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Sample records for deacetylases controls g1

  1. Mechanisms of G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in myeloma cells induced by hybrid-compound histone deacetylase inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Seiko; Okinaga, Toshinori; Ariyoshi, Wataru; Takahashi, Osamu; Iwanaga, Kenjiro; Nishino, Norikazu; Tominaga, Kazuhiro; Nishihara, Tatsuji

    2013-05-10

    Highlights: •Novel histone deacetylase inhibitor Ky-2, remarkably inhibits myeloma cell growth. •Ky-2 demonstrates no cytotoxicity against normal lymphocytic cells. •Ky-2 induces cell cycle arrest through the cell cycle-associated proteins. •Ky-2 induces Bcl-2-inhibitable apoptosis through a caspase-dependent cascade. -- Abstract: Objectives: Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are new therapeutic agents, used to treat various types of malignant cancers. In the present study, we investigated the effects of Ky-2, a hybrid-compound HDAC inhibitor, on the growth of mouse myeloma cells. Materials and methods: Myeloma cells, HS-72, P3U1, and mouse normal cells were used in this study. Effect of HDAC inhibitors on cell viability was determined by WST-assay and trypan blue assay. Cell cycle was analyzed using flow cytometer. The expression of cell cycle regulatory and the apoptosis associated proteins were examined by Western blot analysis. Hoechst’s staining was used to detect apoptotic cells. Results: Our findings showed that Ky-2 decreased the levels of HDACs, while it enhanced acetylation of histone H3. Myeloma cell proliferation was inhibited by Ky-2 treatment. Interestingly, Ky-2 had no cytotoxic effects on mouse normal cells. Ky-2 treatment induced G1-phase cell cycle arrest and accumulation of a sub-G1 phase population, while Western blotting analysis revealed that expressions of the cell cycle-associated proteins were up-regulated. Also, Ky-2 enhanced the cleavage of caspase-9 and -3 in myeloma cells, followed by DNA fragmentation. In addition, Ky-2 was not found to induce apoptosis in bcl-2 overexpressing myeloma cells. Conclusion: These findings suggest that Ky-2 induces apoptosis via a caspase-dependent cascade and Bcl-2-inhibitable mechanism in myeloma cells.

  2. Redundant control of adipogenesis by histone deacetylases 1 and 2.

    PubMed

    Haberland, Michael; Carrer, Michele; Mokalled, Mayssa H; Montgomery, Rusty L; Olson, Eric N

    2010-05-01

    Adipocyte differentiation is a well defined process that is under the control of transcriptional activators and repressors. We show that histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors efficiently block adipocyte differentiation in vitro. This effect is specific to adipogenesis, as another mesenchymal differentiation process, osteoblastogenesis, is enhanced upon HDAC inhibition. Through the systematic genetic deletion of HDAC genes in cultured mesenchymal precursor cells, we show that deletion of HDAC1 and HDAC2 leads to reduced lipid accumulation, revealing redundant and requisite roles of these class I HDACs in adipogenesis. These findings unveil a previously unrecognized role for HDACs in the control of adipogenesis. PMID:20190228

  3. Defects in G1-S cell cycle control in head and neck cancer: a review.

    PubMed

    Michalides, Rob J A M; van de Brekel, Michiel; Balm, Fons

    2002-07-01

    Tumors gradually develop as a result of a multistep acquisition of genetic alterations and ultimately emerge as selfish, intruding and metastatic cells. The genetic defects associated with the process of tumor progression affect control of proliferation, programmed cell death, cell aging, angiogenesis, escape from immune control and metastasis. Fundamental cancer research over the last thirty years has revealed a multitude of genetic alterations which specify more or less separate steps in tumor development and which are collectively responsible for the process of tumor progression. The genes affected play in normal cells a crucial role in control over cell duplication and the interaction between cells, and between cells and their direct surrounding. This is illustrated on control during the G1/S phase of the cell cycle by its ultimate regulators: cyclins and cyclin dependent kinases. These proteins not only control the transition through the G1/S phase of the cell cycle, but also serve as mediators of the interaction between cells, and between cells and their surrounding. Defaults in the regulation of these proteins are associated with tumor progression, and, therefore, serve as targets for therapy. Defaults in those genes are found in various tumor types, although some of those prevail in particular tumor types. In this review emphasis is given to the defaults that occur in head and neck cancer. PMID:12112544

  4. First passage times in M2[X ]|G |1 |R queue with hysteretic overload control policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechinkin, Alexander V.; Razumchik, Rostislav R.; Zaryadov, Ivan S.

    2016-06-01

    One of the reported approaches towards the solution of overload problem in networks of SIP servers is the implementation of multi-level hysteretic control of arrivals in SIP servers. Each level, being the parameter of the policy, specifies operation mode of SIP server i.e. it implicitly indicates what SIP server must do with the arriving packets. The choice of parameters' values is not guided by standards and is usually left for the network owner. In general, all operation modes of the considered policy can be grouped into two groups: normal mode (when all arriving packets are accepted) and congested mode (when part or all arriving packets are being dropped). Such grouping may serve as the criteria for choosing parameters' values of the policy: pick those values which minimize SIP server sojourn time in congested mode. In this short note we propose some analytical results which facilitate the solution of stated minimization problem. The considered mathematical model of SIP server is the queueing system M2[X ]|G |1 |R with batch arrivals and bi-level hysteretic control policy, which specifies three operation modes: normal (customers both flows are accepted), overload (only customers from one flow are accepted), discard (customers from both flows are blocked/lost)). The switching between modes can occur only on service completions. Analytical method allowing computation of stationary sojourn times in different operation modes (as well as first passage times between modes) is presented in brief. Numerical example is given.

  5. Whi5 phosphorylation embedded in the G1/S network dynamically controls critical cell size and cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Palumbo, Pasquale; Vanoni, Marco; Cusimano, Valerio; Busti, Stefano; Marano, Francesca; Manes, Costanzo; Alberghina, Lilia

    2016-01-01

    In budding yeast, overcoming of a critical size to enter S phase and the mitosis/mating switch—two central cell fate events—take place in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Here we present a mathematical model of the basic molecular mechanism controlling the G1/S transition, whose major regulatory feature is multisite phosphorylation of nuclear Whi5. Cln3–Cdk1, whose nuclear amount is proportional to cell size, and then Cln1,2–Cdk1, randomly phosphorylate both decoy and functional Whi5 sites. Full phosphorylation of functional sites releases Whi5 inhibitory activity, activating G1/S transcription. Simulation analysis shows that this mechanism ensures coherent release of Whi5 inhibitory action and accounts for many experimentally observed properties of mitotically growing or conjugating G1 cells. Cell cycle progression and transcriptional analyses of a Whi5 phosphomimetic mutant verify the model prediction that coherent transcription of the G1/S regulon and ensuing G1/S transition requires full phosphorylation of Whi5 functional sites. PMID:27094800

  6. Murine hematopoietic stem cell dormancy controlled by induction of a novel short form of PSF1 by histone deacetylase inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Yinglu; Gong, Zhi-Yuan; Takakura, Nobuyuki

    2015-06-10

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) can survive long-term in a state of dormancy. Little is known about how histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) affect HSC kinetics. Here, we use trichostatin A (TSA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, to enforce histone acetylation and show that this suppresses cell cycle entry by dormant HSCs. Previously, we found that haploinsufficiency of PSF1, a DNA replication factor, led to attenuation of the bone marrow (BM) HSC pool size and lack of acute proliferation after 5-FU ablation. Because PSF1 protein is present in CD34{sup +} transiently amplifying HSCs but not in CD34{sup −} long-term reconstituting-HSCs which are resting in a dormant state, we analyzed the relationship between dormancy and PSF1 expression, and how a histone deacetylase inhibitor affects this. We found that CD34{sup +} HSCs produce long functional PSF1 (PSF1a) but CD34{sup −} HSCs produce a shorter possibly non-functional PSF1 (PSF1b, c, dominantly PSF1c). Using PSF1a-overexpressing NIH-3T3 cells in which the endogenous PSF1 promoter is suppressed, we found that TSA treatment promotes production of the shorter form of PSF1 possibly by inducing recruitment of E2F family factors upstream of the PSF1 transcription start site. Our data document one mechanism by which histone deacetylase inhibitors affect the dormancy of HSCs by regulating the DNA replication factor PSF1. - Highlights: • Hematopoetic stem cell dormancy is controlled by histone deacetylation inhibitors. • Dormancy of HSCs is associated with a shorter form of non-functional PSF1. • Histone deacetylase inhibitors suppress PSF1 promoter activity.

  7. A Novel Histone Deacetylase Complex in the Control of Transcription and Genome Stability

    PubMed Central

    Zilio, Nicola; Codlin, Sandra; Vashisht, Ajay A.; Bitton, Danny A.; Head, Steven R.; Wohlschlegel, James A.; Bähler, Jürg

    2014-01-01

    The acetylation state of histones, controlled by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and deacetylases (HDACs), profoundly affects DNA transcription and repair by modulating chromatin accessibility to the cellular machinery. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe HDAC Clr6 (human HDAC1) binds to different sets of proteins that define functionally distinct complexes: I, I′, and II. Here, we determine the composition, architecture, and functions of a new Clr6 HDAC complex, I′′, delineated by the novel proteins Nts1, Mug165, and Png3. Deletion of nts1 causes increased sensitivity to genotoxins and deregulated expression of Tf2 elements, long noncoding RNA, and subtelomeric and stress-related genes. Similar, but more pervasive, phenotypes are observed upon Clr6 inactivation, supporting the designation of complex I′′ as a mediator of a key subset of Clr6 functions. We also reveal that with the exception of Tf2 elements, the genome-wide loading sites and loci regulated by Clr6 I″ do not correlate. Instead, Nts1 loads at genes that are expressed in midmeiosis, following oxidative stress, or are periodically expressed. Collective data suggest that Clr6 I′′ has (i) indirect effects on gene expression, conceivably by mediating higher-order chromatin organization of subtelomeres and Tf2 elements, and (ii) direct effects on the transcription of specific genes in response to certain cellular or environmental stimuli. PMID:25002536

  8. Histone Deacetylases

    PubMed Central

    Parbin, Sabnam; Kar, Swayamsiddha; Shilpi, Arunima; Sengupta, Dipta; Deb, Moonmoon; Rath, Sandip Kumar

    2014-01-01

    In the current era of genomic medicine, diseases are identified as manifestations of anomalous patterns of gene expression. Cancer is the principal example among such maladies. Although remarkable progress has been achieved in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in the genesis and progression of cancer, its epigenetic regulation, particularly histone deacetylation, demands further studies. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are one of the key players in the gene expression regulation network in cancer because of their repressive role on tumor suppressor genes. Higher expression and function of deacetylases disrupt the finely tuned acetylation homeostasis in both histone and non-histone target proteins. This brings about alterations in the genes implicated in the regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis and other cellular processes. Moreover, the reversible nature of epigenetic modulation by HDACs makes them attractive targets for cancer remedy. This review summarizes the current knowledge of HDACs in tumorigenesis and tumor progression as well as their contribution to the hallmarks of cancer. The present report also describes briefly various assays to detect histone deacetylase activity and discusses the potential role of histone deacetylase inhibitors as emerging epigenetic drugs to cure cancer. PMID:24051359

  9. Cyclin D1 is dispensable for G1 control in retinoblastoma gene-deficient cells independently of cdk4 activity.

    PubMed Central

    Lukas, J; Bartkova, J; Rohde, M; Strauss, M; Bartek, J

    1995-01-01

    To elucidate the regulator-versus-target relationship in the cyclin D1/cdk4/retinoblastoma protein (pRB) pathway, we examined fibroblasts from RB-1 gene-deficient and RB-1 wild-type littermate mouse embryos (ME) and in human tumor cell lines that differed in the status of the RB-1 gene. The RB+/+ and RB-/- ME fibroblasts expressed similar protein levels of D-type cyclins, cdk4, and cdk6, showed analogous spectra and abundance of cellular proteins complexed with cdk4 and/or cyclins D1 and D2, and exhibited comparable associated kinase activities. Of the two human cell lines established from the same sarcoma biopsy, the RB-positive SKUT1B cells contained cdk4 that was mainly associated with D-type cyclins, contrary to a predominant cdk4-p16INK4 complex in the RB-deficient SKUT1A cells. Antibody-mediated neutralization of cyclin D1 arrested the RB-positive ME and SKUT1B cells in G1, whereas this cyclin appeared dispensable in the RB-deficient ME and SKUT1A cells. Lack of requirement for cyclin D1 therefore correlated with absence of functional pRB, regardless of whether active cyclin D1/cdk4 holoenzyme was present in the cells under study. Consistent with a potential role of cyclin D/cdk4 in phosphorylation of pRB, monoclonal anti-cyclin D1 antibodies supporting the associated kinase activity failed to significantly affect proliferation of RB-positive cells, whereas the antibody DCS-6, unable to coprecipitate cdk4, efficiently inhibited G1 progression and prevented pRB phosphorylation in vivo. These data provide evidence for an upstream control function of cyclin D1/cdk4, and a downstream role for pRB, in the order of events regulating transition through late G1 phase of the mammalian cell division cycle. PMID:7739541

  10. Histone deacetylase 3 supports endochondral bone formation by controlling cytokine signaling and matrix remodeling.

    PubMed

    Carpio, Lomeli R; Bradley, Elizabeth W; McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E; Weivoda, Megan M; Poston, Daniel D; Dudakovic, Amel; Xu, Ming; Tchkonia, Tamar; Kirkland, James L; van Wijnen, Andre J; Oursler, Merry Jo; Westendorf, Jennifer J

    2016-01-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are efficacious epigenetic-based therapies for some cancers and neurological disorders; however, each of these drugs inhibits multiple HDACs and has detrimental effects on the skeleton. To better understand how HDAC inhibitors affect endochondral bone formation, we conditionally deleted one of their targets, Hdac3, pre- and postnatally in type II collagen α1 (Col2α1)-expressing chondrocytes. Embryonic deletion was lethal, but postnatal deletion of Hdac3 delayed secondary ossification center formation, altered maturation of growth plate chondrocytes, and increased osteoclast activity in the primary spongiosa. HDAC3-deficient chondrocytes exhibited increased expression of cytokine and matrix-degrading genes (Il-6, Mmp3, Mmp13, and Saa3) and a reduced abundance of genes related to extracellular matrix production, bone development, and ossification (Acan, Col2a1, Ihh, and Col10a1). Histone acetylation increased at and near genes that had increased expression. The acetylation and activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) were also increased in HDAC3-deficient chondrocytes. Increased cytokine signaling promoted autocrine activation of Janus kinase (JAK)-signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) and NF-κB pathways to suppress chondrocyte maturation, as well as paracrine activation of osteoclasts and bone resorption. Blockade of interleukin-6 (IL-6)-JAK-STAT signaling, NF-κB signaling, and bromodomain extraterminal proteins, which recognize acetylated lysines and promote transcriptional elongation, significantly reduced Il-6 and Mmp13 expression in HDAC3-deficient chondrocytes and secondary activation in osteoclasts. The JAK inhibitor ruxolitinib also reduced osteoclast activity in Hdac3 conditional knockout mice. Thus, HDAC3 controls the temporal and spatial expression of tissue-remodeling genes and inflammatory responses in chondrocytes to ensure proper endochondral ossification during development. PMID:27507649

  11. Cytoplasmic-nuclear trafficking of G1/S cell cycle molecules and adult human β-cell replication: a revised model of human β-cell G1/S control.

    PubMed

    Fiaschi-Taesch, Nathalie M; Kleinberger, Jeffrey W; Salim, Fatimah G; Troxell, Ronnie; Wills, Rachel; Tanwir, Mansoor; Casinelli, Gabriella; Cox, Amy E; Takane, Karen K; Srinivas, Harish; Scott, Donald K; Stewart, Andrew F

    2013-07-01

    Harnessing control of human β-cell proliferation has proven frustratingly difficult. Most G1/S control molecules, generally presumed to be nuclear proteins in the human β-cell, are in fact constrained to the cytoplasm. Here, we asked whether G1/S molecules might traffic into and out of the cytoplasmic compartment in association with activation of cell cycle progression. Cdk6 and cyclin D3 were used to drive human β-cell proliferation and promptly translocated into the nucleus in association with proliferation. In contrast, the cell cycle inhibitors p15, p18, and p19 did not alter their location, remaining cytoplasmic. Conversely, p16, p21, and p27 increased their nuclear frequency. In contrast once again, p57 decreased its nuclear frequency. Whereas proliferating β-cells contained nuclear cyclin D3 and cdk6, proliferation generally did not occur in β-cells that contained nuclear cell cycle inhibitors, except p21. Dynamic cytoplasmic-nuclear trafficking of cdk6 was confirmed using green fluorescent protein-tagged cdk6 and live cell imaging. Thus, we provide novel working models describing the control of cell cycle progression in the human β-cell. In addition to known obstacles to β-cell proliferation, cytoplasmic-to-nuclear trafficking of G1/S molecules may represent an obstacle as well as a therapeutic opportunity for human β-cell expansion. PMID:23493571

  12. Overexpression of histone deacetylases in cancer cells is controlled by interplay of transcription factors and epigenetic modulators

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hui; Salz, Tal; Zajac-Kaye, Maria; Liao, Daiqing; Huang, Suming; Qiu, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) that deacetylate histone and nonhistone proteins play crucial roles in a variety of cellular processes. The overexpression of HDACs is reported in many cancer types and is directly linked to accelerated cell proliferation and survival. However, little is known about how HDAC expression is regulated in cancer cells. In this study, we found that HDAC1 and HDAC2 promoters are regulated through collaborative binding of transcription factors Sp1/Sp3 and epigenetic modulators, including histone H3K4 methyltransferase SET1 and histone acetyltransferase p300, whose levels are also elevated in colon cancer cell lines and patient samples. Interestingly, Sp1 and Sp3 differentially regulate HDAC1 and HDAC2 promoter activity. In addition, Sp1/Sp3 recruits SET1 and p300 to the promoters. SET1 knockdown (KD) results in a loss of the H3K4 trimethylation mark at the promoters, as well as destabilizes p300 at the promoters. Conversely, p300 also influences SET1 recruitment and H3K4me3 level, indicating a crosstalk between p300 and SET1. Further, SET1 KD reduces Sp1 binding to the HDAC1 promoter through the increase of Sp1 acetylation. These results indicate that interactions among transcription factors and epigenetic modulators orchestrate the activation of HDAC1 and HDAC2 promoter activity in colon cancer cells.—Yang, H., Salz, T., Zajac-Kaye, M., Liao, D., Huang, S., and Qiu, Y. Overexpression of histone deacetylases in cancer cells is controlled by interplay of transcription factors and epigenetic modulators. PMID:24948597

  13. Epigenetic Control of Macrophage Shape Transition towards an Atypical Elongated Phenotype by Histone Deacetylase Activity.

    PubMed

    Cabanel, Mariana; Brand, Camila; Oliveira-Nunes, Maria Cecilia; Cabral-Piccin, Mariela Pires; Lopes, Marcela Freitas; Brito, Jose Marques; de Oliveira, Felipe Leite; El-Cheikh, Marcia Cury; Carneiro, Katia

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory chronic pathologies are complex processes characterized by an imbalance between the resolution of the inflammatory phase and the establishment of tissue repair. The main players in these inflammatory pathologies are bone marrow derived monocytes (BMDMs). However, how monocyte differentiation is modulated to give rise to specific macrophage subpopulations (M1 or M2) that may either maintain the chronic inflammatory process or lead to wound healing is still unclear. Considering that inhibitors of Histone Deacetylase (HDAC) have an anti-inflammatory activity, we asked whether this enzyme would play a role on monocyte differentiation into M1 or M2 phenotype and in the cell shape transition that follows. We then induced murine bone marrow progenitors into monocyte/macrophage differentiation pathway using media containing GM-CSF and the HDAC blocker, Trichostatin A (TSA). We found that the pharmacological inhibition of HDAC activity led to a shape transition from the typical macrophage pancake-like shape into an elongated morphology, which was correlated to a mixed M1/M2 profile of cytokine and chemokine secretion. Our results present, for the first time, that HDAC activity acts as a regulator of macrophage differentiation in the absence of lymphocyte stimuli. We propose that HDAC activity down regulates macrophage plasticity favoring the pro-inflammatory phenotype. PMID:26196676

  14. Mechanisms Controlling Subcellular Localization of the G1 Cyclins Cln2p and Cln3p in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Mary E.; Cross, Frederick R.

    2001-01-01

    Different G1 cyclins confer functional specificity to the cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) Cdc28p in budding yeast. The Cln3p G1 cyclin is localized primarily to the nucleus, while Cln2p is localized primarily to the cytoplasm. Both binding to Cdc28p and Cdc28p-dependent phosphorylation in the C-terminal region of Cln2p are independently required for efficient nuclear depletion of Cln2p, suggesting that this process may be physiologically regulated. The accumulation of hypophosphorylated Cln2 in the nucleus is an energy-dependent process, but may not involve the RAN GTPase. Phosphorylation of Cln2p is inefficient in small newborn cells obtained by elutriation, and this lowered phosphorylation correlates with reduced Cln2p nuclear depletion in newborn cells. Thus, Cln2p may have a brief period of nuclear residence early in the cell cycle. In contrast, the nuclear localization pattern of Cln3p is not influenced by Cdk activity. Cln3p localization requires a bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS) located at the C terminus of the protein. This sequence is required for nuclear localization of Cln3p and is sufficient to confer nuclear localization to green fluorescent protein in a RAN-dependent manner. Mislocalized Cln3p, lacking the NLS, is much less active in genetic assays specific for Cln3p, but more active in assays normally specific for Cln2p, consistent with the idea that Cln3p localization explains a significant part of Clnp functional specificity. PMID:11509671

  15. Histone deacetylase enzymes as drug targets for the control of the sheep blowfly, Lucilia cuprina.

    PubMed

    Kotze, Andrew C; Hines, Barney M; Bagnall, Neil H; Anstead, Clare A; Gupta, Praveer; Reid, Robert C; Ruffell, Angela P; Fairlie, David P

    2015-12-01

    The Australian sheep blowfly, Lucilia cuprina, is an ecto-parasite that causes significant economic losses in the sheep industry. Emerging resistance to insecticides used to protect sheep from this parasite is driving the search for new drugs that act via different mechanisms. Inhibitors of histone deacetylases (HDACs), enzymes essential for regulating eukaryotic gene transcription, are prospective new insecticides based on their capacity to kill human parasites. The blowfly genome was found here to contain five HDAC genes corresponding to human HDACs 1, 3, 4, 6 and 11. The catalytic domains of blowfly HDACs 1 and 3 have high sequence identity with corresponding human and other Dipteran insect HDACs (Musca domestica and Drosophila melanogaster). On the other hand, HDACs 4, 6 and 11 from the blowfly and the other Dipteran species showed up to 53% difference in catalytic domain amino acids from corresponding human sequences, suggesting the possibility of developing HDAC inhibitors specific for insects as desired for a commercial insecticide. Differences in transcription patterns for different blowfly HDACs through the life cycle, and between the sexes of adult flies, suggest different functions in regulating gene transcription within this organism and possibly different vulnerabilities. Data that supports HDACs as possible new insecticide targets is the finding that trichostatin A and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid retarded growth of early instar blowfly larvae in vitro, and reduced the pupation rate. Trichostatin A was 8-fold less potent than the commercial insecticide cyromazine in inhibiting larval growth. Our results support further development of inhibitors of blowfly HDACs with selectivity over human and other mammalian HDACs as a new class of prospective insecticides for sheep blowfly. PMID:27120067

  16. Histone deacetylase enzymes as drug targets for the control of the sheep blowfly, Lucilia cuprina

    PubMed Central

    Kotze, Andrew C.; Hines, Barney M.; Bagnall, Neil H.; Anstead, Clare A.; Gupta, Praveer; Reid, Robert C.; Ruffell, Angela P.; Fairlie, David P.

    2015-01-01

    The Australian sheep blowfly, Lucilia cuprina, is an ecto-parasite that causes significant economic losses in the sheep industry. Emerging resistance to insecticides used to protect sheep from this parasite is driving the search for new drugs that act via different mechanisms. Inhibitors of histone deacetylases (HDACs), enzymes essential for regulating eukaryotic gene transcription, are prospective new insecticides based on their capacity to kill human parasites. The blowfly genome was found here to contain five HDAC genes corresponding to human HDACs 1, 3, 4, 6 and 11. The catalytic domains of blowfly HDACs 1 and 3 have high sequence identity with corresponding human and other Dipteran insect HDACs (Musca domestica and Drosophila melanogaster). On the other hand, HDACs 4, 6 and 11 from the blowfly and the other Dipteran species showed up to 53% difference in catalytic domain amino acids from corresponding human sequences, suggesting the possibility of developing HDAC inhibitors specific for insects as desired for a commercial insecticide. Differences in transcription patterns for different blowfly HDACs through the life cycle, and between the sexes of adult flies, suggest different functions in regulating gene transcription within this organism and possibly different vulnerabilities. Data that supports HDACs as possible new insecticide targets is the finding that trichostatin A and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid retarded growth of early instar blowfly larvae in vitro, and reduced the pupation rate. Trichostatin A was 8-fold less potent than the commercial insecticide cyromazine in inhibiting larval growth. Our results support further development of inhibitors of blowfly HDACs with selectivity over human and other mammalian HDACs as a new class of prospective insecticides for sheep blowfly. PMID:27120067

  17. An Old Story Retold: Loss of G1 Control Defines A Distinct Genomic Subtype of Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiyan; Bai, Jian; Abliz, Amir; Liu, Ying; Gong, Kenan; Li, Jingjing; Shi, Wenjie; Pan, Yaqi; Liu, Fangfang; Lai, Shujuan; Yang, Haijun; Lu, Changdong; Zhang, Lixin; Chen, Wei; Xu, Ruiping; Cai, Hong; Ke, Yang; Zeng, Changqing

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) has a high mortality rate. To determine the molecular basis of ESCC development, this study sought to identify characteristic genome-wide alterations in ESCC, including exonic mutations and structural alterations. The clinical implications of these genetic alterations were also analyzed. Exome sequencing and verification were performed for nine pairs of ESCC and the matched blood samples, followed by validation with additional samples using Sanger sequencing. Whole-genome SNP arrays were employed to detect copy number alteration (CNA) and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in 55 cases, including the nine ESCC samples subjected to exome sequencing. A total of 108 non-synonymous somatic mutations (NSSMs) in 102 genes were verified in nine patients. The chromatin modification process was found to be enriched in our gene ontology (GO) analysis. Tumor genomes with TP53 mutations were significantly more unstable than those without TP53 mutations. In terms of the landscape of genomic alterations, deletion of 9p21.3 covering CDKN2A/2B (30.9%), amplification of 11q13.3 covering CCND1 (30.9%), and TP53 point mutation (50.9%) occurred in two-thirds of the cases. These results suggest that the deregulation of the G1 phase during the cell cycle is a key event in ESCC. Furthermore, six minimal common regions were found to be significantly altered in ESCC samples and three of them, 9p21.3, 7p11.2, and 3p12.1, were associated with lymph node metastasis. With the high correlation of TP53 mutation and genomic instability in ESCC, the amplification of CCND1, the deletion of CDKN2A/2B, and the somatic mutation of TP53 appear to play pivotal roles via G1 deregulation and therefore helps to classify this cancer into different genomic subtypes. These findings provide clinical significance that could be useful in future molecular diagnoses and therapeutic targeting. PMID:26386145

  18. The STIM1-Orai1 pathway of store-operated Ca2+ entry controls the checkpoint in cell cycle G1/S transition

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yun-Wen; Chen, Yih-Fung; Chen, Ying-Ting; Chiu, Wen-Tai; Shen, Meng-Ru

    2016-01-01

    Ca2+ signaling is important to trigger the cell cycle progression, while it remains elusive in the regulatory mechanisms. Here we show that store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE), mediated by the interaction between STIM1 (an endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ sensor) and Orai1 (a cell membrane pore structure), controls the specific checkpoint of cell cycle. The fluctuating SOCE activity during cell cycle progression is universal in different cell types, in which SOCE is upregulated in G1/S transition and downregulated from S to G2/M transition. Pharmacological or siRNA inhibition of STIM1-Orai1 pathway of SOCE inhibits the phosphorylation of CDK2 and upregulates the expression of cyclin E, resulting in autophagy accompanied with cell cycle arrest in G1/S transition. The subsequently transient expression of STIM1 cDNA in STIM1−/− MEF rescues the phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of CDK2, suggesting that STIM1-mediated SOCE activation directly regulates CDK2 activity. Opposite to the important role of SOCE in controlling G1/S transition, the downregulated SOCE is a passive phenomenon from S to G2/M transition. This study uncovers SOCE-mediated Ca2+ microdomain that is the molecular basis for the Ca2+ sensitivity controlling G1/S transition. PMID:26917047

  19. The Hos2 Histone Deacetylase Controls Ustilago maydis Virulence through Direct Regulation of Mating-Type Genes

    PubMed Central

    Elías-Villalobos, Alberto; Fernández-Álvarez, Alfonso; Moreno-Sánchez, Ismael; Helmlinger, Dominique; Ibeas, José I.

    2015-01-01

    Morphological changes are critical for host colonisation in plant pathogenic fungi. These changes occur at specific stages of their pathogenic cycle in response to environmental signals and are mediated by transcription factors, which act as master regulators. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) play crucial roles in regulating gene expression, for example by locally modulating the accessibility of chromatin to transcriptional regulators. It has been reported that HDACs play important roles in the virulence of plant fungi. However, the specific environment-sensing pathways that control fungal virulence via HDACs remain poorly characterised. Here we address this question using the maize pathogen Ustilago maydis. We find that the HDAC Hos2 is required for the dimorphic switch and pathogenic development in U. maydis. The deletion of hos2 abolishes the cAMP-dependent expression of mating type genes. Moreover, ChIP experiments detect Hos2 binding to the gene bodies of mating-type genes, which increases in proportion to their expression level following cAMP addition. These observations suggest that Hos2 acts as a downstream component of the cAMP-PKA pathway to control the expression of mating-type genes. Interestingly, we found that Clr3, another HDAC present in U. maydis, also contributes to the cAMP-dependent regulation of mating-type gene expression, demonstrating that Hos2 is not the only HDAC involved in this control system. Overall, our results provide new insights into the role of HDACs in fungal phytopathogenesis. PMID:26317403

  20. The replication origin decision point is a mitogen-independent, 2-aminopurine-sensitive, G1-phase event that precedes restriction point control.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, J R; Gilbert, D M

    1997-01-01

    At a distinct point during G1 phase (the origin decision point [ODP]), Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell nuclei experience a transition (origin choice) that is required for specific recognition of the dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) origin locus by Xenopus egg extracts. We have investigated the relationship between the ODP and progression of CHO cells through G1 phase. Selection of the DHFR origin at the ODP was rapidly inhibited by treatment of early G1-phase cells with the protein kinase inhibitor 2-aminopurine (2-AP). Inhibition of the ODP required administration of 2-AP at least 3 h prior to phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (Rb) and the restriction point (R point). Cells deprived of either serum or isoleucine from metaphase throughout early G1 phase acquired the capacity to replicate in Xenopus egg extract (replication licensing) and subsequently passed through the ODP on the same schedule as cells cultured in complete growth medium. After growth arrest at the R point with hypophosphorylated Rb protein, serum- or isoleucine-deprived cells experienced a gradual loss of replication licensing. However, recognition of the DHFR origin by Xenopus egg cytosol remained stable in growth-arrested cells until the point at which all nuclei had lost the capacity to initiate replication. These results provide evidence that the ODP requires a mitogen-independent protein kinase that is activated after replication licensing and prior to R-point control. PMID:9234688

  1. The histone deacetylase HDA19 controls root cell elongation and modulates a subset of phosphate starvation responses in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun-Ying; Wu, Keqiang; Schmidt, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    The length of root epidermal cells and their patterning into files of hair-bearing and non-hair cells are genetically determined but respond with high plasticity to environmental cues. Limited phyto-availability of the essential mineral nutrient phosphate (Pi) increases the number of root hairs by longitudinal shortening of epidermal cells and by reprogramming the fate of cells in positions normally occupied by non-hair cells. Through analysis of the root morphology and transcriptional profiles from transgenic Arabidopsis lines with altered expression of the histone deacetylase HDA19, we show that in an intricate interplay of Pi availability and intrinsic factors, HDA19 controls the epidermal cell length, probably by altering the positional bias that dictates epidermal patterning. In addition, HDA19 regulates several Pi-responsive genes that encode proteins with important regulatory or metabolic roles in the acclimation to Pi deficiency. In particular, HDA19 affects genes encoding SPX (SYG1/Pho81/XPR) domain-containing proteins and genes involved in membrane lipid remodeling, a key response to Pi starvation that increases the free Pi in plants. Our data add a novel, non-transcriptionally regulated component of the Pi signaling network and emphasize the importance of reversible post-translational histone modification for the integration of external signals into intrinsic developmental and metabolic programs. PMID:26508133

  2. Geothermal district G1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-12-01

    Geothermal District G1 includes 37 northeastern California counties and six geothermal fields: Lake City, Susanville, Litchfield, Wendel, Amedee, and Casa Diablo. Electrical generation from geothermal resources occurs in three of the fields: Wendel, Amedee, and Casa Diablo. Low-temperature geothermal projects are underway throughout the district and are described in a road log format. The ten projects described are located at Big Bend, Glass Mountain, Bieber, Alturas, Cedarville, Lake City, Honey Lake Valley, Greenville, and in Sierra and Mono Counties.

  3. Antiepileptic drugs with histone deacetylase inhibition activity and prostate cancer risk: a population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Salminen, Jukka K; Tammela, Teuvo L J; Auvinen, Anssi; Murtola, Teemu J

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies suggest that antiepileptic drugs with histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor properties may have prostate cancer preventive effects. We evaluated the association between antiepileptic drug use and prostate cancer risk in a population-based case-control study. The study included all new prostate cancer cases diagnosed in Finland in 1995-2002 and matched controls (24,657 case-control pairs) identified from the Finnish Cancer Registry and the Population Register Center, respectively. Information on antiepileptic drug purchases was obtained from the national prescription reimbursement database. Odds ratios and their 95 % confidence intervals were estimated using age-adjusted and multivariable-adjusted conditional logistic regression analysis. Compared to never-users of antiepileptic drugs, the overall prostate cancer risk was decreased among users of phenobarbital, carbamazepine, and valproic acid (multivariable-adjusted odds ratio (OR) 0.47, 95 % CI 0.24-0.92; OR 0.82, 95 % CI 0.71-0.94, and OR 0.62, 95 % CI 0.42-0.92, respectively), but not among users of other antiepileptic drugs. Overall prostate cancer risk decreased in a dose-dependent manner by cumulative amount, duration and yearly dosage (intensity) of HDAC inhibitors valproic acid and carbamazepine. The risk of advanced prostate cancer was decreased only among carbamazepine users (OR 0.65, 95 % CI 0.44-0.96). Our results support possible prostate cancer preventive effects of HDAC inhibitors. However, also phenobarbital use was associated with decreased prostate cancer risk, despite not having HDAC inhibiting activity. The mechanism of action for antiepileptic drugs in prostate cancer deserves further study. PMID:27038166

  4. Histone Deacetylase 6-Controlled Hsp90 Acetylation Significantly Alters Mineralocorticoid Receptor Subcellular Dynamics But Not its Transcriptional Activity.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Canino, Rubén; Lorenzo-Díaz, Fabián; Jaisser, Frederic; Farman, Nicolette; Giraldez, Teresa; Alvarez de la Rosa, Diego

    2016-06-01

    The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily that transduces the biological effects of corticosteroids. Its best-characterized role is to enhance transepithelial sodium reabsorption in response to increased aldosterone levels. In addition, MR participates in other aldosterone- or glucocorticoid-controlled processes such as cardiovascular homeostasis, adipocyte differentiation or neurogenesis, and regulation of neuronal activity in the hippocampus. Like other steroid receptors, MR forms cytosolic heterocomplexes with heat shock protein (Hsp) 90), Hsp70, and other proteins such as immunophilins. Interaction with Hsp90 is thought to maintain MR in a ligand-binding competent conformation and to regulate ligand-dependent and -independent nucleocytoplasmatic shuttling. It has previously been shown that acetylation of residue K295 in Hsp90 regulates its interaction with the androgen receptor and glucocorticoid receptor (GR). In this work we hypothesized that Hsp90 acetylation provides a regulatory step to modulate MR cellular dynamics and activity. We used Hsp90 acetylation mimic mutant K295Q or nonacetylatable mutant K295R to examine whether MR nucleocytoplasmatic shuttling and gene transactivation are affected. Furthermore, we manipulated endogenous Hsp90 acetylation levels by controlling expression or activity of histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6), the enzyme responsible for deacetylation of Hsp90-K295. Our data demonstrates that HDAC6-mediated Hsp90 acetylation regulates MR cellular dynamics but it does not alter its function. This stands in contrast with the down-regulation of GR by HDAC6, suggesting that Hsp90 acetylation may play a role in balancing relative MR and GR activity when both factors are co-expressed in the same cell. PMID:27100623

  5. Equine herpesvirus type 1 replication is delayed in CD172a+ monocytic cells and controlled by histone deacetylases.

    PubMed

    Laval, Kathlyn; Favoreel, Herman W; Nauwynck, Hans J

    2015-01-01

    Equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) replicates in the epithelial cells of the upper respiratory tract and disseminates through the body via a cell-associated viraemia in monocytic cells, despite the presence of neutralizing antibodies. However, the mechanism by which EHV-1 hijacks immune cells and uses them as 'Trojan horses' in order to disseminate inside its host is still unclear. Here, we hypothesize that EHV-1 delays its replication in monocytic cells in order to avoid recognition by the immune system. We compared replication kinetics in vitro of EHV-1 in RK-13, a cell line fully susceptible to EHV-1 infection, and primary horse cells from the myeloid lineage (CD172a(+)). We found that EHV-1 replication was restricted to 4 % of CD172a(+) cells compared with 100 % in RK-13 cells. In susceptible CD172a(+) cells, the expression of immediate-early (IEP) and early (EICP22) proteins was delayed in the cell nuclei by 2-3 h post-infection (p.i.) compared with RK-13, and the formation of replicative compartments by 15 h p.i. Virus production in CD172a(+) cells was significantly lower (from 10(1.7) to 10(3.1) TCID50 per 10(5) inoculated cells) than in RK-13 (from 10(5) to 10(5.7) TCID50 per 10(5) inoculated cells). Less than 0.02 % of inoculated CD172a(+) cells produced and transmitted infectious virus to neighbouring cells. Pre-treatment of CD172a(+) cells with inhibitors of histone deacetylase activity increased and accelerated viral protein expression at very early times of infection and induced productive infection in CD172a(+) cells. Our results demonstrated that the restriction and delay of EHV-1 replication in CD172a(+) cells are part of an immune evasive strategy and involve silencing of EHV-1 gene expression associated with histone deacetylases. PMID:25239765

  6. Fus3p and Kss1p control G1 arrest in Saccharomyces cerevisiae through a balance of distinct arrest and proliferative functions that operate in parallel with Far1p.

    PubMed Central

    Cherkasova, V; Lyons, D M; Elion, E A

    1999-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, mating pheromones activate two MAP kinases (MAPKs), Fus3p and Kss1p, to induce G1 arrest prior to mating. Fus3p is known to promote G1 arrest by activating Far1p, which inhibits three Clnp/Cdc28p kinases. To analyze the contribution of Fus3p and Kss1p to G1 arrest that is independent of Far1p, we constructed far1 CLN strains that undergo G1 arrest from increased activation of the mating MAP kinase pathway. We find that Fus3p and Kss1p both control G1 arrest through multiple functions that operate in parallel with Far1p. Fus3p and Kss1p together promote G1 arrest by repressing transcription of G1/S cyclin genes (CLN1, CLN2, CLB5) by a mechanism that blocks their activation by Cln3p/Cdc28p kinase. In addition, Fus3p and Kss1p counteract G1 arrest through overlapping and distinct functions. Fus3p and Kss1p together increase the expression of CLN3 and PCL2 genes that promote budding, and Kss1p inhibits the MAP kinase cascade. Strikingly, Fus3p promotes proliferation by a novel function that is not linked to reduced Ste12p activity or increased levels of Cln2p/Cdc28p kinase. Genetic analysis suggests that Fus3p promotes proliferation through activation of Mcm1p transcription factor that upregulates numerous genes in G1 phase. Thus, Fus3p and Kss1p control G1 arrest through a balance of arrest functions that inhibit the Cdc28p machinery and proliferative functions that bypass this inhibition. PMID:10049917

  7. The Histone Deacetylase Sirt6 Controls Embryonic Stem Cell Fate Via Tet-Mediated Production of 5-Hydroxymethylcytosine

    PubMed Central

    Etchegaray, Jean-Pierre; Chavez, Lukas; Huang, Yun; Ross, Kenneth N.; Choi, Jiho; Martinez-Pastor, Barbara; Walsh, Ryan M.; Sommer, Cesar A.; Lienhard, Matthias; Kugel, Sita; Silberman, Dafne M.; Ramaswamy, Sridhar; Mostoslavsky, Gustavo; Hochedlinger, Konrad; Goren, Alon; Rao, Anjana; Mostoslavsky, Raul

    2015-01-01

    How embryonic stem cells (ESC) commit to specific cell lineages and ultimately yield all cell types of a fully formed organism remains a major question. ESC differentiation is accompanied by large-scale histone and DNA modifications, but the relations between these two categories of epigenetic changes are not understood. Here we demonstrate the hierarchical interplay between the histone deacetylase, sirtuin 6 (Sirt6), which targets acetylated histone H3 at lysines 9 and 56 (H3K9ac and H3K56ac), and the Tet (Ten-eleven translocation) enzymes, which convert 5-methylcytosine (5mC) into 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC). ESCs derived from Sirt6 knockout (S6KO) mice are skewed towards neuroectoderm development. This phenotype is associated with derepression of Oct4, Sox2 and Nanog, which in turn causes an upregulation of Tet enzymes and elevated production of 5hmC. Genome-wide analysis revealed an upregulation of neuroectoderm genes marked with 5hmC in S6KO ESCs, thereby implicating Tet enzymes in the neuroectoderm-skewed differentiation phenotype of S6KO ESCs, which is fully rescued upon knockdown of Tets. We demonstrate a new role for Sirt6 as a chromatin regulator safeguarding the balance between pluripotency and differentiation through Tet-dependent regulation of 5hmC levels. PMID:25915124

  8. Counteractive Control of Polarized Morphogenesis during Mating by Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Fus3 and G1 Cyclin-dependent Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lu; Qi, Maosong; Sheff, Mark A.

    2008-01-01

    Cell polarization in response to external cues is critical to many eukaryotic cells. During pheromone-induced mating in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) Fus3 induces polarization of the actin cytoskeleton toward a landmark generated by the pheromone receptor. Here, we analyze the role of Fus3 activation and cell cycle arrest in mating morphogenesis. The MAPK scaffold Ste5 is initially recruited to the plasma membrane in random patches that polarize before shmoo emergence. Polarized localization of Ste5 is important for shmooing. In fus3 mutants, Ste5 is recruited to significantly more of the plasma membrane, whereas recruitment of Bni1 formin, Cdc24 guanine exchange factor, and Ste20 p21-activated protein kinase are inhibited. In contrast, polarized recruitment still occurs in a far1 mutant that is also defective in G1 arrest. Remarkably, loss of Cln2 or Cdc28 cyclin-dependent kinase restores polarized localization of Bni1, Ste5, and Ste20 to a fus3 mutant. These and other findings suggest Fus3 induces polarized growth in G1 phase cells by down-regulating Ste5 recruitment and by inhibiting Cln/Cdc28 kinase, which prevents basal recruitment of Ste5, Cdc42-mediated asymmetry, and mating morphogenesis. PMID:18256288

  9. A microRNA downregulated in human cholangiocarcinoma controls cell cycle through multiple targets involved in the G1/S checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Olaru, Alexandru V.; Ghiaur, Gabriel; Yamanaka, Sumitaka; Luvsanjav, Delgermaa; An, Fangmei; Popescu, Irinel; Alexandrescu, Sorin; Allen, Sarah; Pawlik, Timothy M.; Torbenson, Michael; Georgiades, Christos; Roberts, Lewis R.; Gores, Gregory J.; Ferguson-Smith, Anne; Almeida, Maria I.; Calin, George A.; Mezey, Esteban; Selaru, Florin M.

    2011-01-01

    Background and rationale MicroRNAs (miRs) recently emerged as prominent regulators of cancer processes. In the current study, we aimed at elucidating regulatory pathways and mechanisms through which miR-494, one of the miR species found to be downregulated in CCA, participates in cancer homeostasis. miR-494 was identified as downregulated in CCA based on miR arrays. Its expression was verified with quantitative real time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR). To enforce miR expression, we employed both transfection methods, as well as a retroviral construct to stably overexpress miR-494. Main Results Upregulation of miR-494 in cancer cells decreased growth, consistent with a functional role. mRNA arrays of cells treated with miR-494, followed by pathway analysis, suggested that miR-494 impacts cell cycle regulation. Cell cycle analyses demonstrated that miR-494 induces a significant G1/S checkpoint reinforcement. Further analyses demonstrated that miR-494 downregulates multiple molecules involved in this transition checkpoint. Luciferase reporter assays demonstrated a direct interaction between miR-494 and the 3’-Untranslated Region (UTR) of Cyclin-dependent-kinase 6 (CDK6). Last, xenograft experiments demonstrated that miR-494 induces a significant cancer growth retardation in-vivo. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that miR-494 is downregulated in CCA and that its upregulation induces cancer cell growth retardation through multiple targets involved in G1-S transition. These findings support the paradigm that miRs are salient cellular signaling pathway modulators, and thus represent attractive therapeutic targets. miR-494 emerges as an important regulator of cholangiocarcinoma growth and its further study may lead to the development of novel therapeutics. PMID:21809359

  10. Histone deacetylases and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xia-xia; Zhou, Tian; Wang, Xin-An; Tong, Xiao-hong; Ding, Jia-wang

    2015-06-01

    Atherosclerosis is the most common pathological process that leads to cardiovascular diseases, a disease of large- and medium-sized arteries that is characterized by a formation of atherosclerotic plaques consisting of necrotic cores, calcified regions, accumulated modified lipids, smooth muscle cells (SMCs), endothelial cells, leukocytes, and foam cells. Recently, the question about how to suppress the occurrence of atherosclerosis and alleviate the progress of cardiovascular disease becomes the hot topic. Accumulating evidence suggests that histone deacetylases(HDACs) play crucial roles in arteriosclerosis. This review summarizes the effect of HDACs and HDAC inhibitors(HDACi) on the progress of atherosclerosis. PMID:25875381

  11. G1 checkpoint is compromised in mouse ESCs due to functional uncoupling of p53-p21Waf1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Suvorova, Irina I; Grigorash, Bogdan B; Chuykin, Ilya A; Pospelova, Tatiana V; Pospelov, Valery A

    2016-01-01

    Mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) lack of G1 checkpoint despite that irradiation (IR) activates ATM/ATR-mediated DDR signaling pathway. The IR-induced p53 localizes in the nuclei and up-regulates p21/Waf1 transcription but that does not lead to accumulation of p21/Waf1 protein. The negative control of the p21Waf1 expression appears to occur at 2 levels of regulation. First, both p21/Waf1 gene transcription and the p21/Waf1 protein content increase in mESCs treated with histone-deacetylase inhibitors, implying its epigenetic regulation. Second, proteasome inhibitors cause the p21/Waf1 accumulation, indicating that the protein is a subject of proteasome-dependent degradation in ESСs. Then, the dynamics of IR-induced p21Waf1 protein show its accumulation at long-term time points (3 and 5 days) that coincides with an increase in the proportion of G1-phase cells, down-regulation of Oct4 and Nanog pluripotent gene transcription and activation of endoderm-specific genes sox17 and afp. In addition, nutlin-dependent stabilization of p53 in mESC was also accompanied by the accumulation of p21/Waf1 as well as restoration of G1 checkpoint and an onset of differentiation. Thus, the lack of functional p21/Waf1 is indispensable for maintaining self-renewal and pluripotency of mESCs. PMID:26636245

  12. Molecular analysis of H2O2-induced senescent-like growth arrest in normal human fibroblasts: p53 and Rb control G1 arrest but not cell replication.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Q M; Bartholomew, J C; Campisi, J; Acosta, M; Reagan, J D; Ames, B N

    1998-01-01

    Human diploid fibroblasts lose the capacity to proliferate and enter a state termed replicative senescence after a finite number of cell divisions in culture.When treated with sub-lethal concentrations of H2O2, pre-senescent human fibroblasts enter long-term growth arrest resembling replicative senescence. To understand the molecular basis for the H2O2-induced growth arrest, we determined the cell cycle distribution, levels of p53 tumour suppressor and p21 cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor proteins, and the status of Rb phosphorylation in H2O2-treated cells. A 2-h pulse of H2O2 arrested the growth of IMR-90 fetal lung fibroblasts for at least 15 days. The arrested cells showed a G1 DNA content. The level of p53 protein increased 2- to 3-fold within 1.5 h after H2O2 exposure but returned to the control level by 48 h. The induction of p53 protein was dose dependent, beginning at 50-75 microM and reaching a maximum at 100-250 microM. The induction of p53 did not appear to correlate with the level of DNA damage as measured by the formation of 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine in DNA. The level of p21 protein increased about 18 h after H2O2 exposure and remained elevated for at least 21 days. During this period, Rb remained underphosphorylated. The induction of p53 by H2O2 was abolished by the iron chelator deferoxamine and the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. The human papillomavirus protein E6, when introduced into the cells, abolished the induction of p53, reduced the induction of p21 to a minimal level and allowed Rb phosphorylation and entry of the cells into S-phase. The human papillomavirus protein E7 reduced the overall level of Rb and also abolished H2O2-induced G1 arrest. Inactivating G1 arrest by E6, E7 or both did not restore the replicative ability of H2O2-treated cells. Thus H2O2-treated cells show a transient elevation of p53, high level of p21, lack of Rb phosphorylation, G1 arrest and inability to replicate when G1 arrest is inactivated. PMID:9576849

  13. Effect of histone deacetylase on prostate carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuanfeng; Xu, Qingchun; Liu, Guoyuan; Huang, Hong; Lin, Weiqiang; Huang, Yueying; Chi, Zepai; Chen, Shaochuan; Lan, Kaijian; Lin, Jiahua; Zhang, Yonghai

    2015-01-01

    Commonly occurred in aged males, the incidence of prostate carcinoma is increasing by years. Histone deacetylase (HDACs) as one key enzyme in regulating gene transcription has been found to be related with cancer occurrence. Trichostatin A (TSA) is one HDAC inhibitor for suppressing tumor growth. This study thus treated prostate carcinoma cell line PC3 with TSA, to analyze the effect of HDAC on the occurrence and progression of HDAC. PC3 cells were treated with gradient concentrations of TSA. MTT assay was employed to detect the proliferation of PC3 cells, while flow cytometry was used to detect the cell apoptosis and cell cycle. Apoptotic proteins including caspase-3, caspase-9 and bcl-2 were further quantified by Western blotting. MTT assays showed a dose- and time-dependent manner of TSA in inhibiting PC3 cell proliferation. Most of PC3 cells were arrested at G1 phase after treating with TSA. The apoptotic ratio of cells was also elevated by higher concentrations of drugs. Apoptotic proteins including caspase-3, caspase-9 and bcl-2 were all up-regulated by TSA. HDAC inhibitor can effectively suppress the proliferation of prostate carcinoma cells, which can be arrested at G1 phase. The elevated apoptotic ratio was caused by up-regulation of apoptosis-related proteins caspase-3, caspase-9 and bcl-2, in both dose- and time-dependent manners. PMID:26823840

  14. The E2F functional analogue SBF recruits the Rpd3(L) HDAC, via Whi5 and Stb1, and the FACT chromatin reorganizer, to yeast G1 cyclin promoters.

    PubMed

    Takahata, Shinya; Yu, Yaxin; Stillman, David J

    2009-11-01

    Regulation of the CLN1 and CLN2 G1 cyclin genes controls cell cycle progression. The SBF activator binds to these promoters but is kept inactive by the Whi5 and Stb1 inhibitors. The Cdc28 cyclin-dependent kinase phosphorylates Whi5, ending the inhibition. Our chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) experiments show that SBF, Whi5 and Stb1 recruit both Cdc28 and the Rpd3(L) histone deacetylase to CLN promoters, extending the analogy with mammalian G1 cyclin promoters in which Rb recruits histone deacetylases. Finally, we show that the SBF subunit Swi6 recruits the FACT chromatin reorganizer to SBF- and MBF-regulated genes. Mutations affecting FACT reduce the transient nucleosome eviction seen at these promoters during a normal cell cycle and also reduce expression. Temperature-sensitive mutations affecting FACT and Cdc28 can be suppressed by disruption of STB1 and WHI5, suggesting that one critical function of FACT and Cdc28 is overcoming chromatin repression at G1 cyclin promoters. Thus, SBF recruits complexes to promoters that either enhance (FACT) or repress (Rpd3L) accessibility to chromatin, and also recruits the kinase that activates START. PMID:19745812

  15. Saccharomyces cerevisiae TORC1 Controls Histone Acetylation by Signaling Through the Sit4/PP6 Phosphatase to Regulate Sirtuin Deacetylase Nuclear Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Workman, Jason J.; Chen, Hongfeng; Laribee, R. Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    The epigenome responds to changes in the extracellular environment, yet how this information is transmitted to the epigenetic regulatory machinery is unclear. Using a Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast model, we demonstrate that target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1) signaling, which is activated by nitrogen metabolism and amino acid availability, promotes site-specific acetylation of histone H3 and H4 N-terminal tails by opposing the activity of the sirtuin deacetylases Hst3 and Hst4. TORC1 does so through suppression of the Tap42-regulated Sit4 (PP6) phosphatase complex, as sit4Δ rescues histone acetylation under TORC1-repressive conditions. We further demonstrate that TORC1 inhibition, and subsequent PP6 activation, causes a selective, rapid, nuclear accumulation of Hst4, which correlates with decreased histone acetylation. This increased Hst4 nuclear localization precedes an elevation in Hst4 protein expression, which is attributed to reduced protein turnover, suggesting that nutrient signaling through TORC1 may limit Hst4 nuclear accumulation to facilitate Hst4 degradation and maintain histone acetylation. This pathway is functionally relevant to TORC1 signaling since the stress sensitivity of a nonessential TORC1 mutant (tco89Δ) to hydroxyurea and arsenic can be reversed by combining tco89Δ with either hst3Δ, hst4Δ, or sit4Δ. Surprisingly, while hst3Δ or hst4Δ rescues the sensitivity tco89Δ has to low concentrations of the TORC1 inhibitor rapamycin, sit4Δ fails to do so. These results suggest Sit4 provides an additional function necessary for TORC1-dependent cell growth and proliferation. Collectively, this study defines a novel mechanism by which TORC1 suppresses a PP6-regulated sirtuin deacetylase pathway to couple nutrient signaling to epigenetic regulation. PMID:27343235

  16. Characterization and biological significance of deacetylase

    SciTech Connect

    Dipaola, E.A.

    1985-01-01

    An attempt is made to clarify the mechanism by which the one known deacetylase inhibitor, sodium butyrate, works and to identify other inhibitors of deacetylase activity. In doing so it was hoped to characterize the enzyme and to better understand its role in regulating genomic expression. The data showed that deacetylases not only showed activity toward their natural histone substrates, but also toward free acetyllysine and to a lesser degree toward acetylcholine, the latter being the natural substrate for acetylcholinesterases. Conversely, acetylcholinesterase was shown to be able to deacetylate groups from acetyllysine and acetylated histones. Decamethonium bromide, a well-known binder of acetylcholinesterase would not absorb the deacetylase. Diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP), an anti-cholinesterase, exhibited no inhibitory effect on deacetylase activity, while acetylcholinesterase showed little or no sensitivity to butyrate inhibition. These findings along with the use of /sup 3/H-DFP binding to fingerprint enzyme bands on gels became the basic criteria for distinguishing between deacetylase and acetylcholinesterase activity.

  17. Beyond Histone and Deacetylase: An Overview of Cytoplasmic Histone Deacetylases and Their Nonhistone Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Ya-Li; Yang, Wen-Ming

    2011-01-01

    Acetylation of lysines is a prominent form of modification in mammalian proteins. Deacetylation of proteins is catalyzed by histone deacetylases, traditionally named after their role in histone deacetylation, transcriptional modulation, and epigenetic regulation. Despite the link between histone deacetylases and chromatin structure, some of the histone deacetylases reside in various compartments in the cytoplasm. Here, we review how these cytoplasmic histone deacetylases are regulated, the identification of nonhistone substrates, and the functional implications of their nondeacetylase enzymatic activities. PMID:21234400

  18. Rho-kinase signaling controls nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of class IIa Histone Deacetylase (HDAC7) and transcriptional activation of orphan nuclear receptor NR4A1

    SciTech Connect

    Compagnucci, Claudia; Barresi, Sabina; Petrini, Stefania; Bertini, Enrico; Zanni, Ginevra

    2015-04-03

    Rho-kinase (ROCK) has been well documented to play a key role in RhoA-induced actin remodeling. ROCK activation results in myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation either by direct action on MLC kinase (MLCK) or by inhibition of MLC phosphatase (MLCP), modulating actin–myosin contraction. We found that inhibition of the ROCK pathway in induced pluripotent stem cells, leads to nuclear export of HDAC7 and transcriptional activation of the orphan nuclear receptor NR4A1 while in cells with constitutive ROCK hyperactivity due to loss of function of the RhoGTPase activating protein Oligophrenin-1 (OPHN1), the orphan nuclear receptor NR4A1 is downregulated. Our study identify a new target of ROCK signaling via myosin phosphatase subunit (MYPT1) and Histone Deacetylase (HDAC7) at the nuclear level and provide new insights in the cellular functions of ROCK. - Highlights: • ROCK regulates nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of HDAC7 via phosphorylation of MYPT1. • Nuclear export of HDAC7 and upregulation of NR4A1 occurs with low ROCK activity. • High levels of ROCK activity due to OPHN1 loss of function downregulate NR4A1.

  19. Knockdown of Selenocysteine-Specific Elongation Factor in Amblyomma maculatum Alters the Pathogen Burden of Rickettsia parkeri with Epigenetic Control by the Sin3 Histone Deacetylase Corepressor Complex

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, Steven W.; Browning, Rebecca E.; Budachetri, Khemraj; Ribeiro, José M. C.; Karim, Shahid

    2013-01-01

    Selenocysteine is the 21st naturally-occurring amino acid. Selenoproteins have diverse functions and many remain uncharacterized, but they are typically associated with antioxidant activity. The incorporation of selenocysteine into the nascent polypeptide chain recodes the TGA stop codon and this process depends upon a number of essential factors including the selenocysteine elongation factor (SEF). The transcriptional expression of SEF did not change significantly in tick midguts throughout the blood meal, but decreased in salivary glands to 20% at the end of the fast feeding phase. Since selenoprotein translation requires this specialized elongation factor, we targeted this gene for knockdown by RNAi to gain a global view of the role selenoproteins play in tick physiology. We found no significant differences in tick engorgement and embryogenesis but detected no antioxidant capacity in tick saliva. The transcriptional profile of selenoproteins in R. parkeri-infected Amblyomma maculatum revealed declined activity of selenoprotein M and catalase and increased activity of selenoprotein O, selenoprotein S, and selenoprotein T. Furthermore, the pathogen burden was significantly altered in SEF-knockdowns. We then determined the global impact of SEF-knockdown by RNA-seq, and mapped huge shifts in secretory gene expression that could be the result of downregulation of the Sin3 histone deacetylase corepressor complex. PMID:24282621

  20. Histone Deacetylases in Cartilage Homeostasis and Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Carpio, Lomeli R; Westendorf, Jennifer J

    2016-08-01

    The involvement of the epigenome in complex diseases is becoming increasingly clear and more feasible to study due to new genomic and computational technologies. Moreover, therapies altering the activities of proteins that modify and interpret the epigenome are available to treat cancers and neurological disorders. Many additional uses have been proposed for these drugs based on promising preclinical results, including in arthritis models. Understanding the effects of epigenomic drugs on the skeleton is of interest because of its importance in maintaining overall health and fitness. In this review, we summarize ongoing advancements in how one class of epigenetic modifiers, histone deacetylases (Hdacs), controls normal cartilage development and homeostasis, as well as recent work aimed at understanding the alterations in the expression and activities of these enzymes in osteoarthritis (OA). We also review recent studies utilizing Hdac inhibitors and discuss the potential therapeutic benefits and limitations of these drugs for preventing cartilage destruction in OA. PMID:27402109

  1. Strategic Cell-Cycle Regulatory Features That Provide Mammalian Cells with Tunable G1 Length and Reversible G1 Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Pfeuty, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    Transitions between consecutive phases of the eukaryotic cell cycle are driven by the catalytic activity of selected sets of cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks). Yet, their occurrence and precise timing is tightly scheduled by a variety of means including Cdk association with inhibitory/adaptor proteins (CKIs). Here we focus on the regulation of G1-phase duration by the end of which cells of multicelled organisms must decide whether to enter S phase or halt, and eventually then, differentiate, senesce or die to obey the homeostatic rules of their host. In mammalian cells, entry in and progression through G1 phase involve sequential phosphorylation and inactivation of the retinoblastoma Rb proteins, first, by cyclin D-Cdk4,6 with the help of CKIs of the Cip/Kip family and, next, by the cyclin E-Cdk2 complexes that are negatively regulated by Cip/Kip proteins. Using a dynamical modeling approach, we show that the very way how the Rb and Cip/Kip regulatory modules interact differentially with cyclin D-Cdk4,6 and cyclin E-Cdk2 provides to mammalian cells a powerful means to achieve an exquisitely-sensitive control of G1-phase duration and fully reversible G1 arrests. Consistently, corruption of either one of these two modules precludes G1 phase elongation and is able to convert G1 arrests from reversible to irreversible. This study unveils fundamental design principles of mammalian G1-phase regulation that are likely to confer to mammalian cells the ability to faithfully control the occurrence and timing of their division process in various conditions. PMID:22558136

  2. Epigenetic targeting of histone deacetylase: therapeutic potential in Parkinson's disease?

    PubMed

    Harrison, Ian F; Dexter, David T

    2013-10-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the most common movement disorder affecting more than 4million people worldwide. The primary motor symptoms of the disease are due to degeneration of dopaminergic nigrostriatal neurons. Dopamine replacement therapies have therefore revolutionised disease management by partially controlling these symptoms. However these drugs can produce debilitating side effects when used long term and do not protect degenerating neurons against death. Recent evidence has highlighted a pathological imbalance in PD between the acetylation and deacetylation of the histone proteins around which deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is coiled, in favour of excessive histone deacetylation. This mechanism of adding/removing acetyl groups to histone lysine residues is one of many epigenetic regulatory processes which control the expression of genes, many of which will be essential for neuronal survival. Hence, such epigenetic modifications may have a pathogenic role in PD. It has therefore been hypothesised that if this pathological imbalance can be corrected with the use of histone deacetylase inhibiting agents then neurodegeneration observed in PD can be ameliorated. This article will review the current literature with regard to epigenetic changes in PD and the use of histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) in PD: examining the evidence of the neuroprotective effects of numerous HDACIs in cellular and animal models of Parkinsonian cell death. Ultimately answering the question: does epigenetic targeting of histone deacetylases hold therapeutic potential in PD? PMID:23711791

  3. Cloning of murine G1RP, a novel gene related to Drosophila melanogaster g1.

    PubMed

    Baker, S J; Reddy, E P

    2000-05-01

    To study the nature of genes that are induced during the apoptotic death of myeloid precursor cells, we performed representational difference analysis (RDA) using 32Dcl3 myeloblastic cells that were deprived of IL-3 for 24h. We have isolated a novel cDNA (g1-related protein, G1RP) that is homologous to g1, a Drosophila melanogaster zinc-finger protein that is expressed in the mesoderm. Northern blot analysis using RNAs derived from 32Dcl3 cells that have been grown in the absence of IL-3 demonstrates that the G1RP message is upregulated in these cells following the removal of IL-3, suggesting that this gene may regulate growth factor withdrawal-induced apoptosis of myeloid precursor cells. PMID:10806348

  4. Colostrogenesis: IgG1 transcytosis mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Baumrucker, Craig R; Bruckmaier, Rupert M

    2014-03-01

    Biological transport of intact proteins across epithelial cells has been documented for many absorptive and secretory tissues. Immunoglobulins were some of the earliest studied proteins in this category. The transcellular transport (transcytosis) of immunoglobulins in neonatal health and development has been recognized; the process is especially significant with ungulates because they do not transcytose immunoglobulins across the placenta to the neonate. Rather, they depend upon mammary secretion of colostrum and intestinal absorption of immunoglobulins in order to provide intestinal and systemic defense until the young ungulate develops its own humoral defense mechanisms. The neonatal dairy calf's ability to absorb immunoglobulins from colostrum is assisted by a ~24 h "open gut" phenomenon where large proteins pass the intestinal epithelial cells and enter the systemic system. However, a critical problem recognized for newborn dairy calves is that an optimum mass of colostrum Immunoglobulin G (IgG) needs to be absorbed within that 24 h window in order to provide maximal resistance to disease. Many calves do not achieve the optimum because of poor quality colostrum. While many studies have focused on calf absorption, the principal cause of the problem resides with the extreme variation (g to kg) in the mammary gland's capacity to transfer blood IgG1 into colostrum. Colostrum is a unique mammary secretory product that is formed during late pregnancy when mammary cells are proliferating and differentiating in preparation for lactation. In addition to the transcytosis of immunoglobulins, the mammary gland also concentrates a number of circulating hormones into colostrum. Remarkably, the mechanisms in the formation of colostrum in ungulates have been rather modestly studied. The mechanisms and causes of this variation in mammary gland transcytosis of IgG1 are examined, evaluated, and in some cases, explained. PMID:24474529

  5. Histone deacetylase inhibitors as cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Clawson, Gary A

    2016-08-01

    Cancer cells contain significant alterations in their epigenomic landscape, which several enzyme families reversibly contribute to. One class of epigenetic modifying enzymes is that of histone deacetylases (HDAC), which are receiving considerable scrutiny clinically as a therapeutic target in many cancers. The underlying rationale is that inhibiting HDACs will reverse dysregulated target gene expression by modulating functional histone (or other) acetylation marks. This perspective will discuss a recent paper by Markozashvili and co-workers which appeared in Gene, which indicates that the mechanisms by which HDAC inhibitors (HDACis) alter the epigenetic landscape include widespread alternative effects beyond simply controlling regional epigenetic marks. HDACs are involved in many processes/diseases, and it is not surprising that HDACis have considerable off-target effects, and thus a major effort is being directed toward identification of inhibitors which are selective for HDAC isoforms often uniquely implicated in various cancers. This Perspective will also discuss some representative work with inhibitors targeting individual HDAC classes or isoforms. At present, it is not really clear that isoform-specific HDACis will avoid non-selective effects on other unrecognized activities of HDACs. PMID:27568481

  6. FERRITIN H INDUCTION BY HISTONE DEACETYLASE INHIBITORS

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Di, Xiumin; Torti, Suzy V.; Torti, Frank M.

    2010-01-01

    Because both iron deficiency and iron excess are deleterious to normal cell function, the intracellular level of iron must be tightly controlled. Ferritin, an iron binding protein, regulates iron balance by storing iron in a bioavailable but non-toxic form. Ferritin protein comprises two subunits: ferritin H, which contains ferroxidase activity, and ferritin L. Here we demonstrate that ferritin H mRNA and protein are induced by histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDAC inhibitors), a promising class of anti-cancer drugs, in cultured human cancer cells. Deletion analysis and EMSA assays reveal that the induction of ferritin H occurs at a transcriptional level via Sp1 and NF-Y binding sites near the transcriptional start site of the human ferritin H promoter. Classically, HDAC inhibitors modulate gene expression by increasing histone acetylation. However, ChIP assays demonstrate that HDAC inhibitors induce ferritin H transcription by increasing NF-Y binding to the ferritin H promoter without changes in histone acetylation. These results identify ferritin H as a new target of HDAC inhibitors, and recruitment of NF-Y as a novel mechanism of action of HDAC inhibitors. PMID:20385107

  7. Histone deacetylase inhibitors as cancer therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells contain significant alterations in their epigenomic landscape, which several enzyme families reversibly contribute to. One class of epigenetic modifying enzymes is that of histone deacetylases (HDAC), which are receiving considerable scrutiny clinically as a therapeutic target in many cancers. The underlying rationale is that inhibiting HDACs will reverse dysregulated target gene expression by modulating functional histone (or other) acetylation marks. This perspective will discuss a recent paper by Markozashvili and co-workers which appeared in Gene, which indicates that the mechanisms by which HDAC inhibitors (HDACis) alter the epigenetic landscape include widespread alternative effects beyond simply controlling regional epigenetic marks. HDACs are involved in many processes/diseases, and it is not surprising that HDACis have considerable off-target effects, and thus a major effort is being directed toward identification of inhibitors which are selective for HDAC isoforms often uniquely implicated in various cancers. This Perspective will also discuss some representative work with inhibitors targeting individual HDAC classes or isoforms. At present, it is not really clear that isoform-specific HDACis will avoid non-selective effects on other unrecognized activities of HDACs. PMID:27568481

  8. Monoclonal immunoglobulin G1-kappa fibrillary glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Grove, P; Neale, P H; Peck, M; Schiller, B; Haas, M

    1998-01-01

    We report here a case of fibrillary glomerulonephritis arising in a 43-year-old man with a polyclonal gammopathy, who presented with progressive renal insufficiency, microscopic hematuria, and mild proteinuria (0.7 g/d). Ultrastructural studies showed deposits of randomly oriented fibrils in the glomerular mesangium and adjacent portions of some glomerular basement membranes, with a mean fibril thickness of 14.3 nm, highly consistent with fibrillary glomerulonephritis. The Congo red stain was negative on histologic sections. Immunofluorescence studies revealed strong mesangial and focal glomerular capillary staining for immunoglobulin (Ig) G, complement (C) 3, and kappa light chains, with minimal staining for IgA, IgM, C1q, or lambda light chains. The IgG present was entirely of the IgG1 subclass. This case is quite unusual for fibrillary glomerulonephritis, which typically presents with polyclonal IgG deposits and IgG4 as the dominant IgG subclass present. Monoclonal deposits are more frequently associated with immunotactoid glomerulopathy, characterized ultrastructurally by microtubule-like structures 30 to 50 nmn thick, often in parallel arrays. The present case illustrates that although fibrillary glomerulonephritis and immunotactoid glomerulopathy might be distinguishable on ultrastructural grounds, there is overlap between these two entities with respect to the potential composition of the glomerular deposits present. PMID:9556416

  9. Soluble Monomeric IgG1 Fc*

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Tianlei; Chen, Weizao; Gong, Rui; Feng, Yang; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.

    2012-01-01

    Antibody fragments are emerging as promising biopharmaceuticals because of their relatively small size and other unique properties. However, compared with full-size antibodies, these antibody fragments lack the ability to bind the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) and have reduced half-lives. Fc engineered to bind antigens but preserve interactions with FcRn and Fc fused with monomeric proteins currently are being developed as candidate therapeutics with prolonged half-lives; in these and other cases, Fc is a dimer of two CH2-CH3 chains. To further reduce the size of Fc but preserve FcRn binding, we generated three human soluble monomeric IgG1 Fcs (mFcs) by using a combination of structure-based rational protein design combined with multiple screening strategies. These mFcs were highly soluble and retained binding to human FcRn comparable with that of Fc. These results provide direct experimental evidence that efficient binding to human FcRn does not require human Fc dimerization. The newly identified mFcs are promising for the development of mFc fusion proteins and for novel types of mFc-based therapeutic antibodies of small size and long half-lives. PMID:22518843

  10. Hepatic steatosis in transgenic mice overexpressing human histone deacetylase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ai-Guo; Seo, Sang-Beom; Moon, Hyung-Bae; Shin, Hye-Jun; Kim, Dong Hoon; Kim, Jin-Man; Lee, Tae-Hoon; Kwon, Ho Jeong; Yu, Dae-Yeul . E-mail: dyyu10@kribb.re.kr; Lee, Dong-Seok . E-mail: lee10@kribb.re.kr

    2005-05-06

    It is generally thought that histone deacetylases (HDACs) play important roles in the transcriptional regulation of genes. However, little information is available concerning the specific functions of individual HDACs in disease states. In this study, two transgenic mice lines were established which harbored the human HDAC1 gene. Overexpressed HDAC1 was detected in the nuclei of transgenic liver cells, and HDAC1 enzymatic activity was significantly higher in the transgenic mice than in control littermates. The HDAC1 transgenic mice exhibited a high incidence of hepatic steatosis and nuclear pleomorphism. Molecular studies showed that HDAC1 may contribute to nuclear pleomorphism through the p53/p21 signaling pathway.

  11. The Microtubule-associated Histone Deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) Regulates Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) Endocytic Trafficking and Degradation*

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ya-sheng; Hubbert, Charlotte C.; Yao, Tso-Pang

    2010-01-01

    Histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) is a microtubule-associated deacetylase with tubulin deacetylase activity, and it binds dynein motors. Recent studies revealed that microtubule acetylation affects the affinity and processivity of microtubule motors. These unique properties implicate a role for HDAC6 in intracellular organelle transport. Here, we show that HDAC6 associates with the endosomal compartments and controls epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) trafficking and degradation. We found that loss of HDAC6 promoted EGFR degradation. Mechanistically, HDAC6 deficiency did not cause aberrant EGFR internalization and recycling. Rather, it resulted in accelerated segregation of EGFR from early endosomes and premature delivery of EGFR to the late endosomal and lysosomal compartments. The deregulated EGFR endocytic trafficking was accompanied by an increase in microtubule-dependent movement of EGFR-bearing vesicles, revealing a novel regulation of EGFR vesicular trafficking and degradation by the microtubule deacetylase HDAC6. PMID:20133936

  12. Post-translational Modifications Regulate Class IIa Histone Deacetylase (HDAC) Function in Health and Disease*

    PubMed Central

    Mathias, Rommel A.; Guise, Amanda J.; Cristea, Ileana M.

    2015-01-01

    Class IIa histone deacetylases (HDACs4, -5, -7, and -9) modulate the physiology of the human cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, nervous, and immune systems. The regulatory capacity of this family of enzymes stems from their ability to shuttle between nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments in response to signal-driven post-translational modification. Here, we review the current knowledge of modifications that control spatial and temporal histone deacetylase functions by regulating subcellular localization, transcriptional functions, and cell cycle-dependent activity, ultimately impacting on human disease. We discuss the contribution of these modifications to cardiac and vascular hypertrophy, myoblast differentiation, neuronal cell survival, and neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:25616866

  13. Histone Deacetylases and Mechanisms of Regulation of Gene Expression (Histone deacetylases in cancer)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hong Ping; Zhao, Yu Tina; Zhao, Ting C

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, it has become widely recognized that histone modification plays a pivotal role in controlling gene expression, and is involved in a wide spectrum of disease regulation. Histone acetylation is a major modification that affects gene transcription and is controlled by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDAC). HATs acetylate lysines of histone proteins, resulting in relaxation of chromatin structure, and they also facilitate gene activation. Conversely, HDACs remove acetyl groups from hyperacetylated histones and suppress general gene transcription. In addition to histones, numerous non-histone proteins can be acetylated and deacetylated, and they are also involved in a wide range of disease regulation. To date, there are 18 HDACs in mammals classified into four classes based on homology to yeast HDACs. Accumulating evidence has revealed that HDACs play crucial roles in a variety of biological processes including inflammation, cell proliferation, apoptosis, and carcinogenesis. In this review, we summarize the current state of knowledge of HDACs in carcinogenesis and describe the involvement of HDACs in cancer-associated molecular processes. It is hoped than our understanding of the role of HDACs in cancer will lead to the design of more potent and specific drugs targeting selective HDAC proteins for the treatment of the disease. PMID:25746103

  14. 26 CFR 301.6503(g)-1 - Suspension pending correction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Suspension pending correction. 301.6503(g)-1 Section 301.6503(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED... Collection § 301.6503(g)-1 Suspension pending correction. The running of the periods of limitations...

  15. 26 CFR 1.167(g)-1 - Basis for depreciation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Basis for depreciation. 1.167(g)-1 Section 1.167(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Itemized Deductions for Individuals and Corporations § 1.167(g)-1...

  16. 26 CFR 1.149(g)-1 - Hedge bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hedge bonds. 1.149(g)-1 Section 1.149(g)-1...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Tax Exemption Requirements for State and Local Bonds § 1.149(g)-1 Hedge bonds... for purposes of section 149(g) and this section. In addition, the following terms have the...

  17. 26 CFR 1.56(g)-1 - Adjusted current earnings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Adjusted current earnings. 1.56(g)-1 Section 1.56(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY INCOME TAX INCOME TAXES Regulations Applicable to Taxable Years Beginning in 1969 and Ending in 1970 § 1.56(g)-1 Adjusted current earnings. (a) Adjustment for...

  18. 26 CFR 1.56(g)-1 - Adjusted current earnings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Adjusted current earnings. 1.56(g)-1 Section 1.56(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY INCOME TAX INCOME TAXES Regulations Applicable to Taxable Years Beginning in 1969 and Ending in 1970 § 1.56(g)-1 Adjusted current earnings. (a) Adjustment for...

  19. 26 CFR 1.56(g)-1 - Adjusted current earnings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Adjusted current earnings. 1.56(g)-1 Section 1.56(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY INCOME TAX INCOME TAXES Regulations Applicable to Taxable Years Beginning in 1969 and Ending in 1970 § 1.56(g)-1 Adjusted current earnings. (a) Adjustment for...

  20. 26 CFR 1.56(g)-1 - Adjusted current earnings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Adjusted current earnings. 1.56(g)-1 Section 1.56(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY INCOME TAX INCOME TAXES Regulations Applicable to Taxable Years Beginning in 1969 and Ending in 1970 § 1.56(g)-1 Adjusted current earnings. (a) Adjustment for...

  1. 26 CFR 1.56(g)-1 - Adjusted current earnings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Adjusted current earnings. 1.56(g)-1 Section 1.56(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY INCOME TAX INCOME TAXES Regulations Applicable to Taxable Years Beginning in 1969 and Ending in 1970 § 1.56(g)-1 Adjusted current earnings. (a) Adjustment for...

  2. 26 CFR 1.514(g)-1 - Business lease indebtedness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Business lease indebtedness. 1.514(g)-1 Section 1.514(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME... § 1.514(g)-1 Business lease indebtedness. (a) Definition. The term business lease indebtedness...

  3. 26 CFR 1.149(g)-1 - Hedge bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hedge bonds. 1.149(g)-1 Section 1.149(g)-1...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Tax Exemption Requirements for State and Local Bonds § 1.149(g)-1 Hedge bonds... for purposes of section 149(g) and this section. In addition, the following terms have the...

  4. 26 CFR 1.167(g)-1 - Basis for depreciation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Basis for depreciation. 1.167(g)-1 Section 1.167(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Itemized Deductions for Individuals and Corporations § 1.167(g)-1...

  5. 26 CFR 301.6503(g)-1 - Suspension pending correction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Suspension pending correction. 301.6503(g)-1 Section 301.6503(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED... Collection § 301.6503(g)-1 Suspension pending correction. The running of the periods of limitations...

  6. 26 CFR 1.167(g)-1 - Basis for depreciation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Basis for depreciation. 1.167(g)-1 Section 1.167(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Itemized Deductions for Individuals and Corporations § 1.167(g)-1...

  7. 26 CFR 1.149(g)-1 - Hedge bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hedge bonds. 1.149(g)-1 Section 1.149(g)-1...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Tax Exemption Requirements for State and Local Bonds § 1.149(g)-1 Hedge bonds... for purposes of section 149(g) and this section. In addition, the following terms have the...

  8. 26 CFR 1.167(g)-1 - Basis for depreciation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Basis for depreciation. 1.167(g)-1 Section 1.167(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Itemized Deductions for Individuals and Corporations § 1.167(g)-1...

  9. 26 CFR 301.6503(g)-1 - Suspension pending correction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Suspension pending correction. 301.6503(g)-1 Section 301.6503(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED... Collection § 301.6503(g)-1 Suspension pending correction. The running of the periods of limitations...

  10. 26 CFR 1.149(g)-1 - Hedge bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hedge bonds. 1.149(g)-1 Section 1.149(g)-1...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Tax Exemption Requirements for State and Local Bonds § 1.149(g)-1 Hedge bonds... for purposes of section 149(g) and this section. In addition, the following terms have the...

  11. 26 CFR 31.3402(g)-1 - Supplemental wage payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Supplemental wage payments. 31.3402(g)-1 Section 31.3402(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED... SOURCE Collection of Income Tax at Source § 31.3402(g)-1 Supplemental wage payments. (a) In general...

  12. 26 CFR 301.6503(g)-1 - Suspension pending correction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Suspension pending correction. 301.6503(g)-1 Section 301.6503(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED... Collection § 301.6503(g)-1 Suspension pending correction. The running of the periods of limitations...

  13. 26 CFR 31.3402(g)-1 - Supplemental wage payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Supplemental wage payments. 31.3402(g)-1 Section 31.3402(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED... SOURCE Collection of Income Tax at Source § 31.3402(g)-1 Supplemental wage payments. (a) In general...

  14. 26 CFR 301.6503(g)-1 - Suspension pending correction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Suspension pending correction. 301.6503(g)-1 Section 301.6503(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED... Collection § 301.6503(g)-1 Suspension pending correction. The running of the periods of limitations...

  15. 26 CFR 1.167(g)-1 - Basis for depreciation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Basis for depreciation. 1.167(g)-1 Section 1.167(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Itemized Deductions for Individuals and Corporations § 1.167(g)-1...

  16. 26 CFR 1.149(g)-1 - Hedge bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hedge bonds. 1.149(g)-1 Section 1.149(g)-1...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Tax Exemption Requirements for State and Local Bonds § 1.149(g)-1 Hedge bonds... for purposes of section 149(g) and this section. In addition, the following terms have the...

  17. Activating Transcription Factor 3 Expression as a Marker of Response to the Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor Pracinostat.

    PubMed

    Sooraj, Dhanya; Xu, Dakang; Cain, Jason E; Gold, Daniel P; Williams, Bryan R G

    2016-07-01

    Improved treatment strategies are required for bladder cancer due to frequent recurrence of low-grade tumors and poor survival rate from high-grade tumors with current therapies. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi), approved as single agents for specific lymphomas, have shown promising preclinical results in solid tumors but could benefit from identification of biomarkers for response. Loss of activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) expression is a feature of bladder tumor progression and correlates with poor survival. We investigated the utility of measuring ATF3 expression as a marker of response to the HDACi pracinostat in bladder cancer models. Pracinostat treatment of bladder cancer cell lines reactivated the expression of ATF3, correlating with significant alteration in proliferative, migratory, and anchorage-dependent growth capacities. Pracinostat also induced growth arrest at the G0-G1 cell-cycle phase, coincident with the activation of tumor suppressor genes. In mouse xenograft bladder cancer models, pracinostat treatment significantly reduced tumor volumes compared with controls, accompanied by reexpression of ATF3 in nonproliferating cells from early to late stage of therapy and in parallel induced antiangiogenesis and apoptosis. Importantly, cells in which ATF3 expression was depleted were less sensitive to pracinostat treatment in vitro, exhibiting significantly higher proliferative and migratory properties. In vivo, control xenograft tumors were significantly more responsive to treatment than ATF3 knockdown xenografts. Thus, reactivation of ATF3 is an important factor in determining sensitivity to pracinostat treatment, both in vitro and in vivo, and could serve as a potential biomarker of response and provide a rationale for therapeutic utility in HDACi-mediated treatments for bladder cancer. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(7); 1726-39. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27196751

  18. Selectively Targeting Prostate Cancer with Antiandrogen Equipped Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Gryder, Berkley E.; Akbashev, Michelle J.; Rood, Michael K.; Raftery, Eric D.; Meyers, Warren M.; Dillard, Paulette; Khan, Shafiq; Oyelere, Adegboyega K.

    2013-01-01

    Diverse cellular processes relevant to cancer progression are regulated by the acetylation status of proteins. Among such processes is chromatin remodeling via histone proteins, controlled by opposing histone deacetylase (HDAC) and histone acetyltransferase (HAT) enzymes. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) show great promise in preclinical cancer models, but clinical trials treating solid tumors have failed to improve patient survival. This is due in part to an inability of HDACi to effectively accumulate in cancerous cells. To address this problem we designed HDACi with secondary pharmacophores to facilitate selective accumulation in malignant cells. We present the first example of HDACi compounds targeted to prostate tumors by equipping them with the additional ability to bind the androgen receptor (AR) with non-steroidal antiandrogen moieties. Leads among these new dual-acting molecules bind to the AR and halt AR transcriptional activity at lower concentrations than clinical antiandrogens. They inhibit key isoforms of HDAC with low nanomolar potency. Fluorescent microscopy reveals varying degrees of AR nuclear localization in response to these compounds that correlates with their HDAC activity. These biological properties translate into potent anticancer activity against hormone dependent (AR+) LNCaP and to a lesser extent against hormone independent (AR−) DU145 prostate cancer, while having greatly reduced toxicity in non-cancerous cells. This illustrates that engaging multiple biological targets with a single chemical probe can achieve both potent and cell-type selective responses. PMID:24004176

  19. Targeting Histone Deacetylases in Diseases: Where Are We?

    PubMed Central

    Benedetti, Rosaria; Conte, Mariarosaria

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Epigenetic inactivation of pivotal genes involved in cell growth is a hallmark of human pathologies, in particular cancer. Histone acetylation balance obtained through opposing actions of histone deacetylases (HDACs) and histone acetyltransferases is one epigenetic mechanism controlling gene expression and is, thus, associated with disease etiology and progression. Interfering pharmacologically with HDAC activity can correct abnormalities in cell proliferation, migration, vascularization, and death. Recent Advances: Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) represent a new class of cytostatic agents that interfere with the function of HDACs and are able to increase gene expression by indirectly inducing histone acetylation. Several HDACi, alone or in combination with DNA-demethylating agents, chemopreventive, or classical chemotherapeutic drugs, are currently being used in clinical trials for solid and hematological malignancies, and are, thus, promising candidates for cancer therapy. Critical Issues: (i) Non-specific (off-target) HDACi effects due to activities unassociated with HDAC inhibition. (ii) Advantages/disadvantages of non-selective or isoform-directed HDACi. (iii) Limited number of response-predictive biomarkers. (iv) Toxicity leading to dysfunction of critical biological processes. Future Directions: Selective HDACi could achieve enhanced clinical utility by reducing or eliminating the serious side effects associated with current first-generation non-selective HDACi. Isoform-selective and pan-HDACi candidates might benefit from the identification of biomarkers, enabling better patient stratification and prediction of response to treatment. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 99–126. PMID:24382114

  20. Structure of Prokaryotic Polyamine Deacetylase Reveals Evolutionary Functional Relationships with Eukaryotic Histone Deacetylases

    SciTech Connect

    P Lombardi; H Angell; D Whittington; E Flynn; K Rajashankar; D Christianson

    2011-12-31

    Polyamines are a ubiquitous class of polycationic small molecules that can influence gene expression by binding to nucleic acids. Reversible polyamine acetylation regulates nucleic acid binding and is required for normal cell cycle progression and proliferation. Here, we report the structures of Mycoplana ramosa acetylpolyamine amidohydrolase (APAH) complexed with a transition state analogue and a hydroxamate inhibitor and an inactive mutant complexed with two acetylpolyamine substrates. The structure of APAH is the first of a histone deacetylase-like oligomer and reveals that an 18-residue insert in the L2 loop promotes dimerization and the formation of an 18 {angstrom} long 'L'-shaped active site tunnel at the dimer interface, accessible only to narrow and flexible substrates. The importance of dimerization for polyamine deacetylase function leads to the suggestion that a comparable dimeric or double-domain histone deacetylase could catalyze polyamine deacetylation reactions in eukaryotes.

  1. Most of the G1 period in hamster cells is eliminated by lengthening the S period.

    PubMed Central

    Stancel, G M; Prescott, D M; Liskay, R M

    1981-01-01

    Two Chinese hamster cell lines, G1+-1 and CHO, have been grown in the presence of low concentrations of hydroxyurea to determine how a slowing DNA synthesis (i.e., a lengthening of the S period) affects the length of the G1 period. Hydroxyurea concentrations of approximately 10 microM do not alter the generation times of these cell lines but do cause increases in S with corresponding decreases in G1. In both cell lines, 10 microM hydroxyurea reduces G1 to an absolute value of 1 hr, which represents decreases of 70% (G1+-1) and 60% (CHO) from control values. Higher concentrations of hydroxyurea increase the generation times and lengths of S for both cell lines but do not reduce G1 below the minimum value of 1 hr. These observations indicate that the majority of G1 is expendable and most of G1 therefore cannot contain specific events required for the initiation of DNA synthesis. This result supports the hypothesis that G1 is a portion of the cell growth cycle but not of the chromosome cycle. PMID:6947230

  2. Targeting Lysine Deacetylases (KDACs) in Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qi; Rosa, Bruce A.; Nare, Bakela; Powell, Kerrie; Valente, Sergio; Rotili, Dante; Mai, Antonello; Marshall, Garland R.; Mitreva, Makedonka

    2015-01-01

    Due to an increasing problem of drug resistance among almost all parasites species ranging from protists to worms, there is an urgent need to explore new drug targets and their inhibitors to provide new and effective parasitic therapeutics. In this regard, there is growing interest in exploring known drug leads of human epigenetic enzymes as potential starting points to develop novel treatments for parasitic diseases. This approach of repurposing (starting with validated targets and inhibitors) is quite attractive since it has the potential to reduce the expense of drug development and accelerate the process of developing novel drug candidates for parasite control. Lysine deacetylases (KDACs) are among the most studied epigenetic drug targets of humans, and a broad range of small-molecule inhibitors for these enzymes have been reported. In this work, we identify the KDAC protein families in representative species across important classes of parasites, screen a compound library of 23 hydroxamate- or benzamide-based small molecules KDAC inhibitors, and report their activities against a range of parasitic species, including the pathogen of malaria (Plasmodium falciparum), kinetoplastids (Trypanosoma brucei and Leishmania donovani), and nematodes (Brugia malayi, Dirofilaria immitis and Haemonchus contortus). Compound activity against parasites is compared to that observed against the mammalian cell line (L929 mouse fibroblast) in order to determine potential parasite-versus-host selectivity). The compounds showed nanomolar to sub-nanomolar potency against various parasites, and some selectivity was observed within the small panel of compounds tested. The possible binding modes of the active compounds at the different protein target sites within different species were explored by docking to homology models to help guide the discovery of more selective, parasite-specific inhibitors. This current work supports previous studies that explored the use of KDAC inhibitors in

  3. Histone deacetylase 9 regulates breast cancer cell proliferation and the response to histone deacetylase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Lapierre, Marion; Linares, Aurélien; Dalvai, Mathieu; Duraffourd, Céline; Bonnet, Sandrine; Boulahtouf, Abdelhay; Rodriguez, Carmen; Jalaguier, Stéphan; Assou, Said; Orsetti, Beatrice; Balaguer, Patrick; Maudelonde, Thierry; Blache, Philippe; Bystricky, Kerstin; Boulle, Nathalie; Cavaillès, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Histone lysine acetylation is an epigenetic mark regulated by histone acetyltransferases and histone deacetylases (HDAC) which plays an important role in tumorigenesis. In this study, we observed a strong overexpression of class IIa HDAC9, at the mRNA and protein levels, in the most aggressive human breast cancer cell lines (i.e. in basal breast cancer cells vs luminal ones or in malignant vs begnin MCF10A breast epithelial cell lines). HDAC9 overexpression was associated with higher rates of gene transcription and increased epigenetic marks on the HDAC9 promoter. Ectopic expression of HDAC9 in MCF7 luminal breast cancer cells led to an increase in cell proliferation and to a decrease in apoptosis. These effects were associated with a deregulated expression of several genes controlled by HDAC inhibitors such as CDKN1A, BAX and TNFRSF10A. Inversely, knock-down of HDAC9 expression in MDA-MB436 basal breast cancer cells reduced cell proliferation. Moreover, high HDAC9 expression decreased the efficacy of HDAC inhibitors to reduce cell proliferation and to regulate CDKN1A gene expression. Interestingly, the gene encoding the transcription factor SOX9 was identified by a global transcriptomic approach as an HDAC9 target gene. In stably transfected MCF7 cells, SOX9 silencing significantly decreased HDAC9 mitogenic activity. Finally, in a large panel of breast cancer biopsies, HDAC9 expression was significantly increased in tumors of the basal subtype, correlated with SOX9 expression and associated with poor prognosis. Altogether, these results indicate that HDAC9 is a key factor involved in mammary carcinogenesis and in the response to HDAC inhibitors. PMID:26930713

  4. Sirtuin 1 Deacetylase: A Key Regulator of Hepatic Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kemper, Jongsook Kim; Choi, SungE; Kim, Dong Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Summary Obesity is a serious medical problem worldwide and disruption of metabolic/energy homeostasis plays a pivotal role in this global epidemic. In obese people, fatty liver (steatosis) develops, which increases the risk for diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and even, liver cancer. Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) is a NAD+-dependent deacetylase that functions as a key metabolic/energy sensor and mediates homeostatic responses to nutrient availability. Accumulating evidence indicates that SIRT1 is a master regulator of the transcriptional networks that control hepatic lipid metabolism. During energy-deprived conditions, SIRT1 deacetylates and alters the expression and activities of key transcriptional regulators involved in hepatic lipogenesis, fatty acid β-oxidation, and cholesterol/bile acid metabolism. This review will discuss the latest advances in this field, focusing on beneficial roles of SIRT1 in hepatic lipid metabolism including its potential as a therapeutic target for treatment of steatosis and other obesity-related metabolic diseases. PMID:23374725

  5. Histone Deacetylases in Skeletal Development and Bone Mass Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E.; Westendorf, Jennifer J.

    2011-01-01

    The skeleton is a multifunctional and regenerative organ. Dynamic activities within the bone microenvironment necessitate and instigate rapid and temporal changes in gene expression within the cells (osteoclasts, osteoblasts, and osteocytes) responsible for skeletal maintenance. Regulation of gene expression is controlled, in part, by histone deacetylases (Hdacs), which are intracellular enzymes that directly affect chromatin structure and transcription factor activity. Key roles for several Hdacs in bone development and biology have been elucidated though in vitro and in vivo models. Recent findings suggest that clinical usage of small molecule Hdac inhibitors for conditions like epilepsy, bipolar disorder, cancer, and a multitude of other ailments may have unintended effects on bone cell populations. Here we review the progress that has been made in the last decade in understanding how Hdacs contribute to bone development and maintenance. PMID:21185361

  6. Histone deacetylases: Targets for antifungal drug development

    PubMed Central

    Kmetzsch, Livia

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of pathogens and its hosts causes a drastic change in the transcriptional landscape in both cells. Among the several mechanisms of gene regulation, transcriptional initiation is probably the main point. In such scenario, the access of transcriptional machinery to promoter is highly regulated by post-translational modification of histones, such as acetylation, phosphorylation and others. Inhibition of histone deacetylases is able to reduce fungal pathogens fitness during infection and, therefore, is currently being considered for the development of new antifungal therapy strategies. PMID:26151486

  7. 26 CFR 1.514(g)-1 - Business lease indebtedness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Business lease indebtedness. 1.514(g)-1 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Taxation of Business Income of Certain Exempt Organizations § 1.514(g)-1 Business lease indebtedness. (a) Definition. The term business lease indebtedness means, with respect...

  8. 26 CFR 1.514(g)-1 - Business lease indebtedness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Business lease indebtedness. 1.514(g)-1 Section... TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Taxation of Business Income of Certain Exempt Organizations § 1.514(g)-1 Business lease indebtedness. (a) Definition. The term business lease indebtedness...

  9. 26 CFR 31.3121(g)-1 - Agricultural labor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Agricultural labor. 31.3121(g)-1 Section 31.3121(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) EMPLOYMENT TAXES AND COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE EMPLOYMENT TAXES AND COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE Federal Insurance Contributions Act (Chapter...

  10. 26 CFR 1.514(g)-1 - Business lease indebtedness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Business lease indebtedness. 1.514(g)-1 Section 1.514(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Taxation of Business Income of Certain Exempt Organizations §...

  11. Human Pancreatic β-Cell G1/S Molecule Cell Cycle Atlas

    PubMed Central

    Fiaschi-Taesch, Nathalie M.; Kleinberger, Jeffrey W.; Salim, Fatimah G.; Troxell, Ronnie; Wills, Rachel; Tanwir, Mansoor; Casinelli, Gabriella; Cox, Amy E.; Takane, Karen K.; Scott, Donald K.; Stewart, Andrew F.

    2013-01-01

    Expansion of pancreatic β-cells is a key goal of diabetes research, yet induction of adult human β-cell replication has proven frustratingly difficult. In part, this reflects a lack of understanding of cell cycle control in the human β-cell. Here, we provide a comprehensive immunocytochemical “atlas” of G1/S control molecules in the human β-cell. This atlas reveals that the majority of these molecules, previously known to be present in islets, are actually present in the β-cell. More importantly, and in contrast to anticipated results, the human β-cell G1/S atlas reveals that almost all of the critical G1/S cell cycle control molecules are located in the cytoplasm of the quiescent human β-cell. Indeed, the only nuclear G1/S molecules are the cell cycle inhibitors, pRb, p57, and variably, p21: none of the cyclins or cdks necessary to drive human β-cell proliferation are present in the nuclear compartment. This observation may provide an explanation for the refractoriness of human β-cells to proliferation. Thus, in addition to known obstacles to human β-cell proliferation, restriction of G1/S molecules to the cytoplasm of the human β-cell represents an unanticipated obstacle to therapeutic human β-cell expansion. PMID:23493570

  12. A novel histone deacetylase inhibitor Chidamide induces apoptosis of human colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Lin; Chen, Baoan; Qin, Shukui; Li, Suyi; He, Xiangming; Qiu, Shaomin; Zhao, Wei; Zhao, Hong

    2010-02-05

    Many studies have demonstrated that histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors induce various tumor cells to undergo apoptosis, and such inhibitors have been used in different clinical trials against different human cancers. In this study, we designed and synthesized a novel HDAC inhibitor, Chidamide. We showed that Chidamide was able to increase the acetylation levels of histone H3 and to inhibit the PI3K/Akt and MAPK/Ras signaling pathways, which resulted in arresting colon cancer cells at the G1 phase of the cell cycle and promoting apoptosis. As a result, the proliferation of colon cancer cells was suppressed in vitro. Our data support the potential application of Chidamide as an anticancer agent in treating colon cancer. Future studies are needed to demonstrate its in vivo efficacy.

  13. Rapid biodegradation of organophosphorus pesticides by Stenotrophomonas sp. G1.

    PubMed

    Deng, Shuyan; Chen, Yao; Wang, Daosheng; Shi, Taozhong; Wu, Xiangwei; Ma, Xin; Li, Xiangqiong; Hua, Rimao; Tang, Xinyun; Li, Qing X

    2015-10-30

    Organophosphorus insecticides have been widely used, which are highly poisonous and cause serious concerns over food safety and environmental pollution. A bacterial strain being capable of degrading O,O-dialkyl phosphorothioate and O,O-dialkyl phosphate insecticides, designated as G1, was isolated from sludge collected at the drain outlet of a chlorpyrifos manufacture plant. Physiological and biochemical characteristics and 16S rDNA gene sequence analysis suggested that strain G1 belongs to the genus Stenotrophomonas. At an initial concentration of 50 mg/L, strain G1 degraded 100% of methyl parathion, methyl paraoxon, diazinon, and phoxim, 95% of parathion, 63% of chlorpyrifos, 38% of profenofos, and 34% of triazophos in 24 h. Orthogonal experiments showed that the optimum conditions were an inoculum volume of 20% (v/v), a substrate concentration of 50 mg/L, and an incubation temperature in 40 °C. p-Nitrophenol was detected as the metabolite of methyl parathion, for which intracellular methyl parathion hydrolase was responsible. Strain G1 can efficiently degrade eight organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) and is a very excellent candidate for applications in OP pollution remediation. PMID:25938642

  14. 26 CFR 1.514(g)-1 - Business lease indebtedness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Business lease indebtedness. 1.514(g)-1 Section 1... Business lease indebtedness. (a) Definition. The term business lease indebtedness means, with respect to... subsidiary corporations. (b) Examples. The rules of section 514(g) respecting business leases also...

  15. Role of Deacetylase Activity of N-Deacetylase/N-Sulfotransferase 1 in Forming N-Sulfated Domain in Heparan Sulfate*

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Wenfang; Xu, Yongmei; Pagadala, Vijayakanth; Pedersen, Lars C.; Liu, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Heparan sulfate (HS) is a highly sulfated polysaccharide that plays important physiological roles. The biosynthesis of HS involves a series of enzymes, including glycosyltransferases (or HS polymerase), epimerase, and sulfotransferases. N-Deacetylase/N-Sulfotransferase isoform 1 (NDST-1) is a critical enzyme in this pathway. NDST-1, a bifunctional enzyme, displays N-deacetylase and N-sulfotransferase activities to convert an N-acetylated glucosamine residue to an N-sulfo glucosamine residue. Here, we report the cooperative effects between N-deacetylase and N-sulfotransferase activities. Using baculovirus expression in insect cells, we obtained three recombinant proteins: full-length NDST-1 and the individual N-deacetylase and N-sulfotransferase domains. Structurally defined oligosaccharide substrates were synthesized to test the substrate specificities of the enzymes. We discovered that N-deacetylation is the limiting step and that interplay between the N-sulfotransferase and N-deacetylase accelerates the reaction. Furthermore, combining the individually expressed N-deacetylase and N-sulfotransferase domains produced different sulfation patterns when compared with that made by the NDST-1 enzyme. Our data demonstrate the essential role of domain cooperation within NDST-1 in producing HS with specific domain structures. PMID:26109066

  16. Characterization of the N-deacetylase domain from the heparan sulfate N-deacetylase/N-sulfotransferase 2

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, Michael B.; Liu, May; Fox, Courtney; Liu, Jian . E-mail: jian_liu@unc.edu

    2006-01-27

    Heparin and heparan sulfate are linear sulfated polysaccharides that exert a multitude of biological functions. Heparan sulfate glucosaminyl N-deacetylase/N-sulfotransferase isoform 2 (NDST-2), a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of heparin, contains two distinct activities. This bifunctional enzyme removes the acetyl group from N-acetylated glucosamine (N-deacetylase activity) and transfers a sulfuryl group to the unsubstituted amino position (N-sulfotransferase activity). The N-sulfotransferase activity of NDST has been unambiguously localized to the C-terminal domain of NDST. Here, we report that the N-terminal domain of NDST-2 retains N-deacetylase activity. The N-terminal domain (A66-P604) of human NDST-2, designated as N-deacetylase (NDase), was cloned as a (His){sub 6}-fusion protein, and protein expression was carried out in Escherichia coli. Heparosan treated with NDase contains N-unsubstituted glucosamine and is highly susceptible to N-sulfation by N-sulfotransferase. Our results conclude that the N-terminal domain of NDST-2 contains functional N-deacetylase activity. This finding helps further elucidate the mechanism of action of heparan sulfate N-deacetylase/N-sulfotransferases and the biosynthesis of heparan sulfate in general.

  17. Regulation of Runx2 by Histone Deacetylases in Bone.

    PubMed

    Vishal, Mohanakrishnan; Ajeetha, Ramachandran; Keerthana, Rajendran; Selvamurugan, Nagarajan

    2016-01-01

    Osteogenesis involves a cascade of processes wherein mesenchymal stem cells differentiate towards osteoblasts, strictly controlled by a number of regulatory factors. Runx2 protein is a key transcription factor which serves as a master regulator for osteogenesis by activating the promoters of various osteoblastic genes. Runx2 is regulated by several cofactors, including the histone deacetylase enzymes known as HDACs. HDACs are a family of proteins that regulate gene expression and/or activity through the mechanism of deacetylation and they can be divided into four classes, namely classes I, II, III and IV HDACs based on their sequence identity and nuclear or cytoplasmic localization. Knockout studies of all classes of HDACs showed their specific developmental roles. Evidence has proved Runx2 to be a repressible target of HDACs and this interplay is found to be a crucial factor controlling osteoblast differentiation. Further, another level of osteogenic regulation involves microRNAs (miRNAs), which are small, non-coding endogenous molecules capable of gene silencing by partial or complete complementary binding of their seed sequences to the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of target mRNAs. In this study, the recent developments on identifying the function of HDACs on Runx2 expression/activity and the impact of miRNAs on HDACs in regulation of osteogenesis are reviewed. PMID:27072566

  18. Cleavage of IgG1 in GCF is associated with presence of Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Guentsch, Arndt; Hirsch, Christiane; Pfister, Wolfgang; Vincents, Bjarne; Abrahamson, Magnus; Sroka, Aneta; Potempa, Jan; Eick, Sigrun

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives Immunoglobulin (Ig) G1 plays an important role in the adaptive immune response. Kgp, a lysine-specific cysteine protease from Porphyromonas gingivalis, specifically hydrolyses IgG1 heavy chains. The purpose of this study was to examine whether cleavage of IgG1 occurs in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) in vivo, and whether there is any association with the presence of P. gingivalis and other periodontopathogens. Material and methods GCF was obtained from nine patients with aggressive periodontitis, nine with chronic periodontitis, and five periodontally-healthy individuals. The bacterial loads of P. gingivalis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Treponema denticola, Prevotella intermedia, and Tannerella forsythia were analysed by real-time PCR, and the presence and cleavage of IgG1 and IgG2 were determined using Western blotting. Kgp levels were measured by ELISA. Results Cleaved IgG1 was identified in the GCF from 67% of patients with aggressive periodontitis and in 44% of patients with chronic periodontitis. By contrast, no cleaved IgG1 was detectable in the healthy controls. No degradation of IgG2 was detected in any of the samples, regardless of health status. P. gingivalis was found in high numbers in all samples in which cleavage of IgG1 was detected (p < 0.001 compared with samples with no IgG cleavage). Furthermore, high numbers of T. forsythia and P. intermedia were also present in these samples. The level of Kgp in the GCF correlated with the load of P. gingivalis (r = 0.425, p < 0.01). The presence of Kgp (range 0.07–10.98 ng/ml) was associated with proteolytic fragments of IgG1 (p < 0.001). However, cleaved IgG1 was also detected in samples with no detectable Kgp. Conclusion In patients with periodontitis cleavage of IgG1 occurs in vivo and may suppress antibody-dependent antibacterial activity in subgingival biofilms especially those colonized by P. gingivalis. PMID:23116446

  19. Dual Inhibitors Against Topoisomerases and Histone Deacetylases

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Young Ho

    2015-01-01

    Topoisomerases and histone deacetylases (HDACs) are considered as important therapeutic targets for a wide range of cancers, due to their association with the initiation, proliferation and survival of cancer cells. Topoisomerases are involved in the cleavage and religation processes of DNA, while HDACs regulate a dynamic epigenetic modification of the lysine amino acid on various proteins. Extensive studies have been undertaken to discover small molecule inhibitor of each protein and thereby, several drugs have been transpired from this effort and successfully approved for clinical use. However, the inherent heterogeneity and multiple genetic abnormalities of cancers challenge the clinical application of these single targeted drugs. In order to overcome the limitations of a single target approach, a novel approach, simultaneously targeting topoisomerases and HDACs with a single molecule has been recently employed and attracted much attention of medicinal chemists in drug discovery. This review highlights the current studies on the discovery of dual inhibitors against topoisomerases and HDACs, provides their pharmacological aspects and advantages, and discusses the challenges and promise of the dual inhibitors. PMID:26151040

  20. Interpreting clinical assays for histone deacetylase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Martinet, Nadine; Bertrand, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    As opposed to genetics, dealing with gene expressions by direct DNA sequence modifications, the term epigenetics applies to all the external influences that target the chromatin structure of cells with impact on gene expression unrelated to the sequence coding of DNA itself. In normal cells, epigenetics modulates gene expression through all development steps. When “imprinted” early by the environment, epigenetic changes influence the organism at an early stage and can be transmitted to the progeny. Together with DNA sequence alterations, DNA aberrant cytosine methylation and microRNA deregulation, epigenetic modifications participate in the malignant transformation of cells. Their reversible nature has led to the emergence of the promising field of epigenetic therapy. The efforts made to inhibit in particular the epigenetic enzyme family called histone deacetylases (HDACs) are described. HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) have been proposed as a viable clinical therapeutic approach for the treatment of leukemia and solid tumors, but also to a lesser degree for noncancerous diseases. Three epigenetic drugs are already arriving at the patient’s bedside, and more than 100 clinical assays for HDACi are registered on the National Cancer Institute website. They explore the eventual additive benefits of combined therapies. In the context of the pleiotropic effects of HDAC isoforms, more specific HDACi and more informative screening tests are being developed for the benefit of the patients. PMID:21625397

  1. Enzymatic production of defined chitosan oligomers with a specific pattern of acetylation using a combination of chitin oligosaccharide deacetylases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamer, Stefanie Nicole; Cord-Landwehr, Stefan; Biarnés, Xevi; Planas, Antoni; Waegeman, Hendrik; Moerschbacher, Bruno Maria; Kolkenbrock, Stephan

    2015-03-01

    Chitin and chitosan oligomers have diverse biological activities with potentially valuable applications in fields like medicine, cosmetics, or agriculture. These properties may depend not only on the degrees of polymerization and acetylation, but also on a specific pattern of acetylation (PA) that cannot be controlled when the oligomers are produced by chemical hydrolysis. To determine the influence of the PA on the biological activities, defined chitosan oligomers in sufficient amounts are needed. Chitosan oligomers with specific PA can be produced by enzymatic deacetylation of chitin oligomers, but the diversity is limited by the low number of chitin deacetylases available. We have produced specific chitosan oligomers which are deacetylated at the first two units starting from the non-reducing end by the combined use of two different chitin deacetylases, namely NodB from Rhizobium sp. GRH2 that deacetylates the first unit and COD from Vibrio cholerae that deacetylates the second unit starting from the non-reducing end. Both chitin deacetylases accept the product of each other resulting in production of chitosan oligomers with a novel and defined PA. When extended to further chitin deacetylases, this approach has the potential to yield a large range of novel chitosan oligomers with a fully defined architecture.

  2. Enzymatic production of defined chitosan oligomers with a specific pattern of acetylation using a combination of chitin oligosaccharide deacetylases

    PubMed Central

    Hamer, Stefanie Nicole; Cord-Landwehr, Stefan; Biarnés, Xevi; Planas, Antoni; Waegeman, Hendrik; Moerschbacher, Bruno Maria; Kolkenbrock, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Chitin and chitosan oligomers have diverse biological activities with potentially valuable applications in fields like medicine, cosmetics, or agriculture. These properties may depend not only on the degrees of polymerization and acetylation, but also on a specific pattern of acetylation (PA) that cannot be controlled when the oligomers are produced by chemical hydrolysis. To determine the influence of the PA on the biological activities, defined chitosan oligomers in sufficient amounts are needed. Chitosan oligomers with specific PA can be produced by enzymatic deacetylation of chitin oligomers, but the diversity is limited by the low number of chitin deacetylases available. We have produced specific chitosan oligomers which are deacetylated at the first two units starting from the non-reducing end by the combined use of two different chitin deacetylases, namely NodB from Rhizobium sp. GRH2 that deacetylates the first unit and COD from Vibrio cholerae that deacetylates the second unit starting from the non-reducing end. Both chitin deacetylases accept the product of each other resulting in production of chitosan oligomers with a novel and defined PA. When extended to further chitin deacetylases, this approach has the potential to yield a large range of novel chitosan oligomers with a fully defined architecture. PMID:25732514

  3. Cellulose Synthesis Is Coupled to Cell Cycle Progression at G1 in the Dinoflagellate Crypthecodinium cohnii

    PubMed Central

    Kwok, Alvin C.M.; Wong, Joseph T.Y.

    2003-01-01

    Cellulosic deposition in alveolar vesicles forms the “internal cell wall” in thecated dinoflagellates. The availability of synchronized single cells, the lack of secondary deposition, and the absence of cellulosic cell plates at division facilitate investigation of the possible roles of cellulose synthesis (CS) in the entire cell cycle. Flow cytograms of cellulosic contents revealed a stepwise process of CS in the dinoflagellate cell cycle, with the highest rate occurring at G1. A cell cycle delay in G1, but not G2/M, was observed after inhibition of CS. A cell cycle inhibitor of G1/S, but not G2/M, was able to delay cell cycle progression with a corresponding reduction of CS. The increase of cellulose content in the cell cycle corresponded well to the expected increase of surface area. No differences were observed in the cellulose to surface area ratio between normal and fast-growing G1 cells, implicating the significance of surface area in linking CS to the coupling of cell growth with cell cycle progression. The coupling of CS to G1 implicates a novel link between CS and cell cycle control, and we postulate that the coupling mechanism might integrate cell wall integrity to the cell size checkpoint. PMID:12692327

  4. G1/S Cell Cycle Checkpoint Defect in Lymphocytes from Patients with Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Song, Misun; Kwon, Young-Ah; Lee, Yujin; Kim, Hyeran; Yun, Ji Hea; Kim, Seonwoo

    2012-01-01

    Objective We compared the cell responsiveness of activated lymphocytes to rapamycin, which blocks the G1/S transition, between patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and normal controls to assess the early phase control defect in cell cycle. Methods Blood samples of 26 patients with AD and 28 normal controls were collected to separate peripheral lymphocytes. We measured the proportion of each cell cycle phase in activated lymphocytes using flow cytometry and evaluated the responsiveness of these lymphocytes to rapamycin. Results The patients with AD were older than the normal controls (AD 74.03±7.90 yr vs. control 68.28±6.21 yr, p=0.004). The proportion of G1 phase cells in the AD group was significantly lower than that in the control group (70.29±6.32% vs. 76.03±9.05%, p=0.01), and the proportion of S phase cells in the AD group was higher than that in control group (12.45±6.09% vs. 6.03±5.11%, p=0.001). Activated lymphocytes in patients with AD were not arrested in the G1 phase and they progressed to the late phase of the cell cycle despite rapamycin treatment, in contrast to those of normal subjects. Conclusion The patients with AD probably have a control defect of early phase cell cycle in peripheral lymphocytes that may be associated with the underlying pathology of neuronal death. PMID:23251208

  5. Compass Measurement of g1 and QCD Fits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunne, Fabienne

    2016-02-01

    We present the latest COMPASS results on the proton spin structure function g1p(x) at 200GeV. The data improve the statistical precision by a factor of ˜2 at low x. A reevaluation of the Bjorken sum rule based on COMPASS proton and deuteron data confirms its validation to a 9% accuracy. Finally, results from a global NLO QCD fit of g1 world data are shown. The extracted spin singlet distribution leads to an integrated value of 0.26 < ΔΣ < 0.34 at Q2 = 3 (GeV/c)2. The large uncertainty is mainly driven by the unknown shape of the distribution.

  6. HDAC6 is a Bruchpilot deacetylase that facilitates neurotransmitter release.

    PubMed

    Miskiewicz, Katarzyna; Jose, Liya E; Yeshaw, Wondwossen M; Valadas, Jorge S; Swerts, Jef; Munck, Sebastian; Feiguin, Fabian; Dermaut, Bart; Verstreken, Patrik

    2014-07-10

    Presynaptic densities are specialized structures involved in synaptic vesicle tethering and neurotransmission; however, the mechanisms regulating their function remain understudied. In Drosophila, Bruchpilot is a major constituent of the presynaptic density that tethers vesicles. Here, we show that HDAC6 is necessary and sufficient for deacetylation of Bruchpilot. HDAC6 expression is also controlled by TDP-43, an RNA-binding protein deregulated in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Animals expressing TDP-43 harboring pathogenic mutations show increased HDAC6 expression, decreased Bruchpilot acetylation, larger vesicle-tethering sites, and increased neurotransmission, defects similar to those seen upon expression of HDAC6 and opposite to hdac6 null mutants. Consequently, reduced levels of HDAC6 or increased levels of ELP3, a Bruchpilot acetyltransferase, rescue the presynaptic density defects in TDP-43-expressing flies as well as the decreased adult locomotion. Our work identifies HDAC6 as a Bruchpilot deacetylase and indicates that regulating acetylation of a presynaptic release-site protein is critical for maintaining normal neurotransmission. PMID:24981865

  7. Inhibition of histone deacetylase as a new mechanism of teratogenesis.

    PubMed

    Menegola, Elena; Di Renzo, Francesca; Broccia, Maria Luisa; Giavini, Erminio

    2006-12-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are nuclear and cytoplasmic enzymes that deacetylate a number of substrates, of which histones are the best known and described in the literature. HDACs are present in eukaryotic and bacteria cells, and are fundamental for a number of cellular functions, including correct gene expression. Surprisingly, only up to 20% of the whole genome is controlled by HDACs, but key processes for survival, proliferation, and differentiation have been strictly linked to HDAC enzyme functioning. The use of HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) has been proposed for the treatment of neoplastic diseases. Their effectiveness has been suggested for a number of liquid and solid tumors, particularly acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). The role of HDACs in embryo development is currently under investigation. Published data indicate knockout phenotype analysis to be of particular interest, in which a number of HDACs play a key role during development. Little data have been published on the effects of HDACi on embryonic development, although for valproic acid (VPA), literature from the 1980s described its teratogenic effects in experimental animals and humans. To date, all tested HDACi have shown teratogenic effects similar to those described for VPA when tested in zebrafish, Xenopus laevis, and mice. HDACs were also able to alter embryo development in invertebrates and plants. A model, similar to that proposed in APL, involving retinoic acid receptors (RAR) and tissue specific Hox gene expression, is suggested to explain the HDAC effects on embryo development. PMID:17315247

  8. Histone Deacetylases and Their Inhibition in Candida Species.

    PubMed

    Garnaud, Cécile; Champleboux, Morgane; Maubon, Danièle; Cornet, Muriel; Govin, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    Fungi are generally benign members of the human mucosal flora or live as saprophytes in the environment. However, they can become pathogenic, leading to invasive and life threatening infections in vulnerable patients. These invasive fungal infections are regarded as a major public health problem on a similar scale to tuberculosis or malaria. Current treatment for these infections is based on only four available drug classes. This limited therapeutic arsenal and the emergence of drug-resistant strains are a matter of concern due to the growing number of patients to be treated, and new therapeutic strategies are urgently needed. Adaptation of fungi to drug pressure involves transcriptional regulation, in which chromatin dynamics and histone modifications play a major role. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) remove acetyl groups from histones and actively participate in controlling stress responses. HDAC inhibition has been shown to limit fungal development, virulence, biofilm formation, and dissemination in the infected host, while also improving the efficacy of existing antifungal drugs toward Candida spp. In this article, we review the functional roles of HDACs and the biological effects of HDAC inhibitors on Candida spp., highlighting the correlations between their pathogenic effects in vitro and in vivo. We focus on how HDAC inhibitors could be used to treat invasive candidiasis while also reviewing recent developments in their clinical evaluation. PMID:27547205

  9. Histone Deacetylases and Their Inhibition in Candida Species

    PubMed Central

    Garnaud, Cécile; Champleboux, Morgane; Maubon, Danièle; Cornet, Muriel; Govin, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    Fungi are generally benign members of the human mucosal flora or live as saprophytes in the environment. However, they can become pathogenic, leading to invasive and life threatening infections in vulnerable patients. These invasive fungal infections are regarded as a major public health problem on a similar scale to tuberculosis or malaria. Current treatment for these infections is based on only four available drug classes. This limited therapeutic arsenal and the emergence of drug-resistant strains are a matter of concern due to the growing number of patients to be treated, and new therapeutic strategies are urgently needed. Adaptation of fungi to drug pressure involves transcriptional regulation, in which chromatin dynamics and histone modifications play a major role. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) remove acetyl groups from histones and actively participate in controlling stress responses. HDAC inhibition has been shown to limit fungal development, virulence, biofilm formation, and dissemination in the infected host, while also improving the efficacy of existing antifungal drugs toward Candida spp. In this article, we review the functional roles of HDACs and the biological effects of HDAC inhibitors on Candida spp., highlighting the correlations between their pathogenic effects in vitro and in vivo. We focus on how HDAC inhibitors could be used to treat invasive candidiasis while also reviewing recent developments in their clinical evaluation. PMID:27547205

  10. Hypothalamic leptin action is mediated by histone deacetylase 5

    PubMed Central

    Kabra, Dhiraj G.; Pfuhlmann, Katrin; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Schriever, Sonja C.; Casquero García, Veronica; Kebede, Adam Fiseha; Fuente-Martin, Esther; Trivedi, Chitrang; Heppner, Kristy; Uhlenhaut, N. Henriette; Legutko, Beata; Kabra, Uma D.; Gao, Yuanqing; Yi, Chun-Xia; Quarta, Carmelo; Clemmensen, Christoffer; Finan, Brian; Müller, Timo D.; Meyer, Carola W.; Paez-Pereda, Marcelo; Stemmer, Kerstin; Woods, Stephen C.; Perez-Tilve, Diego; Schneider, Robert; Olson, Eric N.; Tschöp, Matthias H.; Pfluger, Paul T.

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamic leptin signalling has a key role in food intake and energy-balance control and is often impaired in obese individuals. Here we identify histone deacetylase 5 (HDAC5) as a regulator of leptin signalling and organismal energy balance. Global HDAC5 KO mice have increased food intake and greater diet-induced obesity when fed high-fat diet. Pharmacological and genetic inhibition of HDAC5 activity in the mediobasal hypothalamus increases food intake and modulates pathways implicated in leptin signalling. We show HDAC5 directly regulates STAT3 localization and transcriptional activity via reciprocal STAT3 deacetylation at Lys685 and phosphorylation at Tyr705. In vivo, leptin sensitivity is substantially impaired in HDAC5 loss-of-function mice. Hypothalamic HDAC5 overexpression improves leptin action and partially protects against HFD-induced leptin resistance and obesity. Overall, our data suggest that hypothalamic HDAC5 activity is a regulator of leptin signalling that adapts food intake and body weight to our dietary environment. PMID:26923837

  11. Hypothalamic leptin action is mediated by histone deacetylase 5.

    PubMed

    Kabra, Dhiraj G; Pfuhlmann, Katrin; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Schriever, Sonja C; Casquero García, Veronica; Kebede, Adam Fiseha; Fuente-Martin, Esther; Trivedi, Chitrang; Heppner, Kristy; Uhlenhaut, N Henriette; Legutko, Beata; Kabra, Uma D; Gao, Yuanqing; Yi, Chun-Xia; Quarta, Carmelo; Clemmensen, Christoffer; Finan, Brian; Müller, Timo D; Meyer, Carola W; Paez-Pereda, Marcelo; Stemmer, Kerstin; Woods, Stephen C; Perez-Tilve, Diego; Schneider, Robert; Olson, Eric N; Tschöp, Matthias H; Pfluger, Paul T

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamic leptin signalling has a key role in food intake and energy-balance control and is often impaired in obese individuals. Here we identify histone deacetylase 5 (HDAC5) as a regulator of leptin signalling and organismal energy balance. Global HDAC5 KO mice have increased food intake and greater diet-induced obesity when fed high-fat diet. Pharmacological and genetic inhibition of HDAC5 activity in the mediobasal hypothalamus increases food intake and modulates pathways implicated in leptin signalling. We show HDAC5 directly regulates STAT3 localization and transcriptional activity via reciprocal STAT3 deacetylation at Lys685 and phosphorylation at Tyr705. In vivo, leptin sensitivity is substantially impaired in HDAC5 loss-of-function mice. Hypothalamic HDAC5 overexpression improves leptin action and partially protects against HFD-induced leptin resistance and obesity. Overall, our data suggest that hypothalamic HDAC5 activity is a regulator of leptin signalling that adapts food intake and body weight to our dietary environment. PMID:26923837

  12. Crack azimuths on Europa: The G1 lineament sequence revisited

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sarid, A.R.; Greenberg, R.; Hoppa, G.V.; Brown, D.M., Jr.; Geissler, P.

    2005-01-01

    The tectonic sequence in the anti-jovian area covered by regional mapping images from Galileo's orbit E15 is determined from a study of cross-cutting relationships among lineament features. The sequence is used to test earlier results from orbit G1, based on lower resolution images, which appeared to display a progressive change in azimuthal orientation over about 90?? in a clockwise sense. Such a progression is consistent with expected stress variations that would accompany plausible non-synchronous rotation. The more recent data provide a more complete record than the G1 data did. We find that to fit the sequence into a continual clockwise change of orientation would require at least 1000?? (> 5 cycles) of azimuthal rotation. If due to non-synchronous rotation of Europa, this result implies that we are seeing back further into the tectonic record than the G1 results had suggested. The three sets of orientations found by Geissler et al. now appear to have been spaced out over several cycles, not during a fraction of one cycle. While our more complete sequence of lineament formation is consistent with non-synchronous rotation, a statistical test shows that it cannot be construed as independent evidence. Other lines of evidence do support non-synchronous rotation, but azimuths of crack sequences do not show it, probably because only a couple of cracks form in a given region in any given non-synchronous rotation period. ?? 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of Cell Cycle Interactions and Inhibition of Histone Deacetylases on Development of Porcine Embryos Produced by Nuclear Transfer.

    PubMed

    Rissi, Vitor B; Glanzner, Werner G; Mujica, Lady K S; Antoniazzi, Alfredo Q; Gonçalves, Paulo B D; Bordignon, Vilceu

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate if the positive effects of inhibiting histone deacetylase enzymes on cell reprogramming and development of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos is affected by the cell cycle stage of nuclear donor cells and host oocytes at the time of embryo reconstruction. SCNT embryos were produced with metaphase II (MII) or telophase II (TII) cytoplasts and nuclear donor cells that were either at the G1-0 or G2/M stages. Embryos reconstructed with the different cell cycle combinations were treated or not with the histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) Scriptaid for 15 h and then cultured in vitro for 7 days. Embryos reconstructed with MII-G1-0 and TII-G2/M developed to the blastocyst stage with a higher frequency compared to the other groups, confirming the importance of cell cycle interactions on cell reprogramming and SCNT embryo development. Treatment with HDACi improved development of SCNT embryos produced with MII but not TII cytoplasts, independently of the cell cycle stage of nuclear donor cells. These findings provide evidence that the positive effect of HDACi treatment on development of SCNT embryos depends upon cell cycle interactions between the host cytoplast and the nuclear donor cells. PMID:27281695

  14. Suppression of caspase-11 expression by histone deacetylase inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Heo, Hyejung; Yoo, Lang; Shin, Ki Soon; Kang, Shin Jung

    2009-01-02

    It has been well documented that histone deacetylase inhibitors suppress inflammatory gene expression. Therefore, we investigated whether histone deacetylase inhibitors modulate the expression of caspase-11 that is known as an inducible caspase regulating both inflammation and apoptosis. In the present study, we show that sodium butyrate and trichostatin A, two structurally unrelated inhibitors of histone deacetylase (HDAC), effectively suppressed the induction of caspase-11 in mouse embryonic fibroblasts stimulated with lipopolysaccharides. Sodium butyrate inhibited the activation of upstream signaling events for the caspase-11 induction such as activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and c-Jun N-terminal kinase, degradation of inhibitor of {kappa}B, and activation of nuclear factor-{kappa}B. These results suggest that the HDAC inhibitor suppressed cytosolic signaling events for the induction of caspase-11 by inhibiting the deacetylation of non-histone proteins.

  15. Inhibition of histone deacetylases in cancer therapy: lessons from leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Ceccacci, Elena; Minucci, Saverio

    2016-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are a key component of the epigenetic machinery regulating gene expression, and behave as oncogenes in several cancer types, spurring the development of HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) as anticancer drugs. This review discusses new results regarding the role of HDACs in cancer and the effect of HDACi on tumour cells, focusing on haematological malignancies, particularly acute myeloid leukaemia. Histone deacetylases may have opposite roles at different stages of tumour progression and in different tumour cell sub-populations (cancer stem cells), highlighting the importance of investigating these aspects for further improving the clinical use of HDACi in treating cancer. PMID:26908329

  16. Inhibition of histone deacetylases in cancer therapy: lessons from leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Ceccacci, Elena; Minucci, Saverio

    2016-03-15

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are a key component of the epigenetic machinery regulating gene expression, and behave as oncogenes in several cancer types, spurring the development of HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) as anticancer drugs. This review discusses new results regarding the role of HDACs in cancer and the effect of HDACi on tumour cells, focusing on haematological malignancies, particularly acute myeloid leukaemia. Histone deacetylases may have opposite roles at different stages of tumour progression and in different tumour cell sub-populations (cancer stem cells), highlighting the importance of investigating these aspects for further improving the clinical use of HDACi in treating cancer. PMID:26908329

  17. A mechanism for the suppression of homologous recombination in G1 cells.

    PubMed

    Orthwein, Alexandre; Noordermeer, Sylvie M; Wilson, Marcus D; Landry, Sébastien; Enchev, Radoslav I; Sherker, Alana; Munro, Meagan; Pinder, Jordan; Salsman, Jayme; Dellaire, Graham; Xia, Bing; Peter, Matthias; Durocher, Daniel

    2015-12-17

    DNA repair by homologous recombination is highly suppressed in G1 cells to ensure that mitotic recombination occurs solely between sister chromatids. Although many homologous recombination factors are cell-cycle regulated, the identity of the events that are both necessary and sufficient to suppress recombination in G1 cells is unknown. Here we report that the cell cycle controls the interaction of BRCA1 with PALB2-BRCA2 to constrain BRCA2 function to the S/G2 phases in human cells. We found that the BRCA1-interaction site on PALB2 is targeted by an E3 ubiquitin ligase composed of KEAP1, a PALB2-interacting protein, in complex with cullin-3 (CUL3)-RBX1 (ref. 6). PALB2 ubiquitylation suppresses its interaction with BRCA1 and is counteracted by the deubiquitylase USP11, which is itself under cell cycle control. Restoration of the BRCA1-PALB2 interaction combined with the activation of DNA-end resection is sufficient to induce homologous recombination in G1, as measured by RAD51 recruitment, unscheduled DNA synthesis and a CRISPR-Cas9-based gene-targeting assay. We conclude that the mechanism prohibiting homologous recombination in G1 minimally consists of the suppression of DNA-end resection coupled with a multi-step block of the recruitment of BRCA2 to DNA damage sites that involves the inhibition of BRCA1-PALB2-BRCA2 complex assembly. We speculate that the ability to induce homologous recombination in G1 cells with defined factors could spur the development of gene-targeting applications in non-dividing cells. PMID:26649820

  18. G1/ELE Functions in the Development of Rice Lemmas in Addition to Determining Identities of Empty Glumes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mengjia; Li, Haifeng; Su, Yali; Li, Wenqiang; Shi, Chunhai

    2016-01-01

    Rice empty glumes, also named sterile lemmas or rudimentary lemmas according to different interpretations, are distinct from lemmas in morphology and cellular pattern. Consistently, the molecular mechanism to control the development of lemmas is different from that of empty glumes. Rice LEAFY HULL STERILE1(OsLHS1) and DROOPING LEAF(DL) regulate the cellular pattern and the number of vascular bundles of lemmas respectively, while LONG STERILE LEMMA1 (G1)/ELONGATED EMPTY GLUME (ELE) and PANICLE PHYTOMER2 (PAP2)/OsMADS34 determine identities of empty glumes. Though some progress has been made, identities of empty glumes remain unclear, and genetic interactions between lemma genes and glume genes have been rarely elucidated. In this research, a new G1/ELE mutant g1–6 was identified and the phenotype was analyzed. Similar to previously reported mutant lines of G1/ELE, empty glumes of g1–6 plants transform into lemma-like organs. Furthermore, Phenotypes of single and double mutant plants suggest that, in addition to their previously described gene-specific functions, G1/ELE and OsLHS1 play redundant roles in controlling vascular bundle number, cell volume, and cell layer number of empty glumes and lemmas. Meanwhile, expression patterns of G1/ELE in osmads1-z flowers and OsLHS1 in g1–6 flowers indicate they do not regulate each other at the level of transcription. Finally, down-regulation of the empty glume gene OsMADS34/PAP2 and ectopic expression of the lemma gene DL, in the g1–6 plants provide further evidence that empty glumes are sterile lemmas. Generally, our findings provided valuable information for better understanding functions of G1 and OsLHS1 in flower development and identities of empty glumes. PMID:27462334

  19. G1/ELE Functions in the Development of Rice Lemmas in Addition to Determining Identities of Empty Glumes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mengjia; Li, Haifeng; Su, Yali; Li, Wenqiang; Shi, Chunhai

    2016-01-01

    Rice empty glumes, also named sterile lemmas or rudimentary lemmas according to different interpretations, are distinct from lemmas in morphology and cellular pattern. Consistently, the molecular mechanism to control the development of lemmas is different from that of empty glumes. Rice LEAFY HULL STERILE1(OsLHS1) and DROOPING LEAF(DL) regulate the cellular pattern and the number of vascular bundles of lemmas respectively, while LONG STERILE LEMMA1 (G1)/ELONGATED EMPTY GLUME (ELE) and PANICLE PHYTOMER2 (PAP2)/OsMADS34 determine identities of empty glumes. Though some progress has been made, identities of empty glumes remain unclear, and genetic interactions between lemma genes and glume genes have been rarely elucidated. In this research, a new G1/ELE mutant g1-6 was identified and the phenotype was analyzed. Similar to previously reported mutant lines of G1/ELE, empty glumes of g1-6 plants transform into lemma-like organs. Furthermore, Phenotypes of single and double mutant plants suggest that, in addition to their previously described gene-specific functions, G1/ELE and OsLHS1 play redundant roles in controlling vascular bundle number, cell volume, and cell layer number of empty glumes and lemmas. Meanwhile, expression patterns of G1/ELE in osmads1-z flowers and OsLHS1 in g1-6 flowers indicate they do not regulate each other at the level of transcription. Finally, down-regulation of the empty glume gene OsMADS34/PAP2 and ectopic expression of the lemma gene DL, in the g1-6 plants provide further evidence that empty glumes are sterile lemmas. Generally, our findings provided valuable information for better understanding functions of G1 and OsLHS1 in flower development and identities of empty glumes. PMID:27462334

  20. HDAC4 Does Not Act as a Protein Deacetylase in the Postnatal Murine Brain In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Mielcarek, Michal; Seredenina, Tamara; Stokes, Matthew P.; Osborne, Georgina F.; Landles, Christian; Inuabasi, Linda; Franklin, Sophie A.; Silva, Jeffrey C.; Luthi-Carter, Ruth; Beaumont, Vahri; Bates, Gillian P.

    2013-01-01

    Reversible protein acetylation provides a central mechanism for controlling gene expression and cellular signaling events. It is governed by the antagonistic commitment of two enzymes families: the histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and the histone deacetylases (HDACs). HDAC4, like its class IIa counterparts, is a potent transcriptional repressor through interactions with tissue specific transcription factors via its N-terminal domain. Whilst the lysine deacetylase activity of the class IIa HDACs is much less potent than that of the class I enzymes, HDAC4 has been reported to influence protein deacetylation through its interaction with HDAC3. To investigate the influence of HDAC4 on protein acetylation we employed the immunoaffinity-based AcetylScan proteomic method. We identified many proteins known to be modified by acetylation, but found that the absence of HDAC4 had no effect on the acetylation profile of the murine neonate brain. This is consistent with the biochemical data suggesting that HDAC4 may not function as a lysine deacetylase, but these in vivo data do not support the previous report showing that the enzymatic activity of HDAC3 might be modified by its interaction with HDAC4. To complement this work, we used Affymetrix arrays to investigate the effect of HDAC4 knock-out on the transcriptional profile of the postnatal murine brain. There was no effect on global transcription, consistent with the absence of a differential histone acetylation profile. Validation of the array data by Taq-man qPCR indicated that only protamine 1 and Igfbp6 mRNA levels were increased by more than one-fold and only Calml4 was decreased. The lack of a major effect on the transcriptional profile is consistent with the cytoplasmic location of HDAC4 in the P3 murine brain. PMID:24278330

  1. LUMIX DMC-G1 - New Pleasantness of the Camera with Interchangeable Lenses That G1 Provides -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Hiroshi; Hataji, Shinji; Morishita, Seiki; Inoue, Yoshiyuki

    Panasonic introduced in October 2008 the "LUMIX DMC-G1", which is adopting the Micro Four Thirds standard. This camera was a hot topic from the time of the announcement in September and after the sales start it was highly evaluated not only due to its small size and light weight, but also due to the compact camera like easy operation realized by the mirror-less construction and due to the performance, which is on the same level like conventional consumer SLR cameras. Within this chapter we will explain about the technology behind the high-speed AF, which was seen as difficult to realize in a system based on Live View, and the high resolution Live View Finder, as well as about the new challenge of color variations, presented for the first time for an interchangeable lens camera.

  2. Measurement of the Structure Functions g1p and g1n with the CLAS at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Yelena Prok

    2003-06-01

    Inelastic scattering using polarized nucleon targets and polarized charged lepton beams allows the extraction of the structure functions g1 and g2 which provide information on the spin structure of the nucleon. A program designed to study such processes has been underway in Jefferson Lab since 1998. A polarized electron beam, solid polarized NH3 and ND3 targets and the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) in Hall B were used to collect the desired data. 3 billion events were accumulated during the first run, and over 23 billion events were accumulated during the second run. The measurements cover the resonance region with unprecedented detail and add significantly to the DIS data set at low to moderate Q2 and moderate to high x.

  3. NBM-T-BBX-OS01, Semisynthesized from Osthole, Induced G1 Growth Arrest through HDAC6 Inhibition in Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Pai, Jih-Tung; Hsu, Chia-Yun; Hua, Kuo-Tai; Yu, Sheng-Yung; Huang, Chung-Yang; Chen, Chia-Nan; Liao, Chiung-Ho; Weng, Meng-Shih

    2015-01-01

    Disrupting lung tumor growth via histone deacetylases (HDACs) inhibition is a strategy for cancer therapy or prevention. Targeting HDAC6 may disturb the maturation of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) mediated cell cycle regulation. In this study, we demonstrated the effects of semisynthesized NBM-T-BBX-OS01 (TBBX) from osthole on HDAC6-mediated growth arrest in lung cancer cells. The results exhibited that the anti-proliferative activity of TBBX in numerous lung cancer cells was more potent than suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a clinically approved pan-HDAC inhibitor, and the growth inhibitory effect has been mediated through G1 growth arrest. Furthermore, the protein levels of cyclin D1, CDK2 and CDK4 were reduced while cyclin E and CDK inhibitor, p21Waf1/Cip1, were up-regulated in TBBX-treated H1299 cells. The results also displayed that TBBX inhibited HDAC6 activity via down-regulation HDAC6 protein expression. TBBX induced Hsp90 hyper-acetylation and led to the disruption of cyclin D1/Hsp90 and CDK4/Hsp90 association following the degradation of cyclin D1 and CDK4 proteins through proteasome. Ectopic expression of HDAC6 rescued TBBX-induced G1 arrest in H1299 cells. Conclusively, the data suggested that TBBX induced G1 growth arrest may mediate HDAC6-caused Hsp90 hyper-acetylation and consequently increased the degradation of cyclin D1 and CDK4. PMID:25946558

  4. Early Evolution of Disrupted Asteroid P/2016 G1 (PANSTARRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, F.; Licandro, J.; Cabrera-Lavers, A.; Pozuelos, F. J.

    2016-08-01

    We present deep imaging observations of activated asteroid P/2016 G1 (PANSTARRS) using the 10.4 m Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC) from 2016 late April to early June. The images are best interpreted as the result of a relatively short-duration event with an onset of about {350}-30+10 days before perihelion (i.e., around 2016 February 10), starting sharply and decreasing with {24}-7+10 days (HWHM). The results of the modeling imply that the emission of ∼1.7 × 107 kg of dust, if composed of particles of 1 μm to 1 cm in radius, is distributed following a power law of index ‑3 and having a geometric albedo of 0.15. A detailed fitting of a conspicuous westward feature in the head of the comet-like object indicates that a significant fraction of the dust was ejected along a privileged direction right at the beginning of the event, which suggests that the parent body has possibly suffered an impact followed by a partial or total disruption. From the limiting magnitude reachable with the instrumental setup, and assuming a geometric albedo of 0.15 for the parent body, an upper limit for the size of possible fragment debris of ∼50 m in radius is derived.

  5. Early Evolution of Disrupted Asteroid P/2016 G1 (PANSTARRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, F.; Licandro, J.; Cabrera-Lavers, A.; Pozuelos, F. J.

    2016-08-01

    We present deep imaging observations of activated asteroid P/2016 G1 (PANSTARRS) using the 10.4 m Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC) from 2016 late April to early June. The images are best interpreted as the result of a relatively short-duration event with an onset of about {350}-30+10 days before perihelion (i.e., around 2016 February 10), starting sharply and decreasing with {24}-7+10 days (HWHM). The results of the modeling imply that the emission of ˜1.7 × 107 kg of dust, if composed of particles of 1 μm to 1 cm in radius, is distributed following a power law of index ‑3 and having a geometric albedo of 0.15. A detailed fitting of a conspicuous westward feature in the head of the comet-like object indicates that a significant fraction of the dust was ejected along a privileged direction right at the beginning of the event, which suggests that the parent body has possibly suffered an impact followed by a partial or total disruption. From the limiting magnitude reachable with the instrumental setup, and assuming a geometric albedo of 0.15 for the parent body, an upper limit for the size of possible fragment debris of ˜50 m in radius is derived.

  6. The disulphide bridges of a mouse immunoglobulin G1 protein

    PubMed Central

    Svasti, J.; Milstein, C.

    1972-01-01

    [35S]Cystine-labelled immunoglobulin MOPC21 (IgG1) was prepared from myeloma cells in tissue culture. Carrier myeloma protein was added and the protein was digested with pepsin. The digest was fractionated on Sephadex G-50 into two fractions, further digested with trypsin and again fractionated on Sephadex. Disulphide-bridge peptides were purified by electrophoresis and chromatography and identified by radioautography. A peptide of 96 residues was isolated, which contains both the heavy–light interchain disulphide bridge and all the inter-heavy-chain disulphide bridges. Other peptides were isolated, accounting for all the intrachain disulphide bridges (which could be placed by homology with proteins of other species), except for the variable section of the light chain. Sequences describing this missing disulphide bridge were obtained from totally reduced and alkylated light chains. Peptides related to the interchain disulphide-bridge peptide were isolated from partially reduced and alkylated myeloma protein and from totally reduced heavy chain. The interchain disulphide-bridge peptide was placed at the C-terminal position of the F(ab′)2 fragment, prepared by digestion of the protein with pepsin at pH4.0. Sequences from the heavy-chain intrachain disulphide bridges of MOPC 21 immunoglobulin are compared with homologous sequences from mouse myeloma proteins of other subclasses and proteins of other species. PMID:5073237

  7. Formula G1: Cell cycle in the driver's seat of stem cell fate determination.

    PubMed

    Julian, Lisa M; Carpenedo, Richard L; Rothberg, Janet L Manias; Stanford, William L

    2016-04-01

    Cell cycle dynamics has emerged as a key regulator of stem cell fate decisions. In particular, differentiation decisions are associated with the G1 phase, and recent evidence suggests that self-renewal is actively regulated outside of G1. The mechanisms underlying these phenomena are largely unknown, but direct control of gene regulatory programs by the cell cycle machinery is heavily implicated. A recent study sheds important mechanistic insight by demonstrating that in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) the Cyclin-dependent kinase CDK2 controls a wide-spread epigenetic program that drives transcription at differentiation-related gene promoters specifically in G1. Here, we discuss this finding and explore whether similar mechanisms are likely to function in multipotent stem cells. The implications of this discovery toward our understanding of stem cell-related disease are discussed, and we postulate novel mechanisms that position the cell cycle as a regulator of cell fate gene networks at epigenetic, transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. PMID:26857166

  8. The existence of inflection points for generalized log-aesthetic curves satisfying G1 data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpagavalli, R.; Gobithaasan, R. U.; Miura, K. T.; Shanmugavel, Madhavan

    2015-12-01

    Log-Aesthetic (LA) curves have been implemented in a CAD/CAM system for various design feats. LA curves possess linear Logarithmic Curvature Graph (LCG) with gradient (shape parameter) denoted as α. In 2009, a generalized form of LA curves called Generalized Log-Aesthetic Curves (GLAC) has been proposed which has an extra shape parameter as ν compared to LA curves. Recently, G1 continuous GLAC algorithm has been proposed which utilizes the extra shape parameter using four control points. This paper discusses on the existence of inflection points in a GLAC segment satisfying G1 Hermite data and the effect of inflection point on convex hull property. It is found that the existence of inflection point can be avoided by manipulating the value of α. Numerical experiments show that the increase of α may remove the inflection point (if any) in a GLAC segment.

  9. The Drosophila melanogaster developmental gene g1 encodes a variant zinc-finger-motif protein.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, M L; Côté, S

    1993-03-30

    In Drosophila melanogaster, the mechanisms involved in the pattern formation of complex internal organs are still largely unknown. However, the identity of the molecular determinants that control the development of these specific tissues is emerging from the combined use of genetic and molecular approaches. We have cloned a gene that is expressed in the mesoderm, one of the fundamental embryonic germ layers which gives rise to internal structures, such as the musculature. Here, we describe the molecular characterization of this gene, designated as g1. The nucleotide (nt) sequence of its cDNA shows an open reading frame of 852 nt, which encodes a 32-kDa protein with two putative zinc fingers, and a serine/glutamine/proline-rich region. These features indicate a functional role for g1, which remains to be elucidated, in regulating gene expression during mesoderm formation. PMID:8462875

  10. Influence of temperature cycling on the production of aflatoxins B1 and G1 by Aspergillus parasiticus.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Y C; Ayres, J C; Koehler, P E

    1980-01-01

    The effect of temperature cycling on the relative productions of aflatoxins B1 and G1 by Aspergillus parasiticus NRRL 2999 was studied. The cycling of temperature between 33 and 15 degrees C favored aflatoxin B1 accumulation, whereas cycling between 35 and 15 degrees C favored aflatoxin G1 production. Cultures subjected to temperature cycling between 33 and 25 degrees C at various time intervals changed the relative productions of aflatoxins B1 and G1 drastically. Results obtained with temperature cycling and yeast extract-sucrose medium with ethoxyquin to decrease aflatoxin G1 production suggest that the enzyme system responsible for the conversion of aflatoxin B1 to G1 might be more efficient at 25 degrees C than at 33 degrees C. The possible explanation of the effect of both constant and cycling temperatures on the relative accumulations of aflatoxins B1 and G2 might be through the control of the above enzyme system. The study also showed that greater than 57% of aflatoxin B1, greater than 47% of aflatoxin G1, and greater than 50% of total aflatoxins (B1 plus G1) were in the mycelium by day 10 under both constant and cyclic temperature conditions. PMID:6781404

  11. Histone Deacetylase 6 Regulates Bladder Architecture and Host Susceptibility to Uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Adam J.; Dhakal, Bijaya K.; Liu, Ting; Mulvey, Matthew A.

    2016-01-01

    Histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) is a non-canonical, mostly cytosolic histone deacetylase that has a variety of interacting partners and substrates. Previous work using cell-culture based assays coupled with pharmacological inhibitors and gene-silencing approaches indicated that HDAC6 promotes the actin- and microtubule-dependent invasion of host cells by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC). These facultative intracellular pathogens are the major cause of urinary tract infections. Here, we examined the involvement of HDAC6 in bladder colonization by UPEC using HDAC6 knockout mice. Though UPEC was unable to invade HDAC6−/− cells in culture, the bacteria had an enhanced ability to colonize the bladders of mice that lacked HDAC6. This effect was transient, and by six hours post-inoculation bacterial titers in the HDAC6−/− mice were reduced to levels seen in wild type control animals. Subsequent analyses revealed that the mutant mice had greater bladder volume capacity and fluid retention, along with much higher levels of acetylated α-tubulin. In addition, infiltrating neutrophils recovered from the HDAC6−/− bladder harbored significantly more viable bacteria than their wild type counterparts. Cumulatively, these changes may negate any inhibitory effects that the lack of HDAC6 has on UPEC entry into individual host cells, and suggest roles for HDAC6 in other urological disorders such as urinary retention. PMID:26907353

  12. Modulation of NF-kappaB-dependent transcription and cell survival by the SIRT1 deacetylase.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Fan; Hoberg, Jamie E; Ramsey, Catherine S; Keller, Michael D; Jones, David R; Frye, Roy A; Mayo, Marty W

    2004-06-16

    NF-kappaB is responsible for upregulating gene products that control cell survival. In this study, we demonstrate that SIRT1, a nicotinamide adenosine dinucleotide-dependent histone deacetylase, regulates the transcriptional activity of NF-kappaB. SIRT1, the mammalian ortholog of the yeast SIR2 (Silencing Information Regulator) and a member of the Sirtuin family, has been implicated in modulating transcriptional silencing and cell survival. SIRT1 physically interacts with the RelA/p65 subunit of NF-kappaB and inhibits transcription by deacetylating RelA/p65 at lysine 310. Treatment of cells with resveratrol, a small-molecule agonist of Sirtuin activity, potentiates chromatin-associated SIRT1 protein on the cIAP-2 promoter region, an effect that correlates with a loss of NF-kappaB-regulated gene expression and sensitization of cells to TNFalpha-induced apoptosis. While SIRT1 is capable of protecting cells from p53-induced apoptosis, our work provides evidence that SIRT1 activity augments apoptosis in response to TNFalpha by the ability of the deacetylase to inhibit the transactivation potential of the RelA/p65 protein. PMID:15152190

  13. Dux4 induces cell cycle arrest at G1 phase through upregulation of p21 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Hongliang; Wang, Zhaoxia; Jin, Suqin; Hao, Hongjun; Zheng, Lemin; Zhou, Boda; Zhang, Wei; Lv, He; Yuan, Yun

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Dux4 induced TE671 cell proliferation defect and G1 phase arrest. • Dux4 upregulated p21 expression without activating p53. • Silencing p21 rescued Dux4 mediated proliferation defect and cell cycle arrest. • Sp1 binding site was required for Dux4-induced p21 promoter activation. - Abstract: It has been implicated that Dux4 plays crucial roles in development of facioscapulohumeral dystrophy. But the underlying myopathic mechanisms and related down-stream events of this retrogene were far from clear. Here, we reported that overexpression of Dux4 in a cell model TE671 reduced cell proliferation rate, and increased G1 phase accumulation. We also determined the impact of Dux4 on p53/p21 signal pathway, which controls the checkpoint in cell cycle progression. Overexpression of Dux4 increased p21 mRNA and protein level, while expression of p53, phospho-p53 remained unchanged. Silencing p21 rescued Dux4 mediated proliferation defect and cell cycle arrest. Furthermore, we demonstrated that enhanced Dux4 expression increased p21 promoter activity and elevated expression of Sp1 transcription factor. Mutation of Sp1 binding site decreased dux4 induced p21 promoter activation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays confirmed the Dux4-induced binding of Sp1 to p21 promoter in vivo. These results suggest that Dux4 might induce proliferation inhibition and G1 phase arrest through upregulation of p21.

  14. 26 CFR 1.904(g)-1 - Overall domestic loss and the overall domestic loss account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... loss account. 1.904(g)-1 Section 1.904(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... States § 1.904(g)-1 Overall domestic loss and the overall domestic loss account. For further guidance, see § 1.904(g)-1T....

  15. 26 CFR 1.904(g)-1 - Overall domestic loss and the overall domestic loss account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... loss account. 1.904(g)-1 Section 1.904(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... the United States § 1.904(g)-1 Overall domestic loss and the overall domestic loss account. For further guidance, see § 1.904(g)-1T....

  16. 26 CFR 1.904(g)-1 - Overall domestic loss and the overall domestic loss account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... loss account. 1.904(g)-1 Section 1.904(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... the United States § 1.904(g)-1 Overall domestic loss and the overall domestic loss account. For further guidance, see § 1.904(g)-1T....

  17. Diversity in the Sir2 family of protein deacetylases.

    PubMed

    Buck, Stephen W; Gallo, Christopher M; Smith, Jeffrey S

    2004-06-01

    The silent information regulator (Sir2) family of protein deacetylases (Sirtuins) are nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)(+)-dependent enzymes that hydrolyze one molecule of NAD(+) for every lysine residue that is deacetylated. The Sirtuins are phylogenetically conserved in eukaryotes, prokaryotes, and Archeal species. Prokaryotic and Archeal species usually have one or two Sirtuin homologs, whereas eukaryotes typically have multiple versions. The founding member of this protein family is the Sir2 histone deacetylase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which is absolutely required for transcriptional silencing in this organism. Sirtuins in other organisms often have nonhistone substrates and in eukaryotes, are not always localized in the nucleus. The diversity of substrates is reflected in the various biological activities that Sirtuins function, including development, metabolism, apoptosis, and heterochromatin formation. This review emphasizes the great diversity in Sirtuin function and highlights its unusual catalytic properties. PMID:14742637

  18. Physical and functional interactions between the histone H3K4 demethylase KDM5A and the nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase (NuRD) complex.

    PubMed

    Nishibuchi, Gohei; Shibata, Yukimasa; Hayakawa, Tomohiro; Hayakawa, Noriyo; Ohtani, Yasuko; Sinmyozu, Kaori; Tagami, Hideaki; Nakayama, Jun-ichi

    2014-10-17

    Histone H3K4 methylation has been linked to transcriptional activation. KDM5A (also known as RBP2 or JARID1A), a member of the KDM5 protein family, is an H3K4 demethylase, previously implicated in the regulation of transcription and differentiation. Here, we show that KDM5A is physically and functionally associated with two histone deacetylase complexes. Immunoaffinity purification of KDM5A confirmed a previously described association with the SIN3B-containing histone deacetylase complex and revealed an association with the nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase (NuRD) complex. Sucrose density gradient and sequential immunoprecipitation analyses further confirmed the stable association of KDM5A with these two histone deacetylase complexes. KDM5A depletion led to changes in the expression of hundreds of genes, two-thirds of which were also controlled by CHD4, the NuRD catalytic subunit. Gene ontology analysis confirmed that the genes commonly regulated by both KDM5A and CHD4 were categorized as developmentally regulated genes. ChIP analyses suggested that CHD4 modulates H3K4 methylation levels at the promoter and coding regions of target genes. We further demonstrated that the Caenorhabditis elegans homologues of KDM5 and CHD4 function in the same pathway during vulva development. These results suggest that KDM5A and the NuRD complex cooperatively function to control developmentally regulated genes. PMID:25190814

  19. Physical and Functional Interactions between the Histone H3K4 Demethylase KDM5A and the Nucleosome Remodeling and Deacetylase (NuRD) Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Nishibuchi, Gohei; Shibata, Yukimasa; Hayakawa, Tomohiro; Hayakawa, Noriyo; Ohtani, Yasuko; Sinmyozu, Kaori; Tagami, Hideaki; Nakayama, Jun-ichi

    2014-01-01

    Histone H3K4 methylation has been linked to transcriptional activation. KDM5A (also known as RBP2 or JARID1A), a member of the KDM5 protein family, is an H3K4 demethylase, previously implicated in the regulation of transcription and differentiation. Here, we show that KDM5A is physically and functionally associated with two histone deacetylase complexes. Immunoaffinity purification of KDM5A confirmed a previously described association with the SIN3B-containing histone deacetylase complex and revealed an association with the nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase (NuRD) complex. Sucrose density gradient and sequential immunoprecipitation analyses further confirmed the stable association of KDM5A with these two histone deacetylase complexes. KDM5A depletion led to changes in the expression of hundreds of genes, two-thirds of which were also controlled by CHD4, the NuRD catalytic subunit. Gene ontology analysis confirmed that the genes commonly regulated by both KDM5A and CHD4 were categorized as developmentally regulated genes. ChIP analyses suggested that CHD4 modulates H3K4 methylation levels at the promoter and coding regions of target genes. We further demonstrated that the Caenorhabditis elegans homologues of KDM5 and CHD4 function in the same pathway during vulva development. These results suggest that KDM5A and the NuRD complex cooperatively function to control developmentally regulated genes. PMID:25190814

  20. Functional characterization of Candida albicans Hos2 histone deacetylase

    PubMed Central

    Karthikeyan, G; Paul-Satyaseela, Maneesh; Dhatchana Moorthy, Nachiappan; Gopalaswamy, Radha; Narayanan, Shridhar

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans is a mucosal commensal organism capable of causing superficial (oral and vaginal thrush) infections in immune normal hosts, but is a major pathogen causing systemic and mucosal infections in immunocompromised individuals. Azoles have been very effective anti-fungal agents and the mainstay in treating opportunistic mold and yeast infections. Azole resistant strains have emerged compromising the utility of this class of drugs. It has been shown that azole resistance can be reversed by the co-administration of a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, suggesting that resistance is mediated by epigenetic mechanisms possibly involving Hos2, a fungal deacetylase. We report here the cloning and functional characterization of  HOS2 (High Osmolarity  Sensitive) , a gene coding for fungal histone deacetylase from  C. albicans. Inhibition studies showed that Hos2 is susceptible to pan inhibitors such as trichostatin A (TSA) and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), but is not inhibited by class I inhibitors such as MS-275. This  in  vitro enzymatic assay, which is amenable to high throughput could be used for screening potent fungal Hos2 inhibitors that could be a potential anti-fungal adjuvant. Purified Hos2 protein consistently deacetylated tubulins, rather than histones from TSA-treated cells. Hos2 has been reported to be a putative NAD+ dependent histone deacetylase, a feature of sirtuins. We assayed for sirtuin activation with resveratrol and purified Hos2 protein and did not find any sirtuin activity. PMID:25110576

  1. Preferential synthesis of the G1m(1) allotype of IgG1 in the central nervous system of multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Salier, J P; Goust, J M; Pandey, J P; Fudenberg, H H

    1981-09-18

    Quantitations of the G1m(1) and G1m(3) allotypic determinants of human immunoglobulin G were performed by radioimmunoassay on cerebrospinal fluid and serum samples from patients with multiple sclerosis and from patients with other neurological disorders. In multiple sclerosis patients that were heterozygous for these determinants, G1m(1) concentration in the cerebrospinal fluid was greatly increased-reflected by an increased ratio of G1m(1)-in comparison with that of patients with other neurological disorders. These results suggest that in the heterozygous multiple sclerosis patients, most of the plasma cells in the central nervous system that secrete oligoclonal immunoglobulin G preferentially synthesize G1m(1) IgG1 molecules. PMID:6973823

  2. Biochemical pathways that regulate acetyltransferase and deacetylase activity in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Mellert, Hestia S.; McMahon, Steven B.

    2009-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is dynamically regulated in eukaryotic cells via modulation of the enzymatic activity of kinases and phosphatases. Like phosphorylation, acetylation has emerged as a critical regulatory protein modification that is dynamically altered in response to diverse cellular cues. Moreover, acetyltransferases and deacetylases are tightly linked to cellular signaling pathways. Recent studies provide clues about the mechanisms utilized to regulate acetyltransferases and deacetylases. The therapeutic value of deacetylase inhibitors suggests that understanding acetylation pathways will directly impact our ability to rationally target these enzymes in patients. Recently discovered mechanisms which directly regulate the catalytic activity of acetyltransferases and deacetylases provide exciting new insights about these enzymes. PMID:19819149

  3. Studies on properties of the xylan‑binding domain and linker sequence of xylanase XynG1‑1 from Paenibacillus campinasensis G1‑1.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yihan; Huang, Lin; Li, Weiguo; Guo, Wei; Zheng, Hongchen; Wang, Jianling; Lu, Fuping

    2015-12-01

    Xylanase XynG1-1 from Paenibacillus campinasensis G1-1 consists of a catalytic domain (CD), a family 6_36 carbohydrate-binding module which is a xylan-binding domain (XBD), and a linker sequence (LS)between them. The structure of XynG1-3 from Bacillus pumilus G1-3 consists only of a CD. To investigate the functions and properties of the XBD and LS of XynG1-1, two truncated forms (XynG1-1CDL, XynG1-1CD) and three fusion derivatives (XynG1-3CDL, XynG1-3CDX and XynG1-3CDLX) were constructed and biochemically characterized. The optimum conditions for the catalytic activity of mutants of XynG1-1 and XynG1-3 were 60 °C and pH 7.0, and 55 °C and pH 8.0, respectively, the same as for the corresponding wild-type enzymes. XynGs with an XBD were stable over a broad temperature (30-80 °C)and pH range (4.0-11.0), respectively, on incubation for 3 h. Kinetic parameters (Km, kcat, kcat/Km) of XynGs were determined with soluble birchwood xylan and insoluble oat spelt xylan as substrates. XynGs with the XBD showed better affinities toward, and more efficient catalysis of hydrolysis of the insoluble substrate. The XBD had positive effects on thermostability and pH stability and a crucial function in the ability of the enzyme to bind and hydrolyze insoluble substrate. The LS had little effect on the overall stability of the xylanase and no relationship with affinities for soluble and insoluble substrates or catalytic efficiency. PMID:26467249

  4. Cell cycle transition from S-phase to G1 in Caulobacter is mediated by ancestral virulence regulators

    PubMed Central

    Fumeaux, Coralie; Radhakrishnan, Sunish Kumar; Ardissone, Silvia; Théraulaz, Laurence; Frandi, Antonio; Martins, Daniel; Nesper, Jutta; Abel, Sören; Jenal, Urs; Viollier, Patrick H.

    2014-01-01

    Zinc-finger domain transcriptional regulators regulate a myriad of functions in eukaryotes. Interestingly, ancestral versions (MucR) from Alpha-proteobacteria control bacterial virulence/symbiosis. Whether virulence regulators can also control cell cycle transcription is unknown. Here we report that MucR proteins implement a hitherto elusive primordial S→G1 transcriptional switch. After charting G1-specific promoters in the cell cycle model Caulobacter crescentus by comparative ChIP-seq, we use one such promoter as genetic proxy to unearth two MucR paralogs, MucR1/2, as constituents of a quadripartite and homeostatic regulatory module directing the S→G1 transcriptional switch. Surprisingly, MucR orthologues that regulate virulence and symbiosis gene transcription in Brucella, Agrobacterium or Sinorhizobium support this S→G1 switch in Caulobacter. Pan-genomic ChIP-seq analyses in Sinorhizobium and Caulobacter show that this module indeed targets orthologous genes. We propose that MucR proteins and possibly other virulence regulators primarily control bacterial cell cycle (G1-phase) transcription, rendering expression of target (virulence) genes periodic and in tune with the cell cycle. PMID:24939058

  5. Human HDAC7 Harbors a Class IIa Histone Deacetylase-specific Zinc Binding Motif and Cryptic Deacetylase Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Schuetz, Anja; Min, Jinrong; Allali-Hassani, Abdellah; Schapira, Matthieu; Shuen, Michael; Loppnau, Peter; Mazitschek, Ralph; Kwiatkowski, Nick P.; Lewis, Timothy A.; Maglathin, Rebecca L.; McLean, Thomas H.; Bochkarev, Alexey; Plotnikov, Alexander N.; Vedadi, Masoud; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.

    2010-10-18

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are protein deacetylases that play a role in repression of gene transcription and are emerging targets in cancer therapy. Here, we characterize the structure and enzymatic activity of the catalytic domain of human HDAC7 (cdHDAC7). Although HDAC7 normally exists as part of a multiprotein complex, we show that cdHDAC7 has a low level of deacetylase activity which can be inhibited by known HDAC inhibitors. The crystal structures of human cdHDAC7 and its complexes with two hydroxamate inhibitors are the first structures of the catalytic domain of class IIa HDACs and demonstrate significant differences with previously reported class I and class IIb-like HDAC structures. We show that cdHDAC7 has an additional class IIa HDAC-specific zinc binding motif adjacent to the active site which is likely to participate in substrate recognition and protein-protein interaction and may provide a site for modulation of activity. Furthermore, a different active site topology results in modified catalytic properties and in an enlarged active site pocket. Our studies provide mechanistic insights into class IIa HDACs and facilitate the design of specific modulators.

  6. Rational therapeutic combinations with histone deacetylase inhibitors for the treatment of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thurn, K Ted; Thomas, Scott; Moore, Amy; Munster, Pamela N

    2011-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) regulate the acetylation of a variety of histone and nonhistone proteins, controlling the transcription and regulation of genes involved in cell cycle control, proliferation, survival, DNA repair and differentiation. Unsurprisingly, HDAC expression is frequently altered in hematologic and solid tumor malignancies. Two HDAC inhibitors (vorinostat and romidepsin) have been approved by the US FDA for the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. As single agents, treatment with HDAC inhibitors has demonstrated limited clinical benefit for patients with solid tumors, prompting the investigation of novel treatment combinations with other cancer therapeutics. In this article, the rationales and clinical progress of several combinations with HDAC inhibitors are presented, including DNA-damaging chemotherapeutic agents, radiotherapy, hormonal therapies, DNA methyltransferase inhibitors and various small-molecule inhibitors. The future application of HDAC inhibitors as a treatment for cancer is discussed, examining current hurdles to overcome before realizing the potential of this new approach. PMID:21345145

  7. The histone deacetylase inhibitor Entinostat enhances polymer-mediated transgene expression in cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Elmer, Jacob J; Christensen, Matthew D; Barua, Sutapa; Lehrman, Jennifer; Haynes, Karmella A; Rege, Kaushal

    2016-06-01

    Eukaryotic cells maintain an immense amount of genetic information by tightly wrapping their DNA around positively charged histones. While this strategy allows human cells to maintain more than 25,000 genes, histone binding can also block gene expression. Consequently, cells express histone acetyl transferases (HATs) to acetylate histone lysines and release DNA for transcription. Conversely, histone deacetylases (HDACs) are employed for restoring the positive charge on the histones, thereby silencing gene expression by increasing histone-DNA binding. It has previously been shown that histones bind and silence viral DNA, while hyperacetylation of histones via HDAC inhibition restores viral gene expression. In this study, we demonstrate that treatment with Entinostat, an HDAC inhibitor, enhances transgene (luciferase) expression by up to 25-fold in human prostate and murine bladder cancer cell lines when used with cationic polymers for plasmid DNA delivery. Entinostat treatment altered cell cycle progression, resulting in a significant increase in the fraction of cells present in the G0/G1 phase at low micromolar concentrations. While this moderate G0/G1 arrest disappeared at higher concentrations, a modest increase in the fraction of apoptotic cells and a decrease in cell proliferation were observed, consistent with the known anticancer effects of the drug. DNase accessibility studies revealed no significant change in plasmid transcriptional availability with Entinostat treatment. However, quantitative PCR studies indicated that Entinostat treatment, at the optimal dose for enhancing transgene expression, led to an increase in the amount of plasmid present in the nucleus in two cancer cell lines. Taken together, our results show that Entinostat enhances polymer- mediated transgene expression and can be useful in applications related to transient protein expression in mammalian cells. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1345-1356. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID

  8. The G1 restriction point as critical regulator of neocortical neuronogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caviness, V. S. Jr; Takahashi, T.; Nowakowski, R. S.

    1999-01-01

    Neuronogenesis in the pseudostratified ventricular epithelium is the initial process in a succession of histogenetic events which give rise to the laminate neocortex. Here we review experimental findings in mouse which support the thesis that the restriction point of the G1 phase of the cell cycle is the critical point of regulation of the overall neuronogenetic process. The neuronogenetic interval in mouse spans 6 days. In the course of these 6 days the founder population and its progeny execute 11 cell cycles. With each successive cycle there is an increase in the fraction of postmitotic cells which leaves the cycle (the Q fraction) and also an increase in the length of the cell cycle due to an increase in the length of the G1 phase of the cycle. Q corresponds to the probability that postmitotic cells will exit the cycle at the restriction point of the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Q increases non-linearly, but the rate of change of Q with cycle (i.e., the first derivative) over the course of the neuronogenetic interval is a constant, k, which appears to be set principally by cell internal mechanisms which are species specific. Q also seems to be modulated, but at low amplitude, by a balance of mitogenic and antimitogenic influences acting from without the cell. We suggest that intracellular signal transduction systems control a general advance of Q during development and thereby determine the general developmental plan (i.e., cell number and laminar composition) of the neocortex and that external mitogens and anti-mitogens modulate this advance regionally and temporally and thereby produce regional modifications of the general plan.

  9. Mitotic phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 4G1 (eIF4G1) at Ser1232 by Cdk1:cyclin B inhibits eIF4A helicase complex binding with RNA.

    PubMed

    Dobrikov, Mikhail I; Shveygert, Mayya; Brown, Michael C; Gromeier, Matthias

    2014-02-01

    During mitosis, global translation is suppressed, while synthesis of proteins with vital mitotic roles must go on. Prior evidence suggests that the mitotic translation shift involves control of initiation. Yet, no signals specifically targeting translation initiation factors during mitosis have been identified. We used phosphoproteomics to investigate the central translation initiation scaffold and "ribosome adaptor," eukaryotic initiation factor 4G1 (eIF4G1) in interphase or nocodazole-arrested mitotic cells. This approach and kinase inhibition assays, in vitro phosphorylation with recombinant kinase, and kinase depletion-reconstitution experiments revealed that Ser1232 in eIF4G1 is phosphorylated by cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1):cyclin B during mitosis. Ser1232 is located in an unstructured region of the C-terminal portion of eIF4G1 that coordinates assembly of the eIF4G/-4A/-4B helicase complex and binding of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signal-integrating kinase, Mnk. Intense phosphorylation of Ser1232 in mitosis strongly enhanced the interactions of eIF4A with HEAT domain 2 of eIF4G and decreased association of eIF4G/-4A with RNA. Our findings implicate phosphorylation of eIF4G1(Ser1232) by Cdk1:cyclin B and its inhibitory effects on eIF4A helicase activity in the mitotic translation initiation shift. PMID:24248602

  10. Assembly of the SMRT–histone deacetylase 3 repression complex requires the TCP-1 ring complex

    PubMed Central

    Guenther, Matthew G.; Yu, Jiujiu; Kao, Gary D.; Yen, Tim J.; Lazar, Mitchell A.

    2002-01-01

    The acetylation of histone tails is a primary determinant of gene activity. Histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) requires the nuclear receptor corepressor SMRT for HDAC enzyme activity. Here we report that HDAC3 interacts with SMRT only after priming by cellular chaperones including the TCP-1 ring complex (TRiC), which is required for proper folding of HDAC3 in an ATP-dependent process. SMRT displaces TRiC from HDAC3, yielding an active HDAC enzyme. The SMRT–HDAC3 repression complex thus joins the VHL–elongin BC tumor suppression complex and the cyclin E–Cdk2 cell cycle regulation complex as critical cellular machines requiring TRiC for proper assembly and function. The strict control of HDAC3 activity underscores the cellular imperative that histone deacetylation occur only in targeted regions of the genome. PMID:12502735

  11. Histone Deacetylase (HDAC) Inhibitors - Emerging Roles in Neuronal Memory, Learning, Synaptic Plasticity and Neural Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad Ganai, Shabir; Ramadoss, Mahalakshmi; Mahadevan, Vijayalakshmi

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic regulation of neuronal signalling through histone acetylation dictates transcription programs that govern neuronal memory, plasticity and learning paradigms. Histone Acetyl Transferases (HATs) and Histone Deacetylases (HDACs) are antagonistic enzymes that regulate gene expression through acetylation and deacetylation of histone proteins around which DNA is wrapped inside a eukaryotic cell nucleus. The epigenetic control of HDACs and the cellular imbalance between HATs and HDACs dictate disease states and have been implicated in muscular dystrophy, loss of memory, neurodegeneration and autistic disorders. Altering gene expression profiles through inhibition of HDACs is now emerging as a powerful technique in therapy. This review presents evolving applications of HDAC inhibitors as potential drugs in neurological research and therapy. Mechanisms that govern their expression profiles in neuronal signalling, plasticity and learning will be covered. Promising and exciting possibilities of HDAC inhibitors in memory formation, fear conditioning, ischemic stroke and neural regeneration have been detailed. PMID:26487502

  12. Role of histone acetyltransferases and histone deacetylases in adipocyte differentiation and adipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuanfei; Peng, Jian; Jiang, Siwen

    2014-04-01

    Adipogenesis is a complex process strictly regulated by a well-established cascade that has been thoroughly studied in the last two decades. This process is governed by complex regulatory networks that involve the activation/inhibition of multiple functional genes, and is controlled by histone-modifying enzymes. Among such modification enzymes, histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs) play important roles in the transcriptional regulation and post-translational modification of protein acetylation. HATs and HDACs have been shown to respond to signals that regulate cell differentiation, participate in the regulation of protein acetylation, mediate transcription and post-translation modifications, and directly acetylate/deacetylate various transcription factors and regulatory proteins. In this paper, we review the role of HATs and HDACs in white and brown adipocyte differentiation and adipogenesis, to expand our knowledge on fat formation and adipose tissue biology. PMID:24810880

  13. Dynamic phosphorylation of Histone Deacetylase 1 by Aurora kinases during mitosis regulates zebrafish embryos development

    PubMed Central

    Loponte, Sara; Segré, Chiara V.; Senese, Silvia; Miccolo, Claudia; Santaguida, Stefano; Deflorian, Gianluca; Citro, Simona; Mattoscio, Domenico; Pisati, Federica; Moser, Mirjam A.; Visintin, Rosella; Seiser, Christian; Chiocca, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) catalyze the removal of acetyl molecules from histone and non-histone substrates playing important roles in chromatin remodeling and control of gene expression. Class I HDAC1 is a critical regulator of cell cycle progression, cellular proliferation and differentiation during development; it is also regulated by many post-translational modifications (PTMs). Herein we characterize a new mitosis-specific phosphorylation of HDAC1 driven by Aurora kinases A and B. We show that this phosphorylation affects HDAC1 enzymatic activity and it is critical for the maintenance of a proper proliferative and developmental plan in a complex organism. Notably, we find that Aurora-dependent phosphorylation of HDAC1 regulates histone acetylation by modulating the expression of genes directly involved in the developing zebrafish central nervous system. Our data represent a step towards the comprehension of HDAC1 regulation by its PTM code, with important implications in unravelling its roles both in physiology and pathology. PMID:27458029

  14. Histone Deacetylase (HDAC) Inhibitors - emerging roles in neuronal memory, learning, synaptic plasticity and neural regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ganai, Shabir Ahmad; Ramadoss, Mahalakshmi; Mahadevan, Vijayalakshmi

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic regulation of neuronal signalling through histone acetylation dictates transcription programs that govern neuronal memory, plasticity and learning paradigms. Histone Acetyl Transferases (HATs) and Histone Deacetylases (HDACs) are antagonistic enzymes that regulate gene expression through acetylation and deacetylation of histone proteins around which DNA is wrapped inside a eukaryotic cell nucleus. The epigenetic control of HDACs and the cellular imbalance between HATs and HDACs dictate disease states and have been implicated in muscular dystrophy, loss of memory, neurodegeneration and autistic disorders. Altering gene expression profiles through inhibition of HDACs is now emerging as a powerful technique in therapy. This review presents evolving applications of HDAC inhibitors as potential drugs in neurological research and therapy. Mechanisms that govern their expression profiles in neuronal signalling, plasticity and learning will be covered. Promising and exciting possibilities of HDAC inhibitors in memory formation, fear conditioning, ischemic stroke and neural regeneration have been detailed. PMID:26487502

  15. Histone Deacetylase 7 Promotes PML Sumoylation and Is Essential for PML Nuclear Body Formation▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Chengzhuo; Ho, Chun-Chen; Reineke, Erin; Lam, Minh; Cheng, Xiwen; Stanya, Kristopher J.; Liu, Yu; Chakraborty, Sharmistha; Shih, Hsiu-Ming; Kao, Hung-Ying

    2008-01-01

    Promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) sumoylation has been proposed to control the formation of PML nuclear bodies (NBs) and is crucial for PML-dependent cellular processes, including apoptosis and transcriptional regulation. However, the regulatory mechanisms of PML sumoylation and its specific roles in the formation of PML NBs remain largely unknown. Here, we show that histone deacetylase 7 (HDAC7) knockdown reduces the size and the number of the PML NBs in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). HDAC7 coexpression stimulates PML sumoylation independent of its HDAC activity. Furthermore, HDAC7 associates with the E2 SUMO ligase, Ubc9, and stimulates PML sumoylation in vitro, suggesting that it possesses a SUMO E3 ligase-like activity to promote PML sumoylation. Importantly, HDAC7 knockdown inhibits tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced PML sumoylation and the formation of PML NBs in HUVECs. These results demonstrate a novel function of HDAC7 and provide a regulatory mechanism of PML sumoylation. PMID:18625722

  16. Dynamic phosphorylation of Histone Deacetylase 1 by Aurora kinases during mitosis regulates zebrafish embryos development.

    PubMed

    Loponte, Sara; Segré, Chiara V; Senese, Silvia; Miccolo, Claudia; Santaguida, Stefano; Deflorian, Gianluca; Citro, Simona; Mattoscio, Domenico; Pisati, Federica; Moser, Mirjam A; Visintin, Rosella; Seiser, Christian; Chiocca, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) catalyze the removal of acetyl molecules from histone and non-histone substrates playing important roles in chromatin remodeling and control of gene expression. Class I HDAC1 is a critical regulator of cell cycle progression, cellular proliferation and differentiation during development; it is also regulated by many post-translational modifications (PTMs). Herein we characterize a new mitosis-specific phosphorylation of HDAC1 driven by Aurora kinases A and B. We show that this phosphorylation affects HDAC1 enzymatic activity and it is critical for the maintenance of a proper proliferative and developmental plan in a complex organism. Notably, we find that Aurora-dependent phosphorylation of HDAC1 regulates histone acetylation by modulating the expression of genes directly involved in the developing zebrafish central nervous system. Our data represent a step towards the comprehension of HDAC1 regulation by its PTM code, with important implications in unravelling its roles both in physiology and pathology. PMID:27458029

  17. Inhibitors of Histone Deacetylases Attenuate Noise-Induced Hearing Loss.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Hill, Kayla; Sha, Su-Hua

    2016-08-01

    Loss of auditory sensory hair cells is the major pathological feature of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). Currently, no established clinical therapies for prevention or amelioration of NIHL are available. The absence of treatments is due to our lack of a comprehensive understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying noise-induced damage. Our previous study indicates that epigenetic modification of histones alters hair cell survival. In this study, we investigated the effect of noise exposure on histone H3 lysine 9 acetylation (H3K9ac) in the inner ear of adult CBA/J mice and determined if inhibition of histone deacetylases by systemic administration of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) could attenuate NIHL. Our results showed that H3K9ac was decreased in the nuclei of outer hair cells (OHCs) and marginal cells of the stria vascularis in the basal region after exposure to a traumatic noise paradigm known to induce permanent threshold shifts (PTS). Consistent with these results, levels of histone deacetylases 1, 2, and 3 (HDAC1, HDAC2 and HDAC3) were increased predominately in the nuclei of cochlear cells. Silencing of HDAC1, HDAC2, or HDAC3 with siRNA reduced the expression of the target HDAC in OHCs, but did not attenuate noise-induced PTS, whereas treatment with the pan-HDAC inhibitor SAHA, also named vorinostat, reduced OHC loss, and attenuated PTS. These findings suggest that histone acetylation is involved in the pathogenesis of noise-induced OHC death and hearing loss. Pharmacological targeting of histone deacetylases may afford a strategy for protection against NIHL. PMID:27095478

  18. Histone Deacetylase 9 Is a Negative Regulator of Adipogenic Differentiation*

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Tapan K.; Idelman, Gila; Blanco, Victor; Blomkalns, Andra L.; Piegore, Mark G.; Weintraub, Daniel S.; Kumar, Santosh; Rajsheker, Srinivas; Manka, David; Rudich, Steven M.; Tang, Yaoliang; Hui, David Y.; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N.; Lingrel, Jerry B.; Ho, Shuk-Mei; Weintraub, Neal L.

    2011-01-01

    Differentiation of preadipocytes into mature adipocytes capable of efficiently storing lipids is an important regulatory mechanism in obesity. Here, we examined the involvement of histone deacetylases (HDACs) and histone acetyltransferases (HATs) in the regulation of adipogenesis. We find that among the various members of the HDAC and HAT families, only HDAC9 exhibited dramatic down-regulation preceding adipogenic differentiation. Preadipocytes from HDAC9 gene knock-out mice exhibited accelerated adipogenic differentiation, whereas HDAC9 overexpression in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes suppressed adipogenic differentiation, demonstrating its direct role as a negative regulator of adipogenesis. HDAC9 expression was higher in visceral as compared with subcutaneous preadipocytes, negatively correlating with their potential to undergo adipogenic differentiation in vitro. HDAC9 localized in the nucleus, and its negative regulation of adipogenesis segregates with the N-terminal nuclear targeting domain, whereas the C-terminal deacetylase domain is dispensable for this function. HDAC9 co-precipitates with USF1 and is recruited with USF1 at the E-box region of the C/EBPα gene promoter in preadipocytes. Upon induction of adipogenic differentiation, HDAC9 is down-regulated, leading to its dissociation from the USF1 complex, whereas p300 HAT is up-regulated to allow its association with USF1 and accumulation at the E-box site of the C/EBPα promoter in differentiated adipocytes. This reciprocal regulation of HDAC9 and p300 HAT in the USF1 complex is associated with increased C/EBPα expression, a master regulator of adipogenic differentiation. These findings provide new insights into mechanisms of adipogenic differentiation and document a critical regulatory role for HDAC9 in adipogenic differentiation through a deacetylase-independent mechanism. PMID:21680747

  19. 26 CFR 301.6501(g)-1 - Certain income tax returns of corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Certain income tax returns of corporations. 301.6501(g)-1 Section 301.6501(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... and Collection § 301.6501(g)-1 Certain income tax returns of corporations. (a) Trusts or...

  20. 26 CFR 301.6223(g)-1 - Responsibilities of the tax matters partner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... contained in 26 CFR part 1, revised April 1, 2001. .... 301.6223(g)-1 Section 301.6223(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE....6223(g)-1 Responsibilities of the tax matters partner. (a) Notices described in section...

  1. 26 CFR 1.143(g)-1 - Requirements related to arbitrage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Requirements related to arbitrage. 1.143(g)-1 Section 1.143(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED....143(g)-1 Requirements related to arbitrage. (a) In general. Under section 143, for an issue to be...

  2. 26 CFR 25.2523(g)-1 - Special rule for charitable remainder trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... 25.2523(g)-1 Section 25.2523(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE....2523(g)-1 Special rule for charitable remainder trusts. (a) In general. (1) With respect to gifts made... passing to the spouse qualifies for a marital deduction under section 2523(g) and the value of...

  3. 16 CFR Appendix G1 to Part 305 - Furnaces-Gas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Furnaces-Gas G1 Appendix G1 to Part 305... RULEâ) Appendix G1 to Part 305—Furnaces—Gas Furnace type Range of annual fuel utilization efficiencies (AFUEs) Low High Gas Furnaces Manufactured Before the Compliance Date of DOE Regional...

  4. 26 CFR 1.860G-1 - Definition of regular and residual interests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 9 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Definition of regular and residual interests. 1.860G-1 Section 1.860G-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Real Estate Investment Trusts § 1.860G-1 Definition of regular and residual interests....

  5. 26 CFR 1.404(g)-1 - Deduction of employer liability payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... of Plan Sufficiency and Termination of Sufficient Plans. See PBGC regulations, 29 CFR 2617.13(b) for...(g)-1 Section 1.404(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY.... § 1.404(g)-1 Deduction of employer liability payments. (a) General rule. Employer liability...

  6. 26 CFR 301.6511(g)-1 - Special rule for partnership items of federally registered partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... registered partnerships. 301.6511(g)-1 Section 301.6511(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Limitations on Assessment and Collection § 301.6511(g)-1 Special rule for partnership items of federally...(g) must also be taken into account in applying the various special periods of limitation...

  7. 26 CFR 1.430(g)-1 - Valuation date and valuation of plan assets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ....430(g)-1 Section 1.430(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Certain Stock Options § 1.430(g)-1 Valuation date... plan's valuation date and the valuation of a plan's assets for a plan year under section...

  8. 26 CFR 301.6511(g)-1 - Special rule for partnership items of federally registered partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... registered partnerships. 301.6511(g)-1 Section 301.6511(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Limitations on Assessment and Collection § 301.6511(g)-1 Special rule for partnership items of federally...(g) must also be taken into account in applying the various special periods of limitation...

  9. 26 CFR 25.2523(g)-1 - Special rule for charitable remainder trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .... 25.2523(g)-1 Section 25.2523(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE....2523(g)-1 Special rule for charitable remainder trusts. (a) In general. (1) With respect to gifts made... passing to the spouse qualifies for a marital deduction under section 2523(g) and the value of...

  10. 26 CFR 1.415(g)-1 - Disqualification of plans and trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Disqualification of plans and trusts. 1.415(g)-1 Section 1.415(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED...(g)-1 Disqualification of plans and trusts. (a) Disqualification of plans—(1) In general....

  11. 26 CFR 1.404(g)-1 - Deduction of employer liability payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... of Plan Sufficiency and Termination of Sufficient Plans. See PBGC regulations, 29 CFR 2617.13(b) for...(g)-1 Section 1.404(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY.... § 1.404(g)-1 Deduction of employer liability payments. (a) General rule. Employer liability...

  12. 26 CFR 1.904(g)-1 - Overall domestic loss and the overall domestic loss account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... sustained in other taxable years beginning after December 31, 2006, including periods covered by 26 CFR § 1... loss account. 1.904(g)-1 Section 1.904(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... the United States § 1.904(g)-1 Overall domestic loss and the overall domestic loss account....

  13. 26 CFR 25.2523(g)-1 - Special rule for charitable remainder trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ....2523(g)-1 Section 25.2523(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES GIFT TAX; GIFTS MADE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 1954 Deductions § 25.2523(g)-1... passing to the spouse qualifies for a marital deduction under section 2523(g) and the value of...

  14. 26 CFR 1.430(g)-1 - Valuation date and valuation of plan assets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ....430(g)-1 Section 1.430(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Certain Stock Options § 1.430(g)-1 Valuation date... plan's valuation date and the valuation of a plan's assets for a plan year under section...

  15. 26 CFR 301.6223(g)-1 - Responsibilities of the tax matters partner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... contained in 26 CFR part 1, revised April 1, 2001. .... 301.6223(g)-1 Section 301.6223(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE....6223(g)-1 Responsibilities of the tax matters partner. (a) Notices described in section...

  16. 26 CFR 301.6223(g)-1 - Responsibilities of the tax matters partner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... contained in 26 CFR part 1, revised April 1, 2001. .... 301.6223(g)-1 Section 301.6223(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE....6223(g)-1 Responsibilities of the tax matters partner. (a) Notices described in section...

  17. 26 CFR 25.2523(g)-1 - Special rule for charitable remainder trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ....2523(g)-1 Section 25.2523(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES GIFT TAX; GIFTS MADE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 1954 Deductions § 25.2523(g)-1... passing to the spouse qualifies for a marital deduction under section 2523(g) and the value of...

  18. 26 CFR 1.414(g)-1 - Definition of plan administrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Definition of plan administrator. 1.414(g)-1 Section 1.414(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED...(g)-1 Definition of plan administrator. (a) In general. For purposes of part I of subchapter D...

  19. 26 CFR 301.6511(g)-1 - Special rule for partnership items of federally registered partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... registered partnerships. 301.6511(g)-1 Section 301.6511(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Limitations on Assessment and Collection § 301.6511(g)-1 Special rule for partnership items of federally...(g) must also be taken into account in applying the various special periods of limitation...

  20. 26 CFR 1.415(g)-1 - Disqualification of plans and trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Disqualification of plans and trusts. 1.415(g)-1 Section 1.415(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED...(g)-1 Disqualification of plans and trusts. (a) Disqualification of plans—(1) In general....

  1. 26 CFR 301.6501(g)-1 - Certain income tax returns of corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Certain income tax returns of corporations. 301.6501(g)-1 Section 301.6501(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... and Collection § 301.6501(g)-1 Certain income tax returns of corporations. (a) Trusts or...

  2. 26 CFR 301.6501(g)-1 - Certain income tax returns of corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Certain income tax returns of corporations. 301.6501(g)-1 Section 301.6501(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... and Collection § 301.6501(g)-1 Certain income tax returns of corporations. (a) Trusts or...

  3. 26 CFR 301.6501(g)-1 - Certain income tax returns of corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Certain income tax returns of corporations. 301.6501(g)-1 Section 301.6501(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... and Collection § 301.6501(g)-1 Certain income tax returns of corporations. (a) Trusts or...

  4. 26 CFR 301.6501(g)-1 - Certain income tax returns of corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Certain income tax returns of corporations. 301.6501(g)-1 Section 301.6501(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... and Collection § 301.6501(g)-1 Certain income tax returns of corporations. (a) Trusts or...

  5. 26 CFR 1.402(g)-1 - Limitation on exclusion for elective deferrals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... of 26 CFR Part 1). (ii) Method of allocating income. A plan may use any reasonable method for.... 1.402(g)-1 Section 1.402(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY.... § 1.402(g)-1 Limitation on exclusion for elective deferrals. (a) In general. The excess of...

  6. 26 CFR 1.143(g)-1 - Requirements related to arbitrage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Requirements related to arbitrage. 1.143(g)-1 Section 1.143(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED....143(g)-1 Requirements related to arbitrage. (a) In general. Under section 143, for an issue to be...

  7. 26 CFR 1.665(g)-1A - Capital gain distribution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Capital gain distribution. 1.665(g)-1A Section 1.665(g)-1A Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX... Beginning on Or After January 1, 1969 § 1.665(g)-1A Capital gain distribution. For any taxable year of...

  8. 26 CFR 1.402(g)-1 - Limitation on exclusion for elective deferrals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... of 26 CFR Part 1). (ii) Method of allocating income. A plan may use any reasonable method for.... 1.402(g)-1 Section 1.402(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY.... § 1.402(g)-1 Limitation on exclusion for elective deferrals. (a) In general. The excess of...

  9. 26 CFR 301.6223(g)-1 - Responsibilities of the tax matters partner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... contained in 26 CFR part 1, revised April 1, 2001. .... 301.6223(g)-1 Section 301.6223(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE....6223(g)-1 Responsibilities of the tax matters partner. (a) Notices described in section...

  10. 26 CFR 1.665(g)-1A - Capital gain distribution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Capital gain distribution. 1.665(g)-1A Section 1.665(g)-1A Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX... Beginning on Or After January 1, 1969 § 1.665(g)-1A Capital gain distribution. For any taxable year of...

  11. 26 CFR 1.402(g)-1 - Limitation on exclusion for elective deferrals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... of 26 CFR Part 1). (ii) Method of allocating income. A plan may use any reasonable method for.... 1.402(g)-1 Section 1.402(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY.... § 1.402(g)-1 Limitation on exclusion for elective deferrals. (a) In general. The excess of...

  12. 26 CFR 1.143(g)-1 - Requirements related to arbitrage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Requirements related to arbitrage. 1.143(g)-1 Section 1.143(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED....143(g)-1 Requirements related to arbitrage. (a) In general. Under section 143, for an issue to be...

  13. 26 CFR 1.904(g)-1 - Overall domestic loss and the overall domestic loss account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... sustained in other taxable years beginning after December 31, 2006, including periods covered by 26 CFR § 1... loss account. 1.904(g)-1 Section 1.904(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... the United States § 1.904(g)-1 Overall domestic loss and the overall domestic loss account....

  14. 26 CFR 1.143(g)-1 - Requirements related to arbitrage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Requirements related to arbitrage. 1.143(g)-1 Section 1.143(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED....143(g)-1 Requirements related to arbitrage. (a) In general. Under section 143, for an issue to be...

  15. 26 CFR 1.143(g)-1 - Requirements related to arbitrage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Requirements related to arbitrage. 1.143(g)-1 Section 1.143(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED....143(g)-1 Requirements related to arbitrage. (a) In general. Under section 143, for an issue to be...

  16. 26 CFR 25.2523(g)-1 - Special rule for charitable remainder trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... 25.2523(g)-1 Section 25.2523(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE....2523(g)-1 Special rule for charitable remainder trusts. (a) In general. (1) With respect to gifts made... passing to the spouse qualifies for a marital deduction under section 2523(g) and the value of...

  17. 26 CFR 1.404(g)-1 - Deduction of employer liability payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... of Plan Sufficiency and Termination of Sufficient Plans. See PBGC regulations, 29 CFR 2617.13(b) for...(g)-1 Section 1.404(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY.... § 1.404(g)-1 Deduction of employer liability payments. (a) General rule. Employer liability...

  18. 26 CFR 1.402(g)-1 - Limitation on exclusion for elective deferrals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... of 26 CFR Part 1). (ii) Method of allocating income. A plan may use any reasonable method for....402(g)-1 Section 1.402(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY.... § 1.402(g)-1 Limitation on exclusion for elective deferrals. (a) In general. The excess of...

  19. 26 CFR 1.415(g)-1 - Disqualification of plans and trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Disqualification of plans and trusts. 1.415(g)-1 Section 1.415(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED...(g)-1 Disqualification of plans and trusts. (a) Disqualification of plans—(1) In general....

  20. 26 CFR 301.6511(g)-1 - Special rule for partnership items of federally registered partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Special rule for partnership items of federally registered partnerships. 301.6511(g)-1 Section 301.6511(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Limitations on Assessment and Collection § 301.6511(g)-1 Special rule for partnership items of...

  1. 26 CFR 301.6511(g)-1 - Special rule for partnership items of federally registered partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Special rule for partnership items of federally registered partnerships. 301.6511(g)-1 Section 301.6511(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Limitations on Assessment and Collection § 301.6511(g)-1 Special rule for partnership items of...

  2. 26 CFR 1.860G-1 - Definition of regular and residual interests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 9 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Definition of regular and residual interests. 1.860G-1 Section 1.860G-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Real Estate Investment Trusts § 1.860G-1 Definition of regular and residual interests....

  3. Histone deacetylase inhibitors as potential treatment for spinal muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Mohseni, Jafar; Zabidi-Hussin, Z.A.M.H.; Sasongko, Teguh Haryo

    2013-01-01

    Histone acetylation plays an important role in regulation of transcription in eukaryotic cells by promoting a more relaxed chromatin structure necessary for transcriptional activation. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) remove acetyl groups and suppress gene expression. HDAC inhibitors (HDACIs) are a group of small molecules that promote gene transcription by chromatin remodeling and have been extensively studied as potential drugs for treating of spinal muscular atrophy. Various drugs in this class have been studied with regard to their efficacy in increasing the expression of survival of motor neuron (SMN) protein. In this review, we discuss the current literature on this topic and summarize the findings of the main studies in this field. PMID:24130434

  4. Targeting histone deacetylases: A novel therapeutic strategy for atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Lkhagva, Baigalmaa; Kao, Yu-Hsun; Chen, Yao-Chang; Chao, Tze-Fan; Chen, Shih-Ann; Chen, Yi-Jen

    2016-06-15

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common cardiac arrhythmia associated with high mortality and morbidity. Current treatments of AF have limited efficacy and considerable side effects. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) play critical roles in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular diseases and contribute to the genesis of AF. Therefore, HDAC inhibition may prove a novel therapeutic strategy for AF through upstream therapy and modifications of AF electrical and structural remodeling. In this review, we provide an update of the knowledge of the effects of HDACs and HDAC inhibitors on AF, and dissect potential underlying mechanisms. PMID:27089819

  5. Crystal Structures of Lipoglycopeptide Antibiotic Deacetylases: Implications for the Biosynthesis of A40926 and Teicoplanin

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Yaozhong; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Nair, Satish K.

    2008-07-08

    The lipoglycopeptide antibiotics teicoplanin and A40926 have proven efficacy against Gram-positive pathogens. These drugs are distinguished from glycopeptide antibiotics by N-linked long chain acyl-D-glucosamine decorations that contribute to antibacterial efficacy. During the biosynthesis of lipoglycopeptides, tailoring glycosyltransferases attach an N-acetyl-D-glucosamine to the aglycone, and this N-acetyl-glucosaminyl pseudoaglycone is deacetylated prior to long chain hydrocarbon attachment. Here we present several high-resolution crystal structures of the pseudoaglycone deacetylases from the biosynthetic pathways of teicoplanin and A40926. The cocrystal structure of the teicoplanin pseudoaglycone deacetylase with a fatty acid product provides further insights into the roles of active-site residues, and suggests mechanistic similarities with structurally distinct zinc deacetylases, such as peptidoglycan deacetylase and LpxC. A unique, structurally mobile capping lid, located at the apex of these pseudoaglycone deacetylases, likely serves as a determinant of substrate specificity.

  6. Revised direct radiocarbon dating of the Vindija G1 Upper Paleolithic Neandertals

    PubMed Central

    Higham, Tom; Ramsey, Christopher Bronk; Karavanić, Ivor; Smith, Fred H.; Trinkaus, Erik

    2006-01-01

    The 1998/1999 direct dating of two Neandertal specimens from level G1 of Vindija Cave in Croatia to ≈28,000 and ≈29,000 radiocarbon (14C) years ago has led to interpretations concerning the late survival of Neandertals in south-central Europe, patterns of interaction between Neandertals and in-dispersing early modern humans in Europe, and complex biocultural scenarios for the earlier phases of the Upper Paleolithic. Given improvements, particularly in sample pretreatment techniques for bone radiocarbon samples, especially ultrafiltration of collagen samples, these Vindija G1 Neandertal fossils are redated to ≈32,000–33,000 14C years ago and possibly earlier. These results and the recent redating of a number of purportedly old modern human skeletal remains in Europe to younger time periods highlight the importance of fine chronological control when studying this biocultural time period and the tenuous nature of monolithic scenarios for the establishment of modern humans and earlier phases of the Upper Paleolithic in Europe. PMID:16407102

  7. G1 Domain of Versican Regulates Hyaluronan Organization and the Phenotype of Cultured Human Dermal Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Merrilees, Mervyn J; Zuo, Ning; Evanko, Stephen P; Day, Anthony J; Wight, Thomas N

    2016-06-01

    Variants of versican have wide-ranging effects on cell and tissue phenotype, impacting proliferation, adhesion, pericellular matrix composition, and elastogenesis. The G1 domain of versican, which contains two Link modules that bind to hyaluronan (HA), may be central to these effects. Recombinant human G1 (rhG1) with an N-terminal 8 amino acid histidine (His) tag, produced in Nicotiana benthamiana, was applied to cultures of dermal fibroblasts, and effects on proliferation and pericellular HA organization determined. rhG1 located to individual strands of cell surface HA which aggregated into structures resembling HA cables. On both individual and aggregated strands, the spacing of attached rhG1 was similar (~120 nm), suggesting interaction between rhG1 molecules. Endogenous V0/V1, present on HA between attached rhG1, did not prevent cable formation, while treatment with V0/V1 alone, which also bound to HA, did not induce cables. A single treatment with rhG1 suppressed cell proliferation for an extended period. Treating cells for 4 weeks with rhG1 resulted in condensed layers of elongated, differentiated α actin-positive fibroblasts, with rhG1 localized to cell surfaces, and a compact extracellular matrix including both collagen and elastin. These results demonstrate that the G1 domain of versican can regulate the organization of pericellular HA and affect phenotype. PMID:27126822

  8. The flare activity of G1 718 = BD + 22 deg 3406

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chugainov, P. F.

    The results of 58.8 hours of photoelectric U-band observations of the red dwarf G1 718 are presented. The observations were carried out in order to confirm the conclusion of Mahmoud and Soliman (1980) that G1 718 is experiencing high flare activity. It is shown that the mean rate of energy release from G1 718 is approximately the same as that of G1 825. Both G1 718 and G1 825 show a deviation from the correlation between mean energy release rate and luminosity which has been established for young red dwarfs. No BY Dra variations were found for G1 718. The complete observational results are given in a table.

  9. Inhibition of maize histone deacetylases by HC toxin, the host-selective toxin of Cochliobolus carbonum.

    PubMed Central

    Brosch, G; Ransom, R; Lechner, T; Walton, J D; Loidl, P

    1995-01-01

    HC toxin, the host-selective toxin of the maize pathogen Cochliobolus carbonum, inhibited maize histone deacetylase (HD) at 2 microM. Chlamydocin, a related cyclic tetrapeptide, also inhibited HD activity. The toxins did not affect histone acetyltransferases. After partial purification of histone deacetylases HD1-A, HD1-B, and HD2 from germinating maize embryos, we demonstrated that the different enzymes were similarly inhibited by the toxins. Inhibitory activities were reversibly eliminated by treating toxins with 2-mercaptoethanol, presumably by modifying the carbonyl group of the epoxide-containing amino acid Aeo (2-amino-9,10-epoxy-8-oxodecanoic acid). Kinetic studies revealed that inhibition of HD was of the uncompetitive type and reversible. HC toxin, in which the epoxide group had been hydrolyzed, completely lost its inhibitory activity; when the carbonyl group of Aeo had been reduced to the corresponding alcohol, the modified toxin was less active than native toxin. In vivo treatment of embryos with HC toxin caused the accumulation of highly acetylated histone H4 subspecies and elevated acetate incorporation into H4 in susceptible-genotype embryos but not in the resistant genotype. HDs from chicken and the myxomycete Physarum polycephalum were also inhibited, indicating that the host selectivity of HC toxin is not determined by its inhibitory effect on HD. Consistent with these results, we propose a model in which HC toxin promotes the establishment of pathogenic compatibility between C. carbonum and maize by interfering with reversible histone acetylation, which is implicated in the control of fundamental cellular processes, such as chromatin structure, cell cycle progression, and gene expression. PMID:8535144

  10. SIRT3, a Mitochondrial NAD+-Dependent Deacetylase, Is Involved in the Regulation of Myoblast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Abdel Khalek, Waed; Cortade, Fabienne; Ollendorff, Vincent; Lapasset, Laure; Tintignac, Lionel

    2014-01-01

    Sirtuin 3 (SIRT3), one of the seven mammalian sirtuins, is a mitochondrial NAD+-dependent deacetylase known to control key metabolic pathways. SIRT3 deacetylases and activates a large number of mitochondrial enzymes involved in the respiratory chain, in ATP production, and in both the citric acid and urea cycles. We have previously shown that the regulation of myoblast differentiation is tightly linked to mitochondrial activity. Since SIRT3 modulates mitochondrial activity, we decide to address its role during myoblast differentiation. For this purpose, we first investigated the expression of endogenous SIRT3 during C2C12 myoblast differentiation. We further studied the impact of SIRT3 silencing on both the myogenic potential and the mitochondrial activity of C2C12 cells. We showed that SIRT3 protein expression peaked at the onset of myoblast differentiation. The inhibition of SIRT3 expression mediated by the stable integration of SIRT3 short inhibitory RNA (SIRT3shRNA) in C2C12 myoblasts, resulted in: 1) abrogation of terminal differentiation - as evidenced by a marked decrease in the myoblast fusion index and a significant reduction of Myogenin, MyoD, Sirtuin 1 and Troponin T protein expression - restored upon MyoD overexpression; 2) a decrease in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC-1α) and citrate synthase protein expression reflecting an alteration of mitochondrial density; and 3) an increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) mirrored by the decreased activity of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD). Altogether our data demonstrate that SIRT3 mainly regulates myoblast differentiation via its influence on mitochondrial activity. PMID:25489948

  11. Deacetylase inhibitors modulate proliferation and self-renewal properties of leukemic stem and progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Romanski, Annette; Schwarz, Kerstin; Keller, Maren; Wietbrauk, Sarah; Vogel, Anja; Roos, Jessica; Oancea, Claudia; Brill, Boris; Krämer, Oliver H.; Serve, Hubert; Ruthardt, Martin; Bug, Gesine

    2012-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a highly malignant disease that is not curable in the majority of patients. Numerous non-random genetic abnormalities are known, among which several translocations such as PLZF/RARα or AML1/ETO are known to aberrantly recruit histone deacetylases. Deacetylase inhibitors (DACi) are promising drugs leading to growth inhibition, cell cycle arrest, premature senescence and apoptosis in malignant cells. It is believed that DACi may have clinical efficacy by eradicating the most primitive population of leukemic stem and progenitor cells, possibly by interfering with self-renewal. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of DACi on leukemic stem and progenitor cells using murine transduction-transplantation models of hematopoietic cells harboring the leukemia-associated fusion proteins (LAFP) PLZF/RARα or a truncated AML1/ETO protein (AML1/ETO exon 9). We show that the self-renewal and short-term repopulation capacity of AML1/ETO- or PLZF/RARα-expressing Sca1+/lin- stem and progenitor cells are profoundly inhibited by clinically applicable concentrations of the DACi dacinostat and vorinostat. To further investigate the mechanisms underlying these effects, we examined the impact of DACi on the transcription factor c-MYC and the Polycomb group protein BMI1, which are induced by LAFP and involved in leukemic transformation. In AML1/ETO or PLZF/RARα-positive 32D cells, DACi-mediated antiproliferative effects were associated with downregulation of BMI1 and c-MYC protein levels. Similar effects were demonstrated in primary samples of cytogenetically defined high-risk AML patients. In conclusion, DACi may be effective as maintenance therapy by negatively interfering with signaling pathways that control survival and proliferation of leukemic stem and progenitor cells. PMID:22895185

  12. G1-checkpoint function including a cyclin-dependent kinase 2 regulatory pathway as potential determinant of 7-hydroxystaurosporine (UCN-01)-induced apoptosis and G1-phase accumulation.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, T; Sugiyama, K; Shimizu, M; Tamaoki, T; Akinaga, S

    1999-12-01

    7-Hydroxystaurosporine (UCN-01), which was originally identified as a protein kinase C selective inhibitor, is currently in clinical trials as an anti-cancer drug. We previously showed that UCN-01 induced preferential G1-phase accumulation in tumor cells and this effect was associated with the retinoblastoma (Rb) protein and its regulatory factors, such as cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) and CDK inhibitors p21Cip1/WAF1 and p27Kip1. We demonstrate here that G1-phase accumulation was induced by UCN-01 in Rb-proficient cell lines (WiDr and HCT116 human colon carcinomas and WI-38 human lung fibroblast), and it was accompanied by dephosphorylation of Rb. In addition, UCN-01-induced G1-phase accumulation was also demonstrated in a Rb-defective cell line (Saos-2 human osteosarcoma), but not in a simian virus 40 (SV40)-transformed cell line (WI-38 VA13). Apoptosis was induced by UCN-01 in the two Rb-deficient cell lines, but not in the other Rb-proficient cell lines. These observations suggest that G1-checkpoint function might be important for cell survival during UCN-01 treatment. In addition, there may be a UCN-01-responsive factor in the G1-checkpoint machinery other than Rb which is targeted by SV40. Further studies revealed a correlation between UCN-01-induced G1-phase accumulation and reduction of cellular CDK2 kinase activity. This reduction was strictly dependent on down-regulation of the Thr160-phosphorylated form of CDK2 protein, and coincided in part with up-regulation of p27Kip1, but it was independent of the level of the p21Cip1/WAF1 protein. These results suggest that G1-checkpoint function, including a CDK2-regulatory pathway, may be a significant determinant of the sensitivity of tumor cells to UCN-01. PMID:10665655

  13. Resetting the epigenetic histone code in the MRL-lpr/lpr mouse model of lupus by histone deacetylase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Benjamin A; Busby, Scott A; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Hunt, Donald F; Mishra, Nilamadhab

    2005-01-01

    The baseline level of gene expression varies between healthy controls and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients, and among SLE patients themselves. These variations may explain the different clinical manifestations and severity of disease observed in SLE. Epigenetic mechanisms, which involve DNA and histone modifications, are predictably associated with distinct transcriptional states. To understand the interplay between various histone modifications, including acetylation and methylation, and lupus disease, we performed differential expression histone modification analysis in splenocytes from the MRL-lpr/lpr mouse model of lupus. Using stable isotope labeling in combination with mass spectrometry, we found global site-specific hypermethylation (except H3 K4 methylation) and hypoacetylation in histone H3 and H4 MRL-lpr/lpr mice compared to control MRL/MPJ mice. Moreover, we have identified novel histone modifications such as H3 K18 methylation, H4 K31 methylation, and H4 K31 acetylation that are differentially expressed in MRL-lpr/lpr mice compared to controls. Finally, in vivo administration of the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA) corrected the site-specific hypoacetylation states on H3 and H4 in MRL-lpr/lpr mice with improvement of disease phenotype. Thus, this study is the first to establish the association between aberrant histone codes and pathogenesis of autoimmune disease SLE. These aberrant post-translational histone modifications can therefore be reset with histone deacetylase inhibition in vivo. PMID:16335948

  14. The inhibition of histone deacetylase 8 suppresses proliferation and inhibits apoptosis in gastric adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Song, Shiyuan; Wang, Ying; Xu, Po; Yang, Ruina; Ma, Zhikun; Liang, Shuo; Zhang, Guangping

    2015-11-01

    Histone deacetylase 8 (HDAC8), a unique member of class I HDACs, shows remarkable correlation with advanced disease stage. The depletion of HDAC8 leads to inhibition of proliferation, apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in multiple malignant tumors. However, little is known about the contribution of HDAC8 to the tumorigenesis of gastric cancer (GC). The present study investigated expression of HDAC8 in GC cell lines and tissues, and the roles of HDAC8 inhibition in the proliferation, cell cycle and apoptosis of gastric cancer cells and explored the potential mechanisms. In the present study, quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), western blotting, and immunohistochemistry were used to examine the mRNA and protein expression of HDAC8 in GC cell lines and tissues. Then, the correlation between the clinicopathological parameters and the expression of HDAC8 was assessed. Finally, siRNA transfection and HDAC8 plasmid was performed to explore the functions of HDAC8 in GC progression in vitro. We found that the expression of HDAC8 was significantly upregulated both in GC cell lines and tumor tissues compared to human normal gastric epithelial cell, GES-1 and matched non-tumor tissues. Furthermore, depletion of HDAC8 remarkably inhibited GC cell proliferation, increased the apoptosis rate and G0/G1 phase percentage in vitro. Western blotting showed that the expression of protein promoting apoptosis such as, Bmf, activated caspase-3, caspase-6 were elevated following HDAC8 depletion. Our data exhibited an important role of HDAC8 in promoting gastric cancer tumorigenesis and identify this HDAC8 as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of gastric cancer. PMID:26412386

  15. Histone deacetylase inhibitor screening identifies HC toxin as the most effective in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wenjie; Chen, Xiaoxun; He, Ke; Xiao, Jinfeng; Duan, Xiaopeng; Huang, Rui; Xia, Zhenglin; He, Jingliang; Zhang, Jinqian; Xiang, Guoan

    2016-05-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are highly expressed in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) and are associated with poor prognosis of these patients. The aim of the present study was to explore the inhibitory effects of HDAC inhibitors on ICC cells and identify effective and sensitive drugs for ICC. Effects of 34 HDAC inhibitors were screened through two rounds of cell viability assays, and HC toxin, a cyclic tetrapeptide first isolated from the secondary metabolite of Helminthosporium carbonum, exhibited an antitumor activity superior to that of the other HDAC inhibitors and gemcitabine. The mechanisms involved in the inhibitory effects of HC toxin on CCLP-1 cells were investigated by cell counting, colony formation assay, cell morphological observation, real-time PCR, western blotting and flow cytometry. It was demonstrated that HC toxin inhibited the cell proliferation and clone formation ability of the CCLP-1 cells. HC toxin increased the acetyl-histone H4 level and this was associated with the inhibitory effect of HC toxin on the CCLP-1 cells. We also found that HC toxin reduced the level of HDAC1 protein in a post-transcriptional manner. Morphological observation showed multiple morphological changes and indicated the possibility of cell differentiation owing to HC toxin. With increasing concentration of HC toxin, the cell cycle was gradually arrested at the G0/G1 stage and the percentage of apoptotic cells increased which was not mainly through the caspase-3-dependent ways. These results indicated that HC toxin was the most effective among the various HDAC inhibitors with multiple functions in the suppression of ICC in vitro. Thus, HC may be a potential chemotherapeutic for ICC. PMID:26935789

  16. Histone deacetylase inhibitor screening identifies HC toxin as the most effective in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, WENJIE; CHEN, XIAOXUN; HE, KE; XIAO, JINFENG; DUAN, XIAOPENG; HUANG, RUI; XIA, ZHENGLIN; HE, JINGLIANG; ZHANG, JINQIAN; XIANG, GUOAN

    2016-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are highly expressed in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) and are associated with poor prognosis of these patients. The aim of the present study was to explore the inhibitory effects of HDAC inhibitors on ICC cells and identify effective and sensitive drugs for ICC. Effects of 34 HDAC inhibitors were screened through two rounds of cell viability assays, and HC toxin, a cyclic tetrapeptide first isolated from the secondary metabolite of Helminthosporium carbonum, exhibited an antitumor activity superior to that of the other HDAC inhibitors and gemcitabine. The mechanisms involved in the inhibitory effects of HC toxin on CCLP-1 cells were investigated by cell counting, colony formation assay, cell morphological observation, real-time PCR, western blotting and flow cytometry. It was demonstrated that HC toxin inhibited the cell proliferation and clone formation ability of the CCLP-1 cells. HC toxin increased the acetyl-histone H4 level and this was associated with the inhibitory effect of HC toxin on the CCLP-1 cells. We also found that HC toxin reduced the level of HDAC1 protein in a post-transcriptional manner. Morphological observation showed multiple morphological changes and indicated the possibility of cell differentiation owing to HC toxin. With increasing concentration of HC toxin, the cell cycle was gradually arrested at the G0/G1 stage and the percentage of apoptotic cells increased which was not mainly through the caspase-3-dependent ways. These results indicated that HC toxin was the most effective among the various HDAC inhibitors with multiple functions in the suppression of ICC in vitro. Thus, HC may be a potential chemotherapeutic for ICC. PMID:26935789

  17. [Histone deacetylase inhibitors: new synergistic third-line option in multiple myeloma].

    PubMed

    Stegmann, Danielle A

    2016-04-01

    Despite advances in drug therapy of the orphan disease multiple myeloma, patients relapse or become refractory to first-line therapy, and the disease remains incurable. Therefore, histone deacetylase inhibitors have emerged as a new class of anti-myeloma drugs, with synergistic results on progression free survival when given in combination to current first-line therapy. Histone deacetylase inhibitors influence gene expression of target genes. Based on results of an extensive multicenter phase III trial, panobinostat was approved by the FDA in February 2015 as the first histone deacetylase inhibitor for the treatment of multiple myeloma. In Europe, panobinostat received marketing authorization by August 2015. PMID:27209894

  18. Estradiol and G1 Reduce Infarct Size and Improve Immunosuppression after Experimental Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bing; Subramanian, Sandhya; Dziennis, Suzan; Jia, Jia; Uchida, Masayoshi; Akiyoshi, Kozaburo; Migliati, Elton; Lewis, Anne D.; Vandenbark, Arthur A.; Offner, Halina; Hurn, Patricia D.

    2011-01-01

    Reduced risk and severity of stroke in adult females is thought to depend on normal endogenous levels of estrogen, a well-known neuroprotectant and immunomodulator. In male mice, experimental stroke induces immunosuppression of the peripheral immune system, characterized by a reduction in spleen size and cell numbers and decreased cytokine and chemokine expression. However, stroke-induced immunosuppression has not been evaluated in female mice. To test the hypothesis that estradiol (E2) deficiency exacerbates immunosuppression after focal stroke in females, we evaluated the effect of middle cerebral artery occlusion on infarct size and peripheral and CNS immune responses in ovariectomized mice with or without sustained, controlled levels of 17-β–E2 administered by s.c. implant or the putative membrane estrogen receptor agonist, G1. Both E2- and G1-replacement decreased infarct volume and partially restored splenocyte numbers. Moreover, E2-replacement increased splenocyte proliferation in response to stimulation with anti-CD3/CD28 Abs and normalized aberrant mRNA expression for cytokines, chemokines, and chemokine receptors and percentage of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ T regulatory cells observed in E2-deficient animals. These beneficial changes in peripheral immunity after E2 replacement were accompanied by a profound reduction in expression of the chemokine, MIP-2, and a 40-fold increased expression of CCR7 in the lesioned brain hemisphere. These results demonstrate for the first time that E2 replacement in ovariectomized female mice improves stroke-induced peripheral immunosuppression. PMID:20304826

  19. Histone Deacetylases as Potential Targets for Cocaine Addiction.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Pamela J; Harvey, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Drug-induced changes in gene expression likely contribute to long-lasting structural and functional alterations in the brain's reward circuitry and the persistence of addiction. Modulation of chromatin structure through covalent histone modifications has emerged as an important regulator of gene transcription in brain and increasing evidence suggests that misregulation of histone acetylation contributes to the establishment and maintenance of aberrant neuronal gene programs and behaviors associated with cocaine or amphetamine exposure. In this review, we summarize evidence supporting a role for histone acetylation in psychostimulant-induced plasticity and discuss findings from preclinical studies investigating histone deacetylase (HDAC) action and the use of small-molecule HDAC inhibitors (HDACis) to correct drug-mediated transcriptional dysregulation. PMID:26022264

  20. Treatment of chronic kidney diseases with histone deacetylase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Na; Zhuang, Shougang

    2015-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) induce deacetylation of both histone and non-histone proteins and play a critical role in the modulation of physiological and pathological gene expression. Pharmacological inhibition of HDAC has been reported to attenuate progression of renal fibrogenesis in obstructed kidney and reduce cyst formation in polycystic kidney disease. HDAC inhibitors (HDACis) are also able to ameliorate renal lesions in diabetes nephropathy, lupus nephritis, aristolochic acid nephropathy, and transplant nephropathy. The beneficial effects of HDACis are associated with their anti-fibrosis, anti-inflammation, and immunosuppressant effects. In this review, we summarize recent advances on the treatment of various chronic kidney diseases with HDACis in pre-clinical models. PMID:25972812

  1. Chemical tools for probing histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity.

    PubMed

    Minoshima, Masafumi; Kikuchi, Kazuya

    2015-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) enzymes are responsible for removing epigenetic markers on histone proteins, which results in chromatin inactivation and gene repression. An evaluation of HDAC activity is essential for not only determining the physiological function of HDACs, but also for developing HDAC-targeting drugs. This review focuses on the chemical tools used to detect HDAC activity. We highlight activity-based probes and positron emission tomography probes based on the chemical structure of the inhibitors. We also summarize fluorogenic probes used in single-step methods for HDAC detection. These fluorogenic probes are designed based on the nucleophilicity of the amino group, aggregation via electrostatic interactions, and changes in the DNA binding properties. These fluorogenic systems may enable facile and rapid screening to evaluate HDAC inhibitors, which will contribute to the development of epigenetic drugs. PMID:25864671

  2. Histone deacetylase inhibitors: possible implications for neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Hahnen, Eric; Hauke, Jan; Tränkle, Christian; Eyüpoglu, Ilker Y; Wirth, Brunhilde; Blümcke, Ingmar

    2008-02-01

    During the past six years numerous studies identified histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors as candidate drugs for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. Two major neuroprotective mechanisms of HDAC inhibitors have been identified, namely the transcriptional activation of disease-modifying genes and the correction of perturbations in histone acetylation homeostasis, which have been shown to be intimately involved in the neurodegenerative pathomechanisms of Huntington's, Parkinson's and Kennedy disease, amyotropic lateral sclerosis, Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome as well as stroke. Based on the promising in vitro and in vivo analyses, clinical trials have been initiated to evaluate the safety and efficacy of HDAC inhibitors for the treatment of devastating diseases such as Huntington's disease, amyotropic lateral sclerosis and spinal muscular atrophy. Here, the authors summarize and discuss the findings on the emerging field of epigenetic therapy strategies in neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:18230051

  3. The TCP4 transcription factor of Arabidopsis blocks cell division in yeast at G1 {yields} S transition

    SciTech Connect

    Aggarwal, Pooja; Padmanabhan, Bhavna; Bhat, Abhay; Sarvepalli, Kavitha; Sadhale, Parag P.; Nath, Utpal

    2011-07-01

    Highlights: {yields} TCP4 is a class II TCP transcription factor, that represses cell division in Arabidopsis. {yields} TCP4 expression in yeast retards cell division by blocking G1 {yields} S transition. {yields} Genome-wide expression studies and Western analysis reveals stabilization of cell cycle inhibitor Sic1, as possible mechanism. -- Abstract: The TCP transcription factors control important aspects of plant development. Members of class I TCP proteins promote cell cycle by regulating genes directly involved in cell proliferation. In contrast, members of class II TCP proteins repress cell division. While it has been postulated that class II proteins induce differentiation signal, their exact role on cell cycle has not been studied. Here, we report that TCP4, a class II TCP protein from Arabidopsis that repress cell proliferation in developing leaves, inhibits cell division by blocking G1 {yields} S transition in budding yeast. Cells expressing TCP4 protein with increased transcriptional activity fail to progress beyond G1 phase. By analyzing global transcriptional status of these cells, we show that expression of a number of cell cycle genes is altered. The possible mechanism of G1 {yields} S arrest is discussed.

  4. Histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACI) mechanisms of action: emerging insights

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Prithviraj; Dai, Yun; Grant, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Initially regarded as “epigenetic modifiers” acting predominantly through chromatin remodeling via histone acetylation, HDACIs, alternatively referred to as lysine deacetylase or simply deacetylase inhibitors, have since been recognized to exert multiple cytotoxic actions in cancer cells, often through acetylation of non-histone proteins. Some well-recognized mechanisms of HDACI lethality include, in addition to relaxation of DNA and de-repression of gene transcription, interference with chaperone protein function, free radical generation, induction of DNA damage, up-regulation of endogenous inhibitors of cell cycle progression, e.g., p21, and promotion of apoptosis. Intriguingly, this class of agents is relatively selective for transformed cells, at least in pre-clinical studies. In recent years, additional mechanisms of action of these agents have been uncovered. For example, HDACIs interfere with multiple DNA repair processes, as well as disrupt cell cycle checkpoints, critical to the maintenance of genomic integrity in the face of diverse genotoxic insults. Despite their pre-clinical potential, the clinical use of HDACIs remains restricted to certain subsets of T-cell lymphoma. Currently, it appears likely that the ultimate role of these agents will lie in rational combinations, only a few of which have been pursued in the clinic to date. This review focuses on relatively recently identified mechanisms of action of HDACIs, with particular emphasis on those that relate to the DNA damage response (DDR), and discuss synergistic strategies combining HDACIs with several novel targeted agents that disrupt the DDR or antagonize anti-apoptotic proteins that could have implications for the future use of HDACIs in patients with cancer. PMID:24769080

  5. FoxG1 and TLE2 act cooperatively to regulate ventral telencephalon formation

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Martin; Bonev, Boyan; Lindsay, Jennefer; Lea, Robert; Panagiotaki, Niki; Houart, Corinne; Papalopulu, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    FoxG1 is a conserved transcriptional repressor that plays a key role in the specification, proliferation and differentiation of the telencephalon, and is expressed from the earliest stages of telencephalic development through to the adult. How the interaction with co-factors might influence the multiplicity and diversity of FoxG1 function is not known. Here, we show that interaction of FoxG1 with TLE2, a Xenopus tropicalis co-repressor of the Groucho/TLE family, is crucial for regulating the early activity of FoxG1. We show that TLE2 is co-expressed with FoxG1 in the ventral telencephalon from the early neural plate stage and functionally cooperates with FoxG1 in an ectopic neurogenesis assay. FoxG1 has two potential TLE binding sites: an N-terminal eh1 motif and a C-terminal YWPMSPF motif. Although direct binding seems to be mediated by the N-terminal motif, both motifs appear important for functional synergism. In the neurogenesis assay, mutation of either motif abolishes functional cooperation of TLE2 with FoxG1, whereas in the forebrain deletion of both motifs renders FoxG1 unable to induce the ventral telencephalic marker Nkx2.1. Knocking down either FoxG1 or TLE2 disrupts the development of the ventral telencephalon, supporting the idea that endogenous TLE2 and FoxG1 work together to specify the ventral telencephalon. PMID:20356955

  6. Molecular Basis for the Dissociation Dynamics of Protein A-Immunoglobulin G1 Complex

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fu-Feng; Huang, Bo; Dong, Xiao-Yan; Sun, Yan

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus protein A (SpA) is the most popular affinity ligand for immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1). However, the molecular basis for the dissociation dynamics of SpA-IgG1 complex is unclear. Herein, coarse-grained (CG) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with the Martini force field were used to study the dissociation dynamics of the complex. The CG-MD simulations were first verified by the agreement in the structural and interactional properties of SpA and human IgG1 (hIgG1) in the association process between the CG-MD and all-atom MD at different NaCl concentrations. Then, the CG-MD simulation studies focused on the molecular insight into the dissociation dynamics of SpA-hIgG1 complex at pH 3.0. It is found that there are four steps in the dissociation process of the complex. First, there is a slight conformational adjustment of helix II in SpA. This is followed by the phenomena that the electrostatic interactions provided by the three hot spots (Glu143, Arg146 and Lys154) of helix II of SpA break up, leading to the dissociation of helix II from the binding site of hIgG1. Subsequently, breakup of the hydrophobic interactions between helix I (Phe132, Tyr133 and His137) in SpA and hIgG1 occurs, resulting in the disengagement of helix I from its binding site of hIgG1. Finally, the non-specific interactions between SpA and hIgG1 decrease slowly till disappearance, leading to the complete dissociation of the SpA-hIgG1 complex. This work has revealed that CG-MD coupled with the Martini force field is an effective method for studying the dissociation dynamics of protein-protein complex. PMID:23776704

  7. 26 CFR 1.404(g)-1 - Deduction of employer liability payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Termination of Sufficient Plans. See PBGC regulations, 29 CFR 2617.13(b) for rules concerning these...(g)-1 Section 1.404(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. §...

  8. 26 CFR 301.6323(g)-1 - Refiling of notice of tax lien.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Refiling of notice of tax lien. 301.6323(g)-1 Section 301.6323(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION Collection General Provisions §...

  9. 26 CFR 1.415(g)-1 - Disqualification of plans and trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Disqualification of plans and trusts. 1.415(g)-1 Section 1.415(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. §...

  10. 16 CFR Appendix G1 to Part 305 - Furnaces-Gas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Furnaces-Gas G1 Appendix G1 to Part 305 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS RULE CONCERNING... Part 305—Furnaces—Gas Manufacturer's rated heating capacities (Btu's/hr.) Range of annual...

  11. 16 CFR Appendix G1 to Part 305 - Furnaces-Gas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Furnaces-Gas G1 Appendix G1 to Part 305 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS RULE CONCERNING... Part 305—Furnaces—Gas Manufacturer's rated heating capacities (Btu's/hr.) Range of annual...

  12. 16 CFR Appendix G1 to Part 305 - Furnaces-Gas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Furnaces-Gas G1 Appendix G1 to Part 305 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS RULE CONCERNING... Part 305—Furnaces—Gas Manufacturer's rated heating capacities (Btu's/hr.) Range of annual...

  13. 16 CFR Appendix G1 to Part 305 - Furnaces-Gas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Furnaces-Gas G1 Appendix G1 to Part 305 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS RULE CONCERNING... Part 305—Furnaces—Gas Manufacturer's rated heating capacities (Btu's/hr.) Range of annual...

  14. 17 CFR 240.15g-1 - Exemptions for certain transactions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Exemptions for certain transactions. 240.15g-1 Section 240.15g-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS, SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 Rules and Regulations Under the Securities Exchange Act of...

  15. A hyperactive transcriptional state marks genome reactivation at the mitosis-G1 transition.

    PubMed

    Hsiung, Chris C-S; Bartman, Caroline R; Huang, Peng; Ginart, Paul; Stonestrom, Aaron J; Keller, Cheryl A; Face, Carolyne; Jahn, Kristen S; Evans, Perry; Sankaranarayanan, Laavanya; Giardine, Belinda; Hardison, Ross C; Raj, Arjun; Blobel, Gerd A

    2016-06-15

    During mitosis, RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and many transcription factors dissociate from chromatin, and transcription ceases globally. Transcription is known to restart in bulk by telophase, but whether de novo transcription at the mitosis-G1 transition is in any way distinct from later in interphase remains unknown. We tracked Pol II occupancy genome-wide in mammalian cells progressing from mitosis through late G1. Unexpectedly, during the earliest rounds of transcription at the mitosis-G1 transition, ∼50% of active genes and distal enhancers exhibit a spike in transcription, exceeding levels observed later in G1 phase. Enhancer-promoter chromatin contacts are depleted during mitosis and restored rapidly upon G1 entry but do not spike. Of the chromatin-associated features examined, histone H3 Lys27 acetylation levels at individual loci in mitosis best predict the mitosis-G1 transcriptional spike. Single-molecule RNA imaging supports that the mitosis-G1 transcriptional spike can constitute the maximum transcriptional activity per DNA copy throughout the cell division cycle. The transcriptional spike occurs heterogeneously and propagates to cell-to-cell differences in mature mRNA expression. Our results raise the possibility that passage through the mitosis-G1 transition might predispose cells to diverge in gene expression states. PMID:27340175

  16. Acrocentric Chromosomes in Cultured Leukocytes from Mothers of Children Affected With the G1- Trisomy Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Cotton, James E.

    1973-01-01

    Analysis of venous blood samples from 24 mothers of G1-trisomy-affected (Down's Syndrome) children and 23 mothers of chromosomally normal children indicated that mothers of G1-trisomy-affected children had a greater than expected involvement of the G-chromosomes in associations of acrocentric satellited (chromosome configuration) chromosomes.…

  17. 26 CFR 1.414(g)-1 - Definition of plan administrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Definition of plan administrator. 1.414(g)-1...(g)-1 Definition of plan administrator. (a) In general. For purposes of part I of subchapter D of... for a plan year specifically designates a person or a group of persons as plan administrator,...

  18. 26 CFR 1.414(g)-1 - Definition of plan administrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Definition of plan administrator. 1.414(g)-1...(g)-1 Definition of plan administrator. (a) In general. For purposes of part I of subchapter D of... for a plan year specifically designates a person or a group of persons as plan administrator,...

  19. 26 CFR 1.414(g)-1 - Definition of plan administrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Definition of plan administrator. 1.414(g)-1...(g)-1 Definition of plan administrator. (a) In general. For purposes of part I of subchapter D of... for a plan year specifically designates a person or a group of persons as plan administrator,...

  20. 17 CFR 240.12g-1 - Exemption from section 12(g).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Exemption from section 12(g). 240.12g-1 Section 240.12g-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS, SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 Rules and Regulations Under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934...

  1. 26 CFR 1.642(g)-1 - Disallowance of double deductions; in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Disallowance of double deductions; in general. 1.642(g)-1 Section 1.642(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... Disallowance of double deductions; in general. Amounts allowable under section 2053(a)(2) (relating...

  2. 26 CFR 1.642(g)-1 - Disallowance of double deductions; in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Disallowance of double deductions; in general. 1.642(g)-1 Section 1.642(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... Disallowance of double deductions; in general. Amounts allowable under section 2053(a)(2) (relating...

  3. 26 CFR 1.642(g)-1 - Disallowance of double deductions; in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Disallowance of double deductions; in general. 1.642(g)-1 Section 1.642(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... of double deductions; in general. Amounts allowable under section 2053(a)(2) (relating...

  4. 26 CFR 1.642(g)-1 - Disallowance of double deductions; in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Disallowance of double deductions; in general. 1.642(g)-1 Section 1.642(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... Disallowance of double deductions; in general. Amounts allowable under section 2053(a)(2) (relating...

  5. 26 CFR 1.642(g)-1 - Disallowance of double deductions; in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Disallowance of double deductions; in general. 1.642(g)-1 Section 1.642(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... Disallowance of double deductions; in general. Amounts allowable under section 2053(a)(2) (relating...

  6. 26 CFR 301.6323(g)-1 - Refiling of notice of tax lien.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Refiling of notice of tax lien. 301.6323(g)-1 Section 301.6323(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION Collection General Provisions §...

  7. 26 CFR 1.404(g)-1 - Deduction of employer liability payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... of Plan Sufficiency and Termination of Sufficient Plans. See PBGC regulations, 29 CFR 2617.13(b) for... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Deduction of employer liability payments. 1.404(g)-1 Section 1.404(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE...

  8. 26 CFR 301.6323(g)-1 - Refiling of notice of tax lien.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Refiling of notice of tax lien. 301.6323(g)-1 Section 301.6323(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION Collection General Provisions §...

  9. 26 CFR 301.6323(g)-1 - Refiling of notice of tax lien.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Refiling of notice of tax lien. 301.6323(g)-1 Section 301.6323(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION Collection General Provisions §...

  10. 26 CFR 301.6323(g)-1 - Refiling of notice of tax lien.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Refiling of notice of tax lien. 301.6323(g)-1 Section 301.6323(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION Collection General Provisions §...

  11. Enhanced HIV-1 neutralization by a CD4-VH3-IgG1 fusion protein

    SciTech Connect

    Meyuhas, Ronit; Noy, Hava; Fishman, Sigal; Margalit, Alon; Montefiori, David C.; Gross, Gideon

    2009-08-21

    HIV-1 gp120 is an alleged B cell superantigen, binding certain VH3+ human antibodies. We reasoned that a CD4-VH3 fusion protein could possess higher affinity for gp120 and improved HIV-1 inhibitory capacity. To test this we produced several human IgG1 immunoligands harboring VH3. Unlike VH3-IgG1 or VH3-CD4-IgG1, CD4-VH3-IgG1 bound gp120 considerably stronger than CD4-IgG1. CD4-VH3-IgG1 exhibited {approx}1.5-2.5-fold increase in neutralization of two T-cell laboratory-adapted strains when compared to CD4-IgG1. CD4-VH3-IgG1 improved neutralization of 7/10 clade B primary isolates or pseudoviruses, exceeding 20-fold for JR-FL and 13-fold for Ba-L. It enhanced neutralization of 4/8 clade C viruses, and had negligible effect on 1/4 clade A pseudoviruses. We attribute this improvement to possible pairing of VH3 with CD4 D1 and stabilization of an Ig Fv-like structure, rather than to superantigen interactions. These novel findings support the current notion that CD4 fusion proteins can act as better HIV-1 entry inhibitors with potential clinical implications.

  12. Alum Directly Modulates Murine B Lymphocytes to Produce IgG1 Isotype

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Bo-Ra; Kim, Sun-Jin; Lee, Jeong-Min; Kang, Seong-Ho; Han, Hye-Ju; Jang, Young-Saeng; Seo, Goo-young

    2013-01-01

    Aluminum hydroxide (alum) is the most widely used adjuvant in human vaccines. Nevertheless, it is virtually unknown whether alum acts on B cells. In the present study, we explored the direct effect of alum on Ig expression by murine B cells in vitro. LPS-activated mouse spleen B cells were cultured with alum, and the level of isotype-specific Ig secretion, IgG1 secreting cell numbers, and Ig germ-line transcripts (GLT) were measured using ELISA, ELISPOT, and RT-PCR, respectively. Alum consistently enhanced total IgG1 production, numbers of IgG1 secreting cells, and GLTγ1 expression. These results demonstrate that alum can directly cause IgG1 isotype switching leading to IgG1 production. PMID:23559895

  13. Novel structure of cockroach allergen Bla g 1 has implications for allergenicity and exposure assessment

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Geoffrey A.; Pedersen, Lars C.; Lih, Fred B.; Glesner, Jill; Moon, Andrea F.; Chapman, Martin D.; Tomer, Kenneth B.; London, Robert E.; Pomés, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Background Sensitization to cockroach allergens is a major risk factor for asthma. The cockroach allergen Bla g 1 has multiple repeats of ~100 amino acids, but the fold of the protein and the biological function are unknown. Objective To determine the structure of Bla g 1, investigate the implications for allergic disease, and standardize cockroach exposure assays. Methods Natural Bla g 1 and recombinant constructs were compared by ELISA using specific murine IgG and human IgE. The structure of Bla g 1 was determined by X-ray crystallography. Mass spectrometry and NMR were utilized to examine ligand-binding properties of the allergen. Results The structure of a recombinant Bla g 1 construct with comparable IgE and IgG reactivity to the natural allergen was solved by X-ray crystallography. The Bla g 1 repeat forms a novel fold with 6 helices. Two repeats encapsulate a large and nearly spherical hydrophobic cavity, defining the basic structural unit. Lipids in the cavity varied depending on the allergen origin. Palmitic, oleic and stearic acids were associated with nBla g 1 from cockroach frass. One Unit of Bla g 1 was equivalent to 104 ng of allergen. Conclusions Bla g 1 has a novel fold with a capacity to bind various lipids, which suggests a digestive function associated with non-specific transport of lipid molecules in cockroaches. Defining the basic structural unit of Bla g 1 facilitates the standardization of assays in absolute units for the assessment of environmental allergen exposure. PMID:23915714

  14. Role of HLA-G1 in trophoblast cell proliferation, adhesion and invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Feng; Zhao, Hongxi; Wang, Li; Guo, Xinyu; Wang, Xiaohong; Yin, Guowu; Hu, Yunsheng; Li, Yi; Yao, Yuanqing

    2015-02-27

    Trophoblast cells are important in embryo implantation and fetomaternal tolerance. HLA-G is specifically expressed at the maternal–fetal interface and is a regulator in pregnancy. The aim of the present study was to detect the effect of HLA-G1 on trophoblast cell proliferation, adhesion, and invasion. Human trophoblast cell lines (JAR and HTR-8/SVneo cells) were infected with HLA-G1-expressing lentivirus. After infection, HLA-G1 expression of the cells was detected by western blotting. Cell proliferation was detected by the BrdU assay. The cell cycle and apoptosis of JAR and HTR-8/SVneo cells was measured by flow cytometry (FCM). The invasion of the cells under different conditions was detected by the transwell invasion chamber assay. HLA-G1 didn't show any significant influence on the proliferation, apoptosis, adhesion, and invasion of trophocytes in normal culture conditions. However, HLA-G1 inhibited JAR and HTR-8/SVneo cells invasion induced by hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) under normal oxygen conditions. In conditions of hypoxia, HLA-G1 couldn't inhibit the induction of cell invasion by HGF. HLA-G1 is not an independent factor for regulating the trophocytes. It may play an indirect role in embryo implantation and formation of the placenta. - Highlights: • HLA-G1 could not influence trophocytes under normal conditions. • HLA-G1 inhibited cell invasion induced by HGF under normal oxygen condition. • HLA-G1 could not influence cell invasion under hypoxia conditions.

  15. Msa1 and Msa2 Modulate G1-Specific Transcription to Promote G1 Arrest and the Transition to Quiescence in Budding Yeast.

    PubMed

    Miles, Shawna; Croxford, Matthew W; Abeysinghe, Amali P; Breeden, Linda L

    2016-06-01

    Yeast that naturally exhaust their glucose source can enter a quiescent state that is characterized by reduced cell size, and high cell density, stress tolerance and longevity. The transition to quiescence involves highly asymmetric cell divisions, dramatic reprogramming of transcription and global changes in chromatin structure and chromosome topology. Cells enter quiescence from G1 and we find that there is a positive correlation between the length of G1 and the yield of quiescent cells. The Swi4 and Swi6 transcription factors, which form the SBF transcription complex and promote the G1 to S transition in cycling cells, are also critical for the transition to quiescence. Swi6 forms a second complex with Mbp1 (MBF), which is not required for quiescence. These are the functional analogues of the E2F complexes of higher eukaryotes. Loss of the RB analogue, Whi5, and the related protein Srl3/Whi7, delays G1 arrest, but it also delays recovery from quiescence. Two MBF- and SBF-Associated proteins have been identified that have little effect on SBF or MBF activity in cycling cells. We show that these two related proteins, Msa1 and Msa2, are specifically required for the transition to quiescence. Like the E2F complexes that are quiescence-specific, Msa1 and Msa2 are required to repress the transcription of many SBF target genes, including SWI4, the CLN2 cyclin and histones, specifically after glucose is exhausted from the media. They also activate transcription of many MBF target genes. msa1msa2 cells fail to G1 arrest and rapidly lose viability upon glucose exhaustion. msa1msa2 mutants that survive this transition are very large, but they attain the same thermo-tolerance and longevity of wild type quiescent cells. This indicates that Msa1 and Msa2 are required for successful transition to quiescence, but not for the maintenance of that state. PMID:27272642

  16. Msa1 and Msa2 Modulate G1-Specific Transcription to Promote G1 Arrest and the Transition to Quiescence in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Shawna; Croxford, Matthew W.; Abeysinghe, Amali P.; Breeden, Linda L.

    2016-01-01

    Yeast that naturally exhaust their glucose source can enter a quiescent state that is characterized by reduced cell size, and high cell density, stress tolerance and longevity. The transition to quiescence involves highly asymmetric cell divisions, dramatic reprogramming of transcription and global changes in chromatin structure and chromosome topology. Cells enter quiescence from G1 and we find that there is a positive correlation between the length of G1 and the yield of quiescent cells. The Swi4 and Swi6 transcription factors, which form the SBF transcription complex and promote the G1 to S transition in cycling cells, are also critical for the transition to quiescence. Swi6 forms a second complex with Mbp1 (MBF), which is not required for quiescence. These are the functional analogues of the E2F complexes of higher eukaryotes. Loss of the RB analogue, Whi5, and the related protein Srl3/Whi7, delays G1 arrest, but it also delays recovery from quiescence. Two MBF- and SBF-Associated proteins have been identified that have little effect on SBF or MBF activity in cycling cells. We show that these two related proteins, Msa1 and Msa2, are specifically required for the transition to quiescence. Like the E2F complexes that are quiescence-specific, Msa1 and Msa2 are required to repress the transcription of many SBF target genes, including SWI4, the CLN2 cyclin and histones, specifically after glucose is exhausted from the media. They also activate transcription of many MBF target genes. msa1msa2 cells fail to G1 arrest and rapidly lose viability upon glucose exhaustion. msa1msa2 mutants that survive this transition are very large, but they attain the same thermo-tolerance and longevity of wild type quiescent cells. This indicates that Msa1 and Msa2 are required for successful transition to quiescence, but not for the maintenance of that state. PMID:27272642

  17. Phylogenetic inference of the porcine Rotavirus A origin of the human G1 VP7 gene.

    PubMed

    Do, Loan Phuong; Nakagomi, Toyoko; Otaki, Hiroki; Agbemabiese, Chantal Ama; Nakagomi, Osamu; Tsunemitsu, Hiroshi

    2016-06-01

    Rotavirus A (RVA) is an important cause of acute gastroenteritis in children worldwide. The most common VP7 genotype of human RVA is G1, but G1 is rarely detected in porcine strains. To understand the evolutionary relationships between human and porcine G1 VP7 genes, we sequenced the VP7 genes of three Japanese G1 porcine strains; the first two (PRV2, S80B) were isolated in 1980 and the third (Kyusyu-14) was isolated in 2001. Then, we performed phylogenetic and in-silico structural analyses. All three VP7 sequences clustered into lineage VI, and the mean nucleotide sequence identity between any pair of porcine G1 VP7 sequences belonging to lineage VI was 91.9%. In contrast, the mean nucleotide sequence identity between any pair of human G1 VP7 sequences belonging to lineages I-V was 95.5%. While the mean nucleotide sequence identity between any pair of porcine lineage VI strain and human lineage I-V strain was 85.4%, the VP7 genes of PRV2 and a rare porcine-like human G1P[6] strain (AU19) were 98% identical, strengthening the porcine RVA origin of AU19. The phylogenetic tree suggests that human G1 VP7 genes originated from porcine G1 VP7 genes. The time of their most recent common ancestor was estimated to be 1948, and human and porcine RVA strains evolved along independent pathways. In-silico structural analyses identified 7 amino acid residues within the known neutralisation epitopes that show differences in electric charges and shape between different porcine and human G1 strains. When compared with much divergent porcine G1 VP7 lineages, monophyletic, less divergent human G1 VP7 lineages support the hypothesis that all human G1 VP7 genes included in this study originated from a rare event of a porcine RVA transmitting to humans that was followed by successful adaptation to the human host. By contrast, AU19 represents interspecies transmission that terminated in dead-end infection. PMID:26961591

  18. Histone Deacetylase 6 Regulates Bladder Architecture and Host Susceptibility to Uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Adam J; Dhakal, Bijaya K; Liu, Ting; Mulvey, Matthew A

    2016-01-01

    Histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) is a non-canonical, mostly cytosolic histone deacetylase that has a variety of interacting partners and substrates. Previous work using cell-culture based assays coupled with pharmacological inhibitors and gene-silencing approaches indicated that HDAC6 promotes the actin- and microtubule-dependent invasion of host cells by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC). These facultative intracellular pathogens are the major cause of urinary tract infections. Here, we examined the involvement of HDAC6 in bladder colonization by UPEC using HDAC6 knockout mice. Though UPEC was unable to invade HDAC6(-/-) cells in culture, the bacteria had an enhanced ability to colonize the bladders of mice that lacked HDAC6. This effect was transient, and by six hours post-inoculation bacterial titers in the HDAC6(-/-) mice were reduced to levels seen in wild type control animals. Subsequent analyses revealed that the mutant mice had greater bladder volume capacity and fluid retention, along with much higher levels of acetylated a-tubulin. In addition, infiltrating neutrophils recovered from the HDAC6(-/-) bladder harbored significantly more viable bacteria than their wild type counterparts. Cumulatively, these changes may negate any inhibitory effects that the lack of HDAC6 has on UPEC entry into individual host cells, and suggest roles for HDAC6 in other urological disorders such as urinary retention. PMID:26907353

  19. The Set3/Hos2 Histone Deacetylase Complex Attenuates cAMP/PKA Signaling to Regulate Morphogenesis and Virulence of Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Hnisz, Denes; Majer, Olivia; Frohner, Ingrid E.; Komnenovic, Vukoslav; Kuchler, Karl

    2010-01-01

    Candida albicans, like other pleiomorphic fungal pathogens, is able to undergo a reversible transition between single yeast-like cells and multicellular filaments. This morphogenetic process has long been considered as a key fungal virulence factor. Here, we identify the evolutionarily conserved Set3/Hos2 histone deacetylase complex (Set3C) as a crucial repressor of the yeast-to-filament transition. Cells lacking core components of the Set3C are able to maintain all developmental phases, but are hypersusceptible to filamentation-inducing signals, because of a hyperactive cAMP/Protein Kinase A signaling pathway. Strikingly, Set3C-mediated control of filamentation is required for virulence in vivo, since set3Δ/Δ cells display strongly attenuated virulence in a mouse model of systemic infection. Importantly, the inhibition of histone deacetylase activity by trichostatin A exclusively phenocopies the absence of a functional Set3C, but not of any other histone deacetylase gene. Hence, our work supports a paradigm for manipulating morphogenesis in C. albicans through alternative antifungal therapeutic strategies. PMID:20485517

  20. A signal for Golgi retention in the bunyavirus G1 glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Y; Chen, S Y; Compans, R W

    1994-09-01

    The G1 and G2 glycoproteins of Punta Toro virus, a member of the bunyaviruses, are targeted to the Golgi complex, where viral budding occurs. We found that the G1 protein, when expressed in the absence of G2, is also targeted to the Golgi complex. A series of G1 proteins truncated at the carboxyl-terminal region was constructed, and the localization of the expressed proteins was examined. It was found that the proteins expressed from constructs with partial deletions in the cytoplasmic domain were transported to the Golgi complex at a significantly slower rate than G1. Although a major fraction of these proteins was eventually transported to the Golgi complex, they did not exhibit as clearly defined a pattern of accumulation as G1, but rather appeared to be distributed throughout the endoplasmic reticulum as well as the Golgi complex. The proteins expressed from constructs lacking most of the cytoplasmic domain and, in some cases, part of the transmembrane domain sequences as well were transported to the cell surface. We have also constructed chimeric proteins with the envelope protein of a murine leukemia virus (MCFenv), which is efficiently transported to the plasma membrane. A MCF-G1 chimera that contained the G1 transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains was found to be efficiently retained in the Golgi complex, and a construct that contained only the G1 transmembrane domain was also partially retained in the Golgi complex. Thus, the transmembrane domain as well as a portion of the cytoplasmic domain adjacent to the transmembrane domain are apparently crucial for Golgi retention of the G1 protein. PMID:8077205

  1. A comparison of the ability of the human IgG1 allotypes G1m3 and G1m1,17 to stimulate T-cell responses from allotype matched and mismatched donors

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Carl I.; Bryson, Christine J.; Cloake, Edward A.; Jones, Tim D.; Austin, Mark J.; Karle, Anette C.; Spindeldreher, Sebastian; Lowe, David C.; Baker, Matthew P.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The immunogenicity of clinically administered antibodies has clinical implications for the patients receiving them, ranging from mild consequences, such as increased clearance of the drug from the circulation, to life-threatening effects. The emergence of methods to engineer variable regions resulting in the generation of humanised and fully human antibodies as therapeutics has reduced the potential for adverse immunogenicity. However, due to differences in sequence referred to as allotypic variation, antibody constant regions are not homogeneous within the human population, even within sub-classes of the same immunoglobulin isotype. For therapeutically administered antibodies, the potential exists for an immune response from the patient to the antibody if the allotype of patient and antibody do not match. Allotypic distribution in the human population varies within and across ethnic groups making the choice of allotype for a therapeutic antibody difficult. This study investigated the potential of human IgG1 allotypes to stimulate responses in human CD4+ T cells from donors matched for homologous and heterologous IgG1 allotypes. Allotypic variants of the therapeutic monoclonal antibody trastuzumab were administered to genetically defined allotypic matched and mismatched donor T cells. No significant responses were observed in the mismatched T cells. To investigate the lack of T-cell responses in relation to mismatched allotypes, HLA-DR agretopes were identified via MHC associated peptide proteomics (MAPPs). As expected, many HLA-DR restricted peptides were presented. However, there were no peptides presented from the sequence regions containing the allotypic variations. Taken together, the results from the T-cell assay and MAPPs assay indicate that the allotypic differences in human IgG1 do not represent a significant risk for induction of immunogenicity. PMID:26821574

  2. Histone Deacetylase Rpd3 Regulates Olfactory Projection Neuron Dendrite Targeting via the Transcription Factor Prospero

    PubMed Central

    Tea, Joy S.; Chihara, Takahiro; Luo, Liqun

    2010-01-01

    Compared to the mechanisms of axon guidance, relatively little is known about the transcriptional control of dendrite guidance. The Drosophila olfactory system with its stereotyped organization provides an excellent model to study the transcriptional control of dendrite wiring specificity. Each projection neuron (PN) targets its dendrites to a specific glomerulus in the antennal lobe and its axon stereotypically to higher brain centers. Using a forward genetic screen, we identified a mutation in Rpd3 that disrupts PN targeting specificity. Rpd3 encodes a class I histone deacetylase (HDAC) homologous to mammalian HDAC1 and HDAC2. Rpd3−/− PN dendrites that normally target to a dorsolateral glomerulus mistarget to medial glomeruli in the antennal lobe, and axons exhibit a severe overbranching phenotype. These phenotypes can be rescued by postmitotic expression of Rpd3 but not HDAC3, the only other class I HDAC in Drosophila. Furthermore, disruption of the atypical homeodomain transcription factor Prospero (Pros) yields similar phenotypes, which can be rescued by Pros expression in postmitotic neurons. Strikingly, overexpression of Pros can suppress Rpd3−/− phenotypes. Our study suggests a specific function for the general chromatin remodeling factor Rpd3 in regulating dendrite targeting in neurons, largely through the postmitotic action of the Pros transcription factor. PMID:20660276

  3. Design, synthesis, and antitumor evaluation of histone deacetylase inhibitors with l-phenylglycine scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yingjie; Li, Xiaoguang; Hou, Jinning; Huang, Yongxue; Xu, Wenfang

    2015-01-01

    In our previous research, a novel series of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors with l-phenylglycine scaffold were designed and synthesized, among which amides D3 and D7 and ureido D18 were far superior to the positive control (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid [SAHA]) in HDAC inhibition, but were only comparable to SAHA in antiproliferation on tumor cell lines. Herein, further structural derivation of lead compounds D3, D7, and D18 was carried out to improve their cellular activities. Most of our newly synthesized compounds exhibited more potent HDAC inhibitory activities than the positive control SAHA, and several derivatives were even better than their parent compounds. However, compared with SAHA and our lead compounds, only secondary amine series compounds exhibited improved antiproliferative activities, likely due to their appropriate topological polar surface area values and cell permeabilities. In a human histiocytic lymphoma (U937) xenograft model, the most potent secondary amine 9d exhibited similar in vivo antitumor activity to that of SAHA. PMID:26504374

  4. Non-singlet spin structure function in the valon model and low-x-scaling behavior of g1NS and g1p

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taghavi-Shahri, Fatemeh; Arash, Firooz

    2010-09-01

    A next-to-leading order QCD calculation of non-singlet spin structure function, g1NS is presented within the valon representation of hadrons. In the valon model, it is assumed that a nucleon is composed of three dressed valence quarks: the valons. Each valon has its own internal structure, the valence quark with its associated sea quarks and gluons. The results are in good agreement with all available data from SMC, E143, HERMES, and with the newly released data from COMPASS experiments. It appears that the small-x tail of g1NS can be described by a single Regge-type exchange. The relevant parameter of this exchange is given. Finally we show that the polarized proton structure function has a scaling behavior at small x. The relevant parameters of this behavior are given, too.

  5. Moments of the Spin Structure Functions g1p and g1d for 0.05 < Q2 < 3.0 GeV2

    SciTech Connect

    Prok, Yelena; Bosted, Peter; Burkert, Volker; Deur, Alexandre; Dharmawardane, Kahanawita; Dodge, Gail; Griffioen, Keith; Kuhn, Sebastian; Minehart, Ralph; Adams, Gary; Amaryan, Moscov; Amaryan, Moskov; Anghinolfi, Marco; Asryan, G.; Audit, Gerard; Avagyan, Harutyun; Baghdasaryan, Hovhannes; Baillie, Nathan; Ball, J.P.; Ball, Jacques; Baltzell, Nathan; Barrow, Steve; Battaglieri, Marco; Beard, Kevin; Bedlinskiy, Ivan; Bektasoglu, Mehmet; Bellis, Matthew; Benmouna, Nawal; Berman, Barry; Biselli, Angela; Blaszczyk, Lukasz; Boyarinov, Sergey; Bonner, Billy; Bouchigny, Sylvain; Bradford, Robert; Branford, Derek; Briscoe, William; Brooks, William; Bultmann, S.; Bueltmann, Stephen; Butuceanu, Cornel; Calarco, John; Careccia, Sharon; Carman, Daniel; Casey, Liam; Cazes, Antoine; Chen, Shifeng; Cheng, Lu; Cole, Philip; Collins, Patrick; Coltharp, Philip; Cords, Dieter; Corvisiero, Pietro; Crabb, Donald; Crede, Volker; Cummings, John; Dale, Daniel; Dashyan, Natalya; De Masi, Rita; De Vita, Raffaella; De Sanctis, Enzo; Degtiarenko, Pavel; Denizli, Haluk; Dennis, Lawrence; Dhuga, Kalvir; Dickson, Richard; Djalali, Chaden; Doughty, David; Dugger, Michael; Dytman, Steven; Dzyubak, Oleksandr; Egiyan, Hovanes; Egiyan, Kim; Elfassi, Lamiaa; Elouadrhiri, Latifa; Eugenio, Paul; Fatemi, Renee; Fedotov, Gleb; Feldman, Gerald; Fersch, Robert; Feuerbach, Robert; Forest, Tony; Fradi, Ahmed; Funsten, Herbert; Garcon, Michel; Gavalian, Gagik; Gevorgyan, Nerses; Gilfoyle, Gerard; Giovanetti, Kevin; Girod, Francois-Xavier; Goetz, John; Golovach, Evgeny; Gothe, Ralf; Guidal, Michel; Guillo, Matthieu; Guler, Nevzat; Guo, Lei; Gyurjyan, Vardan; Hadjidakis, Cynthia; Hafidi, Kawtar; Hakobyan, Hayk; Hanretty, Charles; Hardie, John; Hassall, Neil; Heddle, David; Hersman, F.; Hicks, Kenneth; Hleiqawi, Ishaq; Holtrop, Maurik; Huertas, Marco; Hyde, Charles; Ilieva, Yordanka; Ireland, David; Ishkhanov, Boris; Isupov, Evgeny; Ito, Mark; Jenkins, David; Jo, Hyon-Suk; Johnstone, John; Joo, Kyungseon; Juengst, Henry; Kalantarians, Narbe; Keith, Christopher; Kellie, James; Khandaker, Mahbubul; Kim, Kui; Kim, Kyungmo; Kim, Wooyoung; Klein, Andreas; Klein, Franz; Klusman, Mike; Kossov, Mikhail; Krahn, Zebulun; Kramer, Laird; Kubarovsky, Valery; Kuhn, Joachim; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuznetsov, Viacheslav; Lachniet, Jeff; Laget, Jean; Langheinrich, Jorn; Lawrence, Dave; Lima, Ana; Livingston, Kenneth; Lu, Haiyun; Lukashin, K.; MacCormick, Marion; Marchand, Claude; Markov, Nikolai; Mattione, Paul; McAleer, Simeon; McKinnon, Bryan; McNabb, John; Mecking, Bernhard; Mestayer, Mac; Meyer, Curtis; Mibe, Tsutomu; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Mirazita, Marco; Miskimen, Rory; Mokeev, Viktor; Morand, Ludyvine; Moreno, Brahim; Moriya, Kei; Morrow, Steven; Moteabbed, Maryam; Mueller, James; Munevar Espitia, Edwin; Mutchler, Gordon; Nadel-Turonski, Pawel; Nasseripour, Rakhsha; Niccolai, Silvia; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Maria-Ioana; Niczyporuk, Bogdan; Niroula, Megh; Niyazov, Rustam; Nozar, Mina; O'Rielly, Grant; Osipenko, Mikhail; Ostrovidov, Alexander; Park, Kijun; Pasyuk, Evgueni; Paterson, Craig; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Philips, Sasha; Pierce, J.; Pivnyuk, Nikolay; Pocanic, Dinko; Pogorelko, Oleg; Popa, Iulian; Pozdnyakov, Sergey; Preedom, Barry; Price, John; Procureur, Sebastien; Protopopescu, Dan; Qin, Liming; Raue, Brian; Riccardi, Gregory; Ricco, Giovanni; Ripani, Marco; Ritchie, Barry; Rosner, Guenther; Rossi, Patrizia; Rowntree, David; Rubin, Philip; Sabatie, Franck; Salamanca, Julian; Salgado, Carlos; Santoro, Joseph; Sapunenko, Vladimir; Schumacher, Reinhard; Seely, Mikell; Serov, Vladimir; Sharabian, Youri; Sharov, Dmitri; Shaw, Jeffrey; Shvedunov, Nikolay; Skabelin, Alexander; Smith, Elton; Smith, Lee; Sober, Daniel; Sokhan, Daria; Stavinskiy, Aleksey; Stepanyan, Samuel; Stepanyan, Stepan; Stokes, Burnham; Stoler, Paul; Strakovski, Igor; Strauch, Steffen; Suleiman, Riad; Taiuti, Mauro; Tedeschi, David; Tkabladze, Avtandil; Tkachenko, Svyatoslav; Todor, Luminita; Ungaro, Maurizio; V

    2009-02-01

    The spin structure functions $g_1$ for the proton and the deuteron have been measured over a wide kinematic range in $x$ and \\Q2 using 1.6 and 5.7 GeV longitudinally polarized electrons incident upon polarized NH$_3$ and ND$_3$ targets at Jefferson Lab. Scattered electrons were detected in the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer, for $0.05 < Q^2 < 5 $\\ GeV$^2$ and $W < 3$ GeV. The first moments of $g_1$ for the proton and deuteron are presented -- both have a negative slope at low \\Q2, as predicted by the extended Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn sum rule. The first result for the generalized forward spin polarizability of the proton $\\gamma_0^p$ is also reported, and shows evidence of scaling above $Q^2$ = 1.5 GeV$^2$. Although the first moments of $g_1$ are consistent with Chiral Perturbation Theory (\\ChPT) calculations up to approximately $Q^2 = 0.06$ GeV$^2$, a significant discrepancy is observed between the $\\gamma_0^p$ data and \\ChPT\\ for $\\gamma_0^p$,even at the lowest \\Q2.

  6. 26 CFR 1.860G-1 - Definition of regular and residual interests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Real Estate Investment Trusts § 1.860G-1... by the sponsor, the issue price is its fair market value on the pricing date (as defined in §...

  7. Management and production factors influencing immunoglobulin G1 concentration in colostrum from Holstein cows.

    PubMed

    Pritchett, L C; Gay, C C; Besser, T E; Hancock, D D

    1991-07-01

    Immunoglobulin G1 concentration was measured in 919 first milking colostrums from Holstein cows during a 4-yr period on a commercial dairy farm. Sources of variation analyzed for effect on colostral IgG1 concentration were season of calving, lactation number, dry period length, intercalving interval, complete lactation milk and fat production, weight of first milking colostrum, and time from calving to first milking. Weight of first milking colostrum was the variable most highly correlated (negatively) with colostral IgG1 concentration (r = -.29). Weight of first milking colostrum and lactation number of the cow were the most significant discriminators between colostrum of low and high IgG1 concentration. The implications of these results for colostrum feeding management are discussed. PMID:1894821

  8. Commercial geophysical well logs from the USW G-1 drill hole, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muller, D.C.; Kibler, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    Drill hole USW G-1 was drilled at Yucca Mountain, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, as part of the ongoing exploration program for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations. Contract geophysical well logs run at USW G-1 show only limited stratigraphic correlations, but correlate reasonably well with the welding of the ash-flow and ash-fall tuffs. Rocks in the upper part of the section have highly variable physical properties, but are more uniform and predictably lower in the section.

  9. 26 CFR 301.6223(g)-1 - Responsibilities of the tax matters partner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... contained in 26 CFR part 1, revised April 1, 2001. § 301.6223(h)-1 Responsibilities of pass-thru partner. (a... beginning prior to October 4, 2001, see § 301.6223(h)-1T contained in 26 CFR part 1, revised April 1, 2001. .... 301.6223(g)-1 Section 301.6223(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF...

  10. Effects of Bordetella pertussis components on IgE and IgG1 responses.

    PubMed

    Sekiya, K

    1983-01-01

    The effect of dermonecrotic toxin (DNT), fimbrial hemagglutinin (FHA), K-agglutinogen, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and pertussigen from Bordetella pertussis on the production of IgE and IgG1 antibodies to hen egg albumin (Ea) was investigated in C57BL/6 mice. The IgE antibody contents were determined by passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) in the skin of Lewis rats, while the IgG1 antibody contents were determined by PCA reactions on the skin of mice using sera that had been heated for 3 hr at 56 C to destroy the IgE antibodies. Among the B. pertussis components tested, pertussigen was the most effective adjuvant for increasing the IgE and IgG1 antibodies to Ea. LPS also moderately increased both types of antibodies, and FHA slightly increased the IgG1 titers. When LPS was given 5 days before Ea, it suppressed both IgE and IgG1 titers while FHA had only slight adjuvant action on both type of antibodies. When each of the components was tested for its ability to modify the adjuvant action of pertussigen, it was found that only DNT interfered significantly with the adjuvanticity of pertussigen when given on the day of immunization with Ea. When the components were given 5 days before Ea, DNT produced significant suppression of only the IgG1 response. LPS, FHA, and K-agglutinogen did not significantly affect the adjuvant action of pertussigen. PMID:6321910

  11. Evaluation of the hydrometer for testing immunoglobulin G1 concentrations in Holstein colostrum.

    PubMed

    Pritchett, L C; Gay, C C; Hancock, D D; Besser, T E

    1994-06-01

    Hydrometer measurement in globulin and IgG1 concentration measured by the radial immunodiffusion technique were compared for 915 samples of first milking colostrum from Holstein cows. Least squares analysis of the relationship between hydrometer measurement and IgG1 concentration was improved by log transformation of IgG1 concentration and resulted in a significant linear relationship between hydrometer measurement and log10 IgG1 concentration; r2 = .469. At 50 mg of globulin/ml of colostrum, the recommended hydrometer cutoff point for colostrum selection, the sensitivity of the hydrometer as a test of IgG1 concentration in Holstein colostrum was 26%, and the negative predictive value was 67%. The negative predictive value and sensitivity of the hydrometer as a test of IgG1 in Holstein colostrum was improved, and the cost of misclassification of colostrum was minimized, when the cutoff point for colostrum selection was increased above the recommended 50 mg/ml. PMID:8083433

  12. GPER agonist G-1 decreases adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) cell growth in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zolea, Fabiana; Rizza, Pietro; Avena, Paola; Malivindi, Rocco; De Luca, Arianna; Campana, Carmela; Martire, Emilia; Domanico, Francesco; Fallo, Francesco; Carpinelli, Giulia; Cerquetti, Lidia; Amendola, Donatella; Stigliano, Antonio; Pezzi, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that estrogen receptor (ER) alpha (ESR1) increases proliferation of adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) through both an estrogen-dependent and -independent (induced by IGF-II/IGF1R pathways) manner. Then, the use of tamoxifen, a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM), appears effective in reducing ACC growth in vitro and in vivo. However, tamoxifen not only exerts antiestrogenic activity, but also acts as full agonist on the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER). Aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a non-steroidal GPER agonist G-1 in modulating ACC cell growth. We found that G-1 is able to exert a growth inhibitory effect on H295R cells both in vitro and, as xenograft model, in vivo. Treatment of H295R cells with G-1 induced cell cycle arrest, DNA damage and cell death by the activation of the intrinsic apoptotic mechanism. These events required sustained extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 activation. Silencing of GPER by a specific shRNA partially reversed G-1-mediated cell growth inhibition without affecting ERK activation. These data suggest the existence of G-1 activated but GPER-independent effects that remain to be clarified. In conclusion, this study provides a rational to further study G-1 mechanism of action in order to include this drug as a treatment option to the limited therapy of ACC. PMID:26131713

  13. GPER agonist G-1 decreases adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) cell growth in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chimento, Adele; Sirianni, Rosa; Casaburi, Ivan; Zolea, Fabiana; Rizza, Pietro; Avena, Paola; Malivindi, Rocco; De Luca, Arianna; Campana, Carmela; Martire, Emilia; Domanico, Francesco; Fallo, Francesco; Carpinelli, Giulia; Cerquetti, Lidia; Amendola, Donatella; Stigliano, Antonio; Pezzi, Vincenzo

    2015-08-01

    We have previously demonstrated that estrogen receptor (ER) alpha (ESR1) increases proliferation of adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) through both an estrogen-dependent and -independent (induced by IGF-II/IGF1R pathways) manner. Then, the use of tamoxifen, a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM), appears effective in reducing ACC growth in vitro and in vivo. However, tamoxifen not only exerts antiestrogenic activity, but also acts as full agonist on the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER). Aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a non-steroidal GPER agonist G-1 in modulating ACC cell growth. We found that G-1 is able to exert a growth inhibitory effect on H295R cells both in vitro and, as xenograft model, in vivo. Treatment of H295R cells with G-1 induced cell cycle arrest, DNA damage and cell death by the activation of the intrinsic apoptotic mechanism. These events required sustained extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 activation. Silencing of GPER by a specific shRNA partially reversed G-1-mediated cell growth inhibition without affecting ERK activation. These data suggest the existence of G-1 activated but GPER-independent effects that remain to be clarified. In conclusion, this study provides a rational to further study G-1 mechanism of action in order to include this drug as a treatment option to the limited therapy of ACC. PMID:26131713

  14. IgG1 Fc N-glycan galactosylation as a biomarker for immune activation.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Sanne E; Selman, Maurice H J; Adegnika, Ayola A; Amoah, Abena S; van Riet, Elly; Kruize, Yvonne C M; Raynes, John G; Rodriguez, Alejandro; Boakye, Daniel; von Mutius, Erika; Knulst, André C; Genuneit, Jon; Cooper, Philip J; Hokke, Cornelis H; Wuhrer, Manfred; Yazdanbakhsh, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Immunoglobulin G (IgG) Fc N-glycosylation affects antibody-mediated effector functions and varies with inflammation rooted in both communicable and non-communicable diseases. Worldwide, communicable and non-communicable diseases tend to segregate geographically. Therefore, we studied whether IgG Fc N-glycosylation varies in populations with different environmental exposures in different parts of the world. IgG Fc N-glycosylation was analysed in serum/plasma of 700 school-age children from different communities of Gabon, Ghana, Ecuador, the Netherlands and Germany. IgG1 galactosylation levels were generally higher in more affluent countries and in more urban communities. High IgG1 galactosylation levels correlated with low total IgE levels, low C-reactive protein levels and low prevalence of parasitic infections. Linear mixed modelling showed that only positivity for parasitic infections was a significant predictor of reduced IgG1 galactosylation levels. That IgG1 galactosylation is a predictor of immune activation is supported by the observation that asthmatic children seemed to have reduced IgG1 galactosylation levels as well. This indicates that IgG1 galactosylation levels could be used as a biomarker for immune activation of populations, providing a valuable tool for studies examining the epidemiological transition from communicable to non-communicable diseases. PMID:27306703

  15. G1/S Cell Cycle Arrest Provides Anoikis Resistance through Erk-Mediated Bim Suppression†

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Nicole L.; Reginato, Maurico J.; Paulus, Jessica K.; Sgroi, Dennis C.; LaBaer, Joshua; Brugge, Joan S.

    2005-01-01

    Proper attachment to the extracellular matrix is essential for cell survival. Detachment from the extracellular matrix results in an apoptotic process termed anoikis. Anoikis induction in MCF-10A mammary epithelial cells is due not only to loss of survival signals following integrin disengagement, but also to consequent downregulation of epidermal growth factor (EGFR) and loss of EGFR-induced survival signals. Here we demonstrate that G1/S arrest by overexpression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p16INK4a, p21Cip1, or p27Kip1 or by treatment with mimosine or aphidicolin confers anoikis resistance in MCF-10A cells. G1/S arrest-mediated anoikis resistance involves suppression of the BH3-only protein Bim. Furthermore, in G1/S-arrested cells, Erk phosphorylation is maintained in suspension and is necessary for Bim suppression. Following G1/S arrest, known proteins upstream of Erk, including Raf and Mek, are not activated. However, retained Erk activation under conditions in which Raf and Mek activation is lost is observed, suggesting that G1/S arrest acts at the level of Erk dephosphorylation. Thus, anoikis resistance by G1/S arrest is mediated by a mechanism involving Bim suppression through maintenance of Erk activation. These results provide a novel link between cell cycle arrest and survival, and this mechanism could contribute to the survival of nonreplicating, dormant tumor cells that avert apoptosis during early stages of metastasis. PMID:15923641

  16. IgG1 Fc N-glycan galactosylation as a biomarker for immune activation

    PubMed Central

    de Jong, Sanne E.; Selman, Maurice H. J.; Adegnika, Ayola A.; Amoah, Abena S.; van Riet, Elly; Kruize, Yvonne C. M.; Raynes, John G.; Rodriguez, Alejandro; Boakye, Daniel; von Mutius, Erika; Knulst, André C.; Genuneit, Jon; Cooper, Philip J.; Hokke, Cornelis H.; Wuhrer, Manfred; Yazdanbakhsh, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Immunoglobulin G (IgG) Fc N-glycosylation affects antibody-mediated effector functions and varies with inflammation rooted in both communicable and non-communicable diseases. Worldwide, communicable and non-communicable diseases tend to segregate geographically. Therefore, we studied whether IgG Fc N-glycosylation varies in populations with different environmental exposures in different parts of the world. IgG Fc N-glycosylation was analysed in serum/plasma of 700 school-age children from different communities of Gabon, Ghana, Ecuador, the Netherlands and Germany. IgG1 galactosylation levels were generally higher in more affluent countries and in more urban communities. High IgG1 galactosylation levels correlated with low total IgE levels, low C-reactive protein levels and low prevalence of parasitic infections. Linear mixed modelling showed that only positivity for parasitic infections was a significant predictor of reduced IgG1 galactosylation levels. That IgG1 galactosylation is a predictor of immune activation is supported by the observation that asthmatic children seemed to have reduced IgG1 galactosylation levels as well. This indicates that IgG1 galactosylation levels could be used as a biomarker for immune activation of populations, providing a valuable tool for studies examining the epidemiological transition from communicable to non-communicable diseases. PMID:27306703

  17. Design, synthesis, and antitumor evaluation of novel histone deacetylase inhibitors equipped with a phenylsulfonylfuroxan module as a nitric oxide donor.

    PubMed

    Duan, Wenwen; Li, Jin; Inks, Elizabeth S; Chou, C James; Jia, Yuping; Chu, Xiaojing; Li, Xiaoyang; Xu, Wenfang; Zhang, Yingjie

    2015-05-28

    On the basis of the strategy of creating multifunctional drugs, a novel series of phenylsulfonylfuroxan-based hydroxamates with histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitory and nitric oxide (NO) donating activities were designed, synthesized, and evaluated. The most potent NO donor-HDAC inhibitor (HDACI) hybrid, 5c, exhibited a much greater in vitro antiproliferative activity against the human erythroleukemia (HEL) cell line than that of the approved drug SAHA (Vorinostat), and its antiproliferative activity was diminished by the NO scavenger hemoglobin in a dose-dependent manner. Further mechanism studies revealed that 5c strongly induced cellular apoptosis and G1 phase arrest in HEL cells. Animal experiment identified 5c as an orally active agent with potent antitumor activity in a HEL cell xenograft model. Interestingly, although compound 5c was remarkably HDAC6-selective at the molecular level, it exhibited pan-HDAC inhibition in a western blot assay, which is likely due to class I HDACs inhibition caused by NO release at the cellular level. PMID:25906087

  18. D620N mutation in the VPS35 gene and R1205H mutation in the EIF4G1 gene are uncommon in the Greek population.

    PubMed

    Kalinderi, Kallirhoe; Bostantjopoulou, Sevasti; Katsarou, Zoe; Dimikiotou, Maria; Fidani, Liana

    2015-10-01

    Recently, vacuolar protein sorting 35 (VPS35) and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4 gamma 1 (EIF4G1) have been identified as new causal Parkinson's disease (PD) genes, with the VPS35 D620N and EIF4G1 R1205H mutations being identified in both autosomal dominant late-onset familial and sporadic PD patients. However, the frequencies of these two mutations among different ethnic groups vary. We studied the VPS35 D620N and EIF4G1 R1205H mutations in a total of 333 individuals, 202 Greek patients with sporadic PD and 131 control subjects, using a polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method. None of our studied individuals carried these two mutations. Our data support that the VPS35 D620N and EIF4G1 R1205H mutations are not a common cause of PD in the Greek population. PMID:26300542

  19. Insights into neuroepigenetics through human histone deacetylase PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Wey, Hsiao-Ying; Gilbert, Tonya M; Zürcher, Nicole R; She, Angela; Bhanot, Anisha; Taillon, Brendan D; Schroeder, Fredrick A; Wang, Changing; Haggarty, Stephen J; Hooker, Jacob M

    2016-08-10

    Epigenetic dysfunction is implicated in many neurological and psychiatric diseases, including Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. Consequently, histone deacetylases (HDACs) are being aggressively pursued as therapeutic targets. However, a fundamental knowledge gap exists regarding the expression and distribution of HDACs in healthy individuals for comparison to disease states. Here, we report the first-in-human evaluation of neuroepigenetic regulation in vivo. Using positron emission tomography with [(11)C]Martinostat, an imaging probe selective for class I HDACs (isoforms 1, 2, and 3), we found that HDAC expression is higher in cortical gray matter than in white matter, with conserved regional distribution patterns within and between healthy individuals. Among gray matter regions, HDAC expression was lowest in the hippocampus and amygdala. Through biochemical profiling of postmortem human brain tissue, we confirmed that [(11)C]Martinostat selectively binds HDAC isoforms 1, 2, and 3, the HDAC subtypes most implicated in regulating neuroplasticity and cognitive function. In human stem cell-derived neural progenitor cells, pharmacologic-level doses of Martinostat induced changes in genes closely associated with synaptic plasticity, including BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor) and SYP (synaptophysin), as well as genes implicated in neurodegeneration, including GRN (progranulin), at the transcript level, in concert with increased acetylation at both histone H3 lysine 9 and histone H4 lysine 12. This study quantifies HDAC expression in the living human brain and provides the foundation for gaining unprecedented in vivo epigenetic information in health and disease. PMID:27510902

  20. Current evidence for histone deacetylase inhibitors in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Koutsounas, Ioannis; Giaginis, Constantinos; Patsouris, Efstratios; Theocharis, Stamatios

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive human cancers, with more than 200 000 deaths worldwide every year. Despite recent efforts, conventional treatment approaches, such as surgery and classic chemotherapy, have only slightly improved patient outcomes. More effective and well-tolerated therapies are required to reverse the current poor prognosis of this type of neoplasm. Among new agents, histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) are now being tested. HDACIs have multiple biological effects related to acetylation of histones and many non-histone proteins that are involved in regulation of gene expression, apoptosis, cell cycle progression and angiogenesis. HDACIs induce cell cycle arrest and can activate the extrinsic and intrinsic pathways of apoptosis in different cancer cell lines. In the present review, the main mechanisms by which HDACIs act in pancreatic cancer cells in vitro, as well as their antiproliferative effects in animal models are presented. HDACIs constitute a promising treatment for pancreatic cancer with encouraging anti-tumor effects, at well-tolerated doses. PMID:23430136

  1. Histone deacetylase 6 inhibition enhances oncolytic viral replication in glioma

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Hiroshi; Kaufmann, Johanna K.; Wang, Pin-Yi; Nguyen, Tran; Speranza, Maria-Carmela; Kasai, Kazue; Okemoto, Kazuo; Otsuki, Akihiro; Nakano, Ichiro; Fernandez, Soledad; Goins, William F.; Grandi, Paola; Glorioso, Joseph C.; Lawler, Sean; Cripe, Timothy P.; Chiocca, E. Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic viral (OV) therapy, which uses genetically engineered tumor-targeting viruses, is being increasingly used in cancer clinical trials due to the direct cytolytic effects of this treatment that appear to provoke a robust immune response against the tumor. As OVs enter tumor cells, intrinsic host defenses have the potential to hinder viral replication and spread within the tumor mass. In this report, we show that histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) in tumor cells appears to alter the trafficking of post-entry OVs from the nucleus toward lysosomes. In glioma cell lines and glioma-stem–like cells, HDAC6 inhibition (HDAC6i) by either pharmacologic or genetic means substantially increased replication of oncolytic herpes simplex virus type 1 (oHSV). Moreover, HDAC6i increased shuttling of post-entry oHSV to the nucleus. In addition, electron microscopic analysis revealed that post-entry oHSVs are preferentially taken up into glioma cells through the endosomal pathway rather than via fusion at the cell surface. Together, these findings illustrate a mechanism of glioma cell defense against an incoming infection by oHSV and identify possible approaches to enhance oHSV replication and subsequent lysis of tumor cells. PMID:26524593

  2. Functional Analysis of Histone Deacetylase 11 (HDAC11).

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Sahakian, Eva; Powers, John; Lienlaf, Maritza; Perez-Villarroel, Patricio; Knox, Tessa; Villagra, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    The physiological role of histone deacetylase 11 (HDAC11), the newest member of the HDAC family, remained largely unknown until the discovery of its regulatory function in immune cells. Among them, the regulation of cytokine production by antigen-presenting cells and the modulation of the suppressive ability of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) (Sahakian et al. Mol Immunol 63: 579-585, 2015; Wang et al. J Immunol 186: 3986-3996, 2011; Villagra et al. Nat Immunol 10: 92-100, 2009). Our earlier data has demonstrated that HDAC11, by interacting at the chromatin level with the IL-10 promoter, downregulates il-10 transcription in both murine and human APCs in vitro and ex vivo models (Villagra et al. Nat Immunol 10: 92-100, 2009). However the role of HDAC11 in other cell types still remains unknown. Here we present several methods that can potentially be used to identify the functional role of HDAC11, assigning special attention to the evaluation of immunological parameters. PMID:27246214

  3. Histone and Non-Histone Targets of Dietary Deacetylase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunah; Bisson, William H; Löhr, Christiane V; Williams, David E; Ho, Emily; Dashwood, Roderick H; Rajendran, Praveen

    2016-01-01

    Acetylation is an important, reversible post-translational modification affecting histone and non-histone proteins with critical roles in gene transcription, DNA replication, DNA repair, and cell cycle progression. Key regulatory enzymes include histone deacetylase (HDACs) and histone acetyltransferases (HATs). Overexpressed HDACs have been identified in many human cancers, resulting in repressed chromatin states that interfere with vital tumor suppressor functions. Inhibition of HDAC activity has been pursued as a mechanism for re-activating repressed genes in cancers, with some HDAC inhibitors showing promise in the clinical setting. Dietary compounds and their metabolites also have been shown to modulate HDAC activity or expression. Out of this body of research, attention increasingly has shifted towards non-histone targets of HDACs and HATs, such as transcriptions factors, hormone receptors, DNA repair proteins, and cytoskeletal components. These aspects are covered in present review, along with the possible clinical significance. Where such data are available, examples are cited from the literature of studies with short chain fatty acids, polyphenols, isoflavones, indoles, organosulfur compounds, organoselenium compounds, sesquiterpene lactones, isoflavones, and various miscellaneous agents. By virtue of their effects on both histone and non-histone proteins, dietary chemopreventive agents modulate the cellular acetylome in ways that are only now becoming apparent. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms will likely enhance the potential to more effectively combat diseases harboring altered epigenetic landscapes and dysregulated protein signaling. PMID:26303421

  4. Histone deacetylase 6 inhibition enhances oncolytic viral replication in glioma.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Hiroshi; Kaufmann, Johanna K; Wang, Pin-Yi; Nguyen, Tran; Speranza, Maria-Carmela; Kasai, Kazue; Okemoto, Kazuo; Otsuki, Akihiro; Nakano, Ichiro; Fernandez, Soledad; Goins, William F; Grandi, Paola; Glorioso, Joseph C; Lawler, Sean; Cripe, Timothy P; Chiocca, E Antonio

    2015-11-01

    Oncolytic viral (OV) therapy, which uses genetically engineered tumor-targeting viruses, is being increasingly used in cancer clinical trials due to the direct cytolytic effects of this treatment that appear to provoke a robust immune response against the tumor. As OVs enter tumor cells, intrinsic host defenses have the potential to hinder viral replication and spread within the tumor mass. In this report, we show that histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) in tumor cells appears to alter the trafficking of post-entry OVs from the nucleus toward lysosomes. In glioma cell lines and glioma-stem-like cells, HDAC6 inhibition (HDAC6i) by either pharmacologic or genetic means substantially increased replication of oncolytic herpes simplex virus type 1 (oHSV). Moreover, HDAC6i increased shuttling of post-entry oHSV to the nucleus. In addition, electron microscopic analysis revealed that post-entry oHSVs are preferentially taken up into glioma cells through the endosomal pathway rather than via fusion at the cell surface. Together, these findings illustrate a mechanism of glioma cell defense against an incoming infection by oHSV and identify possible approaches to enhance oHSV replication and subsequent lysis of tumor cells. PMID:26524593

  5. Histone deacetylases inhibitors effects on Cryptococcus neoformans major virulence phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Brandão, Fabiana AS; Derengowski, Lorena S; Albuquerque, Patrícia; Nicola, André M; Silva-Pereira, Ildinete; Poças-Fonseca, Marcio J

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans undergoes phenotypical changes during host infection in order to promote persistence and survival. Studies have demonstrated that such adaptations require alterations in gene transcription networks by distinct mechanisms. Drugs such as the histone deacetylases inhibitors (HDACi) Sodium Butyrate (NaBut) and Trichostatin A (TSA) can alter the chromatin conformation and have been used to modulate epigenetic states in the treatment of diseases such as cancer. In this work, we have studied the effect of NaBut and TSA on the expression of C. neoformans major virulence phenotypes and on the survival rate of an animal model infected with drugs-treated yeasts. Both drugs affected fungal growth at 37°C more intensely than at 30°C; nonetheless, drugs did not affect cell viability at the concentrations we studied. HDACi also provoked the reduction of the fungal capsule expansion. Phospholipases enzyme activity decreased; mating process and melanin synthesis were also affected by both inhibitors. NaBut led to an increase in the population of cells in G2/M. Treated yeast cells, which were washed in order to remove the drugs from the culture medium prior to the inoculation in the Galleria mellonela infection model, did not cause significant difference at the host survival curve when compared to non-treated cells. Overall, NaBut effects on the impairment of C. neoformans main virulence factors were more intense and stable than the TSA effects. PMID:26103530

  6. Inhibitors of histone deacetylase as antitumor agents: A critical review.

    PubMed

    Manal, Mohammed; Chandrasekar, M J N; Gomathi Priya, Jeyapal; Nanjan, M J

    2016-08-01

    Histone deacetylase (EC 3.5.1.98 - HDAC) is an amidohydrolase involved in deacetylating the histone lysine residues for chromatin remodeling and thus plays a vital role in the epigenetic regulation of gene expression. Due to its aberrant activity and over expression in several forms of cancer, HDAC is considered as a potential anticancer drug target. HDAC inhibitors alter the acetylation status of histone and non-histone proteins to regulate various cellular events such as cell survival, differentiation and apoptosis in tumor cells and thus exhibit anticancer activity. Till date, four drugs, namely Vorinostat (SAHA), Romidepsin (FK-228), Belinostat (PXD-101) and Panobinostat (LBH-589) have been granted FDA approval for cancer and several HDAC inhibitors are currently in various phases of clinical trials, either as monotherapy and/or in combination with existing/novel anticancer agents. Regardless of this, today scientific efforts have fortified the quest for newer and novel HDAC inhibitors that show isoform selectivity. This review focuses on the chemistry of the molecules of two classes of HDAC inhibitors, namely short chain fatty acids and hydroxamic acids, investigated so far as novel therapeutic agents for cancer. PMID:27239721

  7. Tetrahydroisoquinolines as novel histone deacetylase inhibitors for treatment of cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Danqi; Shen, Aijun; Fang, Guanghua; Liu, Hongchun; Zhang, Minmin; Tang, Shuai; Xiong, Bing; Ma, Lanping; Geng, Meiyu; Shen, Jingkang

    2016-01-01

    Histone acetylation is a critical process in the regulation of chromatin structure and gene expression. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) remove the acetyl group, leading to chromatin condensation and transcriptional repression. HDAC inhibitors are considered a new class of anticancer agents and have been shown to alter gene transcription and exert antitumor effects. This paper describes our work on the structural determination and structure-activity relationship (SAR) optimization of tetrahydroisoquinoline compounds as HDAC inhibitors. These compounds were tested for their ability to inhibit HDAC 1, 3, 6 and for their ability to inhibit the proliferation of a panel of cancer cell lines. Among these, compound 82 showed the greatest inhibitory activity toward HDAC 1, 3, 6 and strongly inhibited growth of the cancer cell lines, with results clearly superior to those of the reference compound, vorinostat (SAHA). Compound 82 increased the acetylation of histones H3, H4 and tubulin in a concentration-dependent manner, suggesting that it is a broad inhibitor of HDACs. PMID:26904403

  8. Histone deacetylase 5 regulates the inflammatory response of macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Poralla, Lukas; Stroh, Thorsten; Erben, Ulrike; Sittig, Marie; Liebig, Sven; Siegmund, Britta; Glauben, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Modifying the chromatin structure and interacting with non-histone proteins, histone deacetylases (HDAC) are involved in vital cellular processes at different levels. We here specifically investigated the direct effects of HDAC5 in macrophage activation in response to bacterial or cytokine stimuli. Using murine and human macrophage cell lines, we studied the expression profile and the immunological function of HDAC5 at transcription and protein level in over-expression as well as RNA interference experiments. Toll-like receptor-mediated stimulation of murine RAW264.7 cells significantly reduced HDAC5 mRNA within 7 hrs but presented baseline levels after 24 hrs, a mechanism that was also found for Interferon-γ treatment. If treated with lipopolysaccharide, RAW264.7 cells transfected for over-expression only of full-length but not of mutant HDAC5, significantly elevated secretion of tumour necrosis factor α and of the monocyte chemotactic protein-1. These effects were accompanied by increased nuclear factor-κB activity. Accordingly, knock down of HDAC5-mRNA expression using specific siRNA significantly reduced the production of these cytokines in RAW264.7 or human U937 cells. Taken together, our results suggest a strong regulatory function of HDAC5 in the pro-inflammatory response of macrophages. PMID:26059794

  9. Class IIa Histone Deacetylases Are Conserved Regulators of Circadian Function*

    PubMed Central

    Fogg, Paul C. M.; O'Neill, John S.; Dobrzycki, Tomasz; Calvert, Shaun; Lord, Emma C.; McIntosh, Rebecca L. L.; Elliott, Christopher J. H.; Sweeney, Sean T.; Hastings, Michael H.; Chawla, Sangeeta

    2014-01-01

    Class IIa histone deacetylases (HDACs) regulate the activity of many transcription factors to influence liver gluconeogenesis and the development of specialized cells, including muscle, neurons, and lymphocytes. Here, we describe a conserved role for class IIa HDACs in sustaining robust circadian behavioral rhythms in Drosophila and cellular rhythms in mammalian cells. In mouse fibroblasts, overexpression of HDAC5 severely disrupts transcriptional rhythms of core clock genes. HDAC5 overexpression decreases BMAL1 acetylation on Lys-537 and pharmacological inhibition of class IIa HDACs increases BMAL1 acetylation. Furthermore, we observe cyclical nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of HDAC5 in mouse fibroblasts that is characteristically circadian. Mutation of the Drosophila homolog HDAC4 impairs locomotor activity rhythms of flies and decreases period mRNA levels. RNAi-mediated knockdown of HDAC4 in Drosophila clock cells also dampens circadian function. Given that the localization of class IIa HDACs is signal-regulated and influenced by Ca2+ and cAMP signals, our findings offer a mechanism by which extracellular stimuli that generate these signals can feed into the molecular clock machinery. PMID:25271152

  10. Targeting Histone Deacetylases: A Novel Approach in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sorabh; Taliyan, Rajeev

    2015-01-01

    The worldwide prevalence of movement disorders is increasing day by day. Parkinson's disease (PD) is the most common movement disorder. In general, the clinical manifestations of PD result from dysfunction of the basal ganglia. Although the exact underlying mechanisms leading to neural cell death in this disease remains unknown, the genetic causes are often established. Indeed, it is becoming increasingly evident that chromatin acetylation status can be impaired during the neurological disease conditions. The acetylation and deacetylation of histone proteins are carried out by opposing actions of histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs), respectively. In the recent past, studies with HDAC inhibitors result in beneficial effects in both in vivo and in vitro models of PD. Various clinical trials have also been initiated to investigate the possible therapeutic potential of HDAC inhibitors in patients suffering from PD. The possible mechanisms assigned for these neuroprotective actions of HDAC inhibitors involve transcriptional activation of neuronal survival genes and maintenance of histone acetylation homeostasis, both of which have been shown to be dysregulated in PD. In this review, the authors have discussed the putative role of HDAC inhibitors in PD and associated abnormalities and suggest new directions for future research in PD. PMID:25694842

  11. Histone deacetylase inhibitors block IFNγ-induced STAT1 phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Ginter, Torsten; Bier, Carolin; Knauer, Shirley K; Sughra, Kalsoom; Hildebrand, Dagmar; Münz, Tobias; Liebe, Theresa; Heller, Regine; Henke, Andreas; Stauber, Roland H; Reichardt, Werner; Schmid, Johannes A; Kubatzky, Katharina F; Heinzel, Thorsten; Krämer, Oliver H

    2012-07-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) is important for innate and adaptive immunity. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) antagonize unbalanced immune functions causing chronic inflammation and cancer. Phosphorylation and acetylation regulate STAT1 and different IFNs induce phosphorylated STAT1 homo-/heterodimers, e.g. IFNα activates several STATs whereas IFNγ only induces phosphorylated STAT1 homodimers. In transformed cells HDACi trigger STAT1 acetylation linked to dephosphorylation by the phosphatase TCP45. It is unclear whether acetylation differentially affects STAT1 activated by IFNα or IFNγ, and if cellular responses to both cytokines depend on a phosphatase-dependent inactivation of acetylated STAT1. Here, we report that HDACi counteract IFN-induced phosphorylation of a critical tyrosine residue in the STAT1 C-terminus in primary cells and hematopoietic cells. STAT1 mutants mimicking a functionally inactive DNA binding domain (DBD) reveal that the number of acetylation-mimicking sites in STAT1 determines whether STAT1 is recruited to response elements after stimulation with IFNγ. Furthermore, we show that IFNα-induced STAT1 heterodimers carrying STAT1 molecules mimicking acetylation bind cognate DNA and provide innate anti-viral immunity. IFNγ-induced acetylated STAT1 homodimers are though inactive, suggesting that heterodimerization and complex formation can rescue STAT1 lacking a functional DBD. Apparently, the type of cytokine determines how acetylation affects the nuclear entry and DNA binding of STAT1. Our data contribute to a better understanding of STAT1 regulation by acetylation. PMID:22425562

  12. Histone deacetylase 10 promotes autophagy-mediated cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Oehme, Ina; Linke, Jan-Peter; Böck, Barbara C.; Milde, Till; Lodrini, Marco; Hartenstein, Bettina; Wiegand, Inga; Eckert, Christian; Roth, Wilfried; Kool, Marcel; Kaden, Sylvia; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Schulte, Johannes H.; Lindner, Sven; Hamacher-Brady, Anne; Brady, Nathan R.; Deubzer, Hedwig E.; Witt, Olaf

    2013-01-01

    Tumor cells activate autophagy in response to chemotherapy-induced DNA damage as a survival program to cope with metabolic stress. Here, we provide in vitro and in vivo evidence that histone deacetylase (HDAC)10 promotes autophagy-mediated survival in neuroblastoma cells. We show that both knockdown and inhibition of HDAC10 effectively disrupted autophagy associated with sensitization to cytotoxic drug treatment in a panel of highly malignant V-MYC myelocytomatosis viral-related oncogene, neuroblastoma derived-amplified neuroblastoma cell lines, in contrast to nontransformed cells. HDAC10 depletion in neuroblastoma cells interrupted autophagic flux and induced accumulation of autophagosomes, lysosomes, and a prominent substrate of the autophagic degradation pathway, p62/sequestosome 1. Enforced HDAC10 expression protected neuroblastoma cells against doxorubicin treatment through interaction with heat shock protein 70 family proteins, causing their deacetylation. Conversely, heat shock protein 70/heat shock cognate 70 was acetylated in HDAC10-depleted cells. HDAC10 expression levels in high-risk neuroblastomas correlated with autophagy in gene-set analysis and predicted treatment success in patients with advanced stage 4 neuroblastomas. Our results demonstrate that HDAC10 protects cancer cells from cytotoxic agents by mediating autophagy and identify this HDAC isozyme as a druggable regulator of advanced-stage tumor cell survival. Moreover, these results propose a promising way to considerably improve treatment response in the neuroblastoma patient subgroup with the poorest outcome. PMID:23801752

  13. Histone deacetylase 10 promotes autophagy-mediated cell survival.

    PubMed

    Oehme, Ina; Linke, Jan-Peter; Böck, Barbara C; Milde, Till; Lodrini, Marco; Hartenstein, Bettina; Wiegand, Inga; Eckert, Christian; Roth, Wilfried; Kool, Marcel; Kaden, Sylvia; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Schulte, Johannes H; Lindner, Sven; Hamacher-Brady, Anne; Brady, Nathan R; Deubzer, Hedwig E; Witt, Olaf

    2013-07-01

    Tumor cells activate autophagy in response to chemotherapy-induced DNA damage as a survival program to cope with metabolic stress. Here, we provide in vitro and in vivo evidence that histone deacetylase (HDAC)10 promotes autophagy-mediated survival in neuroblastoma cells. We show that both knockdown and inhibition of HDAC10 effectively disrupted autophagy associated with sensitization to cytotoxic drug treatment in a panel of highly malignant V-MYC myelocytomatosis viral-related oncogene, neuroblastoma derived-amplified neuroblastoma cell lines, in contrast to nontransformed cells. HDAC10 depletion in neuroblastoma cells interrupted autophagic flux and induced accumulation of autophagosomes, lysosomes, and a prominent substrate of the autophagic degradation pathway, p62/sequestosome 1. Enforced HDAC10 expression protected neuroblastoma cells against doxorubicin treatment through interaction with heat shock protein 70 family proteins, causing their deacetylation. Conversely, heat shock protein 70/heat shock cognate 70 was acetylated in HDAC10-depleted cells. HDAC10 expression levels in high-risk neuroblastomas correlated with autophagy in gene-set analysis and predicted treatment success in patients with advanced stage 4 neuroblastomas. Our results demonstrate that HDAC10 protects cancer cells from cytotoxic agents by mediating autophagy and identify this HDAC isozyme as a druggable regulator of advanced-stage tumor cell survival. Moreover, these results propose a promising way to considerably improve treatment response in the neuroblastoma patient subgroup with the poorest outcome. PMID:23801752

  14. Histone deacetylase 3 is necessary for proper brain development.

    PubMed

    Norwood, Jordan; Franklin, Jade M; Sharma, Dharmendra; D'Mello, Santosh R

    2014-12-12

    The functional role of histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) in the developing brain has yet to be elucidated. We show that mice lacking HDAC3 in neurons and glia of the central nervous system, Nes-Cre/HDAC3 conditional KO mice, show major abnormalities in the cytoarchitecture of the neocortex and cerebellum and die within 24 h of birth. Later-born neurons do not localize properly in the cortex. A similar mislocalization is observed with cerebellar Purkinje neurons. Although the proportion of astrocytes is higher than normal, the numbers of oligodendrocytes are reduced. In contrast, conditional knockout of HDAC3 in neurons of the forebrain and certain other brain regions, using Thy1-Cre and calcium/calmodulin dependent protein kinase II α-Cre for ablation, produces no overt abnormalities in the organization of cells within the cortex or of cerebellar Purkinje neurons at birth. However, both lines of conditional knockout mice suffer from progressive hind limb paralysis and ataxia and die around 6 weeks after birth. The mice display an increase in overall numbers of cells, higher numbers of astrocytes, and Purkinje neuron degeneration. Taken together, our results demonstrate that HDAC3 plays an essential role in regulating brain development, with effects on both neurons and glia in different brain regions. PMID:25339172

  15. Histone deacetylases in fungi: novel members, new facts.

    PubMed

    Trojer, Patrick; Brandtner, Eva M; Brosch, Gerald; Loidl, Peter; Galehr, Johannes; Linzmaier, Roland; Haas, Hubertus; Mair, Karin; Tribus, Martin; Graessle, Stefan

    2003-07-15

    Acetylation is the most prominent modification on core histones that strongly affects nuclear processes such as DNA replication, DNA repair and transcription. Enzymes responsible for the dynamic equilibrium of histone acetylation are histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs). In this paper we describe the identification of novel HDACs from the filamentous fungi Aspergillus nidulans and the maize pathogen Cochliobolus carbonum. Two of the enzymes are homologs of Saccharomyces cerevisiae HOS3, an enzyme that has not been identified outside of the established yeast systems until now. One of these homologs, HosB, showed intrinsic HDAC activity and remarkable resistance against HDAC inhibitors like trichostatin A (TSA) when recombinant expressed in an Escherichia coli host system. Phylo genetic analysis revealed that HosB, together with other fungal HOS3 orthologs, is a member of a separate group within the classical HDACs. Immunological investigations with partially purified HDAC activities of Aspergillus showed that all classical enzymes are part of high molecular weight complexes and that a TSA sensitive class 2 HDAC constitutes the major part of total HDAC activity of the fungus. However, further biochemical analysis also revealed an NAD(+)-dependent activity that could be separated from the other activities by different types of chromatography and obviously represents an enzyme of the sirtuin class. PMID:12853613

  16. Histone Deacetylase Inhibition Restores Retinal Pigment Epithelium Function in Hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Desjardins, Danielle; Liu, Yueying; Crosson, Craig E; Ablonczy, Zsolt

    2016-01-01

    In diabetic individuals, macular edema is a major cause of vision loss. This condition is refractory to insulin therapy and has been attributed to metabolic memory. The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is central to maintaining fluid balance in the retina, and this function is compromised by the activation of advanced glycation end-product receptors (RAGE). Here we provide evidence that acute administration of the RAGE agonist, glycated-albumin (gAlb) or vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), increased histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity in RPE cells. The administration of the class I/II HDAC inhibitor, trichostatin-A (TSA), suppressed gAlb-induced reductions in RPE transepithelial resistance (in vitro) and fluid transport (in vivo). Systemic TSA also restored normal RPE fluid transport in rats with subchronic hyperglycemia. Both gAlb and VEGF increased HDAC activity and reduced acetyl-α-tubulin levels. Tubastatin-A, a relatively specific antagonist of HDAC6, inhibited gAlb-induced changes in RPE cell resistance. These data are consistent with the idea that RPE dysfunction following exposure to gAlb, VEGF, or hyperglycemia is associated with increased HDAC6 activity and decreased acetyl-α-tubulin. Therefore, we propose inhibiting HDAC6 in the RPE as a potential therapy for preserving normal fluid homeostasis in the hyperglycemic retina. PMID:27617745

  17. Production of chitin deacetylase by Aspergillus flavus in submerged conditions.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Karthik; Parameswaran, Binod; Pandey, Ashok

    2016-07-01

    Chitosan is a biopolymer obtained by deacetylation of chitin and has been proven to have various applications in industry and biomedicine. Deacetylation of chitin using the enzyme chitin deacetylase (CDA) is favorable in comparison to the hazardous chemical method involving strong alkali and high temperature. A fungal strain producing CDA was isolated from environmental samples collected from coastal regions of South Kerala, India. It was identified as Aspergillus flavus by morphological characteristics and ITS DNA analysis. Nutritional requirement for maximum production of CDA under submerged condition was optimized using statistical methods including Plackett-Burman and response surface methodology central composite design. A 5.98-fold enhancement in CDA production was attained in shake flasks when the fermentation process parameters were used at their optimum levels. The highest CDA activity was 57.69 ± 1.68 U under optimized bioprocess conditions that included 30 g L(-1) glucose, 40 g L(-1) yeast extract, 15 g L(-1) peptone, and 7 g L(-1) MgCl2 at initial media pH of 7 and incubation temperature of 32°C after 48 hr of incubation, while the unoptimized basal medium yielded 9.64 ± 2.04 U. PMID:26474347

  18. Regulation of Primitive Hematopoiesis by Class I Histone Deacetylases

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Rishita R.; Koniski, Anne; Shinde, Mansi; Blythe, Shelby A.; Fass, Daniel M.; Haggarty, Stephen J.; Palis, James; Klein, Peter S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Histone deacetylases (HDACs) regulate multiple developmental processes and cellular functions. However, their roles in blood development have not been determined, and in Xenopus laevis, a specific function for HDACs has yet to be identified. Here, we employed the class I selective HDAC inhibitor, valproic acid (VPA), to show that HDAC activity is required for primitive hematopoiesis. Results VPA treatment during gastrulation resulted in a complete absence of red blood cells (RBCs) in Xenopus tadpoles, but did not affect development of other mesodermal tissues, including myeloid and endothelial lineages. These effects of VPA were mimicked by Trichostatin A (TSA), a well-established pan-HDAC inhibitor, but not by valpromide, which is structurally similar to VPA but does not inhibit HDACs. VPA also caused a marked, dose-dependent loss of primitive erythroid progenitors in mouse yolk sac explants at clinically relevant concentrations. In addition, VPA treatment inhibited erythropoietic development downstream of bmp4 and gata1 in Xenopus ectodermal explants. Conclusions These findings suggest an important role for class I HDACs in primitive hematopoiesis. Our work also demonstrates that specific developmental defects associated with exposure to VPA, a significant teratogen in humans, arise through inhibition of class I HDACs. PMID:23184530

  19. HLA-DRB1*01 allele and low plasma immunoglobulin G1 concentration may predispose to herpes-associated recurrent lymphocytic meningitis.

    PubMed

    Kallio-Laine, Katariina; Seppänen, Mikko; Aittoniemi, Janne; Kautiainen, Hannu; Seppälä, Ilkka; Valtonen, Ville; Färkkilä, Markus; Kalso, Eija; Lokki, Marja-Liisa

    2010-02-01

    Recurrent lymphocytic meningitis (RLM) is a rare illness caused mostly by herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2). Predisposing factors are not known. Deficiencies in immunoglobulin (Ig) G subclasses 1 (IgG1) and 3 (IgG3) and complement protein C4 are associated with susceptibility to and persistence of bacterial and viral infections. Selected HLA and mannose-binding lectin (MBL) alleles have previously been associated with recurrent genital herpes or herpetic meningitis. We assessed the frequencies of low IgG1 and IgG3, their allotypes (Gm), and HLA-A*, -B*, -DRB1*, and MBL2 alleles, as well as deficiencies in C4A and C4B genes, as potential predisposing factors for HSV-2-associated RLM. The level of IgG1 was lower (p = 0.009) and the frequency of low IgG1 was higher (p < 0.001) in patients than in controls. Furthermore, the risk for a new meningitis episode was increased in patients with low IgG1 (incident ratio 2.05). HLA-DRB1*01 (p = 0.009) and -B*27 (p = 0.050) were more common among patients than controls. We conclude that HLA-DRB1*01 and -B*27 alleles and low plasma IgG1 levels may be significant risk factors for RLM. PMID:19879913

  20. FoxM1 regulates transcription of JNK1 to promote the G1/S transition and tumor cell invasiveness.

    PubMed

    Wang, I-Ching; Chen, Yi-Ju; Hughes, Douglas E; Ackerson, Timothy; Major, Michael L; Kalinichenko, Vladimir V; Costa, Robert H; Raychaudhuri, Pradip; Tyner, Angela L; Lau, Lester F

    2008-07-25

    The Forkhead box M1 (FoxM1) protein is a proliferation-specific transcription factor that plays a key role in controlling both the G(1)/S and G(2)/M transitions through the cell cycle and is essential for the development of various cancers. We show here that FoxM1 directly activates the transcription of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK1) gene in U2OS osteosarcoma cells. Expression of JNK1, which regulates the expression of genes important for the G(1)/S transition, rescues the G(1)/S but not the G(2)/M cell cycle block in FoxM1-deficient cells. Knockdown of either FoxM1 or JNK1 inhibits tumor cell migration, invasion, and anchorage-independent growth. However, expression of JNK1 in FoxM1-depleted cells does not rescue these defects, indicating that JNK1 is a necessary but insufficient downstream mediator of FoxM1 in these processes. Consistent with this interpretation, FoxM1 regulates the expression of the matrix metalloproteinases MMP-2 and MMP-9, which play a role in tumor cell invasion, through JNK1-independent and -dependent mechanisms in U2OS cells, respectively. Taken together, these findings identify JNK1 as a critical transcriptional target of FoxM1 that contributes to FoxM1-regulated cell cycle progression, tumor cell migration, invasiveness, and anchorage-independent growth. PMID:18524773

  1. 26 CFR 6a.6652(g)-1 - Failure to make return or furnish statement required under section 6039C.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... required under section 6039C. 6a.6652(g)-1 Section 6a.6652(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... OMNIBUS RECONCILIATION ACT OF 1980 § 6a.6652(g)-1 Failure to make return or furnish statement required... limitation under § 6a.6652(g)-1(b)(3) with respect to failure to meet the requirements of section 6039C(c),...

  2. 26 CFR 6a.6652(g)-1 - Failure to make return or furnish statement required under section 6039C.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... required under section 6039C. 6a.6652(g)-1 Section 6a.6652(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... OMNIBUS RECONCILIATION ACT OF 1980 § 6a.6652(g)-1 Failure to make return or furnish statement required... limitation under § 6a.6652(g)-1(b)(3) with respect to failure to meet the requirements of section 6039C(c),...

  3. 26 CFR 6a.6652(g)-1 - Failure to make return or furnish statement required under section 6039C.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... required under section 6039C. 6a.6652(g)-1 Section 6a.6652(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... OMNIBUS RECONCILIATION ACT OF 1980 § 6a.6652(g)-1 Failure to make return or furnish statement required... limitation under § 6a.6652(g)-1(b)(3) with respect to failure to meet the requirements of section 6039C(c),...

  4. 26 CFR 6a.6652(g)-1 - Failure to make return or furnish statement required under section 6039C.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... required under section 6039C. 6a.6652(g)-1 Section 6a.6652(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... OMNIBUS RECONCILIATION ACT OF 1980 § 6a.6652(g)-1 Failure to make return or furnish statement required... limitation under § 6a.6652(g)-1(b)(3) with respect to failure to meet the requirements of section 6039C(c),...

  5. Selective Subnormal IgG1 in 54 Adult Index Patients with Frequent or Severe Bacterial Respiratory Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Barton, James C.; Bertoli, Luigi F.; Barton, J. Clayborn; Acton, Ronald T.

    2016-01-01

    We characterized 54 adult index patients with reports of frequent or severe bacterial respiratory tract infections at diagnosis of selective subnormal IgG1. Mean age was 50 ± 13 (SD) y; 87.0% were women. Associated disorders included the following: autoimmune conditions 50.0%; hypothyroidism 24.1%; atopy 38.9%; and other allergy 31.5%. In 35.5%, proportions of protective S. pneumoniae serotype-specific IgG levels did not increase after polyvalent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccination (PPPV). Blood lymphocyte subset levels were within reference limits in most patients. Regressions on IgG1 and IgG3 revealed no significant association with age, sex, autoimmune conditions, hypothyroidism, atopy, other allergy, corticosteroid therapy, or lymphocyte subsets. Regression on IgG2 revealed significant associations with PPPV response (negative) and CD19+ lymphocytes (positive). Regression on IgG4 revealed significant positive associations with episodic corticosteroid use and IgA. Regression on IgA revealed positive associations with IgG2 and IgG4. Regression on IgM revealed negative associations with CD56+/CD16+ lymphocytes. Regressions on categories of infection revealed a negative association of urinary tract infections and IgG1. HLA-A⁎03, HLA-B⁎55 and HLA-A⁎24, HLA-B⁎35 haplotype frequencies were greater in 38 patients than 751 controls. We conclude that nonprotective S. pneumoniae IgG levels and atopy contribute to increased susceptibility to respiratory tract infections in patients with selective subnormal IgG1. PMID:27123464

  6. Echinococcus ortleppi (G5) and Echinococcus granulosus sensu stricto (G1) loads in cattle from Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Balbinotti, Helier; Santos, Guilherme B; Badaraco, Jeferson; Arend, Ana C; Graichen, Daniel Ângelo S; Haag, Karen L; Zaha, Arnaldo

    2012-09-10

    Echinococcus granulosus sensu stricto (G1) and Echinococcus ortleppi (G5) are haplotypes of the parasite formerly known as Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato, which in its larval stage causes cystic hydatid disease, endemic in Southern Brazil. Epidemiological and molecular knowledge about the haplotypes occurring in a region is essential to control the spread of the disease. The aim of this work was to analyze the haplotype frequency and fertility of hydatid cysts in cattle from the state of Rio Grande do Sul. Cysts were collected and classified according to their fertility status. DNA was extracted from protoscoleces and germinal layers and then used as template for the amplification of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 gene by PCR. Amplicons were purified and sequenced, and the sequences were analyzed for haplotype identification. A total of 638 fertile cysts collected in the last ten years were genotyped. On average, G1 (56.6%) was more frequent than G5 (43.4%). In lungs, the G5 haplotype exhibited a higher parasite load (52.8%), whereas in the liver, G1 was more frequent (90.4%). The analysis revealed an increase in the frequency of G5 haplotype cysts during the period of sampling, and an increase in the abundance of fertile cysts has also been observed in the last several years. Most infertile cysts were genotyped as G1. The possible factors involved in the increase in the proportion of E. ortleppi (G5) and the consequences of this increase are discussed. This study suggests that the proportion of E. ortleppi (G5) loads in cattle may be increasing overtime. PMID:22571833

  7. RPD3 histone deacetylase and nutrition have distinct but interacting effects on Drosophila longevity.

    PubMed

    Frankel, Stewart; Woods, Jared; Ziafazeli, Tahereh; Rogina, Blanka

    2015-12-01

    Single-gene mutations that extend longevity have revealed regulatory pathways related to aging and longevity. RPD3 is a conserved histone deacetylase (Class I HDAC). Previously we showed that Drosophila rpd3 mutations increase longevity. Here we tested the longevity effects of RPD3 on multiple nutrient levels. Dietary restriction (DR) has additive effects on RPD3-mediated longevity extension, but the effect may be modestly attenuated relative to controls. RPD3 and DR therefore appear to operate by distinct but interacting mechanisms. Since RPD3 regulates transcription, the mRNA levels for two proteins involved in nutrient signaling, 4E-BP and Tor, were examined in rpd3 mutant flies. 4E-BP mRNA was reduced under longevity-increasing conditions. Epistasis between RPD3 and 4E-BP with regard to longevity was then tested. Flies only heterozygous for a mutation in Thor, the 4E-BP gene, have modestly decreased life spans. Flies mutant for both rpd3 and Thor show a superposition of a large RPD3-mediated increase and a small Thor-mediated decrease in longevity at all food levels, consistent with each gene product having distinct effects on life span. However, DR-mediated extension was absent in males carrying both mutations and lessened in females. Our results support the view that multiple discrete but interacting mechanisms regulate longevity. PMID:26647291

  8. Boric acid inhibits embryonic histone deacetylases: A suggested mechanism to explain boric acid-related teratogenicity

    SciTech Connect

    Di Renzo, Francesca; Cappelletti, Graziella; Broccia, Maria L.; Giavini, Erminio; Menegola, Elena . E-mail: elena.menegola@unimi.it

    2007-04-15

    Histone deacetylases (HDAC) control gene expression by changing histonic as well as non histonic protein conformation. HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) are considered to be among the most promising drugs for epigenetic treatment for cancer. Recently a strict relationship between histone hyperacetylation in specific tissues of mouse embryos exposed to two HDACi (valproic acid and trichostatin A) and specific axial skeleton malformations has been demonstrated. The aim of this study is to verify if boric acid (BA), that induces in rodents malformations similar to those valproic acid and trichostatin A-related, acts through similar mechanisms: HDAC inhibition and histone hyperacetylation. Pregnant mice were treated intraperitoneally with a teratogenic dose of BA (1000 mg/kg, day 8 of gestation). Western blot analysis and immunostaining were performed with anti hyperacetylated histone 4 (H4) antibody on embryos explanted 1, 3 or 4 h after treatment and revealed H4 hyperacetylation at the level of somites. HDAC enzyme assay was performed on embryonic nuclear extracts. A significant HDAC inhibition activity (compatible with a mixed type partial inhibition mechanism) was evident with BA. Kinetic analyses indicate that BA modifies substrate affinity by a factor {alpha} = 0.51 and maximum velocity by a factor {beta} = 0.70. This work provides the first evidence for HDAC inhibition by BA and suggests such a molecular mechanism for the induction of BA-related malformations.

  9. Selective transcription and cellular proliferation induced by PDGF require histone deacetylase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Catania, Annunziata; Iavarone, Carlo; Carlomagno, Stella M.; Chiariello, Mario . E-mail: chiariel@unina.it

    2006-05-05

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are key regulatory enzymes involved in the control of gene expression and their inhibition by specific drugs has been widely correlated to cell cycle arrest, terminal differentiation, and apoptosis. Here, we investigated whether HDAC activity was required for PDGF-dependent signal transduction and cellular proliferation. Exposure of PDGF-stimulated NIH3T3 fibroblasts to the HDAC inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA) potently repressed the expression of a group of genes correlated to PDGF-dependent cellular growth and pro-survival activity. Moreover, we show that TSA interfered with STAT3-dependent transcriptional activity induced by PDGF. Still, neither phosphorylation nor nuclear translocation and DNA-binding in vitro and in vivo of STAT3 were affected by using TSA to interfere with PDGF stimulation. Finally, TSA treatment resulted in the suppression of PDGF-dependent cellular proliferation without affecting cellular survival of NIH3T3 cells. Our data indicate that inhibition of HDAC activity antagonizes the mitogenic effect of PDGF, suggesting that these drugs may specifically act on the expression of STAT-dependent, PDGF-responsive genes.

  10. MicroRNA-381 Regulates Chondrocyte Hypertrophy by Inhibiting Histone Deacetylase 4 Expression.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weishen; Sheng, Puyi; Huang, Zhiyu; Meng, Fangang; Kang, Yan; Huang, Guangxin; Zhang, Zhiqi; Liao, Weiming; Zhang, Ziji

    2016-01-01

    Chondrocyte hypertrophy, regulated by Runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) and matrix metalloproteinase 13 (MMP13), is a crucial step in cartilage degeneration and osteoarthritis (OA) pathogenesis. We previously demonstrated that microRNA-381 (miR-381) promotes MMP13 expression during chondrogenesis and contributes to cartilage degeneration; however, the mechanism underlying this process remained unclear. In this study, we observed divergent expression of miR-381 and histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4), an enzyme that directly inhibits RUNX2 and MMP13 expression, during late-stage chondrogenesis of ATDC5 cells, as well as in prehypertrophic and hypertrophic chondrocytes during long bone development in E16.5 mouse embryos. We therefore investigated whether this miRNA regulates HDAC4 expression during chondrogenesis. Notably, overexpression of miR-381 inhibited HDAC4 expression but promoted RUNX2 expression. Moreover, transfection of SW1353 cells with an miR-381 mimic suppressed the activity of a reporter construct containing the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of HDAC4. Conversely, treatment with a miR-381 inhibitor yielded increased HDAC4 expression and decreased RUNX2 expression. Lastly, knockdown of HDAC4 expression resulted in increased RUNX2 and MMP13 expression in SW1353 cells. Collectively, our results indicate that miR-381 epigenetically regulates MMP13 and RUNX2 expression via targeting of HDAC4, thereby suggesting the possibilities of inhibiting miR-381 to control chondrocyte hypertrophy and cartilage degeneration. PMID:27563877

  11. Panhistone deacetylase inhibitors inhibit proinflammatory signaling pathways to ameliorate interleukin-18-induced cardiac hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Gipsy; Rooney, Robert J.; Johnson, I. Maria

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the genome-wide consequences of pan-histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) trichostatin A (TSA) and m-carboxycinnamic acid bis-hydroxamide (CBHA) in the hearts of BALB/c mice eliciting hypertrophy in response to interleukin-18 (IL-18). Both TSA and CBHA profoundly altered cardiac chromatin structure that occurred concomitantly with normalization of IL-18-induced gene expression and amelioration of cardiac hypertrophy. The hearts of mice exposed to IL-18 +/− TSA or CBHA elicited distinct gene expression profiles. Of 184 genes that were differentially regulated by IL-18 and TSA, 33 were regulated in an opposite manner. The hearts of mice treated with IL-18 and/or CBHA elicited 147 differentially expressed genes (DEGs), a third of which were oppositely regulated by IL-18 and CBHA. Ingenuity Pathways and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes analyses of DEGs showed that IL-18 impinged on TNF-α- and IFNγ-specific gene networks relegated to controlling immunity and inflammation, cardiac metabolism and energetics, and cell proliferation and apoptosis. These TNF-α- and IFNγ-specific gene networks, extensively connected with PI3K, MAPK, and NF-κB signaling pathways, were oppositely regulated by IL-18 and pan-HDACIs. Evidently, both TSA and CBHA caused a two- to fourfold induction of phosphatase and tensin homolog expression to counteract IL-18-induced proinflammatory signaling and cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:21954451

  12. Quantification and Gene Expression Analysis of Histone Deacetylases in Common Bean during Rust Fungal Inoculation

    PubMed Central

    Melmaiee, Kalpalatha; Kalavacharla, Venu (Kal); Brown, Adrianne; Todd, Antonette; Thurston, Yaqoob; Elavarthi, Sathya

    2015-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) play an important role in plant growth, development, and defense processes and are one of the primary causes of epigenetic modifications in a genome. There was only one study reported on epigenetic modifications of the important legume crop, common bean, and its interaction with the fungal rust pathogen Uromyces appendiculatus prior to this project. We measured the total active HDACs levels in leaf tissues and observed expression patterns for the selected HDAC genes at 0, 12, and 84 hours after inoculation in mock inoculated and inoculated plants. Colorimetric analysis showed that the total amount of HDACs present in the leaf tissue decreased at 12 hours in inoculated plants compared to mock inoculated control plants. Gene expression analyses indicated that the expression pattern of gene PvSRT1 is similar to the trend of total active HDACs in this time course experiment. Gene PvHDA6 showed increased expression in the inoculated plants during the time points measured. This is one of the first attempts to study expression levels of HDACs in economically important legumes in the context of plant pathogen interactions. Findings from our study will be helpful to understand trends of total active HDACs and expression patterns of these genes under study during biotic stress. PMID:26824033

  13. RPD3 histone deacetylase and nutrition have distinct but interacting effects on Drosophila longevity

    PubMed Central

    Frankel, Stewart; Woods, Jared; Ziafazeli, Tahereh; Rogina, Blanka

    2015-01-01

    Single-gene mutations that extend longevity have revealed regulatory pathways related to aging and longevity. RPD3 is a conserved histone deacetylase (Class I HDAC). Previously we showed that Drosophila rpd3 mutations increase longevity. Here we tested the longevity effects of RPD3 on multiple nutrient levels. Dietary restriction (DR) has additive effects on RPD3-mediated longevity extension, but the effect may be modestly attenuated relative to controls. RPD3 and DR therefore appear to operate by distinct but interacting mechanisms. Since RPD3 regulates transcription, the mRNA levels for two proteins involved in nutrient signaling, 4E-BP and Tor, were examined in rpd3 mutant flies. 4E-BP mRNA was reduced under longevity-increasing conditions. Epistasis between RPD3 and 4E-BP with regard to longevity was then tested. Flies only heterozygous for a mutation in Thor, the 4E-BP gene, have modestly decreased life spans. Flies mutant for both rpd3 and Thor show a superposition of a large RPD3-mediated increase and a small Thor-mediated decrease in longevity at all food levels, consistent with each gene product having distinct effects on life span. However, DR-mediated extension was absent in males carrying both mutations and lessened in females. Our results support the view that multiple discrete but interacting mechanisms regulate longevity. PMID:26647291

  14. Antitumor Action of a Novel Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor, YF479, in Breast Cancer1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tao; Chen, Yihua; Li, Jingjie; Yang, Feifei; Wu, Haigang; Dai, Fujun; Hu, Meichun; Lu, Xiaoling; Peng, Yi; Liu, Mingyao; Zhao, Yongxiang; Yi, Zhengfang

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence demonstrates important roles for histone deacetylase in tumorigenesis (HDACs), highlighting them as attractive targets for antitumor drug development. Histone deactylase inhibitors (HDACIs), which have shown favorable anti-tumor activity with low toxicity in clinical investigations, are a promising class of anticancer therapeutics. Here, we screened our compound library to explore small molecules that possess anti-HDAC activity and identified a novel HDACI, YF479. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), which was the first approved HDAC inhibitor for clinical treatment by the FDA, was as positive control in our experiments. We further demonstrated YF479 abated cell viability, suppressed colony formation and tumor cell motility in vitro. To investigate YF479 with superior pharmacodynamic properties, we developed spontaneous and experimental breast cancer animal models. Our results showed YF479 significantly inhibited breast tumor growth and metastasis in vivo. Further study indicated YF479 suppressed both early and end stages of metastatic progression. Subsequent adjuvant chemotherapy animal experiment revealed the elimination of local-regional recurrence (LRR) and distant metastasis by YF479. More important, YF479 remarkably prolonged the survival of tumor-bearing mice. Intriguingly, YF479 displayed more potent anti-tumor activity in vitro and in vivo compared with SAHA. Together, our results suggest that YF479, a novel HDACI, inhibits breast tumor growth, metastasis and recurrence. In light of these results, YF479 may be an effective therapeutic option in clinical trials for patients burdened by breast cancer. PMID:25220594

  15. FOXP3+ regulatory T cell development and function require histone/protein deacetylase 3

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liqing; Liu, Yujie; Han, Rongxiang; Beier, Ulf H.; Bhatti, Tricia R.; Akimova, Tatiana; Greene, Mark I.; Hiebert, Scott W.; Hancock, Wayne W.

    2015-01-01

    Treg dysfunction is associated with a variety of inflammatory diseases. Treg populations are defined by expression of the oligomeric transcription factor FOXP3 and inability to produce IL-2, a cytokine required for T cell maintenance and survival. FOXP3 activity is regulated post-translationally by histone/protein acetyltransferases and histone/protein deacetylases (HDACs). Here, we determined that HDAC3 mediates both the development and function of the two main Treg subsets, thymus-derived Tregs and induced Tregs (iTregs). We determined that HDAC3 and FOXP3 physically interact and that HDAC3 expression markedly reduces Il2 promoter activity. In murine models, conditional deletion of Hdac3 during thymic Treg development restored Treg production of IL-2 and blocked the suppressive function of Tregs. HDAC3-deficient mice died from autoimmunity by 4–6 weeks of age; however, injection of WT FOXP3+ Tregs prolonged survival. Adoptive transfer of Hdac3-deficient Tregs, unlike WT Tregs, did not control T cell proliferation in naive mice and did not prevent allograft rejection or colitis. HDAC3 also regulated the development of iTregs, as HDAC3-deficient conventional T cells were not converted into iTregs under polarizing conditions and produced large amounts of IL-2, IL-6, and IL-17. We conclude that HDAC3 is essential for the normal development and suppressive functions of thymic and peripheral FOXP3+ Tregs. PMID:25642770

  16. Histone Deacetylase 3 Depletion in Osteo/Chondroprogenitor Cells Decreases Bone Density and Increases Marrow Fat

    PubMed Central

    Casper, Michelle E.; McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E.; Stensgard, Bridget A.; Li, Xiaodong; Secreto, Frank J.; Knutson, Sarah K.; Hiebert, Scott W.; Westendorf, Jennifer J.

    2010-01-01

    Histone deacetylase (Hdac)3 is a nuclear enzyme that contributes to epigenetic programming and is required for embryonic development. To determine the role of Hdac3 in bone formation, we crossed mice harboring loxP sites around exon 7 of Hdac3 with mice expressing Cre recombinase under the control of the osterix promoter. The resulting Hdac3 conditional knockout (CKO) mice were runted and had severe deficits in intramembranous and endochondral bone formation. Calvarial bones were significantly thinner and trabecular bone volume in the distal femur was decreased 75% in the Hdac3 CKO mice due to a substantial reduction in trabecular number. Hdac3-CKO mice had fewer osteoblasts and more bone marrow adipocytes as a proportion of tissue area than their wildtype or heterozygous littermates. Bone formation rates were depressed in both the cortical and trabecular regions of Hdac3 CKO femurs. Microarray analyses revealed that numerous developmental signaling pathways were affected by Hdac3-deficiency. Thus, Hdac3 depletion in osterix-expressing progenitor cells interferes with bone formation and promotes bone marrow adipocyte differentiation. These results demonstrate that Hdac3 inhibition is detrimental to skeletal health. PMID:20628553

  17. Deciphering the molecular and biologic processes that mediate histone deacetylase inhibitor-induced thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Bishton, Mark J; Harrison, Simon J; Martin, Benjamin P; McLaughlin, Nicole; James, Chloé; Josefsson, Emma C; Henley, Katya J; Kile, Benjamin T; Prince, H Miles; Johnstone, Ricky W

    2011-03-31

    Histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACI)-induced thrombocytopenia (TCP) is a major dose-limiting toxicity of this new class of drugs. Using preclinical models to study the molecular and biologic events that underpin this effect of HDACI, we found that C57BL/6 mice treated with both the HDAC1/2-selective HDACI romidepsin and the pan-HDACI panobinostat developed significant TCP. HDACI-induced TCP was not due to myelosuppression or reduced platelet lifespan, but to decreased platelet release from megakaryocytes. Cultured primary murine megakaryocytes showed reductions in proplatelet extensions after HDACI exposure and a dose-dependent increase in the phosphorylation of myosin light chain 2 (MLC2). Phosphorylation of MLC to phospho-MLC (pMLC) and subsequent proplatelet formation in megakaryocytes is regulated by the Rho-GTPase proteins Rac1, CDC42, and RhoA. Primary mouse megakaryocytes and the human megakaryoblastic cell line Meg-01 showed reductions in Rac1, CDC42, and RhoA protein levels after treatment with HDACIs. We were able to overcome HDACI-induced TCP by administering the mouse-specific thrombopoietin (TPO) mimetic AMP-4, which improved platelet numbers to levels similar to untreated controls. Our report provides the first detailed account of the molecular and biologic processes involved in HDACI-mediated TCP. Moreover, our preclinical studies provide evidence that dose-limiting TCP induced by HDACIs may be circumvented using a TPO mimetic. PMID:21292776

  18. Histone acetyltransferases and histone deacetylases in B- and T-cell development, physiology and malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Haery, Leila; Thompson, Ryan C.; Gilmore, Thomas D.

    2015-01-01

    The development of B and T cells from hematopoietic precursors and the regulation of the functions of these immune cells are complex processes that involve highly regulated signaling pathways and transcriptional control. The signaling pathways and gene expression patterns that give rise to these developmental processes are coordinated, in part, by two opposing classes of broad-based enzymatic regulators: histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs). HATs and HDACs can modulate gene transcription by altering histone acetylation to modify chromatin structure, and by regulating the activity of non-histone substrates, including an array of immune-cell transcription factors. In addition to their role in normal B and T cells, dysregulation of HAT and HDAC activity is associated with a variety of B- and T-cell malignancies. In this review, we describe the roles of HATs and HDACs in normal B- and T-cell physiology, describe mutations and dysregulation of HATs and HDACs that are implicated lymphoma and leukemia, and discuss HAT and HDAC inhibitors that have been explored as treatment options for leukemias and lymphomas. PMID:26124919

  19. Clinical use and applications of histone deacetylase inhibitors in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Nidhi; Ramakrishnan, Vijay; Kumar, Shaji K

    2016-01-01

    The incorporation of various novel therapies has resulted in a significant survival benefit in newly diagnosed and relapsed patients with multiple myeloma (MM) over the past decade. Despite these advances, resistance to therapy leads to eventual relapse and fatal outcomes in the vast majority of patients. Hence, there is an unmet need for new safe and efficacious therapies for continued improvement in outcomes. Given the role of epigenetic aberrations in the pathogenesis and progression of MM and the success of histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) in other malignancies, many HDACi have been tried in MM. Various preclinical studies helped us to understand the antimyeloma activity of different HDACi in MM as a single agent or in combination with conventional, novel, and immune therapies. The early clinical trials of HDACi depicted only modest single-agent activity, but recent studies have revealed encouraging clinical response rates in combination with other antimyeloma agents, especially proteasome inhibitors. This led to the approval of the combination of panobinostat and bortezomib for the treatment of relapsed/refractory MM patients with two prior lines of treatment by the US Food and Drug Administration. However, it remains yet to be defined how we can incorporate HDACi in the current therapeutic paradigms for MM that will help to achieve longer disease control and significant survival benefits. In addition, isoform-selective and/or class-selective HDAC inhibition to reduce unfavorable side effects needs further evaluation. PMID:27226735

  20. IgG1 deficiency exacerbates experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis in BALB/c mice

    PubMed Central

    Huda, Ruksana; Strait, Richard T.; Tüzün, Erdem; Finkelman, Fred D.; Christadoss, Premkumar

    2015-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disease characterized by muscle weakness due to neuromuscular junction (NMJ) damage by anti-acetylcholine receptor (AChR) auto-antibodies and complement. In experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG), which is induced by immunization with Torpedo AChR in CFA, anti-AChR IgG2b and IgG1 are the predominant isotypes in the circulation. Complement activation by isotypes such as IgG2b plays a crucial role in EAMG pathogenesis; this suggested the possibility that IgG1, which does not activate complement through the classical pathway, may suppress EAMG. In this study, we show that AChR-immunized BALB/c mice genetically deficient for IgG1 produce higher levels of complement-activating isotypes of anti-AChR, especially IgG3 and IgG2a, and develop increased IgG3/IgG2a deposits at the NMJ, as compared to wild type (WT) BALB/c mice. Consistent with this, AChR-immunized IgG1−/− BALB/c mice lose muscle strength and muscle AChR to a greater extent than AChR-immunized WT mice. These observations demonstrate that IgG1 deficiency leads to increased severity of EAMG associated with an increase in complement activating IgG isotypes. Further studies are needed to dissect the specific role or mechanism of IgG1 in limiting EAMG and that of EAMG exacerbating role of complement activating IgG3 and IgG2a in IgG1 deficiency. PMID:25867470

  1. Mouse-human immunoglobulin G1 chimeric antibodies with activities against Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed Central

    Zebedee, S L; Koduri, R K; Mukherjee, J; Mukherjee, S; Lee, S; Sauer, D F; Scharff, M D; Casadevall, A

    1994-01-01

    Passive antibody administration is a potentially useful approach for the therapy of human Cryptococcus neoformans infections. To evaluate the efficacy of the human immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) constant region against C. neoformans and to construct murine antibody derivatives with reduced immunogenicities and longer half-lives in humans, two mouse-human IgG1 chimeric antibodies were generated from the protective murine monoclonal antibodies 2D10 (IgM) and 18B7 (IgG1). The 2D10 mouse-human IgG1 chimeric antibody (ch2D10) had significantly lower binding affinity than its parent murine antibody (m2D10), presumably because of a loss of avidity contribution on switching from IgM to IgG. The 18B7 mouse-human IgG1 chimeric antibody (ch18B7) had higher affinity for cryptococcal polysaccharide antigen than its parent murine antibody (m18B7). ch18B7 and ch2D10 promoted phagocytosis of C. neoformans by primary human microglial cells and the murine J774.16 macrophage-like cell line. ch18B7 and m18B7 enhanced fungistatic or fungicidal activity of J774.16 cells and prolonged the survival of lethally infected mice. We conclude that the human IgG1 constant chain can be effective in mediating antifungal activity against C. neoformans. ch18B7 or similar antibodies are potential candidates for passive antibody therapy of human cryptococcosis. PMID:7979280

  2. Inhibition of erythrocyte invasion and Plasmodium falciparum merozoite surface protein 1 processing by human immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) and IgG3 antibodies.

    PubMed

    Lazarou, Maria; Guevara Patiño, José A; Jennings, Richard M; McIntosh, Richard S; Shi, Jianguo; Howell, Steven; Cullen, Eilish; Jones, Tarran; Adame-Gallegos, Jaime R; Chappel, Jonathan A; McBride, Jana S; Blackman, Michael J; Holder, Anthony A; Pleass, Richard J

    2009-12-01

    Antigen-specific antibodies (Abs) to the 19-kDa carboxy-terminal region of Plasmodium falciparum merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP1(19)) play an important role in protective immunity to malaria. Mouse monoclonal Abs (MAbs) 12.10 and 12.8 recognizing MSP1(19) can inhibit red cell invasion by interfering with MSP1 processing on the merozoite surface. We show here that this ability is dependent on the intact Ab since Fab and F(ab')(2) fragments derived from MAb 12.10, although capable of binding MSP1 with high affinity and competing with the intact antibody for binding to MSP1, were unable to inhibit erythrocyte invasion or MSP1 processing. The DNA sequences of the variable (V) regions of both MAbs 12.8 and 12.10 were obtained, and partial amino acid sequences of the same regions were confirmed by mass spectrometry. Human chimeric Abs constructed by using these sequences, which combine the original mouse V regions with human gamma1 and gamma3 constant regions, retain the ability to bind to both parasites and recombinant MSP1(19), and both chimeric human immunoglobulin G1s (IgG1s) were at least as good at inhibiting erythrocyte invasion as the parental murine MAbs 12.8 and 12.10. Furthermore, the human chimeric Abs of the IgG1 class (but not the corresponding human IgG3), induced significant NADPH-mediated oxidative bursts and degranulation from human neutrophils. These chimeric human Abs will enable investigators to examine the role of human Fcgamma receptors in immunity to malaria using a transgenic parasite and mouse model and may prove useful in humans for neutralizing parasites as an adjunct to antimalarial drug therapy. PMID:19805526

  3. PelA Deacetylase Activity Is Required for Pel Polysaccharide Synthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Colvin, Kelly M.; Alnabelseya, Noor; Baker, Perrin; Whitney, John C.

    2013-01-01

    The Pel polysaccharide serves as an intercellular adhesin for the formation and maintenance of biofilms in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Pel biosynthesis requires the products of a seven-gene operon, pelA-pelG, all of which are necessary for Pel-dependent biofilm formation and Pel-related phenotypes. One of the genes, pelA, encodes a protein with a predicted polysaccharide deacetylase domain. In this work, the role of the putative deacetylase domain in Pel production was examined. We first established that purified recombinant PelA hydrolyzed the pseudosubstrate p-nitrophenyl acetate in vitro, and site-specific mutations of predicted deacetylase active-site residues reduced activity greater than 10-fold. Additionally, these mutants were deficient in Pel-dependent biofilm formation and wrinkly colony morphology in vivo. Subcellular fractionation experiments demonstrate that PelA localizes to both the membrane and periplasmic fractions. Finally, antiserum against the Pel polysaccharide was generated, and PelA deacetylase mutants do not produce Pel-reactive material. Taken together, these results suggest that the deacetylase activity of PelA is important for the production of the Pel polysaccharide. PMID:23504011

  4. RESEARCH PAPER: Old stellar population synthesis: new age and mass estimates for Mayall II = G1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jun; de Grijs, Richard; Fan, Zhou; Rey, Soo-Chang; Wu, Zhen-Yu; Zhou, Xu; Wu, Jiang-Hua; Jiang, Zhao-Ji; Chen, Jian-Sheng; Lee, Kyungsook; Sohn, Sangmo Tony

    2009-06-01

    Mayall II = G1 is one of the most luminous globular clusters (GCs) in M31. Here, we determine its age and mass by comparing multicolor photometry with theoretical stellar population synthesis models. Based on far- and near-ultraviolet GALEX photometry, broad-band UBVRI, and infrared JHKS 2MASS data, we construct the most extensive spectral energy distribution of G1 to date, spanning the wavelength range from 1538 to 20 000 Å. A quantitative comparison with a variety of simple stellar population (SSP) models yields a mean age which is consistent with G1 being among the oldest building blocks of M31 and having formed within ~1.7 Gyr after the Big Bang. Irrespective of the SSP model or stellar initial mass function adopted, the resulting mass estimates (of order 107 Modot) indicate that G1 is one of the most massive GCs in the Local Group. However, we speculate that the cluster's exceptionally high mass suggests that it may not be a genuine GC. Our results also suggest that G1 may contain, on average, (1.65±0.63) × 102 Lodot far-ultraviolet-bright, hot, extreme horizontal-branch stars, depending on the adopted SSP model. In addition, we demonstrate that extensive multi-passband photometry coupled with SSP analysis enables one to obtain age estimates for old SSPs that have similar accuracies as those from integrated spectroscopy or resolved stellar photometry, provided that some of the free parameters can be constrained independently.

  5. Post-translational Modifications Differentially Affect IgG1 Conformation and Receptor Binding*

    PubMed Central

    Houde, Damian; Peng, Yucai; Berkowitz, Steven A.; Engen, John R.

    2010-01-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) can have profound effects on protein structure and protein dynamics and thereby can influence protein function. To understand and connect PTM-induced functional differences with any resulting conformational changes, the conformational changes must be detected and localized to specific parts of the protein. We illustrate these principles here with a study of the functional and conformational changes that accompany modifications to a monoclonal immunoglobulin γ1 (IgG1) antibody. IgG1s are large and heterogeneous proteins capable of incorporating a multiplicity of PTMs both in vivo and in vitro. For many IgG1s, these PTMs can play a critical role in affecting conformation, biological function, and the ability of the antibody to initiate a potential adverse biological response. We investigated the impact of differential galactosylation, methionine oxidation, and fucosylation on solution conformation using hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry and probed the effects of IgG1 binding to the FcγRIIIa receptor. The results showed that methionine oxidation and galactosylation both impact IgG1 conformation, whereas fucosylation appears to have little or no impact to the conformation. FcγRIIIa binding was strongly influenced by both the glycan structure/composition (namely galactose and fucose) and conformational changes that were induced by some of the modifications. PMID:20103567

  6. Integrin signaling at the M/G1 transition induces expression of cyclin E.

    PubMed

    Hulleman, E; Bijvelt, J J; Verkleij, A J; Verrips, C T; Boonstra, J

    1999-12-15

    The activities of the mammalian G1 cyclins, cyclin D and cyclin E, during cell cycle progression (G1/S) are believed to be regulated by cell attachment and the presence of growth factors. In order to study the importance of cell attachment and concomitant integrin signaling on the expression of G1 cyclins during the natural adhesion process from mitosis to interphase, protein expression was monitored in cells that were synchronized by mitotic shake off. Here we show that in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and neuroblastoma (N2A) cells, expression of cyclin E at the M/G1 transition is regulated by both growth factors and cell attachment, while expression of cyclin D seems to be entirely dependent on the presence of serum. Expression of cyclin E appears to be correlated with the phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein, suggesting a link with the activity of the cyclin D/cdk4 complex. Expression of the cdk inhibitors p21(cip1/Waf1) and p27(Kip1) is not changed upon serum depletion or detachment of cells during early G1, suggesting no direct role for these CKIs in the regulation of cyclin activity. Although inhibition of cyclin E/cdk2 kinase activity has been reported previously, this is the first time that cyclin E expression is shown to be dependent on cell attachment. PMID:10585265

  7. A Dynamical Framework for the All-or-None G1/S Transition

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Alexis R.; Heldt, Frank S.; Zhang, Tongli; Bakal, Chris; Novák, Béla

    2016-01-01

    Summary The transition from G1 into DNA replication (S phase) is an emergent behavior resulting from dynamic and complex interactions between cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks), Cdk inhibitors (CKIs), and the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C). Understanding the cellular decision to commit to S phase requires a quantitative description of these interactions. We apply quantitative imaging of single human cells to track the expression of G1/S regulators and use these data to parametrize a stochastic mathematical model of the G1/S transition. We show that a rapid, proteolytic, double-negative feedback loop between Cdk2:Cyclin and the Cdk inhibitor p27Kip1 drives a switch-like entry into S phase. Furthermore, our model predicts that increasing Emi1 levels throughout S phase are critical in maintaining irreversibility of the G1/S transition, which we validate using Emi1 knockdown and live imaging of G1/S reporters. This work provides insight into the general design principles of the signaling networks governing the temporally abrupt transitions between cell-cycle phases. PMID:27136687

  8. A comparative genomic analysis of the alkalitolerant soil bacterium Bacillus lehensis G1.

    PubMed

    Noor, Yusuf Muhammad; Samsulrizal, Nurul Hidayah; Jema'on, Noor Azah; Low, Kheng Oon; Ramli, Aizi Nor Mazila; Alias, Noor Izawati; Damis, Siti Intan Rosdianah; Fuzi, Siti Fatimah Zaharah Mohd; Isa, Mohd Noor Mat; Murad, Abdul Munir Abdul; Raih, Mohd Firdaus Mohd; Bakar, Farah Diba Abu; Najimudin, Nazalan; Mahadi, Nor Muhammad; Illias, Rosli Md

    2014-07-25

    Bacillus lehensis G1 is a Gram-positive, moderately alkalitolerant bacterium isolated from soil samples. B. lehensis produces cyclodextrin glucanotransferase (CGTase), an enzyme that has enabled the extensive use of cyclodextrin in foodstuffs, chemicals, and pharmaceuticals. The genome sequence of B. lehensis G1 consists of a single circular 3.99 Mb chromosome containing 4017 protein-coding sequences (CDSs), of which 2818 (70.15%) have assigned biological roles, 936 (23.30%) have conserved domains with unknown functions, and 263 (6.55%) have no match with any protein database. Bacillus clausii KSM-K16 was established as the closest relative to B. lehensis G1 based on gene content similarity and 16S rRNA phylogenetic analysis. A total of 2820 proteins from B. lehensis G1 were found to have orthologues in B. clausii, including sodium-proton antiporters, transport proteins, and proteins involved in ATP synthesis. A comparative analysis of these proteins and those in B. clausii and other alkaliphilic Bacillus species was carried out to investigate their contributions towards the alkalitolerance of the microorganism. The similarities and differences in alkalitolerance-related genes among alkalitolerant/alkaliphilic Bacillus species highlight the complex mechanism of pH homeostasis. The B. lehensis G1 genome was also mined for proteins and enzymes with potential viability for industrial and commercial purposes. PMID:24811681

  9. Increased serum clearance of oligomannose species present on a human IgG1 molecule

    PubMed Central

    Alessandri, Leslie; Ouellette, David; Acquah, Aima; Rieser, Mathew; LeBlond, David; Saltarelli, Mary; Radziejewski, Czeslaw; Fujimori, Taro; Correia, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    The role of Fc glycans on clearance of IgG molecule has been examined by various groups in experiments where specific glycans have been enriched or the entire spectrum of glycans was studied after administration in pre-clinical or clinical pharmacokinetic (PK) studies. The overall conclusions from these studies are inconsistent, which may result from differences in antibody structure or experimental design. In the present study a well-characterized recombinant monoclonal IgG1 molecule (mAb-1) was analyzed from serum samples obtained from a human PK study. mAb-1 was recovered from serum using its ligand cross-linked to Sepharose beads. The overall purity and recovery of all isoforms were carefully evaluated using a variety of methods. Glycans were then enzymatically cleaved, labeled using 2-aminobenzamide and analyzed by normal phase high performance liquid chromatography. The assays for recovering mAb-1 from serum and subsequent glycan analysis were rigorously qualified at a lower limit of quantitation of 15 μg/mL, thus permitting analysis to day 14 of the clinical PK study. Eight glycans were monitored and classified into two groups: (1) the oligomannose type structures (M5, M6 and M7) and (2) fucosylated biantennary oligosaccharides (FBO) structures (NGA2F, NA1F, NA2F, NA1F-GlcNAc and NGA2F-GlcNAc). We observed that the oligomannose species were cleared at a much faster rate (40%) than FBOs and conclude that high mannose species should be carefully monitored and controlled as they may affect PK of the therapeutic; they should thus be considered an important quality attribute. These observations were only possible through the application of rigorous analytical methods that we believe will need to be employed when comparing innovator and biosimilar molecules. PMID:22669558

  10. Histone Deacetylases in Bone Development and Skeletal Disorders.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Elizabeth W; Carpio, Lomeli R; van Wijnen, Andre J; McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E; Westendorf, Jennifer J

    2015-10-01

    Histone deacetylases (Hdacs) are conserved enzymes that remove acetyl groups from lysine side chains in histones and other proteins. Eleven of the 18 Hdacs encoded by the human and mouse genomes depend on Zn(2+) for enzymatic activity, while the other 7, the sirtuins (Sirts), require NAD2(+). Collectively, Hdacs and Sirts regulate numerous cellular and mitochondrial processes including gene transcription, DNA repair, protein stability, cytoskeletal dynamics, and signaling pathways to affect both development and aging. Of clinical relevance, Hdacs inhibitors are United States Food and Drug Administration-approved cancer therapeutics and are candidate therapies for other common diseases including arthritis, diabetes, epilepsy, heart disease, HIV infection, neurodegeneration, and numerous aging-related disorders. Hdacs and Sirts influence skeletal development, maintenance of mineral density and bone strength by affecting intramembranous and endochondral ossification, as well as bone resorption. With few exceptions, inhibition of Hdac or Sirt activity though either loss-of-function mutations or prolonged chemical inhibition has negative and/or toxic effects on skeletal development and bone mineral density. Specifically, Hdac/Sirt suppression causes abnormalities in physiological development such as craniofacial dimorphisms, short stature, and bone fragility that are associated with several human syndromes or diseases. In contrast, activation of Sirts may protect the skeleton from aging and immobilization-related bone loss. This knowledge may prolong healthspan and prevent adverse events caused by epigenetic therapies that are entering the clinical realm at an unprecedented rate. In this review, we summarize the general properties of Hdacs/Sirts and the research that has revealed their essential functions in bone forming cells (e.g., osteoblasts and chondrocytes) and bone resorbing osteoclasts. Finally, we offer predictions on future research in this area and the

  11. Histone Deacetylase 8: Characterization of Physiological Divalent Metal Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Nechay, Michael R; Gallup, Nathan M; Morgenstern, Amanda; Smith, Quentin A; Eberhart, Mark E; Alexandrova, Anastassia N

    2016-07-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are responsible for the removal of acetyl groups from histones, resulting in gene silencing. Overexpression of HDACs is associated with cancer, and their inhibitors are of particular interest as chemotherapeutics. However, HDACs remain a target of mechanistic debate. HDAC class 8 is the most studied HDAC, and of particular importance due to its human oncological relevance. HDAC8 has traditionally been considered to be a Zn-dependent enzyme. However, recent experimental assays have challenged this assumption and shown that HDAC8 is catalytically active with a variety of different metals, and that it may be a Fe-dependent enzyme in vivo. We studied two opposing mechanisms utilizing a series of divalent metal ions in physiological abundance (Zn(2+), Fe(2+), Co(2+), Mn(2+), Ni(2+), and Mg(2+)). Extensive sampling of the entire protein with different bound metals was done with the mixed quantum-classical QM/DMD method. Density functional theory (DFT) on an unusually large cluster model was used to describe the active site and reaction mechanism. We have found that the reaction profile of HDAC8 is similar among all metals tested, and follows one of the previously published mechanisms, but the rate-determining step is different from the one previously claimed. We further provide a scheme for estimating the metal binding affinities to the protein. We use the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) to understand the different binding affinities for each metal in HDAC8 as well as the ability of each metal to bind and properly orient the substrate for deacetylation. The combination of this data with the catalytic rate constants is required to reproduce the experimentally observed trend in metal-depending performance. We predict Co(2+) and Zn(2+) to be the most active metals in HDAC8, followed by Fe(2+), and Mn(2+) and Mg(2+) to be the least active. PMID:26996235

  12. Activation and Inhibition of Histone Deacetylase 8 by Monovalent Cations*

    PubMed Central

    Gantt, Stephanie L.; Joseph, Caleb G.; Fierke, Carol A.

    2010-01-01

    The metal-dependent histone deacetylases (HDACs) catalyze hydrolysis of acetyl groups from acetyllysine side chains and are targets of cancer therapeutics. Two bound monovalent cations (MVCs) of unknown function have been previously observed in crystal structures of HDAC8; site 1 is near the active site, whereas site 2 is located >20 Å from the catalytic metal ion. Here we demonstrate that one bound MVC activates catalytic activity (K1/2 = 3.4 mm for K+), whereas the second, weaker-binding MVC (K1/2 = 26 mm for K+) decreases catalytic activity by 11-fold. The weaker binding MVC also enhances the affinity of the HDAC inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid by 5-fold. The site 1 MVC is coordinated by the side chain of Asp-176 that also forms a hydrogen bond with His-142, one of two histidines important for catalytic activity. The D176A and H142A mutants each increase the K1/2 for potassium inhibition by ≥40-fold, demonstrating that the inhibitory cation binds to site 1. Furthermore, the MVC inhibition is mediated by His-142, suggesting that this residue is protonated for maximal HDAC8 activity. Therefore, His-142 functions either as an electrostatic catalyst or a general acid. The activating MVC binds in the distal site and causes a time-dependent increase in activity, suggesting that the site 2 MVC stabilizes an active conformation of the enzyme. Sodium binds more weakly to both sites and activates HDAC8 to a lesser extent than potassium. Therefore, it is likely that potassium is the predominant MVC bound to HDAC8 in vivo. PMID:20029090

  13. HDACiDB: a database for histone deacetylase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Murugan, Kasi; Sangeetha, Shanmugasamy; Ranjitha, Shanmugasamy; Vimala, Antony; Al-Sohaibani, Saleh; Rameshkumar, Gopal

    2015-01-01

    An histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor database (HDACiDB) was constructed to enable rapid access to data relevant to the development of epigenetic modulators (HDAC inhibitors [HDACi]), helping bring precision cancer medicine a step closer. Thousands of HDACi targeting HDACs are in various stages of development and are being tested in clinical trials as monotherapy and in combination with other cancer agents. Despite the abundance of HDACi, information resources are limited. Tools for in silico experiments on specific HDACi prediction, for designing and analyzing the generated data, as well as custom-made specific tools and interactive databases, are needed. We have developed an HDACiDB that is a composite collection of HDACi and currently comprises 1,445 chemical compounds, including 419 natural and 1,026 synthetic ones having the potential to inhibit histone deacetylation. Most importantly, it will allow application of Lipinski’s rule of five drug-likeness and other physicochemical property-based screening of the inhibitors. It also provides easy access to information on their source of origin, molecular properties, drug likeness, as well as bioavailability with relevant references cited. Being the first comprehensive database on HDACi that contains all known natural and synthetic HDACi, the HDACiDB may help to improve our knowledge concerning the mechanisms of actions of available HDACi and enable us to selectively target individual HDAC isoforms and establish a new paradigm for intelligent epigenetic cancer drug design. The database is freely available on the http://hdacidb.bioinfo.au-kbc.org.in/hdacidb/website. PMID:25945037

  14. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) in XPC gene silencing and bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Bladder cancer is one of the most common malignancies and causes hundreds of thousands of deaths worldwide each year. Bladder cancer is strongly associated with exposure to environmental carcinogens. It is believed that DNA damage generated by environmental carcinogens and their metabolites causes development of bladder cancer. Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is the major DNA repair pathway for repairing bulk DNA damage generated by most environmental carcinogens, and XPC is a DNA damage recognition protein required for initiation of the NER process. Recent studies demonstrate reduced levels of XPC protein in tumors for a majority of bladder cancer patients. In this work we investigated the role of histone deacetylases (HDACs) in XPC gene silencing and bladder cancer development. The results of our HDAC inhibition study revealed that the treatment of HTB4 and HTB9 bladder cancer cells with the HDAC inhibitor valproic acid (VPA) caused an increase in transcription of the XPC gene in these cells. The results of our chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) studies indicated that the VPA treatment caused increased binding of both CREB1 and Sp1 transcription factors at the promoter region of the XPC gene for both HTB4 and HTB9 cells. The results of our immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining studies further revealed a strong correlation between the over-expression of HDAC4 and increased bladder cancer occurrence (p < 0.001) as well as a marginal significance of increasing incidence of HDAC4 positivity seen with an increase in severity of bladder cancer (p = 0.08). In addition, the results of our caspase 3 activation studies demonstrated that prior treatment with VPA increased the anticancer drug cisplatin-induced activation of caspase 3 in both HTB4 and HTB9 cells. All of these results suggest that the HDACs negatively regulate transcription of the XPC gene in bladder cancer cells and contribute to the severity of bladder tumors. PMID:21507255

  15. Antimalarial Activity of the Anticancer Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor SB939

    PubMed Central

    Sumanadasa, Subathdrage D. M.; Goodman, Christopher D.; Lucke, Andrew J.; Skinner-Adams, Tina; Sahama, Ishani; Haque, Ashraful; Do, Tram Anh; McFadden, Geoffrey I.; Fairlie, David P.

    2012-01-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) enzymes posttranslationally modify lysines on histone and nonhistone proteins and play crucial roles in epigenetic regulation and other important cellular processes. HDAC inhibitors (e.g., suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid [SAHA; also known as vorinostat]) are used clinically to treat some cancers and are under investigation for use against many other diseases. Development of new HDAC inhibitors for noncancer indications has the potential to be accelerated by piggybacking onto cancer studies, as several HDAC inhibitors have undergone or are undergoing clinical trials. One such compound, SB939, is a new orally active hydroxamate-based HDAC inhibitor with an improved pharmacokinetic profile compared to that of SAHA. In this study, the in vitro and in vivo antiplasmodial activities of SB939 were investigated. SB939 was found to be a potent inhibitor of the growth of Plasmodium falciparum asexual-stage parasites in vitro (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50], 100 to 200 nM), causing hyperacetylation of parasite histone and nonhistone proteins. In combination with the aspartic protease inhibitor lopinavir, SB939 displayed additive activity. SB939 also potently inhibited the in vitro growth of exoerythrocytic-stage Plasmodium parasites in liver cells (IC50, ∼150 nM), suggesting that inhibitor targeting to multiple malaria parasite life cycle stages may be possible. In an experimental in vivo murine model of cerebral malaria, orally administered SB939 significantly inhibited P. berghei ANKA parasite growth, preventing development of cerebral malaria-like symptoms. These results identify SB939 as a potent new antimalarial HDAC inhibitor and underscore the potential of investigating next-generation anticancer HDAC inhibitors as prospective new drug leads for treatment of malaria. PMID:22508312

  16. Electrocardiographic effects of class 1 selective histone deacetylase inhibitor romidepsin

    PubMed Central

    Sager, Philip T; Balser, Barbara; Wolfson, Julie; Nichols, Jean; Pilot, Richard; Jones, Suzanne; Burris, Howard A

    2015-01-01

    Romidepsin is a histone deacetylase inhibitor approved by the FDA for the treatment of patients with cutaneous or peripheral T-cell lymphoma who have received prior systemic therapy. The objective of this analysis was to evaluate the potential QTc effects of romidepsin. Patients with advanced malignancy received 4-h infusions of 14 mg/m2 romidepsin on days 1, 8, and 15 of a 28-day cycle. In cycle 2, a subset of patients received 1-h infusions of 8–12 mg/m2 romidepsin. Patients were administered antiemetics before each romidepsin dose and electrolyte supplementation as needed. Electrocardiogram readings were performed prior to antiemetic administration, prior to romidepsin administration, and at specified time points over the subsequent 24 h. Romidepsin exposure and heart rate were also assessed. In the electrocardiogram-evaluable population, 26 patients received romidepsin at 14 mg/m2 over 4 h. The maximum mean increases from the preantiemetic baseline for QTcF and heart rate were 10.1 msec (upper 90% CI, 14.5 msec) and 18.2 beats per minute, respectively. No patient in this study had an absolute QTcF value >450 msec and only one patient had an increase from the preantiemetic baseline of >60 msec. There was a mild reduction in the PR interval and no meaningful changes in the QRS interval. Despite the use of QT-prolonging antiemetics, treatment with romidepsin did not markedly prolong the QTc interval through 24 h. Increases in calculated QTc may have been exaggerated as a consequence of transient increases in heart rate. PMID:25914207

  17. Identification and characterization of histone deacetylases in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum)

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Linmao; Lu, Jingxia; Zhang, Jianxia; Wu, Pei-Ying; Yang, Songguang; Wu, Keqiang

    2015-01-01

    Histone acetylation and deacetylation at the N-terminus of histone tails play crucial roles in the regulation of eukaryotic gene activity. Histone acetylation and deacetylation are catalyzed by histone acetyltransferases and histone deacetylases (HDACs), respectively. A growing number of studies have demonstrated the importance of histone deacetylation/acetylation on genome stability, transcriptional regulation, development and response to stress in Arabidopsis. However, the biological functions of HDACs in tomato have not been investigated previously. Fifteen HDACs identified from tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) can be grouped into RPD3/HDA1, SIR2 and HD2 families based on phylogenetic analysis. Meanwhile, 10 members of the RPD3/HDA1 family can be further subdivided into four groups, namely Class I, Class II, Class III, and Class IV. High similarities of protein sequences and conserved domains were identified among SlHDACs and their homologs in Arabidopsis. Most SlHDACs were expressed in all tissues examined with different transcript abundance. Transient expression in Arabidopsis protoplasts showed that SlHDA8, SlHDA1, SlHDA5, SlSRT1 and members of the HD2 family were localized to the nucleus, whereas SlHDA3 and SlHDA4 were localized in both the cytoplasm and nucleus. The difference in the expression patterns and subcellular localization of SlHDACs suggest that they may play distinct functions in tomato. Furthermore, we found that three members of the RPD3/HDA1 family, SlHDA1, SIHDA3 and SlHDA4, interacted with TAG1 (TOMATO AGAMOUS1) and TM29 (TOMATO MADS BOX29), two MADS-box proteins associated with tomato reproductive development, indicating that these HDACs may be involved in gene regulation in reproductive development. PMID:25610445

  18. HDACiDB: a database for histone deacetylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Murugan, Kasi; Sangeetha, Shanmugasamy; Ranjitha, Shanmugasamy; Vimala, Antony; Al-Sohaibani, Saleh; Rameshkumar, Gopal

    2015-01-01

    An histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor database (HDACiDB) was constructed to enable rapid access to data relevant to the development of epigenetic modulators (HDAC inhibitors [HDACi]), helping bring precision cancer medicine a step closer. Thousands of HDACi targeting HDACs are in various stages of development and are being tested in clinical trials as monotherapy and in combination with other cancer agents. Despite the abundance of HDACi, information resources are limited. Tools for in silico experiments on specific HDACi prediction, for designing and analyzing the generated data, as well as custom-made specific tools and interactive databases, are needed. We have developed an HDACiDB that is a composite collection of HDACi and currently comprises 1,445 chemical compounds, including 419 natural and 1,026 synthetic ones having the potential to inhibit histone deacetylation. Most importantly, it will allow application of Lipinski's rule of five drug-likeness and other physicochemical property-based screening of the inhibitors. It also provides easy access to information on their source of origin, molecular properties, drug likeness, as well as bioavailability with relevant references cited. Being the first comprehensive database on HDACi that contains all known natural and synthetic HDACi, the HDACiDB may help to improve our knowledge concerning the mechanisms of actions of available HDACi and enable us to selectively target individual HDAC isoforms and establish a new paradigm for intelligent epigenetic cancer drug design. The database is freely available on the http://hdacidb.bioinfo.au-kbc.org.in/hdacidb/website. PMID:25945037

  19. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Prolong Cardiac Repolarization through Transcriptional Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Spence, Stan; Deurinck, Mark; Ju, Haisong; Traebert, Martin; McLean, LeeAnne; Marlowe, Jennifer; Emotte, Corinne; Tritto, Elaine; Tseng, Min; Shultz, Michael; Friedrichs, Gregory S

    2016-09-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are an emerging class of anticancer agents that modify gene expression by altering the acetylation status of lysine residues of histone proteins, thereby inducing transcription, cell cycle arrest, differentiation, and cell death or apoptosis of cancer cells. In the clinical setting, treatment with HDAC inhibitors has been associated with delayed cardiac repolarization and in rare instances a lethal ventricular tachyarrhythmia known as torsades de pointes. The mechanism(s) of HDAC inhibitor-induced effects on cardiac repolarization is unknown. We demonstrate that administration of structurally diverse HDAC inhibitors to dogs causes delayed but persistent increases in the heart rate corrected QT interval (QTc), an in vivo measure of cardiac repolarization, at timepoints far removed from the Tmax for parent drug and metabolites. Transcriptional profiling of ventricular myocardium from dogs treated with various HDAC inhibitors demonstrated effects on genes involved in protein trafficking, scaffolding and insertion of various ion channels into the cell membrane as well as genes for specific ion channel subunits involved in cardiac repolarization. Extensive in vitro ion channel profiling of various structural classes of HDAC inhibitors (and their major metabolites) by binding and acute patch clamp assays failed to show any consistent correlations with direct ion channel blockade. Drug-induced rescue of an intracellular trafficking-deficient mutant potassium ion channel, hERG (G601S), and decreased maturation (glycosylation) of wild-type hERG expressed by CHO cells in vitro correlated with prolongation of QTc intervals observed in vivo The results suggest that HDAC inhibitor-induced prolongation of cardiac repolarization may be mediated in part by transcriptional changes of genes required for ion channel trafficking and localization to the sarcolemma. These data have broad implications for the development of these drug classes and

  20. Acute appendicitis with a neuroendocrine tumor G1 (carcinoid): pitfalls of conservative treatment.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hiroyuki A; Fujimoto, Taketoshi; Kato, Yo; Sasaki, Mayumi; Ikusue, Toshikazu

    2016-08-01

    A man in his early thirties presented to our clinic with right lower abdominal pain. Computed tomography (CT) and ultrasonography (US) revealed a swollen appendix and an appendicolith. Abscess formation was not observed but ongoing appendiceal rupture was not ruled out. Three months after successful conservative therapy, the lumen of the apical portion was kept dilated and laparoscopic interval appendectomy was performed. No tumorous findings were observed macroscopically. However, histology revealed many tiny nests infiltrating the submucosa, muscular layer, and subserosa at the root of the appendix. An appendiceal neuroendocrine tumor G1 (NET G1; carcinoid) was diagnosed immunohistologically. Neither CT nor US visualized the tumor because of its non-tumor-forming but infiltrative growth. In conclusion, after successful conservative treatment, interval appendectomy should be considered to uncover a possible appendiceal NET G1 (carcinoid), particularly when dilatation of the distal lumen is kept under observation. PMID:27311320

  1. Detection of histidine oxidation in a monoclonal immunoglobulin gamma (IgG) 1 antibody.

    PubMed

    Amano, Masato; Kobayashi, Naoki; Yabuta, Masayuki; Uchiyama, Susumu; Fukui, Kiichi

    2014-08-01

    Although oxidation of methionine and tryptophan are known as popular chemical modifications that occur in monoclonal antibody (mAb) molecules, oxidation of other amino acids in mAbs has not been reported to date. In this study, oxidation of the histidine residue in a human immunoglobulin gamma (IgG) 1 molecule was discovered for the first time by mass spectrometry. The oxidation of a specific histidine located at the CH2 domain of IgG1 occurred under light stress, but it was not observed under heat stress. With the forced degradation study using several reactive oxygen species, the singlet oxygen was attributed to a reactive source of the histidine oxidation. The reaction mechanism of the histidine oxidation was proposed on the basis of the mass spectrometric analysis of IgG1 oxidized in deuterium oxide and hydrogen heavy oxide. PMID:24940720

  2. MicroRNA-22 Inhibits Histone Deacetylase 4 to Promote T Helper-17 Cell-Dependent Emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wen; You, Ran; Yuan, Xiaoyi; Yang, Tianshu; Samuel, Errol L. G.; Marcano, Daniela C.; Sikkema, William K. A.; Tour, James M.; Rodriguez, Antony; Kheradmand, Farrah; Corry, David B.

    2015-01-01

    Smoking-related emphysema is a chronic inflammatory disease driven by T helper 17 (TH17) cells through molecular mechanisms that remain obscure. Here we have explored the role of microRNA-22 (miR-22) in emphysema. MiR-22 was upregulated in lung myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs) of smokers with emphysema and antigen-presenting cells (APCs) of mice exposed to smoke or nanoparticulate carbon black (nCB) through a mechanism involving NF-κB. MiR-22-deficient mice, but not wild-type, showed attenuated TH17 responses and failed to develop emphysema after exposure to either smoke or nCB. We further show that miR-22 controls APC activation and TH17 responses through activation of AP-1 transcription factor complexes and histone deacetylase (HDAC) 4. Thus, miR-22 is a critical regulator of both emphysema and TH17 responses. PMID:26437241

  3. Extraction of monoclonal antibodies (IgG1) using anionic and anionic/nonionic reverse micelles.

    PubMed

    George, Daliya A; Stuckey, David C

    2010-01-01

    Purification schemes for antibody production based on affinity chromatography are trying to keep pace with increases in cell culture expression levels and many current research initiatives are focused on finding alternatives to chromatography for the purification of Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). In this article, we have investigated an alternative separation technique based on liquid-liquid extraction called the reverse micellar extraction. We extracted MAb (IgG1) using reverse micelles of an anionic surfactant, sodium bis 2-ethyl-hexyl sulfosuccinate (AOT) and a combination of anionic (AOT) and nonionic surfactants (Brij-30, Tween-85, Span-85) using isooctane as the solvent system. The extraction efficiency of IgG1 was studied by varying parameters, such as pH of the aqueous phase, cation concentration, and type and surfactant concentration. Using the AOT/Isooctane reverse micellar system, we could achieve good overall extraction of IgG1 (between 80 and 90%), but only 30% of the bioactivity of IgG1 could be recovered at the end of the extraction by using its binding to affinity chromatography columns as a surrogate measure of activity. As anionic surfactants were suspected as being one of the reasons for the reduced activity, we decided to combine a nonionic surfactant with an anionic surfactant and then study its effect on the extraction efficiency and bioactivity. The best results were obtained using an AOT/Brij-30/Isooctane reverse micellar system, which gave an overall extraction above 90 and 59% overall activity recovery. An AOT/Tween-85/Isooctane reverse micellar system gave an overall extraction of between 75 and 80% and overall activity recovery of around 40-45%. The results showed that the activity recovery of IgG1 can be significantly enhanced using different surfactant combination systems, and if the recovery of IgG1 can be further enhanced, the technique shows considerable promise for the downstream purification of MAbs. PMID:20665658

  4. Cyclic Equibiaxial Tensile Strain Alters Gene Expression of Chondrocytes via Histone Deacetylase 4 Shuttling

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chongwei; Wei, Xiaochun; Lv, Zhi; Sun, Xiaojuan; Wang, Shaowei; Zhang, Yang; Jiao, Qiang; Wang, Xiaohu; Li, Yongping; Wei, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This paper aims to investigate whether equibiaxial tensile strain alters chondrocyte gene expression via controlling subcellular localization of histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4). Materials and Methods Murine chondrocytes transfected with GFP-HDAC4 were subjected to 3 h cyclic equibiaxial tensile strain (CTS, 6% strain at 0.25 Hz) by a Flexcell® FX-5000™ Tension System. Fluorescence microscope and western blot were used to observe subcellular location of HDAC4. The gene expression was analyzed by real-time RT-PCR. The concentration of Glycosaminoglycans in culture medium was quantified by bimethylmethylene blue dye; Collagen II protein was evaluated by western blot. Cells phenotype was identified by immunohistochemistry. Cell viability was evaluated by live-dead cell detect kit. Okadaic acid, an inhibitor of HDAC4 nuclear relocation, was used to further validate whether HDAC4 nuclear relocation plays a role in gene expression in response to tension stimulation. Results 87.5% of HDAC4 was located in the cytoplasm in chondrocytes under no loading condition, but it was relocated to the nucleus after CTS. RT-PCR analysis showed that levels of mRNA for aggrecan, collagen II, LK1 and SOX9 were all increased in chondrocytes subjected to CTS as compared to no loading control chondrocytes; in contrast, the levels of type X collagen, MMP-13, IHH and Runx2 gene expression were decreased in the chondrocytes subjected to CTS as compared to control chondrocytes. Meanwhile, CTS contributed to elevation of glycosaminoglycans and collagen II protein, but did not change collagen I production. When Okadaic acid blocked HDAC4 relocation from the cytoplasm to nucleus, the changes of the chondrocytes induced by CTS were abrogated. There was no chondrocyte dead detected in this study in response to CTS. Conclusions CTS is able to induce HDAC4 relocation from cytoplasm to nucleus. Thus, CTS alters chondrocytes gene expression in association with the relocation of HDAC4 induced

  5. Differential expression of histone deacetylase and acetyltransferase genes in gastric cancer and their modulation by trichostatin A.

    PubMed

    Wisnieski, Fernanda; Calcagno, Danielle Queiroz; Leal, Mariana Ferreira; Chen, Elizabeth Suchi; Gigek, Carolina Oliveira; Santos, Leonardo Caires; Pontes, Thaís Brilhante; Rasmussen, Lucas Trevizani; Payão, Spencer Luiz Marques; Assumpção, Paulo Pimentel; Lourenço, Laércio Gomes; Demachki, Sâmia; Artigiani, Ricardo; Burbano, Rommel Rodríguez; Smith, Marília Cardoso

    2014-07-01

    Gastric cancer is still the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide, even though its incidence and mortality have declined over the recent few decades. Epigenetic control using histone deacetylase inhibitors, such as trichostatin A (TSA), is a promising cancer therapy. This study aimed to assess the messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of three histone deacetylases (HDAC1, HDAC2, and HDAC3), two histone acetyltransferases (GCN5 and PCAF), and two possible targets of these histone modifiers (MYC and CDKN1A) in 50 matched pairs of gastric tumors and corresponding adjacent nontumors samples from patients with gastric adenocarcinoma, as well as their correlations and their possible associations with clinicopathological features. Additionally, we evaluated whether these genes are sensitive to TSA in gastric cancer cell lines. Our results demonstrated downregulation of HDAC1, PCAF, and CDKN1A in gastric tumors compared with adjacent nontumors (P < 0.05). On the other hand, upregulation of HDAC2, GCN5, and MYC was observed in gastric tumors compared with adjacent nontumors (P < 0.05). The mRNA level of MYC was correlated to HDAC3 and GCN5 (P < 0.05), whereas CDKN1A was correlated to HDAC1 and GCN5 (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively). In addition, the reduced expression of PCAF was associated with intestinal-type gastric cancer (P = 0.03) and TNM stages I/II (P = 0.01). The increased expression of GCN5 was associated with advanced stage gastric cancer (P = 0.02) and tumor invasion (P = 0.03). The gastric cell lines treated with TSA showed different patterns of histone deacetylase and acetyltransferase mRNA expression, downregulation of MYC, and upregulation of CDKN1A. Our findings suggest that alteration of histone modifier genes play an important role in gastric carcinogenesis, contributing to MYC and CDKN1A deregulation. In addition, all genes studied here are modulated by TSA, although this modulation appears to be dependent of the genetic background of the cell

  6. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv1096 protein: gene cloning, protein expression, and peptidoglycan deacetylase activity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Many bacteria modulate and evade the immune defenses of their hosts through peptidoglycan (PG) deacetylation. The PG deacetylases from Streptococcus pneumonia, Listeria monocytogenes and Lactococcus lactis have been characterized. However, thus far, the PG deacetylase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis has not been identified. Results In this study, we cloned the Rv1096 gene from the M. tuberculosis H37Rv strain and expressed Rv1096 protein in both Escherichia coli and M. smegmatis. The results showed that the purified Rv1096 protein possessed metallo-dependent PG deacetylase activity, which increased in the presence of Co2+. The kinetic parameters of the PG deacetylase towards M. smegmatis PG as a substrate were as follows: Km, 0.910 ± 0.007 mM; Vmax, 0.514 ± 0.038 μMmin-1; and Kcat = 0.099 ± 0.007 (S-1). Additionally, the viability of M. smegmatis in the presence of over-expressed Rv1096 protein was 109-fold higher than that of wild-type M. smegmatis after lysozyme treatment. Additionally, light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy showed that in the presence of over-expressed Rv1096 protein, M. smegmatis kept its regular shape, with an undamaged cell wall and smooth surface. These results indicate that Rv1096 caused deacetylation of cell wall PG, leading to lysozyme resistance in M. smegmatis. Conclusion We have determined that M. tuberculosis Rv1096 is a PG deacetylase. The PG deacetylase activity of Rv1096 contributed to lysozyme resistance in M. smegmatis. Our findings suggest that deacetylation of cell wall PG may be involved in evasion of host immune defenses by M. tuberculosis. PMID:24975018

  7. G1-4A, a Polysaccharide from Tinospora cordifolia Inhibits the Survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by Modulating Host Immune Responses in TLR4 Dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Pramod Kumar; Chakraborty, Pampi; Kumar, Santosh; Singh, Prafull Kumar; Rajan, M G R; Sainis, Krishna B; Kulkarni, Savita

    2016-01-01

    Rapid emergence of drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is a major health concern and demands the development of novel adjunct immunotherapeutic agents capable of modulating the host immune responses in order to control the pathogen. In the present study, we sought to investigate the immunomodulatory effects of G1-4A, a polysaccharide derived from the Indian medicinal plant Tinospora cordifolia, in in-vitro and aerosol mouse models of MTB infection. G1-4A treatment of MTB infected RAW264.7 macrophages significantly induced the surface expression of MHC-II and CD-86 molecules, secretion of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-β, IL-6, IL-12, IFN-γ) and nitric oxide leading to reduced intracellular survival of both drug sensitive (H37Rv) as well as multi drug resistant strains (Beijing and LAM) of MTB, which was partially attributed to G1-4A induced NO production in TLR4-MyD88 dependent manner. Similarly, bacillary burden was significantly reduced in the lungs of MTB infected BALB/c mice treated with G1-4A, with simultaneous up-regulation of the expression of TNF-α, INF-γ and NOS2 in the mouse lung along with increased levels of Th1 cytokines like IFN-γ, IL-12 and decreased levels of Th2 cytokine like IL-4 in the serum. Furthermore, combination of G1-4A with Isoniazid (INH) exhibited better protection against MTB compared to that due to INH or G1-4A alone, suggesting its potential as adjunct therapy. Our results demonstrate that modulation of host immune responses by G1-4A might improve the therapeutic efficacy of existing anti-tubercular drugs and provide an attractive strategy for the development of alternative therapies to control tuberculosis. PMID:27148868

  8. G1-4A, a Polysaccharide from Tinospora cordifolia Inhibits the Survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by Modulating Host Immune Responses in TLR4 Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Pramod Kumar; Chakraborty, Pampi; Kumar, Santosh; Singh, Prafull Kumar; Rajan, M. G. R.; Sainis, Krishna B.; Kulkarni, Savita

    2016-01-01

    Rapid emergence of drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is a major health concern and demands the development of novel adjunct immunotherapeutic agents capable of modulating the host immune responses in order to control the pathogen. In the present study, we sought to investigate the immunomodulatory effects of G1-4A, a polysaccharide derived from the Indian medicinal plant Tinospora cordifolia, in in-vitro and aerosol mouse models of MTB infection. G1-4A treatment of MTB infected RAW264.7 macrophages significantly induced the surface expression of MHC-II and CD-86 molecules, secretion of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-β, IL-6, IL-12, IFN-γ) and nitric oxide leading to reduced intracellular survival of both drug sensitive (H37Rv) as well as multi drug resistant strains (Beijing and LAM) of MTB, which was partially attributed to G1-4A induced NO production in TLR4-MyD88 dependent manner. Similarly, bacillary burden was significantly reduced in the lungs of MTB infected BALB/c mice treated with G1-4A, with simultaneous up-regulation of the expression of TNF-α, INF-γ and NOS2 in the mouse lung along with increased levels of Th1 cytokines like IFN-γ, IL-12 and decreased levels of Th2 cytokine like IL-4 in the serum. Furthermore, combination of G1-4A with Isoniazid (INH) exhibited better protection against MTB compared to that due to INH or G1-4A alone, suggesting its potential as adjunct therapy. Our results demonstrate that modulation of host immune responses by G1-4A might improve the therapeutic efficacy of existing anti-tubercular drugs and provide an attractive strategy for the development of alternative therapies to control tuberculosis. PMID:27148868

  9. Histone deacetylase inhibitors: a review on class-I specific inhibition.

    PubMed

    Behera, Jagannath; Jayprakash, Venkatesan; Sinha, Barij Nayan

    2015-01-01

    Histone Deacetylase (HDAC) is an established and validated target for the treatment of cancer. It has been attempted to present a comprehensive review on the inhibitors for Class-I Histone Deacetylase enzyme family, reported during the period from 2002 to 2012. This review has summarized the inhibitors, based on their specificity towards different isoforms within this class. Further various recent United State (US) patents and the HDAC inhibitors, used singly or in combination undergoing clinical trial as anticancer agents have been reviewed. Three such inhibitors SAHA, Romidepsin and Belinostat have already been approved by the US-FDA for the treatment of cancer. PMID:25994050

  10. Human IgG1 antibodies suppress angiogenesis in a target-independent manner

    PubMed Central

    Bogdanovich, Sasha; Kim, Younghee; Mizutani, Takeshi; Yasuma, Reo; Tudisco, Laura; Cicatiello, Valeria; Bastos-Carvalho, Ana; Kerur, Nagaraj; Hirano, Yoshio; Baffi, Judit Z; Tarallo, Valeria; Li, Shengjian; Yasuma, Tetsuhiro; Arpitha, Parthasarathy; Fowler, Benjamin J; Wright, Charles B; Apicella, Ivana; Greco, Adelaide; Brunetti, Arturo; Ruvo, Menotti; Sandomenico, Annamaria; Nozaki, Miho; Ijima, Ryo; Kaneko, Hiroki; Ogura, Yuichiro; Terasaki, Hiroko; Ambati, Balamurali K; Leusen, Jeanette HW; Langdon, Wallace Y; Clark, Michael R; Armour, Kathryn L; Bruhns, Pierre; Verbeek, J Sjef; Gelfand, Bradley D; De Falco, Sandro; Ambati, Jayakrishna

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant angiogenesis is implicated in diseases affecting nearly 10% of the world’s population. The most widely used anti-angiogenic drug is bevacizumab, a humanized IgG1 monoclonal antibody that targets human VEGFA. Although bevacizumab does not recognize mouse Vegfa, it inhibits angiogenesis in mice. Here we show bevacizumab suppressed angiogenesis in three mouse models not via Vegfa blockade but rather Fc-mediated signaling through FcγRI (CD64) and c-Cbl, impairing macrophage migration. Other approved humanized or human IgG1 antibodies without mouse targets (adalimumab, alemtuzumab, ofatumumab, omalizumab, palivizumab and tocilizumab), mouse IgG2a, and overexpression of human IgG1-Fc or mouse IgG2a-Fc, also inhibited angiogenesis in wild-type and FcγR humanized mice. This anti-angiogenic effect was abolished by Fcgr1 ablation or knockdown, Fc cleavage, IgG-Fc inhibition, disruption of Fc-FcγR interaction, or elimination of FcRγ-initated signaling. Furthermore, bevacizumab’s Fc region potentiated its anti-angiogenic activity in humanized VEGFA mice. Finally, mice deficient in FcγRI exhibited increased developmental and pathological angiogenesis. These findings reveal an unexpected anti-angiogenic function for FcγRI and a potentially concerning off-target effect of hIgG1 therapies. PMID:26918197

  11. 17 CFR 275.202(a)(11)(G)-1 - Family offices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Family offices. 275.202(a)(11... COMMISSION (CONTINUED) RULES AND REGULATIONS, INVESTMENT ADVISERS ACT OF 1940 § 275.202(a)(11)(G)-1 Family offices. (a) Exclusion. A family office, as defined in this section, shall not be considered to be...

  12. 17 CFR 275.202(a)(11)(G)-1 - Family offices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Family offices. 275.202(a)(11... COMMISSION (CONTINUED) RULES AND REGULATIONS, INVESTMENT ADVISERS ACT OF 1940 § 275.202(a)(11)(G)-1 Family offices. (a) Exclusion. A family office, as defined in this section, shall not be considered to be...

  13. 17 CFR 275.202(a)(11)(G)-1 - Family offices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Family offices. 275.202(a)(11... COMMISSION (CONTINUED) RULES AND REGULATIONS, INVESTMENT ADVISERS ACT OF 1940 § 275.202(a)(11)(G)-1 Family offices. (a) Exclusion. A family office, as defined in this section, shall not be considered to be...

  14. Learning Progression of Ecological System Reasoning for Lower Elementary (G1-4) Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hokayem, Hayat Al

    2012-01-01

    In this study, I utilized a learning progression framework to investigate lower elementary students (G1-4) systemic reasoning in ecology and I related students reasoning to their sources of knowledge. I used semi-structured interviews with 44 students from first through fourth grade, four teachers, and eight parents. The results revealed that a…

  15. H, G1, G2 photometric phase function extended to low-accuracy data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penttilä, A.; Shevchenko, V. G.; Wilkman, O.; Muinonen, K.

    2016-04-01

    We introduce a constrained nonlinear least-squares algorithm to be used in estimating the parameters in the H, G1, G2 phase function. As the algorithm works directly in the magnitude space, it will surpass the possible bias problem that may be present in the existing H ,G1 ,G2 fit procedure when applied to low-accuracy observations with large magnitude variations. With constraints on the photometric phase-curve shape parameters G1 and G2, it guarantees a physically reasonable phase-curve estimate. With a new data set of 93 asteroids, we re-assess the two-parameter version of the H ,G1 ,G2 function. Finally, we introduce a one-parameter version of the phase function that can give a suggestion of the asteroids taxonomic group based only on its phase curve. A statistical model selection procedure is presented that can automatically select between the different versions of the photometric phase functions. An online tool that implements these algorithms is introduced.

  16. 26 CFR 1.414(g)-1 - Definition of plan administrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Definition of plan administrator. 1.414(g)-1... Definition of plan administrator. (a) In general. For purposes of part I of subchapter D of chapter 1 of the... specifically designates a person or a group of persons as plan administrator, the person or group of...

  17. Lattice QCD results for the B --> D(*) l nu form factors: F(1) and G(1)

    SciTech Connect

    Van de Water, R.S.; /Fermilab

    2007-01-01

    I review the current status of lattice QCD calculations of the B {yields} D and B {yields} D* form factors and discuss prospects for their improvement. Successful calculations within the quenched approximation demonstrate the power of lattice methods for calculating F(1) and G(1), and the unquenched calculations in progress should soon allow for a 2-3% exclusive determination of |Vcb|.

  18. Overview of Shipyard coast line with Piers G1, G2, G3, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Overview of Shipyard coast line with Piers G-1, G-2, G-3, G-4, and G-5 in view, view facing east-southeast - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Pier & Quay Walls, Entrance to Dry Dock No. 2 & Repair Wharfs, east & west sides of Dry Dock No. 2 & west side of Dry Dock No. 3, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  19. Linking the VPS35 and EIF4G1 pathways in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ross, Owen A; Cook, Casey; Petrucelli, Leonard

    2015-01-01

    Elucidating the underlying pathogenic pathways in Parkinson's disease will be critical for targeted drug development. In this issue of Neuron, Dhungel et al. (2015) utilize a yeast model to establish a link between VPS35 and EIF4G1 in α-synuclein-related neurodegeneration. PMID:25569341

  20. Conversion of 11-hydroxy-O-methylsterigmatocystin to aflatoxin G1 in Aspergillus parasiticus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In aflatoxin biosynthesis, aflatoxins G1 (AFG1) and B1 (AFB1) are independently produced from a common precursor, O-methylsterigmatocystin (OMST). Recently, 11-hydroxy-O-methylsterigmatocystin (HOMST) was identified as a later precursor involved in the conversion of OMST to AFB1. However, the invo...

  1. Checkpoint kinase inhibitor synergizes with DNA-damaging agents in G1 checkpoint-defective neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hong; Cheung, Irene Y; Wei, Xiao X; Tran, Hoa; Gao, Xiaoni; Cheung, Nai-Kong V

    2011-10-15

    Checkpoint kinase inhibitors can enhance the cancer killing action of DNA-damaging chemotherapeutic agents by disrupting the S/G(2) cell cycle checkpoints. The in vitro and in vivo effects of the Chk1/2 inhibitor AZD7762 when combined with these agents were examined using neuroblastoma cell lines with known p53/MDM2/p14(ARF) genomic status. Four of four p53 mutant lines and three of five MDM2/p14(ARF) abnormal lines were defective in G(1) checkpoint, correlating with failure to induce endogenous p21 after treatment with DNA-damaging agents. In cytotoxicity assays, these G(1) checkpoint-defective lines were more resistant to DNA-damaging agents when compared to G(1) checkpoint intact lines, yet becoming more sensitive when AZD7762 was added. Moreover, AZD7762 abrogated DNA damage-induced S/G(2) checkpoint arrest both in vitro and in vivo. In xenograft models, a significant delay in tumor growth accompanied by histological evidence of increased apoptosis was observed, when AZD7762 was added to the DNA-damaging drug gemcitabine. These results suggest a therapeutic potential of combination therapy using checkpoint kinase inhibitor and chemotherapy to reverse or prevent drug resistance in treating neuroblastomas with defective G(1) checkpoints. PMID:21154747

  2. The Hot Stellar Content and HB morphology of the massive globular cluster G1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rich, R.

    2010-09-01

    We propose to obtain deep WFC3 imagery of the Local Group's most luminous globular cluster, G1. Our primary aim is to define the hot stellar content and the extent of what appears to be a multimodal horizontal branch, analogous to those known in Omega Cen and NGC 2808. G1 is 40 kpc distant in the M31, and it would have been highly unlikely that collision with a giant molecular clould would be responsible for the complex populations which must therefore be the result of self-enrichment. We will obtain data very similar to those obtained for the known Galactic multimodal globular clusters NGC 6388 and 6441, and compare the stellar distribution on the horizontal branch with models. We can constrain the fraction of helium-enriched stars, if present, and search for supra-horizontal branch and other anomalous hot, evolved, stars. Parallel ACS observations will be the deepest ever obtained in the adjacnt field to G1, and will help to constrain whether G1 was the nucleus of a now disrupted galaxy.

  3. Class IIa histone deacetylases affect neuronal remodeling and functional outcome after stroke.

    PubMed

    Kassis, Haifa; Shehadah, Amjad; Li, Chao; Zhang, Yi; Cui, Yisheng; Roberts, Cynthia; Sadry, Neema; Liu, Xianshuang; Chopp, Michael; Zhang, Zheng Gang

    2016-06-01

    We have previously demonstrated that stroke induces nuclear shuttling of class IIa histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4). Stroke-induced nuclear shuttling of HDAC4 is positively and significantly correlated with improved indices of neuronal remodeling in the peri-infarct cortex. In this study, using a rat model for middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), we tested the effects of selective inhibition of class IIa HDACs on functional recovery and neuronal remodeling when administered 24hr after stroke. Adult male Wistar rats (n = 15-17/group) were subjected to 2 h MCAO and orally gavaged with MC1568 (a selective class IIa HDAC inhibitor), SAHA (a non-selective HDAC inhibitor), or vehicle-control for 7 days starting 24 h after MCAO. A battery of behavioral tests was performed. Lesion volume measurement and immunohistochemistry were performed 28 days after MCAO. We found that stroke increased total HDAC activity in the ipsilateral hemisphere compared to the contralateral hemisphere. Stroke-increased HDAC activity was significantly decreased by the administration of SAHA as well as by MC1568. However, SAHA significantly improved functional outcome compared to vehicle control, whereas selective class IIa inhibition with MC1568 increased mortality and lesion volume and did not improve functional outcome. In addition, MC1568 decreased microtubule associated protein 2 (MAP2, dendrites), phosphorylated neurofilament heavy chain (pNFH, axons) and myelin basic protein (MBP, myelination) immunoreactivity in the peri-infarct cortex. Quantitative RT-PCR of cortical neurons isolated by laser capture microdissection revealed that MC1568, but not SAHA, downregulated CREB and c-fos expression. Additionally, MC1568 decreased the expression of phosphorylated CREB (active) in neurons. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that selective inhibition of class IIa HDACs impairs neuronal remodeling and neurological outcome. Inactivation of CREB and c-fos by MC1568 likely contributes to

  4. Rapid changes in histone deacetylases and inflammatory gene expression in expert meditators

    PubMed Central

    Kaliman, Perla; Álvarez-López, María Jesús; Cosín-Tomás, Marta; Rosenkranz, Melissa A.; Lutz, Antoine; Davidson, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND A growing body of research shows that mindfulness meditation can alter neural, behavioral and biochemical processes. However, the mechanisms responsible for such clinically relevant effects remain elusive. METHODS Here we explored the impact of a day of intensive practice of mindfulness meditation in experienced subjects (n= 19) on the expression of circadian, chromatin modulatory and inflammatory genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). In parallel, we analyzed a control group of subjects with no meditation experience who engaged in leisure activities in the same environment (n= 21). PBMCs from all participants were obtained before (t1) and after (t2) the intervention (t2-t1= 8 hours) and gene expression was analyzed using custom pathway focused quantitative-real time PCR assays. Both groups were also presented with the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST). RESULTS Core clock gene expression at baseline (t1) was similar between groups and their rhythmicity was not influenced in meditators by the intensive day of practice. Similarly, we found that all the epigenetic regulatory enzymes and inflammatory genes analyzed exhibited similar basal expression levels in the two groups. In contrast, after the brief intervention we detected reduced expression of histone deacetylase genes (HDAC2, 3 and 9), alterations in global modification of histones (H4ac; H3K4me3) and decreased expression of pro-inflammatory genes (RIPK2 and COX2) in meditators compared with controls. We found that the expression of RIPK2 and HDAC2 genes was associated with a faster cortisol recovery to the TSST in both groups. CONCLUSIONS The regulation of HDACs and inflammatory pathways may represent some of the mechanisms underlying the therapeutic potential of mindfulness-based interventions. Our findings set the foundation for future studies to further assess meditation strategies for the treatment of chronic inflammatory conditions. PMID:24485481

  5. Histone deacetylase expression patterns in developing murine optic nerve

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Histone deacetylases (HDACs) play important roles in glial cell development and in disease states within multiple regions of the central nervous system. However, little is known about HDAC expression or function within the optic nerve. As a first step in understanding the role of HDACs in optic nerve, this study examines the spatio-temporal expression patterns of methylated histone 3 (K9), acetylated histone 3 (K18), and HDACs 1–6 and 8–11 in the developing murine optic nerve head. Results Using RT-qPCR, western blot and immunofluorescence, three stages were analyzed: embryonic day 16 (E16), when astrocyte precursors are found in the optic stalk, postnatal day 5 (P5), when immature astrocytes and oligodendrocytes are found throughout the optic nerve, and P30, when optic nerve astrocytes and oligodendrocytes are mature. Acetylated and methylated histone H3 immunoreactivity was co-localized in the nuclei of most SOX2 positive glia within the optic nerve head and adjacent optic nerve at all developmental stages. HDACs 1–11 were expressed in the optic nerve glial cells at all three stages of optic nerve development in the mouse, but showed temporal differences in overall levels and subcellular localization. HDACs 1 and 2 were predominantly nuclear throughout optic nerve development and glial cell maturation. HDACs 3, 5, 6, 8, and 11 were predominantly cytoplasmic, but showed nuclear localization in at least one stage of optic nerve development. HDACs 4, 9 and10 were predominantly cytoplasmic, with little to no nuclear expression at any time during the developmental stages examined. Conclusions Our results showing that HDACs 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 8, and 11 were each localized to the nuclei of SOX2 positive glia at some stages of optic nerve development and maturation and extend previous reports of HDAC expression in the aging optic nerve. These HDACs are candidates for further research to understand how chromatin remodeling through acetylation, deacetylation

  6. IgG1 as a Potential Biomarker of Post-chemotherapeutic Relapse in Visceral Leishmaniasis, and Adaptation to a Rapid Diagnostic Test

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Tapan; Ayandeh, Armon; Falconar, Andrew K.; Sundar, Shyam; El-Safi, Sayda; Gripenberg, Marissa A.; Bowes, Duncan E.; Thunissen, Caroline; Singh, Om Prakash; Kumar, Rajiv; Ahmed, Osman; Eisa, Osama; Saad, Alfarazdeg; Silva Pereira, Sara; Boelaert, Marleen; Mertens, Pascal; Miles, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Visceral leishmaniasis (VL), caused by protozoa of the Leishmania donovani complex, is a widespread parasitic disease of great public health importance; without effective chemotherapy symptomatic VL is usually fatal. Distinction of asymptomatic carriage from progressive disease and the prediction of relapse following treatment are hampered by the lack of prognostic biomarkers for use at point of care. Methodology/Principal Findings All IgG subclass and IgG isotype antibody levels were determined using unpaired serum samples from Indian and Sudanese patients with differing clinical status of VL, which included pre-treatment active VL, post-treatment cured, post-treatment relapsed, and post kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis (PKDL), as well as seropositive (DAT and/or rK39) endemic healthy controls (EHCs) and seronegative EHCs. L. donovani antigen-specific IgG1 levels were significantly elevated in relapsed versus cured VL patients (p<0.0001). Using paired Indian VL sera, consistent with the known IgG1 half-life, IgG1 levels had not decreased significantly at day 30 after the start of treatment (p = 0.8304), but were dramatically decreased by 6 months compared to day 0 (p = 0.0032) or day 15 (p<0.0001) after start of treatment. Similarly, Sudanese sera taken soon after treatment did not show a significant change in the IgG1 levels (p = 0.3939). Two prototype lateral flow immunochromatographic rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) were developed to detect IgG1 levels following VL treatment: more than 80% of the relapsed VL patients were IgG1 positive; at least 80% of the cured VL patients were IgG1 negative (p<0.0001). Conclusions/Significance Six months after treatment of active VL, elevated levels of specific IgG1 were associated with treatment failure and relapse, whereas no IgG1 or low levels were detected in cured VL patients. A lateral flow RDT was successfully developed to detect anti-Leishmania IgG1 as a potential biomarker of post

  7. Biased Immunoglobulin G1 Isotype Responses Induced in Cattle with DNA Expressing msp1a of Anaplasma marginale

    PubMed Central

    Arulkanthan, Appudurai; Brown, Wendy C.; McGuire, Travis C.; Knowles, Donald P.

    1999-01-01

    Immunization with the native major surface protein 1 (MSP1) (a heterodimer containing disulfide and noncovalently bonded polypeptides designated MSP1a and MSP1b) of the erythrocytic stage of Anaplasma marginale conferred protection against homologous challenge (G. H. Palmer, A. F. Barbet, W. C. Davis, and T. C. McGuire, Science 231:1299–1302, 1986). The MSP1a polypeptide possesses a conserved neutralization-sensitive epitope. In the present study, the immune response to DNA-mediated immunization using msp1a was studied. The plasmid pVCL/MSP1a, which encodes the complete msp1a gene of A. marginale under the control of human cytomegalovirus immediate-early enhancer/promoter and intron A, was constructed. The immune responses elicited by immunization with pVCL/MSP1a into cardiotoxin-induced regenerating muscle were evaluated in mice and cattle. Antibody reactive with native MSP1a was detected in pooled sera of immunized BALB/c mice 3 weeks following primary immunization. Two calves seronegative for A. marginale were immunized four times, at weeks 0, 3, 7, and 13, with pVCL/MSP1a. By 8 weeks, both calves responded to MSP1a with an antibody titer of 1:100, which peaked at 1:1,600 and 1:800 by 16 weeks after the initial immunization. Interestingly, immunoblotting with anti-immunoglobulin G1 (anti-IgG1) and anti-IgG2 specific monoclonal antibodies revealed a restricted IgG1 anti-MSP1a response in both animals. T-lymphocyte lines, established after the fourth immunization, proliferated specifically against A. marginale homogenate and purified MSP1 in a dose-dependent manner. These data provide a basis for an immunization strategy to direct bovine immune responses by using DNA vaccine vectors containing single or multiple genes encoding major surface proteins of A. marginale. PMID:10377129

  8. 17 CFR 240.17g-1 - Application for registration as a nationally recognized statistical rating organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... as a nationally recognized statistical rating organization. 240.17g-1 Section 240.17g-1 Commodity and... Statistical Rating Organizations § 240.17g-1 Application for registration as a nationally recognized statistical rating organization. (a) Initial application. A credit rating agency applying to the Commission...

  9. 17 CFR 240.17g-1 - Application for registration as a nationally recognized statistical rating organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... as a nationally recognized statistical rating organization. 240.17g-1 Section 240.17g-1 Commodity and... Statistical Rating Organizations § 240.17g-1 Application for registration as a nationally recognized statistical rating organization. (a) Initial application. A credit rating agency applying to the Commission...

  10. 17 CFR 240.17g-1 - Application for registration as a nationally recognized statistical rating organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... as a nationally recognized statistical rating organization. 240.17g-1 Section 240.17g-1 Commodity and... Statistical Rating Organizations § 240.17g-1 Application for registration as a nationally recognized statistical rating organization. (a) Initial application. A credit rating agency applying to the Commission...

  11. 26 CFR 1.904(g)-1T - Overall domestic loss and the overall domestic loss account (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... loss account (temporary). 1.904(g)-1T Section 1.904(g)-1T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... United States § 1.904(g)-1T Overall domestic loss and the overall domestic loss account (temporary). (a... accounts for purposes of section 904(g). Section 1.904(g)-2T provides rules for recapturing the balance...

  12. 26 CFR 31.3406(g)-1 - Exception for payments to certain payees and certain other payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... certain other payments. 31.3406(g)-1 Section 31.3406(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... TAXES AND COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE Collection of Income Tax at Source § 31.3406(g)-1 Exception for payments to certain payees and certain other payments. (a) Exempt recipients—(1) In general....

  13. 17 CFR 270.17g-1 - Bonding of officers and employees of registered management investment companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bonding of officers and employees of registered management investment companies. 270.17g-1 Section 270.17g-1 Commodity and... ACT OF 1940 § 270.17g-1 Bonding of officers and employees of registered management...

  14. 17 CFR 240.17g-1 - Application for registration as a nationally recognized statistical rating organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... as a nationally recognized statistical rating organization. 240.17g-1 Section 240.17g-1 Commodity and... Statistical Rating Organizations § 240.17g-1 Application for registration as a nationally recognized statistical rating organization. (a) Initial application. A credit rating agency applying to the Commission...

  15. 17 CFR 240.17g-1 - Application for registration as a nationally recognized statistical rating organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... as a nationally recognized statistical rating organization. 240.17g-1 Section 240.17g-1 Commodity and... Statistical Rating Organizations § 240.17g-1 Application for registration as a nationally recognized statistical rating organization. (a) Initial application. A credit rating agency applying to the Commission...

  16. 26 CFR 301.6011(g)-1 - Disclosure by taxable party to the tax-exempt entity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... entity. 301.6011(g)-1 Section 301.6011(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Returns and Records § 301.6011(g)-1 Disclosure by taxable party to the tax-exempt entity. (a) Requirement... prohibited tax shelter transaction. For purposes of section 6011(g), a tax-exempt entity is a party to...

  17. 26 CFR 301.6011(g)-1 - Disclosure by taxable party to the tax-exempt entity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... entity. 301.6011(g)-1 Section 301.6011(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Returns and Records § 301.6011(g)-1 Disclosure by taxable party to the tax-exempt entity. (a) Requirement... prohibited tax shelter transaction. For purposes of section 6011(g), a tax-exempt entity is a party to...

  18. 26 CFR 1.1402(g)-1 - Treatment of certain remuneration erroneously reported as net earnings from self-employment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... reported as net earnings from self-employment. 1.1402(g)-1 Section 1.1402(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL...) Tax on Self-Employment Income § 1.1402(g)-1 Treatment of certain remuneration erroneously reported as... request, and should indicate clearly that it is a request that, pursuant to section 1402(g) of the...

  19. 26 CFR 1.904(g)-1T - Overall domestic loss and the overall domestic loss account (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... loss account (temporary). 1.904(g)-1T Section 1.904(g)-1T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Without the United States § 1.904(g)-1T Overall domestic loss and the overall domestic loss account... reductions from such accounts for purposes of section 904(g). Section 1.904(g)-2T provides rules...

  20. 26 CFR 1.904(g)-1T - Overall domestic loss and the overall domestic loss account (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... loss account (temporary). 1.904(g)-1T Section 1.904(g)-1T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Without the United States § 1.904(g)-1T Overall domestic loss and the overall domestic loss account... reductions from such accounts for purposes of section 904(g). Section 1.904(g)-2T provides rules...

  1. 26 CFR 1.1402(g)-1 - Treatment of certain remuneration erroneously reported as net earnings from self-employment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... reported as net earnings from self-employment. 1.1402(g)-1 Section 1.1402(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL...) Tax on Self-Employment Income § 1.1402(g)-1 Treatment of certain remuneration erroneously reported as... request, and should indicate clearly that it is a request that, pursuant to section 1402(g) of the...

  2. 26 CFR 301.6011(g)-1 - Disclosure by taxable party to the tax-exempt entity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... entity. 301.6011(g)-1 Section 301.6011(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Returns and Records § 301.6011(g)-1 Disclosure by taxable party to the tax-exempt entity. (a) Requirement... prohibited tax shelter transaction. For purposes of section 6011(g), a tax-exempt entity is a party to...

  3. 26 CFR 1.1402(g)-1 - Treatment of certain remuneration erroneously reported as net earnings from self-employment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... reported as net earnings from self-employment. 1.1402(g)-1 Section 1.1402(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL...) Tax on Self-Employment Income § 1.1402(g)-1 Treatment of certain remuneration erroneously reported as... request, and should indicate clearly that it is a request that, pursuant to section 1402(g) of the...

  4. 26 CFR 301.6011(g)-1 - Disclosure by taxable party to the tax-exempt entity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... entity. 301.6011(g)-1 Section 301.6011(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Returns and Records § 301.6011(g)-1 Disclosure by taxable party to the tax-exempt entity. (a) Requirement... prohibited tax shelter transaction. For purposes of section 6011(g), a tax-exempt entity is a party to...

  5. 26 CFR 1.1402(g)-1 - Treatment of certain remuneration erroneously reported as net earnings from self-employment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... reported as net earnings from self-employment. 1.1402(g)-1 Section 1.1402(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL...) Tax on Self-Employment Income § 1.1402(g)-1 Treatment of certain remuneration erroneously reported as... request, and should indicate clearly that it is a request that, pursuant to section 1402(g) of the...

  6. Discovery of bicyclic pyrazoles as class III histone deacetylase SIRT1 and SIRT2 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Therrien, Eric; Larouche, Guillaume; Nguyen, Natalie; Rahil, Jubrail; Lemieux, Anne-Marie; Li, Zuomei; Fournel, Marielle; Yan, Theresa P; Landry, Anne-Julie; Lefebvre, Sylvain; Wang, James J; MacBeth, Kyle; Heise, Carla; Nguyen, Aaron; Besterman, Jeffrey M; Déziel, Robert; Wahhab, Amal

    2015-06-15

    A series of bicyclic pyrazole carboxamides was synthesized and tested for inhibitory activity against the class III deacetylase sirtuin enzymes. Moderate to low micromolar inhibitory activities were obtained against SIRT1 and SIRT2. These bicyclic pyrazole compounds represent a new class of sirtuin inhibitors with a preference for SIRT1 over SIRT2. PMID:25971769

  7. The Cohesin loading factor NIPBL recruits histone deacetylases to mediate local chromatin modifications

    PubMed Central

    Jahnke, Philipp; Xu, Weizhen; Wülling, Manuela; Albrecht, Melanie; Gabriel, Heinz; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Kaiser, Frank J.

    2008-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS) is a rare congenital malformation disorder. About half of the patients with CdLS carry mutations in the NIPBL gene encoding the NIPBL protein, a subunit of the Cohesin loading complex. Recent studies show association of Cohesin with chromatin-remodeling complexes, either by establishing cohesion or by recruiting Cohesin to specific chromosome locations. In yeast two-hybrid assays, we identified an interaction of NIPBL with the histone deacetylases -1 and -3. These interactions were confirmed in mammalian cells by coimmunoprecipitation and a critical region for interaction was defined to a stretch of 163 amino acids of a highly conserved region of NIPBL, which is mutated in patients with CdLS. Utilizing reporter gene assays, we could show that NIPBL fused to the GAL4-DNA-binding domain (GAL4-DBD) represses promoter activity via the recruitment of histone deacetylases. Interestingly, this effect is dramatically reduced by both NIPBL missense mutations identified in CdLS and by chemical inhibition of the histone deacetylases. Our data are the first to indicate a molecular and functional connection of NIPBL with chromatin-remodeling processes via the direct interaction with histone deacetylases. PMID:18854353

  8. A phosphorescent rhenium(I) histone deacetylase inhibitor: mitochondrial targeting and paraptosis induction.

    PubMed

    Ye, Rui-Rong; Tan, Cai-Ping; Lin, Yan-Nan; Ji, Liang-Nian; Mao, Zong-Wan

    2015-05-14

    In this report, we designed a histone deacetylase-targeted phosphorescent Re(I) complex ReLMito. Colocalization studies suggested that ReLMito could specially localize to mitochondria. We also demonstrated that ReLMito could induce paraptosis in cancer cells. These features endowed the complex with potential to induce and monitor mitochondrial morphological changes during the paraptosis simultaneously. PMID:25882790

  9. Graphene oxide-peptide nanoassembly as a general approach for monitoring the activity of histone deacetylases.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ping; Li, Qing; Wu, Zhan; Jiang, Jian-Hui; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2016-06-20

    A novel fluorescent sensor using graphene oxide (GO)-peptide nanoassembly is developed for histone deacetylases (HDACs) based on deacetylation mediated cleavage of substrate peptides, which provides a simple, cost-effective platform for monitoring the activity of HDACs. PMID:27194207

  10. Histone deacetylase activity and recurrent bacterial bronchitis in severe eosinophilic asthma.

    PubMed

    Zuccaro, L; Cox, A; Pray, C; Radford, K; Novakowski, K; Dorrington, M; Surette, M G; Bowdish, D; Nair, P

    2016-04-01

    An increase in P13 Kinase activity and an associated reduction in histone deacetylase activity may contribute to both relative steroid insensitivity in patients with severe eosinophilic asthma and impaired macrophage scavenger function and susceptibility to recurrent infective bronchitis that may, in turn, contribute to further steroid insensitivity. PMID:26715426

  11. Optimization of a series of potent and selective ketone histone deacetylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pescatore, Giovanna; Kinzel, Olaf; Attenni, Barbara; Cecchetti, Ottavia; Fiore, Fabrizio; Fonsi, Massimiliano; Rowley, Michael; Schultz-Fademrecht, Carsten; Serafini, Sergio; Steinkühler, Christian; Jones, Philip

    2008-10-15

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors offer a promising strategy for cancer therapy and the first generation HDAC inhibitors are currently in the clinic. Herein we describe the optimization of a series of ketone small molecule HDAC inhibitors leading to potent and selective class I HDAC inhibitors with good dog PK. PMID:18809328

  12. A Role for Histone Deacetylases in the Cellular and Behavioral Mechanisms Underlying Learning and Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahgoub, Melissa; Monteggia, Lisa M.

    2014-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are a family of chromatin remodeling enzymes that restrict access of transcription factors to the DNA, thereby repressing gene expression. In contrast, histone acetyltransferases (HATs) relax the chromatin structure allowing for an active chromatin state and promoting gene transcription. Accumulating data have…

  13. HDAC6 Deacetylase Activity Is Required for Hypoxia-Induced Invadopodia Formation and Cell Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Arsenault, Dominique; Brochu-Gaudreau, Karine; Charbonneau, Martine; Dubois, Claire M.

    2013-01-01

    Despite significant progress in the cancer field, tumor cell invasion and metastasis remain a major clinical challenge. Cell invasion across tissue boundaries depends largely on extracellular matrix degradation, which can be initiated by formation of actin-rich cell structures specialized in matrix degradation called invadopodia. Although the hypoxic microenvironment within solid tumors has been increasingly recognized as an important driver of local invasion and metastasis, little is known about how hypoxia influences invadopodia biogenesis. Here, we show that histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6), a cytoplasmic member of the histone deacetylase family, is a novel modulator of hypoxia-induced invadopodia formation. Hypoxia was found to enhance HDAC6 tubulin deacetylase activity through activation of the EGFR pathway. Activated HDAC6, in turn, triggered Smad3 phosphorylation resulting in nuclear accumulation. Inhibition of HDAC6 activity or knockdown of the protein inhibited both hypoxia-induced Smad3 activation and invadopodia formation. Our data provide evidence that hypoxia influences invadopodia formation in a biphasic manner, which involves the activation of HDAC6 deacetylase activity by EGFR, resulting in enhanced Smad phosphorylation and nuclear accumulation. The identification of HDAC6 as a key participant of hypoxia-induced cell invasion may have important therapeutic implications for the treatment of metastasis in cancer patients. PMID:23405166

  14. Involvement of miR-15a in G0/G1 Phase Cell Cycle Arrest Induced by Porcine Circovirus Type 2 Replication

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Rong; Wei, Li; Zhu, Shanshan; Wang, Jing; Cao, Yongchang; Xue, Chunyi; Yan, Xu; Liu, Jue

    2016-01-01

    Many viruses exploit the host cell division cycle to favour their own growth. Here we demonstrated that porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), which is a major causative agent of an emerging and important swine disease complex, PCV2-associated diseases, caused G0/G1 cell cycle arrest through degradation of cyclin D1 and E followed by reduction of retinoblastoma phosphorylation in synchronized PCV2-infected cells dependent upon virus replication. This induction of G0/G1 cell cycle arrest promoted PCV2 replication as evidenced by increased viral protein expression and progeny virus production in the synchronized PCV2-infected cells. To delineate a mechanism of miRNAs in regulating PCV2-induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest, we determined expression levels of some relevant miRNAs and found that only miR-15a but not miR-16, miR-21, and miR-34a was significantly changed in the PCV2-infected cells. We further demonstrated that upregulation of miR-15a promoted PCV2-induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest via mediating cyclins D1 and E degradation, in which involves PCV2 growth. These results reveal that G0/G1 cell cycle arrest induced by PCV2 may provide favourable conditions for viral protein expression and progeny production and that miR-15a is implicated in PCV2-induced cell cycle control, thereby contributing to efficient viral replication. PMID:27302568

  15. Involvement of miR-15a in G0/G1 Phase Cell Cycle Arrest Induced by Porcine Circovirus Type 2 Replication.

    PubMed

    Quan, Rong; Wei, Li; Zhu, Shanshan; Wang, Jing; Cao, Yongchang; Xue, Chunyi; Yan, Xu; Liu, Jue

    2016-01-01

    Many viruses exploit the host cell division cycle to favour their own growth. Here we demonstrated that porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), which is a major causative agent of an emerging and important swine disease complex, PCV2-associated diseases, caused G0/G1 cell cycle arrest through degradation of cyclin D1 and E followed by reduction of retinoblastoma phosphorylation in synchronized PCV2-infected cells dependent upon virus replication. This induction of G0/G1 cell cycle arrest promoted PCV2 replication as evidenced by increased viral protein expression and progeny virus production in the synchronized PCV2-infected cells. To delineate a mechanism of miRNAs in regulating PCV2-induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest, we determined expression levels of some relevant miRNAs and found that only miR-15a but not miR-16, miR-21, and miR-34a was significantly changed in the PCV2-infected cells. We further demonstrated that upregulation of miR-15a promoted PCV2-induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest via mediating cyclins D1 and E degradation, in which involves PCV2 growth. These results reveal that G0/G1 cell cycle arrest induced by PCV2 may provide favourable conditions for viral protein expression and progeny production and that miR-15a is implicated in PCV2-induced cell cycle control, thereby contributing to efficient viral replication. PMID:27302568

  16. Implications of intermediate mass black hole in globular cluster G1 on dark matter detection.

    SciTech Connect

    Zaharijas, G.; High Energy Physics

    2008-07-01

    Recently there has been growing evidence in favor of the presence of an intermediate mass black hole in the globular cluster G1, in Andromeda Galaxy. Under the assumption that formation of this globular cluster occurred within a dark matter halo, we explore whether the presence of a black hole could result in an observable gamma ray signal due to dark matter annihilation in this globular cluster. Starting from an initial Navarro-Frenk-White matter profile, with density parameters consistent with G1 observations, we find that indeed, if the spike in the density has been formed and has survived until the present, the signal could be observed by GLAST and current atmospheric Cerenkov telescope detectors.

  17. Implications of the intermediate mass black hole in globular cluster G1 on dark matter detection

    SciTech Connect

    Zaharijas, Gabrijela

    2008-07-15

    Recently there has been growing evidence in favor of the presence of an intermediate mass black hole in the globular cluster G1, in Andromeda Galaxy. Under the assumption that formation of this globular cluster occurred within a dark matter halo, we explore whether the presence of a black hole could result in an observable gamma ray signal due to dark matter annihilation in this globular cluster. Starting from an initial Navarro-Frenk-White matter profile, with density parameters consistent with G1 observations, we find that indeed, if the spike in the density has been formed and has survived until the present, the signal could be observed by GLAST and current atmospheric Cerenkov telescope detectors.

  18. Permanent draft genome sequence of the gliding predator Saprospira grandis strain Sa g1 (= HR1)

    SciTech Connect

    Mavromatis, K; Chertkov, Olga; Lapidus, Alla L.; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Tice, Hope; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Huntemann, Marcel; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, N; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Spring, Stefan; Goker, Markus; Detter, J. Chris; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Woyke, Tanja

    2012-01-01

    Saprospira grandis Gross et al. 1911 is a member of the Saprospiraceae, a family in the class 'Sphingobacteria' that remains poorly characterized at the genomic level. The species is known for preying on other marine bacteria via 'ixotrophy'. S. grandis strain Sa g1 was isolated from decaying crab carapace in France and was selected for genome sequencing because of its isolated location in the tree of life. Only one type strain genome has been published so far from the Saprospiraceae, while the sequence of strain Sa g1 represents the second genome to be published from a non-type strain of S. grandis. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 4,495,250 bp long Improved-High-Quality draft of the genome with its 3,536 protein-coding and 62 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  19. Weighted G0-and G1-multi-degree reduction of Bézier curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rababah, Abedallah; Ibrahim, Salisu

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, weighted G0-and G1-multi-degree reduction of Bézier curves are considered. The degree reduction of a given Bézier curve of degree n is used to write it as a Bézier curve of degree m, m < n. Exact degree reduction is not possible, and, therefore approximation methods are used. The weight function w[t] = 2t(1 - t), t ∈ [0, 1] is used with the L2 -norm in multi degree reduction with G0- and G1- continuity at the end points of the curve. Numerical results and comparisons show that the new methods suggests smaller approximation errors in the interior of the domain and proves to be competative in applications.

  20. NONTHERMAL PROPERTIES OF SUPERNOVA REMNANT G1.9+0.3

    SciTech Connect

    Ksenofontov, L. T.; Berezhko, E. G.; Voelk, H. J.

    2010-05-10

    The properties of the-presumably-youngest Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) G1.9+0.3 are investigated within the framework of nonlinear kinetic theory of cosmic ray acceleration in SNRs. The observed angular size and expansion speed as well as the radio and X-ray emission measurements are used to determine relevant physical parameters of this SNR. Under the assumption that SNR G1.9+0.3 is the result of a Type Ia supernova near the Galactic center (at the distance d = 8.5 kpc), the nonthermal properties are calculated. In particular, the expected TeV gamma-ray spectral energy density is predicted to be as low as {epsilon}{sub {gamma}} F{sub {gamma} {approx}} 5 x 10{sup -15} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, strongly dependent (F{sub {gamma} {proportional_to}} d {sup -11}) upon the source distance d.

  1. Echinococcus ortleppi and E. granulosus G1, G2 and G3 genotypes in Italian bovines.

    PubMed

    Casulli, Adriano; Manfredi, Maria Teresa; La Rosa, Giuseppe; Cerbo, Anna Rita Di; Genchi, Claudio; Pozio, Edoardo

    2008-08-01

    To increase the knowledge on Echinococcus genotypes infesting cattle and water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) born and bred in Italy, the germinal layer of hydatid cysts was collected from the liver and the lungs of 80 animals slaughtered in 2007. Two mitochondrial genes (the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I and the NADH subunit I) were tested by PCR. Four genotypes were identified: G1 (sheep strain), G2 (Tasmanian sheep strain), G3 (buffalo strain), and G5 (cattle strain). Fertile cysts were detected only in the lungs of 4.5% of the total G1 lung cysts, of 9.4% of the total G3 lung cysts, and in the only G5 infected animal. This is the first report of Echinococcus ortleppi (genotype G5) in Italy. PMID:18514422

  2. Passive Smoking Impairs Histone Deacetylase-2 in Children With Severe Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Yoshiki; Bossley, Cara; Gupta, Atul; Akashi, Kenichi; Tsartsali, Lemonia; Mercado, Nicolas; Barnes, Peter J.; Bush, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background: Parental smoking is known to worsen asthma symptoms in children and to make them refractory to asthma treatment, but the molecular mechanism is unclear. Oxidative stress from tobacco smoke has been reported to impair histone deacetylase-2 (HDAC2) via phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt activation and, thus, to reduce corticosteroid sensitivity. The aim of this study was to investigate passive smoking-dependent molecular abnormalities in alveolar macrophages (AMs) by comparing passive smoke-exposed children and non-passive smoke-exposed children with uncontrolled severe asthma. Methods: BAL fluid (BALF) was obtained from 19 children with uncontrolled severe asthma (10 non-passive smoking-exposed subjects and nine passive smoking-exposed subjects), and HDAC2 expression/activity, Akt/HDAC2 phosphorylation levels, and corticosteroid responsiveness in AMs were evaluated. Results: Parental smoking reduced HDAC2 protein expression by 54% and activity by 47%, with concomitant enhancement of phosphorylation of Akt1 and HDAC2. In addition, phosphorylation levels of Akt1 correlated positively with HDAC2 phosphorylation levels and negatively with HDAC2 activity. Furthermore, passive smoke exposure reduced the inhibitory effects of dexamethasone on tumor necrosis factor-α-induced CXCL8 release in AMs. There were relatively higher neutrophil counts and CXCL8 concentrations in BALF and lower Asthma Control Test scores compared with non-passive smoke-exposed children with uncontrolled severe asthma. Conclusions: Passive smoking impairs HDAC2 function via PI3K signaling activation, which could contribute to corticosteroid-insensitive inflammation in children with severe asthma. This novel mechanism will be a treatment target in children with severe asthma and stresses the need for a smoke-free environment for asthmatic children. PMID:24030221

  3. Increased gene expression of histone deacetylases in patients with Philadelphia-negative chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Skov, Vibe; Larsen, Thomas Stauffer; Thomassen, Mads; Riley, Caroline Hasselbalch; Jensen, Morten K; Bjerrum, Ole Weis; Kruse, Torben A; Hasselbalch, Hans Carl

    2012-01-01

    Myeloproliferation, myeloaccumulation (decreased apoptosis), inflammation, bone marrow fibrosis and angiogenesis are cardinal features of the Philadelphia-negative chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms: essential thrombocythemia (ET), polycythemia vera (PV) and primary myelofibrosis (PMF). Histone deacetylases (HDACs) have a critical role in modulating gene expression and, accordingly, in the control of cell pathobiology and cancer development. HDAC inhibition has been shown to inhibit tumor growth (impaired myeloproliferation), to modulate the balance between pro- and antiapoptotic proteins in favor of apoptosis (enhanced apoptosis) and also to inhibit angiogenesis. Recently, enhanced HDAC enzyme activity has been found in CD34+cells from patients with PMF, enzyme activity levels highly exceeding those recorded in other chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms (CMPNs). The raised levels correlated to the degree of splenomegaly, suggesting that HDAC might be recruited as ET or PV progresses into myelofibrosis or PMF progresses into a more advanced stage. Accordingly, HDAC inhibition is an obvious novel therapeutic approach in these neoplasms. Using global gene expression profiling of whole blood from patients with CMPNs, we have found a pronounced deregulation of HDAC genes, involving significant up-regulation of the HDAC genes 9 and 11, with the highest expression levels being found in patients with ET (HDAC9 and 11), PMF (HDAC9) and CMPNs (both HDAC9 and HDAC11). Furthermore, we have identified that the HDAC6 gene is progressively expressed in patients with ET, PV and PMF, reflecting a steady accumulation of abnormally expressed HDAC6 during disease evolution. Our results lend further support to HDACs as important epigenetic targets in the future treatment of patients with CMPNs. Since the highest expression levels of HDAC genes were recorded in ET, in PMF and in the entire CMPN group, their down-regulation by HDAC inhibitors might be associated with decreased disease

  4. A Histone Deacetylase Adjusts Transcription Kinetics at Coding Sequences during Candida albicans Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hnisz, Denes; Bardet, Anaïs F.; Nobile, Clarissa J.; Petryshyn, Andriy; Glaser, Walter; Schöck, Ulrike; Stark, Alexander; Kuchler, Karl

    2012-01-01

    Despite their classical role as transcriptional repressors, several histone deacetylases, including the baker's yeast Set3/Hos2 complex (Set3C), facilitate gene expression. In the dimorphic human pathogen Candida albicans, the homologue of the Set3C inhibits the yeast-to-filament transition, but the precise molecular details of this function have remained elusive. Here, we use a combination of ChIP–Seq and RNA–Seq to show that the Set3C acts as a transcriptional co-factor of metabolic and morphogenesis-related genes in C. albicans. Binding of the Set3C correlates with gene expression during fungal morphogenesis; yet, surprisingly, deletion of SET3 leaves the steady-state expression level of most genes unchanged, both during exponential yeast-phase growth and during the yeast-filament transition. Fine temporal resolution of transcription in cells undergoing this transition revealed that the Set3C modulates transient expression changes of key morphogenesis-related genes. These include a transcription factor cluster comprising of NRG1, EFG1, BRG1, and TEC1, which form a regulatory circuit controlling hyphal differentiation. Set3C appears to restrict the factors by modulating their transcription kinetics, and the hyperfilamentous phenotype of SET3-deficient cells can be reverted by mutating the circuit factors. These results indicate that the chromatin status at coding regions represents a dynamic platform influencing transcription kinetics. Moreover, we suggest that transcription at the coding sequence can be transiently decoupled from potentially conflicting promoter information in dynamic environments. PMID:23236295

  5. Radiosensitizing Effect of a Phenylbutyrate-Derived Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Yen-Shen; Chou, Chia-Hung; Tzen, Kai-Yuan; Gao, Ming; Cheng, Ann-Lii; Kulp, Samuel K.; Cheng, Jason Chia-Hsien

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy is integrated into the multimodal treatment of localized hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) refractory to conventional treatment. Tumor control remains unsatisfactory and the sublethal effect associates with secondary spread. The use of an effective molecularly targeted agent in combination with radiotherapy is a potential therapeutic approach. Our aim was to assess the effect of combining a phenylbutyrate-derived histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, AR-42, with radiotherapy in in vitro and in vivo models of human HCC. Methods and Materials: Human HCC cell lines (Huh-7 and PLC-5) were used to evaluate the in vitro synergism of combining AR-42 with irradiation. Flow cytometry analyzed the cell cycle changes, whereas Western blot investigated the protein expressions after the combined treatment. Severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice bearing ectopic and orthotopic HCC xenografts were treated with AR-42 and/or radiotherapy for the in vivo response. Results: AR-42 significantly enhanced radiation-induced cell death by the inhibition of the DNA end-binding activity of Ku70, a highly versatile regulatory protein for DNA repair, telomere maintenance, and apoptosis. In ectopic xenografts of Huh-7 and PLC-5, pretreatment with AR-42 significantly enhanced the tumor-suppressive effect of radiotherapy by 48% and 66%, respectively. A similar combinatorial effect of AR-42 (10 and 25 mg/kg) and radiotherapy was observed in Huh-7 orthotopic model of tumor growth by 52% and 82%, respectively. This tumor suppression was associated with inhibition of intratumoral Ku70 activity as well as reductions in markers of HDAC activity and proliferation, and increased apoptosis. Conclusion: AR-42 is a potent, orally bioavailable inhibitor of HDAC with therapeutic value as a radiosensitizer of HCC.

  6. Ethanol extract of Innotus obliquus (Chaga mushroom) induces G1 cell cycle arrest in HT-29 human colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun Sook; Kim, Eun Ji

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Inonotus obliquus (I. obliquus, Chaga mushroom) has long been used as a folk medicine to treat cancer. In the present study, we examined whether or not ethanol extract of I. obliquus (EEIO) inhibits cell cycle progression in HT-29 human colon cancer cells, in addition to its mechanism of action. MATERIALS/METHODS To examine the effects of Inonotus obliquus on the cell cycle progression and the molecular mechanism in colon cancer cells, HT-29 human colon cancer cells were cultured in the presence of 2.5 - 10 µg/mL of EEIO, and analyzed the cell cycle arrest by flow cytometry and the cell cycle controlling protein expression by Western blotting. RESULTS Treatment cells with 2.5 - 10 µg/mL of EEIO reduced viable HT-29 cell numbers and DNA synthesis, increased the percentage of cells in G1 phase, decreased protein expression of CDK2, CDK4, and cyclin D1, increased expression of p21, p27, and p53, and inhibited phosphorylation of Rb and E2F1 expression. Among I. obliquus fractions, fraction 2 (fractionated by dichloromethane from EEIO) showed the same effect as EEIO treatment on cell proliferation and cell cycle-related protein levels. CONCLUSIONS These results demonstrate that fraction 2 is the major fraction that induces G1 arrest and inhibits cell proliferation, suggesting I. obliquus could be used as a natural anti-cancer ingredient in the food and/or pharmaceutical industry. PMID:25861415

  7. An APC/C-Cdh1 Biosensor Reveals the Dynamics of Cdh1 Inactivation at the G1/S Transition

    PubMed Central

    Ondracka, Andrej; Robbins, Jonathan A.; Cross, Frederick R.

    2016-01-01

    B-type cyclin-dependent kinase activity must be turned off for mitotic exit and G1 stabilization. B-type cyclin degradation is mediated by the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C); during and after mitotic exit, APC/C is dependent on Cdh1. Cdh1 is in turn phosphorylated and inactivated by cyclin-CDK at the Start transition of the new cell cycle. We developed a biosensor to assess the cell cycle dynamics of APC/C-Cdh1. Nuclear exit of the G1 transcriptional repressor Whi5 is a known marker of Start; APC/C-Cdh1 is inactivated 12 min after Whi5 nuclear exit with little measurable cell-to-cell timing variability. Multiple phosphorylation sites on Cdh1 act in a redundant manner to repress its activity. Reducing the number of phosphorylation sites on Cdh1 can to some extent be tolerated for cell viability, but it increases variability in timing of APC/C-Cdh1 inactivation. Mutants with minimal subsets of phosphorylation sites required for viability exhibit striking stochasticity in multiple responses including budding, nuclear division, and APC/C-Cdh1 activity itself. Multiple cyclin-CDK complexes, as well as the stoichiometric inhibitor Acm1, contribute to APC/C-Cdh1 inactivation; this redundant control is likely to promote rapid and reliable APC/C-Cdh1 inactivation immediately following the Start transition. PMID:27410035

  8. TopBP1 is required at mitosis to reduce transmission of DNA damage to G1 daughter cells

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Rune Troelsgaard; Kruse, Thomas; Nilsson, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    Genome integrity is critically dependent on timely DNA replication and accurate chromosome segregation. Replication stress delays replication into G2/M, which in turn impairs proper chromosome segregation and inflicts DNA damage on the daughter cells. Here we show that TopBP1 forms foci upon mitotic entry. In early mitosis, TopBP1 marks sites of and promotes unscheduled DNA synthesis. Moreover, TopBP1 is required for focus formation of the structure-selective nuclease and scaffold protein SLX4 in mitosis. Persistent TopBP1 foci transition into 53BP1 nuclear bodies (NBs) in G1 and precise temporal depletion of TopBP1 just before mitotic entry induced formation of 53BP1 NBs in the next cell cycle, showing that TopBP1 acts to reduce transmission of DNA damage to G1 daughter cells. Based on these results, we propose that TopBP1 maintains genome integrity in mitosis by controlling chromatin recruitment of SLX4 and by facilitating unscheduled DNA synthesis. PMID:26283799

  9. Cellular expression of human centromere protein C demonstrates a cyclic behavior with highest abundance in the G1 phase.

    PubMed Central

    Knehr, M; Poppe, M; Schroeter, D; Eickelbaum, W; Finze, E M; Kiesewetter, U L; Enulescu, M; Arand, M; Paweletz, N

    1996-01-01

    Centromere proteins are localized within the centromere-kinetochore complex, which can be proven by means of immunofluorescence microscopy and immunoelectron microscopy. In consequence, their putative functions seem to be related exclusively to mitosis, namely to the interaction of the chromosomal kinetochores with spindle microtubules. However, electron microscopy using immune sera enriched with specific antibodies against human centromere protein C (CENP-C) showed that it occurs not only in mitosis but during the whole cell cycle. Therefore, we investigated the cell cycle-specific expression of CENP-C systematically on protein and mRNA levels applying HeLa cells synchronized in all cell cycle phases. Immunoblotting confirmed protein expression during the whole cell cycle and revealed an increase of CENP-C from the S phase through the G2 phase and mitosis to highest abundance in the G1 phase. Since this was rather surprising, we verified it by quantifying phase-specific mRNA levels of CENP-C, paralleled by the amplification of suitable internal standards, using the polymerase chain reaction. The results were in excellent agreement with abundant protein amounts and confirmed the cyclic behavior of CENP-C during the cell cycle. In consequence, we postulate that in addition to its role in mitosis, CENP-C has a further role in the G1 phase that may be related to cell cycle control. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:8816782

  10. NONUNIFORM EXPANSION OF THE YOUNGEST GALACTIC SUPERNOVA REMNANT G1.9+0.3

    SciTech Connect

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Green, David A.; Hwang, Una; Petre, Robert; Willett, Rebecca

    2014-08-01

    We report measurements of the X-ray expansion of the youngest Galactic supernova remnant, G1.9+0.3, using Chandra observations in 2007, 2009, and 2011. The measured rates strongly deviate from uniform expansion, decreasing radially by about 60% along the X-ray bright SE-NW axis from 0.84% ± 0.06% yr{sup –1} to 0.52% ± 0.03% yr{sup –1}. This corresponds to undecelerated ages of 120-190 yr, confirming the young age of G1.9+0.3 and implying a significant deceleration of the blast wave. The synchrotron-dominated X-ray emission brightens at a rate of 1.9% ± 0.4% yr{sup –1}. We identify bright outer and inner rims with the blast wave and reverse shock, respectively. Sharp density gradients in either the ejecta or ambient medium are required to produce the sudden deceleration of the reverse shock or the blast wave implied by the large spread in expansion ages. The blast wave could have been decelerated recently by an encounter with a modest density discontinuity in the ambient medium, such as may be found at a wind termination shock, requiring strong mass loss in the progenitor. Alternatively, the reverse shock might have encountered an order-of-magnitude density discontinuity within the ejecta, such as may be found in pulsating delayed-detonation Type Ia models. We demonstrate that the blast wave is much more decelerated than the reverse shock in these models for remnants at ages similar to G1.9+0.3. Similar effects may also be produced by dense shells possibly associated with high-velocity features in Type Ia spectra. Accounting for the asymmetry of G1.9+0.3 will require more realistic three-dimensional Type Ia models.

  11. Treatment of G1 Baskets at the CEA Marcoule Site - 12027

    SciTech Connect

    Fourquet, Line; Boya, Didier

    2012-07-01

    In the dismantling program for the first-generation French reactors in accordance with the nonproliferation treaty, the CEA is in charge of cleanup and dismantling operations for the facilities at Marcoule, including the decladding units. The G1 decladding was built between 1955 and 1957 in order to de-clad spent fuel elements from the G1 plutonium-producing reactor and prepare them for dissolution. The facility was also used for interim storage of G1, G2 and G3 fuel dissolution baskets, which had been used during plant operation for transfer (from the decladding facility to the UP1 plant) and/or dissolution of spent fuel elements. One of the cleanup projects involves recovery of the baskets, which will be cut up, sorted, and conditioned in metal bins. The bins will be immobilized with cement grout, then transferred to the onsite solid waste conditioning facility (CDS) and to the repository operated by the French National Radioactive Waste Management Agency (ANDRA). The project is now in progress, after special safety permits were issued and measurement stations and dedicated tools were developed to handle all types of baskets (which differed according to their origin and use). The disposal of all the baskets is scheduled to last 2 years and will produce 55 metal waste bins. (authors)

  12. Tet1 is required for Rb phosphorylation during G1/S phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Shengsong; Zhu, Ziqi; Wang, Yiqin; Wang, Yanru; Xu, Longxia; Chen, Xuemei; Xu, Qing; Zhang, Qimin; Zhao, Xin; Yu, Yi; Wu, Denglong

    2013-05-03

    Highlights: •Tet1 was required for NIT3T3 proliferation. •Tet1 depletion inhibited G1-S entry. •Cyclin D1 accumulation and Rb phosphorylation was blocked by Tet1 knockdown. -- Abstract: DNA methylation plays an important role in many biological processes, including regulation of gene expression, maintenance of chromatin conformation and genomic stability. TET-family proteins convert 5-methylcytosine (5mC) to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), which indicates that these enzymes may participate in DNA demethylation. The function of TET1 has not yet been well characterized in somatic cells. Here, we show that depletion of Tet1 in NIH3T3 cells inhibits cell growth. Furthermore, Tet1 knockdown blocks cyclin D1 accumulation in G1 phase, inhibits Rb phosphorylation and consequently delays entrance to G1/S phase. Taken together, this study demonstrates that Tet1 is required for cell proliferation and that this process is mediated through the Rb pathway.

  13. Contribution of the spin-1 diquark to the nucleon's g1 structure function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamani, F.

    2010-07-01

    This is the final installment of a series of work that we have done in the context of the meson cloud model that investigates F2 and g1 structure functions. In our previous work on g1 structure function, we showed that having a spin-0 quark-diquark for the nucleon core along with both pseudoscalar and vector meson clouds was not sufficient to reproduce experimental observation(s) consistently. For the F2 structure function, we found that both superposition of a spin-0 diquark and a spin-1 diquark in the nucleon core along with pseudoscalar and vector meson clouds are needed to reproduce the observed F2(x) and the Gottfried sum rule (GSR) violation. Therefore, in the present work, we consider the contribution of a spin-1 diquark in the nucleon core to the g1 structure function. The calculation is performed in the light-cone frame. The dressed nucleon is assumed to be a superposition of the bare nucleon plus virtual light-cone Fock states of baryon-meson pairs. For the bare nucleon, we consider different quark-diquark configurations along with the possibility that there is no diquark inside the nucleon. The initial distributions are evolved. The final results are compared with experimental results and other theoretical predictions.

  14. MicroRNA-224 Induces G1/S Checkpoint Release in Liver Cancer

    PubMed Central

    An, Fangmei; Olaru, Alexandru V.; Mezey, Esteban; Xie, Qing; Li, Ling; Piontek, Klaus B.; Selaru, Florin M.

    2015-01-01

    Profound changes in microRNA (miR) expression levels are frequently found in liver cancers compared to the normal liver. In this study, we evaluate the expression of miR-224 in human HCC and CCA, as well as its downstream targets and affected pathways. We show that miR-224 is upregulated in a large cohort of human CCA, similar to its upregulation in human HCC. For the purpose of studying the roles of miR-224 in HCC and CCA, we enforced miR-224 expression in cells. mRNA arrays followed by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA)-identified putative molecules and pathways downstream of miR-224. Phenotypically, we report that enforced expression of miR-224 increases the growth rate of normal cholangiocytes, CCA cell lines, and HCC cell lines. In addition, we identified, in an unbiased fashion, that one of the major biologic processes affected by miR-224 is Gap1 (G1) to Synthesis (S) transition checkpoint release. We next identified p21, p15, and CCNE1 as downstream targets of miR-224 and confirmed the coordinated downregulation results in the increased phosphorylation of Retinoblastoma (Rb) with resulting G1/S checkpoint release. Our data suggest that miR-224 is a master regulator of cell cycle progression, and that its overexpression results in G1/S checkpoint release followed by accelerated cell growth. PMID:26343737

  15. SUMOylation of Rb enhances its binding with CDK2 and phosphorylation at early G1 phase.

    PubMed

    Meng, Fengxi; Qian, Jiang; Yue, Han; Li, Xiaofeng; Xue, Kang

    2016-07-01

    Retinoblastoma protein (Rb) is a prototypical tumor suppressor that is vital to the negative regulation of the cell cycle and tumor progression. Hypo-phosphorylated Rb is associated with G0/G1 arrest by suppressing E2F transcription factor activity, whereas Rb hyper-phosphorylation allows E2F release and cell cycle progression from G0/G1 to S phase. However, the factors that regulate cyclin-dependent protein kinase (CDK)-dependent hyper-phosphorylation of Rb during the cell cycle remain obscure. In this study, we show that throughout the cell cycle, Rb is specifically small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO)ylated at early G1 phase. SUMOylation of Rb stimulates its phosphorylation level by recruiting a SUMO-interaction motif (SIM)-containing kinase CDK2, leading to Rb hyper-phosphorylation and E2F-1 release. In contrast, a SUMO-deficient Rb mutant results in reduced SUMOylation and phosphorylation, weakened CDK2 binding, and attenuated E2F-1 sequestration. Furthermore, we reveal that Rb SUMOylation is required for cell proliferation. Therefore, our study describes a novel mechanism that regulates Rb phosphorylation during cell cycle progression. PMID:27163259

  16. SUMOylation of Rb enhances its binding with CDK2 and phosphorylation at early G1 phase

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Fengxi; Qian, Jiang; Yue, Han; Li, Xiaofeng; Xue, Kang

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Retinoblastoma protein (Rb) is a prototypical tumor suppressor that is vital to the negative regulation of the cell cycle and tumor progression. Hypo-phosphorylated Rb is associated with G0/G1 arrest by suppressing E2F transcription factor activity, whereas Rb hyper-phosphorylation allows E2F release and cell cycle progression from G0/G1 to S phase. However, the factors that regulate cyclin-dependent protein kinase (CDK)-dependent hyper-phosphorylation of Rb during the cell cycle remain obscure. In this study, we show that throughout the cell cycle, Rb is specifically small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO)ylated at early G1 phase. SUMOylation of Rb stimulates its phosphorylation level by recruiting a SUMO-interaction motif (SIM)-containing kinase CDK2, leading to Rb hyper-phosphorylation and E2F-1 release. In contrast, a SUMO-deficient Rb mutant results in reduced SUMOylation and phosphorylation, weakened CDK2 binding, and attenuated E2F-1 sequestration. Furthermore, we reveal that Rb SUMOylation is required for cell proliferation. Therefore, our study describes a novel mechanism that regulates Rb phosphorylation during cell cycle progression. PMID:27163259

  17. Downregulation of HMGA2 by the pan-deacetylase inhibitor panobinostat is dependent on hsa-let-7b expression in liver cancer cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Di Fazio, Pietro; Montalbano, Roberta; Neureiter, Daniel; Alinger, Beate; Schmidt, Ansgar; Merkel, Anna Lena; Quint, Karl; Ocker, Matthias

    2012-09-10

    Inhibitors of protein deacetylases represent a novel therapeutic option for cancer diseases due to their effects on transcriptional regulation by interfering with histones acetylation and on several other cellular pathways. Recently, their ability to modulate several transcription factors and, interestingly, also co-factors, which actively participate in formation and modulation of transcription complexes was shown. We here investigate whether HMGA2 (High Mobility Group AT-2 hook), a nuclear non-histone transcriptional co-factor with known oncogenic properties, can be influenced by the novel pan-deacetylase inhibitor panobinostat (LBH589) in human hepatocellular carcinoma models. Panobinostat strongly downregulated HMGA2 in HepG2 and Hep3B cells; this effect was mediated by transcriptional upregulation and promotion of the maturation of the tumorsuppressor miRNA hsa-let-7b, which could inhibit HMGA2 expression via RNA interference pathways. siRNA knockdown of HMGA2 or transfection of hsa-let-7b mimicking oligonucleotides confirmed the role of HMGA2 in regulating cell proliferation and apoptosis in liver cancer cell lines. Co-incubation with panobinostat showed an additive effect on inhibition of cell proliferation using an impedance-based real-time cell analyzer. Treatment of HepG2 xenografts with panobinostat also led to a downregulation of HMGA2 in vivo. These findings show that pan-deacetylase inhibitors also modulate other signaling pathways and networks than histone modifications to influence cell fate. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Panobinostat for the treatment of liver cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Panobinostat meddles with miRNAs-dependent transcriptional and translational control. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tumorsuppressor miRNA hsa-let-7b upregulation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HMGA2 is downregulated via RNA interference pathways mediated by hsa-let-7b. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Panobinostat determines inhibition of

  18. The new low-toxic histone deacetylase inhibitor S-(2) induces apoptosis in various acute myeloid leukaemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Cellai, C; Balliu, M; Laurenzana, A; Guandalini, L; Matucci, R; Miniati, D; Torre, E; Nebbioso, A; Carafa, V; Altucci, L; Romanelli, M N; Paoletti, F

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) induce tumour cell cycle arrest and/or apoptosis, and some of them are currently used in cancer therapy. Recently, we described a series of powerful HDACi characterized by a 1,4-benzodiazepine (BDZ) ring hybridized with a linear alkyl chain bearing a hydroxamate function as Zn++-chelating group. Here, we explored the anti-leukaemic properties of three novel hybrids, namely the chiral compounds (S)-2 and (R)-2, and their non-chiral analogue 4, which were first comparatively tested in promyelocytic NB4 cells. (S)-2 and partially 4– but not (R)-2 – caused G0/G1 cell-cycle arrest by up-regulating cyclin G2 and p21 expression and down-regulating cyclin D2 expression, and also apoptosis as assessed by cell morphology and cytofluorimetric assay, histone H2AX phosphorylation and PARP cleavage. Notably, these events were partly prevented by an anti-oxidant. Moreover, novel HDACi prompted p53 and α-tubulin acetylation and, consistently, inhibited HDAC1 and 6 activity. The rank order of potency was (S)-2 > 4 > (R)-2, reflecting that of other biological assays and addressing (S)-2 as the most effective compound capable of triggering apoptosis in various acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) cell lines and blasts from patients with different AML subtypes. Importantly, (S)-2 was safe in mice (up to 150 mg/kg/week) as determined by liver, spleen, kidney and bone marrow histopathology; and displayed negligible affinity for peripheral/central BDZ-receptors. Overall, the BDZ-hydroxamate (S)-2 showed to be a low-toxic HDACi with powerful anti-proliferative and pro-apototic activities towards different cultured and primary AML cells, and therefore of clinical interest to support conventional anti-leukaemic therapy. PMID:22004558

  19. The new low-toxic histone deacetylase inhibitor S-(2) induces apoptosis in various acute myeloid leukaemia cells.

    PubMed

    Cellai, C; Balliu, M; Laurenzana, A; Guandalini, L; Matucci, R; Miniati, D; Torre, E; Nebbioso, A; Carafa, V; Altucci, L; Romanelli, M N; Paoletti, F

    2012-08-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) induce tumour cell cycle arrest and/or apoptosis, and some of them are currently used in cancer therapy. Recently, we described a series of powerful HDACi characterized by a 1,4-benzodiazepine (BDZ) ring hybridized with a linear alkyl chain bearing a hydroxamate function as Zn(++)--chelating group. Here, we explored the anti-leukaemic properties of three novel hybrids, namely the chiral compounds (S)-2 and (R)-2, and their non-chiral analogue 4, which were first comparatively tested in promyelocytic NB4 cells. (S)-2 and partially 4--but not (R)-2--caused G0/G1 cell-cycle arrest by up-regulating cyclin G2 and p21 expression and down-regulating cyclin D2 expression, and also apoptosis as assessed by cell morphology and cytofluorimetric assay, histone H2AX phosphorylation and PARP cleavage. Notably, these events were partly prevented by an anti-oxidant. Moreover, novel HDACi prompted p53 and α-tubulin acetylation and, consistently, inhibited HDAC1 and 6 activity. The rank order of potency was (S)-2 > 4 > (R)-2, reflecting that of other biological assays and addressing (S)-2 as the most effective compound capable of triggering apoptosis in various acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) cell lines and blasts from patients with different AML subtypes. Importantly, (S)-2 was safe in mice (up to 150 mg/kg/week) as determined by liver, spleen, kidney and bone marrow histopathology; and displayed negligible affinity for peripheral/central BDZ-receptors. Overall, the BDZ-hydroxamate (S)-2 showed to be a low-toxic HDACi with powerful anti-proliferative and pro-apototic activities towards different cultured and primary AML cells, and therefore of clinical interest to support conventional anti-leukaemic therapy. PMID:22004558

  20. Synthesis of 1,2-benzisoxazole tethered 1,2,3-triazoles that exhibit anticancer activity in acute myeloid leukemia cell lines by inhibiting histone deacetylases, and inducing p21 and tubulin acetylation.

    PubMed

    Ashwini, Nanjundaswamy; Garg, Manoj; Mohan, Chakrabhavi Dhananjaya; Fuchs, Julian E; Rangappa, Shobith; Anusha, Sebastian; Swaroop, Toreshettahally Ramesh; Rakesh, Kodagahalli S; Kanojia, Deepika; Madan, Vikas; Bender, Andreas; Koeffler, H Phillip; Basappa; Rangappa, Kanchugarakoppal S

    2015-09-15

    1,2,3-Triazole-based heterocycles have previously been shown to possess significant anticancer activity in various tumor models. In the present study, we attached a 1,2,3-triazole moiety to the third position of a 1,2-benzisoxazole heterocycle via copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) with various alkynes and established for the title compounds significant antiproliferative effect against human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. Among the tested compounds, 3-(4-(4-phenoxyphenyl)-1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-yl)benzo[d]isoxazole (PTB) was found to be the most potent antiproliferative agent with an IC50 of 2 μM against MV4-11 cells using MTT assay. Notably, PTB induced cytotoxicity in MOLM13, MOLM14 and MV4-11 cells with selectivity over normal bone marrow cells (C57BL/6). Furthermore, PTB was found to induce cytotoxicity by increasing apoptosis of AML cells (MOLM13, MOLM14 and MV4-11) as well as sub-G1 cell population and apoptotic cells at submicromolar concentrations, as shown by flow cytometry and Annexin-V staining, respectively. On the protein level we suggested histone deacetylases (HDACs) as the potential protein target of those compounds in silico, and the predicted target was next experimentally validated by measuring the variations in the levels of p21, cyclin D and acetylation of histone H3 and tubulin. Molecular docking analysis of the title compounds with the second deacetylase domain of HDAC6 displayed high degree of shape complementarity to the binding site of the enzyme, forming multiple molecular interactions in the hydrophobic region as well as a hydrogen bond to the phenol side-chain of Tyr-782. Thus, 1,2,3-triazole derivatives appear to represent a class of novel, biologically active ligands against histone deacetylases which deserve to be further evaluated in their applications in the cancer field. PMID:26299825

  1. Stabilization of IgG1 in spray-dried powders for inhalation.

    PubMed

    Schüle, S; Schulz-Fademrecht, T; Garidel, P; Bechtold-Peters, K; Frieb, W

    2008-08-01

    The protein stabilizing capabilities of spray-dried IgG1/mannitol formulations were evaluated. The storage stability was tested at different residual moisture levels prepared by vacuum-drying or equilibration prior to storage. Vacuum-drying at 32 degrees C/0.1mbar for 24h reduced the moisture level below 1%, constituting an optimal basis for improved storage stability. The crystalline IgG1/mannitol powders with a weight ratio of 20/80 up to 40/60 failed to prevent the antibody aggregation as assessed by size exclusion chromatography during storage. Ratios of 60/40 up to 80/20 IgG1/mannitol provided superior stability of the antibody and the powders could be produced with high yields. The lower the residual moisture, the better was the stabilizing capability. An amount of 20% mannitol provided the best stabilization. Storage stability of 60/40, 70/30, and 80/20 IgG1/mannitol formulations over one year was adequate at 2-8 degrees C and 25 degrees C. Closed storage (sealed in vials) at 40 degrees C/75% RH and open storage at 25 degrees C/60% RH revealed that the stability still required optimization. The lower the protein content, the better was the powder flowability. The aerodynamic properties of powders spray-dried with 10% solids content were inadequate, as the particle size ranged between 5.1 and 7.2 microm and the fine particle fraction accounted for only 4-11%. Reduction of the solids content to 2.5% did improve the aerodynamic properties as the mass mean aerodynamic diameter was reduced to 3.6 microm and the fine particle fraction was increased to about 14%. The reduction of the solids content did not influence the storage stability significantly. Also spray-drying at higher temperatures had no significant impact on the storage stability, despite a higher tendency to form amorphous systems. In order to improve the storage stability and to maintain the good flowability of 70/30 IgG1/mannitol powder or to keep the storage stability but to improve the flowability

  2. A hypomorphic mutation of the gamma-1 adaptin gene (Ap1g1) causes inner ear, retina, thyroid, and testes abnormalities in mice.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kenneth R; Gagnon, Leona H; Chang, Bo

    2016-06-01

    Adaptor protein (AP) complexes function in the intracellular sorting and vesicular transport of membrane proteins. The clathrin-associated AP-1 complex functions at the trans-Golgi network and endosomes, and some forms of this complex are thought to mediate the sorting of proteins in plasma membranes of polarized epithelial cells. A null mutation of the mouse Ap1g1 gene, which encodes the gamma-1 subunit of the AP-1 complex, causes embryonic lethality when homozygous, indicating its critical importance in early development but precluding studies of its possible roles during later stages. Here, we describe our analyses of a new spontaneous mutation of Ap1g1 named "figure eight" (symbol fgt) and show that it is an in-frame deletion of 6 bp, which results in the elimination of two amino acids of the encoded protein. In contrast to Ap1g1 (-/-) null mice, mice homozygous for the recessive fgt mutation are viable with adult survival similar to controls. Although Ap1g1 is ubiquitously expressed, the phenotype of Ap1g1 (fgt) mutant mice is primarily restricted to abnormalities in sensory epithelial cells of the inner ear, pigmented epithelial cells of the retina, follicular epithelial cells of the thyroid gland, and the germinal epithelium of the testis, suggesting that impaired AP-1 sorting and targeting of membrane proteins in these polarized cells may underlie the observed pathologies. Ap1g1 (fgt) mutant mice provide a new animal model to study the in vivo roles of gamma-1 adaptin and the AP-1 complex throughout development and to investigate factors that underlie its associated phenotypic abnormalities. PMID:27090238

  3. The transcription factor Swi4 is target for PKA regulation of cell size at the G1 to S transition in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Amigoni, Loredana; Colombo, Sonia; Belotti, Fiorella; Alberghina, Lilia; Martegani, Enzo

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the specific target of PKA in the regulation of cell cycle progression and cell size we developed a new approach using the yeast strain GG104 bearing a deletion in adenylate cyclase gene and permeable to cAMP ( cyr1Δ, pde2Δ, msn2Δ, msn4Δ). In this strain the PKA activity is absent and can be activated by addition of cAMP in the medium, without any other change of the growth conditions. In the present work we show that the activation of PKA by exogenous cAMP in the GG104 strain exponentially growing in glucose medium caused a marked increase of cell size and perturbation of cell cycle with a transient arrest of cells in G1, followed by an accumulation of cells in G2/M phase with a minimal change in the growth rate. Deletion of CLN1 gene, but not of CLN2, abolished the transient G1 phase arrest. Consistently we found that PKA activation caused a transcriptional repression of CLN1 gene. Transcription of CLN1 is controlled by SBF and MBF dual-regulated promoter. We found that also the deletion of SWI4 gene abolished the transient G1 arrest suggesting that Swi4 is a target responsible for PKA modulation of G1/S phase transition. We generated a SWI4 allele mutated in the consensus site for PKA (Swi4S159A) and we found that expression of Swi4S159A protein in the GG104-Swi4Δ strain did not restore the transient G1 arrest induced by PKA activation, suggesting that Swi4 phosphorylation by PKA regulates CLN1 gene expression and G1/S phase transition. PMID:26046481

  4. Selenium Preconcentration in Geological Materials for Determination at sub-μ g\\ g-1 Concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedard, L. P.

    2004-05-01

    Selenium is important because it is a path finder element in economic geology. It has similar geochemical properties as sulfur, but slightly less mobile and less volatile in sulfides. Although its environmental cycle is better understood, its geological cycle is almost unknown. In geological samples, Se concentration ranges 0,02-1 μ g\\ g-1. Se has many spectral interefences in ICP-MS, rendering difficult to determine. INAA detection limit for geological samples is about 10 μ g\\ g-1. The analytical difficulties are one of the main reason why the geological cycle of Se is so poorly known. The preconcentration of Se with Thiol Cotton Fiber (TCF) followed by atomic absorption (AA) has been modified to be used with INAA. The modified technique involves sample dissolution (HF-HNO3) and evaporation to dryness at low temperature (55-60 oC) to keep Se in solution. Se is converted to SeIV by adding 5-6 mol l-1 HCl and heating covered in a boiling bath (95-100oC). Sample is diluted with deionized water to obtain 0,3 - 1 mol l-1 HCl and then collected on TCF. TCF is put in a polyethylene vial for irradiation in the SLOWPOKE II reactor for 10 seconds at a neutron flux of 1015 m-2 s-1. The 162 KeV peak of 77Se (half-life 17,36 sec) is read for 20 seconds after a decay of 7 seconds. Results for certified reference materials show the TCF preconcentration technique followed by INAA provides results comparable with AA with a detection limit of approximately 0,05 μ g\\ g-1. Moreover INAA provides many advantages such as eliminating the desorption step and is less time consuming than AA.

  5. Phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase induces a delay in G1 of the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong P; Schafer, Freya Q; Goswami, Prabhat C; Oberley, Larry W; Buettner, Garry R

    2003-06-01

    Phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase (PhGPx) is an antioxidant enzyme that reduces cellular phospholipid hydroperoxides (PLOOHs) to alcohols. Cellular peroxide tone has been implicated in cell growth and differentiation. By reducing the PLOOH level in the cell membrane, PhGPx regulates the peroxide tone and thereby might be involved in cell growth. We hypothesized that overexpression of PhGPx in human breast cancer cells would decrease their growth rate. We stably transfected MCF-7 cells (Wt) with L-PhGPx and measured cell doubling time, plating efficiency, and cell cycle phase transit times. P-4 cells (8-fold increase in PhGPx activity) showed a 2-fold increase in doubling time; doubling time increased directly with PhGPx activity (r = 0.95). The higher the PhGPx activity, the lower the plating efficiency (r = -0.86). The profile of other antioxidant enzymes was unchanged. Overexpression of PhGPx lowered the steady-state level of PLOOH (by > 60%). Results from bromodeoxyuridine pulse-chase experiments and flow cytometry indicate that PhGPx induced a delay in MCF-7 proliferation that was primarily due to a slower progression from G1 to S. These results support the hypothesis that PhGPx plays a regulatory role in the progression of MCF-7 cells from G1 to S possibly by regulating the steady-state levels of PLOOH. These data suggest that PhGPx can lower the peroxide tone, which might change the cellular redox environment resulting in a delay in G1 transit. Thus, PhGPx could be an important factor in cell growth. PMID:12868489

  6. JAZ mediates G1 cell cycle arrest by interacting with and inhibiting E2F1

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Mingli; Wu, Song; Jia, Jinghua

    2011-01-01

    We discovered and reported JAZ as a unique dsRNA binding zinc finger protein that functions as a direct, positive regulator of p53 transcriptional activity to mediate G1 cell cycle arrest in a mechanism involving upregulation of the p53 target gene, p21. We now find that JAZ can also negatively regulate the cell cycle in a novel, p53-independent mechanism resulting from the direct interaction with E2F1, a key intermediate in regulating cell proliferation and tumor suppression. JAZ associates with E2F1's central DNA binding/dimerization region and its C-terminal transactivation domain. Functionally, JAZ represses E2F1 transcriptional activity in association with repression of cyclin A expression and inhibition of G1/S transition. This mechanism involves JAZ-mediated inhibition of E2F1's specific DNA binding activity. JAZ directly binds E2F1 in vitro in a dsRNA-independent manner, and JAZ's dsRNA binding ZF domains, which are necessary for localizing JAZ to the nucleus, are required for repression of transcriptional activity in vivo. Importantly for specificity, siRNA-mediated “knockdown” of endogenous JAZ increases E2F transcriptional activity and releases cells from G1 arrest, indicating a necessary role for JAZ in this transition. Although JAZ can directly inhibit E2F1 activity independently of p53, if functional p53 is expressed, JAZ may exert a more potent inhibition of cell cycle following growth factor withdrawal. Therefore, JAZ plays a dual role in cell cycle regulation by both repressing E2F1 transcriptional activity and activating p53 to facilitate efficient growth arrest in response to cellular stress, which may potentially be exploited therapeutically for tumor growth inhibition. PMID:21715977

  7. ALDH Expression Characterizes G1-Phase Proliferating Beta Cells during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lijuan; Wang, Lin; Liu, Xiaoliang; Zheng, Dongming; Liu, Sishi; Liu, Caixia

    2014-01-01

    High levels of aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity have been detected in various progenitor and stem cells. Thus, Aldefluor fluorescence, which represents precisely the ALDH activity, has been widely used for the identification, evaluation, and isolation of stem and progenitor cells. Recently, ALDH activity was detected in embryonic and adult mouse pancreas, specifically in adult centroacinar and terminal duct cells supposed to harbor endocrine and exocrine progenitor cells in the adult pancreas. Nevertheless, ALDH activity and aldeflour fluorescence have not been examined in beta cells. Here, we report a dynamic increase in the number of aldeflour+ beta cells during pregnancy. Interestingly, nearly all these aldeflour+ beta cells are positive for Ki-67, suggesting that they are in an active cell cycle (G1, S and M phases). To determine precisely at which phase beta cells activate ALDH activity and thus become aldeflour+, we co-stained insulin with additional proliferation markers, phosphohistone3 (PHH3, a marker for M-phase proliferating cells) and Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU, a marker for S-phase proliferating cells). Our data show little aldeflour+ beta cells that were positive for either PHH3, or BrdU, suggesting that beta cells activate ALDH and become Aldefluor+ when they enter G1-phase of active cell cycle, but may downregulate ALDH when they leave G1-phase and enter S phase. Our data thus reveal a potential change in ALDH activity of proliferating beta cells during pregnancy, which provides a novel method for isolation and analysis of proliferating beta cells. Moreover, our data also suggest that caution needs to be taken on interpretation of Aldefluor lineage-tracing data in pancreas. PMID:24787690

  8. THE ABSENCE OF RADIO EMISSION FROM THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER G1

    SciTech Connect

    Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Wrobel, J. M.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Heinke, C. O.; Miller, R. E.; Plotkin, R. M.; Di Stefano, R.; Greene, J. E.; Ho, L. C.; Joseph, T. D.; Maccarone, T. J.; Kong, A. K. H.

    2012-08-10

    The detections of both X-ray and radio emission from the cluster G1 in M31 have provided strong support for existing dynamical evidence for an intermediate-mass black hole (IMBH) of mass (1.8 {+-} 0.5) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} M{sub Sun} at the cluster center. However, given the relatively low significance and astrometric accuracy of the radio detection, and the non-simultaneity of the X-ray and radio measurements, this identification required further confirmation. Here we present deep, high angular resolution, strictly simultaneous X-ray and radio observations of G1. While the X-ray emission (L{sub X} = 1.74{sup +0.53}{sub -0.44} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 36} (d/750 kpc){sup 2} erg s{sup -1} in the 0.5-10 keV band) remained fully consistent with previous observations, we detected no radio emission from the cluster center down to a 3{sigma} upper limit of 4.7 {mu}Jy beam{sup -1}. Our favored explanation for the previous radio detection is flaring activity from a black hole low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB). We performed a new regression of the 'Fundamental Plane' of black hole activity, valid for determining black hole mass from radio and X-ray observations of sub-Eddington black holes, finding log M{sub BH} = (1.638 {+-} 0.070)log L{sub R} - (1.136 {+-} 0.077)log L{sub X} - (6.863 {+-} 0.790), with an empirically determined uncertainty of 0.44 dex. This constrains the mass of the X-ray source in G1, if a black hole, to be <9.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} M{sub Sun} at 95% confidence, suggesting that it is a persistent LMXB. This annuls what was previously the most convincing evidence from radiation for an IMBH in the Local Group, though the evidence for an IMBH in G1 from velocity dispersion measurements remains unaffected by these results.

  9. Some alkali and titania analyses of tektites before and after G-1 precision monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tatlock, D.B.

    1966-01-01

    A comparison of 55 older analyses of Australasian tektites with 110 modern precisely monitored analyses suggests that more than half of the older alkali and titania determinations are decidedly inaccurate and misleading. Deviations of the older analyses from the restricted values of the modern analyses are comparable to the imprecisions shown by early analyses of G-1 granite and W-1 diabase. This suggests that a high percentage of older alkali and titania analyses, such as those of Washington's tables, are of questionable quality. ?? 1966.

  10. Histone Deacetylase 3 Coordinates Deacetylase-independent Epigenetic Silencing of Transforming Growth Factor-β1 (TGF-β1) to Orchestrate Second Heart Field Development.

    PubMed

    Lewandowski, Sara L; Janardhan, Harish P; Trivedi, Chinmay M

    2015-11-01

    About two-thirds of human congenital heart disease involves second heart field-derived structures. Histone-modifying enzymes, histone deacetylases (HDACs), regulate the epigenome; however, their functions within the second heart field remain elusive. Here we demonstrate that histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) orchestrates epigenetic silencing of Tgf-β1, a causative factor in congenital heart disease pathogenesis, in a deacetylase-independent manner to regulate development of second heart field-derived structures. In murine embryos lacking HDAC3 in the second heart field, increased TGF-β1 bioavailability is associated with ascending aortic dilatation, outflow tract malrotation, overriding aorta, double outlet right ventricle, aberrant semilunar valve development, bicuspid aortic valve, ventricular septal defects, and embryonic lethality. Activation of TGF-β signaling causes aberrant endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition and altered extracellular matrix homeostasis in HDAC3-null outflow tracts and semilunar valves, and pharmacological inhibition of TGF-β rescues these defects. HDAC3 recruits components of the PRC2 complex, methyltransferase EZH2, EED, and SUZ12, to the NCOR complex to enrich trimethylation of Lys-27 on histone H3 at the Tgf-β1 regulatory region and thereby maintains epigenetic silencing of Tgf-β1 specifically within the second heart field-derived mesenchyme. Wild-type HDAC3 or catalytically inactive HDAC3 expression rescues aberrant endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition and epigenetic silencing of Tgf-β1 in HDAC3-null outflow tracts and semilunar valves. These findings reveal that epigenetic dysregulation within the second heart field is a predisposing factor for congenital heart disease. PMID:26420484

  11. Magnetic Shielding Accelerates the Proliferation of Human Neuroblastoma Cell by Promoting G1-Phase Progression

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Bartlett, Perry F.; He, Rong-qiao

    2013-01-01

    Organisms have been exposed to the geomagnetic field (GMF) throughout evolutionary history. Exposure to the hypomagnetic field (HMF) by deep magnetic shielding has recently been suggested to have a negative effect on the structure and function of the central nervous system, particularly during early development. Although changes in cell growth and differentiation have been observed in the HMF, the effects of the HMF on cell cycle progression still remain unclear. Here we show that continuous HMF exposure significantly increases the proliferation of human neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y) cells. The acceleration of proliferation results from a forward shift of the cell cycle in G1-phase. The G2/M-phase progression is not affected in the HMF. Our data is the first to demonstrate that the HMF can stimulate the proliferation of SH-SY5Y cells by promoting cell cycle progression in the G1-phase. This provides a novel way to study the mechanism of cells in response to changes of environmental magnetic field including the GMF. PMID:23355897

  12. Gastrointestinal stability of therapeutic anti-TNF α IgG1 monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Vipul; Varum, Felipe; Bravo, Roberto; Furrer, Esther; Basit, Abdul W

    2016-04-11

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are highly effective therapeutic agents, administered exclusively by the parenteral route owing to their previously-documented instability in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract when delivered orally. To investigate the extent of the validity of this assumption, the stability of the tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) neutralizing IgG1 mAbs, infliximab and adalimumab, was studied in human GI conditions. In gastric fluid, infliximab and adalimumab degraded rapidly, with complete degradation occurring within 1min. In small intestinal fluid, the molecules were shown to be more stable, but nonetheless degraded within a short time frame of 30min. Investigations into the mechanisms responsible for infliximab and adalimumab instability in the small intestine revealed that the proteolytic enzyme elastase, and to a lesser extent the enzymes trypsin and chymotrypsin, was responsible for their degradation. By contrast, in the human colon, 75% and 50% of the dose of infliximab and adalimumab, respectively, were intact after 60min, with conversion of mAbs into F(ab')2 Fab and Fc fragments detected in colonic conditions. These data indicate that therapeutic IgG1 antibodies are more stable in the colon than in the upper GI tract, therefore highlighting the potential for oral delivery of anti-TNF-α mAbs targeted to the colon. PMID:26892815

  13. Lysines in the tetramerization domain of p53 selectively modulate G1 arrest.

    PubMed

    Beckerman, Rachel; Yoh, Kathryn; Mattia-Sansobrino, Melissa; Zupnick, Andrew; Laptenko, Oleg; Karni-Schmidt, Orit; Ahn, Jinwoo; Byeon, In-Ja; Keezer, Susan; Prives, Carol

    2016-06-01

    Functional in a tetrameric state, the protein product of the p53 tumor suppressor gene confers its tumor-suppressive activity by transactivating genes which promote cell-cycle arrest, senescence, or programmed cell death. How p53 distinguishes between these divergent outcomes is still a matter of considerable interest. Here we discuss the impact of 2 mutations in the tetramerization domain that confer unique properties onto p53. By changing lysines 351 and 357 to arginine, thereby blocking all post-translational modifications of these residues, DNA binding and transcriptional regulation by p53 remain virtually unchanged. On the other hand, by changing these lysines to glutamine (2KQ-p53), thereby neutralizing their positive charge and potentially mimicking acetylation, p53 is impaired in the induction of cell cycle arrest and yet can still effectively induce cell death. Surprisingly, when 2KQ-p53 is expressed at high levels in H1299 cells, it can bind to and transactivate numerous p53 target genes including p21, but not others such as miR-34a and cyclin G1 to the same extent as wild-type p53. Our findings show that strong induction of p21 is not sufficient to block H1299 cells in G1, and imply that modification of one or both of the lysines within the tetramerization domain may serve as a mechanism to shunt p53 from inducing cell cycle arrest. PMID:27210019

  14. G-1-activated membrane estrogen receptors mediate increased contractility of the human myometrium.

    PubMed

    Maiti, K; Paul, J W; Read, M; Chan, E C; Riley, S C; Nahar, P; Smith, R

    2011-06-01

    Estrogens are key mediators of increased uterine contractility at labor. We sought to determine whether membrane-associated estrogen receptors, such as the recently described seven-transmembrane receptor G protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30), mediated some of this effect. Using human myometrium obtained at term cesarean section before or after the onset of labor, we demonstrated the presence of GPR30 mRNA and protein using quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting. GPR30 receptor was localized to the cell membrane and often colocalized with calveolin-1. Using the specific estrogen membrane receptor agonist G-1 and myometrial explants, we showed that membrane receptor activation led to phosphorylation of MAPK and the actin-modifying small heat shock protein 27. Using myometrial strips incubated with G-1 or vehicle we demonstrated that estrogen membrane receptor activation increased the myometrial contractile response to oxytocin. These data suggest that activation of the plasma membrane estrogen receptor GPR30 likely participates in the physiology of the human myometrium during pregnancy and identifies it as a potential target to modify uterine activity. PMID:21427217

  15. The extraction of the spin structure function, g2 (and g1) at low Bjorken x

    SciTech Connect

    Ndukum, Luwani Z.

    2015-08-01

    The Spin Asymmetries of the Nucleon Experiment (SANE) used the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility at Jefferson Laboratory in Newport News, VA to investigate the spin structure of the proton. The experiment measured inclusive double polarization electron asymmetries using a polarized electron beam, scattered off a solid polarized ammonia target with target polarization aligned longitudinal and near transverse to the electron beam, allowing the extraction of the spin asymmetries A1 and A2, and spin structure functions g1 and g2. Polarized electrons of energies of 4.7 and 5.9 GeV were used. The scattered electrons were detected by a novel, non-magnetic array of detectors observing a four-momentum transfer range of 2.5 to 6.5 GeV*V. This document addresses the extraction of the spin asymmetries and spin structure functions, with a focus on spin structure function, g2 (and g1) at low Bjorken x. The spin structure functions were measured as a function of x and W in four Q square bins. A full understanding of the low x region is necessary to get clean results for SANE and extend our understanding of the kinematic region at low x.

  16. Nonuniform Expansion of the Youngest Galactic Supernova Remnant G1.9+0.3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Green, David A.; Hwang, Una; Petre, Robert; Krishnamurthy, Kalyani; Willett, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    We report measurements of the X-ray expansion of the youngest Galactic supernova remnant, G1.9+0.3, using Chandra observations in 2007, 2009, and 2011. The measured rates strongly deviate from uniform expansion, decreasing radially by about 60 along the X-ray bright SE-NW axis from 0.84 plus or minus 0.06% yr(exp -1) to 0.52% plus or minus 0.03 yr(exp -1). This corresponds to undecelerated ages of 120-190 yr, confirming the young age of G1.9+0.3 and implying a significant deceleration of the blast wave. The synchrotron-dominated X-ray emission brightens at a rate of 1.9% plus or minus 0.4% yr(exp -1). We identify bright outer and inner rims with the blast wave and reverse shock, respectively. Sharp density gradients in either the ejecta or ambient medium are required to produce the sudden deceleration of the reverse shock or the blast wave implied by the large spread in expansion ages. The blast wave could have been decelerated recently by an encounter with a modest density discontinuity in the ambient medium, such as may be found at a wind termination shock, requiring strong mass loss in the progenitor.

  17. Magnetic shielding accelerates the proliferation of human neuroblastoma cell by promoting G1-phase progression.

    PubMed

    Mo, Wei-chuan; Zhang, Zi-jian; Liu, Ying; Bartlett, Perry F; He, Rong-qiao

    2013-01-01

    Organisms have been exposed to the geomagnetic field (GMF) throughout evolutionary history. Exposure to the hypomagnetic field (HMF) by deep magnetic shielding has recently been suggested to have a negative effect on the structure and function of the central nervous system, particularly during early development. Although changes in cell growth and differentiation have been observed in the HMF, the effects of the HMF on cell cycle progression still remain unclear. Here we show that continuous HMF exposure significantly increases the proliferation of human neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y) cells. The acceleration of proliferation results from a forward shift of the cell cycle in G1-phase. The G2/M-phase progression is not affected in the HMF. Our data is the first to demonstrate that the HMF can stimulate the proliferation of SH-SY5Y cells by promoting cell cycle progression in the G1-phase. This provides a novel way to study the mechanism of cells in response to changes of environmental magnetic field including the GMF. PMID:23355897

  18. Histone deacetylases in monocyte/macrophage development, activation and metabolism: refining HDAC targets for inflammatory and infectious diseases

    PubMed Central

    Das Gupta, Kaustav; Shakespear, Melanie R; Iyer, Abishek; Fairlie, David P; Sweet, Matthew J

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages have central roles in danger detection, inflammation and host defense, and consequently, these cells are intimately linked to most disease processes. Major advances in our understanding of the development and function of macrophages have recently come to light. For example, it is now clear that tissue-resident macrophages can be derived from either blood monocytes or through local proliferation of phagocytes that are originally seeded during embryonic development. Metabolic state has also emerged as a major control point for macrophage activation phenotypes. Herein, we review recent literature linking the histone deacetylase (HDAC) family of enzymes to macrophage development and activation, particularly in relation to these recent developments. There has been considerable interest in potential therapeutic applications for small molecule inhibitors of HDACs (HDACi), not only for cancer, but also for inflammatory and infectious diseases. However, the enormous range of molecular and cellular processes that are controlled by different HDAC enzymes presents a potential stumbling block to clinical development. We therefore present examples of how classical HDACs control macrophage functions, roles of specific HDACs in these processes and approaches for selective targeting of drugs, such as HDACi, to macrophages. Development of selective inhibitors of macrophage-expressed HDACs and/or selective delivery of pan HDACi to macrophages may provide avenues for enhancing efficacy of HDACi in therapeutic applications, while limiting unwanted side effects. PMID:26900475

  19. Analysis of the NuRD subunits reveals a histone deacetylase core complex and a connection with DNA methylation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Ng, Huck-Hui; Erdjument-Bromage, Hediye; Tempst, Paul; Bird, Adrian; Reinberg, Danny

    1999-01-01

    ATP-dependent nucleosome remodeling and core histone acetylation and deacetylation represent mechanisms to alter nucleosome structure. NuRD is a multisubunit complex containing nucleosome remodeling and histone deacetylase activities. The histone deacetylases HDAC1 and HDAC2 and the histone binding proteins RbAp48 and RbAp46 form a core complex shared between NuRD and Sin3-histone deacetylase complexes. The histone deacetylase activity of the core complex is severely compromised. A novel polypeptide highly related to the metastasis-associated protein 1, MTA2, and the methyl-CpG-binding domain-containing protein, MBD3, were found to be subunits of the NuRD complex. MTA2 modulates the enzymatic activity of the histone deacetylase core complex. MBD3 mediates the association of MTA2 with the core histone deacetylase complex. MBD3 does not directly bind methylated DNA but is highly related to MBD2, a polypeptide that binds to methylated DNA and has been reported to possess demethylase activity. MBD2 interacts with the NuRD complex and directs the complex to methylated DNA. NuRD may provide a means of gene silencing by DNA methylation. PMID:10444591

  20. Inhibition of Zinc-Dependent Histone Deacetylases with a Chemically Triggered Electrophile.

    PubMed

    Boskovic, Zarko V; Kemp, Melissa M; Freedy, Allyson M; Viswanathan, Vasanthi S; Pop, Marius S; Fuller, Jason H; Martinez, Nicole M; Figueroa Lazú, Samuel O; Hong, Jiyoung A; Lewis, Timothy A; Calarese, Daniel; Love, James D; Vetere, Amedeo; Almo, Steven C; Schreiber, Stuart L; Koehler, Angela N

    2016-07-15

    Unbiased binding assays involving small-molecule microarrays were used to identify compounds that display unique patterns of selectivity among members of the zinc-dependent histone deacetylase family of enzymes. A novel, hydroxyquinoline-containing compound, BRD4354, was shown to preferentially inhibit activity of HDAC5 and HDAC9 in vitro. Inhibition of deacetylase activity appears to be time-dependent and reversible. Mechanistic studies suggest that the compound undergoes zinc-catalyzed decomposition to an ortho-quinone methide, which covalently modifies nucleophilic cysteines within the proteins. The covalent nature of the compound-enzyme interaction has been demonstrated in experiments with biotinylated probe compound and with electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry. PMID:27064299

  1. Non-Peptide Macrocyclic Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Derived from Tricyclic Ketolide Skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Mwakwari, Sandra C.; Guerrant, William; Patil, Vishal; Khan, Shabana I.; Tekwani, Babu L.; Gurard-Levin, Zachary A.; Mrksich, Milan; Oyelere, Adegboyega K.

    2010-01-01

    Inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC) function is a validated therapeutic strategy for cancer treatment. Of the several structurally distinct small molecule histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) reported, macrocyclic depsipeptides possess the most complex cap-groups and have demonstrated excellent HDAC inhibition potency and isoform selectivity. Unfortunately, the development of macrocyclic depsipeptides has been hampered in part due to development problems characteristic of large peptides and the complex reaction schemes required for their synthesis. Herein we report that tricyclic ketolide TE-802 is an excellent mimetic for the peptide backbone of macrocyclic HDACi. Compounds derived from this template are particularly selective against HDAC 1 and 2 with nanomolar inhibitory activity. Interrogation of the association between a subset of these compounds and key HDAC isoforms, using AutoDock, enables a molecular description of the interaction between the HDAC enzyme's outer rim and the inhibitors’ macrocyclic cap group that are responsible for compound affinity and presumably isoform selectivity. PMID:20669972

  2. Structural Basis of Inhibition of the Human NAD+ -Dependent Deacetylase SIRT5 by Suramin

    SciTech Connect

    Schuetz,A.; Min, J.; Antoshenko, T.; Wang, C.; Allali-Hassani, A.; Dong, A.; Loppnau, P.; vedadi, M.; Bochkarev, A.; et al.

    2007-01-01

    Sirtuins are NAD+-dependent protein deacetylases and are emerging as molecular targets for the development of pharmaceuticals to treat human metabolic and neurological diseases and cancer. To date, several sirtuin inhibitors and activators have been identified, but the structural mechanisms of how these compounds modulate sirtuin activity have not yet been determined. We identified suramin as a compound that binds to human SIRT5 and showed that it inhibits SIRT5 NAD+-dependent deacetylase activity with an IC50 value of 22 {mu}M. To provide insights into how sirtuin function is altered by inhibitors, we determined two crystal structures of SIRT5, one in complex with ADP-ribose, the other bound to suramin. Our structural studies provide a view of a synthetic inhibitory compound in a sirtuin active site revealing that suramin binds into the NAD+, the product, and the substrate-binding site. Finally, our structures may enable the rational design of more potent inhibitors.

  3. Histone Deacetylases Inhibitors in the Treatment of Retinal Degenerative Diseases: Overview and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xufeng; Du, Wei; Pang, Ji-jing

    2015-01-01

    Retinal degenerative diseases are one of the important refractory ophthalmic diseases, featured with apoptosis of photoreceptor cells. Histone acetylation and deacetylation can regulate chromosome assembly, gene transcription, and posttranslational modification, which are regulated by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs), respectively. The histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis) have the ability to cause hyperacetylation of histone and nonhistone proteins, resulting in a variety of effects on cell proliferation, differentiation, anti-inflammation, and anti-apoptosis. Several HDACis have been approved for clinical trials to treat cancer. Studies have shown that HDACis have neuroprotective effects in nervous system damage. In this paper, we will summarize the neuroprotective effects of common HDACis in retinal degenerative diseases and make a prospect to the applications of HDACis in the treatment of retinal degenerative diseases in the future. PMID:26137316

  4. The Therapeutic Potential of Class I Selective Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors in Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Khabele, Dineo

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer remains the deadliest gynecologic malignancy. Despite advances in treatment, new approaches are needed. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are a family of enzymes that regulate gene expression by removing acetyl groups from lysine residues on histones and non-histone proteins. Inhibition of HDACs with small molecules has led to the development of histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) that are in clinical use, primarily for hematologic malignancies. Although clinical trials with HDACi as single agents in solid tumors have been disappointing, data from independent labs and recent work by our group show that class I selective HDACi have potent anti-tumor effects in pre-clinical models of ovarian cancer. This review summarizes the role of HDACs in ovarian cancer and the potential niche for selective class I HDACi, particularly HDAC3 in ovarian cancer therapy. PMID:24904826

  5. Anti-endomysial antibody of IgG1 isotype detection strongly increases the prevalence of coeliac disease in patients affected by type I diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Picarelli, A; Sabbatella, L; Di Tola, M; Vetrano, S; Casale, C; Anania, MC; Porowska, B; Vergari, M; Schiaffini, R; Gargiulo, P

    2005-01-01

    A strong association between type 1 insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM1) and coeliac disease (CD) is well documented, but it is known that prevalence values are underestimated. Serum anti-endomysial antibodies (EMA), considered diagnostic for CD because of their high sensitivity and specificity, belong to the IgA class, but the existence of EMA of IgG1 isotype in the presence or absence of IgA deficiency was reported. In order to re-evaluate the occurrence of CD in IDDM1 patients we performed a screening in IDDM1 patients using EMA of both isotypes. Ninety-four adults affected by IDDM1 (unaffected by CD before enrolling) were enrolled and 83 blood donors as controls. All subjects were on a gluten-containing diet. Histology and biopsy culture were performed. EMA IgA and IgG1 in sera and culture supernatants were detected. Serum EMA were positive in 13 of 94 IDDM1 patients (13·8%). Six of 13 presented IgA-EMA, seven of 13 presented IgG1-EMA. No EMA were found in the control population. Total intestinal atrophy was found in all six patients with serum IgA-EMA and in five of seven with serum IgG1-EMA. Diagnosis of CD was confirmed by histology and organ culture in all 13 patients with serum EMA. The prevalence of CD in the patients affected by IDDM1 was 6·4% for IgA-EMA-positive and 7·4% for IgG1-EMA-positive patients. We confirmed the prevalence of CD in the IDDM1 population obtained with IgA-EMA screening only (6·4%). This prevalence value increases dramatically to 13·8% when IgG1-EMA are also used in the screening. We conclude that IgG1-EMA should also be sought whenever an IDDM1 patient undergoes screening for CD. PMID:16178863

  6. Recruitment of trimeric proliferating cell nuclear antigen by G1-phase cyclin-dependent kinases following DNA damage with platinum-based antitumour agents

    PubMed Central

    He, G; Kuang, J; Koomen, J; Kobayashi, R; Khokhar, A R; Siddik, Z H

    2013-01-01

    Background: In cycling tumour cells, the binary cyclin-dependent kinase Cdk4/cyclin D or Cdk2/cyclin E complex is inhibited by p21 following DNA damage to induce G1 cell-cycle arrest. However, it is not known whether other proteins are also recruited within Cdk complexes, or their role, and this was investigated. Methods: Ovarian A2780 tumour cells were exposed to the platinum-based antitumour agent 1R,2R-diaminocyclohexane(trans-diacetato)(dichloro)platinum(IV) (DAP), which preferentially induces G1 arrest in a p21-dependent manner. The Cdk complexes were analysed by gel filtration chromatography, immunoblot and mass spectrometry. Results: The active forms of Cdk4 and Cdk2 complexes in control tumour cells have a molecular size of ∼140 kDa, which increased to ∼290 kDa when inhibited following G1 checkpoint activation by DAP. Proteomic analysis identified Cdk, cyclin, p21 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in the inhibited complex, and biochemical studies provided unequivocal evidence that the increase in ∼150 kDa of the inhibited complex is consistent with p21-dependent recruitment of PCNA as a trimer, likely bound to three molecules of p21. Although p21 alone was sufficient to inhibit the Cdk complex, PCNA was critical for stabilising p21. Conclusion: G1 Cdk complexes inhibited by p21 also recruit PCNA, which inhibits degradation and, thereby, prolongs activity of p21 within the complex. PMID:24104967

  7. Asymmetric Expansion of the Youngest Galactic Supernova Remnant G1.9+0.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Green, David; Gwynne, Peter; Hwang, Una; Petre, Robert; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Willett, Rebecca

    2016-04-01

    The youngest Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) G1.9+0.3, produced by a (likely) Type Ia SN that exploded around CE 1900, is strongly asymmetric at radio wavelengths but exhibits a bilaterally symmetric morphology in X-rays. It has been difficult to understand the origin of these contrasting morphologies. We present results of X-ray expansion measurements of G1.9+0.3 that illuminate the origin of the radio asymmetry. These measurements are based on comparing recent (2015), 400 ks-long Chandra observations with earlier Chandra observations that include 1 Ms-long 2011 observations. The mean expansion rate from 2011 to 2015 is 0.58% yr-1, in agreement with previous measurements. We also confirm that expansion decreases radially away from the remnant's center along the major E-W axis, from 0.77% yr-1 to 0.53% yr-1. Large variations in expansion are also present along the minor N-S axis. Expansion of the faint S rim and the outermost faint N rim is comparable to the mean expansion. But the prominent X-ray rim in the N, coincident with the outer edge of the bright radio rim that marks the primary blast wave there, is expanding more slowly. Its expansion relative to the S rim is only 0.47% yr-1. At 8.5 kpc, this corresponds to a speed of about 5000 km/s, less than half of the overall blast wave speed of 12,000 km/s. Such strong deceleration of the northern blast wave most likely arises from the collision of SN ejecta with a much denser than average ambient medium there. The presence of the asymmetric ambient medium naturally explains the radio asymmetry. The SN ejecta have also been strongly decelerated in the N, but they expand faster than the blast wave. In several locations, significant morphological changes and strongly nonradial motions are apparent. The spatially-integrated X-ray flux continues to increase with time. As with Kepler's SN - the most recent historical SN in the Galaxy - the SN ejecta are likely colliding with the asymmetric circumstellar medium (CSM

  8. SQSTM1/p62 Interacts with HDAC6 and Regulates Deacetylase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jin; Seibenhener, Michael Lamar; Calderilla-Barbosa, Luis; Diaz-Meco, Maria-Theresa; Moscat, Jorge; Jiang, Jianxiong; Wooten, Marie W.; Wooten, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    Protein aggregates can form in the cytoplasm of the cell and are accumulated at aggresomes localized to the microtubule organizing center (MTOC) where they are subsequently degraded by autophagy. In this process, aggregates are engulfed into autophagosomes which subsequently fuse with lysosomes for protein degradation. A member of the class II histone deacetylase family, histone deacetylase 6(HDAC6) has been shown to be involved in both aggresome formation and the fusion of autophagosomes with lysosomes making it an attractive target to regulate protein aggregation. The scaffolding protein sequestosome 1(SQSTM1)/p62 has also been shown to regulate accumulation and autophagic clearance of protein aggregates. Recent studies have revealed colocalization of HDAC6 and p62 to ubiquitinated mitochondria, as well as, ubiquitinated protein aggregates associated with the E3 ubiquitin ligase TRIM50. HDAC6 deacetylase activity is required for aggresome formation and can be regulated by protein interaction with HDAC6. Due to their colocalization at ubiquitinated protein aggregates, we sought to examine if p62 specifically interacted with HDAC6 and if so, if this interaction had any effect on HDAC6 activity and/or the physiological function of cortactin-F-actin assembly. We succeeded in identifying and mapping the direct interaction between HDAC6 and p62. We further show that this interaction regulates HDAC6 deacetylase activity. Data are presented demonstrating that the absence of p62 results in hyperactivation of HDAC6 and deacetylation of α-tubulin and cortactin. Further, upon induction of protein misfolding we show that p62 is required for perinuclear co-localization of cortactin-F-actin assemblies. Thus, our findings indicate that p62 plays a key role in regulating the recruitment of F-actin network assemblies to the MTOC, a critical cellular function that is required for successful autophagic clearance of protein aggregates. PMID:24086678

  9. Phytotoxic eremophilane sesquiterpenes from the coprophilous fungus Penicillium sp. G1-a14.

    PubMed

    Del Valle, Paulina; Figueroa, Mario; Mata, Rachel

    2015-02-27

    Bioassay-directed fractionation of an extract from the grain-based culture of the coprophilous fungus Penicillium sp. G1-a14 led to the isolation of a new eremophilane-type sesquiterpene, 3R,6R-dihydroxy-9,7(11)-dien-8-oxoeremophilane (1), along with three known analogues, namely, isopetasol (2), sporogen AO-1 (3), and dihydrosporogen AO-1 (4). The structure of 1 was elucidated using 1D and 2D NMR and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Assignment of absolute configuration at the stereogenic centers of 1 was achieved using ECD spectroscopy combined with time-dependent density functional theory calculations. Sporogen AO-1 (3) and dihydrosporogen AO-1 (4) caused significant inhibition of radicle growth against Amaranthus hypochondriacus (IC50 = 0.17 mM for both compounds) and Echinochloa crus-galli (IC50 = 0.17 and 0.30 mM, respectively). PMID:25603174

  10. Characterization of the basic charge variants of a human IgG1

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Franklin; Derfus, Gayle; Kluck, Brian; Nogal, Bartek; Emery, Craig; Summers, Christie; Zheng, Kai; Bayer, Robert; Amanullah, Ashraf

    2011-01-01

    We report a case study of an IgG1 with a unique basic charge variant profile caused by C-terminal proline amidation on either one or two heavy chains. The proline amidation was sensitive to copper ion concentration in the production media during cell culture: the higher the Cu2+ ion concentration, the higher the level of proline amidation detected. This conclusion was supported by the analysis of samples that revealed direct correlation between the proline amidation level observed from peptide maps and the level of basic peaks measured by imaged capillary isoelectric focusing and a pH gradient ion-exchange chromatography method. The importance of these observations to therapeutic antibody production is discussed. PMID:22123059

  11. Association between cellular radiosensitivity and G1/G2 checkpoint proficiencies in human cholangiocarcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Hematulin, Arunee; Sagan, Daniel; Sawanyawisuth, Kanlayanee; Seubwai, Wunchana; Wongkham, Sopit

    2014-09-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma is a destructive malignancy with a poor prognosis and lack of effective medical treatment. Radiotherapy is an alternative treatment for patients with unresectable cholangiocarcinoma. However, there are limited data on the radiation responsiveness of individual cholangiocarcinoma cells, which is a key factor that influences radiation treatment outcome. In this study, we found that cholangiocarcinoma cell lines differ remarkably in their radiosensitivity. The variation of radiosensitivity of cholangiocarcinoma cells correlates with their p53 status and existing G1 and/or G2 checkpoint defects. We also demonstrated the potential of checkpoint kinase Chk1/2 inhibition on the enhancement of the radiosensitivity of cholangiocarcinoma cells. Thus, this study provides useful information for predicting radiation response and provides evidence for the enchantment of radiotherapeutic efficiency by targeting checkpoint kinase Chk1/2 in some subpopulations of cholangiocarcinoma patients. PMID:24969815

  12. Inhibition of Histone Deacetylase 3 Causes Replication Stress in Cutaneous T Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Christina E.; Bhaskara, Srividya; Stengel, Kristy R.; Zhao, Yue; Sirbu, Bianca; Chagot, Benjamin; Cortez, David; Khabele, Dineo; Chazin, Walter J.; Cooper, Andrew; Jacques, Vincent; Rusche, James; Eischen, Christine M.; McGirt, Laura Y.; Hiebert, Scott W.

    2013-01-01

    Given the fundamental roles of histone deacetylases (HDACs) in the regulation of DNA repair, replication, transcription and chromatin structure, it is fitting that therapies targeting HDAC activities are now being explored as anti-cancer agents. In fact, two histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDIs), SAHA and Depsipeptide, are FDA approved for single-agent treatment of refractory cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL). An important target of these HDIs, histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3), regulates processes such as DNA repair, metabolism, and tumorigenesis through the regulation of chromatin structure and gene expression. Here we show that HDAC3 inhibition using a first in class selective inhibitor, RGFP966, resulted in decreased cell growth in CTCL cell lines due to increased apoptosis that was associated with DNA damage and impaired S phase progression. Through isolation of proteins on nascent DNA (iPOND), we found that HDAC3 was associated with chromatin and is present at and around DNA replication forks. DNA fiber labeling analysis showed that inhibition of HDAC3 resulted in a significant reduction in DNA replication fork velocity within the first hour of drug treatment. These results suggest that selective inhibition of HDAC3 could be useful in treatment of CTCL by disrupting DNA replication of the rapidly cycling tumor cells, ultimately leading to cell death. PMID:23894374

  13. Essential Nonredundant Function of the Catalytic Activity of Histone Deacetylase 2 in Mouse Development

    PubMed Central

    Hagelkruys, Astrid; Mattes, Katharina; Moos, Verena; Rennmayr, Magdalena; Ringbauer, Manuela; Sawicka, Anna

    2015-01-01

    The class I histone deacetylases (HDACs) HDAC1 and HDAC2 play partially redundant roles in the regulation of gene expression and mouse development. As part of multisubunit corepressor complexes, these two deacetylases exhibit both enzymatic and nonenzymatic functions. To examine the impact of the catalytic activities of HDAC1 and HDAC2, we generated knock-in mice expressing catalytically inactive isoforms, which are still incorporated into the HDAC1/HDAC2 corepressor complexes. Surprisingly, heterozygous mice expressing catalytically inactive HDAC2 die within a few hours after birth, while heterozygous HDAC1 mutant mice are indistinguishable from wild-type littermates. Heterozygous HDAC2 mutant mice show an unaltered composition but reduced associated deacetylase activity of corepressor complexes and exhibit a more severe phenotype than HDAC2-null mice. They display changes in brain architecture accompanied by premature expression of the key regulator protein kinase C delta. Our study reveals a dominant negative effect of catalytically inactive HDAC2 on specific corepressor complexes resulting in histone hyperacetylation, transcriptional derepression, and, ultimately, perinatal lethality. PMID:26598605

  14. Domain-selective small-molecule inhibitor of histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6)-mediated tubulin deacetylation

    PubMed Central

    Haggarty, Stephen J.; Koeller, Kathryn M.; Wong, Jason C.; Grozinger, Christina M.; Schreiber, Stuart L.

    2003-01-01

    Protein acetylation, especially histone acetylation, is the subject of both research and clinical investigation. At least four small-molecule histone deacetylase inhibitors are currently in clinical trials for the treatment of cancer. These and other inhibitors also affect microtubule acetylation. A multidimensional, chemical genetic screen of 7,392 small molecules was used to discover “tubacin,” which inhibits α-tubulin deacetylation in mammalian cells. Tubacin does not affect the level of histone acetylation, gene-expression patterns, or cell-cycle progression. We provide evidence that class II histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) is the intracellular target of tubacin. Only one of the two catalytic domains of HDAC6 possesses tubulin deacetylase activity, and only this domain is bound by tubacin. Tubacin treatment did not affect the stability of microtubules but did decrease cell motility. HDAC6 overexpression disrupted the localization of p58, a protein that mediates binding of Golgi elements to microtubules. Our results highlight the role of α-tubulin acetylation in mediating the localization of microtubule-associated proteins. They also suggest that small molecules that selectively inhibit HDAC6-mediated α-tubulin deacetylation, a first example of which is tubacin, might have therapeutic applications as antimetastatic and antiangiogenic agents. PMID:12677000

  15. Deacetylase-Independent Function of HDAC3 in Transcription and Metabolism Requires Nuclear Receptor Corepressor

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zheng; Feng, Dan; Fang, Bin; Mullican, Shannon E.; You, Seo-Hee; Lim, Hee-Woong; Everett, Logan J.; Nabel, Christopher S.; Li, Yun; Selvakumaran, Vignesh; Won, Kyoung-Jae; Lazar, Mitchell A.

    2013-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are believed to regulate gene transcription by catalyzing deacetylation reactions. HDAC3 depletion in mouse liver upregulates lipogenic genes and results in severe hepatosteatosis. Here we show that pharmacologic HDAC inhibition in primary hepatocytes causes histone hyperacetylation but does not upregulate expression of HDAC3 target genes. Meanwhile, deacetylase-dead HDAC3 mutants can rescue hepatosteatosis and repress lipogenic genes expression in HDAC3-depleted mouse liver, demonstrating that histone acetylation is insufficient to activate gene transcription. Mutations abolishing interactions with the nuclear receptor corepressor (NCOR or SMRT) render HDAC3 nonfunctional in vivo. Additionally, liver-specific knockout of NCOR, but not SMRT, causes metabolic and transcriptomal alterations resembling those of mice without hepatic HDAC3, demonstrating that interaction with NCOR is essential for deacetylase-independent function of HDAC3. These findings highlight non-enzymatic roles of a major HDAC in transcriptional regulation in vivo and warrant reconsideration of the mechanism of action of HDAC inhibitors. PMID:24268577

  16. Histone deacetylase inhibitors disrupt the mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint by targeting histone and nonhistone proteins.

    PubMed

    Gabrielli, Brian; Brown, Mellissa

    2012-01-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors exhibit pleiotropic effects on cell functions, both in vivo and in vitro. One of the more dramatic effects of these drugs is their ability to disrupt normal mitotic division, which is a significant contributor to the anticancer properties of these drugs. The most important feature of the disrupted mitosis is that drug treatment overcomes the mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint and drives mitotic slippage, but in a manner that triggers apoptosis. The mechanism by which histone deacetylase inhibitors affect mitosis is now becoming clearer through the identification of a number of chromatin and nonchromatin protein targets that are critical to the regulation of normal mitotic progression and cell division. These proteins are directly regulated by acetylation and deacetylation, or in some cases indirectly through the acetylation of essential partner proteins. There appears to be little contribution from deacetylase inhibitor-induced transcriptional changes to the mitotic effects of these drugs. The overall mitotic phenotype of drug treatment appears to be the sum of these disrupted mechanisms. PMID:23088867

  17. Evaluation of histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) as therapeutic leads for human African trypanosomiasis (HAT).

    PubMed

    Carrillo, Angela K; Guiguemde, W Armand; Guy, R Kiplin

    2015-08-15

    Two of the histone deacetylases, TbDAC1 and TbDAC3, have been reported to be essential genes in trypanosomes. Therefore, we tested the activity of a panel of human histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) for their ability to block proliferation of Trypanosoma brucei brucei. Among the HDACi's, the hydroxamic acid derivatives panobinostat and belinostat exhibited potency that appeared to make them viable candidates for development due to their reported pharmacokinetic characteristics. However, cellular pharmacodynamic analysis demonstrated that these drugs were unable to kill cultured parasites at exposures seen in patients at their tolerated doses and additionally failed to show any synergistic effects in combination with pentamidine, suramin, melarsoprol, or nifurtimox. Analysis of the potency of the entire HDACi panel revealed no correlations between potency against any human HDAC isoform and inhibition of T. brucei proliferation, suggesting that the trypanosome histone deacetylases possess a unique specificity. These studies confirmed that HDAC inhibitors have potential as leads against human African trypanosomiasis but that none of the current clinical candidates can be directly repurposed. Therefore, development of HDACi's with appropriate specificity and potency may be a viable route to a new class of anti-trypanosomal drugs. PMID:25637120

  18. Epigenetic suppression of the antitumor cytotoxicity of NK cells by histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiumin; Li, Min; Cui, Meizi; Niu, Chao; Xu, Jianting; Zhou, Lei; Li, Wei; Gao, Yushun; Kong, Weisheng; Cui, Jiuwei; Hu, Jifan; Jin, Haofan

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play an essential role in the fight against tumor development. The therapeutic use of autologous NK cells has been exploited to treat human malignancies, yet only limited antitumor activity is observed in cancer patients. In this study, we sought to augment the antitumor activity of NK cells using epigenetic approaches. Four small molecules that have been known to promote epigenetic reprogramming were tested for their ability to enhance the activity of NK cells. Using a tumor cell lysis assay, we found that the DNA demethylating agent 5-azacytidine and vitamin C did not significantly affect the tumor killing ability of NK cells. The thyroid hormone triiodothyronine (T3) slightly increased the activity of NK cells. The histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid (VPA), however, inhibited NK cell lytic activity against leukemic cells in a dose-dependent manner. Pretreatment using VPA reduced IFNγ secretion, impaired CD107a degranulation, and induced apoptosis by activating the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway. VPA downregulated the expression of the activating receptor NKG2D (natural-killer group 2, member D) by inducing histone K9 hypermethylation and DNA methylation in the gene promoter. Histone deacetylase inhibitors have been developed as anticancer agents for use as monotherapies or in combination with other anticancer therapies. Our data suggest that the activity of histone deacetylase inhibitors on NK cell activity should be considered in drug development. PMID:27152238

  19. CHD4 Is a Peripheral Component of the Nucleosome Remodeling and Deacetylase Complex.

    PubMed

    Low, Jason K K; Webb, Sarah R; Silva, Ana P G; Saathoff, Hinnerk; Ryan, Daniel P; Torrado, Mario; Brofelth, Mattias; Parker, Benjamin L; Shepherd, Nicholas E; Mackay, Joel P

    2016-07-22

    Chromatin remodeling enzymes act to dynamically regulate gene accessibility. In many cases, these enzymes function as large multicomponent complexes that in general comprise a central ATP-dependent Snf2 family helicase that is decorated with a variable number of regulatory subunits. The nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase (NuRD) complex, which is essential for normal development in higher organisms, is one such macromolecular machine. The NuRD complex comprises ∼10 subunits, including the histone deacetylases 1 and 2 (HDAC1 and HDAC2), and is defined by the presence of a CHD family remodeling enzyme, most commonly CHD4 (chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 4). The existing paradigm holds that CHD4 acts as the central hub upon which the complex is built. We show here that this paradigm does not, in fact, hold and that CHD4 is a peripheral component of the NuRD complex. A complex lacking CHD4 that has HDAC activity can exist as a stable species. The addition of recombinant CHD4 to this nucleosome deacetylase complex reconstitutes a NuRD complex with nucleosome remodeling activity. These data contribute to our understanding of the architecture of the NuRD complex. PMID:27235397

  20. A prominent lack of IgG1-Fc fucosylation of platelet alloantibodies in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Kapur, Rick; Kustiawan, Iwan; Vestrheim, Anne; Koeleman, Carolien A. M.; Visser, Remco; Einarsdottir, Helga K.; Porcelijn, Leendert; Jackson, Dave; Kumpel, Belinda; Deelder, André M.; Blank, Dennis; Skogen, Björn; Killie, Mette Kjaer; Michaelsen, Terje E.; de Haas, Masja; Rispens, Theo; van der Schoot, C. Ellen; Wuhrer, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    Immunoglobulin G (IgG) formed during pregnancy against human platelet antigens (HPAs) of the fetus mediates fetal or neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT). Because antibody titer or isotype does not strictly correlate with disease severity, we investigated by mass spectrometry variations in the glycosylation at Asn297 in the IgG Fc because the composition of this glycan can be highly variable, affecting binding to phagocyte IgG-Fc receptors (FcγR). We found markedly decreased levels of core fucosylation of anti-HPA-1a–specific IgG1 from FNAIT patients (n = 48), but not in total serum IgG1. Antibodies with a low amount of fucose displayed higher binding affinity to FcγRIIIa and FcγRIIIb, but not to FcγRIIa, compared with antibodies with a high amount of Fc fucose. Consequently, these antibodies with a low amount of Fc fucose showed enhanced phagocytosis of platelets using FcγRIIIb+ polymorphonuclear cells or FcγRIIIa+ monocytes as effector cells, but not with FcγRIIIa– monocytes. In addition, the degree of anti-HPA-1a fucosylation correlated positively with the neonatal platelet counts in FNAIT, and negatively to the clinical disease severity. In contrast to the FNAIT patients, no changes in core fucosylation were observed for anti-HLA antibodies in refractory thrombocytopenia (post platelet transfusion), indicating that the level of fucosylation may be antigen dependent and/or related to the immune milieu defined by pregnancy. PMID:24243971

  1. Supernova Ejecta in the Youngest Galactic Supernova Remnant G1.9+0.3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Hwang, Una; Green, David A.; Petre, Robert; Krishnamurthy, Kalyani; Willett, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    G1.9+0.3 is the youngest known Galactic supernova remnant (SNR), with an estimated supernova (SN) explosion date of approximately 1900, and most likely located near the Galactic Center. Only the outermost ejecta layers with free-expansion velocities (is) approximately greater than 18,000 km s-1 have been shocked so far in this dynamically young, likely Type Ia SNR. A long (980 ks) Chandra observation in 2011 allowed spatially-resolved spectroscopy of heavy-element ejecta. We denoised Chandra data with the spatio-spectral method of Krishnamurthy et al., and used a wavelet based technique to spatially localize thermal emission produced by intermediate-mass elements (IMEs: Si and S) and iron. The spatial distribution of both IMEs and Fe is extremely asymmetric, with the strongest ejecta emission in the northern rim. Fe K alpha emission is particularly prominent there, and fits with thermal models indicate strongly oversolar Fe abundances. In a localized, outlying region in the northern rim, IMEs are less abundant than Fe, indicating that undiluted Fe-group elements (including 56Ni) with velocities greater than 18,000 km s-1 were ejected by this SN. But in the inner west rim, we find Si- and S-rich ejecta without any traces of Fe, so high-velocity products of O-burning were also ejected. G1.9+0.3 appears similar to energetic Type Ia SNe such as SN 2010jn where iron-group elements at such high free-expansion velocities have been recently detected. The pronounced asymmetry in the ejecta distribution and abundance inhomogeneities are best explained by a strongly asymmetric SN explosion, similar to those produced in some recent 3D delayed-detonation Type Ia models.

  2. SUPERNOVA EJECTA IN THE YOUNGEST GALACTIC SUPERNOVA REMNANT G1.9+0.3

    SciTech Connect

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Hwang, Una; Green, David A.; Petre, Robert

    2013-07-01

    G1.9+0.3 is the youngest known Galactic supernova remnant (SNR), with an estimated supernova (SN) explosion date of {approx}1900, and most likely located near the Galactic center. Only the outermost ejecta layers with free-expansion velocities {approx}>18,000 km s{sup -1} have been shocked so far in this dynamically young, likely Type Ia SNR. A long (980 ks) Chandra observation in 2011 allowed spatially resolved spectroscopy of heavy-element ejecta. We denoised Chandra data with the spatio-spectral method of Krishnamurthy et al., and used a wavelet-based technique to spatially localize thermal emission produced by intermediate-mass elements (IMEs; Si and S) and iron. The spatial distribution of both IMEs and Fe is extremely asymmetric, with the strongest ejecta emission in the northern rim. Fe K{alpha} emission is particularly prominent there, and fits with thermal models indicate strongly oversolar Fe abundances. In a localized, outlying region in the northern rim, IMEs are less abundant than Fe, indicating that undiluted Fe-group elements (including {sup 56}Ni) with velocities >18,000 km s{sup -1} were ejected by this SN. However, in the inner west rim, we find Si- and S-rich ejecta without any traces of Fe, so high-velocity products of O-burning were also ejected. G1.9+0.3 appears similar to energetic Type Ia SNe such as SN 2010jn where iron-group elements at such high free-expansion velocities have been recently detected. The pronounced asymmetry in the ejecta distribution and abundance inhomogeneities are best explained by a strongly asymmetric SN explosion, similar to those produced in some recent three-dimensional delayed-detonation Type Ia models.

  3. Preliminary stratigraphic and petrologic characterization of core samples from USW-G1, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, A.C.; Carroll, P.R.

    1981-11-01

    Tuffs of the Nevada Test Site are currently under investigation to determine their potential for long-term storage of radioactive waste. As part of this program, hole USW-G1 was drilled to a depth of 6000 ft below the surface, in the central part of the Yucca Mountain area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. Petrographic study of the USW-G1 core is presented in this report and shows the tuffs (which generally were variably welded ash flows) are partly recrystallized to a variety of secondary minerals. The important alteration products are zeolites (heulandite, clinoptilolite, mordenite and analcime), smectite clays with minor interstratified illite, albite, micas, potassium feldspar, and various forms of silica. Iijima`s zeolite zones I through IV of burial metamorphism can be recognized in the core. Zeolites are first observed at about the 1300-ft depth, and the high-temperature boundary of zeolite stability in this core occurs at about 4350 ft. Analcime persists, either metastably or as a retrograde mineral, deeper in the core. The oxidation state of Fe-Ti oxide minerals, through most of the core, increases as the degree of welding decreases, but towards the bottom of the hole, reducing conditions generally prevail. Four stratigraphic units transected by the core may be potentially favorable sites for a waste repository. These four units, in order of increasing depth in the core, are (1) the lower cooling unit of the Topopah Spring Member, (2) cooling unit II of the Bullfrog Member, (3) the upper part of the Tram tuff, and (4) the Lithic-rich tuff.

  4. The impact of geoengineering on vegetation in experiment G1 of the GeoMIP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glienke, Susanne; Irvine, Peter J.; Lawrence, Mark G.

    2015-10-01

    Solar Radiation Management (SRM) has been proposed as a mean to partly counteract global warming. The Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP) has simulated the climate consequences of a number of SRM techniques. Thus far, the effects on vegetation have not yet been thoroughly analyzed. Here the vegetation response to the idealized GeoMIP G1 experiment from eight fully coupled Earth system models (ESMs) is analyzed, in which a reduction of the solar constant counterbalances the radiative effects of quadrupled atmospheric CO2 concentrations (abrupt4 × CO2). For most models and regions, changes in net primary productivity (NPP) are dominated by the increase in CO2, via the CO2 fertilization effect. As SRM will reduce temperatures relative to abrupt4 × CO2, in high latitudes this will offset increases in NPP. In low latitudes, this cooling relative to the abrupt4 × CO2 simulation decreases plant respiration while having little effect on gross primary productivity, thus increasing NPP. In Central America and the Mediterranean, generally dry regions which are expected to experience increased water stress with global warming, NPP is highest in the G1 experiment for all models due to the easing of water limitations from increased water use efficiency at high-CO2 concentrations and the reduced evaporative demand in a geoengineered climate. The largest differences in the vegetation response are between models with and without a nitrogen cycle, with a much smaller CO2 fertilization effect for the former. These results suggest that until key vegetation processes are integrated into ESM predictions, the vegetation response to SRM will remain highly uncertain.

  5. D-type cyclins and G1 progression during liver development in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Boylan, Joan M. . E-mail: Joan_Boylan@brown.edu; Gruppuso, Philip A. . E-mail: Philip_Gruppuso@brown.edu

    2005-05-13

    Initiation and progression through G1 requires the activity of signaling complexes containing cyclins (D- or E-type) and cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK4/6 and CDK2, respectively). We set out to identify the G1-phase cyclins and CDKs that are operative during late gestation liver development in the rat. This is a period during which hepatocytes show a high rate of proliferation that is, at least in part, independent of the mitogenic signaling pathways that are functional in mature hepatocytes. RNase protection assay and Western immunoblotting indicated that cyclin D1 is expressed at similar levels in fetal and adult liver. When cyclin D1 was induced after partial hepatectomy, its predominant CDK-binding partner was CDK4. In contrast, cyclins D2 and D3 predominated in fetal liver and were complexed with both CDK4 and CDK6. Little CDK6 protein was expressed in quiescent or regenerating adult liver. Cyclins E1 and E2 were both transcriptionally up-regulated in fetal liver. Activity of complexes containing cyclins E1 and E2 was higher in fetal liver, as was content of the cell cycle regulator, Rb. In fetal liver, Rb was highly phosphorylated at both cyclin D- and cyclin E-dependent sites. In conclusion, liver development is associated with a switch from cyclin D2/D3-containing complexes to cyclin D1:CDK4 complexes. We speculate that the switch in D-type cyclins may be associated with the dependence on mitogenic signaling that develops as hepatocytes mature.

  6. A prominent lack of IgG1-Fc fucosylation of platelet alloantibodies in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kapur, Rick; Kustiawan, Iwan; Vestrheim, Anne; Koeleman, Carolien A M; Visser, Remco; Einarsdottir, Helga K; Porcelijn, Leendert; Jackson, Dave; Kumpel, Belinda; Deelder, André M; Blank, Dennis; Skogen, Björn; Killie, Mette Kjaer; Michaelsen, Terje E; de Haas, Masja; Rispens, Theo; van der Schoot, C Ellen; Wuhrer, Manfred; Vidarsson, Gestur

    2014-01-23

    Immunoglobulin G (IgG) formed during pregnancy against human platelet antigens (HPAs) of the fetus mediates fetal or neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT). Because antibody titer or isotype does not strictly correlate with disease severity, we investigated by mass spectrometry variations in the glycosylation at Asn297 in the IgG Fc because the composition of this glycan can be highly variable, affecting binding to phagocyte IgG-Fc receptors (FcγR). We found markedly decreased levels of core fucosylation of anti-HPA-1a-specific IgG1 from FNAIT patients (n = 48), but not in total serum IgG1. Antibodies with a low amount of fucose displayed higher binding affinity to FcγRIIIa and FcγRIIIb, but not to FcγRIIa, compared with antibodies with a high amount of Fc fucose. Consequently, these antibodies with a low amount of Fc fucose showed enhanced phagocytosis of platelets using FcγRIIIb(+) polymorphonuclear cells or FcγRIIIa(+) monocytes as effector cells, but not with FcγRIIIa(-) monocytes. In addition, the degree of anti-HPA-1a fucosylation correlated positively with the neonatal platelet counts in FNAIT, and negatively to the clinical disease severity. In contrast to the FNAIT patients, no changes in core fucosylation were observed for anti-HLA antibodies in refractory thrombocytopenia (post platelet transfusion), indicating that the level of fucosylation may be antigen dependent and/or related to the immune milieu defined by pregnancy. PMID:24243971

  7. Nuclear vasohibin-2 promotes cell proliferation by inducing G0/G1 to S phase progression.

    PubMed

    Ge, Qianqian; Zhou, Jia; Tu, Min; Xue, Xiaofeng; Li, Zhanjun; Lu, Zipeng; Wei, Jishu; Song, Guoxin; Chen, Jianmin; Guo, Feng; Jiang, Kuirong; Miao, Yi; Gao, Wentao

    2015-09-01

    As a member of the vasohibin (VASH2) family, VASH2 is localized intracellularly as a nuclear and cytoplasmic type. Cytoplasmic VASH2 is associated with carcinoma angiogenesis and malignant transformation and promotes cancer growth. However, the function of nuclear VASH2 has yet to be investigated. The aim of the present study was to detect the nuclear VASH2 expression profile in human organs and tissues by protein microarray technique. To examine the function of nuclear VASH2, we analyzed the relationship between nuclear VASH2 and Ki-67, and stably constructed VASH2 overexpression and knockdown in LO2 and HepG2 cell lines, based on a previous study in hepatic cells. The study was conducted using bromodeoxyuridine, immunofluorescent staining, western blot analysis and flow cytometry. Nuclear VASH2 was highly expressed in actively dividing cells in normal and cancer tissues. There was a significant positive correlation between nuclear VASH2 and Ki-67, indicating that nuclear VASH2 positively correlated with cell proliferation in normal and cancer tissues. The bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) proliferation test showed that nuclear VASH2 increased the S-phase population and promoted cell proliferation, while VASH2 knockdown reduced BrdU absorbance. Cell cycle analysis revealed that nuclear VASH2 overexpression increased the S-phase population in LO2 and HepG2 cells, while nuclear VASH2 knockdown reduced the S-phase population and increased the G0/G1 population. The findings of this study challenge the classic view of VASH2, which was previously reported as an angiogenesis factor. Furthermore, to the best of our knowledge, these results are the first clinical data indicating that nuclear VASH2, but not cytoplasmic VASH2, promotes cell proliferation by driving the cell cycle from the G0/G1 to S phase. PMID:26177649

  8. Inhibition of Plasmodium falciparum proliferation in vitro by double-stranded RNA directed against malaria histone deacetylase

    SciTech Connect

    Sriwilaijaroen, N.; Boonma, S.; Attasart, P.; Pothikasikorn, J.; Panyim, S.; Noonpakdee, W.

    2009-04-03

    Acetylation and deacetylation of histones play important roles in transcription regulation, cell cycle progression and development events. The steady state status of histone acetylation is controlled by a dynamic equilibrium between competing histone acetylase and deacetylase (HDAC). We have used long PfHDAC-1 double-stranded (ds)RNA to interfere with its cognate mRNA expression and determined the effect on malaria parasite growth and development. Chloroquine- and pyrimethamine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum K1 strain was exposed to 1-25 {mu}g of dsRNA/ml of culture for 48 h and growth was determined by [{sup 3}H]-hypoxanthine incorporation and microscopic examination. Parasite culture treated with 10 {mu}g/ml pfHDAC-1 dsRNA exhibited 47% growth inhibition when compared with either untreated control or culture treated with an unrelated dsRNA. PfHDAC-1 dsRNA specifically blocked maturation of trophozoite to schizont stages and decreased PfHDAC-1 transcript 44% in treated trophozoites. These results indicate the potential of HDAC-1 as a target for development of novel antimalarials.

  9. Inhibition of histone deacetylase activity by trichostatin A modulates gene expression during mouse embryogenesis without apparent toxicity.

    PubMed

    Nervi, C; Borello, U; Fazi, F; Buffa, V; Pelicci, P G; Cossu, G

    2001-02-15

    Remodeling of the chromatin template by inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC) activities represents a major goal for transcriptional therapy in neoplastic diseases. Recently, a number of specific and potent HDAC-inhibitors that modulate in vitro cell growth and differentiation have been developed. In this study we analyzed the effect of trichostatin A (TSA), a specific and potent HDAC-inhibitor, on mouse embryos developing in vivo. When administered i.p. to pregnant mice (at a concentration of 0.5-1 mg/kg) at postimplantation stages (embryonic day 8 to embryonic day 10), TSA was not toxic for the mother and did not cause any obvious malformation during somitogenesis or at later stages of development. Treated embryos were born at similar frequency and were indistinguishable from control animals, developed normally, and were fertile. Interestingly, embryos from TSA-treated mice killed during somitogenesis were modestly but consistently larger than control embryos and presented an increased (+2 to +6) number of somites. This correlated with an increased acetylation of histone H4, the number of somites expressing the myogenic factor Myf-5, and the expression of Notch, RARalpha2, and RARbeta2 mRNAs. These data indicate that the effects of TSA on transcription: (a) are not toxic for the mother; (b) transiently accelerated growth in mouse embryos without perturbing embryogenesis; and (c) do not result in teratogenesis, at least in rodents. Thus, TSA might represent a nontoxic and effective agent for the transcriptional therapy of neoplasia. PMID:11245412

  10. 26 CFR 31.3406(g)-1T - Exception for payments to certain payees and certain other payments (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., 2014, see this paragraph (e) as in effect and contained in 26 CFR part 1 revised April 1, 2013.) (f... certain other payments (temporary). 31.3406(g)-1T Section 31.3406(g)-1T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE... EMPLOYMENT TAXES AND COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE Collection of Income Tax at Source §...

  11. 26 CFR 31.3406(g)-1 - Exception for payments to certain payees and certain other payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Exception for payments to certain payees and certain other payments. 31.3406(g)-1 Section 31.3406(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) EMPLOYMENT TAXES AND COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE EMPLOYMENT TAXES AND COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT...

  12. Antitumor Efficacy of Anti-GD2 IgG1 Is Enhanced by Fc Glyco-Engineering.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hong; Guo, Hongfen; Cheung, Irene Y; Cheung, Nai-Kong V

    2016-07-01

    The affinity of therapeutic antibodies for Fcγ receptors (FcγRs) strongly influences their antitumor potency. To generate antibodies with optimal binding and immunologic efficacy, we compared the affinities of different versions of an IgG1 Fc region that had an altered peptide backbone, altered glycans, or both. To produce IgG1 with glycans that lacked α1,6-fucose, we used CHO cells that were deficient in the enzyme UDP-N-acetylglucosamine: α-3-d-mannoside-β-1,2-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase I (GnT1), encoded by the MGAT1 gene. Mature N-linked glycans require this enzyme, and without it, CHO cells synthesize antibodies carrying only Man5-GlcNAc2, which were more effective in antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). Our engineered IgG1, hu3F8-IgG1, is specific for GD2, a neuroendocrine tumor ganglioside. Its peptide mutant is IgG1-DEL (S239D/I332E/A330L), both produced in wild-type CHO cells. When produced in GnT1-deficient CHO cells, we refer to them as IgG1n and IgG1n-DEL, respectively. Affinities for human FcγRs were measured using Biacore T-100 (on CD16 and CD32 polymorphic alleles), their immunologic properties compared for ADCC and complement-mediated cytotoxicity (CMC) in vitro, and pharmacokinetics and antitumor effects were compared in vivo in humanized mice. IgG1n and IgG1n-DEL contained only mannose and acetylglucosamine and had preferential affinity for activating CD16s, over inhibitory CD32B, receptors. In vivo, the antitumor effects of IgG1, IgG1-DEL, and IgG1n-DEL were similar but modest, whereas IgG1n was significantly more effective (P < 0.05). Thus, IgG1n antibodies produced in GnT1-deficient CHO cells may have potential as improved anticancer therapeutics. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(7); 631-8. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197064

  13. Exploring inhibitor release pathways in histone deacetylases using random acceleration molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Kalyaanamoorthy, Subha; Chen, Yi-Ping Phoebe

    2012-02-27

    Molecular channel exploration perseveres to be the prominent solution for eliciting structure and accessibility of active site and other internal spaces of macromolecules. The volume and silhouette characterization of these channels provides answers for the issues of substrate access and ligand swapping between the obscured active site and the exterior of the protein. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are metal-dependent enzymes that are involved in the cell growth, cell cycle regulation, and progression, and their deregulations have been linked with different types of cancers. Hence HDACs, especially the class I family, are widely recognized as the important cancer targets, and the characterizations of their structures and functions have been of special interest in cancer drug discovery. The class I HDACs are known to possess two different protein channels, an 11 Å and a 14 Å (named channels A and B1, respectively), of which the former is a ligand or substrate occupying tunnel that leads to the buried active site zinc ion and the latter is speculated to be involved in product release. In this work, we have carried out random acceleration molecular dynamics (RAMD) simulations coupled with the classical molecular dynamics to explore the release of the ligand, N-(2-aminophenyl) benzamide (LLX) from the active sites of the recently solved X-ray crystal structure of HDAC2 and the computationally modeled HDAC1 proteins. The RAMD simulations identified significant structural and dynamic features of the HDAC channels, especially the key 'gate-keeping' amino acid residues that control these channels and the ligand release events. Further, this study identified a novel and unique channel B2, a subchannel from channel B1, in the HDAC1 protein structure. The roles of water molecules in the LLX release from the HDAC1 and HDAC2 enzymes are also discussed. Such structural and dynamic properties of the HDAC protein channels that govern the ligand escape reactions will provide

  14. Inhibition of transcription in Staphylococcus aureus by a primary sigma factor-binding polypeptide from phage G1.

    PubMed

    Dehbi, Mohammed; Moeck, Gregory; Arhin, Francis F; Bauda, Pascale; Bergeron, Dominique; Kwan, Tony; Liu, Jing; McCarty, John; Dubow, Michael; Pelletier, Jerry

    2009-06-01

    The primary sigma factor of Staphylococcus aureus, sigma(SA), regulates the transcription of many genes, including several essential genes, in this bacterium via specific recognition of exponential growth phase promoters. In this study, we report the existence of a novel staphylococcal phage G1-derived growth inhibitory polypeptide, referred to as G1ORF67, that interacts with sigma(SA) both in vivo and in vitro and regulates its activity. Delineation of the minimal domain of sigma(SA) that is required for its interaction with G1ORF67 as amino acids 294 to 360 near the carboxy terminus suggests that the G1 phage-encoded anti-sigma factor may occlude the -35 element recognition domain of sigma(SA). As would be predicted by this hypothesis, the G1ORF67 polypeptide abolished both RNA polymerase core-dependent binding of sigma(SA) to DNA and sigma(SA)-dependent transcription in vitro. While G1ORF67 profoundly inhibits transcription when expressed in S. aureus cells in mode of action studies, our finding that G1ORF67 was unable to inhibit transcription when expressed in Escherichia coli concurs with its inability to inhibit transcription by the E. coli holoenzyme in vitro. These features demonstrate the selectivity of G1ORF67 for S. aureus RNA polymerase. We predict that G1ORF67 is one of the central polypeptides in the phage G1 strategy to appropriate host RNA polymerase and redirect it to phage reproduction. PMID:19376864

  15. Disruption of G1-phase phospholipid turnover by inhibition of Ca2+-independent phospholipase A2 induces a p53-dependent cell-cycle arrest in G1 phase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu Hannah; Zhao, Chunying; Seleznev, Konstantin; Song, Keying; Manfredi, James J; Ma, Zhongmin Alex

    2006-03-15

    The G1 phase of the cell cycle is characterized by a high rate of membrane phospholipid turnover. Cells regulate this turnover by coordinating the opposing actions of CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase and the group VI Ca2+-independent phospholipase A2 (iPLA2). However, little is known about how such turnover affects cell-cycle progression. Here, we show that G1-phase phospholipid turnover is essential for cell proliferation. Specific inhibition of iPLA2 arrested cells in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. This G1-phase arrest was associated with marked upregulation of the tumour suppressor p53 and the expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21cip1. Inactivation of iPLA2 failed to arrest p53-deficient HCT cells in the G1 phase and caused massive apoptosis of p21-deficient HCT cells, suggesting that this G1-phase arrest requires activation of p53 and expression of p21cip1. Furthermore, downregulation of p53 by siRNA in p21-deficient HCT cells reduced the cell death, indicating that inhibition of iPLA2 induced p53-dependent apoptosis in the absence of p21cip1. Thus, our study reveals hitherto unrecognized cooperation between p53 and iPLA2 to monitor membrane-phospholipid turnover in G1 phase. Disrupting the G1-phase phospholipid turnover by inhibition of iPLA2 activates the p53-p21cip1 checkpoint mechanism, thereby blocking the entry of G1-phase cells into S phase. PMID:16492706

  16. Histone Deacetylase 10 Regulates the Cell Cycle G2/M Phase Transition via a Novel Let-7-HMGA2-Cyclin A2 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Yixuan; Peng, Lirong; Seto, Edward

    2015-10-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibition leads to cell cycle arrest in G1 and G2, suggesting HDACs as therapeutic targets for cancer and diseases linked to abnormal cell growth and proliferation. Many HDACs are transcriptional repressors. Some may alter cell cycle progression by deacetylating histones and repressing transcription of key cell cycle regulatory genes. Here, we report that HDAC10 regulates the cell cycle via modulation of cyclin A2 expression, and cyclin A2 overexpression rescues HDAC10 knockdown-induced G2/M transition arrest. HDAC10 regulates cyclin A2 expression by deacetylating histones near the let-7 promoter, thereby repressing transcription. In HDAC10 knockdown cells, let-7f and microRNA 98 (miR-98) were upregulated and the let-7 family target, HMGA2, was downregulated. HMGA2 loss resulted in enrichment of the transcriptional repressor E4F at the cyclin A2 promoter. These findings support a role for HDACs in cell cycle regulation, reveal a novel mechanism of HDAC10 action, and extend the potential of HDACs as targets in diseases of cell cycle dysregulation. PMID:26240284

  17. Chidamide, a novel histone deacetylase inhibitor, inhibits the viability of MDS and AML cells by suppressing JAK2/STAT3 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Sida; Guo, Juan; Zhao, Youshan; Fei, Chengming; Zheng, Qingqing; Li, Xiao; Chang, Chunkang

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have indicated that histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity is always increased in a lot of human tumors, and inhibition of HDAC activity is a promising new strategy in the treatment of cancers. Chidamide, a novel HDAC inhibitor of the benzamide class, is currently under clinical trials. In this study, we aimed to investigate the antitumor activity of Chidamide on myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell lines and explore the possible mechanism. Chidamide exhibited efficient anti-proliferative activity on MDS and AML cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner, accompanied by cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase and cell apoptosis. Importantly, Chidamide possessed potent HDAC inhibition property, as evaluated by HDAC activity analysis and acetylation of histone H3 and H4. Moreover, Chidamide significantly increased the expression of Suppressors of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3), reduced the expression of Janus activated kinases 2 (JAK2) and Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), and inhibited STAT3 downstream genes, including c-Myc, Bcl-xL, and Mcl-1, which are involved in cell cycle progression and anti-apoptosis. Therefore, we demonstrate that Chidamide exhibits potent inhibitory effect on cell viability of MDS and AML cells, and the possible mechanism may lie in the downregulation of JAK2/STAT3 signaling through SOCS3 upregulation. Our data provide rationale for clinical investigations of Chidamide in MDS and AML. PMID:27508038

  18. Histone Deacetylase 10 Regulates the Cell Cycle G2/M Phase Transition via a Novel Let-7–HMGA2–Cyclin A2 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yixuan; Peng, Lirong

    2015-01-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibition leads to cell cycle arrest in G1 and G2, suggesting HDACs as therapeutic targets for cancer and diseases linked to abnormal cell growth and proliferation. Many HDACs are transcriptional repressors. Some may alter cell cycle progression by deacetylating histones and repressing transcription of key cell cycle regulatory genes. Here, we report that HDAC10 regulates the cell cycle via modulation of cyclin A2 expression, and cyclin A2 overexpression rescues HDAC10 knockdown-induced G2/M transition arrest. HDAC10 regulates cyclin A2 expression by deacetylating histones near the let-7 promoter, thereby repressing transcription. In HDAC10 knockdown cells, let-7f and microRNA 98 (miR-98) were upregulated and the let-7 family target, HMGA2, was downregulated. HMGA2 loss resulted in enrichment of the transcriptional repressor E4F at the cyclin A2 promoter. These findings support a role for HDACs in cell cycle regulation, reveal a novel mechanism of HDAC10 action, and extend the potential of HDACs as targets in diseases of cell cycle dysregulation. PMID:26240284

  19. Emergence and Characterization of Unusual DS-1-Like G1P[8] Rotavirus Strains in Children with Diarrhea in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Komoto, Satoshi; Tacharoenmuang, Ratana; Guntapong, Ratigorn; Ide, Tomihiko; Haga, Kei; Katayama, Kazuhiko; Kato, Takema; Ouchi, Yuya; Kurahashi, Hiroki; Tsuji, Takao; Sangkitporn, Somchai; Taniguchi, Koki

    2015-01-01

    The emergence and rapid spread of unusual DS-1-like G1P[8] rotaviruses in Japan have been recently reported. During rotavirus surveillance in Thailand, three DS-1-like G1P[8] strains (RVA/Human-wt/THA/PCB-180/2013/G1P[8], RVA/Human-wt/THA/SKT-109/2013/G1P[8], and RVA/Human-wt/THA/SSKT-41/2013/G1P[8]) were identified in stool specimens from hospitalized children with severe diarrhea. In this study, we sequenced and characterized the complete genomes of strains PCB-180, SKT-109, and SSKT-41. On whole genomic analysis, all three strains exhibited a unique genotype constellation including both genogroup 1 and 2 genes: G1-P[8]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A2-N2-T2-E2-H2. This novel genotype constellation is shared with Japanese DS-1-like G1P[8] strains. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the G/P genes of strains PCB-180, SKT-109, and SSKT-41 appeared to have originated from human Wa-like G1P[8] strains. On the other hand, the non-G/P genes of the three strains were assumed to have originated from human DS-1-like strains. Thus, strains PCB-180, SKT-109, and SSKT-41 appeared to be derived through reassortment event(s) between Wa-like G1P[8] and DS-1-like human rotaviruses. Furthermore, strains PCB-180, SKT-109, and SSKT-41 were found to have the 11-segment genome almost indistinguishable from one another in their nucleotide sequences and phylogenetic lineages, indicating the derivation of the three strains from a common origin. Moreover, all the 11 genes of the three strains were closely related to those of Japanese DS-1-like G1P[8] strains. Therefore, DS-1-like G1P[8] strains that have emerged in Thailand and Japan were assumed to have originated from a recent common ancestor. To our knowledge, this is the first report on whole genome-based characterization of DS-1-like G1P[8] strains that have emerged in an area other than Japan. Our observations will provide important insights into the evolutionary dynamics of emerging DS-1-like G1P[8] rotaviruses. PMID:26540260

  20. Heavy-Element Ejecta in G1.9+0.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Reynolds, S. P.; Green, D.; Hwang, U.; Petre, R.; Krishnamurthy, K.; Willett, R.

    2013-04-01

    G1.9+0.3 is the youngest known Galactic supernova remnant (SNR), with an estimated supernova (SN) explosion date of about 1900, most likely located near the Galactic center. Only the outermost ejecta layers with free-expansion velocities in excess of 18,000 km/s have been shocked so far in this dynamically-young, likely Type Ia SNR. A long (980 ks) Chandra observation in 2011 allowed for spatially-resolved spectroscopy of heavy-element ejecta. We denoised Chandra data with the spatio-spectral method of Krishnamurthy, Raginsky, & Willett, and then used a wavelet-based technique to spatially localize thermal emission produced by intermediate-mass elements (IMEs: Si, S, Ar, and Ca) and by iron. The spatial distribution of both IMEs and Fe is extremely asymmetric and inhomogeneous, with the strongest ejecta emission in the northern limb. Fe K emission is particularly prominent there, and fits with a thermal plane-shock model indicate strongly oversolar Fe abundances. In a localized, outlying region in the northern shell, IMEs are at least 5 times less abundant than Fe (by mass), indicating that undiluted Fe-group elements (including radioactive Ni) with velocities > 18,000 km/s were ejected by this SN. More modest (up to a factor of 2) Fe overabundances with respect to IMEs are present in other locations within the northern limb. There are several thousandths of a solar mass of shocked Fe in G1.9+0.3. In several locations within the remnant, including the (inner) west limb, we also find Si- and S-rich ejecta without any traces of Fe, so high-velocity, presumably undiluted products of O-burning were also ejected by the SN. If the underlying continuum is thermal, with plasma temperatures of 3-4 keV, then it must be produced by lighter elements such as O that comprise the bulk of the shocked gas. We discuss these findings in the context of Type Ia SNe such as SN 2010jn where iron-group elements at such high free-expansion velocities have been recently detected. We also

  1. MuSK induced experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis does not require IgG1 antibody to MuSK.

    PubMed

    Küçükerden, Melike; Huda, Ruksana; Tüzün, Erdem; Yılmaz, Abdullah; Skriapa, Lamprini; Trakas, Nikos; Strait, Richard T; Finkelman, Fred D; Kabadayı, Sevil; Zisimopoulou, Paraskevi; Tzartos, Socrates; Christadoss, Premkumar

    2016-06-15

    Sera of myasthenia gravis (MG) patients with muscle-specific receptor kinase-antibody (MuSK-Ab) predominantly display the non-complement fixing IgG4 isotype. Similarly, mouse IgG1, which is the analog of human IgG4, is the predominant isotype in mice with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) induced by MuSK immunization. The present study was performed to determine whether IgG1 anti-MuSK antibody is required for immunized mice to develop EAMG. Results demonstrated a significant correlation between clinical severity of EAMG and levels of MuSK-binding IgG1+, IgG2+ and IgG3+ peripheral blood B cells in MuSK-immunized wild-type (WT) mice. Moreover, MuSK-immunized IgG1 knockout (KO) and WT mice showed similar EAMG severity, serum MuSK-Ab levels, muscle acetylcholine receptor concentrations, neuromuscular junction immunoglobulin and complement deposit ratios. IgG1 and IgG3 were the predominant anti-MuSK isotypes in WT and IgG1 KO mice, respectively. These observations demonstrate that non-IgG1 isotypes can mediate MuSK-EAMG pathogenesis. PMID:27235354

  2. Long noncoding RNA linc00598 regulates CCND2 transcription and modulates the G1 checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Oh-Seok; Chae, Yun-Cheol; Jung, Hyeonsoo; Park, Soon Cheol; Cho, Sung-Jin; Kook, Hyun; Seo, SangBeom

    2016-01-01

    Data derived from genomic and transcriptomic analyses have revealed that long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have important roles in the transcriptional regulation of various genes. Recent studies have identified the mechanism underlying this function. To date, a variety of noncoding transcripts have been reported to function in conjunction with epigenetic regulator proteins. In this study, we investigated the function of linc00598, which is transcribed by a genomic sequence on chromosome 13, downstream of FoxO1 and upstream of COG6. Microarray analysis showed that linc00598 regulates the transcription of specific target genes, including those for cell cycle regulators. We discovered that linc00598 regulates CCND2 transcription through modulation of the transcriptional regulatory effect of FoxO1 on the CCND2 promoter. Moreover, we observed that knockdown of linc00598 induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and inhibited proliferation. These data indicate that linc00598 plays an important role in cell cycle regulation and proliferation through its ability to regulate the transcription of CCND2. PMID:27572135

  3. Hygrolidin induces p21 expression and abrogates cell cycle progression at G1 and S phases.

    PubMed

    Kawada, Manabu; Usami, Ihomi; Ohba, Shun; Someno, Tetsuya; Kim, Jin; Hayakawa, Yoichi; Nose, Kiyoshi; Ishizuka, Masaaki

    2002-10-18

    Hygrolidin family antibiotics showed selective cytotoxicity against both cyclin E- and cyclin A-overexpressing cells. Among them, hygrolidin was the most potent and inhibited growth of solid tumor-derived cell lines such as DLD-1 human colon cancer cells efficiently more than that of hematopoietic tumor cells and normal fibroblasts. FACS analysis revealed that hygrolidin increased cells in G1 and S phases in DLD-1 cells. While hygrolidin decreased amounts of cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) 4, cyclin D, and cyclin B, it increased cyclin E and p21 levels. Hygrolidin-induced p21 bound to and inhibit cyclin A-cdk2 complex more strongly than cyclin E-cdk2 complex. Furthermore, hygrolidin was found to increase p21 mRNA in DLD-1 cells, but not in normal fibroblasts. Thus, hygrolidin inhibited tumor cell growth through induction of p21. In respect to p21 induction, inhibition of vacuolar-type (H+)-ATPase by hygrolidin was suggested to be involved. PMID:12379237

  4. FOUR LIPS and MYB88 conditionally restrict the G1/S transition during stomatal formation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, EunKyoung; Liu, Xuguang; Eglit, Yana; Sack, Fred

    2013-01-01

    Consistent with their valve-like function in shoot–atmosphere gas exchange, guard cells are smaller than other epidermal cells and usually harbour 2C DNA levels in diploid plants. The paralogous Arabidopsis R2R3 MYB transcription factors, FOUR LIPS and MYB88, ensure that stomata contain just two guard cells by restricting mitosis. The loss of both FLP and MYB88 function in flp myb88 double mutants induces repeated mitotic divisions that lead to the formation of clusters of stomata in direct contact. By contrast, CYCLIN DEPENDENT KINASE B1 function is required for the symmetric division that precedes stomatal maturation. It was found that blocking mitosis by chemically disrupting microtubules or by the combined loss of FLP/MYB88 and CDKB1 function, causes single (undivided) guard cells (sGCs) to enlarge and attain mean DNA levels of up to 10C. The loss of both FLP and CDKB1 function also dramatically increased plastid number, led to the formation of multiple nuclei in GCs, altered GC and stomatal shape, and disrupted the fate of lineage-specific stem cells. Thus, in addition to respectively restricting and promoting symmetric divisions, FLP and CDKB1 together also conditionally restrict the G1/S transition and chloroplast and nuclear number, and normally maintain fate and developmental progression throughout the stomatal cell lineage. PMID:24123248

  5. Fusarochromanone Induces G1 Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis in COS7 and HEK293 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Ying; Chen, Xin; Shang, Chaowei; Singh, Karnika; Barzegar, Mansoureh; Mahdavian, Elahe; Salvatore, Brian A.; Jiang, Shanxiang; Huang, Shile

    2014-01-01

    Fusarochromanone (FC101), a mycotoxin produced by the fungus Fusarium equiseti, is frequently observed in the contaminated grains and feedstuffs, which is toxic to animals and humans. However, the underlying molecular mechanism remains to be defined. In this study, we found that FC101 inhibited cell proliferation and induced cell death in COS7 and HEK293 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Flow cytometric analysis showed that FC101 induced G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in the cells. Concurrently, FC101 downregulated protein expression of cyclin D1, cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK4 and CDK6), and Cdc25A, and upregulated expression of the CDK inhibitors (p21Cip1 and p27Kip1), resulting in hypophosphorylation of Rb. FC101 also inhibited protein expression of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, Mcl-1 and survivin, and induced expression of BAD, leading to activation of caspase 3 and cleavage of PARP, indicating caspase-dependent apoptosis. However, Z-VAD-FMK, a pan-caspase inhibitor, only partially prevented FC101-induced cell death, implying that FC101 may induce cell death through both caspase-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Our results support the notion that FC101 executes its toxicity at least by inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing cell death. PMID:25384025

  6. A gradient in the duration of the G1 phase in the murine neocortical proliferative epithelium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyama, S.; Takahashi, T.; Nowakowski, R. S.; Caviness, V. S. Jr

    1997-01-01

    Neuronogenesis in the neocortical pseudostratified ventricular epithelium (PVE) is initiated rostrolaterally and progresses caudo-medially as development progresses. Here we have measured the cytokinetic parameters and the fractional neuronal output parameter, Q, of laterally located early-maturing regions over the principal embryonic days (E12-E15) of neocortical neuronogenesis in the mouse. These measures are compared with ones previously made of a medial, late-maturing portion of the PVE. Laterally, as medially, the duration of the neuronogenetic interval is 6 days and comprises 11 integer cell cycles. Also, in both lateral and medial areas the length of G1 phase (TG1) increases nearly 4-fold and is the only cell cycle parameter to change. Q progresses essentially identically laterally and medially with respect to the succession of integer cell cycles. Most importantly, from E12 to E13 there is a steeply declining lateral to medial gradient in TG1. The gradient is due both to the lateral to medial graded stage of neuronogenesis and to the stepwise increase in TG1 with each integer cycle during the neuronogenetic interval. To our knowledge this gradient in TG1 of the cerebral PVE is the first cell biological gradient to be demonstrated experimentally in such an extensive proliferative epithelial sheet. We suggest that this gradient in TG1 is the cellular mechanism for positionally encoding a protomap of the neocortex within the PVE.

  7. Bioreducible cross-linked polymers based on G1 peptide dendrimer as potential gene delivery vectors.

    PubMed

    Li, Chun-Yan; Wang, Hai-Jiao; Cao, Jing-Ming; Zhang, Ji; Yu, Xiao-Qi

    2014-11-24

    A series of cationic polymers based on low generation (G1) peptide dendrimer were synthesized with disulfide-containing linkages. The DNA binding abilities of the target polymers were studied by gel electrophoresis and fluorescence quenching assay. The bioreducible property of the disulfide-containing polymers P2 and P3 was also investigated in the presence of dithiothreitol (DTT). Results from dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) assays reveal that these materials may condense DNA into nanoparticles with proper sizes and zeta-potentials. In vitro cell experiments show that compared to branched 25 KDa PEI, P2 and P3 may exhibit much higher gene transfection efficiency and lower cytotoxicity in both HEK293 and U-2OS cells. Additionally, polymer prepared from Michael addition gives better gene transfection ability, while polymer prepared from ring-opening reaction has better serum tolerance. Results indicate that these polymers might be promising non-viral gene vectors for their easy preparation, very low cytotoxicity, and good transfection efficiency. PMID:25282264

  8. Biosimilarity Assessments of Model IgG1-Fc Glycoforms Using a Machine Learning Approach.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Hyun; Joshi, Sangeeta B; Tolbert, Thomas J; Middaugh, C Russell; Volkin, David B; Smalter Hall, Aaron

    2016-02-01

    Biosimilarity assessments are performed to decide whether 2 preparations of complex biomolecules can be considered "highly similar." In this work, a machine learning approach is demonstrated as a mathematical tool for such assessments using a variety of analytical data sets. As proof-of-principle, physical stability data sets from 8 samples, 4 well-defined immunoglobulin G1-Fragment crystallizable glycoforms in 2 different formulations, were examined (see More et al., companion article in this issue). The data sets included triplicate measurements from 3 analytical methods across different pH and temperature conditions (2066 data features). Established machine learning techniques were used to determine whether the data sets contain sufficient discriminative power in this application. The support vector machine classifier identified the 8 distinct samples with high accuracy. For these data sets, there exists a minimum threshold in terms of information quality and volume to grant enough discriminative power. Generally, data from multiple analytical techniques, multiple pH conditions, and at least 200 representative features were required to achieve the highest discriminative accuracy. In addition to classification accuracy tests, various methods such as sample space visualization, similarity analysis based on Euclidean distance, and feature ranking by mutual information scores are demonstrated to display their effectiveness as modeling tools for biosimilarity assessments. PMID:26869422

  9. A Novel Intracellular Peptide Derived from G1/S Cyclin D2 Induces Cell Death*

    PubMed Central

    de Araujo, Christiane B.; Russo, Lilian C.; Castro, Leandro M.; Forti, Fábio L.; do Monte, Elisabete R.; Rioli, Vanessa; Gozzo, Fabio C.; Colquhoun, Alison; Ferro, Emer S.

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular peptides are constantly produced by the ubiquitin-proteasome system, and many are probably functional. Here, the peptide WELVVLGKL (pep5) from G1/S-specific cyclin D2 showed a 2-fold increase during the S phase of HeLa cell cycle. pep5 (25–100 μm) induced cell death in several tumor cells only when it was fused to a cell-penetrating peptide (pep5-cpp), suggesting its intracellular function. In vivo, pep5-cpp reduced the volume of the rat C6 glioblastoma by almost 50%. The tryptophan at the N terminus of pep5 is essential for its cell death activity, and N terminus acetylation reduced the potency of pep5-cpp. WELVVL is the minimal active sequence of pep5, whereas Leu-Ala substitutions totally abolished pep5 cell death activity. Findings from the initial characterization of the cell death/signaling mechanism of pep5 include caspase 3/7 and 9 activation, inhibition of Akt2 phosphorylation, activation of p38α and -γ, and inhibition of proteasome activity. Further pharmacological analyses suggest that pep5 can trigger cell death by distinctive pathways, which can be blocked by IM-54 or a combination of necrostatin-1 and q-VD-OPh. These data further support the biological and pharmacological potential of intracellular peptides. PMID:24764300

  10. Screening of recombinant glycosyltransferases reveals the broad acceptor specificity of stevia UGT-76G1.

    PubMed

    Dewitte, Griet; Walmagh, Maarten; Diricks, Margo; Lepak, Alexander; Gutmann, Alexander; Nidetzky, Bernd; Desmet, Tom

    2016-09-10

    UDP-glycosyltransferases (UGTs) are a promising class of biocatalysts that offer a sustainable alternative for chemical glycosylation of natural products. In this study, we aimed to characterize plant-derived UGTs from the GT-1 family with an emphasis on their acceptor promiscuity and their potential application in glycosylation processes. Recombinant expression in E. coli provided sufficient amounts of enzyme for the in-depth characterization of the salicylic acid UGT from Capsella rubella (UGT-SACr) and the stevia UGT from Stevia rebaudiana (UGT-76G1Sr). The latter was found to have a remarkably broad specificity with activities on a wide diversity of structures, from aliphatic and branched alcohols, over small phenolics to larger flavonoids, terpenoids and even higher glycoside compounds. As an example for its industrial potential, the glycosylation of curcumin was thoroughly evaluated. Under optimized conditions, 96% of curcumin was converted within 24h into the corresponding curcumin β-glycosides. In addition, the reaction was performed in a coupled system with sucrose synthase from Glycine max, to enable the cost-efficient (re)generation of UDP-Glc from sucrose as abundant and renewable resource. PMID:27378621

  11. Conversion of 11-hydroxy-O-methylsterigmatocystin to aflatoxin G1 in Aspergillus parasiticus.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hongmei; Hatabayashi, Hidemi; Nakagawa, Hiroyuki; Cai, Jingjing; Suzuki, Ryoya; Sakuno, Emi; Tanaka, Toshitsugu; Ito, Yasuhiro; Ehrlich, Kenneth C; Nakajima, Hiromitsu; Yabe, Kimiko

    2011-04-01

    In aflatoxin biosynthesis, aflatoxins G(1) (AFG(1)) and B(1) (AFB(1)) are independently produced from a common precursor, O-methylsterigmatocystin (OMST). Recently, 11-hydroxy-O-methylsterigmatocystin (HOMST) was suggested to be a later precursor involved in the conversion of OMST to AFB(1), and conversion of HOMST to AFB(1) was catalyzed by OrdA enzyme. However, the involvement of HOMST in AFG(1) formation has not been determined. In this work, HOMST was prepared by incubating OrdA-expressing yeast with OMST. Feeding Aspergillus parasiticus with HOMST allowed production of AFG(1) as well as AFB(1). In cell-free systems, HOMST was converted to AFG(1) when the microsomal fraction, the cytosolic fraction from A. parasiticus, and yeast expressing A. parasiticus OrdA were added. These results demonstrated (1) HOMST is produced from OMST by OrdA, (2) HOMST is a precursor of AFG(1) as well as AFB(1), and (3) three enzymes, OrdA, CypA, and NadA, and possibly other unknown enzymes are involved in conversion of HOMST to AFG(1). PMID:21153813

  12. 3D Structural Fluctuation of IgG1 Antibody Revealed by Individual Particle Electron Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xing; Zhang, Lei; Tong, Huimin; Peng, Bo; Rames, Matthew J.; Zhang, Shengli; Ren, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Commonly used methods for determining protein structure, including X-ray crystallography and single-particle reconstruction, often provide a single and unique three-dimensional (3D) structure. However, in these methods, the protein dynamics and flexibility/fluctuation remain mostly unknown. Here, we utilized advances in electron tomography (ET) to study the antibody flexibility and fluctuation through structural determination of individual antibody particles rather than averaging multiple antibody particles together. Through individual-particle electron tomography (IPET) 3D reconstruction from negatively-stained ET images, we obtained 120 ab-initio 3D density maps at an intermediate resolution (~1–3 nm) from 120 individual IgG1 antibody particles. Using these maps as a constraint, we derived 120 conformations of the antibody via structural flexible docking of the crystal structure to these maps by targeted molecular dynamics simulations. Statistical analysis of the various conformations disclosed the antibody 3D conformational flexibility through the distribution of its domain distances and orientations. This blueprint approach, if extended to other flexible proteins, may serve as a useful methodology towards understanding protein dynamics and functions. PMID:25940394

  13. 3D structural fluctuation of IgG1 antibody revealed by individual particle electron tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xing; Zhang, Lei; Tong, Huimin; Peng, Bo; Rames, Matthew J.; Zhang, Shengli; Ren, Gang

    2015-05-05

    Commonly used methods for determining protein structure, including X-ray crystallography and single-particle reconstruction, often provide a single and unique three-dimensional (3D) structure. However, in these methods, the protein dynamics and flexibility/fluctuation remain mostly unknown. Here, we utilized advances in electron tomography (ET) to study the antibody flexibility and fluctuation through structural determination of individual antibody particles rather than averaging multiple antibody particles together. Through individual-particle electron tomography (IPET) 3D reconstruction from negatively-stained ET images, we obtained 120 ab-initio 3D density maps at an intermediate resolution (~1–3 nm) from 120 individual IgG1 antibody particles. Using these maps as a constraint, we derived 120 conformations of the antibody via structural flexible docking of the crystal structure to these maps by targeted molecular dynamics simulations. Statistical analysis of the various conformations disclosed the antibody 3D conformational flexibility through the distribution of its domain distances and orientations. This blueprint approach, if extended to other flexible proteins, may serve as a useful methodology towards understanding protein dynamics and functions.

  14. 3D structural fluctuation of IgG1 antibody revealed by individual particle electron tomography

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Xing; Zhang, Lei; Tong, Huimin; Peng, Bo; Rames, Matthew J.; Zhang, Shengli; Ren, Gang

    2015-05-05

    Commonly used methods for determining protein structure, including X-ray crystallography and single-particle reconstruction, often provide a single and unique three-dimensional (3D) structure. However, in these methods, the protein dynamics and flexibility/fluctuation remain mostly unknown. Here, we utilized advances in electron tomography (ET) to study the antibody flexibility and fluctuation through structural determination of individual antibody particles rather than averaging multiple antibody particles together. Through individual-particle electron tomography (IPET) 3D reconstruction from negatively-stained ET images, we obtained 120 ab-initio 3D density maps at an intermediate resolution (~1–3 nm) from 120 individual IgG1 antibody particles. Using these maps as a constraint, wemore » derived 120 conformations of the antibody via structural flexible docking of the crystal structure to these maps by targeted molecular dynamics simulations. Statistical analysis of the various conformations disclosed the antibody 3D conformational flexibility through the distribution of its domain distances and orientations. This blueprint approach, if extended to other flexible proteins, may serve as a useful methodology towards understanding protein dynamics and functions.« less

  15. Long noncoding RNA linc00598 regulates CCND2 transcription and modulates the G1 checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Oh-Seok; Chae, Yun-Cheol; Jung, Hyeonsoo; Park, Soon Cheol; Cho, Sung-Jin; Kook, Hyun; Seo, SangBeom

    2016-01-01

    Data derived from genomic and transcriptomic analyses have revealed that long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have important roles in the transcriptional regulation of various genes. Recent studies have identified the mechanism underlying this function. To date, a variety of noncoding transcripts have been reported to function in conjunction with epigenetic regulator proteins. In this study, we investigated the function of linc00598, which is transcribed by a genomic sequence on chromosome 13, downstream of FoxO1 and upstream of COG6. Microarray analysis showed that linc00598 regulates the transcription of specific target genes, including those for cell cycle regulators. We discovered that linc00598 regulates CCND2 transcription through modulation of the transcriptional regulatory effect of FoxO1 on the CCND2 promoter. Moreover, we observed that knockdown of linc00598 induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and inhibited proliferation. These data indicate that linc00598 plays an important role in cell cycle regulation and proliferation through its ability to regulate the transcription of CCND2. PMID:27572135

  16. Intermolecular interactions and conformation of antibody dimers present in IgG1 biopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Iwura, Takafumi; Fukuda, Jun; Yamazaki, Katsuyoshi; Kanamaru, Shuji; Arisaka, Fumio

    2014-01-01

    Intermolecular interactions and conformation in dimer species of Palivizumab, a monoclonal antibody (IgG1), were investigated to elucidate the physical and chemical properties of the dimerized antibody. Palivizumab solution contains ∼1% dimer and 99% monomer. The dimer species was isolated by size-exclusion chromatography and analysed by a number of methods including analytical ultracentrifugation-sedimantetion velocity (AUC-SV). AUC-SV in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulphate indicated that approximately half of the dimer fraction was non-covalently associated, whereas the other half was dimerized by covalent bond. Disulphide bond and dityrosine formation were likely to be involved in the covalent dimerization. Limited proteolysis of the isolated dimer by Lys-C and mass spectrometry for the resultant products indicated that the dimer species were formed by Fab-Fc or Fab-Fab interactions, whereas Fc-Fc interactions were not found. It is thus likely that the dimerization occurs mainly via the Fab region. With regard to the conformation of the dimer species, the secondary and tertiary structures were shown to be almost identical to those of the monomer. Furthermore, the thermal stability turned out also to be very similar between the dimer and monomer. PMID:24155259

  17. Fangchinoline induces G1 arrest in breast cancer cells through cell-cycle regulation.

    PubMed

    Xing, Zhibo; Zhang, Youxue; Zhang, Xianyu; Yang, Yanmei; Ma, Yuyan; Pang, Da

    2013-12-01

    Fangchinoline, an alkaloid derived from the dry roots of Stephaniae tetrandrine S. Moore (Menispermaceae), has been shown to possess cytotoxic, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant properties. In this study, we used Fangchinoline to inhibit breast cancer cell proliferation and to investigate its underlying molecular mechanisms. Human breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, were both used in this study. We found that Fangchinoline significantly decreased cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner and induced G1-phase arrest in both cell lines. In addition, upon analysis of expression of cell cycle-related proteins, we found that Fangchinoline reduced expression of cyclin D1, cyclin D3, and cyclin E, and increased expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors, p21/WAF1, and p27/KIP1. Moreover, Fangchinoline also inhibited the kinase activities of CDK2, CDK4, and CDK6. These results suggest that Fangchinoline can inhibit human breast cancer cell proliferation and thus may have potential applications in cancer therapy. PMID:23401195

  18. Whole genomic analysis of human G1P[8] rotavirus strains from different age groups in China.

    PubMed

    Shintani, Tsuzumi; Ghosh, Souvik; Wang, Yuan-Hong; Zhou, Xuan; Zhou, Dun-Jin; Kobayashi, Nobumichi

    2012-08-01

    G1P[8] rotaviruses are an important cause of diarrhea in humans in China. To date, there are no reports on the whole genomic analysis of the Chinese G1P[8] rotaviruses. To determine the origin and overall genetic makeup of the recent Chinese G1P[8] strains, the whole genomes of three strains, RVA/Human-wt/CHN/E1911/2009/G1P[8], RVA/Human-tc/CHN/R588/2005/G1P[8] and RVA/Human-tc/CHN/Y128/2004/G1P[8], detected in an infant, a child and an adult, respectively, were analyzed. Strains E1911, R588 and Y128 exhibited a typical Wa-like genotype constellation. Except for the NSP3 gene of E1911, the whole genomes of strains E1911, R588 and Y128 were found to be more closely related to those of the recent Wa-like common human strains from different countries than those of the prototype G1P[8] strain, or other old strains. On the other hand, the NSP3 gene of E1911 was genetically distinct from those of Y128, R588, or other Wa-like common human strains, and appeared to share a common origin with those of the porcine-like human G9 strains, providing evidence for intergenotype reassortment events. Comparisons of the amino acid residues defining the VP7 and VP4 antigenic domains revealed several mismatches between these Chinese G1P[8] strains and the G1 and P[8] strains contained in the currently licensed rotavirus vaccines Rotarix(TM )and RotaTeq(TM). PMID:23012626

  19. Glyco-engineering of human IgG1-Fc through combined yeast expression and in vitro chemoenzymatic glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yadong; Li, Cishan; Huang, Wei; Li, Bing; Strome, Scott; Wang, Lai-Xi

    2009-01-01

    The presence and precise structures of the glycans attached at the Fc domain of monoclonal antibodies play an important role in determining antibody's effector functions such as antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity (ADCC), complement activation, and anti-inflammatory activity. This paper describes a novel approach for glyco-engineering of human IgG1-Fc that combines high-yield expression of human IgG1-Fc in yeast and subsequent in vitro enzymatic glycosylation, using the endoglycosidase-catalyzed transglycosylation as the key reaction. Human IgG1-Fc was first overproduced in Pichia pastoris. Then the heterogeneous yeast glycans were removed by Endo-H treatment to give the GlcNAc-containing IgG1-Fc as a homodimer. Finally, selected homogeneous glycans were attached to the GlcNAc-primer in the IgG1-Fc through an endoglycosidase-catalyzed transglycosylation, using sugar oxazolines as the donor substrates. It was found that the enzymatic transglycosylation was efficient with native GlcNAc-containing IgG1-Fc homodimer without the need to denature the protein, and the reaction could proceed to completion to give homogeneous glycoforms of IgG1-Fc when excess of oligosaccharide oxazolines was used as the donor substrates. The binding of the synthetic IgG1-Fc glycoforms to the FcγIIIa receptor was also investigated. This novel glyco-engineering approach should be useful for providing various homogeneous, natural or synthetic glycoforms of IgG1-Fc for structure-function relationship studies, and for future clinical applications. PMID:18771295

  20. The G Protein-Coupled Estrogen Receptor Agonist G-1 Inhibits Nuclear Estrogen Receptor Activity and Stimulates Novel Phosphoproteomic Signatures.

    PubMed

    Smith, L Cody; Ralston-Hooper, Kimberly J; Ferguson, P Lee; Sabo-Attwood, Tara

    2016-06-01

    Estrogen exerts cellular effects through both nuclear (ESR1 and ESR2) and membrane-bound estrogen receptors (G-protein coupled estrogen receptor, GPER); however, it is unclear if they act independently or engage in crosstalk to influence hormonal responses. To investigate each receptor's role in proliferation, transcriptional activation, and protein phosphorylation in breast cancer cells (MCF-7), we employed selective agonists for ESR1 propyl-pyrazole-triol (PPT), ESR2 diarylpropionitrile (DPN), and GPER (G-1) and also determined the impact of xenoestrogens bisphenol-A (BPA) and genistein on these effects. As anticipated, 17β-estradiol (E2), PPT, DPN, BPA, and genistein each enhanced proliferation and activation of an ERE-driven reporter gene whereas G-1 had no significant impact. However, G-1 significantly reduced E2-, PPT-, DPN-, BPA-, and genistein-induced proliferation and ERE activation at doses greater than 500 nM indicating that G-1 mediated inhibition is not ESR isotype specific. As membrane receptors initiate cascades of phosphorylation events, we performed a global phosphoproteomic analysis on cells exposed to E2 or G-1 to identify potential targets of receptor crosstalk via downstream protein phosphorylation targets. Of the 211 phosphorylated proteins identified, 40 and 13 phosphoproteins were specifically modified by E2 and G-1, respectively. Subnetwork enrichment analysis revealed several processes related to cell cycle were specifically enriched by G-1 compared with E2. Further there existed a number of newly identified proteins that were specifically phosphorylated by G-1. These phosphorylation networks highlight specific proteins that may modulate the inhibitory effects of G-1 and suggest a novel role for interference with nuclear receptor activity driven by E2 and xenoestrogens. PMID:27026707