering part of the interior canal water levels 3 feet (1.0 metre), as done in 1961, does not affect the aquifer head or salt-water intrusion along the coastal area of Lake Worth. As a result, no effect in the coastal area would be expected as a result of canal stage lowering in other, interior parts of the study area. Results from the other test runs show that lowering interior canal water levels by as much as 4 feet (1.2 metres) would result in some salt-water intrusion for either land development scheme. Salt-water intrusion is dependent on the location, and amount of water withdrawn, from well fields.

Land, Larry F.

1975-01-01

117

Coastal land loss in Florida  

SciTech Connect

Florida has approximately 593 mi of shoreline fronting on the Atlantic Ocean and Straits of Florida and approximately 673 mi of shoreline fronting on the Gulf of Mexico with an additional 5,000 mi of bay and estuary shoreline. Of a statewide total of 818.9 mi of open coast sandy beaches, 337.2 mi or 41.2% of the beaches are identified as erosion problem areas. These erosion problem areas include those beaches with a moderate or low erosion rate, but with a narrow width fronting a highly developed area, and those restored beaches with an active maintenance nourishment program. Of these erosion problem areas, 217.8 mi or 26.6% of the statewide beach length are areas of critical erosion; that is, segments of the shoreline where substantial development or recreation interests are threatened by the erosion processes. On a shorewide basis, the Atlantic Ocean beaches of Florida typically have historical erosion rates of between 0 and {minus}3 ft per year, while the Gulf of Mexico beaches typically have historical erosion rates of between 0 and {minus}2 ft per year. Many of the problem areas have shoreline erosion rates in the magnitude of between {minus}3 and {minus}5 ft per year. The most extreme erosion rates are occurring along the southern portion of St. Joseph Peninsula at Cape San Bias where the annual shoreline recession exceeds {minus}20 ft. Erosion conditions in Florida are most apparent as a result of storm tides and storm wave activity. Extreme meteorological events inflict significant erosion conditions in all beach areas of the state. Historical shoreline changes are often the cumulative effect of a number of storm events and their cycles of poststorm recovery. Erosion and damage from recent storms as well as efforts to mitigate storm damage have heightened the erosion problems and incited a public response through coastal construction regulation and beach management planning.

Clark, R.R. (Florida Dept. of Natural Resources, Tallahassee (USA))

1990-09-01

118

Anniston Museum of Natural History, Anniston Gulf Coast Exploreum Science Center, Mobile  

E-print Network

and Sciences, Daytona Beach Museum of Discovery & Science, Fort Lauderdale Museum of Science & History, Fort Walton Beach Florida Air Museum, Lakeland Florida Museum of Natural History, Gainesville Myers Loggerhead Marinelife Center, Juno Beach MOSI (Museum of Science & Industry), Tampa Museum of Arts

Patterson, Bruce D.

119

Impact of WESH Case on Procedures for Comparative License Renewals.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses Federal Communications Commission policies concerning comparative license renewal standards; examines the application of those standards to the case involving control of television station WESH in Daytona Beach, Florida; and evaluates the implications of that case. (FL)

Meeske, Milan D.

1980-01-01

120

On the beach Introduction  

E-print Network

On the beach Onno Bokhove Introduction: Cutting Edge Mathematical Design of Hele-Shaw Beach Beach-Shaw' Beach Evolution by Breaking Waves Onno Bokhove "Mathematics of Computational Science", University of Twente CASA, TU Eindhoven, November 2011 #12;On the beach Onno Bokhove Introduction: Cutting Edge

Al Hanbali, Ahmad

121

Education Conference of the Gulf of Mexico Accord (1st, Daytona Beach, FL, September 28-30, 1995). Interim Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Under the auspices of the North American Free Trade Agreement, five states in the United States and six states in Mexico established the Gulf of Mexico Accord to create a working partnership to foster economic development in the Gulf of Mexico. The agreement addresses six major sectors: investment; communication and transportation; health;…

Day, Philip R., Jr.

122

Beach profile variation on Hawaiian carbonate beaches  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Beach profiles from selected Oahu and Maui beaches quantitatively document beach volume variation and change between 1994 and 1999. Along exposed, high-energy beaches, large fluctuations in beach volume, characterized primarily by the formation and erosion of extensive berms, dominate the seasonal changes. Beaches along more protected stretches of coastline show much less variation in profile morphology. Beaches on the west (leeward) coast of Oahu experienced the most seasonal variation in profile volume, followed by the north shore, east (windward) shore, and south shore. Similar to Oahu, beaches along the west coast of Maui showed the greatest overall profile variation. However, the mean variation for profiles along a single coastal reach showed little difference compared to other coastal segments. Although some beaches showed net gain or loss during the study period, most beaches remained relatively stable with change limited to a finite envelope. No island-wide trends in beach erosion or accretion were observed during the study period. However, no extreme events, such as tropical storms or hurricanes, directly influenced the Hawaiian Islands during the study period. This data set should therefore be considered as representative of typical annual beach activity. Greater variation and possible long-term change would be expected during extreme events.

Gibbs, A. E.; Richmond, B. M.; Fletcher, C. H.

2000-01-01

123

76 FR 53822 - Safety Zone; Labor Day at the Landing Santa Rosa Sound, Fort Walton Beach, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Safety Zone; Labor Day at the Landing Santa Rosa Sound, Fort Walton Beach, FL AGENCY...temporary safety zone for a portion of the Santa Rosa Sound in Fort Walton Beach, Florida...Permit to conduct a fireworks display on the Santa Rosa Sound, in Fort Walton Beach,...

2011-08-30

124

76 FR 26931 - Safety Zone; Second Annual Space Coast Super Boat Grand Prix, Atlantic Ocean, Cocoa Beach, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Coast Super Boat Grand Prix, Atlantic Ocean, Cocoa Beach, FL AGENCY: Coast...safety zone on the waters of the Atlantic Ocean east of Cocoa Beach, Florida...will be held on the waters of the Atlantic Ocean east of Cocoa Beach,...

2011-05-10

125

The Rotary Club of Boca Raton Sunrise is pleased to offer: Future Teachers of Palm Beach County  

E-print Network

The Rotary Club of Boca Raton Sunrise is pleased to offer: Future Teachers of Palm Beach County is be a Teacher of students of Palm Beach County, or current Teachers who wish to upgrade their skills. We are for students majoring in Education attending Palm Beach State College, Florida Atlantic University or Lynn

Fernandez, Eduardo

126

South Florida Sun-Sentinel.com South Florida a bargain haven for used cars, website says  

E-print Network

South Florida Sun-Sentinel.com South Florida a bargain haven for used cars, website says By Donna on a used car. According to CarGurus.com, a car-shopping website, used cars in Broward, Palm Beach and Miami on an analysis of 3 million listings for pre-owned cars across the country. Shopping patterns seem to bear

Fernandez, Eduardo

127

Florida From Space  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Taken during the STS-95 mission from a point over Cuba, this photo shows an oblique, foreshortened view of the Florida Peninsula, with the light blue, shallow seafloor of both the Florida Keys (curving across the bottom of the view) and the Bahama banks (right). 'Popcorn' cumulus cloud covers Miami and the Southern Everglades, although the built-up area from Ft. Lauderdale to West Palm Beach can be discerned. Lake Okeechobee is the prominent waterbody in Florida. Cape Canaveral is shown well, half way up the peninsula. Orlando appears as the lighter patch West (left) of Cape Canaveral, near the middle of the peninsula. Cape Hatteras appears top right, with the North part of Chesapeake Bay also visible. This is a visibility of 16 degrees of latitude (23 degrees N over Cuba to 39 degrees at Baltimore), showing unusual atmospheric clarity.

1998-01-01

128

Anniston Museum of Natural History, Anniston Gulf Coast Exploreum Science Center, Mobile  

E-print Network

, Daytona Beach Museum of Discovery & Science, Inc., Fort Lauderdale Museum of Science & History, Fort Walton Beach Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, Miami The Florida Air Museum at Sun `n Fun-On Museum, Fort Myers Loggerhead Marinelife Center, Juno Beach The Mary Brogan Museum of Art and Science

Westneat, Mark W.

129

List of Providers of NMFS Approved Endangered Species Observers -Platform, Dredge and/or Seismic alphabetical by company name -(last updated 1-2013)  

E-print Network

@hotmail.com (207)460-2170 JCG Marine Services Joe Giquinto 175 Ekana Circle Daytona Beach, FL 32124 386@gmail.com East West Technical Jerry Cygler East West Technical Services, Inc. PO Box 643864 Vero Beach, Florida@ecoes.com www.ecoes.com Ecological Associates, Inc R. Eric Martin P.O. Box 405 Jensen Beach, FL 34958 772

130

Florida beachgoers are warned to stay OUT of the water: Tens of thousands of 'frenzied'  

E-print Network

Florida beachgoers are warned to stay OUT of the water: Tens of thousands of 'frenzied' sharks down beaches across the area and forcing swimmers out of the water. The sharks are heading north after of a shark while in the water in the Palm Beach area. Several beaches have been closed to swimmers as red

Fernandez, Eduardo

131

Discrete event simulation to improve aircraft availability and maintainability  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a study of maintenance operations at the Daytona Beach, Florida campus of Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. Embry-Riddle is well-known for its large flight training programs. The Flight Training Department also maintains the school's aircraft on-site at the Daytona Beach campus. There, overall system availability at the operational level has been a chronic problem. The number of aircraft grounded

Massoud Bazargan; R. N. McGrath

2003-01-01

132

76 FR 9278 - Safety Zone; Fourth Annual Offshore Challenge, Sunny Isles Beach, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...a temporary safety zone in the Atlantic Ocean east of Sunny Isles Beach, Florida...Challenge has been held in the Atlantic Ocean offshore of Sunny Isles Beach...zone around a race area in the Atlantic Ocean offshore of Sunny Isles...

2011-02-17

133

BEACHES HEALTH SURVEY  

EPA Science Inventory

Baterial samples were taken at swimming beaches (primarily freshwater beaches) in Region 10 while evaluating potential bacterial sources (e.g., people, cattle, pets, septic systems, runoff, birds). For each beach selected, the preferred sampling is: background, low/no use period...

134

University of Florida Digital Collections: Florida Photograph Collections  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Florida is much, much more than a certain rather large theme park and the bustling nightlife of South Beach. Anyone with a cursory interest in the history of the Sunshine State should make a beeline for this engaging site. Created by the University of Florida Digital Collections, the Florida Photograph collection contains thousands of images related to the history and culture of the state. The collection features a number of subcollections, including Florida Ephemera and Concrete Blog: Messages on the Wall. The Concrete Blog section offers a fascinating portrait of Gainesville's 34th Street Wall, which has served as a community sounding board and place of artistic reflection for over 30 years. Neophytes can also type a few keywords into the search engine to get started; they might do well to begin with Tampa, Apalachicola, or hotels.

2012-05-18

135

Palm Beach Community College Strategic Plan, 1999-2004.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report addresses strategies and action plans for Palm Beach Community College (PBCC) (Florida) between 1999-2004. As part of a commitment to achieve specific, measurable end results, the college has set various objectives, including: (1) develop, implement and institutionalize a mission driven strategic budget for the 1999-2000 fiscal year;…

Samuels, Seymour

136

Boca Raton Dania Beach Davie Fort Lauderdale Harbor Branch Jupiter Treasure Coast An Equal Opportunity/Equal Access Institution  

E-print Network

Boca Raton Dania Beach Davie Fort Lauderdale Harbor Branch Jupiter Treasure Coast.fau.edu/student Florida Atlantic University Game Day Fan Conduct Policy and Procedures: FAU sports fans have long been

Fernandez, Eduardo

137

Herbert Hoover Dike Major Rehabilitation Glades, Hendry and Palm Beach Counties Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This Environmental Assessment (EA) proposes structural rehabilitation measures for Reach 1 and two priority areas in Reaches 2 and 3 of the Herbert Hoover Dike, in Palm Beach and Hendry Counties, Florida. The recommended alternative is to fill the existin...

2007-01-01

138

Volusia County, Florida. PLATO Evaluation Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An evaluation was conducted to determine how the PLATO Pathways program was used in three high schools in Volusia County, Florida: Deland, New Smyrna Beach, and Atlantic. Of the many PLATO sites in Volusia, these three were selected for study because of the representative patterns of low, medium, and high PLATO use. PLATO is a computer learning…

Hannafin, Bob

139

Projected sea level rise in Florida  

Microsoft Academic Search

Future sea level rise will lead to salt water intrusion, beach\\/dune recession, and many other coastal problems. This paper addresses a data based forecasting approach to provide relative sea level rise estimates at locations in Florida where historical water level data exist. Many past estimates of sea level rise have treated the rise as a linear straight line trend over

Todd L. Walton

2007-01-01

140

Florida Ecosystems  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Provided by FICUS (the Florida Internet Center for Understanding Sustainability) and the University of South Florida, this gem of a site covers Florida's native upland, freshwater, and marine ecosystems. Streamlined in organization but solid in content, Florida Ecosystems offers introductory information and photographic images of a dozen ecosystems, ranging from Pine Flatwoods and Dry Prairies to Mangrove Swamps and Coral Reefs. For students and educators interested in subtropical ecosystems, this is a nice place to start.

141

UCF Stands For Opportunity UndergraduateCatalog  

E-print Network

Clearlake Road Building 3 Cocoa, FL 32922 321-433-7821 UCF Daytona Beach (In partnership with Daytona State College) 1200 W. International Speedway Blvd. Daytona Beach, FL 32114 386-506-4021 UCF Leesburg (In

Wu, Shin-Tson

142

UCF Stands For Opportunity UndergraduateCatalog  

E-print Network

State College) 1519 Clearlake Road Building 3 Cocoa, FL 32922 321-433-7821 UCF Daytona Beach (In partnership with Daytona State College) 1200 W. International Speedway Blvd. Daytona Beach, FL 32114 386

Wu, Shin-Tson

143

State of the Beach  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This annual Surfrider Foundation report surveys the state of the beaches in coastal and Great Lakes states that are home to Foundation chapters. Each state is rated based on the availability of information and status of eight indicators, including beach access, Website access, surf zone water quality, and beach erosion, among others. The report is written from the perspective of a "concerned local citizen" and aimed at "the people who use and care most about this precious resource." The online report contains six sections, including an executive summary, an explanation of the indicators, conclusions, and recommendations.

2000-01-01

144

Preparing for Changing Educational Roles: Creating and Learning from within the Public Schools.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the Professional Development Schools (PDS) initiative to simultaneously restructure schools and teacher education programs. Outlines program components. Presents steps to develop an inclusive PDS through the University of Central Florida-Daytona Beach, Volusia County School District, and the Florida Inclusion Network, including public…

Little, Mary E.

2000-01-01

145

Phase III Proposed Early Restoration Project Alabama Florida Louisiana Mississippi Texas  

E-print Network

an entrance kiosk, information facilities, parking facilities, a parking area, interpretive fishing facility for trash and food storage. ESTIMATED COST The Florida Navarre Beach Park Coastal Access and Dune

146

South Florida Sun-Sentinel.com Candidate mischief deprives South Florida voters of a say in  

E-print Network

and Palm Beach counties are shut out of some elections this year, deprived of any say in who will run key parts of county government and represent them in the Florida Legislature. It's all very legal counties, are for Democrats and Republicans to choose their party's nominees to run in the Nov. 6 general

Belogay, Eugene A.

147

Hawaii Beach Monitoring Program: Beach Profile Data  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Coastal erosion is widespread and locally severe in Hawaii and other low-latitude areas. Typical erosion rates in Hawaii are in the range of 15 to 30 cm/yr (0.5 to 1 ft/yr; Hwang, 1981; Sea Engineering, Inc., 1988; Makai Ocean Engineering, Inc. and Sea Engineering, Inc.,1991). Recent studies on Oahu (Fletcher et al., 1997; Coyne et al., 1996) have shown that nearly 24%, or 27.5 km (17.1 mi) of an original 115 km (71.6 mi) of sandy shoreline (1940's) has been either significantly narrowed (17.2 km; 10.7 mi) or lost (10.3 km; 6.4 mi). Nearly one-quarter of the islands' beaches have been significantly degraded over the last half-century and all shorelines have been affected to some degree. Oahu shorelines are by far the most studied, however, beach loss has been identified on the other islands as well, with nearly 13 km (8 mi) of beach likely lost due to shoreline hardening on Maui (Makai Engineering, Inc. and Sea Engineering, Inc., 1991). Causes of coastal erosion and beach loss in Hawaii are numerous but, unfortunately, poorly understood and rarely quantified. Construction of shoreline protection structures limits coastal land loss, but does not alleviate beach loss and may actually accelerate the problem by prohibiting sediment deposition in front of the structures. Other factors contributing to beach loss include: a) reduced sediment supply; b) large storms; and, c) sea-level rise. Reduction in sand supply, either from landward or seaward (primarily reef) sources, can have a myriad of causes. Obvious causes such as beach sand mining and emplacement of structures that interrupt natural sediment transport pathways or prevent access to backbeach sand deposits, remove sediment from the active littoral system. More complex issues of sediment supply can be related to reef health and carbonate production which, in turn, may be linked to changes in water quality. Second, the accumulated effect of large storms is to transport sediment beyond the littoral system. Third, rising sea level leads to a natural landward migration of the shoreline. Dramatic examples of coastal erosion, such as houses and roads falling into the sea, are rare in Hawaii, but the impact of erosion is still very serious. The signs of erosion are much more subtle and typically start as a "temporary" hardening structure designed to mitigate an immediate problem which, eventually, results in a proliferation of structures along a stretch of coast. The natural ability of the sandy shoreline to respond to changes in wave climate is lost. The overall goals of this study are to document the coastal erosion history in Hawaii, determine the causal factors of that erosion, provide high-quality data for other "end-users" in applied studies (i.e. coastal engineers, planners, and managers), and increase our general understanding of low-latitude coastal geologic development. This project involves close cooperation between the USGS Coastal and Marine Geology Program and the University of Hawaii.

Gibbs, Ann E.; Richmond, Bruce M.; Fletcher, Charles H.; Hillman, Kindra P.

2001-01-01

148

Virtual Beach: Decision Support Tools for Beach Pathogen Prediction  

EPA Science Inventory

The Virtual Beach Managers Tool (VB) is decision-making software developed to help local beach managers make decisions as to when beaches should be closed due to predicted high levels of water borne pathogens. The tool is being developed under the umbrella of EPA's Advanced Monit...

149

EXCELLENCE IN TERMINAL EDUCATION, PROCEEDINGS OF THE ANNUAL JUNIOR COLLEGE ADMINISTRATIVE TEAMS INSTITUTE (3RD, DAYTONA BEACH, JULY 29-AUGUST 2, 1963).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

THIS DOCUMENT IS A COMPILATION OF FOUR ADDRESSES AND FOUR PANEL PRESENTATIONS CONCERNING JUNIOR COLLEGE TERMINAL EDUCATION. CONSIDERATION WAS GIVEN TO THE NATURE AND PURPOSES OF TERMINAL EDUCATION, THE ROLES OF GENERAL AND SPECIALIZED EDUCATION, AND DESCRIPTIONS OF PROGRAMS RELATED TO TERMINAL EDUCATION AT THE NATIONAL, STATE, AND LOCAL LEVELS.…

WIEGMAN, ROBERT R.

150

THE CARE AND FEEDING OF THE COMMUNITY JUNIOR COLLEGE, PROCEEDINGS OF THE ANNUAL JUNIOR COLLEGE ADMINISTRATIVE TEAMS INSTITUTE (7TH, DAYTONA BEACH, AUGUST 13-15, 1967).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

THIS CONFERENCE WAS ORGANIZED AROUND A 2-PART THEME, CONSISTING OF (1) THE JUNIOR COLLEGE'S COMMUNITY AND PUBLIC RELATIONS AND (2) SUPPORT FOR INSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT, WITH EMPHASIS ON PRIVATE SOURCES OF FUNDS. SPECIFIC TOPICS INCLUDED PUBLICITY, THE IMAGE OF THE COLLEGE IN PRINT, COMMUNITY RELATIONS, THE MACHINERY FOR DEVELOPMENT, GIFTS, AND…

WIEGMAN, ROBERT R.

151

Morphodynamics of Prograding Beaches  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Long-term coastal evolution often results from the cumulative effects of small residual differences between relatively large signals. In light of dire projections of sea level rise over the next several decades to century, there is a strong societal need for accurate forecasts of net interannual- to decadal-scale coastal change. However, our present understanding of the processes responsible for storm-induced erosion and coastal recession is significantly more advanced than our knowledge of coastal recovery during calm periods. To investigate the processes and morphodynamics associated with progading beaches we synthesize findings from a long-term (15 years) beach morphology monitoring program in the U.S. Pacific Northwest. Most of the beaches along the Columbia River littoral cell (northwest Oregon and southwest Washington) were eroded during the two intense winters of 1997/1998 (a major El Niño event) and 1998/1999 (a moderate La Niña event). Subsequent to these winters the beaches have exhibited net residual progradation of several meters per year resulting in significant shoreline advance. During this same period as many as two to three new foredunes formed with backshore beach profiles accumulating sand at rates of well over 10 m3/m/yr. Interestingly, these large signals of horizontal and vertical coastal advance have occurred on beaches in which nearshore morphological variability is dominated by net offshore sandbar migration. Net offshore sandbar migration follows a three-stage process; bar generation near the shoreline, seaward migration, and bar degeneration in the outer nearshore with a cyclic return period of approximately 4 to 5 years in the region. Gradients in alongshore sediment transport, net onshore directed cross-shore sediment transport within the surf zone, and cross-shore feeding from a shoreface out of equilibrium with forcing conditions may each be partially responsible for the sediment supplied to the beaches and dunes during the study period. In this paper we will exploit regional variability in physical (e.g. sediment supply) and ecological variables (e.g. % cover of exotic beach grass species and density) thought responsible for the varying rates and form of coastal advance in the region. These gradients allow us to test hypotheses regarding the relative role of the various controls on interannual- to decadal-scale coastal evolution.

Ruggiero, P.

2012-12-01

152

Charlotte Neubauer, MSN, RN University of Central Florida College of Nursing  

E-print Network

River Memorial Hospital, Vero Beach, Florida. Women's Health Educator, staff nurse for labor Memorial Hospital, Sebastian, Florida. Staff nurse and patient educator for women's health unit including, FL. Partners in Women's Health, OB/GYN RN Coordinator for outpatient obstetric and gynecology

Wu, Shin-Tson

153

South Florida Sun-Sentinel.com Seaweed invasion creates disposal problem  

E-print Network

." The invasion of seaweed, primarily species of floating algae called sargassum, reaches far beyond South Florida Oceanographic Institute. "There have been reports of unusually large amounts of sargassum in Bermuda, in Florida [excessive biomass of Sargassum on beaches, bays, and coastlines] appears to be unprecedented in recent

Belogay, Eugene A.

154

Miami, Florida--New City in the New World  

PubMed Central

The land of Florida was one of the first areas explored in the New World during the Age of Discovery; Miami is one of the newest major cities to develop in our present age. Members of the Medical Library Association are invited to come to the 1967 Annual Convention on Miami Beach and to enjoy both the past and the present in Miami and in Florida. PMID:16017443

Richmond, Joy S.

1967-01-01

155

77 FR 50019 - Safety Zone; Cocoa Beach Air Show, Atlantic Ocean, Cocoa Beach, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Zone; Cocoa Beach Air Show, Atlantic Ocean, Cocoa Beach, FL AGENCY: Coast...safety zone on the waters of the Atlantic Ocean located east of Cocoa Beach...in aerobatic maneuvers over the Atlantic Ocean east of Cocoa Beach,...

2012-08-20

156

NAME: Cedar Beach Creek Habitat Restoration Demonstration Project LOCATION: Cedar Beach County Parke, Suffolk Co., NY  

E-print Network

NAME: Cedar Beach Creek Habitat Restoration Demonstration Project LOCATION: Cedar Beach County: The Cedar Beach Creek Habitat Restoration Demonstration Project will restore local essential ecosystem, beach, and open water mosaic. This project will establish and enhance three critical marine habitats

US Army Corps of Engineers

157

Hurricane Frederic tidal floods of September 12-13, 1979, along the Gulf Coast Orange Beach quadrangle, Alabama  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Shown on the Orange Beach topographic map are floodmark elevations and approximate areas flooded by Hurricane Frederic tides of September 12-13, 1979, along the shores of Wolf Bay, Perdido Bay, and Bayou St. John and adjacent areas in the vicinity of Orange Beach, Ala., and along the beaches exposed to the Gulf of Mexico, from Romar Beach, Ala., eastward to Perdido Key, in Florida. Damage from wind and tidal waves was widespread. The greatest damage occurred along Perdido Key in Alabama and Florida where many homes were destroyed and the highway was washed out in several places. Storm-tide frequency and records of annual maximum tides at Mobile, Ala., since 1772, are presented. Offshore winds reached about 160 miles per hour. A wind velocity of about 145 miles per hour was recorded near Dauphin Island, Ala. (USGS)

Scott, John C.; Bohman, Larry R.

1980-01-01

158

AN ASSESSMENT OF THE ECOLOGICAL CONDITION OF PENSACOLA BAY, FLORIDA  

EPA Science Inventory

Assessment of the Ecological Condition of Pensacola Bay, Florida (Abstract). To be presented at the16th Biennial Conference of the Estuarine Research Foundation, ERF 2001: An Estuarine Odyssey, 4-8 November 2001, St. Pete Beach, FL. 1 p. (ERL,GB R848). We conducted surve...

159

Beach/Fireworks Notes from the Office  

E-print Network

Highlights · Beach/Fireworks · Notes from the Office · Birthdays · Manners TheELIWeekly Beach at Crescent Beach. We will drive to the beach and spend the day sunning, swimming, and having fun! After the beach, we will come back to campus to watch fireworks at Flavet Field. WHEN: Saturday, July 3rd. Meet

Pilyugin, Sergei S.

160

Florida Everglades  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Florida Everglades belongs to a series of online modules entitled Exploring the Environment. Emphasizing an integrated approach to environmental earth science through problem-based learning, this module asks students to predict the future of the Florida Panther based on their Earth system science analysis of the restoration of water to the Everglades. Five links assist students in their analysis. The situation link provides students with their assignment. The remaining four links (Remote Sensing, Everglades, Wetlands, and Florida Panther) serve as research tools, providing current and historical data on the Everglades and its land use, waterflow, and habitat. Hyperlinked background resources offer more detail for student investigation. A glossary, teacher resources, related links, and a general description of the problem-based learning model compliment the site.

2001-02-08

161

The Weekly Newsletter of the English Language Institute Volume 100, Issue 10  

E-print Network

Beach Trip On Saturday, July 15th, we will take a trip to world-famous Daytona Beach to enjoy a day return earlier, depending on how long we want to spend on the beach. Because Daytona Beach is about a two. You should bring money for lunch, dinner, and any shopping you may want to do in Daytona Beach. You

Pilyugin, Sergei S.

162

QUANTA: An Interdisciplinary Learning Community (Four Studies).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

QUANTA is a year-long interdisciplinary program at Daytona Beach Community College (Florida) that seeks to establish a learning community of students and teachers. Three courses (English, Pyschology, and Humanities) are integrated around a common theme each semester of the freshman year, and are taught using a collaborative teaching model. This…

Avens, Cynthia; Zelley, Richard

163

Coatings Preserve Metal, Stone, Tile, and Concrete  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

John B. Schutt, a chemist at Goddard Space Flight Center, created a coating for spacecraft that could resist corrosion and withstand high heat. After retiring from NASA, Schutt used his expertise to create new formulations for Daytona Beach, Florida-based Adsil Corporation, which now manufactures a family of coatings to preserve various surfaces. Adsil has created 150 jobs due to the products.

2014-01-01

164

Raymond Mojica Jr. East Volusia County Mosquito Control District  

E-print Network

Daytona Beach, Florida 321 14 Recruitment of bonefish, Albula vUlpes, around Lee Stocking Isl,and, Bahamas- ment of settlement-stage bonefish, Albula vulpes, leptocephali was moni- tored over four consecutive. Manuscript accepted 15 December 1994. Fishery Bulletin 93:666-674 (1995). The bonefish, Albula vulpes

165

Partnership Proves Profitable: DBCC Saves Money with Health Partnership Plan.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Daytona Beach Community College (Florida) has created a health plan partnership with the local school district and county government, resulting in more favorable medical rates and lower insurance premiums. The system emphasizes preventive care, financial and benefit incentives to use preferred providers, and an extensive and comprehensive provider…

Birkenmeyer, Clare C.; Mojock, Charles R.

1994-01-01

166

Thinking of the Future: Career Planning.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A course in career planning is offered at Daytona Beach Community College to help postsecondary students with the career development process. Learning activities include values clarification, role playing, use of interest inventories and of CHOICES, Florida's computerized career information system. (SK)

Schlossman, Alan G.

1980-01-01

167

Field Trip: Multimedia and the Curriculum.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the development of the Academy of Communications and Multimedia Technology--a school-to-work program integrating English, social studies, and mathematics with multimedia, art, and television production--at Mainland High School in Daytona Beach, Florida. Discusses the program's goals, student recruitment, roles of business partners (such…

McBroom, George

1997-01-01

168

Use of Community Resources in Rehabilitation of Blind Persons.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In a search for alternative funding sources, as well as opportunities to involve the community voluntarily in the rehabilitation of visually impaired persons, the Rehabilitation Center for the Blind in Daytona Beach (Florida) turned to the local community college. (Author/SBH)

Bean, Amy; And Others

1980-01-01

169

Culture Conscious Teaching: A Case Study Approach.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Advocates a recognition of students' individual cultures. Describes the efforts of Oglala Lakota College (South Dakota), Daytona Beach Community College (Florida), Northwestern Connecticut Community College, and South Central Community College (Connecticut) to meet the needs of Native Americans, illiterate adults, deaf students, and White students…

Robinson, Ann E. Garrett

1989-01-01

170

Changes in College Student Drinking and Alcohol Knowledge: A Decade of Progress, 1981-1991.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Compared drinking patterns and level of alcohol knowledge in two samples of college students who visited Daytona Beach, Florida, during their spring breaks in 1981 and 1991 (n=3,368). Found significant reductions between 1981 and 1991 in number of students who were drinkers and amount they consumed. Significant increases in alcohol knowledge were…

Gonzalez, Gerardo M.; Broughton, Elizabeth A.

1994-01-01

171

Casual sex on spring break: Intentions and behaviors of canadian students  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using Triandis's theory of interpersonal behavior, we analyzed factors related to casual sex among Canadian university students on a spring break vacation. Two samples were obtained: 151 students completed a questionnaire before a spring break trip to Daytona Beach, Florida and 681 completed a questionnaire during or immediately following the vacation. More men than women intended to have casual sex

Edward S. Herold; Dawn Mewhinney

1998-01-01

172

75 FR 21042 - Notice of Determinations Terminating Investigations of Petitions Regarding Eligibility To Apply...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Michigan. TA-W-72,591: Hutchinson Technology, Eau Claire, Wisconsin. TA-W-72,685: First Data Corp., Daytona Beach, Florida. TA-W-72,814: Ariba, Inc., Sunnyvale, California. TA-W-72,891: Pulva Corp.,...

2010-04-22

173

The Die-Hard Communicator  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article profiles Margaret A. Smith, superintendent of Volusia County School District in Florida. In the six years since her appointment as superintendent of Volusia County--a district that has 63,000 students in 16 cities, including Daytona Beach--Smith has had her share of success. But what makes her so different from other superintendents…

Rivero, Victor

2010-01-01

174

GRADUATE ENGINEERING EDUCATION VIA TELEVISION.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING INSTALLED IN 1964 A CLOSED CIRCUIT TV NETWORK INTERLOCKING GAINESVILLE, DAYTONA BEACH, ORLANDO, AND PORT CANAVERAL TO PROVIDE GRADUATE ENGINEERING EDUCATION TO A GREATER NUMBER OF STUDENTS, MAINLY EMPLOYEES OF INDUSTRIES. CENTERS ARE CONNECTED THROUGH INTERCITY MICROWAVE CIRCUITS, EACH CIRCUIT…

FORSMAN, MARION E.

175

Archive of digital boomer subbottom data collected during USGS cruise 05FGS01 offshore east-central Florida, July 17-29, 2005  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In July of 2005, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Florida Geological Survey (FGS), conducted a geophysical survey of the Atlantic Ocean offshore of Florida's east coast from Flagler Beach to Daytona Beach. This report serves as an archive of unprocessed digital boomer subbottom data, trackline maps, navigation files, Geographic Information System (GIS) files, Field Activity Collection System (FACS) logs and formal Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) metadata. Filtered and gained (showing a relative increase in signal amplitude) digital images of the seismic profiles are also provided. Refer to the Acronyms page for expansions of acronyms and abbreviations used in this report. The USGS Saint Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center (SPCMSC) assigns a unique identifier to each cruise or field activity. For example, 05FGS01 tells us the data were collected in 2005 for cooperative work with the FGS and the data were collected during the first field activity for that project in that calendar year. Refer to http://walrus.wr.usgs.gov/infobank/programs/html/definition/activity.html for a detailed description of the method used to assign the field activity ID. The boomer subbottom processing system consists of an acoustic energy source that is made up of capacitors charged to a high voltage and discharged through a transducer in the water. The transducer is towed on a sled floating on the water surface and when discharged emits a short acoustic pulse, or shot, which propagates through the water column and shallow stratrigraphy below. The acoustic energy is reflected at density boundaries (such as the seafloor or sediment layers beneath the seafloor), detected by the receiver (a hydrophone streamer), and recorded by a PC-based seismic acquisition system. This process is repeated at timed intervals (for example, 0.5 s) and recorded for specific intervals of time (for example, 100 ms). In this way, a two-dimensional (2-D) vertical image of the shallow geologic structure beneath the ship track is produced. Figure 1 displays the acquisition geometry. Refer to table 1 for a summary of acquisition parameters and table 2 for trackline statistics. The archived trace data are in standard Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) SEG Y format (Barry and others, 1975), except an ASCII format is used for the first 3,200 bytes of the card image header instead of the standard EBCDIC format. For a detailed description about the recorded trace headers, refer to the SEG Y Format page. The SEG Y files may be downloaded and processed with commercial or public domain software such as Seismic Unix (Cohen and Stockwell, 2005). See the How To Download SEG Y Data page for download instructions. The printable profiles provided here are GIF images that were processed and gained using SU software; refer to the Software page for links to example SU processing scripts. The processed SEG Y data were also exported to Chesapeake Technology, Inc. (CTI) SonarWeb software to produce a geospatially interactive version of the profile that allows the user to obtain a geographic location and depth from the profile for a given cursor position; this information is displayed in the status bar of the browser. Please note that clicking on the profile image switches it to "Expanded View" (a compressed image of the entire line) and cursor tracking is not available in this mode.

Forde, Arnell S.; Dadisman, Shawn V.; Wiese, Dana S.; Phelps, Daniel C.

2012-01-01

176

FLORIDA STATE Florida State University,  

E-print Network

the academically motivated, intellectually curious, and socially conscious student. We are more than just a place facilities; supportive, student-centered community; and more than 150 undergraduate majors provide you-eminent research universities in the state. #12;At Florida State, you will find a rigorous academic environment

177

FLORIDA STATE Florida State University,  

E-print Network

the academically motivated, intellectually curious, and socially conscious student. We are more than just a place dance and performance facilities; supportive, student-centered community; and more than 150-eminent research universities in the state. 2 #12;At Florida State, you will find a rigorous academic environment

178

Are They Beach Cusps or Beach Horns? A Kauai Observation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Beach cusps on a southwest Kauai shoreline exhibit departures from the current schools of thought on cusp dynamics. Beach sediment is either carbonate sand or volcanic sand. The horns of the beach cusps are depositional features, reflecting the migration of sediment along the beach during the waning storm-wave (energy) phase and represent a building of the beach face. This phase may be comparable to the development of distinct sediment-transport bedforms in a unidirectional flow environment that develop at distinct ranges of Froude number. Heterogeneities such as groundwater-sapping patterns after storms, protruding bedrock, and variation of sediment size along the initial beach front (perhaps as a result of previous cusp development) provide the initial irregularities to initiate cusp morphology with evolution to a more rhythmic pattern because of the major feedback processes in the beach cusp environment. Although cusps may be stationary at some locations, transport of sediment along the shore is still occurring. The term beach horns, instead of beach cusps, should be used because the morphology is developed as a consequence of horn development. At the start of the field observation, long-period (LP) waves from south-southwest of Kauai dominated the shorter period Trade-Wind (TW) waves which are refracted around the island. The LP waves generated high-surf warnings. At this time, the cusps had an asymmetric pattern with the main backwash close to the horn located on the side of the cusp that represents the direction of longshore transport. Active erosion of the horn took place on the side of the cusp where more backwash occurred. The horn crests had an acute angle towards the approaching LP wave front. As the energy of the LP waves decreased, the TW waves became more dominant in the interference pattern of the two wave forms. The beach cusps reflected this change of interference in terms of symmetry as they became more symmetrical. Significant transport of sediment within the cusp feature was limited to high-tide periods. Troughs form offshore in front of the horns and sediment buildup occurs offshore of the cusps. Backwash in the cusp interferes with incoming waves, resulting in sediment deposition. In contrast, waves impinging on the horns had no interference from backwash and eroded the offshore troughs, depositing the sediment on the surface of the horn with additional sediment being carried into the cusps. Beach cusp processes were the same on the two types of beaches along this shoreline.

Pederson, D. T.

2004-12-01

179

Florida Everglades  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Spanning the southern tip of the Florida Peninsula and most of Florida Bay, Everglades National Park is the only subtropical preserve in North America. It contains both temperate and tropical plant communities, including sawgrass prairie, mangrove and cypress swamps, pinelands, and hardwood hammocks, as well as marine and estuarine environments. The park is known for its rich bird life, particularly large wading birds, such as the roseate spoonbill, wood stork, great blue heron, and a variety of egrets. It is also the only place in the world where alligators and crocodiles exist side by side. This image was acquired by Landsat 7's Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+) sensor on May 2, 2000. This is a false-color composite image made using shortwave infrared, near infrared, and green wavelengths. The image has also been sharpened using the sensor's panchromatic band. Image provided by the USGS EROS Data Center Satellite Systems Branch

2002-01-01

180

Satellite applications to a coastal inlet study, Clearwater Beach, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Two sets of LANDSAT magnetic tapes were obtained and displayed on the screen of an IMAGE 100 computer. Spectral analysis was performed to produce various signatures, their extent and location. Subsequent ground truth observations and measurements were gathered by means of hydrographic surveys and low-altitude aerial photography for interpretation and calibration of the LANDSAT data. Finally, a coastal engineering assessment based on the LANDSAT data was made. Recommendations to the City of Clearwater regarding the navigational channel alignment and dredging practice are presented in the light of the inlet stability.

Wang, Y. H.; Smutz, M.; Ruth, B. E.; Brooks, H. K.

1977-01-01

181

Beryllium technology workshop, Clearwater Beach, Florida, November 20, 1991  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the following topics: beryllium in the ITER blanket; mechanical testing of irradiated beryllium; tritium release measurements on irradiated beryllium; beryllium needs for plasma-facing components; thermal conductivity of plasma sprayed beryllium; beryllium research at the INEL; Japanese beryllium research activities for in-pile mockup tests on ITER; a study of beryllium bonding of copper alloy; new production technologies; thermophysical properties of a new ingot metallurgy beryllium product line; implications of beryllium:steam interactions in fusion reactors; and a test program for irradiation embrittlement of beryllium at JET.

Longhurst, G.R.

1991-12-01

182

Beach Hopper Bonanza Grade Level: Second Grade  

E-print Network

Beach Hopper Bonanza Grade Level: Second Grade Developers: Jan Ward, Merry Lojkovic, Kara Davidson the characteristics, behavior, and anatomy of beach hoppers. !" Examine the relationships between the beach hopper (transparent) !" 1-2 buckets !" sieves !" shovel !" small plastic container with lid to hold beach hoppers

183

AES Huntington Beach Generation Station Surf Zone  

E-print Network

AES Huntington Beach Generation Station Surf Zone Water Quality Study Prepared For: California HUNTINGTON BEACH GENERATING STATION SURF ZONE WATER QUALITY STUDY Prepared for: California of the Applied Energy Services (AES) Huntington Beach Generating Station (AES HBGS) in 2001, a near shore beach

184

Carbonate slope and platform accumulations: Lower Florida Keys  

SciTech Connect

Approximately 500 km of high-resolution seismic-reflection data off the lower Florida Keys reveal (1) a linear reef and trough seaward of the more shallow platform margin reefs and (2) possible late Pleistocene to early Holocene reef and beach-dune deposits 80-100 m below sea level. The linear reef and sand-filled trough are an extension of a reef-and-trough system that extends more than 300 km along the southeast Florida reef tract. In the study area, the outer reef is shallow (-10 m at its top), has relief of up to 30 m, and is separated from the platform margin reef by a 0.5-km-wide, 30-m-deep sediment-filled trough. The outer reef trend is locally broken, and reefs vary in size. Farther north near Miami, the outer reef has lower relief, and the trough separating it from the platform margin is narrower. A 6-m-long rock core recovered from the crest of the outer reef trend in the lower Florida Keys, off Sand Key reef, reveals a Pleistocene massive coral facies that has a thin (< 1 m) Holocene reef veneer. Farther seaward, where the sea floor slopes into the Straits of Florida, thick (5-8 m) fringing-reef and barrier beach-dune deposits are buried beneath thin Holocene slope deposits 80-100 m below sea level. Beach-dune accumulations are distinguished from reef buildups by the presence of seaward and landward seismic reflections. Fringing-reef buildups, in contrast, are massive and lack reflectors. Both beach-dune and reef buildups are overlain by thin Holocene slope sediments. The beach-dune deposits are probably indicative of a paleoshoreline that existed between 9,000 and 15,000 yr ago.

Shinn, E.A.; Lidz, B.H.; Kindinger, J.L. (Geological Survey, St. Petersburg, FL (USA)); Hine, A.C. (Univ. of South Florida, St. Petersburg (USA))

1990-05-01

185

The genetic basis of phenotypic convergence in beach mice: similar pigment patterns but different genes.  

PubMed

Convergent evolution is a widespread phenomenon seen in diverse organisms inhabiting similar selective environments. However, it is unclear if similar phenotypes are produced by the same or different genes and mutations. Here we analyze the molecular mechanisms underlying convergent pigment pattern among subspecies of the beach mouse (Peromyscus polionotus) inhabiting the Gulf and Atlantic coasts of Florida. In these two geographic regions, separated by more than 300 km, "beach mice" have lighter colored coats than do their mainland counterparts, produced by natural selection for camouflage against the pale coastal sand dunes. We measured color pattern in eight beach mouse subspecies and showed that three of the Gulf Coast subspecies are more phenotypically similar to an Atlantic coast subspecies than to their Gulf Coast neighbors. However, light-colored beach mice do not form a monophyletic group. Previous results implicated a single derived amino acid change in the melanocortin-1 receptor (Mc1r) as a major contributor to pigment pattern in the Gulf Coast beach mice; despite phenotypic similarities, the derived Mc1r allele was not found in the Atlantic coast beach mouse populations. Here we show that Atlantic coast beach mice have high levels of Mc1r polymorphism but they lack unique alleles. Functional assays revealed that single amino acid mutations segregating in Atlantic coast beach mice do not cause any change in Mc1r activity compared with the activity of Mc1r from dark-colored mice. These joint results show that convergent pigment patterns in recently diverged beach mouse subspecies--whose developmental constraints are presumably similar--have evolved through a diversity of genetic mechanisms. PMID:18832078

Steiner, Cynthia C; Römpler, Holger; Boettger, Linda M; Schöneberg, Torsten; Hoekstra, Hopi E

2009-01-01

186

Nonlinear Magnetic Beach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ion response to the rf-field in the magnetic beach problem can be essentially nonlinear. This paper presents a self-consistent theory of the rf-wave propagation and ion motion through the ion cyclotron resonance. An important ingredient of the problem is the ion flow along the magnetic field. The flow velocity limits the time the ions spend at the resonance, which in turn limits the ion energy gain. A feature that makes the problem nonlinear is that the flow accelerates under the effect of the grad B force and rf-pressure. This acceleration can produce a steep decrease in the plasma density at the resonance, resulting in partial reflection of the incident wave. *Work supported by VASIMR project at NASA and by U.S. DOE Contract DE-FG03-96ER-54346.

Arefiev, A.; Breizman, B.

2000-10-01

187

NATURE: Hippo Beach  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website is the online companion to Hippo Beach, which recently aired on the PBS series NATURE. And as the website explains, "from the study of hippos' essential relationships with birds to the discovery that hippos can communicate underwater, these mammals deserve a closer look." Students can get a closer look with "Sun, Sand, and Hippos," an interdisciplinary lesson plan for grades 3-5. The lesson guides students in researching and creating presentations on hippos and helpful weblinks, worksheets, and a teacher's guide are provided. The website contains other special features as well, including video clips from the program, multimedia activities, informative essays, and more. [RS] This site is also reviewed in the November 14, 2003 NSDL Life Sciences Report.

188

Coastal Erosion: Where's the Beach?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This data tip from Bridge, the Ocean Sciences Education Teacher Resource Center archive, explores erosion and accretion of coastal sediments, the two processes that keep our beaches in a constant state of change. Both natural and not-so-natural factors influencing these processes are discussed. Learners can view a variety of weblinks on the topic and conduct their own beach profile investigation, or access profile data from a 1999 Ocean City, Maryland beach and plot the changes over time for a graphic illustration of these processes.

2000-05-01

189

PAH concentrations in Coquina (Donax spp.) on a sandy beach shoreline impacted by a marine oil spill.  

PubMed

The BP MC252 well failure in the Gulf of Mexico, April 2010 caused concern for crude oil and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs) exposure along the sandy beaches of the Florida Panhandle. We began collections of Coquina clams (Donax spp.) from the surf zone of Florida Panhandle beaches to monitor PAH contamination to compliment analysis of surf zone sand samples. These clams had higher levels of PAHs relative to ambient sand, and this allowed us to continue to monitor PAH levels after sand concentrations fell below limits of detection. PAH levels in the Coquina tissues were highly variable, perhaps indicative of the heterogeneous distribution of oil and tar on the beaches and exposure to tar particles. Overall, PAH levels decreased continuously in both sand and Coquina tissues, reaching limits of detection within one and two years respectively after oil landed on Florida Panhandle beaches. Our work suggests these surf zone molluscs may be used to monitor pollutant exposure along high energy sandy beach shorelines. PMID:24775069

Snyder, Richard A; Vestal, Alexandra; Welch, Christina; Barnes, Gracie; Pelot, Robert; Ederington-Hagy, Melissa; Hileman, Fredrick

2014-06-15

190

Q UICK R ESPONSE R EPORT Community Impacts of Hurricane Ivan: A Case Study of Orange Beach, Alabama  

Microsoft Academic Search

On September 15 and 16, 2004, Hurricane Ivan struck the Alabama\\/Florida coast with sustained winds at 130 mph. Severe destruction occurred in the small, coastal community of Orange Beach, Alabama, which has experienced increased tourism and rapid population growth over the last 20 years. Disaster research has revealed that natural disasters, such as hurricanes, tornadoes, and floods, affect communities not

J. Steven Picou; Cecelia G. Martin

191

77 FR 27120 - Safety Zone; Virginia Beach Oceanfront Air Show, Atlantic Ocean, Virginia Beach, VA  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Virginia Beach Oceanfront Air Show, Atlantic Ocean, Virginia Beach, VA AGENCY...a temporary safety zone on the Atlantic Ocean in the vicinity of Virginia Beach...vessel traffic movement on the Atlantic Ocean to protect mariners from the...

2012-05-09

192

An Alternative Approach to Water Regulations for Public Health Protection at Bathing Beaches  

PubMed Central

New approaches should be considered as the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) moves rapidly to develop new beach monitoring guidelines by the end of 2012, as these guidelines serve as the basis by which states and territories with coasts along the oceans and Great Lakes can then develop and implement monitoring programs for recreational waters. We describe and illustrate one possible approach to beach regulation termed as the “Comprehensive Toolbox within an Approval Process (CTBAP).” The CTBAP consists of three components. The first is a “toolbox” consisting of an inventory of guidelines on monitoring targets, a series of measurement techniques, and guidance to improve water quality through source identification and prevention methods. The second two components are principles of implementation. These include first, “flexibility” to encourage and develop an individualized beach management plan tailored to local conditions and second, “consistency” of this management plan to ensure a consistent national level of public health protection. The results of this approach are illustrated through a case study at a well-studied South Florida recreational marine beach. This case study explores different monitoring targets based on two different health endpoints (skin versus gastrointestinal illness) and recommends a beach regulation program for the study beach that focuses predominately on source prevention. PMID:23431320

Abdelzaher, Amir M.; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M.; Phillips, Matthew C.; Elmir, Samir M.; Fleming, Lora E.

2013-01-01

193

Beach Recovery Rates Derived From Airborne LIDAR Following Hurricane Ivan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hurricanes are a major source for erosion and damage along the southeastern US coastline. This study uses airborne LIDAR data to quantify shoreline change due to Hurricane Ivan. Hurricane Ivan made landfall on the Alabama gulf coast in September, 2004 with maximum sustained winds of 58 m/s. Five separate LIDAR data sets of barrier beaches situated in the front right quadrant of the hurricane were collected during a six month period before and after landfall allowing an excellent timeline for analyzing change in shoreline position. Shorelines were extracted and incremental shoreline position differences were quantified for a 30 km portion of Panama City Beach, Florida. Preliminary results show alternating trends in shoreline change. The hurricane caused an initial average shoreline retreat of more than 16 m relative to pre-storm positions. Within three weeks this shoreline position recovered or moved seaward by 10 m. However, during the 2 month interval between October and December, 2004, the shoreline again retreated 5 m. This 5 m of shoreline retreat in the two months following the initial recovery could be attributed to the beach profile transition from summer to winter, and will have to be researched further.

Robertson, W.; Zhang, K.; Whitman, D.; Leatherman, S. P.

2005-12-01

194

Submarine Geomorphology and Coastal Process Zones: Morphodynamics of the Inner Continental Shelf off Southeast Florida  

Microsoft Academic Search

KHALIL, S.M. and FINKL, C.W., 2007. Submarine geomorphology and coastal process zones: Morphodynamics of the inner continental shelf off southeast Florida. Journal of Coastal Research, SI 50 (Proceedings of the 9th International Coastal Symposium), 480 - 485. Gold Coast, Australia, ISSN 0749.0208 The subtropical southeast coast of Florida is a mixed siliciclastic-carbonate shore that contains sandy beaches, marshes, estuaries, rock

S. Khalil

195

Wayside Trees of Tropical Florida : a guide to the native and exotic trees and palms of Miami and tropical south Florida  

Microsoft Academic Search

Wayside Trees is an beautifully illustrated guide to Florida trees growing south of Lake Okeechobee. It covers both native and exotic species in the areas of Miami to Palm Beach on the east coast, and Naples to Fort Meyers on the west. The introduction describes environmental, cultural and economic importance of trees, while a non-technical key provides a means for

David W. Lee; Stacy West

2011-01-01

196

75 FR 24997 - FPL Energy Point Beach, LLC; Point Beach Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2; Environmental Assessment...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...the Point Beach Nuclear Plant, Units...from ``FPL Energy Point Beach...to ``NextEra Energy Point Beach...for Point Beach Nuclear Plant, Units...a significant effect on the quality of the human environment....

2010-05-06

197

Beach Cusps of Monterey Bay, California.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A radiographic study was conducted on impregnated sand samples taken from beach cusps on Marina Beach, Monterey Bay, California, over a 7-month period from September 1970 to April 1971. The radiographs revealed much more structure than is discernable with...

J. L. Brueggeman

1971-01-01

198

Newport Beach Police Department Press Release870 Santa Barbara Dr., Newport Beach, CA 92660  

E-print Network

Newport Beach Police Department Press Release870 Santa Barbara Dr., Newport Beach, CA 92660, at approximately 8 a.m., Newport Beach Police Detectives served a search warrant in the 1000 block of Valencia for 496 PC ­ Possession of Stolen Property. They were booked at the Newport Beach Police Jail and were

Rose, Michael R.

199

Week 5, A 'Sweet As' Beach and Ride Murdering Beach at sunset.  

E-print Network

Week 5, A 'Sweet As' Beach and Ride Murdering Beach at sunset. I'm starting to get used Point trailhead, we turned off on a steep road down to Murdering Beach. Apparently a murder did occur for the sunset. #12;Tidal Pool at Murdering Beach Also this week, I brought the camera along on what has become

Bardsley, John

200

33 CFR 100.736 - Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL. 100.736 Section 100.736 Navigation...NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.736 Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL....

2011-07-01

201

33 CFR 100.736 - Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL. 100.736 Section 100.736 Navigation...NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.736 Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL....

2013-07-01

202

West Onslow Beach and New River Inlet (Topsail Beach), North Carolina  

E-print Network

West Onslow Beach and New River Inlet (Topsail Beach), North Carolina 17 April 2008 Abstract: Topsail Beach lies along the southwestern end of Topsail Island, a sandy barrier island about two miles are estimated at $9,200,00 The proposed project for coastal storm damage reduction is a traditional beach

US Army Corps of Engineers

203

Fish in Long Beach waters have risky contamination levels From staff reports Long Beach Press Telegram  

E-print Network

Fish in Long Beach waters have risky contamination levels From staff reports Long Beach Press coast showed high levels of methylmercury and moderate levels of PCBs in fish in Long Beach bay waters the coast. In the bay waters of Long Beach, the levels found in fish were of "high concern," according

204

NAME: City of Long Beach's Colorado Lagoon LOCATION: Long Beach, California  

E-print Network

NAME: City of Long Beach's Colorado Lagoon LOCATION: Long Beach, California ACRES: 28.3 acres NON-FEDERAL SPONSORS: City of Long Beach Friends of Colorado Lagoon PROJECT DESCRIPTION: The Colorado Lagoon is a 28 of visitors from communities within and surrounding the City of Long Beach, California. There are over 700

US Army Corps of Engineers

205

33 CFR 100.736 - Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL. 100.736 Section 100.736 Navigation...NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.736 Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL....

2012-07-01

206

2008 Spring Issue Page The Critical Path  

E-print Network

Conference yet in Daytona Beach. The value of the presentations and discussions and their relevance will again be in Daytona Beach in February 2009. This March, the TWINS-B instrument was successfully launched

Christian, Eric

207

CS 428: Second Midterm (Fall '03) Answer all problems. You have 1.5 hours to complete this test. Your answers should be concise short  

E-print Network

points) Your company has two branch offices, one in Daytona Beach, and one 50 miles away in Cocoa Beach. Roughly 3/4 of your machines will be in Daytona. Subnet your network between the two sites according

Abu-Ghazaleh, Nael B.

208

ODU Virginia Beach 1881 University Drive  

E-print Network

Live at ODU Virginia Beach 1881 University Drive Virginia Beach, VA 23453 757-368-4100 www.odu.edu/vabeach Thursday October 9 2014 12:30--1:30pm Lecture Hall Book signing and Reception to follow: Book sales in Lot 3 Ellen Dor� Watson The HungryHeart isTellingYou ODU Virginia Beach Presents Poetry Readings

209

The Belgian sandy beach ecosystem: a review  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reviews the available knowledge on sedimentology, hydrodynamics and five major ecosystem components (microphytobenthos, vascular plants, terrestrial arthropods, zoobenthos, and avifauna) of Belgian sandy beaches. It covers the area from the foredunes to the lower foreshore, takes an ecosystem approach to beaches of this specific geographic area. Morphodynamically, Bel- gian beaches are (ultra-)dissipative, macrotidal, and wide. Characteristic grain sizes

Jeroen Speybroeck; Dries Bonte; Wouter Courtens; Tom Gheskiere; Patrick Grootaert; Jean-Pierre Maelfait; Sam Provoost; Koen Sabbe; Eric W. M. Stienen; Vera Van Lancker; Wouter Van Landuyt; Magda Vincx; Steven Degraer

2008-01-01

210

Radiological Habits Survey: Cumbrian coast beach occupancy,  

E-print Network

Radiological Habits Survey: Cumbrian coast beach occupancy, 2009 2010 Cefas contract report C3635 Environment Report RL 01/10 #12;1 Environment Report RL 01/10 Radiological Habits Survey: Cumbrian coast beach. Survey area 9 Map 1 The Cumbrian coast beach occupancy survey area 10 3.1 General observations 11 3

211

Radiological Habits Survey: Sellafield Beach Occupancy, 2007  

E-print Network

Radiological Habits Survey: Sellafield Beach Occupancy, 2007 Environment Report RL 02/08 Customer: Sellafield Beach Occupancy, 2007 Centre for Environment, Fisheries & Aquaculture Science Lowestoft Laboratory to Seamill 12 4.2.1 Beach description 12 4.2.2 Activities 13 4.3 Seamill Lane to Coulderton and Nethertown 15

212

City of Manhattan Beach Community Development  

E-print Network

City of Manhattan Beach Community Development Phone: (310) 802-5500 FAX: (310) 802-5501 TDD: (310 Sacramento, Ca. 95814 Attention: Joe Loyer j mloycr@cncrgy.stalc.ca.us Subject: City of Manhattan Beach the City of Manhattan Beach adoption of our local more stringent energy efficiency standards. In accordance

213

Week 14, Surfing It Is Smaills Beach  

E-print Network

Week 14, Surfing It Is Smaills Beach One of the things that I had hoped to be able to do while I enjoy swimming at the beach; the ocean is cold this far south, even in summer. Over the past couple to go out for an hour before school. And we also have two body boards, so going to the beach is now

Bardsley, John

214

College 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Brevard 16 11 12 12 19 23 44%  

E-print Network

766 963 995 1,075 28% Central Florida 3 1 5 2 5 8 167% Chipola 1 0 0 0 0 0 -100% Daytona State 7 6 10 120 131 137 150 33% North Florida 0 0 0 0 0 0 0% Northwest Florida 0 0 0 0 2 1 n/a Palm Beach 774 737 25 60 2% Palm Beach 957 31 28 19 47 2% Miami-Dade 166 32 19 23 42 2% St. Lucie 78 33 13 9 22 1

Fernandez, Eduardo

215

SOME EFFECTS OF HYDRAULIC DREDGING AND COASTAL DEVELOPMENT IN BOCA CIEGA BAY, FLORIDA 1  

E-print Network

SOME EFFECTS OF HYDRAULIC DREDGING AND COASTAL DEVELOPMENT IN BOCA CIEGA BAY, FLORIDA 1 BY JOHN L. PETERSBURG BEACH, FLA. 33706 ABSTRACT Filling of 1,400 hectares (3,500 acres) of bay by hy- draulic dredging in dredged ItreltS wit.h those in relatively undisturbed ttreas. Hydl'ltulic dredging becmue. ltll ltccepted

216

Phase III Proposed Early Restoration Project Alabama Florida Louisiana Mississippi Texas  

E-print Network

of Agriculture PROJECT DESCRIPTION The Deepwater Horizon Natural Resource Damage Assessment Trustees Walton Beach) project is $4,643,547. Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill Natural Resource Damage Assessment, the public's access to and enjoyment of their natural resources along Florida's Panhandle was denied

217

Challenges in Projecting Sea Level Rise impacts on the Coastal Environment of South Florida (Invited)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Due to flat topography, a highly transmissive groundwater aquifer, and a growing population with the associated infrastructure, South Florida's coastal environment is one of the most vulnerable areas to sea level rise. Current projections of sea level rise and the associated storm surges will have direct impacts on coastal beaches and infrastructure, flood protection, freshwater aquifers, and both the isolated

J. Obeysekera; M. M. Irizarry-Ortiz; J. A. Barnes; P. Trimble; W. Said

2010-01-01

218

Inside the "Long Beach Way"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article features Long Beach Unified School District, the 2003 winner of a prestigious prize in urban education. The district of more than 90,000 students is the first winner of the award to return to the competition as a finalist. Its reappearance on the list after earning the prize in 2003 raises interesting questions about how districts…

Olson, Lynn

2007-01-01

219

Leatherback nests increasing significantly in Florida, USA; trends assessed over 30 years using multilevel modeling.  

PubMed

Understanding population status for endangered species is critical to developing and evaluating recovery plans mandated by the Endangered Species Act. For sea turtles, changes in abundance are difficult to detect because most life stages occur in the water. Currently, nest counts are the most reliable way of assessing trends. We determined the rate of growth for leatherback turtle (Dermochelys coriacea) nest numbers in Florida (USA) using a multilevel Poisson regression. We modeled nest counts from 68 beaches over 30 years and, using beach-level covariates (including latitude), we allowed for partial pooling of information between neighboring beaches. This modeling approach is ideal for nest count data because it recognizes the hierarchical structure of the data while incorporating variables related to survey effort. Nesting has increased at all 68 beaches in Florida, with trends ranging from 3.1% to 16.3% per year. Overall, across the state, the number of nests has been increasing by 10.2% per year since 1979. Despite being a small population (probably < 1000 individuals), this nesting population may help achieve objectives in the federal recovery plan. This exponential growth rate mirrors trends observed for other Atlantic populations and may be driven partially by improved protection of nesting beaches. However, nesting is increasing even where beach protection has not been enhanced. Climate variability and associated marine food web dynamics, which could enhance productivity and reduce predators, may be driving this trend. PMID:21516903

Stewart, Kelly; Sims, Michelle; Meylan, Anne; Witherington, Blair; Brost, Beth; Crowder, Larry B

2011-01-01

220

Florida Law Collections  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Florida Law Collections document the laws and legal heritage of Florida through a wide range of texts digitized from the holdings of the University of Florida's Lawton Chiles Legal Information Center, the State Library, and Archives of Florida, and several other key institutions. Specifically, the collection includes issues of the Journal of the Florida House of Representatives, the Florida Historical Legal Documents collection, a Florida Water Law collection that is particularly noteworthy, as well as other general texts on Florida laws, the legislative process, and government. Given the debates over water rights and usage throughout the state, the Water Law collection is a real find, and visitors can search over 7300 documents within the collection. From the homepage, visitors can perform advanced searches and also look over recently added items. Finally, visitors can also sign up to receive their RSS feed and contact the site administrators with any additional queries they might have.

221

University of South Florida  

MedlinePLUS

... for Cybersecurity, FC², will be located at the University of South Florida's Tampa campus and will create ... impact research and a culture of innovation support University of South Florida's success. Celebrate Hispanic Heritage on ...

222

Virtual Beach 3: user's guide  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Virtual Beach version 3 (VB3) is a decision support tool that constructs site-specific statistical models to predict fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) concentrations at recreational beaches. VB3 is primarily designed for beach managers responsible for making decisions regarding beach closures or the issuance of swimming advisories due to pathogen contamination. However, researchers, scientists, engineers, and students interested in studying relationships between water quality indicators and ambient environmental conditions will find VB3 useful. VB3 reads input data from a text file or Excel document, assists the user in preparing the data for analysis, enables automated model selection using a wide array of possible model evaluation criteria, and provides predictions using a chosen model parameterized with new data. With an integrated mapping component to determine the geographic orientation of the beach, the software can automatically decompose wind/current/wave speed and magnitude information into along-shore and onshore/offshore components for use in subsequent analyses. Data can be examined using simple scatter plots to evaluate relationships between the response and independent variables (IVs). VB3 can produce interaction terms between the primary IVs, and it can also test an array of transformations to maximize the linearity of the relationship The software includes search routines for finding the "best" models from an array of possible choices. Automated censoring of statistical models with highly correlated IVs occurs during the selection process. Models can be constructed either using previously collected data or forecasted environmental information. VB3 has residual diagnostics for regression models, including automated outlier identification and removal using DFFITs or Cook's Distances.

Cyterski, Mike; Brooks, Wesley; Galvin, Mike; Wolfe, Kurt; Carvin, Rebecca; Roddick, Tonia; Fienen, Mike; Corsi, Steve

2014-01-01

223

Florida Panther Society  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

With only 30 to 50 individual cats remaining in Florida's wild areas, Florida panthers are a conservation concern. The Florida Panther Society is a non-governmental organization dedicated to the recovery of the Florida panther population. The Society's Webpage offers background information on panthers, genetic restoration efforts, the state's panther population, field notes on current research/ restoration activities, and photographs of some of the remaining individuals.

224

Florida Panther Net  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

With only 30 to 50 individual cats remaining in Florida's wild areas, Florida panthers are a conservation concern. The state's Florida Panther Net Website offers additional information, including natural history information, notes from the field, photographs, and a series of educational materials.

225

Florida's Civil War soldiers  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this thesis is to chronicle the actions of the soldiers of Florida during the Civil War, both within and without Florida. As there has not been a great deal written on this topic, it is hoped that this thesis will contribute to the discussion and perhaps lead others to study this field.The soldiers of Florida during the

Jennifer J Hawley

2005-01-01

226

Comparison of Airborne Lidar and Multibeam Bathymetric Data in the Florida Reef Tract Along Broward County  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Although large, well-known concentrations of corals are found in deeper waters off Florida's eastern seaboard, most mapping of Florida's coral resources addresses the relatively shallow waters of the Florida Keys. To date, technological limitations precluded mapping corals in these deeper waters. Satellite imaging systems and natural color aerial photography, two mapping mainstays, are generally only effective in Florida waters shallower than 20 meters. Conservation of the northern portion of the Florida reef tract, which parallels the Atlantic coast in Miami-Dade, Broward, and Palm Beach counties, has been hampered by minimal or nonexistent coordinated management, monitoring, and mapping activities. In November 2000, the Simrad EM3000 multibeam system was used to collect data south of Port Everglades. Additionally, the Broward County shore protection project conducted a Laser Airborne Depth Sounder (LADS) survey in 2001. Wavelet analyses performed on overlapping transects of the two data sets compare the accuracy of reef bathymetry and complexity captured in the two data collection projects.

Morton, N. E.; Burd, J. J.

2003-12-01

227

BP money will go to study dolphin, sharks, reefs, beaches A research council has awarded more than $9 million in BP money to 27 projects designed to  

E-print Network

BP money will go to study dolphin, sharks, reefs, beaches TBO.com A research council has awarded more than $9 million in BP money to 27 projects designed to measure the Gulf oil disaster's impact on Florida's environment. The money will pay for studies of bottle-nosed dolphin, coral reefs, sharks, water

Belogay, Eugene A.

228

Florida Digital Newspaper Library  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

With generous funding from Florida's Library Services and Technology Act Grants Program, the Institute for Museum and Library Services (IMLS), and other organizations, the Florida Digital Newspaper Library exists "to provide access to the news and history of Florida." On this site, visitors can browse through over 800,000 pages of historic Florida newspapers dating back to the early 19th century. Currently the archive contains current Florida newspapers digitized from 2005 to the present, dozens of historic newspapers, and the "Historic News Accounts of Florida", which features articles from newspapers published outside the state which deal with life in Florida. On the site's homepage, visitors can use a simple search engine, perform an advanced search, or look through the "New Items" section. Some of the papers in this archive include the Alachua Advocate, the Apopka Chief, and the Wakulla County News.

229

Valuing Recreation and Amenities at San Diego County Beaches  

Microsoft Academic Search

Policymakers and analysts concerned with coastal issues often need economic value information to evaluate policies that affect beach recreation. This paper presents economic values associated with beach recreation in San Diego County generated from a recreation demand model that explains a beach user's choice of which beach to visit. These include estimates of the economic values of a beach day,

DANIEL K. LEW; DOUGLAS M. LARSON

2005-01-01

230

Huntington Beach offshore Parcel 14  

Microsoft Academic Search

Parcel 14 of the Huntington Beach Oil Field (California) is located down the west plunge of a large east-west-trending asymmetrical anticlinal structure. This offshore structure extends from the shore westward approximately 3 miles. The south flank of the anticline is steep-dipping with known dips up to 65°. The north flank has an average dip of 10$. Faulting is minor on

1966-01-01

231

1250 BELLFLOWER BOULEVARD, LONG BEACH, CA 90840 CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, LONG BEACH  

E-print Network

KKJZ AS HC 1250 BELLFLOWER BOULEVARD, LONG BEACH, CA 90840 CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, LONG BEACH PA SRM FND HRL IPCDC LIB MLSC PP/CMREC WHSE RH1 RH4 RH5 RH3 RH2 SH MMC VEC SLH BEACH DRIVE 1 = Apprx.500 Steps Beach Striders Campus Tour · 2.35 miles · apprx.4700 steps #12;KKJZ AS HC 1250 BELLFLOWER

Sorin, Eric J.

232

2008 VIRGINIA BEACH TOURISM ECONOMIC IMPACT STUDY  

E-print Network

2008 VIRGINIA BEACH TOURISM ECONOMIC IMPACT STUDY by Gilbert R. Yochum, Ph.D. gyochum University Research Foundation Norfolk, Virginia 23529 (757) 683 May 2009 2008 VIRGINIA BEACH TOURISM¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼ 2008 Virginia Beach Visitor Annual Summary Direct City Taxes and Fees

233

Caribbean beach changes and climate change adaptation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Beach monitoring data are presented and show an average beach erosion trend of 0.5 m yr in eight Caribbean islands over the period 1985–2000, with elevated rates in those islands impacted by a higher number of hurricanes. The data are based on 5 to 15 years of continuous monitoring, conducted at three-month intervals, at 113 beaches (200 profile sites) on

Gillian Cambers

2009-01-01

234

An energy?mobility beach classification system as a basis for the management of beach resources  

Microsoft Academic Search

The successful implementation of structural and nonstructural solution to problems of shoreline erosion is greatly facilitated if the accumulation and analysis of data sets are accomplished within a design framework which has both theoretical validity and practical application. An inventory of beach resources based upon breaking?wave energy and beach mobility is presented as a basis for a beach classification system.

Karl F. Nordstrom

1979-01-01

235

VISUAL BEACH: SOFTWARE FOR ACHIEVING BEACH AESTHETIC AND PUBLIC HEALTH PROTECTION  

EPA Science Inventory

The Beaches Environmental Assessment and Coastal Health Act of 2000 directs the EPA to assure that 100% of significant public beaches are managed by 2008. Under the Act EPA is developing a program to monitor beach water quality and strategies for timely notification of the public...

236

Parasailing fatalities in southwest Florida.  

PubMed

Parasailing is a recreational sport that is generally considered to be of little risk to the participants. Typically, the passenger launches from a motorboat with a specially designed winch that pulls him or her back to the boat at the end of the ride. The sport is not regulated at the federal, state, or county level. There have been few reports of injuries to parasailors. Additionally, there have been only 2 fatalities reported to the United States Coast Guard in a 10-year review. We report the details of these 2 deaths, those of a mother and daughter riding in a tandem parasail, which occurred on Fort Myers Beach in 2001, as well as an additional case of a parasailing fatality that occurred in southwest Florida in 1999. These cases illustrate the injuries seen in such fatalities and the hazards posed by adverse weather conditions and faulty equipment, as well as the impairment of passenger judgment by drugs and/or alcohol. PMID:19901809

Wolf, Barbara C; Harding, Brett E

2009-12-01

237

Factors controlling beach changes of a Texas gulf coast beach  

E-print Network

of the old Brazos delta retreated 1000 feet since 1937, while the the shoreline of the new Brazos delta grew a comparable distance (Figures 7, 9 and Appendix 0). 1941: Hurricane tides of nine feet were recorded at the Freeport Jetties (Bodine, 3). 1942... National Ocean Survey) 21 beach profile than normal and caused high ebbing velocities at Brown Cedar Cut. 1946; Photographs by the U. S. Department of Agriculture of the new Brazos delta show the shoreline changed only an insignificant amount between...

Seelig, William Newton

2012-06-07

238

75 FR 16201 - FPL Energy Point Beach, LLC; Point Beach Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2; Exemption  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...NRC-2010-0123] FPL Energy Point Beach, LLC; Point Beach Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2; Exemption 1.0 Background FPL Energy Point Beach, LLC (FPLE...NRC) to M. S. Fertel (Nuclear Energy Institute) dated June...

2010-03-31

239

Florida Energy Assurance Plan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This spring, Florida held the nation's first statewide emergency preparedness training and exercises geared specifically to the aftermath of severe geomagnetic events. Funded by the State of Florida Division of Emergency Management (FDEM) via a Department of Energy grant and held in collaboration with Watch House International, Inquesta Corporation, and the Florida Institute of Technology, the 17-19 April 2012 workshop had 99 on-site attendees in an oceanfront hotel in Melbourne, Florida, as well as 16 over live Web streaming. The workshop was the capstone to a three-month season of 21 regional space weather training sessions and workshops serving 386 attendees in total.

Turner, Niescja E.; Murtagh, William; Guthrie, Kevin; Nykyri, Katariina; Radasky, William A.; Senkowicz, Eric

2012-08-01

240

Rip Currents on a Cornish Beach  

Microsoft Academic Search

RIP currents have been measured at Holywell in West Cornwall, where a sandy beach is open to waves and swells from the Atlantic. A rip current is a narrow streak of water which flows seawards from the beach; it carries the return flow of the general shorewards transport of water produced by the breaking of waves. Such currents cause many

L. Draper; P. J. DOBSON

1965-01-01

241

Plastics and beaches: A degrading relationship  

Microsoft Academic Search

Plastic debris in Earth’s oceans presents a serious environmental issue because breakdown by chemical weathering and mechanical erosion is minimal at sea. Following deposition on beaches, plastic materials are exposed to UV radiation and physical processes controlled by wind, current, wave and tide action. Plastic particles from Kauai’s beaches were sampled to determine relationships between composition, surface textures, and plastics

Patricia L. Corcoran; Mark C. Biesinger; Meriem Grifi

2009-01-01

242

PREDICTING BACTERIAL CONCENTRATION ON THE NATION'S BEACHES  

EPA Science Inventory

A classical example of the failure of institutions and environmental technology to protect the nation's aesthetic, recreational, and public health values is represented by the July-August, 1999 Huntington Beach, California beach closure. This multi-million dollar regional public ...

243

Hydrodynamic variability on megatidal beaches, Normandy, France  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several experiments aimed at characterising the hydrodynamics of megatidal beaches outside the surf zone were carried out between 1990 and 1994 on the Cotentin coast of the Cherbourg Peninsula in Normandy. The database was established from the records of several electromagnetic current meters and pressure sensors and from field surveys. The mean spring tidal range on these beaches varies between

Franck Levoy; Olivier Monfort; Claude Larsonneur

2001-01-01

244

Geophysical and Geotechnical Determination of Sand Resources on the Florida Atlantic Continental Shelf: Preliminary Results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The State of Florida is committed to maintaining beaches to sustain beach width and protect coastal infrastructure. Nearshore sand resources must be identified and cataloged for potential beach nourishment projects in response to sea-level rise and increased tropical storm activity. Given the vast length of Florida coastline, application of a variety of remote sensing techniques are required for measuring large areas in a short amount of time. The study area encompasses a shelf area of about 2,053,220 ha (20,532 km2) from Miami to the Georgia State line (about 653 km shoreline length) and extends up to 27 km offshore to about the 45 m isobath offshore Jacksonville. The continental shelf along the east coast of the Florida peninsula contains a wide range of seafloor environments that lie above the Florida-Hatteras Slope on the shoreface and inner, middle, and outer shelf floors. This study used Airborne Laser Bathymetry (ALB), 3D digital terrain models based on reformatted NOAA bathymetric data, sidescan sonar, and seismic reflection profiling to map seafloor geomorphological conditions that range from coralline-algal reef systems to drowned karst, submerged paleo shorelines (drowned beach ridge plains), and buried paleo channels. Seatruthing of morphosedimentary features is achieved via jetprobe and vibracore surveys in the study of inter-reefal sand troughs, ebb-tidal deltas, transverse bars, shoals, sand waves, ridges, and banks. Preliminary results, which visualize seafloor topography as color-ramped morphoforms, indicate the presence of sedimentary deposits that may constitute viable sand resources for shore protection in the form of beach renourishment. Use of ALB and reformatted NOAA bathymetric data in the form of 3D terrain models permits classification of submarine landform topologies that was heretofore not possible using isobaths. The combination of multiple remote sensing methods showed the spatial distribution of morphosedimentary features and provided the ability to assess sand resource potential on the shelf. Sand resources on the Florida Atlantic continental shelf amount to something on the order of about 85 x 109 m3. These potential sand volumes, based on average 3 m depth assumptions, break down to about 1 x 109 m3 for the southeast (Miami, Broward, Palm Beach counties), 4.3 x 109 m3 for the central (Martin, St. Lucie, Indian River, Brevard counties), and 78.5 x 109 m3 for the northeast (Volusia, Flagler, St. Johns, Duval, Nassau counties) Florida shelf areas. It is effective to use multiple remote sensing methods to locate large sand bodies, but more detailed geotechnical surveys are required to better estimate these sand resource potentials.

Finkl, C. W.; Andrews, J. L.; Suthard, B. C.; Robertson, W.

2007-12-01

245

Effects of beach cast cleaning on beach quality, microbial food web, and littoral macrofaunal biodiversity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

At the end of the summer, drifting filamentous red algae cover shallow bottoms and accumulate in huge cast walls on the open shores of the non-tidal central Baltic Sea. The hypotheses that beach cleaning increases water clarity, decreases the organic content of the sand, and increases the species diversity in the shallow zone closest to the shore, were tested through field investigations and experiments. Cleaned shorelines were compared with un-cleaned shorelines at two sites with different intensity of beach cleaning in a rural area of SE Sweden. The results show that water clarity was significantly increased off the intensively cleaned beach but not off the moderately cleaned one. Similarly, the total leakage of nitrogenous compounds decreased off the intensively cleaned beach, but not off the moderately cleaned. The organic content of the sand was lower on both cleaned beaches compared with nearby un-cleaned beaches. The total animal biomass was significantly lower on the intensively cleaned beach compared with the un-cleaned beach, but the moderately cleaned beach gave no such effect. The difference in biodiversity and community structure between cleaned and un-cleaned beaches was insignificant. The most obvious difference in species composition was a much higher number of planktivore opossum shrimps of the genus Mysis and Praunus on the un-cleaned beaches. The bacterial production and the amount of ciliates larger than 20 mm were also higher on un-cleaned beaches, indicating that the microbial food web off the un-cleaned beaches is stimulated by the discharge of decomposing algal material. The conclusion of the study is that mechanical cleaning reduces the organic content of the beach sand and may change the water quality and microbial production, but the effect on the macrofaunal biodiversity is insignificant.

Malm, Torleif; Råberg, Sonja; Fell, Sabine; Carlsson, Per

2004-06-01

246

FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY ORIENTATION  

E-print Network

GRADUATE COLLEGE Dear Graduate Student, As you begin your graduate degree program at Florida AtlanticFLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY GRADUATE STUDENT ORIENTATION #12;2 #12;3 WELCOME FROM THE DEAN FAU. Whether you are a new student to the university, or returning after completing an undergraduate de gree

Fernandez, Eduardo

247

Florida Articulation Summary.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report provides articulation information for Florida public schools, community colleges, and state universities. Among the items contained in the paper are text and accompanying charts regarding (1) Florida public high school graduates receiving standard and GED diplomas; (2) high school graduates' postsecondary education intent versus actual…

Florida State Board of Community Colleges, Tallahassee.

248

FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY ORIENTATION  

E-print Network

FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY GRADUATE STUDENT ORIENTATION #12;3 WELCOME FROM THE DEAN FAU GRADUATE COLLEGE Dear Graduate Student, As you begin your graduate degree program at Florida Atlantic University I. Whether you are a new student to the university, or returning after completing an undergraduate de- gree

Fernandez, Eduardo

249

FloridaMaster Money Mentors What is the Florida  

E-print Network

FloridaMaster Money Mentors What is the Florida Master Money Mentor Program? The Florida Master Money Mentor (FMMM) program is a coordinated referral network of volunteer mentors who provide basic.25% ­1,712 58,897 125.39 2845.41 +89.65 ­50.00 x15.23% Program Contact Information: Florida Master Money

Jawitz, James W.

250

Horseshoe crab (Limulus polyphemus) reproductive activity on Delaware Bay beaches: Interactions with beach characteristics  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We used results from a survey of horseshoe crab reproductive activity that was conducted in 1999 throughout Delaware Bay to examine the relationship between estimates of spawning females and egg deposition and analyze how that relationship varies with geography, time within a spawning season, beach morphology, and wave energy. We found that beach morphology and wave energy interacted with density of spawning females to explain variation in the density and distribution of eggs and larvae. For example, the quantity of eggs in surface sediment (i.e., eggs that are potentially available to foraging shorebirds) was associated with the density of spawning females, beach morphology, and wave energy. The association between beach morphology and live eggs in surface sediment was strong especially in late May (Percent Reduction in Error = 86% from regression tree model) where egg density was an order of magnitude higher on beaches <15 m wide (3.38*105 m-2; 90% CI: 2.29*105, 4.47*105) compared to wider beaches (1.49*104 m-2; 90% CI: 4.47*103, 2.53*104). Results also indicate that, among bay-front beaches, horseshoe crabs prefer to spawn on narrow beaches, possibly because of reduced wave energy. At peak periods of spawning activity, density of spawning females was inversely related to foreshore width on mid-latitude beaches within Delaware Bay (t = -2.68, 7 df, p = 0.03). Because the distribution of eggs across the foreshore varied with beach morphology and widened as the spawning season progressed, methods used to sample eggs need to be robust to variation in beach morphology and applicable regardless of when the samples are taken. Because beach morphology and wave energy were associated with the quantity of eggs in surface sediment, certain beach types may be critical to the conservation of shorebird foraging habitat.

Smith, D.R.; Pooler, P.S.; Loveland, R.E.; Botton, M.L.; Michels, S.F.; Weber, R.G.; Carter, D.B.

2002-01-01

251

First international conference on nonlinear problems in aviation & aerospace  

SciTech Connect

The International Conference on Nonlinear Problems in Aviation and Aerospace was held at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Daytona Beach, Florida on May 9-11, 1996. This conference was sponsored by the International Federation of Nonlinear Analysts, International Federation of Information Processing, and Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. Over one hundred engineers, scientists, and mathematicians from seventeen countries attended. These proceedings include keynote addresses, invited lectures, and contributed papers presented during the conference.

Sivasundaram, S. [ed.

1994-12-31

252

Basic Information on the Beach Standards, Monitoring, & Notification Program  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The U.S. EPA BEACH Program website describes how the public's health and environmental quality of our nation's beaches can be improved. It focuses on strengthening beach standards and testing, providing faster laboratory test methods, predicting pollution, investing in health and methods research, and informing the public about the environmental quality of our beaches.

2006-11-30

253

Hispanics push for equality in Palm Beach County school district  

E-print Network

Hispanics push for equality in Palm Beach County school district WPEC - CBS12.com 2011-09-21 22:16:58 PALM BEACH COUNTY, Fla. -- A group of Hispanic business and community leaders pack the Palm Beach, 29 percent of Palm Beach County Students are Hispanic. Meanwhile, less than 10 percent of teachers

Belogay, Eugene A.

254

Palm Beach County nonprofits get creative, gain By EMILY ROACH  

E-print Network

Palm Beach County nonprofits get creative, gain stability By EMILY ROACH Palm Beach Post Staff Writer Updated: 5:47 a.m. Tuesday, Aug. 30, 2011 Posted: 10:26 p.m. Monday, Aug. 29, 2011 Palm Beach. The center had committed six years earlier to moving to West Palm Beach's city hall complex on Clematis

Belogay, Eugene A.

255

Surf City and North Topsail Beach, NC 27 August 2010  

E-print Network

Surf City and North Topsail Beach, NC 27 August 2010 Abstract: Surf City and North Topsail Beach elevation of 15 feet NGVD fronted by a 7-foot NGVD (50-foot wide) beach berm. The project also includes Topsail Beach. The total average annual benefits are $39,775,000 with $11,180,000 in total annual costs

US Army Corps of Engineers

256

Genetic structure of the southeastern United States loggerhead turtle nesting aggregation: evidence of additional structure within the peninsular Florida recovery unit  

Microsoft Academic Search

The southeastern United States supports one of two large loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta) nesting aggregations worldwide and is therefore critical to global conservation and recovery efforts for the species. Previous\\u000a studies have established the presence of four demographically distinct nesting populations (management units) corresponding\\u000a to beaches from (1) North Carolina through northeastern Florida, (2) peninsular Florida, (3) the Dry Tortugas,

Brian M. Shamblin; Mark G. Dodd; Dean A. Bagley; Llewellyn M. Ehrhart; Anton D. Tucker; Chris Johnson; Raymond R. Carthy; Russell A. Scarpino; Erin McMichael; David S. Addison; Kristina L. Williams; Michael G. Frick; Stefanie Ouellette; Anne B. Meylan; Matthew H. Godfrey; Sally R. Murphy; Campbell J. Nairn

2011-01-01

257

75 FR 20802 - Safety Zone; New York Air Show at Jones Beach State Park, Atlantic Ocean off of Jones Beach...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Show at Jones Beach State Park, Atlantic Ocean off of Jones Beach, Wantagh...performing aerobatic maneuvers over the Atlantic Ocean off of Jones Beach State Park...aircraft over a specified area of the Atlantic Ocean off of Jones Beach State...

2010-04-21

258

The recreational value of beaches in the Nelson Mandela Bay area, South Africa  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using beach visitation data collected via the administration of a questionnaire to 226 respondents, this paper estimates a random utility model of beach recreation. The relative value of selected attributes of beaches is estimated, and the recreational values of lost access to four Blue Flag beaches in the Nelson Mandela Bay area, namely Kings beach, Humewood beach, Hobie beach and

Mario Du Preez; Deborah Ellen Lee; Stephen Gerald Hosking

2011-01-01

259

Case study Piçarras Beach: Erosion and nourishment of a headland bay beach  

Microsoft Academic Search

Master project report.\\u000aPiçarras is one of the touristic beaches of Santa Catarina state in Brazil. Piçarras beach is a headland bay beach. In the bay irregular features like an island, rocky outcrops and shoals are present influencing wave propagation. In the south Piçarras is bounded by Piçarras river. The river mouth has been fixated in 1970, after which erosion

S. Van den Heuvel; R. Hoekstra; R. De Zeeuw; A. Zoon

2008-01-01

260

Morphodynamics of a mesotidal rocky beach: Palmeras beach, Gorgona Island National Natural Park, Colombia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The response of a rocky beach to different possible combinations of hydrodynamic conditions (tides, waves, oceanic currents) has been little studied. In this work, the morphodynamic response to different hydrodynamic forcing is evaluated from sedimentological and geomorphological analysis in seasonal and medium term (19 years) scale in Palmeras beach, located in the southwest of Gorgona Island National Natural Park (NNP), a mesotidal rocky island on the Colombian Pacific continental shelf. Palmeras is an important nesting area of two types of marine turtles, with no anthropogenic stress. In the last years, coastal erosion has reduced the beach width, restricting the safe areas for nesting and conservation of these species. Until now, the sinks, sources, reservoirs, rates, and paths of sediments were unknown, as well as their hydrodynamic forcing. The beach seasonal variability, from October 2010 to August 2012, was analyzed based on biweekly or monthly measurements of five beach profiles distributed every 200 m along the 1.2 km of beach length. The main paths for sediment transport were defined from the modeling of wave currents with the SMC model (Coastal Modeling System), as well as the oceanic currents, simulated for the dry and wet seasons of 2011 using the ELCOM model (Estuary and Lake COmputer Model). Extreme morphologic variations over a time span of 19 years were analyzed with the Hsu and Evans beach static equilibrium parabolic model, from one wave diffraction point which dominates the general beach plan shape. The beach lost 672 m3/m during the measuring period, and erosional processes were intensified during the wet season. The beach trends responded directly to a wave mean energy flux change, resulting in an increase of up to 14 m in the width northward and loss of sediments in the beach southward. This study showed that to obtain the integral morphodynamic behavior of a rocky beach it is necessary to combine information of hydrodynamic, sedimentology and geomorphology in different time scales.

Gómez-García, A. M.; Bernal, G. R.; Osorio, A. F.; Botero, V.

2014-10-01

261

Organochlorine pesticides in anhingas, white ibises, and apple snails collected in Florida, 1989–1991  

Microsoft Academic Search

Apple snails (Pomacea paludosa) and eggs and nestlings of anhingas (Anhinga anhinga) and white ibises (Eudocimus albus) were collected in Palm Beach County, Florida from 1989–1991 and analyzed for organochlorine pesticide (OCP) residues. Pesticide residues were not detected in the apple snails. Residues of DDT, with maximum concentrations of 1,200 µg\\/kg wet weight occurred in 50% of the ibis samples

D. G. Rumbold; M. C. Bruner; M. B. Mihalik; E. A. Marti; L. L. White

1996-01-01

262

(dm-)Beach Creation by Breaking Waves  

E-print Network

(1938-2007). #12;... Howell Peregrine... ·! British applied mathematician on surface wave phenomena. ·! Hypothesis: beach forms because sea has energy in all frequencies; slow because only bit of correct frequency

Al Hanbali, Ahmad

263

A Day at the Beach, Anyone?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A field trip to the shore can engage students in real-world science and offer plentiful opportunities for interdisciplinary learning. This field trip "action plan" ensures that a day at the beach goes smoothly for students and chaperones alike.

Fredericks, Anthony D.; Childers, Julie

2004-07-01

264

Sea level anomalies exacerbate beach erosion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

level anomalies are intra-seasonal increases in water level forced by meteorological and oceanographic processes unrelated to storms. The effects of sea level anomalies on beach morphology are unknown but important to constrain because these events have been recognized over large stretches of continental margins. Here, we present beach erosion measurements along Onslow Beach, a barrier island on the U.S. East Coast, in response to a year with frequent sea level anomalies and no major storms. The anomalies enabled extensive erosion, which was similar and in most places greater than the erosion that occurred during a year with a hurricane. These results highlight the importance of sea level anomalies in facilitating coastal erosion and advocate for their inclusion in beach-erosion models and management plans. Sea level anomalies amplify the erosive effects of accelerated sea level rise and changes in storminess associated with global climate change.

Theuerkauf, Ethan J.; Rodriguez, Antonio B.; Fegley, Stephen R.; Luettich, Richard A.

2014-07-01

265

Salinity and groundwater flow below beaches  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

High rates of exchange between seawater and fresh groundwater in beach sediments drive significant chemical reactions, but the groundwater flow that controls this is poorly understood. Current conceptual models for groundwater flow in beaches highlight an upper saline plume, which is separated from the traditional freshwater-saltwater interface by a zone of brackish to fresh groundwater discharge. The lack of an upper saline plume at our study site led us to ask whether the plume exists in all beaches and what hydrogeological features control its formation. We used variable-density, saturated-unsaturated, transient groundwater flow models to investigate the geometry of the freshwater-saltwater interface in beaches with slopes varying from 0.1 to 0.01. We also varied hydraulic conductivity, dispersivity, tidal amplitude, inflow of fresh groundwater and precipitation. All models showed that a salinity gradient developed between the fresh groundwater and seawater in the intertidal zone, but the magnitude of the gradient was variable. The hydraulic conductivity was an important control on the development of an upper saline plume. A hydraulic conductivity of 100 m/d allowed the formation of an upper saline plume in every beach slope. No upper saline plumes formed in any beach with hydraulic conductivities less than 10 m/d. The slope of the beach was also a significant control. In models using a representative hydraulic conductivity of 10 m/d, the upper saline plume only formed in beaches with a slope of 0.5 or greater. The salinity of brackish groundwater that discharges seaward of the upper saline plume was inversely proportional to the input of fresh groundwater. Prior studies of groundwater flow and salinity in beaches have used very small dispersivities, but we found that the upper saline plume becomes much less distinct when larger dispersivities are used. Real beaches are highly mixed environments and the appropriate magnitude of dispersivity remains unclear. Our results suggest that upper saline plumes may not form in beaches of the U.S. Southeast, which are characterized by fine-grained sediment and moderate slopes. The concentration gradient between the upper saline plume and adjacent groundwater discharge zone increased with decreasing longitudinal dispersivity.

Evans, T. B.; Wilson, A. M.; Moore, W. S.

2013-12-01

266

Mixed sediment beach processes: Kachemak Bay, AK  

Microsoft Academic Search

Numerous studies have documented the rates of sediment transport along well-sorted, sand-rich beaches relating sediment transport to forcing by waves and currents. The dynamics of mixed-grain size beaches, however, have received relatively little attention in the scientific literature in spite of the estimate that these systems represent approximately 80 percent of the world's non-rocky coastlines. The tectonically active, megatidal, sea

P. Ruggiero; P. N. Adams; J. A. Warrick

2006-01-01

267

Florida Mental Health Institute  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Florida Mental Health Institute, dedicated to research, training and program development for improving psychological wellbeing, has four main divisions: Aging and Mental Health, Child and Family Studies, Community Mental Health, and Mental Health Law and Policy.

2007-03-16

268

Florida State Bowling Team  

E-print Network

23 Pro-Shop Policies 23 FSU STATEMENT OF NON-DISCRIMINATION 22 PARENTS 24 SCHEDULE 26 #12;THE FLORIDA that this year we will continue our relationships with Roto Grip on the women's side. The men's team will have

Weston, Ken

269

Made in Florida  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Everyday, you enjoy things you may not realize were made in Florida. Behind every product and technology you use, there is a world of manufacturing. Today, in Florida, more than 16,000 different companies and 400,000 people work in the manufacturing field.This means that not just jobs, but manufacturing careers are being Made in Florida, by people like you, right now. If you get satisfaction by making something, get excited about using new technology, or you work well with teams of people, then the manufacturing industry may be the place for you, with a challenging job, great pay, and excellent benefits. The diversity of Manufacturing in Florida includes: Food, Beverages, Pharmaceuticals, Medical Devices and Instruments, Metals and Plastics, Electronics and Technical instruments, Aerospace components, Transportation, Household goods, Mining, Industrial and Construction Components.

2010-05-31

270

Hail Formation in Florida  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hail poses a substantial threat to life and property in the state of Florida. These losses could be minimized through better understanding of the relationships between atmospheric variables that impact hail formation in Florida. Improving hail forecasting in Florida requires analyzing a number of meteorological parameters and synoptic data related to hail formation. NOAA archive data was retrieved to create a database that was used to categorize text files of hail days. The text files were entered into the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Earth System Research Laboratory website to create National Centers for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research Reanalysis maps of atmospheric variables for Florida hail days as well as days leading to the hail event. These data were then analyzed to determine the relationship between variables that affect hail formation, in general, across different regions and seasons in Florida using Statistical Product and Service Solutions. The reasoning for the differing factors affecting hail formation between regions, seasons and hail sizes were discussed, as well as forecasting suggestions relating to region and month in Florida. The study found that the majority of all hail that occurs in Florida is during the wet season. A low Lifted Index, high Precipitable Water and lower than average Sea Level Pressure, in most cases, is present during hail days in Florida. Furthermore, results show that Vector Wind magnitude increases as hail size increases. Additionally, several atmospheric variables useful to studying hail events, such as Lifted Index, Precipitable Water, Sea Level Pressure, Vector Wind and Temperature have significant correlations with each other depending on the region and season being observed. Strong correlations between low Lifted Index, high Precipitable Water values and the occurrence of hail events are discussed, as well as the relationship between temperature anomalies at various pressure levels and the occurrence of hail events.

Stanley, Matthew

271

Elevated sedimentation on coral reefs adjacent to a beach nourishment project.  

PubMed

An increasingly common method to restore eroding beaches is nourishment, a process by which lost sand is replaced with terrestrial or offshore sediments to widen beaches. The southeastern Florida coastline contains shore-parallel coral reef communities adjacent to eroding beaches. Scleractinian corals and other reef-associated organisms are known to demonstrate sensitivity to elevated sedimentation levels. Sediment traps were used to examine spatio-temporal sedimentation patterns and assess the effects of nourishment (dredge and fill) activities. Several environmental variables correlated with among-site spatial variability of sediment parameters. Intra-annual variability correlated with wind velocity and direction. Nourishment activities showed localized effects, with sites in close proximity to dredging areas exhibiting significantly higher collection rates and lower percent fines than control sites. A regional increase in sedimentation occurred while nourishment activities were ongoing. Due to concurrent impacts of hurricanes, only one during-construction sampling interval revealed substantially higher collection rates relative to corresponding pre-construction sampling intervals. PMID:19837439

Jordan, L K B; Banks, K W; Fisher, L E; Walker, B K; Gilliam, D S

2010-02-01

272

A PIECE OF THE SPACE SHUTTLE CHALLENGER WASHED ASHORE AT COCOA BEACH  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A Cocoa Beach front-end loader holds a large piece of debris from the Space Shuttle orbiter Challenger after it washed ashore in Cocoa Beach near the Coconuts on the Beach restaurant and bar. Overseeing the recovery and protection of the piece is KSC criminal investigator Jan Seinkner, facing camera at center, of EG&G Florida Inc., base operations contractor. The piece, about 15 feet by 6 feet, is believed to be part of an elevon or rudder. It is one of the biggest pieces to wash ashore to date. A smaller piece was found several blocks south. NASA recovered thousands of pounds of debris from the Atlantic Ocean after the Jan. 28, 1986 accident which destroyed the Shuttle and claimed the lives of the seven crew members; about 50 percent of the orbiter remained in the ocean after search operations were suspended. Those remains are stored at Cape Canaveral Air Station, mostly in two Minutemen silos. The two newly recovered pieces will be brought to KSC's Security Patrol Headquarters on Contractor Road for examination and temporary storage.

1996-01-01

273

An holistic approach to beach erosion vulnerability assessment.  

PubMed

Erosion is a major threat for coasts worldwide, beaches in particular, which constitute one of the most valuable coastal landforms. Vulnerability assessments related to beach erosion may contribute to planning measures to counteract erosion by identifying, quantifying and ranking vulnerability. Herein, we present a new index, the Beach Vulnerability Index (BVI), which combines simplicity in calculations, easily obtainable data and low processing capacity. This approach provides results not only for different beaches, but also for different sectors of the same beach and enables the identification of the relative significance of the processes involved. It functions through the numerical approximation of indicators that correspond to the mechanisms related to the processes that control beach evolution, such as sediment availability, wave climate, beach morhodynamics and sea level change. The BVI is also intended to be used as a managerial tool for beach sustainability, including resilience to climate change impact on beach erosion. PMID:25123815

Alexandrakis, George; Poulos, Serafim ?

2014-01-01

274

MONITORING AND MODELING NEARSHORE DREDGE DISPOSAL FOR INDIRECT BEACH NOURISHMENT, OCEAN BEACH, SAN  

E-print Network

MONITORING AND MODELING NEARSHORE DREDGE DISPOSAL FOR INDIRECT BEACH NOURISHMENT, OCEAN BEACH, SAN FRANCISCO Patrick L. Barnard1 , Daniel M. Hanes1 , Jamie Lescinski1 and Edwin Elias2 Nearshore dredge toward the shore, providing evidence that annual dredge disposal at this site could be beneficial over

275

Stratigraphy of the Upper Pleistocene Miami Limestone of Florida  

SciTech Connect

The upper Pleistocene Miami Limestone is probably the most stratigraphically-complex formation in the Cenozoic of Florida. The Miami overlies and vertically/laterally grades into the upper Pleistocene Ft. Thompson Formation to the west in southeast Palm Beach County (west of I-95); to the west in Broward County (west of the Turnpike); and to the north in south Broward County (along U.S. 27). The Miami overlies and very locally vertically grades into the Ft. Thompson in all of Dade County. The Miami overlies and vertically/laterally grades into the upper Pleistocene Anastasia Formation to the north and east in southeast Palm Beach County (east of I-95), and to the northeast in east Broward County (east of the Turnpike). The Miami laterally grades into the upper Pleistocene Key Largo Limestone to the southeast in extreme southeast Dade County, and overlies and locally vertically grades into the Key Largo in the Lower Keys, south Monroe County. The Miami unconformably overlies the Pliocene Tamiami Formation and pinches out to the west in northeast mainland Monroe and southeast Collier Counties, and also pinches out to the north in east-central Palm Beach County. In all areas, the Miami Limestone is either overlain unconformably by very discontinuous undifferentiated surficial sediments or forms land surface.

Johnson, R.A.

1993-03-01

276

Threats to sandy beach ecosystems: A review  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We provide a brief synopsis of the unique physical and ecological attributes of sandy beach ecosystems and review the main anthropogenic pressures acting on the world's single largest type of open shoreline. Threats to beaches arise from a range of stressors which span a spectrum of impact scales from localised effects (e.g. trampling) to a truly global reach (e.g. sea-level rise). These pressures act at multiple temporal and spatial scales, translating into ecological impacts that are manifested across several dimensions in time and space so that today almost every beach on every coastline is threatened by human activities. Press disturbances (whatever the impact source involved) are becoming increasingly common, operating on time scales of years to decades. However, long-term data sets that describe either the natural dynamics of beach systems or the human impacts on beaches are scarce and fragmentary. A top priority is to implement long-term field experiments and monitoring programmes that quantify the dynamics of key ecological attributes on sandy beaches. Because of the inertia associated with global climate change and human population growth, no realistic management scenario will alleviate these threats in the short term. The immediate priority is to avoid further development of coastal areas likely to be directly impacted by retreating shorelines. There is also scope for improvement in experimental design to better distinguish natural variability from anthropogenic impacts. Sea-level rise and other effects of global warming are expected to intensify other anthropogenic pressures, and could cause unprecedented ecological impacts. The definition of the relevant scales of analysis, which will vary according to the magnitude of the impact and the organisational level under analysis, and the recognition of a physical-biological coupling at different scales, should be included in approaches to quantify impacts. Zoning strategies and marine reserves, which have not been widely implemented in sandy beaches, could be a key tool for biodiversity conservation and should also facilitate spillover effects into adjacent beach habitats. Setback and zoning strategies need to be enforced through legislation, and all relevant stakeholders should be included in the design, implementation and institutionalisation of these initiatives. New perspectives for rational management of sandy beaches require paradigm shifts, by including not only basic ecosystem principles, but also incentives for effective governance and sharing of management roles between government and local stakeholders.

Defeo, Omar; McLachlan, Anton; Schoeman, David S.; Schlacher, Thomas A.; Dugan, Jenifer; Jones, Alan; Lastra, Mariano; Scapini, Felicita

2009-01-01

277

Influence of Beach Scraping on Beach Profile Morphology: Fire Island, New York  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fire Island is part of a barrier island system located just south of Long Island, New York. The island is 50 km long, oriented southwest-northeast, and varies in width from 150 meters to 1 kilometer. Established communities on Fire Island are part of Fire Island National Seashore (FIIS) which is managed by the National Park Service. The island is densely populated, and thus mitigating coastal erosion caused by large-scale storm waves has become an important issue. Severe nor'easter storms in 1991, 1992, and 1993 caused substantial erosion and property damage. This prompted communities within FIIS to conduct a pilot study in which the preventative, non-structural practice of beach scraping was employed as a method of erosion control. Beach scraping is the anthropogenic movement of sand from the berm to the back beach creating an artificial foredune. Currently, there is no published research that explores the morphologic influence of beach scraping on Fire Island, although the practice is still in place today for a number of communities. This study assesses changes caused by beach scraping using a temporally robust beach profile dataset of over 150 profiles, spanning thirteen years. Three study areas were chosen based on location (western, central, and eastern parts of Fire Island) and data availability in scraped and adjacent control areas. Analyzed characteristics include beach width, beach volume, slope (dune, beachface, global), berm crest elevation, and dune crest elevation. Initial results indicate a detectable difference in the behavior of the beach between scraped and control areas. Seasonal signals show beach width decreasing substantially westward from the scraped profile location, which is in the direction of net littoral transport. Anthropogenic relocation of berm material to the foredune zone during scraping places sediment in the back beach area that might otherwise be mobilized by storm waves, therefore depriving downcoast beaches of sediment. Longer-term comparisons (decadal) indicate that the beach is both widening and increasing in volume in the western study area (by 30-50%), which corresponds spatially to a persistent accretional cell that has been identified in current studies along this section of Fire Island.

Kratzmann, M.; Hapke, C.

2007-12-01

278

The Florida Yards & Neighborhoods Handbook  

E-print Network

-FRIENDLY LANDSCAPES? Florida-Friendly Landscapes protect Florida's unique natural resources by conserving water to conserve or protect the state's water resources serves a compelling public interest conservation and water quality protection and restoration." Florida Yards and Neighborhoods is the residential

Watson, Craig A.

279

USING PUBLIC-DOMAIN MODELS TO ESTIMATE BEACH BACTERIA CONCENTRATIONS  

EPA Science Inventory

Stretches of beach along popular Huntington Beach, California are occassionally closed to swimming due to high levels of bacteria. One hypothesized source is the treated wastewater plume from the Orange County Sanitation District's (OCSD) ocean outfall. While three independent sc...

280

Nonlinear Magnetic Beach* Boris N. Breizman and Alexey V. Arefiev  

E-print Network

Nonlinear Magnetic Beach* Boris N. Breizman and Alexey V. Arefiev Institute for Fusion Studies into the directed energy of the ion flow. This work can be viewed as a nonlinear version of the magnetic beach

281

Depositional settings of sand beaches along whitewater rivers  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The numbers and sizes of sand beaches suitable for recreation along selected whitewater rivers in the western United States depend on sand concentrations, range of discharge and the size, frequency and type of depositional settings. River-width expansions downstream from constrictions are the predominant depositional setting for sand beaches in the upper Grand Canyon and along five Wild and Scenic Rivers in Idaho, but not along other rivers. Beaches located upstream from constrictions are rare, in general, except in the Grand Canyon. Beaches found in expansions without constrictions dominate depositional sites along the Yampa and Green Rivers, are fairly common along the rivers in Idaho, but are relatively rare in the Grand Canyon. The magnitude of flow expansion is a reliable predictor of beach size. Beaches located on the inside of curves are uncommon, in general, but can be important recreation sites. The mid-channel bar setting is the least important from a recreation standpoint because that setting is rare and beaches there are typically small, and emergent only at low flow. The frequency of beaches is highly variable among rivers and the concentration of sand in transport is only partially responsible. Of the rivers studied, the unregulated Yampa River carries the highest concentrations of suspended sand and has among the most beaches (1.2 beaches km-1). Emergent sand beaches are essentially nonexistent along the Deschutes River and are rare along other Oregon rivers, yet these rivers transport some sand. Sand beaches are fairly common (0.8-1.1 beaches km-1) along the regulated Colorado River, but are comparatively rare (0.6 beaches km-1) along the unregulated Middle Fork Salmon River. The suspended sand concentrations in study reaches of these two rivers are similar, and the difference in the frequency of beaches may be largely because the processes that create beach-deposition settings are less active along the Middle Fork Salmon.

Vincent, K.R.; Andrews, E.D.

2008-01-01

282

Florida Hydrogen Initiative  

SciTech Connect

The Florida Hydrogen Initiative (FHI) was a research, development and demonstration hydrogen and fuel cell program. The FHI program objectives were to develop Florida?s hydrogen and fuel cell infrastructure and to assist DOE in its hydrogen and fuel cell activities The FHI program funded 12 RD&D projects as follows: Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure and Rental Car Strategies -- L. Lines, Rollins College This project analyzes strategies for Florida's early stage adaptation of hydrogen-powered public transportation. In particular, the report investigates urban and statewide network of refueling stations and the feasibility of establishing a hydrogen rental-car fleet based in Orlando. Methanol Fuel Cell Vehicle Charging Station at Florida Atlantic University ? M. Fuchs, EnerFuel, Inc. The project objectives were to design, and demonstrate a 10 kWnet proton exchange membrane fuel cell stationary power plant operating on methanol, to achieve an electrical energy efficiency of 32% and to demonstrate transient response time of less than 3 milliseconds. Assessment of Public Understanding of the Hydrogen Economy Through Science Center Exhibits, J. Newman, Orlando Science Center The project objective was to design and build an interactive Science Center exhibit called: ?H2Now: the Great Hydrogen Xchange?. On-site Reformation of Diesel Fuel for Hydrogen Fueling Station Applications ? A. Raissi, Florida Solar Energy Center This project developed an on-demand forecourt hydrogen production technology by catalytically converting high-sulfur hydrocarbon fuels to an essentially sulfur-free gas. The removal of sulfur from reformate is critical since most catalysts used for the steam reformation have limited sulfur tolerance. Chemochromic Hydrogen Leak Detectors for Safety Monitoring ? N. Mohajeri and N. Muradov, Florida Solar Energy Center This project developed and demonstrated a cost-effective and highly selective chemochromic (visual) hydrogen leak detector for safety monitoring at any facility engaged in transport, handling and use of hydrogen. Development of High Efficiency Low Cost Electrocatalysts for Hydrogen Production and PEM Fuel Cell Applications ? M. Rodgers, Florida Solar Energy Center The objective of this project was to decrease platinum usage in fuel cells by conducting experiments to improve catalyst activity while lowering platinum loading through pulse electrodeposition. Optimum values of several variables during electrodeposition were selected to achieve the highest electrode performance, which was related to catalyst morphology. Understanding Mechanical and Chemical Durability of Fuel Cell Membrane Electrode Assemblies ? D. Slattery, Florida Solar Energy Center The objective of this project was to increase the knowledge base of the degradation mechanisms for membranes used in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. The results show the addition of ceria (cerium oxide) has given durability improvements by reducing fluoride emissions by an order of magnitude during an accelerated durability test. Production of Low-Cost Hydrogen from Biowaste (HyBrTec?) ? R. Parker, SRT Group, Inc., Miami, FL This project developed a hydrogen bromide (HyBrTec?) process which produces hydrogen bromide from wet-cellulosic waste and co-produces carbon dioxide. Eelectrolysis dissociates hydrogen bromide producing recyclable bromine and hydrogen. A demonstration reactor and electrolysis vessel was designed, built and operated. Development of a Low-Cost and High-Efficiency 500 W Portable PEMFC System ? J. Zheng, Florida State University, H. Chen, Bing Energy, Inc. The objectives of this project were to develop a new catalyst structures comprised of highly conductive buckypaper and Pt catalyst nanoparticles coated on its surface and to demonstrate fuel cell efficiency improvement and durability and cell cost reductions in the buckypaper based electrodes. Development of an Interdisciplinary Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology Academic Program ? J. Politano, Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, FL This project developed a hydrogen and fuel cel

Block, David L

2013-06-30

283

Atlas of Florida Vascular Plants  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This online atlas provides information on the occurrence and distribution of plants in the State of Florida. Records are based on collections in the four major Florida institutional herbaria: the University of Florida, Florida State University, Fairchild Tropical Gardens, and the University of South Florida. There are also records from the New York Botanical Garden, Harvard University, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The collection is browsable by county or by an alphabetical listing of families, and searchable by scientific name. An advanced search feature lets users search by text string, taxonomic category, county, nativity, wetland status, and several other parameters.

284

Monitoring of beach enteromorpha variation with near shore video  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Beach is an important coastal protective barrier and tourism resources. Beach environment monitoring can help beach managers to make feasible decisions. Digital image of video monitoring technology can provide high resolution information of temporal and spatial variation of near shore in real time. The application of Video monitoring technology has been implemented in Qingdao's Shilaoren beach. The clustering method based on Gaussian mixture model is applied to extract beach enteromorpha changs for the digital images. Analysis results show that, the period of enteromorpha in Qingdao's Shilaoren beach was mainly from the early July to the mid-August in 2011, and the decline of enteromorpha is mainly associated with the rising temperature in the mid-August. Storm has significant impact on the beach enteromorpha. Tourists' activity space on the beach will decrease due to the enteromorpha covering on the beach, which affects beach tourism activities. Therefore, it's necessary to make preventive measures to avoid enteromorpha piling up on the beach, which is of great importance to the bathing beach environment and tourism development.

Hu, Yali; Yu, Xinsheng; Yan, Zhijin; Yi, Weidong

2014-07-01

285

Lynnhaven River Basin Ecosystem Restoration Project Virginia Beach, Virginia  

E-print Network

Lynnhaven River Basin Ecosystem Restoration Project Virginia Beach, Virginia 24 September 2013 the Lynnhaven River Basin. The watershed is located within the City of Virginia Beach in Southeastern Virginia is the City of Virginia Beach. The study area consists of the entire Lynnhaven River Basin, a 64-square- mile

US Army Corps of Engineers

286

107. VIEW OF BEACH DEVELOPMENT ON NORTHWEST SIDE OF PIER, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

107. VIEW OF BEACH DEVELOPMENT ON NORTHWEST SIDE OF PIER, LOOKING SOUTH-SOUTHEAST. SECTION OF PIER IS IN BACKGROUND Photograph #1579-HB. Photographer unknown, c. 1930-31 prior to replacement of original light standards in 1930-31 - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

287

Modelling Groundwater Flow in Beach Profiles for Optimising Stabilising Measures  

Microsoft Academic Search

VESTERBY, H., 2000. Modelling Groundwater Flow in Beach Profiles for Optimising Stabilising Measures. The coherence between the elevation of the beach groundwater and erosional or accretionary trends of the beach face has been reported for years. Manipulation of the groundwater flow has during physical model tests and at the prototype scale shown reduction of the erosive processes and often let

Hans Vesterby

2000-01-01

288

Tracer Studies In A Laboratory Beach Subjected To Waves  

EPA Science Inventory

This work investigated the washout of dissolved nutrients from beaches due to waves by conducting tracer studies in a laboratory beach facility. The effects of waves were studied in the case where the beach was subjected to the tide, and that in which no tidal action was present...

289

POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION (PCR) TECHNOLOGY IN VISUAL BEACH  

EPA Science Inventory

In 2000, the US Congress passed the Beaches Environmental Assessment and Coastal Health Act under which the EPA has the mandate to manage all significant public beaches by 2008. As a result, EPA, USGS and NOAA are developing the Visual Beach program which consists of software eq...

290

Rhomboid beach pattern: A laboratory investigation O. Devauchelle,1  

E-print Network

Click Here for Full Article Rhomboid beach pattern: A laboratory investigation O. Devauchelle,1 L December 2009; accepted 21 January 2010; published 18 June 2010. [1] The formation of beach rhomboid beach pattern: A laboratory investigation, J. Geophys. Res., 115, F02017, doi:10.1029/2009JF001471. 1

Lajeunesse, Eric

291

SWASH ZONE CHARACTERISTICS AT OCEAN BEACH, SAN FRANCISCO, CA  

E-print Network

1 SWASH ZONE CHARACTERISTICS AT OCEAN BEACH, SAN FRANCISCO, CA L. H. Erikson1 , D.M. Hanes2 , P.M. Barnard2 , and A. E. Gibbs2 Runup data collected during the summer of 2005 at Ocean Beach, San Francisco shows that the beach was dissipative with Iribarren numbers between 0.05 and 0.4 and that infragravity

292

May 20, 2004 TO: Newport Beach Planning Commission  

E-print Network

May 20, 2004 TO: Newport Beach Planning Commission We respectfully request the assistance of the city Planning Commission regarding a major community concern. AT ISSUE The city of Newport Beach has Commission= ALL required in the city's Zoning Code. The Newport Beach Zoning Code states, "Use permits

Touretzky, David S.

293

World Catalog of the Beach-Fly Family Canacidae (Diptera)  

E-print Network

World Catalog of the Beach-Fly Family Canacidae (Diptera) WAYNE N. MATH IS I SMITHSONIAN O G Y · N U M B E R 5 3 6 World Catalog of the Beach-Fly Family Canacidae (Diptera) Wayne N. Mathis of the Beach-Fly Family Canacidae (Diptera). Smithsonian Contributions toZoology, number 536,18 pages, 1992

Mathis, Wayne N.

294

DEGREE PROGRAM COMPARISON CHART ODU and ODU Virginia Beach  

E-print Network

DEGREE PROGRAM COMPARISON CHART ODU and ODU Virginia Beach UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAMS ODU-VB ODU ODU has 69 Undergraduate Degree programs; 31 are available at ODU Virginia Beach* # of Degrees-to-degree completion by complementing Beach course offerings with online & main campus offerings. GRADUATE DEGREE

295

NEWPORT BEACH STANDS UP FOR LEONA VALLEY, GREEN VALLEY  

E-print Network

NEWPORT BEACH STANDS UP FOR LEONA VALLEY, GREEN VALLEY AND BOUQUET CANYON. It's time to take business in Newport Beach. Multiple times a month, paramedics, fire &/or police are called to the property, and suffering we, the neighbors of this business in Newport Beach, have experienced. In sharing my experience

Touretzky, David S.

296

Project # 1109 September 13-16, 2011 Clearwater Beach, FL  

E-print Network

Project # 1109 #12;#12;September 13-16, 2011 Clearwater Beach, FL i Welcome to our 51st Annual-16, 2011 Clearwater Beach, FL iii Table of Contents Welcome Letter ...................................................................................... 24 #12;The International Citrus & Beverage Conference iv #12;September 13-16, 2011 Clearwater Beach

Florida, University of

297

Jacksonville Zoo and the beach Note from Daryl  

E-print Network

Highlights Jacksonville Zoo and the beach Note from Daryl Bicycle Safety Daily Activities! First, we will drive to Jacksonville zoo to see animals! Then, we're going to the beach to swim and see Zoo and Beach are now SOLD OUT. If you want to go, see Nate to sign up in case other students can't go

Pilyugin, Sergei S.

298

North beach (Nazaré) sand tracer experiment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The littoral in the vicinity of Nazaré (West Portuguese coast) is characterized by two distinct coastal stretches separated by Nazaré headland: a northern sector (Norte beach) characterized by a high energetic continuous sandy beach and a southern sector (Nazaré bay beach) that corresponds to an embayed beach, sheltered by the Nazaré headland. The bay is a geomorphological expression of the Nazaré canyon head, which acts as powerful sediment sink, capturing the large longshore net southward transport at Norte beach generated by the north Atlantic high energetic swell. The northern side of the canyon head is carved on highly resistant Cretaceous limestone sustaining an underwater vertical relief that emerges on the Nazaré headland, creating a unusual nearshore wave pattern. This wave pattern not only concentrates high energy levels at the Norte beach but also contributes to local complex longshore drift gradients capable of inducing beach seasonal cross-shore variations of more than 200 m. The main factors that influence local sediment budget are: (1) canyon head capturing and (2) headland sediment bypassing. To obtain a direct measure of the net longshore drift at Norte beach (upstream boundary of the system) a large scale fluorescent tracer experiment was performed. The data will be used to validate longshore transport formulas in a high energetic environment and to access Nazaré canyon head sediment loss. Considering the anticipation of high transport rates, approximately 10 tonnes of native sand where coated with orange fluorescent ink using a set of concrete mixers. The experiment took place on the 9th to 15th September 2013 period and followed the continuous injection method (CIM). The CIM approach was justified by the expected high energy levels that inhibits sediment sampling across the surf zone. During the tracer injection procedure (approx. 5 hours), sediment sampling was performed at 13 sites along a rectilinear coastal stretch extended through 600 m downdrift of the injection point. Tracer was injected at a rate of 16 kg each 30 sec and collected at a frequency of 10 min at each site. Complementary sampling was performed at the inner shelf and at the beach southern of the headland. In order to follow tracer downdrift movement and headland sediment bypassing low resolution sampling was extended through three more days. Oceanographic forcing throughout the experiment was measured by an offshore wave buoy and an ADCP specifically deployed for the experiment. During the first tidal cycle, data from field observations using a hand held UV light showed a southward tracer displacement of more than 600 m. After the second tidal cycle, sediment tracer was detected in the Nazaré bay beach showing headland bypassing. Further insights on the sediment transport at the Nazaré canyon head system will be supported by the analysis of sediment samples collected at the beach and inner shelf using an automated image analysis system. This work was done in the framework of the PTDC/MAR/114674/2009 program, financed by FCT which the authors acknowledge gratefully.

Duarte, João; Taborda, Rui; Ribeiro, Mónica; Cascalho, João; Silva, Ana; Bosnic, Ivana

2014-05-01

299

Florida's Online Option  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Education reform often appears a zero-sum battle, one that pits crusaders demanding accountability and choice against much of the traditional education establishment, including teachers unions. The political skirmishes in Florida, including court fights over vouchers and charter schools, and ongoing struggles over a parade of different merit pay…

Tucker, Bill

2009-01-01

300

Florida's Red Tide Infestation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This CBS news article reports a toxic algae bloom that spread along the Florida's west coast in 2001, threatening the wildlife of Tampa Bay's estuary. The article briefly discusses the cause of the red tide and its affect on the shellfish industry.

News, Cbs

301

The Seminoles of Florida.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book gives a complete account of the Florida Seminoles from their entrance into the state almost 300 years ago, through the great chiefdoms of Micanopy, Osceola, and Billy Bowlegs, to the current political reality of democratic tribal elections. After moving into the peninsula from Georgia and Alabama, the Seminoles fought three wars against…

Covington, James W.

302

Florida Educational Facilities, 1999.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication describes Florida school and community college facilities completed in 1999, including photographs and floor plans. The facilities profiled are: Buchholz High School (Alachua County); Gator Run Elementary School (Broward); Corkscrew Elementary School (Collier); The 500 Role Models Academy of Excellence (Miami-Dade); Caribbean…

Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Office of Educational Facilities.

303

Florida and SREB  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Southern Regional Education Board is a nonprofit organization that works collaboratively with Florida and 15 other member states to improve education at every level-- from pre-K to postdoctoral study-- through many effective programs and initiatives. SREB's "Challenge to Lead Goals for Education", which call for the region to lead the nation…

Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2009

2009-01-01

304

Florida Driver Education Handbook.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This student edition contains the same basic information as the official Florida Driver Handbook, but the reading difficulty of the material has been sharply reduced. It also provides activity-oriented exercises and review tests on this material. Introductory materials include a complete listing of all activities given, some vocabulary exercises…

Mick, Susan H.

305

The Everglades, Florida  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This tutorial explains the wetland ecosystem of the Everglades. Students will discover how living and nonliving parts of the ecosystem interact and the importance of habitats such as the saltwater environment of the Florida Bay, the coastal prairie, freshwater sloughs, pinelands, and mangrove forests. There is an interactive glossary within the text.

306

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA MAINTENANCE  

E-print Network

Health and Safety Building 179 PO Box 112190 Gainesville, Florida 32611 #12;2011 Revision University is to protect building occupants and workers by minimizing the potential for exposure to asbestos fibers, be surveyed for asbestos prior to demolition or renovation. Health effects related to asbestos exposure

Wu, Dapeng Oliver

307

The Florida Folklife Collection  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

With generous funding from the Institute of Museum and Library Services, the Florida State Archives has recently finished an ambitious two-year project to enhance access to a number of items in the Florida Folklife Collection by creating The Florida Memory Project website. No doubt the site will be of great interest to folklorists and the general public, as it contains an online index with descriptions of 50,000 photographic images and close to 5,000 audio recordings. Additionally, visitors can peruse over 10,000 of these photographic images by performing detailed searches. Visitors can also look through the audio section for a number of real finds, including a WPA recording of a work song performed by Zora Neale Hurston along with other folk song recordings. The site also includes five separate educational units, which may be used in the classroom, or perused at the discretion of each visitor. The units include discussions of the history of net making and net fishing in Florida and the creation of Seminole dolls by noted doll maker Mary B. Billie.

308

Florida State Bowling Team  

E-print Network

on equipment but nothing free. In addition we will continue our involvement with the Applied Sports Psychology BENEFITS AND RESPONSIBILITIES 19 The Good Stuff 19 Distribution of Equipment 20 How to Get the Boot 21 successful sports programs on campus and continue to build the legacy of more than 50 years of Florida State

Sura, Philip

309

Conservation: saving Florida's manatees  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Robert K. Bonde of the U.S. Geological Survey writes about the protected population of manatees in Crystal River, Florida, including information about the threats they face as they migrate in and out of protected waters. Photographer Carol Grant shares images of "Angel," a newborn manatee she photographed early one winter morning.

Bonde, Robert K.

2008-01-01

310

Frontiers in Outreach and Education: The Florida Red Tide Experience  

PubMed Central

To enhance information sharing and garner increased support from the public for scientific research, funding agencies now typically require that research groups receiving support convey their work to stakeholders. The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences-(NIEHS) funded Aerosolized Florida Red Tide P01 research group (Florida Red Tide Research Group) has employed a variety of outreach strategies to meet this requirement. Messages developed from this project began a decade ago and have evolved from basic print material (fliers and posters) to an interactive website, to the use of video and social networking technologies, such as Facebook and Twitter. The group was able to track dissemination of these information products; however, evaluation of their effectiveness presented much larger challenges. The primary lesson learned by the Florida Red Tide Research Group is that the best ways to reach specific stakeholders is to develop unique products or services to address specific stakeholders needs, such as the Beach Conditions Reporting System. Based on the experience of the Group, the most productive messaging products result when scientific community engages potential stakeholders and outreach experts during the very initial phases of a project. PMID:21532966

Nierenberg, Kate; Hollenbeck, Julie; Fleming, Lora E.; Stephan, Wendy; Reich, Andrew; Backer, Lorraine C.; Currier, Robert; Kirkpatrick, Barbara

2011-01-01

311

Cosmology at the Beach Lecture: Wayne Hu  

SciTech Connect

Wayne Hu lectures on Secondary Anisotropy in the CMB. The lecture is the first in a series of 3 he delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the Beach" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.

Wayne Hu

2009-03-02

312

An Interview with Beatrice Beach Szekely  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents an interview with Beatrice Beach Szekely, a comparative education scholar that specialized in the Soviet Union. She was editor of the journal "Soviet Education" from 1970 to 1989. During the interview, Szekely talked about how she became personally involved in Russian/Soviet studies of education. She related that her interest…

Steiner-Khamsi, Gita

2007-01-01

313

Miami Beach: Eden Roc Renaissance Hotel  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Eden Roc Renaissance Miami Beach was completed in 1956. Designed by architect Morris Lapidus after completing the Fontainebleu, the Eden Roc’s neighbor. Lapidus used curvy and innovative designs that were widely criticized at the time they were being built. At the time it was built, the Eden Roc was considered a vision of the Italian Renaissance. Today the style

Chet Smolski; Morris Lapidus

1978-01-01

314

Cosmology at the Beach Lecture: Wayne Hu  

ScienceCinema

Wayne Hu lectures on Secondary Anisotropy in the CMB. The lecture is the first in a series of 3 he delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the Beach" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.

Wayne Hu

2010-01-08

315

Where Has All the Oil Gone? The use of trace metals as potential indicators of oil contamination in marine sediments and beach sands  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report initial results to determine if select trace metals are effective indicators for the magnitude and spatial extent of Deep Water Horizon (DWH) oil contamination in Gulf of Mexico marine sediments and beach sands. Since crude oil is known to have elevated concentrations of nickel and vanadium, contamination can be detected even after the degradation of oil by measuring enrichment of these metals within marine sediments and beach sands. A sample of crude oil from the Macondo Prospect, source of the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill, was fully digested and analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) at the College of Marine Science, University of South Florida. Results indicate the crude oil is enriched in nickel, vanadium, and cobalt, with concentrations of 0.86 ppm, 2.76 ppm, and 84 ppb, respectively. With this known trace metal enrichment in DWH oil, Gulf of Mexico marine sediments from 400 and 1100m water depth near DeSoto Canyon and beach sands from Pensacola, FL were examined for enrichment of V, Ni, and Co. Both marine sediment and beach sand samples were partially digested with HNO3 before analysis via ICP-MS. With marine sediments, the visually contaminated layer at or near the surface typically exhibited an enrichment in Ni, V, and Co compared to the pristine control sediments. Vanadium and nickel enrichment in marine sediments varied from 10 to 32% and 0 to 22%, respectively. Visible contamination in beach sands was found between 20-60cm beneath the surface and, likewise, showed Ni, V, and Co enrichment up to 33%, 45%, and 100%. This data shows that enrichment of V, Ni, and Co in marine sediments and beach sands may be an effective proxy for contamination even after the degradation of oil. Marine sediments and beach sands will continue to be monitored for trace metal enrichment in an effort to assess the continuing impacts of the DWH spill on the Gulf of Mexico.

Roeder, T. K.; Hastings, D. W.; Holzinger, C.; Playle, E.; Brooks, G.; Huettel, M. H.; Kostka, J. E.; Larson, R. A.; Flower, B. P.

2011-12-01

316

Hydrologic processes on tree islands in the Everglades (Florida, USA): tracking the effects of tree establishment and growth  

Microsoft Academic Search

The hydrodynamics of tree islands during the growth of newly planted trees has been found to be influenced by both vegetation\\u000a biomass and geologic conditions. From July 2007 through June 2009, groundwater and surface-water levels were monitored on\\u000a eight recently planted tree islands at the Loxahatchee Impoundment Landscape Assessment (LILA) facility in Boynton Beach,\\u000a Florida, USA. Over the 2-year study,

Pamela L. Sullivan; René M. Price; Michael S. Ross; Leonard J. Scinto; Susana L. Stoffella; Eric Cline; Thomas W. Dreschel; Fred H. Sklar

2011-01-01

317

Hydrogen Research at Florida Universities  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This final report describes the R&D activities and projects conducted for NASA under the 6-year NASA Hydrogen Research at Florida Universities grant program. Contained within this report are summaries of the overall activities, one-page description of all the reports funded under this program and all of the individual reports from each of the 29 projects supported by the effort. The R&D activities cover hydrogen technologies related to production, cryogenics, sensors, storage, separation processes, fuel cells, resource assessments and education. In the span of 6 years, the NASA Hydrogen Research at Florida Universities program funded a total of 44 individual university projects, and employed more than 100 faculty and over 100 graduate research students in the six participating universities. Researchers involved in this program have filed more than 20 patents in all hydrogen technology areas and put out over 220 technical publications in the last 2 years alone. This 6 year hydrogen research program was conducted by a consortium of six Florida universities: Florida International University (FIU) in Miami, Florida State University (FSU) and Florida A&M University (FAMU) in Tallahassee, University of Central Florida (UCF) in Orlando, University of South Florida (USF) in Tampa, and University of Florida (UF) in Gainesville. The Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) of the University of Central Florida managed the research activities of all consortium member universities except those at the University of Florida. This report does not include any of the programs or activities conducted at the University of Florida, but can be found in NASA/CR-2008-215440-PART 1-3.

Block, David L.; T-Raissi, Ali

2009-01-01

318

Economic Contributions of the Florida Craft Brewing Industry to the Florida Economy  

E-print Network

Economic Contributions of the Florida Craft Brewing Industry to the Florida Economy Timothy G Contributions of the Florida Craft Brewing Industry to the Florida Economy Executive Summary The Florida Brewers on the state's economy, which was conducted using the University of Florida's Food and Resource Economics

Florida, University of

319

Economic Contributions of the Florida Craft Brewing Industry to the Florida Economy  

E-print Network

Economic Contributions of the Florida Craft Brewing Industry to the Florida Economy Timothy G.....................................................................................................34 #12;i Economic Contributions of the Florida Craft Brewing Industry to the Florida Economy of the Florida craft brewing industry on the state's economy, which was conducted using the University of Florida

Florida, University of

320

GIS Assessment of Wind Energy Potential in California and Florida  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Energy efficiency coupled with renewable energy technologies can provide most of the U.S. carbon emissions reductions needed to contain atmospheric carbon concentrations at 450-500 parts per million, considered by many to be a tipping point in mitigating climate change. Among the leaders in the alternative energy sector is wind power, which is now one of the largest sources of new power generation in the U.S. creating jobs and revenue for rural communities while powering our economy with an emissions-free source of energy. In 2006, wind turbines capable of generating more than 2,400 megawatts of electricity were installed in the U.S. and by 2007 this number had risen to 3,000 megawatts. The U.S. generated 31 billion kilowatt-hours of wind power in 2007, which is enough electricity to power the equivalent of nearly 3 million average homes. It is estimated that generating the same amount of electricity would require burning 16 million tons of coal or 50 million barrels of oil. This study examines the wind power potential of sites near populated areas in Florida and California to determine the practicability of installing wind turbines at these locations. A GIS was developed in order to conduct a spatial analysis of these sites based on mean annual wind speed measured in meters per second and wind power density ratings measured in watts per square meter. The analysis indicates that coastal areas of Cocoa Beach, Key West, Hollywood, and West Palm Beach, respectively, possess the greatest potential for wind energy in Florida with mean annual wind speeds of 4.9 m/s and average wind power density ratings of 171 w/m2 peaking at Cocoa Beach followed by wind speeds of 4.64 m/s and wind power ratings of 115 w/m2 at Key West. California wind energy potential is even greater than that of Florida with Fairfield exhibiting mean annual wind speeds of 5.9 m/s and average wind power density ratings of 327 w/m2 followed by the Mojave and Palmdale areas with mean annual wind speeds of 5.0 m/s and 4.6 m/s, respectively. Wind power density ratings for Mojave are 240 w/m2 and 153 w/m2 at Palmdale. These results help confirm that wind energy continues to offer a clean, cost-effective, inexhaustible, and readily available means of helping to curb global warming while answering the increasing demand for electricity.

Snow, R. K.; Snow, M. M.

2008-05-01

321

SAVANNAH ROADLESS AREA, FLORIDA.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

On the basis of a mineral survey the Savannah Roadless Area in Florida was appraised to offer little promise for the occurrence of mineral resources. The commodities identified in the area are deposits of sand and gravel; however, they are deeply buried, far from potential markets, and more readily accessible material exists outside the roadless area. The possibility that oil and gas might occur in the Jurassic Smackover Formation or in other formations at depth cannot be ruled out.

Patterson, Sam H.; Crandall, Thomas M.

1984-01-01

322

Florida's propagation report  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

One of the key goals of the Florida Center is to obtain a maximum of useful information on propagation behavior unique to its subtropical weather and subtropical climate. Such weather data is of particular interest when it is (or has the potential to become) useful for developing and implementing techniques to compensate for adverse weather effects. Also discussed are data observations, current challenges, CDF's, sun movement, and diversity experiments.

Helmken, Henry; Henning, Rudolf

1994-01-01

323

Florida Seafood & Aquaculture  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Official web site of the Bureau of Seafood and Aquaculture Marketing, offering seafood information for both consumers and the industry to help buy, sell and market Florida seafood and aquaculture products. Provides promotional materials, supplier directories, and training for retailers, food service, wholesalers, processors, fishermen and aquaculturists. Also includes internet links, recipes, news, calendar of seafood festivals, brochures, clip art, audio and video. Includes both freshwater and marine species culture.

324

Charlotte Harbor - A Florida Resource.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Partial contents: An introduction to the Charlotte Harbor Area; Environment (Climate, plant communities, geology, estuaries and mangroves, beaches and barrier islands, hurricane and flood hazards, freshwater resources, groundwater, surface water); Economy...

1978-01-01

325

Assessment of South Florida's Bonefish Stock.  

E-print Network

??Florida’s recreational bonefish fishery generates substantial economic benefits to the region; however, the resource has never been adequately assessed to determine standard benchmarks for sustainability.… (more)

Larkin, Michael F

2011-01-01

326

Winter mortality of common loons in Florida coastal waters.  

PubMed

Diagnostic findings are presented for 434 common loons (Gavia immer) found sick or dead on Florida beaches from 1970 through 1994, primarily during the months of December to April. The most commonly recognized problem was an emaciation syndrome (66%), followed by oiling (18%), aspergillosis (7%), trauma (5%) and miscellaneous disease entities (1%). The cause-of-death for 3% of the birds was not determined. Many of the carcasses examined (n = 173) were obtained during an epizootic which occurred from January to March of 1983 in which more than 13,000 loons were estimated to have died. An emaciation syndrome, characterized by severe atrophy of pectoral muscles, loss of body fat and hemorrhagic enteritis, was the primary finding in this epizootic. It was postulated to have a complex etiologic basis involving synergistic effects and energy costs of migration, molting and replacement of flight feathers, food resource changes, salt-loading, intestinal parasitism, environmental contaminants, and inclement weather. PMID:9391969

Forrester, D J; Davidson, W R; Lange, R E; Stroud, R K; Alexander, L L; Franson, J C; Haseltine, S D; Littell, R C; Nesbitt, S A

1997-10-01

327

Beach Closings: Science versus Public Perception  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The issue-focused, peer-reviewed article addresses how beach closings are on the rise, but the public is not being given accurate information to help them get involved in solving the problem. The media, the publics primary information source, must provide information based on factual scientific evidence, not be swayed by economic and political factors, and work with scientists to obtain data and facts.

Erika Jensen and Sandra McLellan (Great Lakes WATER Institute;)

2005-04-01

328

Virginia Beach search and rescue experiment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In May, 1998, the NASA Search and Rescue Mission conducted a SAR crash detection test in the swampy area south and west of Virginia Beach. A number of aircraft parts were hidden in the dense foliage. The radar used was the Navy P-3 with the ERIM XLC and UHF SAR, providing fine resolution imagery with full polarimetry and an IFSAR capability. This paper reports preliminary results of this test.

Rais, Houra; Mansfield, Arthur W.; Huxtable, Barton D.; Chotoo, Kancham

2000-08-01

329

Sand Beach Bacteria: Enumeration and Characterization  

PubMed Central

Bacteria in the water-saturated sand of a relatively unpolluted sand beach were enumerated by direct microscope and viable counting. The number of interstitial bacteria was estimated to be a significant fraction of the total number of bacteria present. Three hundred sixty-two strains were isolated and submitted to cultural and biochemical tests. Fermentational abilities and the production of indole suggested that a significant number of these bacteria were symbiotically associated with resident metazoans. PMID:4356458

Khiyama, H. M.; Makemson, J. C.

1973-01-01

330

Florida Field Naturalist PUBLISHED BY THE FLORIDA ORNITHOLOGICAL SOCIETY  

E-print Network

, such as generalist feeding (Clark 1979) and a tendency for symbiotic #12;2 FLORIDA FIELD NATURALIST relationships the population of Sacred Ibis in South Florida consumes food items derived from human activities which may have and gizzards were used to classify ibis diets (N = 22) as being of anthropogenic origin (derived from human

Gawlik, Dale E.

331

Shaping Solutions for Florida's Future The Florida Extension Roadmap  

E-print Network

, and supply. · Water conservation. · Water quality. · Public awareness of water issues. 3. EnhancingShaping Solutions for Florida's Future The Florida Extension Roadmap Super Issues Broad societal. · Citizen awareness of food systems and the environment. 2. Enhancing and protecting water quality, quantity

Watson, Craig A.

332

Dune recovery after storm erosion on a high-energy beach: Vougot Beach, Brittany (France)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

On 10th March 2008, the high energy storm Johanna hit the French Atlantic coast, generating severe dune erosion on Vougot Beach (Brittany, France). In this paper, the recovery of the dune of Vougot Beach is analysed through a survey of morphological changes and hydrodynamic conditions. Data collection focused on the period immediately following storm Johanna until July 2010, i.e. over two and a half years. Results showed that the dune retreated by a maximum of almost 6 m where storm surge and wave attack were the most energetic. Dune retreat led to the creation of accommodation space for the storage of sediment by widening and elevating space between the pre- and post-storm dune toe, and reducing impacts of the storm surge. Dune recovery started in the month following the storm event and is still ongoing. It is characterised by the construction of "secondary" embryo dunes, which recovered at an average rate of 4-4.5 cm per month, although average monthly volume changes varied from - 1 to 2 m 3.m - 1 . These embryo dunes accreted due to a large aeolian sand supply from the upper tidal beach to the existing foredune. These dune-construction processes were facilitated by growth of vegetation on low-profile embryo dunes promoting backshore accretion. After more than two years of survey, the sediment budget of the beach/dune system showed that more than 10,000 m 3 has been lost by the upper tidal beach. We suggest that seaward return currents generated during the storm of 10th March 2008 are responsible for offshore sediment transport. Reconstitution of the equilibrium beach profile following the storm event may therefore have generated cross-shore sediment redistribution inducing net erosion in the tidal zone.

Suanez, Serge; Cariolet, Jean-Marie; Cancouët, Romain; Ardhuin, Fabrice; Delacourt, Christophe

2012-02-01

333

Shifts in the Microbial Community Composition of Gulf Coast Beaches Following Beach Oiling  

PubMed Central

Microorganisms associated with coastal sands serve as a natural biofilter, providing essential nutrient recycling in nearshore environments and acting to maintain coastal ecosystem health. Anthropogenic stressors often impact these ecosystems, but little is known about whether these disturbances can be identified through microbial community change. The blowout of the Macondo Prospect reservoir on April 20, 2010, which released oil hydrocarbons into the Gulf of Mexico, presented an opportunity to examine whether microbial community composition might provide a sensitive measure of ecosystem disturbance. Samples were collected on four occasions, beginning in mid-June, during initial beach oiling, until mid-November from surface sand and surf zone waters at seven beaches stretching from Bay St. Louis, MS to St. George Island, FL USA. Oil hydrocarbon measurements and NOAA shoreline assessments indicated little to no impact on the two most eastern beaches (controls). Sequence comparisons of bacterial ribosomal RNA gene hypervariable regions isolated from beach sands located to the east and west of Mobile Bay in Alabama demonstrated that regional drivers account for markedly different bacterial communities. Individual beaches had unique community signatures that persisted over time and exhibited spatial relationships, where community similarity decreased as horizontal distance between samples increased from one to hundreds of meters. In contrast, sequence analyses detected larger temporal and less spatial variation among the water samples. Superimposed upon these beach community distance and time relationships, was increased variability in bacterial community composition from oil hydrocarbon contaminated sands. The increased variability was observed among the core, resident, and transient community members, indicating the occurrence of community-wide impacts rather than solely an overprinting of oil hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria onto otherwise relatively stable sand population structures. Among sequences classified to genus, Alcanivorax, Alteromonas, Marinobacter, Winogradskyella, and Zeaxanthinibacter exhibited the largest relative abundance increases in oiled sands. PMID:24040219

Newton, Ryan J.; Huse, Susan M.; Morrison, Hilary G.; Peake, Colin S.; Sogin, Mitchell L.; McLellan, Sandra L.

2013-01-01

334

Florida Atlantic University Faculty Guide  

E-print Network

, services and facilities to promote academic success and student development The Mission of Student AffairsFlorida Atlantic University Faculty Guide to Student Affairswww.fau.edu/student revised August 2014 #12;2 Florida Atlantic University | Faculty Guide to Student Affairs www.fau.edu/student Greetings

Marques, Oge

335

Florida Atlantic University Student Government  

E-print Network

: The purpose of club funding is to assist Florida Atlantic University recognized student clubs2 #12;2 Florida Atlantic University Student Government Council of Student Organizations (COSO) Boca and a Director. The councils are Academic, Multicultural, Special Interest, Greek, Sports, and Graduate. Section

Fernandez, Eduardo

336

Shorebird use of an exposed sandy beach in southern California  

Microsoft Academic Search

Frequent morning surveys of birds were conducted on 1 km of beach in southern California to investigate shorebird use of an exposed sandy beach. The overall mean abundance (98.6individualskm?1), estimated biomass (9.6kgkm?1), and species richness (5.5specieskm?1) of shorebirds observed were very high for a sandy beach in the temperate zone. Eight species, sanderling (Calidris alba), semipalmated plover (Charadrius semipalmatus), marbled

David M. Hubbard; Jenifer E. Dugan

2003-01-01

337

77 FR 40541 - Safety Zone; Water Main Crossing; Choctawhatchee Bay; Santa Rosa Beach, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Water Main Crossing; Choctawhatchee Bay; Santa Rosa Beach, FL AGENCY: Coast Guard...Intracoastal Waterway in Choctawhatchee Bay, Santa Rosa Beach, FL. This action is necessary...portion of GICW in Choctawhatchee Bay, Santa Rosa Beach, FL. This proposed...

2012-07-10

338

77 FR 56772 - Safety Zone; Water Main Crossing; Choctawhatchee Bay; Santa Rosa Beach, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Water Main Crossing; Choctawhatchee Bay; Santa Rosa Beach, FL AGENCY: Coast Guard...Intracoastal Waterway in Choctawhatchee Bay, Santa Rosa Beach, FL. This action is necessary...portion of GICW in Choctawhatchee Bay, Santa Rosa Beach, FL. This temporary...

2012-09-14

339

77 FR 69388 - Safety Zone; Water Main Crossing; Choctawhatchee Bay; Santa Rosa Beach, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Water Main Crossing; Choctawhatchee Bay; Santa Rosa Beach, FL AGENCY: Coast Guard...Intracoastal Waterway in Choctawhatchee Bay, Santa Rosa Beach, FL. This action is necessary...portion of GICW in Choctawhatchee Bay, Santa Rosa Beach, FL. This temporary...

2012-11-19

340

76 FR 1359 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Wrightsville Beach, NC  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...the 2011 Wrightsville Beach/Quintiles Marathon will be transiting across the bridge...the 2011 Wrightsville Beach/Quintiles Marathon. DATES: This deviation is effective...The Wrightsville Beach/Quintiles Marathon Committee on behalf of the North...

2011-01-10

341

78 FR 31840 - Safety Zone; USO Patriotic Festival Air Show, Atlantic Ocean; Virginia Beach, VA  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Patriotic Festival Air Show, Atlantic Ocean; Virginia Beach, VA AGENCY...on the navigable waters of the Atlantic Ocean in Virginia Beach, VA. This...host an air show event over the Atlantic Ocean in Virginia Beach, VA. In...

2013-05-28

342

33 CFR 165.T05-0741 - Safety Zone, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Carolina Beach, NC.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Carolina Beach, NC. 165.T05-0741 Section 165...Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Carolina Beach, NC. (a) Regulated area. The...Intracoastal Waterway, mile 295.6, at Carolina Beach, North Carolina (34°03?21? N,...

2013-07-01

343

Public perception of beach quality: lessons learnt from a French case study Virginie DUVAT  

E-print Network

Public perception of beach quality: lessons learnt from a French case study 000 La Rochelle - FRANCE virginie.duvat@univ-lr.fr Keywords: beach quality to be highly valuable for beach management as they are holistic (incorporating all

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

344

33 CFR 263.26 - Small beach erosion control project authority (Section 103).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Small beach erosion control project authority (Section...Protection Policy § 263.26 Small beach erosion control project authority (Section...undertake construction of small shore and beach restoration and protection...

2011-07-01

345

33 CFR 165.T05-1082 - Safety Zone; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Wrightsville Beach, NC.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Wrightsville Beach, NC. 165.T05-1082 Section 165...Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Wrightsville Beach, NC. (a) Regulated area. The...Waterway, mile 283.1, at Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina (34°13?07?...

2013-07-01

346

33 CFR 263.26 - Small beach erosion control project authority (Section 103).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Small beach erosion control project authority (Section...Protection Policy § 263.26 Small beach erosion control project authority (Section...undertake construction of small shore and beach restoration and protection...

2013-07-01

347

36 CFR 3.17 - What regulations apply to swimming areas and beaches?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... false What regulations apply to swimming areas and beaches? 3.17 Section...3.17 What regulations apply to swimming areas and beaches? (a) The superintendent may designate areas as swimming areas or swimming beaches in...

2010-07-01

348

FLORIDA TOWER FOOTPRINT EXPERIMENTS  

SciTech Connect

The Florida Footprint experiments were a series of field programs in which perfluorocarbon tracers were released in different configurations centered on a flux tower to generate a data set that can be used to test transport and dispersion models. These models are used to determine the sources of the CO{sub 2} that cause the fluxes measured at eddy covariance towers. Experiments were conducted in a managed slash pine forest, 10 km northeast of Gainesville, Florida, in 2002, 2004, and 2006 and in atmospheric conditions that ranged from well mixed, to very stable, including the transition period between convective conditions at midday to stable conditions after sun set. There were a total of 15 experiments. The characteristics of the PFTs, details of sampling and analysis methods, quality control measures, and analytical statistics including confidence limits are presented. Details of the field programs including tracer release rates, tracer source configurations, and configuration of the samplers are discussed. The result of this experiment is a high quality, well documented tracer and meteorological data set that can be used to improve and validate canopy dispersion models.

WATSON,T.B.; DIETZ, R.N.; WILKE, R.; HENDREY, G.; LEWIN, K.; NAGY, J.; LECLERC, M.

2007-01-01

349

Beyond beach width: Steps toward identifying and integrating ecological envelopes with geomorphic features and datums for sandy beach ecosystems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Our understanding of ecological responses to climatic and anthropogenic forcing lags far behind that of physical or geomorphic responses for beach ecosystems. Reconciling geomorphic features of beaches with ecological features, such as intertidal zones and mobile biota that are not described by beach width alone, could help address this issue. First, although intertidal zones characterized by distinct groups of mobile burrowing animals are described for beaches, the locations and elevations of these zones do not coincide with standard shoreline datums. Second, intertidal zonation on beaches is extremely dynamic due to the combination of unstable sandy substrate and a highly mobile biota; shifting strongly with tides, waves, storms, and beach conditions. We propose that beach biota use ecological "envelopes" of cross-shore habitat to cope with constantly changing beach conditions. We estimated the extent of these "envelopes" for a variety of taxa on tidal to daily, semi-lunar and seasonal to annual time scales, using literature values on cross-shore animal movements and a field study of the positions of intertidal beds of two species of typical mid and upper shore beach invertebrates. Daily or tidal cross-shore movement varied most (1 m to 100 m) with daily "envelopes" covering 7% to 85% of the available beach width. Semi-lunar movement (12 m) and envelopes (28%) were relatively small, while estimated annual "envelopes" were large, averaging 61% of beach width. The large scope of annual ecological envelopes relative to beach widths reflects how intertidal animals escape seasonally extreme or episodically harsh conditions. Intertidal bed positions of a talitrid amphipod and an opheliid polychaete correlated well with selected beach features in our field study suggesting that incorporation of ecological envelopes in models of shoreline evolution may be feasible. Describing ecological zones in terms of more dynamic shoreline features, such as total water level (TWL) that incorporate wave setup and runup, may be particularly applicable to upper intertidal biota whose distributions closely followed the high tide strand line (HTS), a feature which tracks total water level (TWL). Developing a TWL approach may also provide new insights on habitat availability for beach nesting wildlife and coastal strand vegetation. Conservation of beach ecosystems could be enhanced by incorporating sufficient beach habitat to accommodate the dynamic ecological envelopes used by mobile intertidal invertebrates and wildlife.

Dugan, Jenifer E.; Hubbard, David M.; Quigley, Brenna J.

2013-10-01

350

Biologist (2003) 50 (4) 163 In south-eastern Florida, sandy beaches attract tourists  

E-print Network

, affecting the survival of many species of nocturnally active wildlife and the integrity of the communities reptiles that have a residency of tens of millions of years on this planet. But `newcomers' � humans � have International effort to restore darkness to coastal and other wildlife habitats. It's a global problem

Milton, Sarah

351

First Year Sedimentological Characteristics and Morphological Evolution of an Artificial Berm at Fort Myers Beach, Florida  

E-print Network

First Year Sedimentological Characteristics and Morphological Evolution of an Artificial Berm Methods and Data Analysis 29 Results and Discussion 34 Sedimentological Characteristics of the Artificial Project Area 45 Control Area Northwest of Berm 47 Discussion of Sedimentological Characteristics 49

US Army Corps of Engineers

352

NEA Retirement and Benefits Forum: Selected Proceedings (Clearwater Beach, Florida, October 18-21, 1990).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The National Education Association (NEA) Retirement and Benefits Forum is an annual event where leaders, lobbyists, researchers, and trustees of retirement and health and welfare plans meet to learn about and discuss current and future retirement and benefits issues. This report of the 1990 forum contains 10 selected papers and a welcoming speech…

National Education Association, Washington, DC. Research Div.

353

South Florida Sun-Sentinel.com Libraries in Palm Beach County promote summer reading  

E-print Network

. At the Greenacres branch on Thursday, children and their parents watched magician James Changefield. "My kids love or 20 years ago. Today, children have more reading options than ever -- e-books, picture books, audio,806 e-books, with 480 e-book titles for young adults and children, and 4,199 audio books. The library

Belogay, Eugene A.

354

76 FR 61744 - Xpedite Systems, LLC Deerfield Beach, Florida; Notice of Negative Determination on Reconsideration  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...completes SOW (SOW template) reviewed by SE before going to customer'' ``SOW delivered to customer, documented in Workflow tool'' ``Customer signs off on SOW'' ``App Labs builds and does initial testing on request'' ``Depending...

2011-10-05

355

2003 Summer Bioengineering Conference, June 25-29, Sonesta Beach Resort in Key Biscayne, Florida INTRODUCTION  

E-print Network

rotational DOFs express the movement of the pelvis in 3D space and the remaining 13 segments comprise four open chains branching from the pelvis segment. A static motion capture trial is used to create segment values for the pelvis DOFs, since the marker locations directly identify the position of the pelvis

George, Alan D.

356

Chronic interaction between humans and free-ranging bottlenose dolphins near Panama City Beach, Florida, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Swim-with' activities, in which humans enter the water to interact with free-ranging cetaceans, are a popular form of nature t ourism; however, there is considerable disagreement as to whether these encounters constitute a threat to the animals. At the request o f the US Marine Mammal Commission, a systematic study was designed to quantify effects of swim-with activities on the

Amy Samuels; Lars Bejder

2004-01-01

357

Oil spill nears the beaches of Florida, and the leak may not be plugged before Christmas  

E-print Network

the western part of the state known as the Panhandle 'in a day or two'. He said sheen from the slick was seen technologies. More than 20 scientists, engineers and technical experts attended the meeting, which also successive day, reacting to the company's failure to get a grip on the relentless leak. BP closed yesterday

Belogay, Eugene A.

358

Genetic Relationships among Populations of Florida Bass  

Microsoft Academic Search

Florida bass Micropterus floridanus are endemic to peninsular Florida and co-occur with largemouth bass M. salmoides in a natural intergrade zone in the northern portions of the state. In this study, we resolved the genetic population structure among populations of largemouth bass, Florida bass, and their interspecific hybrids from 48 lakes and streams across Florida, and we updated and refined

Brandon L. Barthel; Dijar J. Lutz-Carrillo; Kristen E. Norberg; Wesley F. Porak; Michael D. Tringali; Todd W. Kassler; William E. Johnson; Anne M. Readel; Richard A. Krause; David P. Philipp

2010-01-01

359

Bylaws of the Florida Medical Entomology Laboratory  

E-print Network

1 Bylaws of the Florida Medical Entomology Laboratory University of Florida As Approved: March 16, 2009 Preamble The shared goals of the faculty and administration of the Florida Medical Entomology These Bylaws establish the general principles by which the Florida Medical Entomology Laboratory shall

Jawitz, James W.

360

Bull Test ID 1181 2013 Florida Bull Test  

E-print Network

Bull Test ID 1181 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1182 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1183 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1184 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1185 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1186 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1187 2013 Florida

Jawitz, James W.

361

Bull Test ID 1118 2013 Florida Bull Test  

E-print Network

Bull Test ID 1118 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1119 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1120 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1121 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1122 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1123 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1124 2013 Florida

Jawitz, James W.

362

Bull Test ID 1077 2013 Florida Bull Test  

E-print Network

14th Annual Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1077 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1078 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1079 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1080 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1081 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1082 2013 Florida Bull Test #12

Jawitz, James W.

363

Bull Test ID 1160 2013 Florida Bull Test  

E-print Network

Bull Test ID 1160 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1161 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1162 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1163 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1164 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1165 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1166 2013 Florida

Jawitz, James W.

364

Bull Test ID 1140 2013 Florida Bull Test  

E-print Network

Bull Test ID 1140 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1141 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1142 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1143 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1144 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1145 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1146 2013 Florida

Jawitz, James W.

365

Bull Test ID 1098 2013 Florida Bull Test  

E-print Network

Bull Test ID 1098 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1099 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1100 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1101 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1102 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1103 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1104 2013 Florida

Jawitz, James W.

366

77 FR 13519 - Safety Zone; Virginia Beach Oceanfront Air Show, Atlantic Ocean, Virginia Beach, VA  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...waters of the Atlantic Ocean bounded by the following...portion of the Atlantic Ocean from 11 a.m. until...Act, and the Endanger Species Act an environmental...that may lead to the discovery of a significant environmental...Oceanfront Air Show, Atlantic Ocean, Virginia Beach,...

2012-03-07

367

The health effects of swimming at Sydney beaches. The Sydney Beach Users Study Advisory Group.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES. The purpose of the study was to determine the health risks of swimming at ocean beaches in Sydney, Australia. METHODS. From people attending 12 Sydney beaches in the period from December 5, 1989 to February 26, 1990, we recruited a cohort of 8413 adults who agreed to participate in this study. Of these, 4424 were excluded either because they had been swimming in the previous 5 days or because they reported a current illness. Of the remainder, 2839 successfully completed a follow-up telephone interview conducted within 10 days after recruitment. We recorded reported respiratory, gastrointestinal, eye, and ear symptoms and fever that occurred within the 10 days between initial interview on the beach and the follow-up interview. RESULTS. A total of 683 participants (24.0%) reported experiencing symptoms in the 10 days following initial interview. Of these, 435 (63.7%) reported respiratory symptoms. Swimmers were almost twice as likely as nonswimmers to report symptoms. There was a linear relationship between water pollution and all reported symptoms with the exception of gastrointestinal complaints. CONCLUSIONS. Swimmers at Sydney ocean beaches are more likely to report respiratory, ear, and eye symptoms than beachgoers who do not swim. The incidence of these symptoms increases slightly with increasing levels of pollution. PMID:8259798

Corbett, S J; Rubin, G L; Curry, G K; Kleinbaum, D G

1993-01-01

368

Predicting the effect of beach nourishment and cross-shore sediment variation on beach morphodynamic assessment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Studies of coastal morphodynamics are becoming increasingly more focused on quantification of relationships between processes, form and function of dynamic landform systems because wave climates (e.g., wave height, wave period, seasonality, cyclical patterns) and sediments (i.e., composition, size, and shape) interact in various ways to collectively produce distinctive types of beaches. This paper identifies criteria and boundary conditions that characterize

Lindino Benedet; Charles W. Finkl; Thomas Campbell; Antonio Klein

2004-01-01

369

NOWCASTING AND FORECASTING BEACH BACTERIA CONCENTRATION USING THE EPA VIRTUAL BEACH SOFTWARE  

EPA Science Inventory

Beaches are subject to closure when bacterial counts exceed water quality criteria. Many authorities base these decisions on sample counts, which typically require a day or more to analyze. Sometimes called the persistence model, because conditions are assumed to persist, experie...

370

Beach ridge plains and sea level change  

SciTech Connect

Beach ridge systems of the low-to-moderate energy swash-built type can be used to determine ambient near-shore wave energy values, as well as sea level changes up to 4--5 m. Wave energy values can be obtained from individual samples or mean values of individual samples, the grain-size kurtosis (inverted) is useful, as is the sixth moment measure. Sea level change information comes from sequences of beach ridge samples, spanning one or more abrupt changes in smoothed kurtosis. Other procedures are also available for each of these tasks. Settling-lag ridges (horizontal bedding) may be useful also. Dune ridges and storm-surge ridges are not appropriate for this kind of work. There are also limitations on nature and general size of the sediment in the ridge (preferably quartz sand or coarse silt; 50-gram samples), and on map geometry of the system (no sharp curvature, no splaying; parallelism or nearly so). Sampling must meet strict standards as to location, depth and thickness of the sampled layer: lab work requires 30-minute sieving on quarter-phi screens. Each beach ridge represents a sea level rise and then fall, perhaps 5 to 30 cm, over a few years or decades, but not a storm. The longest presently-known sequence of beach ridge is located in an area of slow glacio-isostatic rebound, and spans some 12,000 years, but ridge systems in stable areas cover only about 3,200 years or less. Each long system typically shows many changes of sea level, in the range of one to 4--5 meters, but there does not appear to be any clearly-marked periodicity that persists throughout the entire record, other than the time interval between the ridges themselves. This interval commonly averages 35--50 years, but in a few settings is only about four years, and in others 10--12. In a few instances, the interval may be 60 years or more.

Tanner, W.F. (Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States))

1993-03-01

371

Florida Everglades and Keys, USA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Though much of southern Florida is covered by clouds, the Florida Everglades and Keys (25.0N, 82.0W) remain relatively clear in this nearly vertical view. The view covers the Gulf of Mexico port city of Ft. Myers, and Lake Okeechobee, at the top of the scene, in the north, The Everglades, in the center and the entire Florida Key Chain at the bottom. Even with the many popcorn clouds, ground detail and the city of Miami is easily discerned.

1991-01-01

372

Alongshore variability in beach planform, grain-size distribution and foredune height of an embayed beach: Shoalwater Bay, Queensland, Australia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Headland-bay beaches (HBB) are common beach-types found throughout the coastlines of the world. Morphodynamics of these structurally-controlled beaches are primarily governed by geological inheritance, wave climate, tidal range and grain-size distribution, which ultimately influence sediment transport across the beach-dune system. For embayed beaches, the degree of curvature (i.e., indentation ratio) has significant implications for littoral cell circulation, which mediates both cross-shore and alongshore sediment transport. This study investigated the morphodynamic controls on longshore and cross-shore sediment transport for a macro-tidal, embayed beach in central Queensland, Australia. Freshwater Beach is a 10 km long embayed beach located in the Shoalwater Bay Training Area, ~50 km north of Yeppoon. Freshwater Beach exhibits an asymmetrical planform which is characterized by a curved "shadow zone" (adjacent to the headland), transitioning to a straight tangential segment extending to the north. The beach is subjected to a mean tidal range of 6 m and prevailing onshore-directed winds and swell from the southeast. A total of 12 topographic profiles at ~1 km spacing were taken along the entire length of the beach to characterize variation in beach slope and foredune height. Sediment samples were collected across each transect for detailed grain-size and geochemical (XRD/XRF and SEM) analysis. Additionally, ground-based LiDAR surveys were conducted along the topographic profiles and for comparison with aerial-based LiDAR surveys. Preliminary results from topographic profiles show that the largest foredunes are located in the central portion of the beach, contrary to most embayed beaches where the largest dunes are typically located downdrift of the headland. Along the exposed section, the foredunes become large (~15 m high) and are hypothesized to be supplied by onshore welded bars that act as a sediment source for the foredunes to grow. Presently the alongshore and cross-shore sediment exchange is unknown and the dynamics of surface drainage and freshwater seeps in close proximity to the outlet of Freshwater Swamp remain a priority for understanding the morphologic evolution of the beach-dune system. Ongoing research is currently in progress to address relationships between grain-size grading alongshore and foredune height to determine a sediment budget from the nearshore extending through the parabolic dunefield.

Weymer, B. A.; Houser, C.; Giardino, R.

2012-12-01

373

Evaluation of potential sources and transport mechanisms of fecal indicator bacteria to beach water, Murphy Park Beach, Door County, Wisconsin  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Fecal Indicator Bacteria (FIB) concentrations in beach water have been used for many years as a criterion for closing beaches due to potential health concerns. Yet, current understanding of sources and transport mechanisms that drive FIB occurrence remains insufficient for accurate prediction of closures at many beaches. Murphy Park Beach, a relatively pristine beach on Green Bay in Door County, Wis., was selected for a study to evaluate FIB sources and transport mechanisms. Although the relatively pristine nature of the beach yielded no detection of pathogenic bacterial genes and relatively low FIB concentrations during the study period compared with other Great Lakes Beaches, its selection limited the number of confounding FIB sources and associated transport mechanisms. The primary sources of FIB appear to be internal to the beach rather than external sources such as rivers, storm sewer outfalls, and industrial discharges. Three potential FIB sources were identified: sand, swash-zone groundwater, and Cladophora mats. Modest correlations between FIB concentrations in these potential source reservoirs and FIB concentrations at the beach from the same day illustrate the importance of understanding transport mechanisms between FIB sources and the water column. One likely mechanism for transport and dispersion of FIB from sand and Cladophora sources appears to be agitation of Cladophora mats and erosion of beach sand due to storm activity, as inferred from storm indicators including turbidity, wave height, current speed, wind speed, sky visibility, 24-hour precipitation, and suspended particulate concentration. FIB concentrations in beach water had a statistically significant relation (p-value ‹0.05) with the magnitude of these storm indicators. In addition, transport of FIB in swash-zone groundwater into beach water appears to be driven by groundwater recharge associated with multiday precipitation and corresponding increased swash-zone groundwater discharge at the beach, as indicated by an increase in the specific conductance of beach water. Understanding the dynamics of FIB sources (sand, swash-zone groundwater, and Cladophora) and transport mechanisms (dispersion and erosion from storm energy, and swash-zone groundwater discharge) is important for improving predictions of potential health risks from FIB in beach water.

Juckem, Paul F.; Corsi, Steven R.; McDermott, Colleen; Kleinheinz, Gregory; Fogarty, Lisa R.; Haack, Sheridan K.; Johnson, Heather E.

2013-01-01

374

78 FR 43881 - Florida Petroleum Reprocessors Site, Davie, Broward County, Florida; Notice of Settlement  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...CERCLA-04-2013-3758] Florida Petroleum Reprocessors Site, Davie, Broward County...Tech, Inc. concerning the Florida Petroleum Reprocessors Site located in Davie...Submit your comments by Site name Florida Petroleum Reprocesssors Site by one of the...

2013-07-22

375

Deepwater Horizon oil spill impacts on Alabama beaches  

Microsoft Academic Search

From mid June 2010 to early August 2010, the white sandy beaches along Alabama's Gulf coast were inundated with crude oil discharged from the Deepwater Horizon well. The long-term consequences of this environmental catastrophe are still unfolding. Although BP has attempted to clean up some of these beaches, there still exist many unanswered questions regarding the physical, chemical, and ecological

J. S. Hayworth; T. P. Clement; J. F. Valentine

2011-01-01

376

The Beach--A Natural Protection from the Sea.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The beach and sand dunes are the first line of defense protecting the land from the sea. The effectiveness of the beach is caused by its sloping surface which dissipates the energy of waves and by the flexibility of the slope which changes as the waves change. The process and rate of accretion and erosion are dependent on the size and frequency of…

Sensabaugh, William M.

1983-01-01

377

Virtual Beach v2.2 User Guide  

EPA Science Inventory

Virtual Beach version 2.2 (VB 2.2) is a decision support tool. It is designed to construct site-specific Multi-Linear Regression (MLR) models to predict pathogen indicator levels (or fecal indicator bacteria, FIB) at recreational beaches. MLR analysis has outperformed persisten...

378

RECREATIONAL BEACH WATER QUALITY MONITORING WITH QUANTITATIVE POLYMERASE CHAIN  

EPA Science Inventory

Recreational beaches are an important economic and aesthetic asset to communities, states and the nation as a whole. Considerable resources are expended each year in monitoring the water at these beaches for fecal indicator bacteria as a means of determining if it is safe for pu...

379

Dramatic Improvements in Beach Water Quality Following Gull Removal  

EPA Science Inventory

Gulls are often cited as important contributors of fecal contamination to surface waters, and some recreational beaches have used gull control measures to improve microbial water quality. In this study, gulls were chased from a Lake Michigan beach using specially trained dogs, a...

380

WATER QUALITY ASSESSMENT OF LAKE TEXOMA BEACHES, 1999-2001  

EPA Science Inventory

A biological and inorganic assessment of five beaches on Lake Texoma was conducted from September 1999 through July 2001. Water samples for each beach site were divided into two groups, a swimming season and non-swimming season. Water properties such as temperature, alkalinity,...

381

Composition and Distribution of Beach Debris in Orange County, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many studies have quantified debris collected on beaches around the world. Only a few of those studies have been conducted in the United States, and they are largely limited to semi-quantitative efforts performed as part of volunteer clean-up activities. This study quantifies the distribution and composition of beach debris by sampling 43 stratified random sites on the Orange County, California

Shelly L. Moore; Dominic Gregorio; Michael Carreon; Stephen B. Weisberg; Molly K. Leecaster

2001-01-01

382

270. OFFICERS' QUARTERS (FORMER SUMMER COTTAGES) AT DOG PATCH BEACH, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

270. OFFICERS' QUARTERS (FORMER SUMMER COTTAGES) AT DOG PATCH BEACH, C. 1939. VIEW NORTH DOWN GREENWICH ROAD TOWARD FORMER SUMMER COTTAGES, CONVERTED TO OFFICER'S QUARTERS, OVER-LOOKING DOG PATCH BEACH. - Quonset Point Naval Air Station, Roger Williams Way, North Kingstown, Washington County, RI

383

33 CFR 110.74b - Apollo Beach, Fla.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Apollo Beach, Fla. 110.74b Section 110.74b Navigation...ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.74b Apollo Beach, Fla. Beginning at a point approximately 300 feet south of...

2010-07-01

384

Howard Beach Youth: A Study of Racial and Ethnic Attitudes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This assessment of the climate of racial and ethnic attitudes in Howard Beach (New York) was conducted at John Adams High School, the public school attended by the greatest number of high school children in the Howard Beach community. The survey of 1,217 students was administered in December, 1986, several weeks before the incident in which a…

Lichter, Linda S.; Lichter, S. Robert

385

View of the yacht club facing north. The beach is ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

View of the yacht club facing north. The beach is in the foreground, the pier to the right. The painted octagonal window is above the deck. Avila's Front Street is at the rear of the building. - San Luis Yacht Club, Avila Pier, South of Front Street, Avila Beach, San Luis Obispo County, CA

386

33 CFR 110.74b - Apollo Beach, Fla.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Apollo Beach, Fla. 110.74b Section 110.74b Navigation and Navigable...REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.74b Apollo Beach, Fla. Beginning at a point approximately 300 feet south of the...

2011-07-01

387

33 CFR 110.74b - Apollo Beach, Fla.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Apollo Beach, Fla. 110.74b Section 110.74b Navigation and Navigable...REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.74b Apollo Beach, Fla. Beginning at a point approximately 300 feet south of the...

2013-07-01

388

33 CFR 110.74b - Apollo Beach, Fla.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Apollo Beach, Fla. 110.74b Section 110.74b Navigation and Navigable...REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.74b Apollo Beach, Fla. Beginning at a point approximately 300 feet south of the...

2012-07-01

389

Falcon Beach School Closure Review. Research 87-01.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Falcon Beach School is a small school experiencing declining school enrollment and increasing operational costs. In February, 1987, Falcon Beach School was announced as a candidate for closure. The Planning and Research Branch of Manitoba Education conducted an economic and social analysis of the school operations. This research report provides…

Manitoba Dept. of Education, Winnipeg. Planning and Research Branch.

390

Grain size dependence on turbulence entrainment in coastal beach areas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sediment samples and beach profile evolution data have been collected at several sites (in Vilanova and the Ebro delta, Spain, and near Marseille, France), analyzing the structure of the grain size distribution variability and its relationship with the beach morfology. Measurement of the samples are performed in a detailled laboratory experiment using oscillating grid turbulence to compare the behaviour of

P. Medina; M. A. Sanchez

2009-01-01

391

Rip spacing and persistence on an embayed beach  

Microsoft Academic Search

Four years of daily time exposure images from an embayed beach were examined to study the spacing, persistence, and location preferences of rips in a natural rip channel system. A total of 5271 rip channels was observed on 782 days. Occurrence statistics showed no evidence of the preferred location pattern associated with standing edge waves trapped in an embayed beach.

R. A. Holman; G. Symonds; E. B. Thornton; R. Ranasinghe

2006-01-01

392

Geographic setting influences Great Lakes beach microbiological water quality  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Understanding of factors that influence Escherichia coli (EC) and enterococci (ENT) concentrations, pathogen occurrence, and microbial sources at Great Lakes beaches comes largely from individual beach studies. Using 12 representative beaches, we tested enrichment cultures from 273 beach water and 22 tributary samples for EC, ENT, and genes indicating the bacterial pathogens Shiga-toxin producing E. coli (STEC), Shigella spp., Salmonella spp, Campylobacter jejuni/coli, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and 108–145 samples for Bacteroides human, ruminant, and gull source-marker genes. EC/ENT temporal patterns, general Bacteroides concentration, and pathogen types and occurrence were regionally consistent (up to 40 km), but beach catchment variables (drains/creeks, impervious surface, urban land cover) influenced exceedances of EC/ENT standards and detections of Salmonella and STEC. Pathogen detections were more numerous when the EC/ENT Beach Action Value (but not when the Geometric Mean and Statistical Threshold Value) was exceeded. EC, ENT, and pathogens were not necessarily influenced by the same variables. Multiple Bacteroides sources, varying by date, occurred at every beach. Study of multiple beaches in different geographic settings provided new insights on the contrasting influences of regional and local variables, and a broader-scale perspective, on significance of EC/ENT exceedances, bacterial sources, and pathogen occurrence.

Haack, Sheridan K.; Fogarty, Lisa R.; Stelzer, Erin A.; Fuller, Lori M.; Brennan, Angela K.; Isaacs, Natasha M.; Johnson, Heather E.

2013-01-01

393

33 CFR 110.74b - Apollo Beach, Fla.  

...Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Apollo Beach, Fla. 110.74b Section 110.74b Navigation...ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.74b Apollo Beach, Fla. Beginning at a point approximately 300 feet south of...

2014-07-01

394

NEST SITES OF FLORIDA SANDHILL CRANES IN SOUTHWESTERN FLORIDA  

Microsoft Academic Search

We located twenty-eight nest sites of the Florida Sandhill Crane in southwestern Florida during the 1991 breeding season. Similar to other studies, all sites were classified as palustrine emergent wetlands. Average wetland area and average maximum depth were 5.96 ha and 0.61 m, respectively. Vegetation assessments at seven of the sites yielded 82 plant species. Panicum hemitomon, Sagittaria lancifolia, Ponted-

F. CHRIS DEPKIN; LAURA A. BRANDTIAND; FRANK J. MAZZOTTI

395

Seminole Tribe of Florida  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Seminole Tribe of Florida is the only tribe in the United States that has never signed a peace treaty and its website provides ample information about Seminole history, culture, government, business ventures, and publications. Visitors might want to look first at the Seminole Tribune, which offers excellent current news updates on the goings on throughout the community. Moving on, the Government area contains key information about the operations of the tribal council, the board of directors, and day-to-day activities. The Culture area offers interested parties access to slideshows, fact sheets, and information about Seminole material culture. One section that should not be missed is the History area. Here, visitors can learn about the tribe's history, resistance, and storied Council Oak.

396

Florida State Parks  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The modern Florida State Parks system was created in 1935, and their programs include parks all the way from the St. Augustine area to the Keys. Their homepage brings together cultural, historical, and scientific materials related to the various sites in the state system. The website includes information on each park, along with interactive features on African American sites in the state and notable battlegrounds. Along the top of the page, visitors can use sections such as "Find a Park" and "Stay the Night" to plan their journey through the state. Each park entry also contains information about the site's history, along with detailed information about ranger programs, special music events, and so on. Finally, visitors can stay in touch via Twitter and other social media.

397

Deepwater Horizon oil spill impacts on Alabama beaches  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

From mid June 2010 to early August 2010, the white sandy beaches along Alabama's Gulf coast were inundated with crude oil discharged from the Deepwater Horizon well. The long-term consequences of this environmental catastrophe are still unfolding. Although BP has attempted to clean up some of these beaches, there still exist many unanswered questions regarding the physical, chemical, and ecological state of the oil contaminated beach system. In this paper, we present our understanding of what is known and known to be unknown with regard to the current state of Alabama's beaches in the aftermath of the Deepwater Horizon disaster. Motivated by our observations of the evolving distribution of oil in Alabama's beaches and BP's clean-up activities, we offer our thoughts on the lessons learned from this oil spill disaster.

Hayworth, J. S.; Clement, T. P.; Valentine, J. F.

2011-12-01

398

Deepwater Horizon oil spill impacts on Alabama beaches  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

From mid June 2010 to early August 2010, the white sandy beaches along Alabama's Gulf coast were inundated with crude oil discharged from the Deepwater Horizon well. The long-term consequences of this environmental catastrophe are still unfolding. Although BP has attempted to clean up some of these beaches, there still exist many unanswered questions regarding the physical, chemical, and ecological state of the oil contaminated beach system. In this paper, we present our understanding of what is known and known to be unknown with regard to the current state of Alabama's beaches in the aftermath of the Deepwater Horizon disaster. Motivated by our observations of the evolving distribution of oil in Alabama's beaches and BP's clean-up activities, we offer our thoughts on the lessons learned from this oil spill disaster.

Hayworth, J. S.; Clement, T. P.; Valentine, J. F.

2011-07-01

399

Acropora corals in Florida: status, trends, conservation, and prospects for recovery  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Despite representing the northern extent of Acropora spp. in the Caribbean, most of the Florida reef line from Palm Beach through the Keys was built by these species. Climatic factors appear to have bee important agents of Acropora loss within historic (century) time frames. In the recent past (1980-present), available quantitative evidence suggests dramatic declines occurred in A. cervicornis first (late 70's to 84) with collapse of A. palmata occuring later (1981-86). However, recent monitoring studies (1996-2001) show continued decline of remnant populations of A. palmata. Current trends in A. cervicornis in the Florida Keys are hard to assess given its exceedingly low abundance, except in Broward County, FL where recently discovered A. cervicornis thickets are thriving. While the State of Florida recognizes A. palmata and A. cervicornis as endangered species (Deyrup and Franz 1994), this designation carries no management implications. The current management plan of the FKNMS provides many strategies for coral conservation, among them minimizing the threat of vessel groundings and anchor damage, and prohibitions on collection, touching, and damage from fishery and recreational users. Although Acropopra spp. are not explicitly given any special consideration, they are implicitly by Santuary management. Restoration approaches undertaken in the Florida Keys include rescue of fragments damaged by groudings and experimental work to culture broadcast-spawned larvae to re-seed natural substrates. Neither of these efforts have yet realized full success.

Miller, Margaret W.; Jaap, Walt C.; Chiappone, Mark; Vargas-Angel, Bernardo; Keller, Brian; Aronson, Richard B.; Shinn, Eugene A.

2003-01-01

400

Do Tropical Cyclones Shape Shorebird Habitat Patterns? Biogeoclimatology of Snowy Plovers in Florida  

PubMed Central

Background The Gulf coastal ecosystems in Florida are foci of the highest species richness of imperiled shoreline dependent birds in the USA. However environmental processes that affect their macroecological patterns, like occupancy and abundance, are not well unraveled. In Florida the Snowy Plover (Charadrius alexandrinus nivosus) is resident along northern and western white sandy estuarine/ocean beaches and is considered a state-threatened species. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we show that favorable nesting areas along the Florida Gulf coastline are located in regions impacted relatively more frequently by tropical cyclones. The odds of Snowy Plover nesting in these areas during the spring following a tropical cyclone impact are seven times higher compared to the odds during the spring following a season without a cyclone. The only intensity of a tropical cyclone does not appear to be a significant factor affecting breeding populations. Conclusions/Significance Nevertheless a future climate scenario featuring fewer, but more extreme cyclones could result in a decrease in the breeding Snowy Plover population and its breeding range. This is because the spatio-temporal frequency of cyclone events was found to significantly affect nest abundance. Due to the similar geographic range and habitat suitability, and no decrease in nest abundance of other shorebirds in Florida after the cyclone season, our results suggest a common bioclimatic feedback between shorebird abundance and tropical cyclones in breeding areas which are affected by cyclones. PMID:21264268

Convertino, Matteo; Elsner, James B.; Munoz-Carpena, Rafael; Kiker, Gregory A.; Martinez, Christopher J.; Fischer, Richard A.; Linkov, Igor

2011-01-01

401

Ecological risk assessment: Seal Beach, California  

SciTech Connect

Ecological risk assessment offers a means of quantifying the probability and degree of hazard posed toward the well-being of ecological resources by a myriad of physical, chemical and biological agents generated from human activity. In this paper, the authors discuss the results of a screening-level ecological risk assessment conducted in a unique coastal setting-the Seal beach National Wildlife Refuge, which is located within the US Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach, California. Evaluation of activities formerly conducted by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration indicated the presence of various organic and inorganic chemical contaminants in subsurface soil and groundwater resources located beneath the weapons station, as well as potential pathways for introduction of those contaminants to the ecological resources of the wildlife refuge. Completion of the screening-level assessment identified inorganic contaminants-antimony, arsenic, beryllium, and manganese-as the primary risk drivers, leading to a recommendation for definitive characterization of the extent of chemical degradation of the subsurface environs and concurrent performance of a full-scale ecological risk assessment. It is the author's understanding that both of the recommended studies were initiated and were nearing completion at the time of the submittal of this paper.

Vernon, K.J.; Kuo, J.

1999-07-01

402

Shaping Solutions FOR Florida's Future  

E-print Network

......................................................................................................................................................11 Organizational Goals and Strategies to improve the lives of Floridians as we face the challenges of tomorrow and beyond. Florida Extension and partnership, lifelong learning, diversity, responsiveness, innovation, open communication, and global reach

Jawitz, James W.

403

WASTEWATER IRRIGATION AT TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA  

EPA Science Inventory

Municipal wastewater from the City of Tallahassee, Florida, which has received secondary treatment was used to demonstrate the effectiveness of wastewater renovation without pollution of groundwater or surface water through land application to forage crops by sprinkler irrigation...

404

THE VISUAL BEACH NUMERICAL MODEL: A DIAGNOSTIC AND PROGNOSTIC MODELING APPROACH TO ACHIEVING US BEACHES AESTHETIC AND PUBLIC HEALTH PROTECTION  

EPA Science Inventory

Under the BEACH Act of 2000, EPA has committed to a program to monitor beach water quality and develop strategies, including modeling, for timely notification of the public when bacterial contamination poses a risk to bathers. EPA's goal is to manage 100% of significant public be...

405

Geothermal energy at Long Beach Naval Shipyard and Naval Station and at Seal Beach Naval Weapons Station, California. Final report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this project was to determine and evaluate sources of geothermal energy at two military bases in southern California, the Long Beach Naval Shipyard and Naval Station and the Seal Beach Naval Weapons Station. One part of the project focused on the natural geothermal characteristics beneath the naval bases. Another part focused on the geothermal energy produced by

C. T. Higgins; R. H. Chapman

1984-01-01

406

Beach dynamics and nest distribution of the leatherback turtle (Dermochelys coriacea) at Grande Riviere Beach, Trinidad & Tobago.  

PubMed

Grande Riviere Beach in Trinidad and Tobago is an important nesting site in the Caribbean for the Critically Endangered leatherback sea turtle, Dermochelys coriacea. Community members were concerned that beach erosion and seasonal river flooding were destroying many of the nests deposited annually and thought that a hatchery was a possible solution. Over the 2001 turtle nesting season, the Institute of Marine Affairs (IMA) assessed the spatial and temporal distribution of nests using the Global Positioning System recorded to reference points, and beach dynamics using permanent bench mark profile stations, to determine areas of high risk and more stable areas for nesting. A total of 1449 leatherback nests were positioned. It was evident that at the start of the season in March, the majority of leatherback nests were deposited at the eastern section of the beach. After May, there was a continuing westward shift in nest distribution as the season progressed until August and beach erosion in the eastern section became predominant. The backshore remained relatively stable along the entire beach throughout the nesting season, and erosion was predominant in the foreshore at the eastern section of the beach, from the middle to the end of the season. Similar trends in accretion and erosion were observed in 2000. River flooding did not occur during the study period or in the previous year. With both high risk and more stable regions for turtle nesting available at Grande Riviere Beach, there was no compelling evidence to justify the need for a hatchery. PMID:17465163

Lum, Lori Lee

2005-05-01

407

USING TODAY'S DATA TO CLOSE THE BEACH TODAY. QUANTITATIVE POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION (QPCR) RAPID BEACH CLOSINGS TOOL  

EPA Science Inventory

Recreational beaches are an important economic and aesthetic asset to communities, states and the nation as a whole. Considerable resources are expended each year in the measurement of fecal indicator bacteria concentrations in the water at these beaches to determine whether thes...

408

USING TODAY'S DATA TO CLOSE THE BEACH TODAY. QUANTITATIVE POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION (QPCR) RAPID BEACH CLOSING TOOL  

EPA Science Inventory

Recreational beaches are an important economic and aesthetic asset to communities, states and the nation as a whole. Considerable resources are expended each year in the measurement of fecal indicator bacteria concentrations in the water at these beaches to determine whether thes...

409

Florida panther dispersal and conservation  

Microsoft Academic Search

We studied dispersal in 27 radio-collared Florida panthers Puma concolor coryi in southern Florida from 1986 to 2000. Male dispersal was longer (mean=68.4 km) than that of females (mean=20.3 km), tended to be circular, frustrated, and of insufficient length to ameliorate inbreeding. Females were philopatric and established home ranges that were less than one home range width away from their

David S. Maehr; E. Darrell Land; David B. Shindle; Oron L. Bass; Thomas S. Hoctor

2002-01-01

410

Florida Atlantic How Will You  

E-print Network

universities. Here you will find a wide choice of majors, top-notch faculty, small classes and personal, baseball, basketball and hockey. We have the convenience of being within 30 miles of two airports -- Palm Beach International Airport to the north and the Fort Lauderdale/Hollywood International Airport

Fernandez, Eduardo

411

Environmental contaminants in the food chain, NWS Seal Beach and Seal Beach NWR  

SciTech Connect

The authors conducted a study to determine whether environmental contaminants occurred in fish and invertebrates at concentrations that could be harmful to birds feeding in the estuarine salt marsh at Seal Beach National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), which is part of Naval Weapons Station (NWS) Seal Beach. Management of the refuge is focused primarily on endangered species, especially the light-footed clapper rail and the California least tern. Important food-chain organisms taken by rails (e.g., crabs and snails) and least terns (small fish) were sampled and analyzed for inorganic and organic contaminants that might be related to Navy activities at the Station. Results indicated that those contaminants are not likely to have lethal effects on rails or terns, although some chemicals (including cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, zinc and DDE) occurred at elevated concentrations in portions of the marsh. Possible sublethal effects also were evaluated and will be discussed.

Ohlendorf, H.M.; Byron, E.R. [CH2M Hill, Sacramento, CA (United States); Freas, K.E. [CH2M Hill, San Jose, CA (United States); Casados, E.M.; Kidwell, J.J. [Naval Facilities Engineering Command, San Diego, CA (United States). SW Division

1994-12-31

412

Tsunami Deposits and Hazard Analysis On Khalaktirskiy Beach Near Petropavlovsk, Pacific Coast of Kamchatka, Russia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Khalaktirskiy beach is a long, open Pacific beach just north of the narrow entrance to Avacha Bay, and is the ocean beach nearest the city of Petropavlovsk- Kamchatskiy [The city is well protected from tsunamis and has the most complete tide gage record of tsunamis affecting Kamchatka.] Khalaktirskiy is one of most populated beach areas on Kamchatka, including low-lying towns

Tatiana K. Pinegina; Joanne Bourgeois

2002-01-01

413

Impact of Offshore Nuclear Power PlantsForecasting Visits to Nearby Beaches  

Microsoft Academic Search

A multiple method investigation was undertaken to project the impact of offshore nuclear power plants on beach visitation at adjacent beaches. (1) Related literature was reviewed concerning human adjustment to natural hazards, risk-taking behavior, and public attitudes toward nuclear power. (2) People were interviewed at beaches in three states with respect to: (a) intended avoidance of beaches near a hypothetical

Earl J. Baker; Stephen G. West; Dennis J. Moss; James M. Weyant

1980-01-01

414

TESTING A BEACH BACTERIA MODEL IN LAKE MICHIGAN AND SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA  

EPA Science Inventory

Beach closures due to high bacterial concentrations deprive the public and disrupt the tourist industry. Almost half the Lake Michigan beaches are closed more than 10% of the time. In 1999 the six-mile long beach in Huntington Beach, California was closed in July and August. Due ...

415

75 FR 59966 - Safety Zone; New York Air Show at Jones Beach State Park, Wantagh, NY  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...performing aerobatic maneuvers over the Atlantic Ocean off of Jones Beach State Park...Show at Jones Beach State Park, Atlantic Ocean off of Jones Beach, Wantagh...aircraft over a specified area of the Atlantic Ocean off of Jones Beach State...

2010-09-29

416

Revisiting Hele-Shaw Dynamics to Better Understand Beach O. Bokhove1,2  

E-print Network

Revisiting Hele-Shaw Dynamics to Better Understand Beach Evolution O. Bokhove1,2 , A.J. van der during storms, drives the evo- lution of beaches. Beach evolution by non-linear break- ing waves to the classic "Hele-Shaw" lab- oratory experiment can be designed that creates beach mor- phologies

Al Hanbali, Ahmad

417

How Palm Beach County's economy has suffered after real-estate bust  

E-print Network

How Palm Beach County's economy has suffered after real-estate bust By JEFF OSTROWSKI Palm Beach, 2011 The collapse of the housing market has exacted a multibillion-dollar toll on Palm Beach County verges on extinction, it's no exaggeration to conclude that middle-income residents of Palm Beach County

Belogay, Eugene A.

418

!""#$%%&'()*+,-.)-)/+,(012*3#*(440&2.%5667%68%69%:()&!;!2##(*;:2,),/)%Beach Hopper Bonanza  

E-print Network

!""#$%%&'()*+,-.)-)/+,(012*3#*(440&2.%5667%68%69%:()&!;!2##(*;:2,),/)%Beach Hopper Bonanza Field Introduction/Overview This second grade unit focuses on beach hoppers, tiny amphipods found on most sandy beaches. The first three lessons focus on learning beach hopper characteristics in the classroom

419

A MODEL OF BEACH PROFILE EVOLUTION INCLUDING WAVE-UNDERTOW INTERACTION  

E-print Network

1 A MODEL OF BEACH PROFILE EVOLUTION INCLUDING WAVE-UNDERTOW INTERACTION Chi Zhang1 , Jinhai Zheng2 , Titi Sui3 , Zeki Demirbilek4 and Lihwa Lin5 A numerical model of beach profile evolution is developed in beach profile evolution. Keywords: beach profile evolution; sandbar; wave; undertow; numerical model

US Army Corps of Engineers

420

At $60.6 million, FPL is Palm Beach County's biggest property taxpayer  

E-print Network

At $60.6 million, FPL is Palm Beach County's biggest property taxpayer By BILL DIPAOLO Palm Beach Quick quiz: Who'll be Palm Beach County's biggest property taxpayer this year? Donald Trump? Wrong. Jack to figures released by the Palm Beach County Tax Collector's office today. That's about 1.6 percent of the $3

Belogay, Eugene A.

421

Nearshore hydrodynamics as loading and forcing factors for Escherichia coli contamination at an embayed beach  

E-print Network

at an embayed beach Zhongfu Ge,a,* Richard L. Whitman,a Meredith B. Nevers,a Mantha S. Phanikumar coli were conducted at Chicago's 63rd Street Beach, an embayed beach that had the highest mean E. coli concentration among 23 similar Lake Michigan beaches during summer months of 2000­2005, in order to find

422

Mixed sediment beach processes: Kachemak Bay, AK  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Numerous studies have documented the rates of sediment transport along well-sorted, sand-rich beaches relating sediment transport to forcing by waves and currents. The dynamics of mixed-grain size beaches, however, have received relatively little attention in the scientific literature in spite of the estimate that these systems represent approximately 80 percent of the world's non-rocky coastlines. The tectonically active, megatidal, sea dominated beaches of Kachemak Bay, AK exhibit a wide range of interesting characteristics. In particular, the surficial sediments have a bimodal size distribution, in which self- organized bedforms composed of fine-to-medium sand migrate as coherent packages over a cobble substrate which is also dynamic. Our goal is to characterize and quantify, over various time scales, the coupled sediment transport dynamics and morphological development of this prototypical mixed sediment system. In February 2003 we installed an Argus Beach Monitoring System at the study site consisting of 8 cameras spanning a field of view of approximately 220 degrees. Utilizing a tidal contouring algorithm and over three years of hourly images, we are quantifying the rates, direction, and form of sediment transport taken by both the sand size and cobble fractions of the bi-modal distribution. Annual topographic surveys provide ground- truthing for the image derived data. Hydrodynamic forcing data are being collected with a wave/tide gage deployed in approximately 3m (MLLW) of water about 1.5 km (in the cross-shore) from the ARGUS station. In addition, we are applying new digital imaging technologies to map the spatial distribution of surficial grain size (both modes) along the field of view of the Argus cameras. Alongshore migration rates of intertidal sand bedforms, 1-2 m amplitude and ~200m wave length, over the cobble substrate have been documented to be approximately 250 m/yr. Strong seasonality in migration rates is evident with the majority of sand body movement, up to weekly-averaged rates of movement exceeding 6 m/day, occurring during large wave events. The cobble substrate, over which the organized sand fraction is transported, is dynamic as well. Both video measurements and ground surveys have documented the cross- shore and longshore migration of a large cobble bedform over its life cycle of more than a year. The cobble bedform was formed during a recent winter and by the following spring the bedform had organized into a mobile cobble berm with a landward slipface approximately 1.5 m high and a cross-shore length of about 50 m. During the following year, this feature increased in volume and migrated 50 m in the cross-shore direction and over 100 m in the alongshore. While the organized sand bedform migration rates are well correlated with the larger winter storm season, initial observations indicate that the cobble berm is significantly active during the relatively mild spring and summer months. The long time series of images allows us to not only quantify the transport rates and form of the two distinct sediment size modes but also to examine feedback processes within the overall coupled system.

Ruggiero, P.; Adams, P. N.; Warrick, J. A.

2006-12-01

423

Kennedy Space Center ocean beach erosion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dune barrier erosion and possible breakthrough due to storm and hurricane wave activity is studied near Mosquito Lagoon, in Kennedy Space Center property. The results of a geological as well as hydrodynamic appraisal of the problem area indicate that no inlet has existed across the dune barrier since 500 A.D., and that there is little likelihood of a possible breakthrough inlet remaining open permanently, primarily because the relatively shallow lagoon does not contain enough volume of water to maintain an inlet between the ocean and the lagoon. It is therefore recommended that only minimal measures, such as closing up the man-made passes across the dunes, be carried out to ensure continuation of the action of natural beach maintaining processes.

Mehta, A. J.; Obrien, M. P.

1973-01-01

424

Shoulder arthroscopy positioning: lateral decubitus versus beach chair.  

PubMed

Since the introduction of the beach chair position for shoulder arthroscopy, orthopaedic surgeons have debated whether the beach chair or lateral decubitus is superior. Most surgeons use the same patient position to perform all of their arthroscopic shoulder procedures, regardless of the pathology. Each position has its advantages and disadvantages. The evidence regarding the efficiency, efficacy, and risks of the lateral decubitus and the beach chair positions for shoulder arthroscopy does not show one position to be superior. This review presents a comparison of these positions with regard to setup, surgical visualization, access, and patient risk. PMID:19664509

Peruto, Christina M; Ciccotti, Michael G; Cohen, Steven B

2009-08-01

425

Presence of Pathogens and Indicator Microbes at a Non-Point Source Subtropical Recreational Marine Beach ? †  

PubMed Central

Swimming in ocean water, including ocean water at beaches not impacted by known point sources of pollution, is an increasing health concern. This study was an initial evaluation of the presence of indicator microbes and pathogens and the association among the indicator microbes, pathogens, and environmental conditions at a subtropical, recreational marine beach in south Florida impacted by non-point sources of pollution. Twelve water and eight sand samples were collected during four sampling events at high or low tide under elevated or reduced solar insolation conditions. The analyses performed included analyses of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) (fecal coliforms, Escherichia coli, enterococci, and Clostridium perfringens), human-associated microbial source tracking (MST) markers (human polyomaviruses [HPyVs] and Enterococcus faecium esp gene), and pathogens (Vibrio vulnificus, Staphylococcus aureus, enterovirus, norovirus, hepatitis A virus, Cryptosporidium spp., and Giardia spp.). The enterococcus concentrations in water and sand determined by quantitative PCR were greater than the concentrations determined by membrane filtration measurement. The FIB concentrations in water were below the recreational water quality standards for three of the four sampling events, when pathogens and MST markers were also generally undetectable. The FIB levels exceeded regulatory guidelines during one event, and this was accompanied by detection of HPyVs and pathogens, including detection of the autochthonous bacterium V. vulnificus in sand and water, detection of the allochthonous protozoans Giardia spp. in water, and detection of Cryptosporidium spp. in sand samples. The elevated microbial levels were detected at high tide and under low-solar-insolation conditions. Additional sampling should be conducted to further explore the relationships between tidal and solar insolation conditions and between indicator microbes and pathogens in subtropical recreational marine waters impacted by non-point source pollution. PMID:19966020

Abdelzaher, Amir M.; Wright, Mary E.; Ortega, Cristina; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M.; Miller, Gary; Elmir, Samir; Newman, Xihui; Shih, Peter; Bonilla, J. Alfredo; Bonilla, Tonya D.; Palmer, Carol J.; Scott, Troy; Lukasik, Jerzy; Harwood, Valerie J.; McQuaig, Shannon; Sinigalliano, Chris; Gidley, Maribeth; Plano, Lisa R. W.; Zhu, Xiaofang; Wang, John D.; Fleming, Lora E.

2010-01-01

426

CLASS XI NRLI When it came me to introduce ourselves to each other, we took part in an icebreaker  

E-print Network

, Frank Bruno welcomed the class to Daytona Beach. Immediately following lunch, the class was wel comed in the Best Western Aku Tiki Inn in Day tona Beach Shores, FL. During lunch, Volusia Coun ty Council Chair arriving in Daytona, she had sur veyed the other Fellows to determine which, if any, social media chan nels

Florida, University of

427

75 FR 60304 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...44701, 44719, 44721-44722. 0 2. Part 97 is amended to read as follows: Effective October 21 2010 Daytona Beach, FL, Daytona Beach Intl, RNAV (GPS) Z RWY 7L, Orig-B Lewiston, ID, Lewiston-Nez Perce County, RNAV (RNP) RWY...

2010-09-30

428

76 FR 18379 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...RWY 25, Amdt 1 Santa Ana, CA, John Wayne Airport-Orange County, NDB RWY 19R, Amdt 1, CANCELLED Daytona Beach, FL, Daytona Beach Intl, RNAV (GPS) RWY 34, Amdt 2 Tampa, FL, Tampa Executive, RNAV (GPS) RWY 18, Amdt 1...

2011-04-04

429

Service Assessment Central Florida Tornado Outbreak  

E-print Network

personnel; law enforcement; other local officials; the media; and residents of the impacted areas governments; the media; and the public in Florida. The team traveled to Florida for the period February 25

430

Towards a Sustainable Florida A Review of  

E-print Network

..................................................................36 Transportation and Sustainability Ruth L. SteinerTowards a Sustainable Florida A Review of Environmental, Social and Economic Concepts for Sustainable Development in Florida Edited by Stephen S. Mulkey, PhD Chair, People and Land Use Strategies

Watson, Craig A.

431

NITRATE LEACHING IN FLORIDA URBAN ENVIRONMENTS  

E-print Network

NITRATE LEACHING IN FLORIDA URBAN ENVIRONMENTS Michael Atkin Non-Thesis Research Paper Advisor: Dr....................................................................................3 Background- Nitrate Behavior in Soil and Florida Groundwater Vulnerability.......4 Urban Ecology in Urban Areas and Nitrate Reduction Strategies.......13 Conclusion

Ma, Lena

432

University of Florida Environmental Health & Safety  

E-print Network

University of Florida Environmental Health & Safety Biological Safety Office 2014 Bloodborne.......................................................................................................5 Medical Record...................................................................6 Personal Protective Equipment

Slatton, Clint

433

Florida Cooperative Fish & Wildlife Research Unit  

E-print Network

and Habitat Development on Spoil Islands in Lake Tohopekaliga, FL.........23 Vegetative Habitat Responses Central Florida Lake ...............................................................22 Wildlife Usage

Mazzotti, Frank

434

NOAA/NMFS Developments u. S. Fishery Catch  

E-print Network

of the charts for broad- casts over NOAA Weather Radio sta- tions in Miami, Jacksonville, Key West, Daytona Beach, and West Palm Beach. Miami and Jacksonville broadcast on an FM frequency of 162.550 MHz, while

435

Bibliography on the Event Calculus This, like any bibliography, is incomplete. Any corrections, updates, comments, suggestion,  

E-print Network

on Temporal Representation and Reasoning --- TIME'97, Daytona Beach, FL, 10--11 May 1997. To appear. [11 on Temporal Representation and Reasoning --- TIME'95, pages 73--80, Melbourne Beach, FL, 26 April 1995. [7

Cervesato, Iliano

436

Bibliography on the Event Calculus This, like any bibliography, is incomplete. Any corrections, updates, comments, suggestion,  

E-print Network

Workshop on Temporal Representation and Reasoning --- TIME'97, Daytona Beach, FL, 10--11 May 1997 on Temporal Representation and Reasoning --- TIME'95, pages 73--80, Melbourne Beach, FL, 26 April 1995. [7

Cervesato, Iliano

437

18. SAND BEACH WITH SUNBATHERS AND UMBRELLAS. VIEW FROM SOUTHEAST. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

18. SAND BEACH WITH SUNBATHERS AND UMBRELLAS. VIEW FROM SOUTHEAST. NORTHWEST ELEVATION OF REFRESHMENT STAND Photocopy of 1930-1940 photograph - Glen Echo Park, Crystal Swimming Pool, 7300 McArthur Boulevard, Glen Echo, Montgomery County, MD

438

11. BEACH TOILET BUILDING, OFFICE AND FIRST AID BUILDING, PLANS, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

11. BEACH TOILET BUILDING, OFFICE AND FIRST AID BUILDING, PLANS, ELEVATIONS AND SECTIONS Drawing No. 103-07 - Glen Echo Park, Crystal Swimming Pool, 7300 McArthur Boulevard, Glen Echo, Montgomery County, MD

439

BOB COLE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC California State University, Long Beach  

E-print Network

to the music industry include John Patitucci (bass), Mark Turner (saxophone), Tom Kubis (saxophone1 BOB COLE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC California State in the Jazz Studies program at the Bob Cole Conservatory of Music at California State University, Long Beach

Sorin, Eric J.

440

Beach Erosion Project, Delaware Coast Protection Project, Delaware.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The project provides for improvements along the Atlantic Coast of Delaware extending from Cape Henlopen to the Maryland State Line at Fenwick Island. Those improvements include combined beach erosion control and hurricane protection and consists of wideni...

1971-01-01

441

Nonlinear resonance of trapped waves on a plane beach  

E-print Network

Linear edge waves were first found mathematically by Stokes (1846). It has long been a topic of interest, since edge waves are believed to be responsible for the formation of beach cusps. Galvin (1965) was the first to ...

Li, Guangda, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01

442

Modes of embayed beach dynamics: analysis reveals emergent timescales  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Embayed beaches, or beaches positioned between rocky headlands, exhibit morphologic changes over many length and time scales. Beach sediment is transported as a result of the day-to-day wave forcing, causing patterns of erosion and accretion. We use the Rocky Coastline Evolution Model (RCEM) to investigate how patterns of shoreline change depend on wave climate (the distribution of wave-approach angles) and beach characteristics. Measuring changes in beach width through time allows us to track the evolution of the shape of the beach and the movement of sand within it. By using Principle Component Analysis (PCA), these changes can be categorized into modes, where the first few modes explain the majority of the variation in the time series. We analyze these modes and how they vary as a function of wave climate and headland/bay aspect ratio. In the purposefully simple RCEM, sediment transport is wave-driven and affected by wave shadowing behind the headlands. The rock elements in our model experiments (including the headlands) are fixed and unerodable so that this analysis can focus purely on sand dynamics between the headlands, without a sand contribution from the headlands or cliffs behind the beach. The wave climate is characterized by dictating the percentage of offshore waves arriving from the left and the percentage of waves arriving from high angles (very oblique to the coastline orientation). A high-angle dominated wave climate tends to amplify coastline perturbations, whereas a lower-angle wave climate is diffusive. By changing the headland/bay aspect ratio and wave climate, we can perform PCA analysis of generalized embayed beaches with differing anatomy and wave climate forcings. Previous work using PCA analysis of embayed beaches focused on specific locations and shorter timescales (<30 years; Short and Trembanis, 2004). By using the RCEM, we can more broadly characterize beach dynamics over longer timescales. The first two PCA modes, which explain a majority of the beach width time series variation (typically >70%), are a 'breathing' mode and a 'rotational' mode. The newly identified breathing mode captures the sand movement from the middle of the beach towards the edges (thickening the beach along the headlands), and the rotational mode describes the movement of sand towards one headland or another, both in response to stochastic fluctuations about the mean wave climate. The two main modes operate independently and on different timescales. In a weakly low-angle dominated wave climate, the breathing mode tends to be the first mode (capturing the most variance), but with greater low-angle dominance (greater morphological diffusivity), the rotational mode tends to be first. The aspect ratio of the bay also affects the order of the modes, because wave shadowing affects sediment transport behind the headlands. Previous work has attributed beach rotation to changes in various climate indices such as the North Atlantic Oscillation (Thomas et al., 2011); however, PCA analysis of the RCEM results suggests that embayed beaches can have characteristic timescales of sand movement that result from internal system dynamics, emerging even within a statistically constant wave climate. These results suggest that morphologic changes in embayed beaches can occur independently of readily identifiable shifts in forcing.

Murray, K. T.; Murray, A.; Limber, P. W.; Ells, K. D.

2013-12-01

443

An application of partial differential equations and boundary value problems in computational fluid dynamic modeling  

SciTech Connect

This paper outlines a method used to create a complex grid map for a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) modeling conducted at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Daytona Beach, Florida. The investigators used a Laplace operator in the CFD software Fluent to create an imaginary flow domain around a hydrofoil that runs nearly parallel to the stream function. The goal of this project is to eventually study the evolution of lift, drag, and pitching moment for the hydrofoil as a result of changing boundary layer conditions due to growth of the biological fouling Enteromorpha Clathrata.

Collino, B.J.; Gangadharan, S.; Wimberly, C.R.

1994-12-31

444

FAWN: Florida Automated Weather Network  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Florida Automated Weather Network (FAWN) provides up-to-date weather information through a system of automated weather stations distributed throughout the State of Florida. Research scientists at the University of Florida work closely with extension agents to monitor the FAWN system and make sure it provides fast, reliable, and convenient access. Overall, there are four parts to the FAWN system: collecting data, transmitting it to the collection site, processing the data, and redistributing it to the end user. FAWN database servers maintained by IFAS Information Technologies receive weather data about the date and time of collection, the air temperature, soil temperature, relative humidity, dewpoint, rainfall, wind direction, wind speed, and radiation from remote stations every 15 minutes. The information is processed and made available almost instantaneously through several different search methods accessible through FAWN web server, as well as an interactive voice-response system.

445

Tropical Connections South Florida's marine environment  

E-print Network

University), coral reef (Michael White, NOAA). Thiscopypurchasedat2012-07-3113:34:48andlicensedto of Health Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission Florida International University Foundation Refuge System Protect Our Reefs Sanctuary Friends Foundation of the Florida Keys United States Fish

Meyers, Steven D.

446

Florida Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research  

E-print Network

Florida Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit Annual Report January ­December 2009 #12;2 We and Alan Woodward of the Florida Fish an and Wildlife Conservation Commission to support him as a master AND WILDLIFE CONSERVATION COMMISSION UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA U.S. FISH & WILDLIFE SERVICE U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

Watson, Craig A.

447

Hydrology of Southeast Florida and Associated Topics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This booklet deals with the hydrology of southeastern Florida. It is designed to provide the citizen, teacher, or student with hydrological information, to promote an understanding of water resources, and to initiate conservation practices within Florida communities. The collection of articles within the booklet deal with Florida water resources…

Monsour, William, Comp.; Moyer, Maureen, Comp.

448

Update: Shaping Solutions for 1 Florida's Future  

E-print Network

on 2 New Water Recycling Unit Extension's Green Industry BMP 3 Training Protects Florida's Water Training Protects Florida's Water Resources Faculty Transfers 3 Update: Shaping Solutions for Florida and water conservation. By safely using rainwater, nearly all of the facility's irrigation needs can

Jawitz, James W.

449

Florida-Friendly LandscapingTM Program  

E-print Network

2080 defines FFL: "...quality landscapes that conserve water, protect the environment, are adaptable by The Manasota Basin Board of the Southwest Florida Water Management District #12;Florida-Friendly Landscaping, and waterfront protection. ... F. S., Ch. 373.185 #12;Florida-Friendly Landscaping Definition continued

Jawitz, James W.

450

FLORIDA CONSUMER SENTIMENT INDEX September 24, 2013  

E-print Network

housing is likely to be less of a driver of a recovery in Florida. While housing prices are not likely. Housing has been a bright spot in Florida, but as anticipated this trend may slow at least temporarily. The median price of a single family home in Florida was down from July by $4,500 to $175,000. Although

Guo, Jing

451

Tropical Connections South Florida's marine environment  

E-print Network

periods of low sea level (e.g., winter dry season or strong winds toward the west or southwest), the banksTropical Connections South Florida's marine environment William L. Kruczynski and Pamela J circulation and renewal in Florida Bay is influenced by flows from the Southwest Florida Shelf and tidal

452

Heart rate and motion analysis by GPS in beach soccer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although beach soccer has become increasingly popular in recent years very little scientific research has been conducted into the sport. A pilot study was carried out with the aim of examining the physiological (heart rate) and physical (motion analysis) responses of beach soccer players during competitive matches. Ten players (age 25.5 ±0.5 years; height 1.80 ± 0.08 m; weight 78.2

Julen Castellano; David Casamichana

2010-01-01

453

Evaluation of airborne topographic lidar for quantifying beach changes  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A scanning airborne topographic lidar was evaluated for its ability to quantify beach topography and changes during the Sandy Duck experiment in 1997 along the North Carolina coast. Elevation estimates, acquired with NASA's Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM), were compared to elevations measured with three types of ground-based measurements - 1) differential GPS equipped all-terrain vehicle (ATV) that surveyed a 3-km reach of beach from the shoreline to the dune, 2) GPS antenna mounted on a stadia rod used to intensely survey a different 100 m reach of beach, and 3) a second GPS-equipped ATV that surveyed a 70-km-long transect along the coast. Over 40,000 individual intercomparisons between ATM and ground surveys were calculated. RMS vertical differences associated with the ATM when compared to ground measurements ranged from 13 to 19 cm. Considering all of the intercomparisons together, RMS ??? 15 cm. This RMS error represents a total error for individual elevation estimates including uncertainties associated with random and mean errors. The latter was the largest source of error and was attributed to drift in differential GPS. The ??? 15 cm vertical accuracy of the ATM is adequate to resolve beach-change signals typical of the impact of storms. For example, ATM surveys of Assateague Island (spanning the border of MD and VA) prior to and immediately following a severe northeaster showed vertical beach changes in places greater than 2 m, much greater than expected errors associated with the ATM. A major asset of airborne lidar is the high spatial data density. Measurements of elevation are acquired every few m2 over regional scales of hundreds of kilometers. Hence, many scales of beach morphology and change can be resolved, from beach cusps tens of meters in wavelength to entire coastal cells comprising tens to hundreds of kilometers of coast. Topographic lidars similar to the ATM are becoming increasingly available from commercial vendors and should, in the future, be widely used in beach surveying.

Sallenger, A.H., Jr.; Krabill, W.B.; Swift, R.N.; Brock, J.; List, J.; Hansen, M.; Holman, R.A.; Manizade, S.; Sontag, J.; Meredith, A.; Morgan, K.; Yunkel, J.K.; Frederick, E.B.; Stockdon, H.

2003-01-01

454

Online Beach Profile Management and Analysis System (PMAS)  

Microsoft Academic Search

HARRIS, M.S., TINKER, T.P., and WRIGHT, E.E. 2007. Online Beach Profile Management and Analysis System (PMAS). Journal of Coastal Research, SI 50 (Proceedings of the 9th International Coastal Symposium), 62 - 66. Gold Coast, Australia, ISSN 0749.0208 Long-term beach profile datasets provide coastal communities with information critical to understanding temporal and spatial variability in coastal systems. Given the economic growth

M. S. Harris; T. P. Tinker; E. E. Wright

455

Mapping Submarine Groundwater Discharge - how to investigate spatial discharge variability on coastal and beach scales  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) is now increasingly recognized as an important component in the water balance, water quality and ecology of the coastal zone. A multitude of methods are currently employed to study SGD, ranging from point flux measurements with seepage meters to methods integrating over various spatial and temporal scales such as hydrological models, geophysical techniques or surface water tracer approaches. From studies in a large variety of hydrogeological settings, researchers in this field have come to expect that SGD is rarely uniformly distributed. Here we discuss the application of: (a) the mapping of subsurface electrical conductivity in a discharge zone on a beach; and (b) the large-scale mapping of radon in coastal surface water to improving our understanding of SGD and its spatial variability. On a beach scale, as part of intercomparison studies of a UNESCO/IAEA working group, mapping of subsurface electrical conductivity in a beach face have elucidated the non-uniform distribution of SGD associated with rock fractures, volcanic settings and man-made structures (e.g., piers, jetties). Variations in direct point measurements of SGD flux with seepage meters were linked to the subsurface conductivity distribution. We demonstrate how the combination of these two techniques may complement one another to better constrain SGD measurements. On kilometer to hundred kilometer scales, the spatial distribution and regional importance of SGD can be investigated by mapping relevant tracers in the coastal ocean. The radon isotope Rn-222 is a commonly used tracer for SGD investigations due to its significant enrichment in groundwater, and continuous mapping of this tracer, in combination with ocean water salinity, can be used to efficiently infer locations of SGD along a coastline on large scales. We use a surface-towed, continuously recording multi-detector setup installed on a moving vessel. This tool was used in various coastal environments, e.g. in Florida, Brazil, Mauritius and Australia's Great Barrier Reef lagoon. From shore-parallel transects along the Central Great Barrier Reef coastline, numerous processes and locations of SGD were identified, including terrestrially-derived fresh SGD and the recirculation of seawater in mangrove forests, as well as riverine sources. From variations in the inverse relationship of the two tracers radon and salinity, some aspects of regional freshwater input into the lagoon during the tropical wet season could be assessed. Such surveys on coastal scales can be a useful tool to obtain an overview of locations and processes of SGD on an unknown coastline.

Stieglitz, T. C.; Burnett, W. C.; Rapaglia, J.

2008-12-01

456

Comparison of Airborne Lidar and Mulitbeam Bathymetric Data in the Florida Reef Tract Along Broward County  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Most mapping of Florida's coral resources has been in the relatively shallow waters of the Florida Keys. However, it is well known that large concentrations of corals are found in deeper waters off Florida's eastern seaboard. To date, technological limitations have precluded the mapping of corals in these deeper waters. Satellite imaging systems and natural color aerial photography, two mapping mainstays, are generally only effective in Florida waters shallower than 20 meters. Conservation of the northern portion of the Florida reef tract, which parallels the Atlantic coast in Miami-Dade, Broward and Palm Beach counties, has been hampered by the fact that there are little or no coordinated management, monitoring and mapping activities in place. To assist the Broward county shore protection project geographic information systems database, a Laser Airborne Depth Sounder (LADS) survey was performed in 2001. The surveyFlanked the 43 km shoreline to a depth of ~50m and distances out to 2km in the north and 3.5km in the southern portion at a spatial resolution of 1.524m (5ft). Additionally, in November 2000 as part of a container vessel grounding lawsuit, funding was allocated to find an alternative anchorage for Port Everglades. The Simrad EM3000 multibeam system was used to collect data in a 2km x 2km square south of Port Everglades, offshore at a depth from 7m to 36m deep and at a spatial resolution of 1m. The area of overlap coincided with the second and third reef tracts, which have the highest biodiversity of the three reef tracts. These datasets were compared at overlapping geographic extents.

Morton, N. E.; Burd, J. J.; McIntyre, M. L.; O'Kiefe, K. M.; Wheaton, J. L.; Naar, D. F.; Donahue, B. T.; Kohler, M. F.

2002-12-01

457

Florida Center for Environmental Studies  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Florida Center for Environmental Studies site acts as a university system research and training facilitator and environmental education center with activities that especially address the issues of water dominated ecosystems. There is information on: the Agro-Ecology program, which focuses on the interface between agriculture and natural systems in Florida; the Riverwoods Field Laboratory, which is committed to restoration of the Kissimmee River and the greater Everglades watershed; and events, internships, workshops, field studies and academic programs. The site also contains a water and environmental website database, environmental news, and discussion lists.

458

Physical modeling of three-dimensional intermediate beach morphodynamics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Experiments have been performed in a large wave tank in order to study the morphodynamics of rip current systems. Both accretive and erosive shore-normal wave conditions were applied, the beach evolving through all the states within the intermediate beach classification, under the so-called down-state (accretive) and up-state (erosive) morphological transitions. Results show that any prescribed change in the wave conditions drastically increases the rate at which the morphology changes. The surf zone morphology tends toward a steady state when running a given wave climate for a long duration. We quantitatively describe a full down-state sequence characterized by the progressive evolution of an alongshore-uniform bar successively into a crescentic plan shape, a bar and rip channel morphology, and a terrace. From the analysis of a large data set of dense Eulerian measurements and bathymetric surveys, we depict several feedback mechanisms associated with wave-driven rip current circulation, wave nonlinearities and the seabed evolution. At first, a positive feedback mechanism drives a rapid increase in the rate of morphological change, beach three-dimensionality, and rip intensity. By the time the sandbar evolves into a bar and rip morphology, a negative feedback mechanism, characterized by a decaying beach change rate and an increasing beach alongshore uniformity, overwhelms the former mechanism. An erosive sequence characterized by both an overall offshore bar migration and an increase in beach three-dimensionality is also described.

Michallet, H.; Castelle, B.; BarthéLemy, E.; Berni, C.; Bonneton, P.

2013-06-01

459

75 FR 77010 - Nextera Energy Point Beach, LLC; Point Beach Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2, Draft Environmental...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...increase the maximum thermal power at the Point Beach Nuclear Plant (PBNP), Units 1 and...One Light-Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Reactor. Therefore, there...Evaluating Design Basis Accidents at Nuclear Power Reactors. The analyses...

2010-12-10

460

Florida Field Naturalist PUBLISHED BY THE FLORIDA ORNITHOLOGICAL SOCIETY  

E-print Network

identified as a West- ern Wood-Pewee (Contopus sordidulus). We recorded numerous calls and prepared from Archbold Biological Station listened to and watched a lone Western Wood-Pewee (Contopus sordidulus Wildlife Refuge, Wakulla County, Florida, that was identified as C. sordidulus. Our sonogram also depicts

Nelson, Brian S.

461

Dedicated to Sharing Information About Water Management and the Florida LAKEWATCH Program Volume 65 (2014) Florida LAKEWATCH Honored with State and National Awards  

E-print Network

1 Dedicated to Sharing Information About Water Management and the Florida LAKEWATCH Program of Florida that work to protect and manage Florida's precious natural re- sources Volume 65 (2014) Florida LAKEWATCH Florida LAKEWATCH Honored with State and National Awards

Florida, University of

462

Invasive Whitefly Pests of Florida  

E-print Network

Invasive Whitefly Pests of Florida #12;· General Whitefly Introduction · Other Problems Whiteflies · Managing Whiteflies Outline #12;· 1500 species worldwide, at least 60 have been reported from, Michigan State University, www.bugwood.org, #5351016 ­ 2 pairs of wings which are covered by a white dust

Watson, Craig A.

463

NORTHEAST FLORIDA BEEF & FORAGE GROUP  

E-print Network

Page | 1 2008 NORTHEAST FLORIDA BEEF & FORAGE GROUP FARM & FORAGE RESOURCE GUIDE #12 Beef & Forage Group, Alachua County Extension, Baker County Extension, Bradford County Extension, Clay Beef and Forage Group We are a group of Extension Agents providing regional programming for livestock

Watson, Craig A.

464

THE SOUTH FLORIDA EDUCATION CENTER.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

THE SOUTH FLORIDA EDUCATION CENTER (SFEC) WAS ORGANIZED BY 50 CITIZENS IN 1961 TO DESIGN, CREATE, AND DEMONSTRATE A QUALITY OF EDUCATION, FROM EARLY CHILDHOOD THROUGH GRADUATE STUDY, WHICH WILL BECOME A PROTOTYPE FOR BROWARD COUNTY, THE STATE, AND THE NATION. THIS PROTOTYPE WILL EXHIBIT A PATTERN OF EDUCATION WHICH WILL PLACE THE MAJOR EMPHASIS OF…

Nova Univ., Fort Lauderdale, FL.

465

REGULATIONS OF UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA  

E-print Network

1 REGULATIONS OF UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 6C1-1.0081 Prohibition of Hazing; Procedures and Penalties. (1) Hazing Policy -- Actions which amount to hazing are prohibited. Hazing is any action or situation or organization. (2) Definition of Hazing -- In accordance with Section 1006.63, F.S., "hazing" means any action

Pilyugin, Sergei S.

466

Florida's Fit to Achieve Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes Florida's "Fit to Achieve," a cardiovascular fitness education program for elementary students. Children are taught responsibility for their own cardiovascular fitness through proper exercise, personal exercise habits, and regular aerobic exercise. The program stresses collaborative effort between physical educators and classroom…

Sander, Allan N.; And Others

1993-01-01

467

Forest Statistics for Florida, 1980.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Since the fourth inventory of Florida's forest resources in 1970, area of commercial forest has declined by 597,000 acres, or 4 percent. Commercial forest now occupies 15.7 million acres, or 45 percent of the total land area. The ratio of pine types to ha...

R. M. Sheffield, W. A. Bechtold

1981-01-01

468

Floriculture. Florida Vocational Program Guide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This program guide is intended for the implementation of a floriculture program in Florida secondary and postsecondary schools. The program guide describes the program content and structure, provides a program description, describes jobs under the program, and includes a curriculum framework and student performance standards for floriculture…

Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Center for Instructional Development and Services.

469

Southwest Florida Frog Monitoring Network  

E-print Network

Southwest Florida Frog Monitoring Network 10 years of change in the frog community of the Estero Control District #12;Frogs ­ canaries in the coal mine www.lostlaowai.com/.../02/seven-legged-frog1.png www.chemistryexplained.com/images/chfa_03_img http://images.smh.com.au/2009/07/23/646328/frog11%20copy

Demers, Nora Egan

470

Florida State University Heritage Protocol  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Florida State University (FSU) Heritage Protocol was created to preserve the history of FSU through collections of various ephemeral items, including yearbooks, photographs, items of clothing, audio recordings, and films. The materials on the site are divided into six primary sections that include: "Virtual Museum", "Photo Galleries", "Mixed Media", and "Publications". In the "Virtual Museum", visitors can look at the mortar board of physical education professor, Katherine W. Montgomery, and the 1913 commencement announcement for the Florida State College for Women. Moving on, the "Photo Galleries" area includes a photo of the week feature, a collection of images from the Florida State College for Women and some unique photos of one Burt Reynolds, who went to Florida State University in the 1950s. The "Mixed Media" area is quite interesting, and visitors can view a FSU circus rehearsal film from the early 1950s and listen to an album of performances from FSU's School of Music. Finally, the "Publications" area includes primary documents like an article on the FSU Circus from the March 31, 1952 issue of Life magazine and a piece from 1955 on the FSU Marine Lab.

471

Zoom Down to Orlando, Florida  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Viewing Earth from space, the Landsat 7 satellite takes images of the Earth, which allows us to look at land changes such as; urban growth, deforestation, and overall changes in the Earth itself. Here is a Landsat 7 image of Orlando, Florida

Snodgrass, Stuart; Williams, Darrel

2000-01-01

472

Dry Tortugas National Park, Florida  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This National Park Service (NPS) publication discusses Dry Tortugas National Park in Florida. This system consists of 7 small islands off the coast of Key West. The site discusses the history of this area, as well as the marine setting of the park.

473

Faculty Governance University of Florida  

E-print Network

brief summary of faculty participation in the governance of the University of Florida was motivated, Sellards, and Thomas Public Functions Rolfs and Hochstrasser Athletics Blair and the Commandant Student were the 1910-11 Standing Committees of the Faculty: Athletics Crow, Cox, the Commandant Discipline

Pilyugin, Sergei S.

474

Florida Atlantic University Internal Solicitation  

E-print Network

to Improve Quality of Life for Aging Americans based on the Healthy Aging Research Initiative (HARI) Now open. Purpose of Award: Faculty from all colleges at Florida Atlantic University with interest in aging research grants will be awarded through this solicitation Grantees will receive up to $2,500 each in financial

Fernandez, Eduardo

475

State University System of Florida  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper presents some information about the State University System of Florida. The following are presented in this paper: (1) University Work Plans and Annual Reports; (2) State University System 2009 Annual Report; (3) Quick Facts: Planned New Degree Programs--2010 to 2013; (4) State University System Tuition Differential Summary, FY…

Board of Governors, State University System of Florida, 2012

2012-01-01

476

Public Health Education in Florida.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report documents issues related to the work of the Florida Comprehensive Health Professions Education Plan. Public health education prepares students for initial employment or advancement in a number of positions. While the public health work force is primarily employed in various units in local, state, and federal governments, industry also…

Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee.

477

RAISING TOMATOES IN NORTH FLORIDA  

E-print Network

RAISING TOMATOES IN NORTH FLORIDA Barton Wilder Agriculture & Natural Resources Agent UF/IFAS Extension: Alachua County #12;First some botany... · Tomatoes are members of the Solanaceae or nightshade;When should I plant? · Tomatoes can be transplanted from February through April. (Watch out for late

Jawitz, James W.

478

Florida Community Colleges Argentina Project.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the origins of the Florida community colleges' Argentina Project, which sent a delegation of representatives to Argentina in 1992 to describe the community college system as a model for educational reform in the country. Describes changes in Argentina since 1989 regarding the political climate and reviews recent educational reforms in…

Holcombe, Willis; Greene, William

1996-01-01

479

Rural health networks in Florida.  

PubMed

This article describes the development of rural health networks in Florida, which has adopted formal policies to support these networks. First, the history and content of the relevant legislation are described. The current networks are identified and their development to date summarized. Finally, a detailed case study is employed to outline the steps taken to establish one network. PMID:10141278

Duncan, R P; Klepper, B R; Krumerman, C J; Kuhn, S L

1995-01-01

480

Housing in Florida. Volume 4.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Volume 4 of a five volume technical report includes three studies. The first on codes and standards, makes a preliminary survey of all codes, rules, and regulations, and statutes in effect in Florida which control the housing environment. The key areas ar...

1973-01-01

481

FLORIDA ATLANTIC COASTAL ENVIRONMENTAL INITIATIVE  

EPA Science Inventory

The Florida Atlantic Coastal Environmental Initiative (FACEI) will consist of a multiyear, multidisciplinary research and monitoring program designed to detect and trace a variety of nutrient sources (point and non-point sources) and other major environmental stressors to the coa...

482

TRANSMITTAL Florida Institute of Technology  

E-print Network

. University Blvd. Melbourne, FL 32901 FROM: Senior Design: ROV Team, Slime Shark Department of Marine Dr. Wood, Please review the attached Final Report for the ROV team. The ROV Team #12;2 Florida: The ROV Team Kelley Pitts Amy Pothier Amanda Mackintosh Michael Plasker Jeffrey Pollard #12

Wood, Stephen L.

483

Readability of Central Florida Newspapers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study analyzed the readability of seven central Florida newspapers (one of which is a college newspaper) and "USA Today.""Rightwriter," a grammar checker and readability computer program, was used to evaluate front page articles for each of the eight newspapers. The readability formulas invoked in the readability program included the…

Olmstead, Phyllis M.

484

Veterinary Medical Needs in Florida.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is a wide agreement that (1) Florida needs more practicing veterinarians and veterinary medical services than it now has, especially in the area of large animal and food animal practice, and (2) there is a deficiency of opportunities to study veterinary medicine for those Floridians who would elect this profession. This report takes into…

Florida State Board of Regents, Tallahassee.

485

REGULATIONS OF UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA  

E-print Network

1 REGULATIONS OF UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 6C1-4.004 Social Fraternities and Sororities. (1) Social sororities and fraternities are student organizations that are founded on the principles of brotherhood with the educational mission of the University, social sororities and fraternities promote the highest standards

Pilyugin, Sergei S.

486

Investigating the Geomorphic Behavior of the Cape Canaveral Coast Through High-Resolution Beach Monitoring, Sediment Analysis, Oceanographic Observations, and Numerical Modeling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The salient of Cape Canaveral interrupts a relatively straight, sandy, passive margin coastline that extends nearly 400 km from the St. Johns River mouth to the St. Lucie Inlet along the Florida Atlantic coast. OSL dating indicates that the modern cape has been prograding rapidly since the LGM and subtle topographic features, inland from the modern cape, suggest that this salient has persisted over several sea level cycles since the early Pleistocene. Dynamic shoreline change over the past decade at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is threatening critical NASA infrastructure and has prompted officials to develop a mitigation strategy through a partnership among researchers from the U.S. Geological Survey, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, private coastal engineering firms, and the University of Florida. Since May 2009, the research team has assembled data on decadal to event-scale shoreline change (dGPS), beach and nearshore morphodynamics (dGPS and Argus), beach sedimentary character (grain size analysis), wave climate and transformation (ADCP), and inner shelf bathymetry (Echo Sounding) in an effort to assess dune vulnerability and flooding risk. In addition, SWAN numerical modeling simulations offer insight into the influence of irregular bathymetry (cape-associated shoals) on the alteration of spatial patterns of wave energy flux during a decadal shift in deep-water wave climate. Beach-fx, modeling of cross-shore profile evolution is being applied to evaluate the performance of alternative protective measures, estimate project costs, and examine ecological influences of the proposed alternative protective measures. By combining contemporaneous data of coastal geomorphic and sedimentary response to wave forcing with numerical model results that explore a range of climate scenarios, we aim to develop a useful understanding of the coastal geomorphic behavior at KSC that can be used to make a mitigation recommendation.

Adams, P. N.; Jaeger, J. M.; MacKenzie, R. A.; Kline, S. W.; Maibauer, B. J.; Plant, N. G.; Gravens, M. B.; Pierro, T. P.; Shaffer, J.

2011-12-01

487

The responses of artificial embayed beaches to storm events  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The plan-view and the profile shape of sandy beaches largely depend on the incoming wave-energy (Wright and Short, 1984). In this sense, storm events are responsible for major changes in the configuration of sandy beaches and the cumulative effect of storms and fair-weather conditions determines the morphodynamic state of a certain beach. With increasing wave energy, the beach will change from the Reflective state to the Low Tide Terrace, Transverse Bar and Rip, Rhythmic Bar and Beach, Longshore Bar and Trough and finally to the Dissipative beach state. These morphodynamic states are also observed at artificial embayed beaches, although artificial groins limit alongshore sediment transport and protect sections of the beach from waves approaching from a range of directions (Short and Masselink, 1999). This contribution focuses on the morphological changes of the shoreline and the submerged sandbars of artificial embayed (sandy) beaches due to the effect of high-wave conditions associated to storms. We characterize the morphological response of the emerged and submerged beach profile of two of the artificial embayed beaches of the Barcelona city coast (NW Mediterranean). The two embayed beaches under study are single-barred beaches subject to the same climatic conditions but with different morphological characteristics. The study comprises more than 4 years of data, from November 2001 to March 2006, obtained through an Argus video system (Holman and Stanley, 2007). The extraction of the shoreline and barline locations is accomplished using 10-minute time-exposure video images. Shorelines were extracted directly from oblique images (see Ojeda and Guillén, [2008] for a complete description) and rectified afterwards. Sandbars were inferred from the rectified time-exposure video images based on the preferential wave breaking over shallow areas, so they required a minimum significant wave height (Hs) which allowed the occurrence of a clear wave-breaking pattern. The barline extraction was accomplished through an automated alongshore tracking of the intensity maxima across each beach section (Van Enckevort and Ruessink, 2001). The mean Hs during the study period was 0.71 m and the averaged peak period was 5.7 s. The wave height time series shows a cyclic behaviour, with storm periods (October-April) separated by periods of low storm activity (May-October). The two most energetic periods affecting the beaches were from October 2001 to May 2002 and from October 2003 to April 2004 (wave data were obtained from a WANA node [virtual buoy] and direct measurements of the Barcelona-Coastal buoy). Approximately 25 storm events have been identified during the study period (following Ojeda and Guillén [2008], significant storms were defined as those with Hs higher than 2.5 m during the peak of the storm and a minimum duration of 12 h with Hs greater than 1.5 m). The morphological responses of the beach to the storm action determine the morphodynamic state. These responses were grouped into five categories: shoreline advance or retreat, beach rotation, sandbar migration, formation of megacusps, and changes in the sandbar configuration (linear or crescentic shape). The intensity and frequency of these modifications were different in both beaches. Regarding the changes in the morphodynamic state of the beaches, the bar at Bogatell switched more frequently among the four intermediate morphodynamic states during the study period than the bar at La Barceloneta. The bar at La Barceloneta only underwent the complete "reset" of the nearshore morphology (i.e., abrupt change of the plan-view shape of the beach towards a Longshore Bar and Trough state) once, associated with the high-energy wave event occurring on November 2001. At this beach, the strongest storm events produced the offshore migration of the bar and a certain decrease in the bar sinuosity, but did not generate an alongshore parallel bar. Similar storms caused different effects on the two adjacent beaches and, furthermore, the effect of storms of similar characteristics at t

Ojeda, E.; Guillén, J.; Ribas, F.

2009-09-01

488

Toxic cyanobacteria in Florida waters.  

PubMed

The occurrence of toxic cyanobacterial blooms in Florida waters have become more prominent following increased growth, declining groundwater supplies, and identification of impaired surface waters as future drinking water sources. Cyanobacterial toxins have been identified in source waters used for drinking water supply and in post-treated drinking water during algal bloom events. Algal toxin concentrations in post-treated drinking water have exceeded existing and proposed World Health Organization guidelines for the oral consumption of microcystin and cylindrospermopsin. Severe dermatitis has also been reported by swimmers in Florida springs where Lyngbya mats have expanded. The prevalence and toxicity of cyanobacteria should be considered when developing appropriate Total Maximum Daily Loads for impaired Florida waters that do not currently meet their designated use. It could also support further efforts to characterize potential ecological and human health risks due to toxic cyanobacterial blooms. Identification of algal toxins in finished drinking water and reports of severe skin irritation following contact with toxic cyanobacteria should be utilized for justification and implementation of increased monitoring of potentially toxic cyanobacterial blooms by surface water managers and water utilities. Epidemiological studies may also be required in Florida to assess potential human health risks due to algal toxin consumption at the tap and for those exposed to cyanotoxic blooms during recreational use of lakes, springs and rivers. Without adequate water treatment and coordinated state-wide monitoring efforts, it is anticipated that the likelihood for human exposure to cyanobacteria and their toxins will increase as Florida becomes more dependent upon surface waters to supply a growing population and an expanding urban environment. Coordination and communication between surface water managers and public health officials at the local level will be critical to the overall protection of the environment and public health during toxic cyanobacterial bloom events. PMID:18461767

Burns, John

2008-01-01

489

Heart Rate and Motion Analysis by GPS in Beach Soccer  

PubMed Central

Although beach soccer has become increasingly popular in recent years very little scientific research has been conducted into the sport. A pilot study was carried out with the aim of examining the physiological (heart rate) and physical (motion analysis) responses of beach soccer players during competitive matches. Ten players (age 25.5 ± 0.5 years; height 1.80 ± 0.08 m; weight 78.2 ± 5.6 kg.) were studied over five beach soccer matches. The physiological demands were analysed by measuring heart rate (HR) using telemetric devices, while the physical profile was evaluated by recording motion and speed by means of GPS devices. During competitive matches, players obtained a HRmean of 165.2 bpm (86.5% HRmax), with 59.3% of the time participating (TP) corresponding to values above 90% of the HRmax. The distance covered per minute of participation was 97.7 m, with 9.5% of this distance corresponding to high-intensity running and 2.5% to sprint; the work:rest ratio was 1.4:1 and the maximum speed 21.7 km·h-1. These results showed that beach soccer is an intermittent physical activity of greater intensity than other team games. It requires a major contribution from the anaerobic system as emphasis is placed on players making quick bursts of high-intensity activity separated by brief rest periods. Key points The distance covered per minute of play is around 100 m. Beach soccer is an intermittent sport with a work:rest ratio of 1.4:1. The playing surface in beach soccer is an important handicap to obtain maximum speeds. Beach soccer has a high physiological intensity, with more than half of the game is spent at intensities above 90 % of the HRmax. PMID:24149392

Castellano, Julen; Casamichana, David

2010-01-01

490

Monitoring and modeling nearshore dredge disposal for indirect beach nourishment, Ocean Beach, San Francisco  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Nearshore dredge disposal was performed during the summer of 2005 at Ocean Beach, San Francisco, CA, a high energy tidal and wave environment. This trial run was an attempt to provide a buffer to a reach of coastline where wave attack during the winter months has had a severe impact on existing sewage infrastructure. Although the subsequent beach response was inconclusive, after one year the peak of the disposal mound had migrated ~100 m toward the shore, providing evidence that annual dredge disposal at this site could be beneficial over the long-term by at the very least providing: 1) additional wave dissipation during storms 2) compatible sediment to feed nearshore bars, 3) sediment cover on an exposed sewage outfall pipe, and 4) a viable alternative to the shoaling offshore disposal site. Numerical modeling suggests that despite the strong tidal currents in the region, wave forcing is the dominant factor moving the sediment slowly toward shore, and placing sediment at just slightly shallower depths (e.g. 9 m) in the future would have a more immediate impact.

Barnard, Patrick L.; Hanes, Daniel M.; Lescinski, Jamie; Elias, Edwin

2007-01-01

491

33 CFR 100.35T05-0482 - Special Local Regulations for Marine Events, Wrightsville Channel; Wrightsville Beach, NC.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Events, Wrightsville Channel; Wrightsville Beach, NC. 100.35T05-0482 Section 100...Events, Wrightsville Channel; Wrightsville Beach, NC. (a) Regulated area. The following...48?44? West, at Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina. All coordinates...

2013-07-01

492

The effect of two mechanical beach grooming strategies on Escherichia coli density in beach sand at a southwestern Lake Michigan beach  

Microsoft Academic Search

The influence of indicator bacteria associated with beach sands on recreational water quality has become increasingly recognized. Constant wave action may serve as a transport mechanism for delivering bacterial organisms to surface waters resulting in an increased frequency of dry weather advisories. The ability to reduce the concentration of these organisms may serve to improve recreational water quality. To date,

J. L. Kinzelman; K. R. Pond; K. D. Longmaid; R. C. Bagley

2004-01-01

493

Threatened and Endangered Species Survey for Patrick Air Force Base, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A review of previous environmental work conducted at Patrick Air Force Base (PAFB) indicated that several threatened, endangered, or species of special concern occurred or had the potential to occur there. This study was implemented to collect more information on protected species at PAFB. A map of landcover types was prepared for PAFB using aerial photography, groundtruthing, and a geographic information system (GIS). Herbaceous vegetation was the most common vegetation type. The second most abundant vegetation type was disturbed shrubs/exotics. The beach and associated dune vegetation comprised 3.2% of the land area, but was the most extensive natural community within PAFB. A few isolated mangrove communities exist along the Banana River. Seventy-seven species of vascular plants occurred on the dunes, including four species listed by state agencies: spider lily (Hymenocallis latifolia), prickly pear cactus (Opuntia stricta), beach star (Remirea maritima), and inkberry (Scaevola plumien). Surveys of other habitats revealed eighty-four species of vascular plants including two state-listed species: spider lily and prickly pear cactus. Many of these areas are dominated by invasive, exotic species, particularly Brazilian pepper (Schinus terebinthifolius) and Australian pine (Casuarina equisetifolia), and native species of open or disturbed sites such as camphorweed (Heterotheca subaxillaris) and beardgrass (Andropogon spp.). Due to the isolation of PAFB from other natural areas, most exotic plant populations on the base are not an immediate threat to intact native plant communities. Dune habitat was surveyed for the southeastem beach mouse (Peromyscus polionotus niveiventris) by quarterly trapping along eight 100 m transects. No beach mice were found. The limited extent of dune habitat, its fragmented condition, and the isolation of PAFB from extant populations of the beach mouse probably accounts for its absence. Surveys of birds on PAFB found an avifauna characteristic of species that occur in the Indian River Lagoon system. Twenty-five species of waterbirds were observed during quarterly surveys on PAFB, including five species listed as species of special concern by the state of Florida: Snowy Egret (Egretta thula), Little Blue Heron (Egretta caerulea), Tricolored Heron (Egretta tricolo4, White Ibis (Eudocimus albus), and Brown Pelican (Pelecanus occidentalis). The Golf Course was used extensively by almost all species of waterbirds on PAFB. Twenty-two species of shorebirds were observed on PAFB. Although no listed species were observed, the potential exists for several protected species of shorebirds to use the beach at PAFB during some parts of the year. The Airfield runways and associated grass areas were important sites at PAFB for loafing and feeding for some shorebirds. Surveys of rooftop nesting by Least Terns (Stema antillarum) on PAFB found a large colony on a rooftop in the PAFB Industrial Area. This colony produced some independent young. Two rooftop Least Tern colonies reported from previous years were inactive during 1996. A small number of Black Skimmers (Rhynchops nigee attempted to nest at the Least Ten colony but were unsuccessful. Surveys for the gopher tortoise (Gopherus polyphemus) revealed burrows and tortoises only at the Waste Study Site; five burrows and three tortoises were observed. No Florida scrub lizards (Sceloporus woodi), eastern indigo snakes (Drymarchon corais couperl), or diamondback terrapins (Malademys terrapin terrapin) were observed. American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) were observed on the Golf Course and using ditches, ponds, and areas along the Banana River. The amount of dune habitat could be expanded by not mowing areas adjacent to the dunes to allow dune species to colonize and expand. Planting dune species as part of the beach renourishment project will also increase this habitat. Exotic plants dominate several areas on the base and are used by threatened, endangered, and species of special concern. However, the use of native vegetation in landscaping projects thro

Oddy, Donna M.; Stolen, Eric D.; Schmalzer, Paul A.; Larson, Vickie L.; Hall, Patrice; Hensley, Melissa A.

1997-01-01

494

Low faunal diversity on Maltese sandy beaches: fact or artefact?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Eight sandy beaches on Malta and two on Gozo were sampled for macrofauna to test the hypothesis that Maltese beaches have an intrinsically low diversity. Stations distributed in the supralittoral (dry zone), mediolittoral (wet zone) and upper infralittoral (submerged zone to 1 m water depth) were sampled by sieving core samples and standardised searching during daytime, and pitfall trapping and standardised sweeping of the water column using a hand-net at night, as appropriate. Physical parameters of the sediment were measured and human occupancy of the beaches was estimated. From the supralittoral and mediolittoral, 39 species represented by 1584 individuals were collected by the combined techniques of pitfall trapping, sieving and standard searching. For Ramla beach, which had the highest diversity, 267 individuals representing 25 infaunal species were collected by sieving from a combined volume of 1.175 m 3 of sand, and 149 individuals representing 28 epifaunal species were collected by standardised searching from a combined area of 700 m 2 of sand during two winter and two summer sampling sessions between 1992 and 1993. For nine other beaches sampled during the summer of 2000, only six macrofaunal species were collected from core samples, with overall population densities ranging from 4.13 to 45.45 individuals m -2. Only 92 individuals belonging to 12 species were collected by hand-net from the uppermost infralittoral of five beaches sampled using this method during the summer of 2000. Taxa of gastropods, bivalves, decapods, mysids and staphylinid beetles generally abundant on Mediterranean sandy beaches, were entirely absent from the beaches sampled. Few correlations that could explain the impoverishment of Maltese sandy beaches were found between physical parameters and faunal abundances, and other factors such as inadequate sampling effort, human disturbance and marine pollution were also excluded; however, seasonally biased sampling may partly explain the results obtained. One factor that may explain why certain species are missing could be lack of recruitment, due to Malta's geographical isolation from the European and African mainlands.

Deidun, Alan; Azzopardi, Marthese; Saliba, Stephen; Schembri, Patrick J.

2003-10-01

495

Water quality, weather and environmental factors associated with fecal indicator organism density in beach sand at two recreational marine beaches.  

PubMed

Recent studies showing an association between fecal indicator organisms (FIOs) in sand and gastrointestinal (GI) illness among beachgoers with sand contact have important public health implications because of the large numbers of people who recreate at beaches and engage in sand contact activities. Yet, factors that influence fecal pollution in beach sand remain unclear. During the 2007 National Epidemiological and Environmental Assessment of Recreational (NEEAR) Water Study, sand samples were collected at three locations (60m apart) on weekend days (Sat, Sun) and holidays between June and September at two marine beaches - Fairhope Beach, AL and Goddard Beach, RI - with nearby publicly-owned treatment works (POTWs) outfalls. F(+) coliphage, enterococci, Bacteroidales, fecal Bacteroides spp., and Clostridium spp. were measured in sand using culture and qPCR-based calibrator-cell equivalent methods. Water samples were also collected on the same days, times and transects as the 144 sand samples and were assayed using the same FIO measurements. Weather and environmental data were collected at the time of sample collection. Mean FIO concentrations in sand varied over time, but not space. Enterococci CFU and CCE densities in sand were not correlated, although other FIOs in sand were. The strongest correlation between FIO density in sand and water was fecal Bacteroides CCE, followed by enterococci CFU, Clostridium spp. CCE, and Bacteroidales CCE. Overall, the factors associated with FIO concentrations in sand were related to the sand-water interface (i.e., sand-wetting) and included daily average densities of FIOs in water, rainfall, and wave height. Targeted monitoring that focuses on daily trends of sand FIO variability, combined with information about specific water quality, weather, and environmental factors may inform beach monitoring and management decisions to reduce microbial burdens in beach sand. The views expressed in this paper are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. PMID:25150738

Heaney, Christopher D; Exum, Natalie G; Dufour, Alfred P; Brenner, Kristen P; Haugland, Richard A; Chern, Eunice; Schwab, Kellogg J; Love, David C; Serre, Marc L; Noble, Rachel; Wade, Timothy J

2014-11-01

496

South Florida Natural Resources Center Runoff Under the Trail  

E-print Network

South Florida Natural Resources Center Runoff Under the Trail: An Historical Analysis of Flows Resources Branch South Florida Natural Resources Center Everglades National Park #12;South Florida Natural Resources Center #12;South Florida Natural Resources Center #12;South Florida Natural Resources Center #12

Sukop, Mike

497

Behavioural adaptations in talitrids from two Atlantic beaches  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The aim of the present study was to test sun orientation and rhythmic activity of two sandhopper populations from two Atlantic macro-tidal beaches. A population from Le Verger beach (orientated to 346°, Ille et Vilaine, Brittany, France) and a population from Damgan (orientated to 195°, Morbihan, Brittany, France), were tested on the beach under clear sky discriminating for landscape vision. For both populations locomotor activity rhythm was recorded in the laboratory. The two beaches differed for climatic features, tidal range and for human use. Both talitrid populations resulted very well orientated toward the shoreline, and both used solar position and landscape vision to orient. However the multiple regression analysis of orientation with climatic features showed a different use of local cues by the two populations and a slight influence of tidal regime (ebbing and rising tide), in spite of the supralittoral zonation of sandhoppers. In the laboratory they showed a well defined rhythmic behaviour as well as a bimodal rhythmicity, explained as a tidal one. These results are a new brick in the complex picture of orientation and rhythm studies on sandy beach invertebrates.

Rossano, Claudia; Gambineri, Simone; Fanini, Lucia; Durier, Virginie; Rivault, Colette; Scapini, Felicita

2009-12-01

498

New beach ridge type: severely limited fetch, very shallow water  

SciTech Connect

The southern end of Laguna Madre (Texas) north of the Rio Grande mouth is marked by very shallow water, wide tidal flats, lunettes, islands made of beach ridges, and lesser features. The number and variety of islands in the lagoon is remarkable. The lunettes (clay dunes) are made primarily of quartz sand and coarse silt. They are common 5-10 m high, irregular in shape, and steep sided. They were deposited from wind transport and did not migrate. Those that are islands in the lagoon predate present position of sea level. Islands made of beach ridges were built from the lagoon side. Photoanalysis, field work, and granulometry all show that this sand was not moved into these ridges by Gulf of Mexico waves. Trenches in 12 beach ridges showed horizontal bedding but neither low-angle nor steep cross-bedding (quite unlike swash-built beach ridges). The ridges were built by wind-tide lag effects, not from the swash. Therefore, these beach ridges are a new type, in addition to swash-built, eolian, and storm-surge ridges. Growth of the ridges appears to be completed.

Tanner, W.F.; Demirpolat, S.

1988-09-01

499

AN EMAP APPROACH FOR ASSESSING THE ECOLOGICAL CONDITION OF COASTAL BEACHES  

EPA Science Inventory

Using the approach established by EPA's Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP), a pilot shoreline monitoring survey was conducted in August and September 1999, encompassing the Florida panhandle from Perdido Key, Florida to Port St. Joe, Florida. The objective of...

500

Millennial, centennial and decadal sea- level change in Florida, USA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Reconstructions of relative sea-level changes on millennial timescales provide data against which to test and calibrate Earth-Ice models. On the U.S. mid-Atlantic coast they constrain the geometry of the Laurentide Ice Sheet's collapsing forebulge. Sea -level data from southeastern Atlantic coast additionally constrain ice-equivalent meltwater input. Here we produce the first Holocene sea-level curve for Florida and Georgia from the St. Mary's River using agglutinated foraminifera preserved in radiocarbon-dated brackish and salt-marsh sediment. The use of foraminfera as sea-level indicators was underpinned by local and regional datasets describing the modern distribution of assemblages that are analogues for those preserved in buried sediment. This approach produced 25 index points that record 5.2 m of relative sea level rise over the last 8000 years with no evidence of a mid Holocene high stand. These reconstructions indicate that existing GIA models do not replicate proxy reconstructions and that northern Florida is subsiding in response to ongoing forebulge collapse at an estimated rate of approximately 0.3 mm/yr. Over multi decadal time scales, detailed sea level reconstructions provide an appropriate geological context for modern rates of sea-level rise. Reconstructions spanning the last 2000 years of known climate variability are important for developing models with predictive capacity that link climate and sea level changes. A reconstruction of sea-level changes since 2000 years BP was developed using a core of brackish marsh sediment from the Nassau River in Florida. Foraminifera estimated the elevation of former sea level with an uncertainty of ± 10 cm. Consistent downcore assemblages indicate that the marsh maintained its tidal elevation for 2000 years. An age depth model was developed for the core results from radiocarbon dating, 210Pb and 137Cs. The resulting relative sea level record was adjusted for the contribution made by glacio-isostatic subsidence to reveal climate-related sea level variability. The proxy dataset reproduces trends recorded by reliable nearby tide gauges at Fernandina Beach, FL and Fort Pulaski, GA and indicates that modern rates of rise were initiated in the latest part of the 19th century and are greater than any persistent trend in the last 2000 years.

Kemp, A.; Hawkes, A. D.; Donnelly, J. P.; Horton, B. P.

2012-12-01