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Sample records for death linking sister

  1. Meaning of the death of an elderly father: two sisters' perspectives.

    PubMed

    Moss, Miriam S; Moss, Sidney Z

    Multiple bereaved adult children, as siblings, have rarely been studied. We expand the paradigm of bereavement research to explore the ways that two sisters describe the experience and meaning of the death of their elderly father. The two sisters each participated in two separate qualitative ethnographic interviews, followed by standard qualitative analyses of the transcribed narratives. The findings yield contrasting perspectives of the sisters' disparate views of their family, of their father, and their views of each other, that provide insight into the complexity of the sharp differences in their reactions to their father's death. Their views of their father's death reflected their particular relationship with their father, their non-shared experiences over the life course, and their personal world views. Differences and contradictions in the views of multiple siblings can broaden our understanding of bereavement and of the processes central to parent-child ties at the end of life. PMID:23617099

  2. Overlap microtubules link sister k-fibres and balance the forces on bi-oriented kinetochores

    PubMed Central

    Kajtez, Janko; Solomatina, Anastasia; Novak, Maja; Polak, Bruno; Vukušić, Kruno; Rüdiger, Jonas; Cojoc, Gheorghe; Milas, Ana; Šumanovac Šestak, Ivana; Risteski, Patrik; Tavano, Federica; Klemm, Anna H.; Roscioli, Emanuele; Welburn, Julie; Cimini, Daniela; Glunčić, Matko; Pavin, Nenad; Tolić, Iva M.

    2016-01-01

    During metaphase, forces on kinetochores are exerted by k-fibres, bundles of microtubules that end at the kinetochore. Interestingly, non-kinetochore microtubules have been observed between sister kinetochores, but their function is unknown. Here we show by laser-cutting of a k-fibre in HeLa and PtK1 cells that a bundle of non-kinetochore microtubules, which we term ‘bridging fibre', bridges sister k-fibres and balances the interkinetochore tension. We found PRC1 and EB3 in the bridging fibre, suggesting that it consists of antiparallel dynamic microtubules. By using a theoretical model that includes a bridging fibre, we show that the forces at the pole and at the kinetochore depend on the bridging fibre thickness. Moreover, our theory and experiments show larger relaxation of the interkinetochore distance for cuts closer to kinetochores. We conclude that the bridging fibre, by linking sister k-fibres, withstands the tension between sister kinetochores and enables the spindle to obtain a curved shape. PMID:26728792

  3. Tantalizing Thanatos: unexpected links in death pathways.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Isabelle; Castedo, Maria; Kroemer, Guido

    2002-07-01

    Cell death is most frequently the result of apoptosis, an event that is often controlled by mitochondrial membrane permeabilization (MMP). Recent data reveal unexpected functional links between apoptosis and autophagic cell death, in the sense that MMP can trigger autophagy of damaged mitochondria. Conversely, one of the major signal-transducing molecules involved in the activation of autophagy during apoptosis--the so-called DAP kinase--can induce cell death through MMP. Connections are also emerging between apoptosis, autophagy, replicative senescence and cancer-specific metabolic changes. PMID:12185842

  4. Links between sisters' sexual and dating victimization: the roles of neighborhood crime and parental controls.

    PubMed

    East, Patricia L; Chien, Nina C; Adams, Joyce A; Hokoda, Audrey; Maier, Ashley

    2010-12-01

    This study examined the extent to which a sister's prior sexual and dating victimization is a risk factor for young women being similarly victimized and the possible factors underlying a co-occurrence. The sample involved 122 young adult Latina or African American sister pairs (244 women; ages 16-25) who resided in low-income, urban neighborhoods. Results indicated that women whose sisters had been victimized had increased risk of victimization even after controlling for neighborhood crime, parental controls, age and race-ethnicity (odds ratios were 4.0 for unwanted touching, 6.2 for a forced sex act, and 16.7 for dating violence). In high-crime neighborhoods, the presence of two adult parent figures in the home was associated with women's reduced likelihood of unwanted touching, and mothers' high monitoring during adolescence was associated with women's lower risk of dating aggression. Survival analysis results showed that the risk period of a second sister being victimized lasts between 7 and 10 years after a first sister's victimization. The prevention implications of study findings are discussed. PMID:21171768

  5. Sickle Cell Trait Not Linked to Early Death in Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Sickle Cell Trait Not Linked to Early Death in Study However, black soldiers with the gene ... cell gene variant, are at risk of premature death. People with the sickle cell gene variant do ...

  6. Cytochrome b Divergence between Avian Sister Species Is Linked to Generation Length and Body Mass

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Caroline E.; Gilbert, James D. J.; Brooke, M. de L

    2014-01-01

    It is increasingly realised that the molecular clock does not tick at a constant rate. Rather, mitochondrial mutation rates are influenced by factors such as generation length and body mass. This has implications for the use of genetic data in species delimitation. It could be that speciation, as recognised by avian taxonomists, is associated with a certain minimum genetic distance between sister taxa, in which case we would predict no difference in the cytochrome b divergence of sister taxa according to the species' body size or generation time. Alternatively, if what taxonomists recognise as speciation has tended to be associated with the passage of a minimum amount of time since divergence, then there might be less genetic divergence between sister taxa with slower mutation rates, namely those that are heavier and/or with longer generation times. After excluding non-flying species, we analysed a database of over 600 avian sister species pairs, and found that species pairs with longer generation lengths (which tend to be the larger species) showed less cytochrome b divergence. This finding cautions against using any simple unitary criterion of genetic divergence to delimit species. PMID:24505250

  7. Ctf4 Links DNA Replication with Sister Chromatid Cohesion Establishment by Recruiting the Chl1 Helicase to the Replisome.

    PubMed

    Samora, Catarina P; Saksouk, Julie; Goswami, Panchali; Wade, Ben O; Singleton, Martin R; Bates, Paul A; Lengronne, Armelle; Costa, Alessandro; Uhlmann, Frank

    2016-08-01

    DNA replication during S phase is accompanied by establishment of sister chromatid cohesion to ensure faithful chromosome segregation. The Eco1 acetyltransferase, helped by factors including Ctf4 and Chl1, concomitantly acetylates the chromosomal cohesin complex to stabilize its cohesive links. Here we show that Ctf4 recruits the Chl1 helicase to the replisome via a conserved interaction motif that Chl1 shares with GINS and polymerase α. We visualize recruitment by EM analysis of a reconstituted Chl1-Ctf4-GINS assembly. The Chl1 helicase facilitates replication fork progression under conditions of nucleotide depletion, partly independently of Ctf4 interaction. Conversely, Ctf4 interaction, but not helicase activity, is required for Chl1's role in sister chromatid cohesion. A physical interaction between Chl1 and the cohesin complex during S phase suggests that Chl1 contacts cohesin to facilitate its acetylation. Our results reveal how Ctf4 forms a replisomal interaction hub that coordinates replication fork progression and sister chromatid cohesion establishment. PMID:27397686

  8. NATIONAL VITAL STATISTICS SYSTEM - LINKED BIRTH AND INFANT DEATH DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1983, NCHS established a research data set comprised of linked birth and death certificates for infants born in the United States who died before reaching one year of age. In this data set, information from the death certificate is linked with information from the birth certif...

  9. Metazoan Scc4 Homologs Link Sister Chromatid Cohesion to Cell and Axon Migration Guidance

    PubMed Central

    Seitan, Vlad C; Banks, Peter; Laval, Steve; Majid, Nazia A; Dorsett, Dale; Rana, Amer; Smith, Jim; Bateman, Alex; Krpic, Sanja; Hostert, Arnd; Rollins, Robert A; Erdjument-Bromage, Hediye; Tempst, Paul; Benard, Claire Y; Hekimi, Siegfried; Newbury, Sarah F

    2006-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae Scc2 binds Scc4 to form an essential complex that loads cohesin onto chromosomes. The prevalence of Scc2 orthologs in eukaryotes emphasizes a conserved role in regulating sister chromatid cohesion, but homologs of Scc4 have not hitherto been identified outside certain fungi. Some metazoan orthologs of Scc2 were initially identified as developmental gene regulators, such as Drosophila Nipped-B, a regulator of cut and Ultrabithorax, and delangin, a protein mutant in Cornelia de Lange syndrome. We show that delangin and Nipped-B bind previously unstudied human and fly orthologs of Caenorhabditis elegans MAU-2, a non-axis-specific guidance factor for migrating cells and axons. PSI-BLAST shows that Scc4 is evolutionarily related to metazoan MAU-2 sequences, with the greatest homology evident in a short N-terminal domain, and protein–protein interaction studies map the site of interaction between delangin and human MAU-2 to the N-terminal regions of both proteins. Short interfering RNA knockdown of human MAU-2 in HeLa cells resulted in precocious sister chromatid separation and in impaired loading of cohesin onto chromatin, indicating that it is functionally related to Scc4, and RNAi analyses show that MAU-2 regulates chromosome segregation in C. elegans embryos. Using antisense morpholino oligonucleotides to knock down Xenopus tropicalis delangin or MAU-2 in early embryos produced similar patterns of retarded growth and developmental defects. Our data show that sister chromatid cohesion in metazoans involves the formation of a complex similar to the Scc2-Scc4 interaction in the budding yeast. The very high degree of sequence conservation between Scc4 homologs in complex metazoans is consistent with increased selection pressure to conserve additional essential functions, such as regulation of cell and axon migration during development. PMID:16802858

  10. Metazoan Scc4 homologs link sister chromatid cohesion to cell and axon migration guidance.

    PubMed

    Seitan, Vlad C; Banks, Peter; Laval, Steve; Majid, Nazia A; Dorsett, Dale; Rana, Amer; Smith, Jim; Bateman, Alex; Krpic, Sanja; Hostert, Arnd; Rollins, Robert A; Erdjument-Bromage, Hediye; Tempst, Paul; Benard, Claire Y; Hekimi, Siegfried; Newbury, Sarah F; Strachan, Tom

    2006-07-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae Scc2 binds Scc4 to form an essential complex that loads cohesin onto chromosomes. The prevalence of Scc2 orthologs in eukaryotes emphasizes a conserved role in regulating sister chromatid cohesion, but homologs of Scc4 have not hitherto been identified outside certain fungi. Some metazoan orthologs of Scc2 were initially identified as developmental gene regulators, such as Drosophila Nipped-B, a regulator of cut and Ultrabithorax, and delangin, a protein mutant in Cornelia de Lange syndrome. We show that delangin and Nipped-B bind previously unstudied human and fly orthologs of Caenorhabditis elegans MAU-2, a non-axis-specific guidance factor for migrating cells and axons. PSI-BLAST shows that Scc4 is evolutionarily related to metazoan MAU-2 sequences, with the greatest homology evident in a short N-terminal domain, and protein-protein interaction studies map the site of interaction between delangin and human MAU-2 to the N-terminal regions of both proteins. Short interfering RNA knockdown of human MAU-2 in HeLa cells resulted in precocious sister chromatid separation and in impaired loading of cohesin onto chromatin, indicating that it is functionally related to Scc4, and RNAi analyses show that MAU-2 regulates chromosome segregation in C. elegans embryos. Using antisense morpholino oligonucleotides to knock down Xenopus tropicalis delangin or MAU-2 in early embryos produced similar patterns of retarded growth and developmental defects. Our data show that sister chromatid cohesion in metazoans involves the formation of a complex similar to the Scc2-Scc4 interaction in the budding yeast. The very high degree of sequence conservation between Scc4 homologs in complex metazoans is consistent with increased selection pressure to conserve additional essential functions, such as regulation of cell and axon migration during development. PMID:16802858

  11. SISTER STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Sister Study will investigate the role of genetic, environmental, and lifestyle factors on the risk of breast cancer and other diseases in sisters of women with breast cancer. This research study will enroll 50,000 women who live in the United States and who are the cancer-fr...

  12. Correlations of blood lead with DNA-protein cross-links and sister chromatid exchanges in lead workers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fang-Yang; Chang, Pao-Wen; Wu, Chin-Ching; Kuo, Hsien-Wen

    2002-03-01

    Levels of sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs), high-SCE frequency cells (HFCs), DNA-protein cross-links (DPCs), blood lead (BLL), and zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP) were measured in peripheral blood from three groups. The lead workers were divided into two groups: a high BLL group (> or =15 microg/dl) and a low BLL group (<15 microg/dl). The control subjects were selected from an area that had not been contaminated with lead and had normal BLL and ZPP levels. In addition, exposure to airborne lead was measured for 11 lead workers, and the time-weighted average was shown to range from 0.19 to 10.32 mg/m(3). The BLL levels of 9 of 11 workers were >15 microg/dl, of which, 3 exceeded current exposure limits (> or =40 microg/dl). The BLL levels of all 11 controls were < 15 microg/dl. The average SCE and DPC values for the workers were 6.1 SCEs/cell and 1.9%, which were significantly higher (P < 0.01, Wilcoxon's test) than the value of 5.2 SCEs/cell and 1.1% for the control subjects. Lead workers had significantly higher BLL and ZPP levels than did the controls. Statistically significant increases in DPCs, SCEs, and HFCs were observed for the high-BLL group compared with the control group. The results of this study suggest that DPCs, SCEs, and HFCs are reliable biomarkers for monitoring workers exposed to lead and clearly indicate health effects from occupational exposure to lead. PMID:11895879

  13. One Sister's Story

    MedlinePlus

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues One Sister's Story Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of ... NIH/NIEHS By Tina Hall Sister Study participant One day in April, after my sister returned from ...

  14. Goddard Welcomes SISTER

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., hosted a weeklong summer institute, SISTER, for the purpose of increasing the awareness of and providing opportunities for middle school girls to ...

  15. Embryonic Death Is Linked to Maternal Identity in the Leatherback Turtle (Dermochelys coriacea)

    PubMed Central

    Rafferty, Anthony R.; Santidrián Tomillo, Pilar; Spotila, James R.; Paladino, Frank V.; Reina, Richard D.

    2011-01-01

    Leatherback turtles have an average global hatching success rate of ∼50%, lower than other marine turtle species. Embryonic death has been linked to environmental factors such as precipitation and temperature, although, there is still a lot of variability that remains to be explained. We examined how nesting season, the time of nesting each season, the relative position of each clutch laid by each female each season, maternal identity and associated factors such as reproductive experience of the female (new nester versus remigrant) and period of egg retention between clutches (interclutch interval) affected hatching success and stage of embryonic death in failed eggs of leatherback turtles nesting at Playa Grande, Costa Rica. Data were collected during five nesting seasons from 2004/05 to 2008/09. Mean hatching success was 50.4%. Nesting season significantly influenced hatching success in addition to early and late stage embryonic death. Neither clutch position nor nesting time during the season had a significant affect on hatching success or the stage of embryonic death. Some leatherback females consistently produced nests with higher hatching success rates than others. Remigrant females arrived earlier to nest, produced more clutches and had higher rates of hatching success than new nesters. Reproductive experience did not affect stage of death or the duration of the interclutch interval. The length of interclutch interval had a significant affect on the proportion of eggs that failed in each clutch and the developmental stage they died at. Intrinsic factors such as maternal identity are playing a role in affecting embryonic death in the leatherback turtle. PMID:21695086

  16. Birth and death of links control disease spreading in empirical contact networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holme, Petter; Liljeros, Fredrik

    2014-05-01

    We investigate what structural aspects of a collection of twelve empirical temporal networks of human contacts are important to disease spreading. We scan the entire parameter spaces of the two canonical models of infectious disease epidemiology--the Susceptible-Infectious-Susceptible (SIS) and Susceptible-Infectious-Removed (SIR) models. The results from these simulations are compared to reference data where we eliminate structures in the interevent intervals, the time to the first contact in the data, or the time from the last contact to the end of the sampling. The picture we find is that the birth and death of links, and the total number of contacts over a link, are essential to predict outbreaks. On the other hand, the exact times of contacts between the beginning and end, or the interevent interval distribution, do not matter much. In other words, a simplified picture of these empirical data sets that suffices for epidemiological purposes is that links are born, is active with some intensity, and die.

  17. The Prodigal Sister - Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlow, Nadine G.

    1995-09-01

    If you think Venus is a hellhole now, be thankful you weren't there 500 million years ago. Those were the days, many planetary scientists believe, of apocalypse on our sister world: Volcanoes wracked the land, while greenhouse gases broiled the air. Is this the Earth's fate, too?

  18. Wallerian degeneration: an emerging axon death pathway linking injury and disease.

    PubMed

    Conforti, Laura; Gilley, Jonathan; Coleman, Michael P

    2014-06-01

    Axon degeneration is a prominent early feature of most neurodegenerative disorders and can also be induced directly by nerve injury in a process known as Wallerian degeneration. The discovery of genetic mutations that delay Wallerian degeneration has provided insight into mechanisms underlying axon degeneration in disease. Rapid Wallerian degeneration requires the pro-degenerative molecules SARM1 and PHR1. Nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase 2 (NMNAT2) is essential for axon growth and survival. Its loss from injured axons may activate Wallerian degeneration, whereas NMNAT overexpression rescues axons from degeneration. Here, we discuss the roles of these and other proposed regulators of Wallerian degeneration, new opportunities for understanding disease mechanisms and intriguing links between Wallerian degeneration, innate immunity, synaptic growth and cell death. PMID:24840802

  19. Big Sisters: An Experimental Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seidl, Fredrick W.

    1982-01-01

    Assessed the effects of participation in a Big Sisters' Program. The first part consisted of interviews (N=20) with pairs of Big Sisters-Little Sisters. The second part evaluated program effectiveness experimentally. Findings indicated positive relationships between pairs, and improved behavior of experimental girls versus controls. (RC)

  20. Veterans and Suicide: A Reexamination of the National Death Index–Linked National Health Interview Survey

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Catherine; Young, Melissa; Azrael, Deborah; Mukamal, Kenneth; Lawler, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. We assessed the risk of suicide among veterans compared with nonveterans. Methods. Cox proportional hazards models estimated the relative risk of suicide, by self-reported veteran status, among 500 822 adult male participants in the National Death Index (NDI)–linked National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), a nationally representative cohort study. Results. A total of 482 male veterans died by suicide during 1 837 886 person-years of follow-up (76% by firearm); 835 male nonveterans died by suicide during 4 438 515 person-years of follow-up (62% by firearm). Crude suicide rates for veterans and nonveterans were, respectively, 26.2 and 18.8 per 100 000 person-years. The risk of suicide was not significantly higher among veterans, compared with nonveterans, after adjustment for differences in age, race, and survey year (hazard ratio = 1.11; 95% confidence interval = 0.96, 1.29). Conclusions. Consistent with most studies of suicide risk among veterans of conflicts before Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom, but in contrast to a previous study using the NDI-linked NHIS data, we found that male veterans responding to the NHIS were modestly, but not significantly, at higher risk for suicide compared with male nonveterans. PMID:22390591

  1. B cell receptor cross-linking triggers a caspase-8-dependent apoptotic pathway that is independent of the death effector domain of Fas-associated death domain protein.

    PubMed

    Besnault, L; Schrantz, N; Auffredou, M T; Leca, G; Bourgeade, M F; Vazquez, A

    2001-07-15

    We have previously reported that B cell receptors, depending on the degree to which they are cross-linked, can promote apoptosis in various human B cell types. In this study, we show that B cell receptors can trigger two apoptotic pathways according to cross-linking and that these pathways control mitochondrial activation in human Burkitt's lymphoma cells. Whereas soluble anti-mu Ab triggers caspase-independent mitochondrial activation, cross-linked anti-mu Ab induces an apoptotic response associated with a caspase-dependent loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential. This B cell receptor-mediated caspase-dependent mitochondrial activation is associated with caspase-8 activation. We show here that caspase-8 inhibitors strongly decrease cross-linking-dependent B cell receptor-mediated apoptosis in Burkitt's lymphoma BL41 cells. These inhibitors act upstream from the mitochondria as they prevented the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential observed in B cell receptor-treated BL41 cells. Caspase-8 activation in these cells was also evident from the detection of cleaved fragments of caspase-8 and the cleavage of specific substrates, including Bid. Our data show that cross-linked B cell receptors induced an apoptotic pathway involving sequential caspase-8 activation, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and the activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3. Cells expressing a dominant negative mutant of Fas-associated death domain protein were sensitive to cross-linked B cell receptor-induced caspase-8 activation and apoptosis; therefore, this caspase-8 activation was independent of the death effector domain of Fas-associated death domain protein. PMID:11441077

  2. Community-linked maternal death review (CLMDR) to measure and prevent maternal mortality: a pilot study in rural Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Bayley, Olivia; Chapota, Hilda; Kainja, Esther; Phiri, Tambosi; Gondwe, Chelmsford; King, Carina; Nambiar, Bejoy; Mwansambo, Charles; Kazembe, Peter; Costello, Anthony; Rosato, Mikey

    2015-01-01

    Background In Malawi, maternal mortality remains high. Existing maternal death reviews fail to adequately review most deaths, or capture those that occur outside the health system. We assessed the value of community involvement to improve capture and response to community maternal deaths. Methods We designed and piloted a community-linked maternal death review (CLMDR) process in Mchinji District, Malawi, which partnered community and health facility stakeholders to identify and review maternal deaths and generate actions to prevent future deaths. The CLMDR process involved five stages: community verbal autopsy, community and facility review meetings, a public meeting and bimonthly reviews involving both community and facility representatives. Results The CLMDR process was found to be comparable to a previous research-driven surveillance system at identifying deaths in Mchinji District (population 456 500 in 2008). 52 maternal deaths were identified between July 2011 and June 2012, 27 (52%) of which would not have been identified without community involvement. Based on district estimates of population (500 000) and crude birth rate (35 births per 1000 population), the maternal mortality ratio was around 300 maternal deaths per 100 000 live births. Of the 41 cases that started the CLMDR process, 28 (68%) completed all five stages. We found the CLMDR process to increase the quantity of information available and to involve a wider range of stakeholders in maternal death review (MDR). The process resulted in high rates of completion of community-planned actions (82%), and district hospital (67%) and health centre (65%) actions to prevent maternal deaths. Conclusions CLMDR is an important addition to the established forms of MDR. It shows potential as a maternal death surveillance system, and may be applicable to similar contexts with high maternal mortality. PMID:25897028

  3. A possible link between life and death of a xeric tree in desert.

    PubMed

    Xu, Gui-Qing; McDowell, Nate G; Li, Yan

    2016-05-01

    Understanding the interactions between drought and tree ontogeny or size remains an essential research priority because size-specific mortality patterns have large impacts on ecosystem structure and function, determine forest carbon storage capacity, and are sensitive to climatic change. Here we investigate a xerophytic tree species (Haloxylon ammodendron (C.A. Mey.)) with which the changes in biomass allocation with tree size may play an important role in size-specific mortality patterns. Size-related changes in biomass allocation, root distribution, plant water status, gas exchange, hydraulic architecture and non-structural carbohydrate reserves of this xerophytic tree species were investigated to assess their potential role in the observed U-shaped mortality pattern. We found that excessively negative water potentials (<-4.7MPa, beyond the P50leaf of -4.1MPa) during prolonged drought in young trees lead to hydraulic failure; while the imbalance of photoassimilate allocation between leaf and root system in larger trees, accompanied with declining C reserves (<2% dry matter across four tissues), might have led to carbon starvation. The drought-resistance strategy of this species is preferential biomass allocation to the roots to improve water capture. In young trees, the drought-resistance strategy is not well developed, and hydraulic failure appears to be the dominant driver of mortality during drought. With old trees, excess root growth at the expense of leaf area may lead to carbon starvation during prolonged drought. Our results suggest that the drought-resistance strategy of this xeric tree is closely linked to its life and death: well-developed drought-resistance strategy means life, while underdeveloped or overdeveloped drought-resistance strategy means death. PMID:26968083

  4. Linking families and facilities for care at birth: What works to avert intrapartum-related deaths?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Anne CC; Lawn, Joy E.; Cousens, Simon; Kumar, Vishwajeet; Osrin, David; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A.; Wall, Steven N.; Nandakumar, Allyala K.; Syed, Uzma; Darmstadt, Gary L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Delays in receiving effective care during labor and at birth may be fatal for the mother and fetus, contributing to 2 million annual intrapartum stillbirths and intrapartum-related neonatal deaths each year. Objective We present a systematic review of strategies to link families and facilities, including community mobilization, financial incentives, emergency referral and transport systems, prenatal risk screening, and maternity waiting homes. Results There is moderate quality evidence that community mobilization with high levels of community engagement can increase institutional births and significantly reduce perinatal and early neonatal mortality. Meta-analysis showed a doubling of skilled birth attendance and a 35% reduction in early neonatal mortality. However, no data are available on intrapartum-specific outcomes. Evidence is limited, but promising, that financial incentive schemes and community referral/transport systems may increase rates of skilled birth attendance and emergency obstetric care utilization; however, impact on mortality is unknown. Current evidence for maternity waiting homes and risk screening is low quality. Conclusions Empowering communities is an important strategy to reduce the large burden of intrapartum complications. Innovations are needed to bring the poor closer to obstetric care, such as financial incentives and cell phone technology. New questions need to be asked of “old” strategies such as risk screening and maternity waiting homes. The effect of all of these strategies on maternal and perinatal mortality, particularly intrapartum-related outcomes, requires further evaluation. PMID:19815201

  5. Sister-sister incest: data from an anonymous computerized survey.

    PubMed

    Stroebel, Sandra S; O'Keefe, Stephen L; Griffee, Karen; Kuo, Shih-Ya; Beard, Keith W; Kommor, Martin J

    2013-01-01

    Retrospective data were entered anonymously by 1,521 adult women using a computer-assisted self-interview. Thirty-one participants were victims of sister-sister incest, 40 were victims of brother-sister incest, 19 were victims of father-daughter incest, 8 were victims of sexual abuse by an adult female (including one mother), and 232 were victims of sexual abuse by an adult male other than their father before reaching 18 years of age. The rest (1,203) served as controls. The victims of sister-sister incest had significantly more problematic outcomes than controls on many measures as adults. Victims of sister-sister incest were more depressed and more likely than controls to be distant from the perpetrator-sister and to have traded sex for money, experienced an unplanned pregnancy, engaged in four different types of masturbation, and engaged in 13 different same-sex behaviors. Our findings were consistent with other reports of early eroticization and persistent hypereroticization of incest victims. PMID:23924178

  6. Aluminum adjuvant linked to Gulf War illness induces motor neuron death in mice.

    PubMed

    Petrik, Michael S; Wong, Margaret C; Tabata, Rena C; Garry, Robert F; Shaw, Christopher A

    2007-01-01

    Gulf War illness (GWI) affects a significant percentage of veterans of the 1991 conflict, but its origin remains unknown. Associated with some cases of GWI are increased incidences of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and other neurological disorders. Whereas many environmental factors have been linked to GWI, the role of the anthrax vaccine has come under increasing scrutiny. Among the vaccine's potentially toxic components are the adjuvants aluminum hydroxide and squalene. To examine whether these compounds might contribute to neuronal deficits associated with GWI, an animal model for examining the potential neurological impact of aluminum hydroxide, squalene, or aluminum hydroxide combined with squalene was developed. Young, male colony CD-1 mice were injected with the adjuvants at doses equivalent to those given to US military service personnel. All mice were subjected to a battery of motor and cognitive-behavioral tests over a 6-mo period postinjections. Following sacrifice, central nervous system tissues were examined using immunohistochemistry for evidence of inflammation and cell death. Behavioral testing showed motor deficits in the aluminum treatment group that expressed as a progressive decrease in strength measured by the wire-mesh hang test (final deficit at 24 wk; about 50%). Significant cognitive deficits in water-maze learning were observed in the combined aluminum and squalene group (4.3 errors per trial) compared with the controls (0.2 errors per trial) after 20 wk. Apoptotic neurons were identified in aluminum-injected animals that showed significantly increased activated caspase-3 labeling in lumbar spinal cord (255%) and primary motor cortex (192%) compared with the controls. Aluminum-treated groups also showed significant motor neuron loss (35%) and increased numbers of astrocytes (350%) in the lumbar spinal cord. The findings suggest a possible role for the aluminum adjuvant in some neurological features associated with GWI and possibly an

  7. On the feasibility of linking census samples to the National Death Index for epidemiologic studies: a progress report.

    PubMed

    Rogot, E; Feinleib, M; Ockay, K A; Schwartz, S H; Bilgrad, R; Patterson, J E

    1983-11-01

    To test the feasibility of using large national probability samples provided by the US Census Bureau, a pilot project was initiated to link 230,000 Census-type records to the National Death Index (NDI). Using strict precautions to maintain the complete confidentiality of individual records, the Current Population Survey files of one month in 1973 and one month in 1978 were matched by computer to the 1979 NDI file. The basic question to be addressed was whether deaths so obtained are seriously underestimated when there is no Social Security Number (SSN) in the Census record. The search of the NDI file resulted in 5,542 matches of which about 1,800 appear to be "true positives" representing deaths, the remainder are "false positives." Of the deaths, 80 per cent would still have been detected without SSN in the Census record. The main reasons for missing deaths (false negatives) were discrepancies in the year of birth and in the given name. Assuming certain changes in the NDI matching algorithm, the 80 per cent figure could increase to 85 per cent or higher; however, this could also cause significant increases in the number of false positives. The National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) and Census Bureau staff are currently developing a probabilistic method to eliminate false positives from the NDI output tape. The results of the pilot study indicate that a larger research project is clearly feasible. PMID:6625029

  8. Where are Sedna's Sisters?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, D. F.

    2005-05-01

    Simulations of the formation of the Oort cloud from the Kuiper Belt typically are presented as an animated scatter diagram. Here the orbit of each object appears as a point of perihelion distance q and semi-major axis a. (eg. Levison, Morbidelli, & Dones 2004). These plots show a conspicuous void, bounded by the inequalities: q < a, q > 50 AU, and a < 5000-10000 AU. Brown (2005) calls this void the ``Bermuda Triangle". The only present occupant is Sedna (q=76 AU, a=501 AU). Brown, Trujillo, & Rabinowitz , the discovers of Sedna, have challenged others to explain how Sedna got inside the triangle and to predict where similar objects might be found. Sedna could not have simply formed in its current orbit by the accumulation of smaller objects (Stern 2005). Several authors have suggested that a passing star scattered Sedna into the triangle shortly after the birth of the solar system. Here I offer an alternative which uses the very strong galactic tidal forces of the Sinusoidal potential (Bartlett 2001, 2004). In this potential, the numerator of Newton's law is replaced by GM cos(ko r) where ko = 2 π / lambdao and the 'wavelength' λ o is 425 pc. The 20 radial oscillations between the sun and the center of the Galaxy give tidal forces that are 120 times as big as generally expected. I will show how this tidal force, acting over the lifetime of the solar system, could move the perihelion of Sedna from about 40 to 76 AU. Sedna's sisters are likely to have still larger q & a and to have perihelia in two specific quadrants of the ecliptic plane.

  9. Evidence links increases in public health spending to declines in preventable deaths.

    PubMed

    Mays, Glen P; Smith, Sharla A

    2011-08-01

    Public health encompasses a broad array of programs designed to prevent the occurrence of disease and injury within communities. But policy makers have little evidence to draw on when determining the value of investments in these program activities, which currently account for less than 5 percent of US health spending. We examine whether changes in spending by local public health agencies over a thirteen-year period contributed to changes in rates of community mortality from preventable causes of death, including infant mortality and deaths due to cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and cancer. We found that mortality rates fell between 1.1 percent and 6.9 percent for each 10 percent increase in local public health spending. These results suggest that increased public health investments can produce measurable improvements in health, especially in low-resource communities. However, more money by itself is unlikely to generate significant and sustainable health gains; improvements in public health practices are needed as well. PMID:21778174

  10. Neuromyelitis optica in Japanese sisters.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yuji; Yoshikura, Nobuaki; Harada, Naoko; Yamada, Megumi; Koumura, Akihiro; Sakurai, Takeo; Hayashi, Yuichi; Kimura, Akio; Hozumi, Isao; Moriwaki, Hisataka; Inuzuka, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    We report cases of Japanese sisters with neuromyelitis optica (NMO). The elder sister was 25, when she was diagnosed with right optic neuritis. After 3 months, she developed left optic neuritis and myelitis. At age 27, she had the second relapse, but she has been free from episodes thereafter. The younger sister was 26, when she was diagnosed with optic neuritis. Thus far, she has 9 relapses, comprising both myelitis and optic neuritis. Both sisters had normal brain MRI scans, longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis over 3 vertebral segments, and positive results for anti-aquaporin-4 antibody (AQAP4Ab). They fulfilled the Wingerchuk criteria for definite NMO. Both sisters shared some immunogenetic factors, but they were not exposed to the same environmental factors after their early twenties. The final disability status was almost the same in both cases, and both showed a very benign course. These data suggest that genetic factors affect the age at onset and environmental factors may affect the frequency of relapse. PMID:22082898

  11. Investigations into the Mechanisms of Cell Death: The Common Link between Anticancer Nanotherapeutics and Nanotoxicology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minocha, Shalini

    Nanotoxicology and anticancer nanotherapeutics are essentially two sides of the same coin. The nanotoxicology discipline deals with the nanoparticle (NP)-induced toxicity and mechanisms of cell death in healthy cells, whereas anticancer agents delivered via nano-based approaches aim to induce cell death in abnormally proliferating cancer cells. The objectives of the studies presented herein were two-fold; to (a) systematically study the physico-chemical properties and cell death mechanisms of model NPs and (b) utilize the knowledge gained from cell death-nanotoxicity studies in developing a potentially novel anticancer nanotherapeutic agent. For the first objective, the effect of a distinguishing characteristic, i.e., surface carbon coating on the matched pairs of carbon-coated and non-coated copper and nickel NPs (Cu, C-Cu, Ni and C-Ni) on the physico-chemical properties and toxicity in A549 alveolar epithelial cells were evaluated. The effect of carbon coating on particle size, zeta potential, oxidation state, cellular uptake, release of soluble metal and concentration dependent toxicity of Cu and Ni NPs was systematically evaluated. A significant effect of carbon coating was observed on the physico-chemical properties, interaction with cellular membranes, and overall toxicity of the NPs. C-Cu NPs, compared to Cu NPs, showed four-fold lower release of soluble copper, ten-fold higher cellular uptake and protection against surface oxidation. In toxicity assays, C-Cu NPs induced higher mitochondrial damage than Cu NPs whereas Cu NPs were associated with a significant damage to plasma membrane integrity. Nickel and carbon coated nickel NPs were less toxic compared to Cu and C-Cu NPs. Thus, by studying the effect of carbon coating, correlations between physico-chemical properties and toxicity of NPs were established. The second objective was focused on utilizing nano-based approaches for the intracellular delivery of an anticancer agent, Cytochrome c (Cyt c), to

  12. Linking pattern recognition and salicylic acid responses in Arabidopsis through ACCELERATED CELL DEATH6 and receptors

    PubMed Central

    Tateda, Chika; Zhang, Zhongqin; Greenberg, Jean T

    2015-01-01

    The Arabidopsis membrane protein ACCELERATED CELL DEATH 6 (ACD6) and the defense signal salicylic acid (SA) are part of a positive feedback loop that regulates the levels of at least 2 pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMP) receptors, including FLAGELLIN SENSING 2 (FLS2) and CHITIN ELICITOR RECEPTOR (LYSM domain receptor-like kinase 1, CERK1). ACD6- and SA-mediated regulation of these receptors results in potentiation of responses to FLS2 and CERK1 ligands (e.g. flg22 and chitin, respectively). ACD6, FLS2 and CERK1 are also important for callose induction in response to an SA agonist even in the absence of PAMPs. Here, we report that another receptor, EF-Tu RECEPTOR (EFR) is also part of the ACD6/SA signaling network, similar to FLS2 and CERK1. PMID:26442718

  13. Weather and Death on Mount Everest: Is there a link between Storms and Human Physiology?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, K.; Semple, J.

    2004-05-01

    Scientific interest in Mount Everest has been largely focused on the hypoxia caused by the summit's low barometric pressure. Although weather is recognized as a significant risk factor, it has not been extensively studied. Through the use of observations made at the mountain's South Col, elevation 7986m, and other datasets, we show that high impact weather events on Mount Everest, including the May 1996 storm in which 8 climbers perished, are often associated with continental-scale intrusions of stratospheric air into the upper-troposphere. The variability in wind speeds associated with these intrusions triggered convective activity that resulted in the high impact weather. In addition, the validation of existing meteorological data allows for useful insights into the possibility of forecasting these high impact weather events and their physiological impacts thereby mitigating deaths that occur on the exposed upper slopes of Mount Everest.

  14. Sudden infant death syndrome and placental disorders: the thyroid-selenium link.

    PubMed

    Reid, G M; Tervit, H

    1997-04-01

    Placental insufficiency, inducing hypoxia-ischaemia, is considered a major cause of neuronal injury and impaired post natal development. Placental insufficiency alters the metabolism of arachidonic acid and its oxidation products. Premature labour and low-birth-weight infants are associated with reduced intrauterine blood-flow and infections of the reproductive tract. Thyroidal activity is depressed in undernutrition (placental insufficiency). Premature infants require extra vitamin C for normal tyrosine metabolism (tyrosine is the thyroxine precursor). Among the symptoms indicating infantile cretinism, which appear during 3-5 months of age are: delayed union of skull bones, torpid behaviour, slow feeding, cyanosis during feeding, excessive sleepiness, enlarged tongue, umbilical herniation, flabby musculature, short stature and delayed development. These symptoms have all been described in low-birth-weight infants and sudden infant death syndrome victims by various authors. Bacteria utilize selenium (at the expense of host tissue). Escherichia coli is among the bacteria invading the reproductive tract. E. coli produce thiouracil and are goitrogenic. Some strains of E. coli produce phospholipase A2 which releases arachidonic acid from phospholipids for prostaglandin synthesis. Phospholipase A2 is more active against peroxidized than non-peroxidized lipids. Bacterial competition for intrauterine selenium and goitrogenic bacterial infections of the reproductive tract during pregnancy, depress thyroid function in the fetus but not in the mother. PMID:9160285

  15. The Shannoniella sisters (Diptera: Rhinophoridae).

    PubMed

    Nihei, Silvio S; Andrade, Marcos R; Pape, Thomas; Cerretti, Pierfilippo

    2016-01-01

    Shannoniella cuspidata Townsend, 1939 is redescribed and S. setinervis sp. nov. (Brazil, State of Rio de Janeiro) is newly described as its putative sister taxon, thereby allowing for a strict definition of the genus Shannoniella Townsend, 1939 through explicit synapomorphies. An identification key is provided. PMID:27395483

  16. All in the Family: The Sister Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues All in the Family: The Sister Study Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of ... in their daily lives. Want to Volunteer for the Sister Study? To volunteer or learn more about ...

  17. Novel Insights into the Molecular Events Linking to Cell Death Induced by Tetracycline in the Amitochondriate Protozoan Trichomonas vaginalis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Kuo-Yang; Ku, Fu-Man; Cheng, Wei-Hung; Lee, Chi-Ching; Huang, Po-Jung; Chu, Lichieh Julie; Cheng, Chih-Chieh; Fang, Yi-Kai; Wu, Hsueh-Hsia

    2015-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis colonizes the human urogenital tract and causes trichomoniasis, the most common nonviral sexually transmitted disease. Currently, 5-nitroimidazoles are the only recommended drugs for treating trichomoniasis. However, increased resistance of the parasite to 5-nitroimidazoles has emerged as a highly problematic public health issue. Hence, it is essential to identify alternative chemotherapeutic agents against refractory trichomoniasis. Tetracycline (TET) is a broad-spectrum antibiotic with activity against several protozoan parasites, but the mode of action of TET in parasites remains poorly understood. The in vitro effect of TET on the growth of T. vaginalis was examined, and the mode of cell death was verified by various apoptosis-related assays. Next-generation sequencing-based RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) was employed to elucidate the transcriptome of T. vaginalis in response to TET. We show that TET has a cytotoxic effect on both metronidazole (MTZ)-sensitive and -resistant T. vaginalis isolates, inducing some features resembling apoptosis. RNA-seq data reveal that TET significantly alters the transcriptome via activation of specific pathways, such as aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases and carbohydrate metabolism. Functional analyses demonstrate that TET disrupts the hydrogenosomal membrane potential and antioxidant system, which concomitantly elicits a metabolic shift toward glycolysis, suggesting that the hydrogenosomal function is impaired and triggers cell death. Collectively, we provide in vitro evidence that TET is a potential alternative therapeutic choice for treating MTZ-resistant T. vaginalis. The in-depth transcriptomic signatures in T. vaginalis upon TET treatment presented here will shed light on the signaling pathways linking to cell death in amitochondriate organisms. PMID:26303799

  18. Nonzero-temperature entanglement negativity of quantum spin models: Area law, linked cluster expansions, and sudden death.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Nicholas E; Devakul, Trithep; Hastings, Matthew B; Singh, Rajiv R P

    2016-02-01

    We show that the bipartite logarithmic entanglement negativity (EN) of quantum spin models obeys an area law at all nonzero temperatures. We develop numerical linked cluster (NLC) expansions for the "area-law" logarithmic entanglement negativity as a function of temperature and other parameters. For one-dimensional models the results of NLC are compared with exact diagonalization on finite systems and are found to agree very well. The NLC results are also obtained for two dimensional XXZ and transverse field Ising models. In all cases, we find a sudden onset (or sudden death) of negativity at a finite temperature above which the negativity is zero. We use perturbation theory to develop a physical picture for this sudden onset (or sudden death). The onset of EN or its magnitude are insensitive to classical finite-temperature phase transitions, supporting the argument for absence of any role of quantum mechanics at such transitions. On approach to a quantum critical point at T=0, negativity shows critical scaling in size and temperature. PMID:26986309

  19. Nonzero-temperature entanglement negativity of quantum spin models: Area law, linked cluster expansions, and sudden death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Nicholas E.; Devakul, Trithep; Hastings, Matthew B.; Singh, Rajiv R. P.

    2016-02-01

    We show that the bipartite logarithmic entanglement negativity (EN) of quantum spin models obeys an area law at all nonzero temperatures. We develop numerical linked cluster (NLC) expansions for the "area-law" logarithmic entanglement negativity as a function of temperature and other parameters. For one-dimensional models the results of NLC are compared with exact diagonalization on finite systems and are found to agree very well. The NLC results are also obtained for two dimensional X X Z and transverse field Ising models. In all cases, we find a sudden onset (or sudden death) of negativity at a finite temperature above which the negativity is zero. We use perturbation theory to develop a physical picture for this sudden onset (or sudden death). The onset of EN or its magnitude are insensitive to classical finite-temperature phase transitions, supporting the argument for absence of any role of quantum mechanics at such transitions. On approach to a quantum critical point at T =0 , negativity shows critical scaling in size and temperature.

  20. A Brief Analysis of Sister Carrie's Character

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Hanying

    2010-01-01

    Carrie is always dreaming while the rocking chair is rocking again and again, this is the deep impression on us after we read "Sister Carrie" which is the first novel of Theodore Dreiser. In this novel the protagonist Sister Carrie is a controversial person. This paper tries to analyze the character of Sister Carrie in order to find out…

  1. Sister R. Leadership: Doing the Seemingly Impossible

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sena, Rachel; Schoorman, Dilys; Bogotch, Ira

    2013-01-01

    Sister R., the first author, is a Dominican Sister of Peace. Until recently, Sister R. had been the director of the Maya Ministry Family Literacy Program, working with the Maya Community in Lake Worth, Palm Beach County, Florida. She described her work with these indigenous, preliterate, hardworking peoples as "a university of the poor" in which…

  2. Two Sisters with Rett Syndrome. Brief Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haenggeli, Charles A.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Clinical histories and physical findings are presented for 2 sisters with Rett syndrome. The older sister, age 25, was typically affected, whereas the younger sister, 22 years old, was affected with a seizure disorder showing an unusually early onset. The paper discusses hypotheses in genetic causation of Rett syndrome. (JDD)

  3. EarthLabs Meet Sister Corita Kent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quartini, E.; Ellins, K. K.; Cavitte, M. G.; Thirumalai, K.; Ledley, T. S.; Haddad, N.; Lynds, S. E.

    2013-12-01

    The EarthLabs project provides a framework to enhance high school students' climate literacy and awareness of climate change. The project provides climate science curriculum and teacher professional development, followed by research on students' learning as teachers implement EarthLabs climate modules in the classroom. The professional development targets high school teachers whose professional growth is structured around exposure to current climate science research, data observation collection and analysis. During summer workshops in Texas and Mississippi, teachers work through the laboratories, experiments, and hand-on activities developed for their students. In summer 2013, three graduate students from the University of Texas at Austin Institute for Geophysics with expertise in climate science participated in two weeklong workshops. The graduate students partnered with exemplary teacher leaders to provide scientific content and lead the EarthLabs learning activities. As an experiment, we integrated a visit to the Blanton Museum and an associated activity in order to motivate participants to think creatively, as well as analytically, about science. This exercise was inspired by the work and educational philosophy of Sister Corita Kent. During the visit to the Blanton Museum, we steered participants towards specific works of art pre-selected to emphasize aspects of the climate of Texas and to draw participants' attention to ways in which artists convey different concepts. For example, artists use of color, lines, and symbols conjure emotional responses to imagery in the viewer. The second part of the exercise asked participants to choose a climate message and to convey this through a collage. We encouraged participants to combine their experience at the museum with examples of Sister Corita Kent's artwork. We gave them simple guidelines for the project based on techniques and teaching of Sister Corita Kent. Evaluation results reveal that participants enjoyed the

  4. Nuclear localized protein-1 (Nulp1) increases cell death of human osteosarcoma cells and binds the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein

    SciTech Connect

    Steen, Hakan; Lindholm, Dan

    2008-02-08

    Nuclear localized protein-1 (Nulp1) is a recently identified gene expressed in mouse and human tissues particularly during embryonic development. Nulp1 belongs to the family of basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins that are important in development. The precise function of Nulp1 in cells is however not known. We observed that overexpression of Nulp1 induces a large increase in cell death of human osteosarcoma Saos2 cells with DNA fragmentation. In mouse N2A neuroblastoma cells Nulp1 affected cell proliferation and sensitized cells towards death induced by staurosporine. Staining using a novel antibody localized Nulp1 mainly to the cell nucleus and to some extent to the cytoplasm. Nulp1 binds the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) and this interaction was increased during cell death. These results indicate that Nulp1 plays a role in cell death control and may influence tumor growth.

  5. 78 FR 45061 - Safety Zone; Sister Bay Marina Fest Fireworks and Ski Show, Sister Bay, WI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-26

    ...The Coast Guard is establishing a temporary safety zone on Sister Bay near Sister Bay, WI. This safety zone is intended to restrict vessels from a portion of Sister Bay due to a fireworks display and ski show. This temporary safety zone is necessary to protect the surrounding public and vessels from the hazards associated with the fireworks display and ski show in Sister Bay on August 31,...

  6. The sister bonding of duplicated chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Hui

    2011-01-01

    Sister chromatid cohesion and separation are two fundamental chromosome dynamics that are essential to equal chromosome segregation during cell proliferation. In this review, I will discuss the major steps that regulate these dynamics during mitosis, with an emphasis on vertebrate cells. The implications of these machineries outside of sister chromatid cohesion and separation are also discussed. PMID:21497666

  7. Apoptosis Inducing Factor Binding Protein PGAM5 Triggers Mitophagic Cell Death That Is Inhibited by the Ubiquitin Ligase Activity of X-Linked Inhibitor of Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Lenhausen, Audrey M; Wilkinson, Amanda S; Lewis, Eric M; Dailey, Kaitlin M; Scott, Andrew J; Khan, Shahzeb; Wilkinson, John C

    2016-06-14

    Apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) plays a well-defined role in controlling cell death but is also a critical factor for maintaining mitochondrial energy homeostasis; how these dueling activities are balanced has remained largely elusive. To identify new AIF binding partners that may define the continuum of AIF cellular regulation, a biochemical screen was performed that identified the mitochondrial phosphoglycerate mutase 5 (PGAM5) as an AIF associated factor. AIF binds both the short and long isoforms of PGAM5 and can reduce the ability of PGAM5 to control antioxidant responses. Transient overexpression of either PGAM5 isoform triggers caspase activation and cell death, and while AIF could reduce this caspase activation neither AIF expression nor caspase activity is required for PGAM5-mediated death. PGAM5 toxicity morphologically and biochemically resembles mitophagic cell death and is inhibited by the AIF binding protein X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) in a manner that depends on the ubiquitin ligase activity of XIAP. The phosphatase activity of PGAM5 was not required for cell death, and comparison of phosphatase activity between short and long PGAM5 isoforms suggested that only the long isoform is catalytically competent. This property correlated with an increased ability of PGAM5L to form dimers and/or higher order oligomers in intact cells compared to PGAM5S. Overall this study identifies an AIF/PGAM5/XIAP axis that can regulate PGAM5 activities related to the antioxidant response and mitophagy. PMID:27218139

  8. Creating Sister Cities: An Exchange Across Hemispheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, M. T.; Cabezon, S. A.; Hardy, E.; Harrison, R. J.

    2008-06-01

    Sponsored by Associated Universities, Inc. (AUI) and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), this project creates a cultural and educational exchange program between communities in South and North America, linking San Pedro de Atacama in Chile and Magdalena, New Mexico in the United States. Both communities have similar demographics, are in relatively undeveloped regions of high-elevation desert, and are located near major international radio astronomy research facilities. The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) is just 40 km east of San Pedro; the Very Large Array (VLA) is just 40 km west of Magdalena. In February 2007, the Mayor of San Pedro and two teachers visited Magdalena for two weeks; in July 2007 three teachers from Magdalena will visit San Pedro. These visits enable the communities to lay the foundation for a permanent, unique partnership. The teachers are sharing expertise and teaching methodologies for physics and astronomy. In addition to creating science education opportunities, this project offers students linguistic and cultural connections. The town of San Pedro, Chile, hosts nearly 100,000 tourists per year, and English language skills are highly valued by local students. Through exchanges enabled by email and distance conferencing, San Pedro and Magdalena students will improve English and Spanish language skills while teaching each other about science and their respective cultures. This poster describes the AUI/NRAO Sister Cities program, including the challenges of cross-cultural communication and the rewards of interpersonal exchanges between continents and cultures.

  9. When Your Brother or Sister Has Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Tips on what to say to your friends, how to deal with stress, and where to find support – as well as information about cancer and cancer treatments, for young people who have a brother or sister with cancer.

  10. All in the Family: The Sister Study

    MedlinePlus

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues All in the Family: The Sister Study Past Issues / ... that may ultimately eliminate this dreaded disease. We all know that breast cancer does not discriminate. Whether ...

  11. Eruptive history of South Sister, Oregon Cascades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fierstein, J.; Hildreth, W.; Calvert, A.T.

    2011-01-01

    South Sister is southernmost and highest of the Three Sisters, three geologically dissimilar stratovolcanoes that together form a spectacular 20km reach along the Cascade crest in Oregon. North Sister is a monotonously mafic edifice as old as middle Pleistocene, Middle Sister a basalt-andesite-dacite cone built between 48 and 14ka, and South Sister is a basalt-free edifice that alternated rhyolitic and intermediate modes from 50ka to 2ka (largely contemporaneous with Middle Sister). Detailed mapping, 330 chemical analyses, and 42 radioisotopic ages show that the oldest exposed South Sister lavas were initially rhyolitic ~50ka. By ~37ka, rhyolitic lava flows and domes (72-74% SiO2) began alternating with radially emplaced dacite (63-68% SiO2) and andesite (59-63% SiO2) lava flows. Construction of a broad cone of silicic andesite-dacite (61-64% SiO2) culminated ~30ka in a dominantly explosive sequence that began with crater-forming andesitic eruptions that left fragmental deposits at least 200m thick. This was followed at ~27ka by growth of a steeply dipping summit cone of agglutinate-dominated andesite (56-60.5% SiO2) and formation of a summit crater ~800m wide. This crater was soon filled and overtopped by a thick dacite lava flow and then by >150m of dacitic pyroclastic ejecta. Small-volume dacite lavas (63-67% SiO2) locally cap the pyroclastic pile. A final sheet of mafic agglutinate (54-56% SiO2) - the most mafic product of South Sister - erupted from and drapes the small (300-m-wide) present-day summit crater, ending a summit-building sequence that lasted until ~22ka. A 20kyr-long-hiatus was broken by rhyolite eruptions that produced (1) the Rock Mesa coulee, tephra, and satellite domelets (73.5% SiO2) and (2) the Devils Chain of ~20 domes and short coulees (72.3-72.8% SiO2) from N-S vent alignments on South Sister's flanks. The compositional reversal from mafic summit agglutinate to recent rhyolites epitomizes the frequently changing compositional modes of the

  12. [Two Dutch sisters in analysis with Freud].

    PubMed

    Stroeken, Harry

    2010-01-01

    The author provides persuasive or at least plausible data for the identity of two patients recorded by Freud in his working season of 1910/11. They were two sisters, living in The Hague/Leiden, who came from a rich banker's family, the van der Lindens. Whereas the treatment does not seem to have led to any decisive improvement for the older of the two, it may have encouraged the younger sister to seek divorce. PMID:20503771

  13. "If I only touch her cloak": the Sisters of Charity of St. Joseph in New Orleans hospital, 1834-1860.

    PubMed

    Kong, Hyejung Grace; Kim, Ock-Joo

    2015-04-01

    wearing a distinctive religious garment, they eschewed female dependence and sexuality. As medical and religious attendants at the sick wards, the sisters played a vital role in preparing the patients for a "good death" as well as spiritual wellness. By waging their own war on the Protestant influences, the sisters did their best to build their own sacred place in caring for sick bodies and saving souls. Through the research on the Sisters of Charity at Charity Hospital, this study ultimately sheds light on the ways in which a nineteenth-century southern hospital functioned as a unique environment for the recovery of wellness of the body and soul, shaped and envisioned by the Catholic sister-nurses' gender and religious identities. PMID:25985782

  14. Perceptions of "Big Sisters" and Their "Little Sisters" Regarding Mentoring Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quarles, Alice; Maldonado, Nancy L.; Lacey, Candace H.; Thompson, Steve D.

    2008-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the relationships between six Little Sisters (mentees) and their Big Sisters (mentors) to develop an understanding of the perceptions of high-risk adolescent female mentees and their mentors regarding their mentoring relationships. Participants were purposefully selected--those actively involved in a formal…

  15. [Wilson-Konovalov disease in 3 sisters: a radical change in prognosis if timely diagnosed].

    PubMed

    Rozina, T P; Ignatova, T M; Solov'eva, O V

    2014-01-01

    Wilson-Konovalov disease is a rare autosomal recessive genetic disorder in which copper accumulates in the liver, brain and other target organs. The paper describes a family case of the abdominal form of the disease in three sisters, the eldest of them died from fulminant liver failure at the age of 18 years. The second sister aged 16 years was diagnosed as having the disease at the stage of decompensated liver cirrhosis; her treatment with D-penicillamine resulted in complete disease remission. The youngest sister was diagnosed with the disease at the preclinical stage, which could expect its good prognosis. However, the patient's refusal of treatment led to death from liver failure. This case demonstrates the importance of timely diagnosis and the possibility of dramatic improvement in prognosis even at the stage of decompensated liver cirrhosis. PMID:24864473

  16. SISTER CHROMATID EXCHANGES IN MAMMALIAN MEIOTIC CHROMOSOMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Very little is known about sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) in meiotic cells--only that they occur (1) and reveal frequency and distribution patterns apparently unaffected by cross-over (CO) exchange conditions in those cells; (2) unfortunately, the number of studies from which ...

  17. Sisters at Work: Career and Community Changes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briody, Elizabeth K.; Sullivan, Teresa A.

    1988-01-01

    The authors examine occupational differentiation of U.S. Catholic nuns before and since the Second Vatican Council. Data were collected from interviews with 30 sisters representing 11 congregations. The analysis relates the diversification of their careers to changes in ideology and life-style and to the changing demographic and financial status…

  18. Mechanics of Sister Chromatids studied with a Polymer Model English</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zhang, Yang; Isbaner, Sebastian; Heermann, Dieter</p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Sister</span> chromatid cohesion denotes the phenomenon that <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids are initially attached to each other in mitosis to guarantee the error-free distribution into the daughter cells. Cohesion is mediated by binding proteins and only resolved after mitotic chromosome condensation is completed. However, the amount of attachement points required to maintain <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion while still allowing proper chromosome condensation is not known yet. Additionally the impact of cohesion on the mechanical properties of chromosomes also poses an interesting problem. In this work we study the conformational and mechanical properties of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids by means of computer simulations. We model both protein-mediated cohesion between <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids and chromosome condensation with a dynamic binding mechanisms. We show in a phase diagram that only specific <span class="hlt">link</span> concentrations lead to connected and fully condensed chromatids that do not intermingle with each other nor separate due to entropic forces. Furthermore we show that dynamic bonding between chromatids decrease the Young's modulus compared to non-bonded chromatids.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=crocodile&pg=3&id=EJ537653','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=crocodile&pg=3&id=EJ537653"><span id="translatedtitle">Crocodile Talk: Attributions of Incestuously Abused and Nonabused <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Monahan, Kathleen</p> <p>1997-01-01</p> <p>This qualitative study analyzed the retrospective attributions of adult <span class="hlt">sisters</span> (five abused <span class="hlt">sister</span> dyads, and five abused and nonabused <span class="hlt">sister</span> dyads) who grew up in incestuous families. It examined the attributions of subjects regarding the general sibling group; victim selection and nonselection; and attributions regarding jealousy, protection,…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=nuns&pg=2&id=EJ656516','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=nuns&pg=2&id=EJ656516"><span id="translatedtitle">The Lay <span class="hlt">Sister</span> in Educational History and Memory.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Jack, Christine Trimingham</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>Focuses on the construction of lay <span class="hlt">sisters</span> in a religious order and school setting using a poststructuralist orientation. Explains that in the study documents were examined and interviews were conducted with ex-students, choir nuns, and a lay <span class="hlt">sister</span> at a small Catholic girls-preparatory boarding school. Explores the narrative of one lay <span class="hlt">sister</span>.…</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>1</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_2");'>2</a></li> <li class="active"><span>3</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_3 --> <div id="page_4" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_2");'>2</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");'>3</a></li> <li class="active"><span>4</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="61"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-03-07/pdf/2012-5533.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-03-07/pdf/2012-5533.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">77 FR 13585 - Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> Irrigation District; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing and Soliciting...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-03-07</p> <p>... COMMISSION Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> Irrigation District; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing and Soliciting..., 2012. d. Applicant: Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> Irrigation District. e. Name of Project: Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> Irrigation District Hydroelectric Project. f. Location: The proposed Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> Irrigation District...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23954140','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23954140"><span id="translatedtitle">Clinicopathologic significance of immunostaining of α-thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-<span class="hlt">linked</span> protein and <span class="hlt">death</span> domain-associated protein in neuroendocrine tumors.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Chen, Shi-Fan; Kasajima, Atsuko; Yazdani, Samaneh; Chan, Monica S M; Wang, Lin; He, Yang-Yang; Gao, Hong-Wen; Sasano, Hironobu</p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p>α-Thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-<span class="hlt">linked</span> protein (ATRX) and <span class="hlt">death</span> domain-associated protein (DAXX) genes are tumor suppressors whose mutations have been identified in sporadic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors as well as in patients with MEN1. However, it is unknown whether ATRX and DAXX alterations are specific for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor. In addition, the association of ATRX/DAXX protein loss with tumor cell proliferation has not been examined. We, therefore, immunostained ATRX and DAXX in 10 gastric, 15 duodenal, 20 rectal, 70 pancreatic, and 22 pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors with 15 nonneoplastic pancreases and 27 pancreatic adenocarcinomas to elucidate the site-specific roles of ATRX/DAXX abnormalities. At least 1 loss of ATRX and DAXX immunoreactivity was detected in all neuroendocrine tumor cases but not in any of nonneoplastic pancreatic tissues or pancreatic adenocarcinomas. The loss of DAXX protein was correlated with the Ki-67 index (ATRX, P = .904; DAXX, P = .044). The status of DAXX immunoreactivity correlated positively with World Health Organization histologic grade (P = .026). These results suggest that the status of ATRX or DAXX protein loss in neuroendocrine tumor differed among the organs in which these tumors arose, and these proteins may play site-specific roles in the development of these tumors. PMID:23954140</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2743075','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2743075"><span id="translatedtitle">Catholic Nursing <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> and Brothers and Racial Justice in Mid-20th-Century America</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Wall, Barbra Mann</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>This historical article considers nursing’s work for social justice in the 1960s civil rights movement through the lens of religious <span class="hlt">sisters</span> and brothers who advocated for racial equality. The article examines Catholic nurses’ work with African Americans in the mid-20th century that took place amid the prevailing social conditions of poverty and racial disempowerment, conditions that were <span class="hlt">linked</span> to serious health consequences. Historical methodology is used within the framework of “bearing witness,” a term often used in relation to the civil rights movement and one the <span class="hlt">sisters</span> themselves employed. Two situations involving nurses in the mid-20th century are examined: the civil rights movement in Selma, Alabama, and the actions for racial justice in Chicago, Illinois. The thoughts and actions of Catholic <span class="hlt">sister</span> and brother nurses in the mid-20th century are chronicled, including those few <span class="hlt">sister</span> nurses who stepped outside their ordinary roles in an attempt to change an unjust system entirely. PMID:19461224</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/254378','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/254378"><span id="translatedtitle">Two <span class="hlt">sisters</span> with clinical diagnosis of Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome: Is the condition in the family autosomal recessive?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Kondoh, T.; Hayashi, K.; Matsumoto, T.</p> <p>1995-10-09</p> <p>We report two <span class="hlt">sisters</span> in a family representing manifestations of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS), an X-<span class="hlt">linked</span> immunodeficiency disorder. An elder <span class="hlt">sister</span> had suffered from recurrent infections, small thrombocytopenic petechiae, purpura, and eczema for 7 years. The younger <span class="hlt">sister</span> had the same manifestations as the elder <span class="hlt">sister`s</span> for a 2-year period, and died of intracranial bleeding at age 2 years. All the laboratory data of the two patients were compatible with WAS, although they were females. Sialophorin analysis with the selective radioactive labeling method of this protein revealed that in the elder <span class="hlt">sister</span> a 115-KD band that should be specific for sialophorin was reduced in quantity, and instead an additional 135-KD fragment was present as a main band. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of the sialophorin gene and single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of the PCR product demonstrated that there were no detectable size-change nor electrophoretic mobility change in the DNA from both patients. The results indicated that their sialophorin gene structure might be normal. Studies on the mother-daughter transmission of X chromosome using a pERT84-MaeIII polymorphic marker mapped at Xp21 and HPRT gene polymorphism at Xq26 suggested that each <span class="hlt">sister</span> had inherited a different X chromosome from the mother. Two explanations are plausible for the occurrence of the WAS in our patients: the WAS in the patients is attributable to an autosomal gene mutation which may regulate the sialophorin gene expression through the WAS gene, or, alternatively, the condition in this family is an autosomal recessive disorder separated etiologically from the X-<span class="hlt">linked</span> WAS. 17 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1006063.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1006063.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Sister</span> Mary Emil Penet, I.H.M.: Founder of the <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Formation Conference</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Glisky, Joan</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>Mary Emil Penet, I.H.M., (1916-2001) used her talents and charisma to shape the first national organization of American women religious, the <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Formation Conference (SFC; 1954-1964), facilitating the integrated intellectual, spiritual, psychological, and professional development of vowed women religious. In the decade preceding Vatican II, her…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5020959','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5020959"><span id="translatedtitle">Bardet-Biedl syndrome in two <span class="hlt">sisters</span>: A rare incidence</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Varma, Chaitanya; Bhat, Ramesh Y.; Bhatt, Sonia</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Bardet-Biedl syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by retinitis pigmentosa, obesity, polydactyly, mental retardation and hypogonadism. We present two <span class="hlt">sisters</span> with this rare genetic condition.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9023020','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9023020"><span id="translatedtitle">Crocodile talk: attributions of incestuously abused and nonabused <span class="hlt">sisters</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Monahan, K</p> <p>1997-01-01</p> <p>This study is a qualitative analysis of the attributions of <span class="hlt">sisters</span> (abused and nonabused <span class="hlt">sister</span> dyads, n = 10 and abused <span class="hlt">sister</span> dyads, n = 10) who grew up in an incestuous family. While the sibling subsystem is reported to be the most important and enduring relational environment in the life of the family, little is known about the cognitions and attributions of siblings, regarding incest. This study examines the attributions of participants regarding the general sibling group, victim selection and nonselection, as well as attributions regarding jealousy, protection, and guilt within the <span class="hlt">sister</span> relationship. PMID:9023020</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2014AGUFM.B21D0073D&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2014AGUFM.B21D0073D&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">Carbon associated nitrate (CAN) in the Ediacaran Johnnie Formation, <span class="hlt">Death</span> Valley, California and <span class="hlt">links</span> to the Shuram negative carbon isotope excursion</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Dilles, Z. Y. G.; Prokopenko, M. G.; Bergmann, K.; Loyd, S. J.; Corsetti, F. A.; Berelson, W.; Gaines, R. R.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>Nitrogen, a major nutrient of marine primary production whose many redox states are <span class="hlt">linked</span> through biological processes to O2, may afford better understanding of changes in post-Great Oxidation Event (GOE) environmental redox conditions. Using a novel approach to quantify nitrate content in carbonates, we identified a trend of CAN increase in the late-Proterozoic, including several distinct peaks within a carbonate succession of the Sonora province, Mexico, deposited ~630-500 Ma. The goal of the current study was to investigate CAN variability in the context of the global "Shuram" event, a large negative δ13C excursion expressed in Rainstorm member carbonates of the Johnnie Formation in <span class="hlt">Death</span> Valley, CA. The lower Rainstorm Member "Johnnie Oolite", a time-transgressive, regionally extensive, shallow dolomitic oolite, was sampled. CAN concentrations ranged from 7.31 to 127.36 nmol/g, with higher values measured toward the base of the bed. This trend held at each sampled locality, along with a tendency towards decreasing CAN with larger magnitude negative δ13C excursions. Modern analog ooids formed in low-latitude marine environments lack CAN, consistent with their formation in low-nitrate waters of the euphotic zone characteristic of the modern ocean nitrogen cycling. In contrast, maximum values within the Johnnie oolite exceed by a factor of five to seven CAN measured in carbonates deposited below the main nitracline in the modern ocean, implying high nitrate content within shallow depositional environments. Johnnie oolite data, broadly consistent with the Sonora sequence findings, may indicate large perturbations in the Ediacaran nitrogen cycle immediately preceding the negative δ13C excursion. The implication of these findings for possible changes in the Ediacaran nitrogen, oxygen and carbon biogeochemical cycling will be further discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title46-vol4/pdf/CFR-2014-title46-vol4-sec116-210.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title46-vol4/pdf/CFR-2014-title46-vol4-sec116-210.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">46 CFR 116.210 - Plans for <span class="hlt">sister</span> vessels.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Plans for <span class="hlt">sister</span> vessels. 116.210 Section 116.210 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE... ARRANGEMENT Plans § 116.210 Plans for <span class="hlt">sister</span> vessels. (a) Plans are not required for a vessel that is a...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title46-vol4/pdf/CFR-2012-title46-vol4-sec116-210.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title46-vol4/pdf/CFR-2012-title46-vol4-sec116-210.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">46 CFR 116.210 - Plans for <span class="hlt">sister</span> vessels.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-10-01</p> <p>... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Plans for <span class="hlt">sister</span> vessels. 116.210 Section 116.210 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE... ARRANGEMENT Plans § 116.210 Plans for <span class="hlt">sister</span> vessels. (a) Plans are not required for a vessel that is a...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title46-vol7/pdf/CFR-2012-title46-vol7-sec177-210.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title46-vol7/pdf/CFR-2012-title46-vol7-sec177-210.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">46 CFR 177.210 - Plans for <span class="hlt">sister</span> vessels.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-10-01</p> <p>... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Plans for <span class="hlt">sister</span> vessels. 177.210 Section 177.210 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Plans § 177.210 Plans for <span class="hlt">sister</span> vessels. (a) Plans are not...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title46-vol7/pdf/CFR-2013-title46-vol7-sec177-210.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title46-vol7/pdf/CFR-2013-title46-vol7-sec177-210.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">46 CFR 177.210 - Plans for <span class="hlt">sister</span> vessels.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p>... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Plans for <span class="hlt">sister</span> vessels. 177.210 Section 177.210 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Plans § 177.210 Plans for <span class="hlt">sister</span> vessels. (a) Plans are not...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Cold+AND+international+AND+relations&pg=3&id=EJ437613','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Cold+AND+international+AND+relations&pg=3&id=EJ437613"><span id="translatedtitle">Building International Relations for Children through <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Schools.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Pryor, Carolyn B.</p> <p>1992-01-01</p> <p>Inspired by <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Cities International and the NASSP's school-to-school exchange program, "<span class="hlt">sister</span> school" pairings have proved to be workable educational programs with long-range impact on participants. Some post-cold war efforts include U.S.-USSR High School Academic Partnerships, Project Harmony, and Center for U.S.-USSR Initiatives. Resource…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=little+AND+girl&pg=6&id=EJ811809','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=little+AND+girl&pg=6&id=EJ811809"><span id="translatedtitle">Mentoring At-Risk Adolescent Girls: Listening to "Little <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>"</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Maldonado, Nancy L.; Quarles, Alice; Lacey, Candace H.; Thompson, Steve D.</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>In order to develop an understanding of mentoring relationships and the impact these relationships might have on the development of high-risk adolescent girls, this qualitative study explored the relationships between six "Little <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>" and their "Big <span class="hlt">Sister</span>" mentors. The purposefully-selected sample includes women and girls who were actively…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title46-vol7/pdf/CFR-2010-title46-vol7-sec177-210.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title46-vol7/pdf/CFR-2010-title46-vol7-sec177-210.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">46 CFR 177.210 - Plans for <span class="hlt">sister</span> vessels.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-10-01</p> <p>... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Plans for <span class="hlt">sister</span> vessels. 177.210 Section 177.210 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Plans § 177.210 Plans for <span class="hlt">sister</span> vessels. (a) Plans are not...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1088162','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1088162"><span id="translatedtitle">[Concordant deuteranomaly in monozygotic twin <span class="hlt">sisters</span> (author's transl)].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Franceschetti, A T; Klein, D; Dieterle, P</p> <p>1976-12-01</p> <p>Colorblind twin <span class="hlt">sisters</span> were born from the marriage of a hemizygote with a carrier for colorblindness. The proof of monozygosity is given by the blood-group typing and the dermatoglyphs. The deuteranomaly is of the same degree in each but is more marked in one of the <span class="hlt">sisters</span>. The mother has none of the microsymptoms sometimes found in carriers. PMID:1088162</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title46-vol7/pdf/CFR-2011-title46-vol7-sec169-307.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title46-vol7/pdf/CFR-2011-title46-vol7-sec169-307.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">46 CFR 169.307 - Plans for <span class="hlt">sister</span> vessels.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-10-01</p> <p>... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Plans for <span class="hlt">sister</span> vessels. 169.307 Section 169.307 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Construction and Arrangement Plans § 169.307 Plans for <span class="hlt">sister</span> vessels. Plans are not required for any...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title46-vol7/pdf/CFR-2014-title46-vol7-sec169-307.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title46-vol7/pdf/CFR-2014-title46-vol7-sec169-307.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">46 CFR 169.307 - Plans for <span class="hlt">sister</span> vessels.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Plans for <span class="hlt">sister</span> vessels. 169.307 Section 169.307 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Construction and Arrangement Plans § 169.307 Plans for <span class="hlt">sister</span> vessels. Plans are not required for any...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title46-vol7/pdf/CFR-2010-title46-vol7-sec169-307.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title46-vol7/pdf/CFR-2010-title46-vol7-sec169-307.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">46 CFR 169.307 - Plans for <span class="hlt">sister</span> vessels.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-10-01</p> <p>... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Plans for <span class="hlt">sister</span> vessels. 169.307 Section 169.307 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Construction and Arrangement Plans § 169.307 Plans for <span class="hlt">sister</span> vessels. Plans are not required for any...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title46-vol7/pdf/CFR-2012-title46-vol7-sec169-307.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title46-vol7/pdf/CFR-2012-title46-vol7-sec169-307.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">46 CFR 169.307 - Plans for <span class="hlt">sister</span> vessels.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-10-01</p> <p>... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Plans for <span class="hlt">sister</span> vessels. 169.307 Section 169.307 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Construction and Arrangement Plans § 169.307 Plans for <span class="hlt">sister</span> vessels. Plans are not required for any...</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_2");'>2</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");'>3</a></li> <li class="active"><span>4</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_4 --> <div id="page_5" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");'>3</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li class="active"><span>5</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="81"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title46-vol7/pdf/CFR-2013-title46-vol7-sec169-307.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title46-vol7/pdf/CFR-2013-title46-vol7-sec169-307.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">46 CFR 169.307 - Plans for <span class="hlt">sister</span> vessels.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p>... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Plans for <span class="hlt">sister</span> vessels. 169.307 Section 169.307 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Construction and Arrangement Plans § 169.307 Plans for <span class="hlt">sister</span> vessels. Plans are not required for any...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8557450','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8557450"><span id="translatedtitle">A comparison of sisterhood information on causes of maternal <span class="hlt">death</span> with the registration causes of maternal <span class="hlt">death</span> in Matlab, Bangladesh.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Shahidullah, M</p> <p>1995-10-01</p> <p>This study compared the sisterhood method of determining causes of maternal <span class="hlt">death</span>, an indirect method for providing a community-based estimate of the level of maternal mortality, with the Matlab Demographic Surveillance System's (DSS) causes of maternal <span class="hlt">death</span>. Data were derived from the Matlab DSS, which has been in operation since 1966 as a field site of the International Center for Diarrheal Disease Research, Bangladesh. The maternal <span class="hlt">deaths</span> that occurred during the 15-year period from 1976 to 1990 in the Matlab DSS area were the basis of this study. A sisterhood survey was conducted in Matlab in November and December 1991 to collect information on conditions, events, and symptoms that preceded <span class="hlt">death</span>. The collected information was evaluated to assign a most likely cause of maternal <span class="hlt">death</span>. The sisterhood survey cause of maternal <span class="hlt">death</span> was then compared with the DSS cause of maternal <span class="hlt">death</span>. Of the 510 <span class="hlt">deaths</span> identified as maternal <span class="hlt">deaths</span> by the DSS, 384 siblings, 1 for each deceased woman, was interviewed. 305 of these correctly reported that they had a <span class="hlt">sister</span> who died during pregnancy or childbirth. 16 reported that they did not know whether their <span class="hlt">sister</span> died during pregnancy or after termination of a pregnancy. The remaining 63 respondents misreported their <span class="hlt">sisters</span>' <span class="hlt">deaths</span> as nonmaternal <span class="hlt">deaths</span>. Cause of <span class="hlt">death</span> could not be assigned with reasonable confidence for 34 (11%) of the 305 maternal <span class="hlt">deaths</span> for which information was collected. For the remaining 271 <span class="hlt">deaths</span>, the agreement between the 2 classification systems was generally high for most cause-of-<span class="hlt">death</span> categories considered. The overall rate of agreement between DSS cause and survey cause was 82%. For the direct obstetric <span class="hlt">deaths</span> as a group, the agreement was 86%, while it was around 76% for indirect obstetric <span class="hlt">deaths</span>, and 71% for abortion-related <span class="hlt">deaths</span>. Though the sisterhood method will always be subject to some error, it can provide an indication of an overall distribution of causes of maternal <span class="hlt">deaths</span>. PMID</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25601100','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25601100"><span id="translatedtitle">Partial dosage compensation in Strepsiptera, a <span class="hlt">sister</span> group of beetles.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mahajan, Shivani; Bachtrog, Doris</p> <p>2015-02-01</p> <p>Sex chromosomes have evolved independently in many different taxa, and so have mechanisms to compensate for expression differences on sex chromosomes in males and females. Different clades have evolved vastly different ways to achieve dosage compensation, including hypertranscription of the single X in male Drosophila, downregulation of both X's in XX Caenorhabditis, or inactivation of one X in female mammals. In the flour beetle Tribolium, the X appears hyperexpressed in both sexes, which might represent the first of two steps to evolve dosage compensation along the paths mammals may have taken (i.e., upregulation of X in both sexes, followed by inactivation of one X in females). Here we test for dosage compensation in Strepsiptera, a <span class="hlt">sister</span> taxon to beetles. We identify sex-<span class="hlt">linked</span> chromosomes in Xenos vesparum based on genomic analysis of males and females, and show that its sex chromosome consists of two chromosomal arms in Tribolium: The X chromosome that is shared between Tribolium and Strepsiptera, and another chromosome that is autosomal in Tribolium and another distantly related Strepsiptera species, but sex-<span class="hlt">linked</span> in X. vesparum. We use RNA-seq (RNA sequencing) to show that dosage compensation along the X of X. vesparum is partial and heterogeneous. In particular, genes that are X-<span class="hlt">linked</span> in both beetles and Strepsiptera appear fully dosage compensated probably through downregulation in both sexes, whereas genes on the more recently added X segment have evolved only partial dosage compensation. In addition, reanalysis of published RNA-seq data suggests that Tribolium has evolved dosage compensation, without hypertranscribing the X in females. Our results demonstrate that patterns of dosage compensation are highly variable across sex-determination systems and even within species. PMID:25601100</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4350179','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4350179"><span id="translatedtitle">Partial Dosage Compensation in Strepsiptera, a <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Group of Beetles</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Mahajan, Shivani; Bachtrog, Doris</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Sex chromosomes have evolved independently in many different taxa, and so have mechanisms to compensate for expression differences on sex chromosomes in males and females. Different clades have evolved vastly different ways to achieve dosage compensation, including hypertranscription of the single X in male Drosophila, downregulation of both X’s in XX Caenorhabditis, or inactivation of one X in female mammals. In the flour beetle Tribolium, the X appears hyperexpressed in both sexes, which might represent the first of two steps to evolve dosage compensation along the paths mammals may have taken (i.e., upregulation of X in both sexes, followed by inactivation of one X in females). Here we test for dosage compensation in Strepsiptera, a <span class="hlt">sister</span> taxon to beetles. We identify sex-<span class="hlt">linked</span> chromosomes in Xenos vesparum based on genomic analysis of males and females, and show that its sex chromosome consists of two chromosomal arms in Tribolium: The X chromosome that is shared between Tribolium and Strepsiptera, and another chromosome that is autosomal in Tribolium and another distantly related Strepsiptera species, but sex-<span class="hlt">linked</span> in X. vesparum. We use RNA-seq (RNA sequencing) to show that dosage compensation along the X of X. vesparum is partial and heterogeneous. In particular, genes that are X-<span class="hlt">linked</span> in both beetles and Strepsiptera appear fully dosage compensated probably through downregulation in both sexes, whereas genes on the more recently added X segment have evolved only partial dosage compensation. In addition, reanalysis of published RNA-seq data suggests that Tribolium has evolved dosage compensation, without hypertranscribing the X in females. Our results demonstrate that patterns of dosage compensation are highly variable across sex-determination systems and even within species. PMID:25601100</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23747271','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23747271"><span id="translatedtitle">Radiation-induced mitotic cell <span class="hlt">death</span> and glioblastoma radioresistance: a new regulating pathway controlled by integrin-<span class="hlt">linked</span> kinase, hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha and survivin in U87 cells.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lanvin, Olivia; Monferran, Sylvie; Delmas, Caroline; Couderc, Bettina; Toulas, Christine; Cohen-Jonathan-Moyal, Elizabeth</p> <p>2013-09-01</p> <p>We have previously shown that integrin-<span class="hlt">linked</span> kinase (ILK) regulates U87 glioblastoma cell radioresistance by modulating the main radiation-induced cell <span class="hlt">death</span> mechanism in solid tumours, the mitotic cell <span class="hlt">death</span>. To decipher the biological pathways involved in these mechanisms, we constructed a U87 glioblastoma cell model expressing an inducible shRNA directed against ILK (U87shILK). We then demonstrated that silencing ILK enhanced radiation-induced centrosome overduplication, leading to radiation-induced mitotic cell <span class="hlt">death</span>. In this model, ionising radiations induce hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α) stabilisation which is inhibited by silencing ILK. Moreover, silencing HIF-1α in U87 cells reduced the surviving fraction after 2 Gy irradiation by increasing cell sensitivity to radiation-induced mitotic cell <span class="hlt">death</span> and centrosome amplification. Because it is known that HIF-1α controls survivin expression, we then looked at the ILK silencing effect on survivin expression. We show that survivin expression is decreased in U87shILK cells. Furthermore, treating U87 cells with the specific survivin suppressor YM155 significantly increased the percentage of giant multinucleated cells, centrosomal overduplication and thus U87 cell radiosensitivity. In consequence, we decipher here a new pathway of glioma radioresistance via the regulation of radiation-induced centrosome duplication and therefore mitotic cell <span class="hlt">death</span> by ILK, HIF-1α and survivin. This work identifies new targets in glioblastoma with the intention of radiosensitising these highly radioresistant tumours. PMID:23747271</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25999055','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25999055"><span id="translatedtitle">Horsetails are the <span class="hlt">sister</span> group to all other monilophytes and Marattiales are <span class="hlt">sister</span> to leptosporangiate ferns.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Knie, Nils; Fischer, Simon; Grewe, Felix; Polsakiewicz, Monika; Knoop, Volker</p> <p>2015-09-01</p> <p>The "Monilophyte" clade comprising ferns, horsetails and whisk ferns receives unequivocal support from molecular data as the <span class="hlt">sister</span> clade to seed plants. However, the branching order of its earliest emerging lineages, the Equisetales (horsetails), the Marattiales, the Ophioglossales/Psilotales and the large group of leptosporangiate ferns has remained dubious. We investigated the mitochondrial nad2 and rpl2 genes as two new, intron-containing loci for a wide sampling of taxa. We found that both group II introns - nad2i542g2 and rpl2i846g2 - are universally present among monilophytes. Both introns have orthologues in seed plants where nad2i542g2 has evolved into a trans-arrangement. In contrast and despite substantial size extensions to more than 5kb in Psilotum, nad2i542g2 remains cis-arranged in the monilophytes. For phylogenetic analyses, we filled taxonomic gaps in previously investigated mitochondrial (atp1, nad5) and chloroplast (atpA, atpB, matK, rbcL, rps4) loci and created a 9-gene matrix that also included the new mitochondrial nad2 and rpl2 loci. We extended the taxon sampling with two taxa each for all land plant outgroups (liverworts, mosses, hornworts, lycophytes and seed plants) to minimize the risk of phylogenetic artefacts. We ultimately obtained a well-supported molecular phylogeny placing Marattiales as <span class="hlt">sister</span> to leptosporangiate ferns and horsetails as <span class="hlt">sister</span> to all remaining monilophytes. In addition, an indel in an exon of the here introduced rpl2 locus independently supports the placement of horsetails. We conclude that under dense taxon sampling, phylogenetic information from a prudent choice of loci is currently superior to character-rich phylogenomic approaches at low taxon sampling. As here shown the selective choice of loci and taxa enabled us to resolve the long-enigmatic diversifications of the earliest monilophyte lineages. PMID:25999055</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/dc0640.photos.036900p/','SCIGOV-HHH'); return false;" href="//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/dc0640.photos.036900p/"><span id="translatedtitle">8. STREAMSIDE PATH NEAR MIDDLE OF THREE <span class="hlt">SISTERS</span> FALLS, LOOKING ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>8. STREAM-SIDE PATH NEAR MIDDLE OF THREE <span class="hlt">SISTERS</span> FALLS, LOOKING WEST Photocopy of photograph, 1930s National Park Service, National Capital Region files - Dumbarton Oaks Park, Thirty-second & R Streets Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Recombination&pg=3&id=EJ384605','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Recombination&pg=3&id=EJ384605"><span id="translatedtitle">How-to-Do-It: Demonstrating <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Chromatid Exchanges.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Dye, Frank J.</p> <p>1988-01-01</p> <p>Outlines procedures for demonstrating and preparing a permanent slide of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchanges and recombination events between the two chromatids of a single chromosome. Provides the name of an additional resource for making preparations of exchanges. (RT)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/mi0639.photos.196598p/','SCIGOV-HHH'); return false;" href="//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/mi0639.photos.196598p/"><span id="translatedtitle">38. 8 <span class="hlt">sisters</span> and powerhouse, pulverizer building for powerhouse, coal ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>38. 8 <span class="hlt">sisters</span> and powerhouse, pulverizer building for powerhouse, coal conveyor, blast stoves, "A" furnace, stoves, "B" furnace, stoves, "C" furnace, bottle cars. Looking south - Rouge Steel Company, 3001 Miller Road, Dearborn, MI</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/or0493.photos.200307p/','SCIGOV-HHH'); return false;" href="//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/or0493.photos.200307p/"><span id="translatedtitle">UNDERSIDE FROM SOUTH BANKS; NOTICE NEW GLUE LAM CROSSBEAMS <span class="hlt">SISTERED</span> ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>UNDERSIDE FROM SOUTH BANKS; NOTICE NEW GLUE LAM CROSSBEAMS <span class="hlt">SISTERED</span> TO OLDER BEAMS, NEW STRINGERS AND COMPONENTS MAKE UP A NEARLY NEW SUPPORT SYSTEM - Short Bridge, Spanning South Santiam River at High Deck Road, Cascadia, Linn County, OR</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4825568','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4825568"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Sister</span> chromatid decatenation: bridging the gaps in our knowledge</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Broderick, Ronan; Niedzwiedz, Wojciech</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Faithful chromosome segregation is critical in preventing genome loss or damage during cell division. Failure to properly disentangle catenated <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids can lead to the formation of bulky or ultrafine anaphase bridges, and ultimately genome instability. In this review we present an overview of the current state of knowledge of how <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid decatenation is carried out, with particular focus on the role of TOP2A and TOPBP1 in this process. PMID:26266709</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4843159','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4843159"><span id="translatedtitle">Cholangicarcinoma Presenting as a <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Mary Joseph Nodule</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Rangegowda, Devaraja; Vyas, Tanmay; Grover, Shrruti; Joshi, YK; Sharma, Chhagan; Sahney, Amrish</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Sister</span> Mary Joseph nodules represent metastatic cancer of the umbilicus. More than half of these cases are attributable to gastrointestinal malignancies including gastric, colonic, and pancreatic cancer. In addition, gynecologic (ovarian, uterine cancer), unknown primary tumors, and, rarely, bladder or respiratory malignancies may cause umbilical metastasis. We report the case of a <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Mary Joseph nodule originating from a hilar cholangiocarcinoma. Umbilical nodules should prompt clinical evaluation, as these tumors are usually associated with poor prognosis. PMID:27144207</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=sudden+AND+death&pg=6&id=EJ322555','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=sudden+AND+death&pg=6&id=EJ322555"><span id="translatedtitle">Cot <span class="hlt">Deaths</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Tyrrell, Shelagh</p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>Addresses the tragedy of crib <span class="hlt">deaths</span>, giving particular attention to causes, prevention, and medical research on Sudden Infant <span class="hlt">Death</span> Syndrome (SIDS). Gives anecdotal accounts of coping strategies used by parents and families of SIDS infants. (DT)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4890842','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4890842"><span id="translatedtitle">The Excess Winter <span class="hlt">Deaths</span> Measure</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Gasparrini, Antonio</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Background: Excess winter <span class="hlt">deaths</span>, the ratio between average daily <span class="hlt">deaths</span> in December–March versus other months, is a measure commonly used by public health practitioners and analysts to assess health burdens associated with wintertime weather. We seek to demonstrate that this measure is fundamentally biased and can lead to misleading conclusions about health impacts associated with current and future winter climate. Methods: Time series regression analysis of 779,372 <span class="hlt">deaths</span> from natural causes in London over 15 years (1 August 1997–31 July 2012),collapsed by day of <span class="hlt">death</span> and <span class="hlt">linked</span> to daily temperature values. The outcome measures were the excess winter <span class="hlt">deaths</span> index, and daily and annual <span class="hlt">deaths</span> attributable specifically to cold. Results: Most of the excess winter <span class="hlt">deaths</span> are driven by cold: The excess winter <span class="hlt">deaths</span> index decreased from 1.19 to 1.07 after excluding <span class="hlt">deaths</span> attributable to low temperatures. Over 40% of cold-attributable <span class="hlt">deaths</span> occurred outside of the December–March period, leading to bias in the excess winter <span class="hlt">deaths</span> measure. Although there was no relationship between winter severity and annual excess winter <span class="hlt">deaths</span>, there was a clear correlation with annual cold-attributable <span class="hlt">deaths</span>. Conclusions: Excess winter <span class="hlt">deaths</span> is not an appropriate indicator of cold-related health impacts, and its use should be discontinued. We advocate alternative measures. The findings we present bring into doubt previous claims that cold-related <span class="hlt">deaths</span> in the UK will not reduce in future as a result of climate change. PMID:26986872</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Children+AND+death+AND+mothers&pg=6&id=EJ329850','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Children+AND+death+AND+mothers&pg=6&id=EJ329850"><span id="translatedtitle">Understanding <span class="hlt">Death</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Heath, Charles P.</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>Bibliotherapy can help children prepare for and understand the <span class="hlt">death</span> of a loved one. An annotated bibliography lists references with age level information on attitudes toward <span class="hlt">death</span> and <span class="hlt">deaths</span> of a father, friend, grandparent, mother, pet, and sibling. (Author/CL)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4889787','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4889787"><span id="translatedtitle">GNE Myopathy in Turkish <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> with a Novel Homozygous Mutation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Diniz, Gulden; Secil, Yaprak; Ceylaner, Serdar; Tokucoglu, Figen; Türe, Sabiha; Celebisoy, Mehmet; İncesu, Tülay Kurt; Akhan, Galip</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Background. Hereditary inclusion body myopathy is caused by biallelic defects in the GNE gene located on chromosome 9p13. It generally affects adults older than 20 years of age. Methods and Results. In this study, we present two Turkish <span class="hlt">sisters</span> with progressive myopathy and describe a novel mutation in the GNE gene. Both <span class="hlt">sisters</span> had slightly higher levels of creatine kinase (CK) and muscle weakness. The older <span class="hlt">sister</span> presented at 38 years of age with an inability to climb steps, weakness, and a steppage gait. Her younger <span class="hlt">sister</span> was 36 years old and had similar symptoms. The first symptoms of the disorder were seen when the <span class="hlt">sisters</span> were 30 and 34 years old, respectively. The muscle biopsy showed primary myopathic features and presence of rimmed vacuoles. DNA analysis demonstrated the presence of previously unknown homozygous mutations [c.2152 G>A (p.A718T)] in the GNE genes. Conclusion. Based on our literature survey, we believe that ours is the first confirmed case of primary GNE myopathy with a novel missense mutation in Turkey. These patients illustrate that the muscle biopsy is still an important method for the differential diagnosis of vacuolar myopathies in that the detection of inclusions is required for the definitive diagnosis. PMID:27298745</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27298745','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27298745"><span id="translatedtitle">GNE Myopathy in Turkish <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> with a Novel Homozygous Mutation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Diniz, Gulden; Secil, Yaprak; Ceylaner, Serdar; Tokucoglu, Figen; Türe, Sabiha; Celebisoy, Mehmet; İncesu, Tülay Kurt; Akhan, Galip</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Background. Hereditary inclusion body myopathy is caused by biallelic defects in the GNE gene located on chromosome 9p13. It generally affects adults older than 20 years of age. Methods and Results. In this study, we present two Turkish <span class="hlt">sisters</span> with progressive myopathy and describe a novel mutation in the GNE gene. Both <span class="hlt">sisters</span> had slightly higher levels of creatine kinase (CK) and muscle weakness. The older <span class="hlt">sister</span> presented at 38 years of age with an inability to climb steps, weakness, and a steppage gait. Her younger <span class="hlt">sister</span> was 36 years old and had similar symptoms. The first symptoms of the disorder were seen when the <span class="hlt">sisters</span> were 30 and 34 years old, respectively. The muscle biopsy showed primary myopathic features and presence of rimmed vacuoles. DNA analysis demonstrated the presence of previously unknown homozygous mutations [c.2152 G>A (p.A718T)] in the GNE genes. Conclusion. Based on our literature survey, we believe that ours is the first confirmed case of primary GNE myopathy with a novel missense mutation in Turkey. These patients illustrate that the muscle biopsy is still an important method for the differential diagnosis of vacuolar myopathies in that the detection of inclusions is required for the definitive diagnosis. PMID:27298745</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED314204.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED314204.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Early Childhood Injury <span class="hlt">Deaths</span> in Washington State.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Starzyk, Patricia M.</p> <p></p> <p>This paper discusses data on the <span class="hlt">deaths</span> of children aged 1-4 years in Washington State. A two-fold approach was used in the analysis. First, Washington State <span class="hlt">death</span> certificate data for 1979-85 were used to characterize the <span class="hlt">deaths</span> and identify hazardous situations. Second, <span class="hlt">death</span> certificates were <span class="hlt">linked</span> to birth certificates of children born in…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27477908','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27477908"><span id="translatedtitle">A Long Noncoding RNA Regulates <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Chromatid Cohesion.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Marchese, Francesco P; Grossi, Elena; Marín-Béjar, Oskar; Bharti, Sanjay Kumar; Raimondi, Ivan; González, Jovanna; Martínez-Herrera, Dannys Jorge; Athie, Alejandro; Amadoz, Alicia; Brosh, Robert M; Huarte, Maite</p> <p>2016-08-01</p> <p>Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are involved in diverse cellular processes through multiple mechanisms. Here, we describe a previously uncharacterized human lncRNA, CONCR (cohesion regulator noncoding RNA), that is transcriptionally activated by MYC and is upregulated in multiple cancer types. The expression of CONCR is cell cycle regulated, and it is required for cell-cycle progression and DNA replication. Moreover, cells depleted of CONCR show severe defects in <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion, suggesting an essential role for CONCR in cohesion establishment during cell division. CONCR interacts with and regulates the activity of DDX11, a DNA-dependent ATPase and helicase involved in DNA replication and <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion. These findings unveil a direct role for an lncRNA in the establishment of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion by modulating DDX11 enzymatic activity. PMID:27477908</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3858829','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3858829"><span id="translatedtitle">Mycelium differentiation and development of Streptomyces coelicolor in lab-scale bioreactors: Programmed cell <span class="hlt">death</span>, differentiation, and lysis are closely <span class="hlt">linked</span> to undecylprodigiosin and actinorhodin production</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Rioseras, Beatriz; López-García, María Teresa; Yagüe, Paula; Sánchez, Jesús; Manteca, Ángel</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Streptomycetes are mycelium-forming bacteria that produce two thirds of clinically relevant secondary metabolites. Secondary metabolite production is activated at specific developmental stages of Streptomyces life cycle. Despite this, Streptomyces differentiation in industrial bioreactors tends to be underestimated and the most important parameters managed are only indirectly related to differentiation: modifications to the culture media, optimization of productive strains by random or directed mutagenesis, analysis of biophysical parameters, etc. In this work the relationship between differentiation and antibiotic production in lab-scale bioreactors was defined. Streptomyces coelicolor was used as a model strain. Morphological differentiation was comparable to that occurring during pre-sporulation stages in solid cultures: an initial compartmentalized mycelium suffers a programmed cell <span class="hlt">death</span>, and remaining viable segments then differentiate to a second multinucleated antibiotic-producing mycelium. Differentiation was demonstrated to be one of the keys to interpreting biophysical fermentation parameters and to rationalizing the optimization of secondary metabolite production in bioreactors. PMID:24240146</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");'>3</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li class="active"><span>5</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_5 --> <div id="page_6" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li class="active"><span>6</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="101"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24240146','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24240146"><span id="translatedtitle">Mycelium differentiation and development of Streptomyces coelicolor in lab-scale bioreactors: programmed cell <span class="hlt">death</span>, differentiation, and lysis are closely <span class="hlt">linked</span> to undecylprodigiosin and actinorhodin production.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Rioseras, Beatriz; López-García, María Teresa; Yagüe, Paula; Sánchez, Jesús; Manteca, Angel</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Streptomycetes are mycelium-forming bacteria that produce two thirds of clinically relevant secondary metabolites. Secondary metabolite production is activated at specific developmental stages of Streptomyces life cycle. Despite this, Streptomyces differentiation in industrial bioreactors tends to be underestimated and the most important parameters managed are only indirectly related to differentiation: modifications to the culture media, optimization of productive strains by random or directed mutagenesis, analysis of biophysical parameters, etc. In this work the relationship between differentiation and antibiotic production in lab-scale bioreactors was defined. Streptomyces coelicolor was used as a model strain. Morphological differentiation was comparable to that occurring during pre-sporulation stages in solid cultures: an initial compartmentalized mycelium suffers a programmed cell <span class="hlt">death</span>, and remaining viable segments then differentiate to a second multinucleated antibiotic-producing mycelium. Differentiation was demonstrated to be one of the keys to interpreting biophysical fermentation parameters and to rationalizing the optimization of secondary metabolite production in bioreactors. PMID:24240146</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19218843','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19218843"><span id="translatedtitle">Catholic <span class="hlt">sister</span> nurses in Selma, Alabama, 1940-1972.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wall, Barbra Mann</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>This study analyzes the activities of religious <span class="hlt">sister</span> nurses as they confronted racism in the American South from 1940 to 1972. Selma was chosen as a case study because, in the 1960s, events in that southern town marked a turning point in the civil rights movement in the United States. This is a story about the workings of gender, race, religion, and nursing. The <span class="hlt">sisters</span>' work demonstrates how an analysis of race in nursing history is incomplete without an understanding of the roles that a number of Catholic religious women took in reaching out to African Americans in the Deep South. PMID:19218843</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26948225','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26948225"><span id="translatedtitle">Improving patient flow: role of the orthopaedic discharge <span class="hlt">sister</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Tytler, Beverley</p> <p>2016-03-01</p> <p>Timely and well-planned discharge improves the patient's experience, contributes to patient safety and reduces the length of hospital stays. The role of orthopaedic discharge <span class="hlt">sister</span> was developed at James Cook University Hospital in 2007 to provide safe, timely and efficient discharge for patients from the trauma and theatre centre, and to improve patient experience and flow. This article gives an overview of the role and describes how the <span class="hlt">sister</span> works with colleagues to plan patient discharges from pre-assessment and emergency department admission through their hospital stay until their departure. PMID:26948225</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27120695','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27120695"><span id="translatedtitle">Separase Is Required for Homolog and <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Disjunction during Drosophila melanogaster Male Meiosis, but Not for Biorientation of <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Centromeres.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Blattner, Ariane C; Chaurasia, Soumya; McKee, Bruce D; Lehner, Christian F</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>Spatially controlled release of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion during progression through the meiotic divisions is of paramount importance for error-free chromosome segregation during meiosis. Cohesion is mediated by the cohesin protein complex and cleavage of one of its subunits by the endoprotease separase removes cohesin first from chromosome arms during exit from meiosis I and later from the pericentromeric region during exit from meiosis II. At the onset of the meiotic divisions, cohesin has also been proposed to be present within the centromeric region for the unification of <span class="hlt">sister</span> centromeres into a single functional entity, allowing bipolar orientation of paired homologs within the meiosis I spindle. Separase-mediated removal of centromeric cohesin during exit from meiosis I might explain <span class="hlt">sister</span> centromere individualization which is essential for subsequent biorientation of <span class="hlt">sister</span> centromeres during meiosis II. To characterize a potential involvement of separase in <span class="hlt">sister</span> centromere individualization before meiosis II, we have studied meiosis in Drosophila melanogaster males where homologs are not paired in the canonical manner. Meiosis does not include meiotic recombination and synaptonemal complex formation in these males. Instead, an alternative homolog conjunction system keeps homologous chromosomes in pairs. Using independent strategies for spermatocyte-specific depletion of separase complex subunits in combination with time-lapse imaging, we demonstrate that separase is required for the inactivation of this alternative conjunction at anaphase I onset. Mutations that abolish alternative homolog conjunction therefore result in random segregation of univalents during meiosis I also after separase depletion. Interestingly, these univalents become bioriented during meiosis II, suggesting that <span class="hlt">sister</span> centromere individualization before meiosis II does not require separase. PMID:27120695</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4847790','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4847790"><span id="translatedtitle">Separase Is Required for Homolog and <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Disjunction during Drosophila melanogaster Male Meiosis, but Not for Biorientation of <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Centromeres</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Blattner, Ariane C.; McKee, Bruce D.; Lehner, Christian F.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Spatially controlled release of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion during progression through the meiotic divisions is of paramount importance for error-free chromosome segregation during meiosis. Cohesion is mediated by the cohesin protein complex and cleavage of one of its subunits by the endoprotease separase removes cohesin first from chromosome arms during exit from meiosis I and later from the pericentromeric region during exit from meiosis II. At the onset of the meiotic divisions, cohesin has also been proposed to be present within the centromeric region for the unification of <span class="hlt">sister</span> centromeres into a single functional entity, allowing bipolar orientation of paired homologs within the meiosis I spindle. Separase-mediated removal of centromeric cohesin during exit from meiosis I might explain <span class="hlt">sister</span> centromere individualization which is essential for subsequent biorientation of <span class="hlt">sister</span> centromeres during meiosis II. To characterize a potential involvement of separase in <span class="hlt">sister</span> centromere individualization before meiosis II, we have studied meiosis in Drosophila melanogaster males where homologs are not paired in the canonical manner. Meiosis does not include meiotic recombination and synaptonemal complex formation in these males. Instead, an alternative homolog conjunction system keeps homologous chromosomes in pairs. Using independent strategies for spermatocyte-specific depletion of separase complex subunits in combination with time-lapse imaging, we demonstrate that separase is required for the inactivation of this alternative conjunction at anaphase I onset. Mutations that abolish alternative homolog conjunction therefore result in random segregation of univalents during meiosis I also after separase depletion. Interestingly, these univalents become bioriented during meiosis II, suggesting that <span class="hlt">sister</span> centromere individualization before meiosis II does not require separase. PMID:27120695</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2766539','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2766539"><span id="translatedtitle">Precocious <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Chromatid Separation (PSCS) in Cornelia de Lange Syndrome</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Kaur, Maninder; DeScipio, Cheryl; McCallum, Jennifer; Yaeger, Dinah; Devoto, Marcella; Jackson, Laird G.; Spinner, Nancy B.; Krantz, Ian D.</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>The Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) (OMIM# 122470) is a dominantly inherited multisystem developmental disorder. The phenotype consists of characteristic facial features, hirsutism, abnormalities of the upper extremities ranging from subtle changes in the phalanges and metacarpal bones to oligodactyly and phocomelia, gastroesophageal dysfunction, growth retardation, and neurodevelopmental delay. Prevalence is estimated to be as high as 1 in 10,000. Recently, mutations in NIPBL were identified in sporadic and familial CdLS cases. To date, mutations in this gene have been identified in over 45% of individuals with CdLS. NIPBL is the human homolog of the Drosophila Nipped-B gene. Although its function in mammalian systems has not yet been elucidated, sequence homologs of Nipped-B in yeast (Scc2 and Mis4) are required for <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion during mitosis, and a similar role was recently demonstrated for Nipped-B in Drosophila. In order to evaluate NIPBL role in <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion in humans, metaphase spreads on 90 probands (40 NIPBL mutation positive and 50 NIPBL mutation negative) with CdLS were evaluated for evidence of precocious <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid separation (PSCS). We screened 50 metaphases from each proband and found evidence of PSCS in 41% (compared to 9% in control samples). These studies indicate that NIPBL may play a role in <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion in humans as has been reported for its homologs in Drosophila and yeast. PMID:16100726</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/dc0640.photos.036899p/','SCIGOV-HHH'); return false;" href="//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/dc0640.photos.036899p/"><span id="translatedtitle">7. STREAMSIDE PATH BETWEEN THREE BRIDGE FALLS AND THREE <span class="hlt">SISTERS</span> ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>7. STREAM-SIDE PATH BETWEEN THREE BRIDGE FALLS AND THREE <span class="hlt">SISTERS</span> FALLS, LOOKING WEST Photocopy of photograph, 1930s National Park Service, National Capital Region files - Dumbarton Oaks Park, Thirty-second & R Streets Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=relationship&pg=3&id=EJ1069817','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=relationship&pg=3&id=EJ1069817"><span id="translatedtitle">Adult Sibling Relationships with Brothers and <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> with Severe Disabilities</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Rossetti, Zach; Hall, Sarah</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine perceptions of adult sibling relationships with a brother or <span class="hlt">sister</span> with severe disabilities and the contexts affecting the relationships. Adult siblings without disabilities (N = 79) from 19 to 72 years of age completed an online survey with four open-ended questions about their relationship…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=innovation+AND+management&pg=6&id=EJ667313','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=innovation+AND+management&pg=6&id=EJ667313"><span id="translatedtitle">Clinical Design Sciences: A View from <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Design Efforts.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Zaritsky, Raul; Kelly, Anthony E.; Flowers, Woodie; Rogers, Everett; O'Neill, Patrick</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>Asserts that the social sciences are clinical-like endeavors, and the way that "<span class="hlt">sister</span>" fields discover and validate their results may inform research practice in education. Describes three fields of design that confront similar societal demands for improvement (engineering product design, research on the diffusion of innovations, and management…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Freud&id=EJ827914','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Freud&id=EJ827914"><span id="translatedtitle">Freud on Brothers and <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>: A Neglected Topic</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Sherwin-White, Susan</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>This paper explores Freud's developing thought on brothers and <span class="hlt">sisters</span>, and their importance in his psychoanalytical writings and clinical work. Freud's work on sibling psychology has been seriously undervalued. This paper aims to give due recognition to Freud's work in this area. (Contains 1 note.)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4845193','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4845193"><span id="translatedtitle">DNA damage tolerance branches out toward <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Branzei, Dana</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>ABSTRACT Genome duplication is temporarily coordinated with <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion and DNA damage tolerance. Recently, we found that replication fork-coupled repriming is important for both optimal cohesion and error-free replication by recombination. The mechanism involved has implications for the etiology of replication-based genetic diseases and cancer. PMID:27308553</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=identical+AND+twin+AND+studies&pg=6&id=ED313842','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=identical+AND+twin+AND+studies&pg=6&id=ED313842"><span id="translatedtitle">Language and Cognitive Development of Deaf and Hearing Twin <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Schirmer, Barbara R.</p> <p></p> <p>In this case study, the language and cognitive development of a 4-year 5-month old profoundly deaf girl and her normally hearing identical twin <span class="hlt">sister</span> were investigated by videotaping the twins in their home interacting with each other, the investigator, and family members. Materials used with the children were designed to elicit spontaneous,…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=little+AND+sister&id=EJ484673','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=little+AND+sister&id=EJ484673"><span id="translatedtitle">A Profile and Perceptions of Fraternity Little <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Auxiliary Groups.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Scott, Peggy S.; Saracino, Marie</p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>Examined fraternity little <span class="hlt">sister</span> auxiliary group members' perceptions of fraternity-related roles/experiences, and identified personality types of women who join such groups. Subjects (n=49) completed Auxiliary Group Questionnaire and Myers-Briggs Type Inventory. Results revealed that 83% of subjects could be classified as extraverted personality…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2399726','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2399726"><span id="translatedtitle">Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura associated with pregnancy in two <span class="hlt">sisters</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Alqadah, F.; Zebeib, M. A.; Awidi, A. S.</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>Two <span class="hlt">sisters</span> suffered from thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura late in their first pregnancies. HLA typing of the patients and their immediate family members demonstrated no obvious relationship. Hereditary aspects, association with pregnancy, prognosis and management of pregnant women with TTP are discussed. PMID:8497440</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26899633','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26899633"><span id="translatedtitle">Practicing <span class="hlt">death</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Avny, Ohad; Alon, Aya</p> <p>2016-07-01</p> <p>This narrative describes the struggle of a primary care physician contending with the challenge of remaining committed to his patient's care despite a sense of burnout in relation to an intense period of patient <span class="hlt">deaths</span>. The story presents two patient <span class="hlt">deaths</span> and the physician's reflections on how he handled both cases. PMID:26899633</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3960080','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3960080"><span id="translatedtitle">Sibling Conversations about Dating and Sexuality: <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> as Confidants, Sources of Support, and Mentors</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Killoren, Sarah E.; Roach, Andrea L.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Using an observational methodology to examine sibling communication, <span class="hlt">sisters</span> (N = 28 dyads) were videotaped discussing their ideas about dating and sexuality. Social provision theory was used as a framework for the examination of roles enacted by <span class="hlt">sisters</span> during these conversations. Inductive thematic analytic procedures were conducted and three roles were identified: <span class="hlt">sisters</span> as confidants, sources of support, and mentors. Older and younger <span class="hlt">sisters</span> both served as confidants and sources of support for one another, whereas, older <span class="hlt">sisters</span> were more likely to be mentors for their younger <span class="hlt">sisters</span> than vice versa. Findings indicate the potential importance of <span class="hlt">sisters</span> in the formation of adolescent girls’ ideas about romantic relationships and sexuality, sibling communication as a socialization mechanism of sisters’ similarities in romantic experiences and sexual behaviors/attitudes, and the inclusion of older <span class="hlt">sisters</span> in prevention intervention programs focused on reducing adolescent sexual risk behaviors and promoting healthy romantic relationships and sexuality development. PMID:24659843</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=49851&keyword=inequality&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=76725160&CFTOKEN=61978598','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=49851&keyword=inequality&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=76725160&CFTOKEN=61978598"><span id="translatedtitle">TISSUE-SPECIFIC <span class="hlt">SISTER</span> CHROMATID EXCHANGE ANALYSES IN MUTAGEN-CARCINOGEN EXPOSED ANIMALS</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The phenomenon of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange (SCE) has been extensively reviewed. <span class="hlt">Sister</span> chromatid exchanges are intrachromosomal events, wherein segments of DNA are reciprocally swapped between the chromatids. They are most easily studied with 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) dye metho...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1949219','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1949219"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Death</span> duties</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Myers, Kathryn A.; Eden, David</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>PROBLEM BEING ADDRESSED Family physicians are often called upon to pronounce and certify the <span class="hlt">deaths</span> of patients. Inadequate knowledge of the Coroners Act (in the province of Ontario) and of the correct process of certifying <span class="hlt">death</span> can make physicians uncomfortable when confronted with these tasks. OBJECTIVE OF PROGRAM To educate family physicians about how to perform the administrative tasks required of them when patients die. PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The program included an educational video, a tutorial outlining the process of <span class="hlt">death</span> certification, and discussion with a regional coroner about key features of the Coroners Act. In small groups, participants worked through cases of patient <span class="hlt">deaths</span> in which they were asked to determine whether a coroner needed to be involved, to determine the manner of <span class="hlt">death</span>, and to complete a mock <span class="hlt">death</span> certificate for each case. CONCLUSION All participants reported a high level of satisfaction with the workshop and thought the main objective of the program had been achieved. Results of a test given 3 months after the workshop showed substantial improvement in participants’ knowledge of the coroner’s role and of the process of <span class="hlt">death</span> certification. PMID:17872782</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/sim3186','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/sim3186"><span id="translatedtitle">Geologic map of Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> volcanic cluster, Cascade Range, Oregon</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Hildreth, Wes; Fierstein, Judy; Calvert, Andrew T.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>The cluster of glaciated stratovolcanoes called the Three Sisters—South <span class="hlt">Sister</span>, Middle <span class="hlt">Sister</span>, and North Sister—forms a spectacular 20-km-long reach along the crest of the Cascade Range in Oregon. The three eponymous stratocones, though contiguous and conventionally lumped sororally, could hardly display less family resemblance. North <span class="hlt">Sister</span> (10,085 ft), a monotonously mafic edifice at least as old as 120 ka, is a glacially ravaged stratocone that consists of hundreds of thin rubbly lava flows and intercalated falls that dip radially and steeply; remnants of two thick lava flows cap its summit. Middle <span class="hlt">Sister</span> (10,047 ft), an andesite-basalt-dacite cone built between 48 and 14 ka, is capped by a thick stack of radially dipping, dark-gray, thin mafic lava flows; asymmetrically glaciated, its nearly intact west flank contrasts sharply with its steep east face. Snow and ice-filled South <span class="hlt">Sister</span> is a bimodal rhyolitic-intermediate edifice that was constructed between 50 ka and 2 ka; its crater (rim at 10,358 ft) was created between 30 and 22 ka, during the most recent of several explosive summit eruptions; the thin oxidized agglutinate that mantles its current crater rim protects a 150-m-thick pyroclastic sequence that helped fill a much larger crater. For each of the three, the eruptive volume is likely to have been in the range of 15 to 25 km³, but such estimates are fairly uncertain, owing to glacial erosion. The map area consists exclusively of Quaternary volcanic rocks and derivative surficial deposits. Although most of the area has been modified by glaciation, the volcanoes are young enough that the landforms remain largely constructional. Furthermore, twelve of the 145 eruptive units on the map are postglacial, younger than the deglaciation that was underway by about 17 ka. The most recent eruptions were of rhyolite near South <span class="hlt">Sister</span>, about 2,000 years ago, and of mafic magma near McKenzie Pass, about 1,500 years ago. As observed by trailblazing volcanologist</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=little+AND+sister&id=EJ906857','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=little+AND+sister&id=EJ906857"><span id="translatedtitle">Testing of the "Healthy 'Little' Lives Project": A Training Program for Big <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Mentors</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Kaufman, Michelle R.</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Big Brothers/Big <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> is a national program aimed at providing mentors for disadvantaged children. This study tested whether Big <span class="hlt">Sister</span> mentors could be trained to increase communication with their Little <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> about sexual health issues. The study tested an intervention based on social cognitive theory in which a sexual health communication…</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li class="active"><span>6</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_6 --> <div id="page_7" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li class="active"><span>7</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="121"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26373274','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26373274"><span id="translatedtitle">Keeping It in the Family: ATRX Loss Promotes Persistent <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Telomere Cohesion in ALT Cancer Cells.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Roake, Caitlin M; Artandi, Steven E</p> <p>2015-09-14</p> <p>In this issue of Cancer Cell, Ramamoorthy and Smith report that cancer cells that maintain their chromosome ends through alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) display persistent <span class="hlt">sister</span> telomere cohesion. This delayed resolution of <span class="hlt">sister</span> telomere cohesion depends upon the loss of ATRX and its histone-sequestering function and is associated with increased recombination between <span class="hlt">sister</span> telomeres. PMID:26373274</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3129082','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3129082"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Sister</span> Mary Joseph nodule-A case report with review of literature</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Dar, Ishrat Hussain; Kamili, Mqtasid Ahmed; Dar, Showkat Hussain; Kuchaai, Faiz Ahmed</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Sister</span> Mary Joseph nodule or <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Mary Joseph Sign refers to a palpable nodule bulging into the umbilicus as a result of metastasis of a malignant cancer in the pelvis or abdomen. A rare case of <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Mary Joseph nodule, manifesting as ascites, cachexia and bleeding per rectum, is presented without any primary tumor despite extensive search for the same. PMID:21772912</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.marchofdimes.org/complications/neonatal-death.aspx','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="http://www.marchofdimes.org/complications/neonatal-death.aspx"><span id="translatedtitle">Neonatal <span class="hlt">Death</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... story First Candle Centering Corporation The Compassionate Friends Star Legacy Foundation Last reviewed: November, 2015 Neonatal <span class="hlt">death</span> ... story First Candle Centering Corporation The Compassionate Friends Star Legacy Foundation Last reviewed: November, 2015 Complications & Loss ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1794387','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1794387"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Sister</span> chromatid junctions in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Robinson, Nicholas P; Blood, Katherine A; McCallum, Simon A; Edwards, Paul A W; Bell, Stephen D</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>Although the Archaea exhibit an intriguing combination of bacterial- and eukaryotic-like features, it is not known how these prokaryotic cells segregate their chromosomes before the process of cell division. In the course of our analysis of the third replication origin in the archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus, we identify and characterise <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid junctions in this prokaryote. This pairing appears to be mediated by hemicatenane-like structures, and we provide evidence that these junctions persist in both replicating and postreplicative cells. These data, in conjunction with fluorescent in situ hybridisation analyses, suggest that Sulfolobus chromosomes have a significant period of postreplicative <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid synapsis, a situation that is more reminiscent of eukaryotic than bacterial chromosome segregation mechanisms. PMID:17255945</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14631983','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14631983"><span id="translatedtitle">[The duties of <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> of Mercy in light of documents].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hałat, S M</p> <p>1999-01-01</p> <p>There are numerous documents in the Archives kept by the Convent of the <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> of Mercy that refer to the taking care of the sick and hospitalization. The article depicts the regulations applicable in the hospital of Angers dating back to the 17th century (reprinted from the French work about St. Vincent a Paulo) and the Polish regulations from the period between the World War I and II kept in the Polish archives. PMID:14631983</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4465693','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4465693"><span id="translatedtitle">Malignant Triton Tumors in <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> with Clinical Neurofibromatosis Type 1</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Alina, Basnet; Sebastian, Jofre A.; Gerardo, Capo</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Malignant triton tumors (MTTs) are rare and aggressive sarcomas categorized as a subgroup of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs). MTTs arise from Schwann cells of peripheral nerves or existing neurofibromas and have elements of rhabdomyoblastic differentiation. We report the occurrence of MTTs in two <span class="hlt">sisters</span>. The first patient is a 36-year-old female who presented with left sided chest wall swelling. She also had clinical features consistent with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF-1). Debulking of the mass showed high-grade malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor with skeletal muscle differentiation (MTT). The patient was treated with ifosfamide and adriamycin along with radiation. Four years after treatment, she still has no evidence of disease recurrence. Her <span class="hlt">sister</span> subsequently presented to us at the age of 42 with left sided lateral chest wall pain. Imaging showed a multicompartmental retroperitoneal cystic mass with left psoas involvement. The tumor was resected and, similarly to her <span class="hlt">sister</span>, it showed high-grade malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor with rhabdomyoblastic differentiation (MTT). The patient was started on chemotherapy and radiation as described above. PMID:26114002</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22253761','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22253761"><span id="translatedtitle">Broad phylogenomic sampling and the <span class="hlt">sister</span> lineage of land plants.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Timme, Ruth E; Bachvaroff, Tsvetan R; Delwiche, Charles F</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>The tremendous diversity of land plants all descended from a single charophyte green alga that colonized the land somewhere between 430 and 470 million years ago. Six orders of charophyte green algae, in addition to embryophytes, comprise the Streptophyta s.l. Previous studies have focused on reconstructing the phylogeny of organisms tied to this key colonization event, but wildly conflicting results have sparked a contentious debate over which lineage gave rise to land plants. The dominant view has been that 'stoneworts,' or Charales, are the <span class="hlt">sister</span> lineage, but an alternative hypothesis supports the Zygnematales (often referred to as "pond scum") as the <span class="hlt">sister</span> lineage. In this paper, we provide a well-supported, 160-nuclear-gene phylogenomic analysis supporting the Zygnematales as the closest living relative to land plants. Our study makes two key contributions to the field: 1) the use of an unbiased method to collect a large set of orthologs from deeply diverging species and 2) the use of these data in determining the <span class="hlt">sister</span> lineage to land plants. We anticipate this updated phylogeny not only will hugely impact lesson plans in introductory biology courses, but also will provide a solid phylogenetic tree for future green-lineage research, whether it be related to plants or green algae. PMID:22253761</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12287625','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12287625"><span id="translatedtitle">Southall Black <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>. Hannana Siddiqui speaks to Rasna Warah.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Warah, R</p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>Southall Black <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>, an organization for Asian and Afro-Caribbean women in Great Britain, was established in 1979 at the height of anti-racist protests to address the otherwise neglected issue of women's oppression. The group has campaigned against discriminatory immigration laws, illegal virginity tests at Heathrow airport, domestic violence, and other issues of particular concern to British Asian women. Women who migrate to England for an arranged marriage must remain with their husband at least 1 year or face deportation and denial of any public assistance, placing them at risk of unreported domestic violence. Southall Black <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> has attempted to raise the public consciousness about domestic violence as a criminal issue and garner support for Asian women who leave abusive husbands. However, no support has been forthcoming from the anti-racist movement, which fears that publicity on domestic violence will create a racist backlash against Asian men. More support has been available for the group's campaign to protect battered women who kill their husbands by removing from the law on provocation the need for an immediate response. Another campaign has involved protests against "bounty hunters" hired by Asian families to return girls who have escaped from arranged marriages in their home country or sexual abuse within their family. Southall Black <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> attributes many of the problems faced by its clients to a rise in religious fundamentalism and Muslim attempts to reverse the gains of the feminist movement. PMID:12287625</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3258253','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3258253"><span id="translatedtitle">Broad Phylogenomic Sampling and the <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Lineage of Land Plants</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Timme, Ruth E.; Bachvaroff, Tsvetan R.; Delwiche, Charles F.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>The tremendous diversity of land plants all descended from a single charophyte green alga that colonized the land somewhere between 430 and 470 million years ago. Six orders of charophyte green algae, in addition to embryophytes, comprise the Streptophyta s.l. Previous studies have focused on reconstructing the phylogeny of organisms tied to this key colonization event, but wildly conflicting results have sparked a contentious debate over which lineage gave rise to land plants. The dominant view has been that ‘stoneworts,’ or Charales, are the <span class="hlt">sister</span> lineage, but an alternative hypothesis supports the Zygnematales (often referred to as “pond scum”) as the <span class="hlt">sister</span> lineage. In this paper, we provide a well-supported, 160-nuclear-gene phylogenomic analysis supporting the Zygnematales as the closest living relative to land plants. Our study makes two key contributions to the field: 1) the use of an unbiased method to collect a large set of orthologs from deeply diverging species and 2) the use of these data in determining the <span class="hlt">sister</span> lineage to land plants. We anticipate this updated phylogeny not only will hugely impact lesson plans in introductory biology courses, but also will provide a solid phylogenetic tree for future green-lineage research, whether it be related to plants or green algae. PMID:22253761</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20966869','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20966869"><span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">death</span> of Florence Nightingale: BJN 100 years ago.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Castledine, Sir George</p> <p></p> <p>This August marks the centenary of the <span class="hlt">death</span> of Florence Nightingale, who died at 2 o'clock on Saturday 13 August 1910 at her home, 10 South Street, Park Lane, London. The following are some snippets which appeared in the BJN of the 20 and 27 August 1910. It was not until the announcement of her <span class="hlt">death</span> in the morning papers of Monday 15 August that the country heard about Nightingale's <span class="hlt">death</span>. In her last hours she was attended by Sir Thomas Barlow and two nurses from the Nursing <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>' Institution, Devonshire Square, founded by Mrs Elizabeth Fry in 1840. PMID:20966869</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009AGUFM.V51B1681K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009AGUFM.V51B1681K"><span id="translatedtitle">Strain gradients and melt pathways, Twin <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> complex, Washington State</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kruckenberg, S. C.; Newman, J.; Tikoff, B.; Toy, V. G.</p> <p>2009-12-01</p> <p>The Twin <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> complex in the North Cascades of Washington state is a large (~6 by 16 km), virtually unaltered ultramafic body that provides information about the relationships between the formation of compositional layering, structural fabrics and the formation of inferred melt pathways in naturally deforming peridotites. Compositional layering is largely defined by alternating layers of orthopyroxene-absent dunite (>95% olivine) and orthopyroxene-present (~15% orthopyroxene; ~85% olivine) harzburgite aligned parallel to a roughly N-S striking and steeply dipping foliation. Orthopyroxene- and clinopyroxene-bearing dikes occur throughout the Twin <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> and crosscut the host dunite and harzburgite layering. Orthopyroxene dikes range in thickness from 1 cm to >1 m and are variably oriented and may be folded. Clinopyroxene-bearing dikes are thinner, more consistently oriented (~N-S), and generally more tabular than the orthopyroxene dikes. In the Twin <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>, cm- to m-scale zones of porphyroclastic dunite cross-cut the main dunite-harzburgite compositional layering and display a variety of relationships with pyroxene dikes in the region. These porphyroclastic dunite bands locally contain single olivine grains >10 cm and likely represent former pathways of melt migration. Transect mapping along an E-W traverse across the Twin <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> massif reveals that these inferred melt channels form at various angles relative to the main dunite-harzburgite layering. In the west, porphyroclastic olivine layers form at low angle to the main foliation and compositional layering. These zone form at systematically higher angles across the structural section of the Twin <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> massif to the east and commonly form conjugate cross-cutting sets at high-angle to the main N-S dunite-harzburgite layering. This change in band angle correlates broadly with changes in the intensity of folding of orthopyroxene-bearing dikes, with more intensely deformed dikes in the west to more planar dikes</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25872779','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25872779"><span id="translatedtitle">Faith healers, myths and <span class="hlt">deaths</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wasti, Harihar; Kanchan, Tanuj; Acharya, Jenash</p> <p>2015-09-01</p> <p>Science and myth have been closely <span class="hlt">linked</span> and argued upon by philosophers, educationalists, scientists, enthusiasts and the general public. Faith healing, when added as an adjuvant or alternative aid to medical science, will not necessarily be confined to mere arguments and debates but may also give rise to series of complications, medical emergencies and even result in <span class="hlt">death</span>. We present an unusual case where reliance on faith healing led to the <span class="hlt">death</span> of a young man. PMID:25872779</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/tn0124.photos.154039p/','SCIGOV-HHH'); return false;" href="//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/tn0124.photos.154039p/"><span id="translatedtitle">10. Photocopy of photograph showing the three Walker <span class="hlt">sisters</span> ginning ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>10. Photocopy of photograph showing the three Walker <span class="hlt">sisters</span> ginning cotton. Misses Hettie, Martha and Louisa are from left to right. The original photograph was taken on May 21, 1936 by Edouard E. Exline and is one of five photographs in the album, 'A Sketch of Mountain Life: Great Smoky Mountains National Park', compiled by Edouard E. Exline and C.S. Grossman. The album is on file at the Great Smoky Mountains National Park; the photograph number is III-A-HSE-9642. - Walker Family Farm (General views), Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2758051','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2758051"><span id="translatedtitle">Catholic <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Nurses in Selma, Alabama, 1940–1972</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Wall, Barbra Mann</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>This study analyzes the activities of religious <span class="hlt">sister</span> nurses as they confronted racism in the American South from 1940 to 1972. Selma was chosen as a case study because, in the 1960s, events in that southern town marked a turning point in the civil rights movement in the United States. This is a story about the workings of gender, race, religion, and nursing. The sisters’ work demonstrates how an analysis of race in nursing history is incomplete without an understanding of the roles that a number of Catholic religious women took in reaching out to African Americans in the Deep South. PMID:19218843</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4746374','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4746374"><span id="translatedtitle">Agenesis of the Gallbladder in Monozygotic Twin <span class="hlt">Sisters</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Hoshi, Koki; Irisawa, Atsushi; Shibukawa, Goro; Yamabe, Akane; Fujisawa, Mariko; Igarashi, Ryo; Sato, Ai; Maki, Takumi</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Agenesis of the gallbladder, a rare anomaly, is generally regarded as an organogenic failure. Several reports suggest that this congenital defect is inherited but that supposition remains controversial. We described agenesis of the gallbladder in identical twins. A 21-year-old female presented with a history of acute pain in the epigastrium and right hypochondrium. Various imaging modalities showed “gallbladder agenesis.” Moreover, her older identical twin <span class="hlt">sister</span> had also no visualized gallbladder in imaging modalities. This case report strongly suggested that agenesis of the gallbladder would be caused by a genetic abnormality. PMID:26925274</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26925274','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26925274"><span id="translatedtitle">Agenesis of the Gallbladder in Monozygotic Twin <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hoshi, Koki; Irisawa, Atsushi; Shibukawa, Goro; Yamabe, Akane; Fujisawa, Mariko; Igarashi, Ryo; Sato, Ai; Maki, Takumi</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Agenesis of the gallbladder, a rare anomaly, is generally regarded as an organogenic failure. Several reports suggest that this congenital defect is inherited but that supposition remains controversial. We described agenesis of the gallbladder in identical twins. A 21-year-old female presented with a history of acute pain in the epigastrium and right hypochondrium. Various imaging modalities showed "gallbladder agenesis." Moreover, her older identical twin <span class="hlt">sister</span> had also no visualized gallbladder in imaging modalities. This case report strongly suggested that agenesis of the gallbladder would be caused by a genetic abnormality. PMID:26925274</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6662359','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6662359"><span id="translatedtitle">Eating attitudes and behaviors of anorexia nervosa patients and their <span class="hlt">sisters</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Maloney, M J; Shepard-Spiro, P</p> <p>1983-12-01</p> <p>Although the <span class="hlt">sisters</span> of anorexia nervosa patients may have an increased risk for this disorder, there are no controlled studies of the eating patterns and attitudes of the normal <span class="hlt">sisters</span> of anorexic patients. Twenty-one <span class="hlt">sister</span> pairs (anorexics and their normal <span class="hlt">sisters</span>) were interviewed and given the Eating Attitude Test (EAT) to compare their eating attitudes and behaviors. The mean scores on the EAT and its three subscales (measuring "Dieting," "Bulimia and Food Preoccupation," and "Oral Control") were significantly correlated with criterion group membership (p less than 0.0001). The normal <span class="hlt">sisters</span> as a group did not demonstrate anorexic eating attitudes. However, two normal <span class="hlt">sisters</span> did score in the anorexic range and are being followed prospectively. The EAT questionnaire could be used to screen vulnerable siblings of patients with anorexia nervosa for early signs of this disorder. PMID:6662359</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24182378','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24182378"><span id="translatedtitle">Brain <span class="hlt">death</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wijdicks, Eelco F M</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>The diagnosis of brain <span class="hlt">death</span> should be based on a simple premise. If every possible confounder has been excluded and all possible treatments have been tried or considered, irreversible loss of brain function is clinically recognized as the absence of brainstem reflexes, verified apnea, loss of vascular tone, invariant heart rate, and, eventually, cardiac standstill. This condition cannot be reversed - not even partly - by medical or surgical intervention, and thus is final. Many countries in the world have introduced laws that acknowledge that a patient can be declared brain-dead by neurologic standards. The U.S. law differs substantially from all other brain <span class="hlt">death</span> legislation in the world because the U.S. law does not spell out details of the neurologic examination. Evidence-based practice guidelines serve as a standard. In this chapter, I discuss the history of development of the criteria, the current clinical examination, and some of the ethical and legal issues that have emerged. Generally, the concept of brain <span class="hlt">death</span> has been accepted by all major religions. But patients' families may have different ideas and are mostly influenced by cultural attitudes, traditional customs, and personal beliefs. Suggestions are offered to support these families. PMID:24182378</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22930868','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22930868"><span id="translatedtitle">[The <span class="hlt">death</span> of Ignatius Loyola].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Huguier, Michel; Lacaine, Francois</p> <p>2011-12-01</p> <p>A recent examination of a bilioportal fistula led us to suspect a <span class="hlt">link</span> between this case and the <span class="hlt">death</span> of Ignatius of Loyola. Realdo Colombo, professor of anatomy, eviscerated Ignatius prior to his embalming In his book De re anatomica, published in 1559, he wrote that he extracted stones from the portal vein of the venerable Ignatius. Before his <span class="hlt">death</span>, Ignatius suffered from epigastric pain and fever (Monumenta historica societatis Jesu). Colombo latin text is difficult to interpret and the data are meager. Other possible causes of Ignatius' <span class="hlt">death</span> include gastroduodenal ulcer, tuberculosis and hyperparathyroidism, but despite of rarity bilioportal fistula is the best guess. PMID:22930868</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1577959','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1577959"><span id="translatedtitle">Pregnancy risk among the younger <span class="hlt">sisters</span> of pregnant and childbearing adolescents.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>East, P L; Felice, M E</p> <p>1992-04-01</p> <p>There is increasing evidence that younger <span class="hlt">sisters</span> of childbearing teenagers are at increased risk for adolescent childbearing. We critically review this research and discuss three plausible theoretical explanations (social modeling, shared parenting influences, and shared societal risk) why the younger <span class="hlt">sisters</span> of childbearing adolescents would themselves be at risk for teenage pregnancy. Considerations for preventive interventions aimed at the younger <span class="hlt">sisters</span> of pregnant teenagers and directions for future research are discussed. PMID:1577959</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li class="active"><span>7</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_7 --> <div id="page_8" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li class="active"><span>8</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="141"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3230346','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3230346"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Sister-sister</span> in vitro fertilization surrogate pregnancy with donor sperm: the case for surrogate gestational pregnancy.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Leeton, J; King, C; Harman, J</p> <p>1988-10-01</p> <p>A case of surrogate pregnancy is described in the <span class="hlt">sister</span> of a 40-year-old hysterectomized woman where two oocytes of the latter were fertilized in vitro with known donor sperm and transferred into the surrogate. A normal singleton pregnancy developed which was complicated after 24 weeks of gestation with recurrent antepartum hemorrhages due to grade 3 placenta praevia. A healthy female baby was delivered by elective cesarean section at 36 weeks of gestation. The legal, social, psychological, and ethical issues of surrogacy remain unsettled and are discussed in this case report. PMID:3230346</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3575537','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3575537"><span id="translatedtitle">Condensin II initiates <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid resolution during S phase</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Ono, Takao; Yamashita, Daisuke</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Condensins I and II are multisubunit complexes that play essential yet distinct functions in chromosome condensation and segregation in mitosis. Unlike condensin I, condensin II localizes to the nucleus during interphase, but it remains poorly understood what functions condensin II might have before mitotic entry. Here, we report that condensin II changes its chromatin-binding property during S phase. Remarkably, advanced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) assays enabled us to visualize condensin II forming “<span class="hlt">sister</span> axes” in replicated regions of chromosomes in S phase cells. Depletion of condensin II compromised PCC-driven <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid resolution during S phase. Moreover, fluorescence in situ hybridization assays revealed that condensin II, but not condensin I, promotes disjoining duplicated chromosomal loci during S phase. Application of mild replicative stress partially impaired this process and further exacerbated phenotypes arising from condensin II depletion. Our results suggest that condensin II initiates structural reorganization of duplicated chromosomes during S phase to prepare for their proper condensation and segregation in mitosis. PMID:23401001</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27541002','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27541002"><span id="translatedtitle">Investigating the Interplay between <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Chromatid Cohesion and Homolog Pairing in Drosophila Nuclei.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Senaratne, T Niroshini; Joyce, Eric F; Nguyen, Son C; Wu, C-Ting</p> <p>2016-08-01</p> <p>Following DNA replication, <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids must stay connected for the remainder of the cell cycle in order to ensure accurate segregation in the subsequent cell division. This important function involves an evolutionarily conserved protein complex known as cohesin; any loss of cohesin causes premature <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid separation in mitosis. Here, we examined the role of cohesin in <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion prior to mitosis, using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to assay the alignment of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids in interphase Drosophila cells. Surprisingly, we found that <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion can be maintained in G2 with little to no cohesin. This capacity to maintain cohesion is widespread in Drosophila, unlike in other systems where a reduced dependence on cohesin for <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid segregation has been observed only at specific chromosomal regions, such as the rDNA locus in budding yeast. Additionally, we show that condensin II antagonizes the alignment of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids in interphase, supporting a model wherein cohesin and condensin II oppose each other's functions in the alignment of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids. Finally, because the maternal and paternal homologs are paired in the somatic cells of Drosophila, and because condensin II has been shown to antagonize this pairing, we consider the possibility that condensin II-regulated mechanisms for aligning homologous chromosomes may also contribute to <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion. PMID:27541002</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4991795','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4991795"><span id="translatedtitle">Investigating the Interplay between <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Chromatid Cohesion and Homolog Pairing in Drosophila Nuclei</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Senaratne, T. Niroshini; Joyce, Eric F.; Wu, C.-ting</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Following DNA replication, <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids must stay connected for the remainder of the cell cycle in order to ensure accurate segregation in the subsequent cell division. This important function involves an evolutionarily conserved protein complex known as cohesin; any loss of cohesin causes premature <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid separation in mitosis. Here, we examined the role of cohesin in <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion prior to mitosis, using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to assay the alignment of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids in interphase Drosophila cells. Surprisingly, we found that <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion can be maintained in G2 with little to no cohesin. This capacity to maintain cohesion is widespread in Drosophila, unlike in other systems where a reduced dependence on cohesin for <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid segregation has been observed only at specific chromosomal regions, such as the rDNA locus in budding yeast. Additionally, we show that condensin II antagonizes the alignment of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids in interphase, supporting a model wherein cohesin and condensin II oppose each other’s functions in the alignment of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids. Finally, because the maternal and paternal homologs are paired in the somatic cells of Drosophila, and because condensin II has been shown to antagonize this pairing, we consider the possibility that condensin II-regulated mechanisms for aligning homologous chromosomes may also contribute to <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion. PMID:27541002</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26100636','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26100636"><span id="translatedtitle">Inhibition of N-Methyl-D-aspartate-induced Retinal Neuronal <span class="hlt">Death</span> by Polyarginine Peptides Is <span class="hlt">Linked</span> to the Attenuation of Stress-induced Hyperpolarization of the Inner Mitochondrial Membrane Potential.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Marshall, John; Wong, Kwoon Y; Rupasinghe, Chamila N; Tiwari, Rakesh; Zhao, Xiwu; Berberoglu, Eren D; Sinkler, Christopher; Liu, Jenney; Lee, Icksoo; Parang, Keykavous; Spaller, Mark R; Hüttemann, Maik; Goebel, Dennis J</p> <p>2015-09-01</p> <p>It is widely accepted that overactivation of NMDA receptors, resulting in calcium overload and consequent mitochondrial dysfunction in retinal ganglion neurons, plays a significant role in promoting neurodegenerative disorders such as glaucoma. Calcium has been shown to initiate a transient hyperpolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential triggering a burst of reactive oxygen species leading to apoptosis. Strategies that enhance cell survival signaling pathways aimed at preventing this adverse hyperpolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential may provide a novel therapeutic intervention in retinal disease. In the retina, brain-derived neurotrophic factor has been shown to be neuroprotective, and our group previously reported a PSD-95/PDZ-binding cyclic peptide (CN2097) that augments brain-derived neurotrophic factor-induced pro-survival signaling. Here, we examined the neuroprotective properties of CN2097 using an established retinal in vivo NMDA toxicity model. CN2097 completely attenuated NMDA-induced caspase 3-dependent and -independent cell <span class="hlt">death</span> and PARP-1 activation pathways, blocked necrosis, and fully prevented the loss of long term ganglion cell viability. Although neuroprotection was partially dependent upon CN2097 binding to the PDZ domain of PSD-95, our results show that the polyarginine-rich transport moiety C-R(7), <span class="hlt">linked</span> to the PDZ-PSD-95-binding cyclic peptide, was sufficient to mediate short and long term protection via a mitochondrial targeting mechanism. C-R(7) localized to mitochondria and was found to reduce mitochondrial respiration, mitochondrial membrane hyperpolarization, and the generation of reactive oxygen species, promoting survival of retinal neurons. PMID:26100636</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1461886','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1461886"><span id="translatedtitle">Sex determination in the androdioecious plant Datisca glomerata and its dioecious <span class="hlt">sister</span> species D. cannabina.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Wolf, D E; Satkoski, J A; White, K; Rieseberg, L H</p> <p>2001-01-01</p> <p>Datisca glomerata is an androdioecious plant species containing male and hermaphroditic individuals. Molecular markers and crossing data suggest that, in both D. glomerata and its dioecious <span class="hlt">sister</span> species D. cannabina, sex is determined by a single nuclear locus, at which maleness is dominant. Supporting this conclusion, an amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) is heterozygous in males and homozygous recessive in hermaphrodites in three populations of the androdioecious species. Additionally, hermaphrodite x male crosses produced 1:1 sex ratios, while hermaphrodite x hermaphrodite crosses produced almost entirely hermaphroditic offspring. No perfectly sex-<span class="hlt">linked</span> marker was found in the dioecious species, but all markers associated with sex mapped to a single linkage group and were heterozygous in the male parent. There was no sex-ratio heterogeneity among crosses within D. cannabina collections, but males from one collection produced highly biased sex ratios (94% females), suggesting that there may be sex-<span class="hlt">linked</span> meiotic drive or a cytoplasmic sex-ratio factor. Interspecific crosses produced only male and female offspring, but no hermaphrodites, suggesting that hermaphroditism is recessive to femaleness. This comparative approach suggests that the hermaphrodite form arose in a dioecious population from a recessive mutation that allowed females to produce pollen. PMID:11729166</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26898580','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26898580"><span id="translatedtitle">Pediatric familial neuromyelitis optica in two <span class="hlt">sisters</span> with long term follow-up.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Chuquilin, Miguel; Mullaguri, Naresh; Weinshenker, Brian</p> <p>2016-07-01</p> <p>Neuromyelitis optica causes bilateral optic neuritis and longitudinal extensive transverse myelitis. Although usually sporadic, 3% of cases of neuromyelitis optica are familial. The interval over which attacks continue and the long term prognosis for pediatric-onset neuromyelitis optica are not well defined. We describe two patients with pediatric familial neuromyelitis optica with the longest clinical follow-up of a pediatric case reported in the literature to our knowledge. One woman developed blindness with bilateral eye involvement within a few weeks at age 3. This was followed by transverse myelitis with paraparesis at age 19 leading to diagnosis of neuromyelitis optica. Her serum anti-aquaporin 4 antibody was later found to be positive. She continued with sporadic myelitis-related relapses but remained ambulant until age 40 when she had a more severe relapse. There was evidence of longitudinal extensive T2 hyperintensity in the thoracic spinal cord. Her <span class="hlt">sister</span> also developed blindness at age 3.5 followed by myelitis 1year later with multiple relapses of gait impairment until her <span class="hlt">death</span> from pneumonia at age 21. These patients represent the rare occurrence of neuromyelitis optica in children within the same family and show that this disease can have prolonged periods of remission but a continued tendency to relapse, supporting the need for lifelong immunosuppression. PMID:26898580</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3169009','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3169009"><span id="translatedtitle">Increased <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange associated with smoking and coffee consumption.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Reidy, J A; Annest, J L; Chen, A T; Welty, T K</p> <p>1988-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Sister</span> chromatid exchange (SCE) is a very sensitive cytogenetic assay for detecting exposure to chemical mutagens and carcinogens. One application of SCE is the monitoring of populations believed to be exposed to such agents. We have, however, relatively little knowledge about common lifestyle factors that may influence SCE and therefore complicate any study designed to examine the effects of exposure to genotoxins. In this study, we assessed the effect of cigarette smoking and coffee consumption on SCE. Smoking was associated with an increase of approximately 2 SCEs per cell and a decrease in cell proliferation. A positive linear relationship between SCE and coffee consumption was also observed. This effect was similar for smokers and nonsmokers. Additionally, the folic acid content of cell culture medium seemed to affect neither SCE nor cell proliferation. PMID:3169009</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6395271','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6395271"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Sister</span> chromatid exchanges in peripheral lymphocytes after preoperative mammography</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Husum, B.; Wulf, H.C.; Niebuhr, E.</p> <p>1981-09-01</p> <p>Examination of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchanges (SCE) in peripheral lymphocytes may be useful for evaluating in vivo exposure to chemical mutagens. In vitro exposure of human lymphocytes to low levels of ionizing radiation has failed to produce increased SCE rates. Scarcity of information about the SCE test system and in vivo exposure to radiation prompted the present study of SCE rates in peripheral lymphocytes in women investigated with mammography prior to operation because of a tumor of the breast. In 64 of a total of 131 women a mammography was performed before the operation. The two groups of patients were identical with respect to age, smoking habits, and incidence of malignancy of the mammary tumors. SCE rates were examined in 30 metaphases from each patient following cultivation of peripheral blood lymphocytes using the BrdU/Giemsa technique.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/978252','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/978252"><span id="translatedtitle">Telomere <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange in telomerase deficient murine cells</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Wang, Yisong; Giannone, Richard J; Liu, Yie</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>We have recently demonstrated that several types of genomic rearrangements (i.e., telomere <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange (T-SCE), genomic-SCE, or end-to-end fusions) were more often detected in long-term cultured murine telomerase deficient embryonic stem (ES) cells than in freshly prepared murine splenocytes, even through they possessed similar frequencies of critically short telomeres. The high rate of genomic rearrangements in telomerase deficient ES cells, when compared to murine splenocytes, may reflect the cultured cells' gained ability to protect chromosome ends with eroded telomeres allowing them to escape 'end crisis'. However, the possibility that ES cells were more permissive to genomic rearrangements than other cell types or that differences in the microenvironment or genetic background of the animals might consequentially determine the rate of T-SCEs or other genomic rearrangements at critically short telomeres could not be ruled out.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27084937','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27084937"><span id="translatedtitle">Transcription facilitates <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion on chromosomal arms.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bhardwaj, Shweta; Schlackow, Margarita; Rabajdova, Miroslava; Gullerova, Monika</p> <p>2016-08-19</p> <p>Cohesin is a multi-subunit protein complex essential for <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion, gene expression and DNA damage repair. Although structurally well studied, the underlying determinant of cohesion establishment on chromosomal arms remains enigmatic. Here, we show two populations of functionally distinct cohesin on chromosomal arms using a combination of genomics and single-locus specific DNA-FISH analysis. Chromatin bound cohesin at the loading sites co-localizes with Pds5 and Eso1 resulting in stable cohesion. In contrast, cohesin independent of its loader is unable to maintain cohesion and associates with chromatin in a dynamic manner. Cohesive sites coincide with highly expressed genes and transcription inhibition leads to destabilization of cohesin on chromatin. Furthermore, induction of transcription results in de novo recruitment of cohesive cohesin. Our data suggest that transcription facilitates cohesin loading onto chromosomal arms and is a key determinant of cohesive sites in fission yeast. PMID:27084937</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21452027','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21452027"><span id="translatedtitle">Bold vision: Catholic <span class="hlt">sisters</span> and the creation of American hospitals.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Levin, Peter J</p> <p>2011-06-01</p> <p>American hospitals were started by religious, ethnic and community groups to serve local health care needs. Immigration into the eastern cities and the constant movement west of the frontier required the creation of educational and service facilities to serve these populations and localities. In the nineteenth century, Catholic <span class="hlt">sisters</span> went all across the country establishing schools and hospitals. They were motivated to care for the sick, establish charitable institutions and spread their religious beliefs. Their impact on the development of the American health system was enormous. They also supported the importance of nursing for the provision of scientifically based medical care and created schools of nursing. Their historical record as founders, builders, financiers and managers of hospitals is unmatched by any other group between 1850 and 1950. And, this was accomplished at a time when women played no similar leadership and institutional ownership role elsewhere in society. PMID:21452027</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26109979','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26109979"><span id="translatedtitle">Mercury poisoning in two 13-year-old twin <span class="hlt">sisters</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Khodashenas, Ezzat; Aelami, Mohammadhassan; Balali-Mood, Mahdi</p> <p>2015-03-01</p> <p>Mercury (Hg) is a toxic agent that evaporates in room temperature and its inhalation may cause poisoning. Due to the nonspecific symptoms, diagnosis is difficult in special circumstances with no initial history of Hg exposure. We report two such cases of Hg poisoning. The patients were two <span class="hlt">sisters</span>, presenting with pain in extremities, itchy rashes, sweating, salivation, weakness, and mood changes. They have used a compound that contains mercury, for treatment of pedicullosis three months before admission. This compound was purchased from a herbal shop and was applied locally on the scalps for 2 days. Their urinary mercury concentrations were 50 and 70 mg/L. They were successfully treated by D-penicillamine and gabapentin. In a patient with any kind of bone and joint pain, skin rash erythema and peripheral neuropathy, mercury poisoning should be considered as a differential diagnosis. PMID:26109979</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158574.html','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158574.html"><span id="translatedtitle">Officials Report First Zika <span class="hlt">Death</span> in Puerto Rico</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... news/fullstory_158574.html Officials Report First Zika <span class="hlt">Death</span> in Puerto Rico The victim was a 70- ... HealthDay News) -- The first known Zika virus-<span class="hlt">linked</span> <span class="hlt">death</span> in Puerto Rico was announced Friday by officials ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_158574.html','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_158574.html"><span id="translatedtitle">Officials Report First Zika <span class="hlt">Death</span> in Puerto Rico</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... gov/news/fullstory_158574.html Officials Report First Zika <span class="hlt">Death</span> in Puerto Rico The victim was a ... April 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The first known Zika virus-<span class="hlt">linked</span> <span class="hlt">death</span> in Puerto Rico was announced ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title40-vol16/pdf/CFR-2011-title40-vol16-sec79-65.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title40-vol16/pdf/CFR-2011-title40-vol16-sec79-65.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">40 CFR 79.65 - In vivo <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange assay.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-07-01</p> <p>... references should be consulted. (1) 40 CFR 798.5915, In vivo <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Chromatid Exchange Assay. (2) Kato, H...) assay detects the ability of a chemical to enhance the exchange of DNA between two <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids of... ligation of at least two DNA helices. (c) Test method—(1) Principle of the test method. (i) Groups...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=older+AND+brother&pg=4&id=EJ626967','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=older+AND+brother&pg=4&id=EJ626967"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Sisters</span>, Brothers, and Delinquency: Evaluating Social Influence during Early and Middle Adolescence.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Slomkowski, Cheryl; Rende, Richard; Conger, Katherine J.; Simons, Ronald L.; Conger, Rand D.</p> <p>2001-01-01</p> <p>Examined sibling influence on delinquency in 164 brother and <span class="hlt">sister</span> pairs over 4-year period. Found that sibling similarity for self-reports of delinquent behavior were highly correlated for brothers and <span class="hlt">sisters</span>. Conditional effects of high hostile-coercive relationships and older sibling delinquency predicted younger sibling delinquency in both…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=nuns&pg=6&id=EJ1021763','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=nuns&pg=6&id=EJ1021763"><span id="translatedtitle">Addressing the Apparent Paradox of the Catholic <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Principal: 1940-1965</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>O'Donoghue, Tom; Harford, Judith</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>A body of scholarship on the history of the lives of Catholic teaching <span class="hlt">sisters</span> has thrown up various challenges to educational historians. One challenge can be posed by asking how teaching <span class="hlt">sisters</span> were able to go on to take up leadership positions. This is prompted by the observation that a particular body of literature for the period 1940-1965…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=siblings+AND+%22+friends%22&pg=6&id=EJ625349','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=siblings+AND+%22+friends%22&pg=6&id=EJ625349"><span id="translatedtitle">Adolescents' Sex-Typed Friendship Experiences: Does Having a <span class="hlt">Sister</span> versus a Brother Matter?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Updegraff, Kimberly A.; McHale, Susan M.; Crouter, Ann C.</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>Examined connections between having a <span class="hlt">sister</span> versus a brother and coming from a same-sex versus an opposite-sex sibling dyad, and sex-typing in adolescents' friendships. Findings suggested that <span class="hlt">sisters</span> may learn control tactics from brothers that they apply in friendships. Boys were less likely to model emotional intimacy. Coming from opposite-sex…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title40-vol17/pdf/CFR-2014-title40-vol17-sec79-65.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title40-vol17/pdf/CFR-2014-title40-vol17-sec79-65.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">40 CFR 79.65 - In vivo <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange assay.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-07-01</p> <p>... references should be consulted. (1) 40 CFR 798.5915, In vivo <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Chromatid Exchange Assay. (2) Kato, H...) assay detects the ability of a chemical to enhance the exchange of DNA between two <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids of... ligation of at least two DNA helices. (c) Test method—(1) Principle of the test method. (i) Groups...</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li class="active"><span>8</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_8 --> <div id="page_9" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li class="active"><span>9</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="161"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title40-vol17/pdf/CFR-2012-title40-vol17-sec79-65.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title40-vol17/pdf/CFR-2012-title40-vol17-sec79-65.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">40 CFR 79.65 - In vivo <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange assay.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-07-01</p> <p>... references should be consulted. (1) 40 CFR 798.5915, In vivo <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Chromatid Exchange Assay. (2) Kato, H...) assay detects the ability of a chemical to enhance the exchange of DNA between two <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids of... ligation of at least two DNA helices. (c) Test method—(1) Principle of the test method. (i) Groups...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title40-vol17/pdf/CFR-2013-title40-vol17-sec79-65.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title40-vol17/pdf/CFR-2013-title40-vol17-sec79-65.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">40 CFR 79.65 - In vivo <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange assay.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-07-01</p> <p>... references should be consulted. (1) 40 CFR 798.5915, In vivo <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Chromatid Exchange Assay. (2) Kato, H...) assay detects the ability of a chemical to enhance the exchange of DNA between two <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids of... ligation of at least two DNA helices. (c) Test method—(1) Principle of the test method. (i) Groups...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3794122','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3794122"><span id="translatedtitle">Unusual presentation of two Chinese phenylketonuria <span class="hlt">sisters</span> who were misdiagnosed for years</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Liu, Xiaomei; Guo, Hui; Dahal, Mahesh; Shi, Bingyin</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Significant developmental delay was first noticed when both <span class="hlt">sisters</span> were in their third year of life. However, no biochemical disorders were found through the routine biochemical tests, including liver and kidney function, lipoprotein, urine and blood cell count analysis. Progressively, both <span class="hlt">sisters</span> exhibited odd behaviour, accompanied by personality changes and altered sleep rhythm and then were diagnosed as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. In the eighth year, the younger <span class="hlt">sister</span> began to take risperidone due to a presumed psychiatric disorder. Four months before attending our hospital, both <span class="hlt">sisters</span> were diagnosed by MRI as having hereditary leukodystrophy. Nerve-nurturing treatment was tried, but without good outcome. They were then referred to our hospital for further consultation. After systematic examinations, it was confirmed that both the <span class="hlt">sisters</span> were suffering from phenylketonuria. The symptoms were alleviated after dietary restriction of phenylalanine and symptomatic treatment. PMID:24068375</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25839724','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25839724"><span id="translatedtitle">Brain <span class="hlt">death</span>: the Asian perspective.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Chua, Hoe Chin; Kwek, Tong Kiat; Morihara, Hirofumi; Gao, Daiquan</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>Asia is the largest and most populous continent in the world with people from many diverse ethnic groups, religions and government systems. The authors surveyed 14 countries accounting for the majority of Asia's population and found that, although the concept of brain <span class="hlt">death</span> is widely accepted, there is wide variability in the criteria for certification. Although most Asian countries have adopted the "whole-brain" concept of brain <span class="hlt">death</span>, most countries with past colonial <span class="hlt">links</span> to the United Kingdom follow the UK "brainstem" concept of brain <span class="hlt">death</span>. Despite this difference, most countries require only neurologic testing of irreversible coma and absent brainstem reflexes as criteria for certification of brain <span class="hlt">death</span>. Variability exists in the number of personnel required, qualifications of certifying doctors, need for repeat examination, minimum time interval between examinations, and requirement for and choice of confirmatory tests. PMID:25839724</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=self+AND+help+AND+book+AND+aid&pg=5&id=ED346375','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=self+AND+help+AND+book+AND+aid&pg=5&id=ED346375"><span id="translatedtitle">Encountering <span class="hlt">Death</span>: Structured Activities for <span class="hlt">Death</span> Awareness.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Welch, Ira David; And Others</p> <p></p> <p>This book is intended to be used as a supplement to standard textbooks on <span class="hlt">death</span> and dying for college students. Chapter 1 "Encountering <span class="hlt">Death</span> in the Self" builds the foundation for increased self-awareness for the study of <span class="hlt">death</span> and dying. Chapter 2 "Encountering <span class="hlt">Death</span> in the Family" provides activities which are appropriate for a wide variety of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27136266','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27136266"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Sister</span> chromatid resolution is an intrinsic part of chromosome organization in prophase.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Nagasaka, Kota; Hossain, M Julius; Roberti, M Julia; Ellenberg, Jan; Hirota, Toru</p> <p>2016-06-01</p> <p>The formation of mitotic chromosomes requires both compaction of chromatin and the resolution of replicated <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids. Compaction occurs during mitotic prophase and prometaphase, and in prophase relies on the activity of condensin II complexes. Exactly when and how <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid resolution occurs has been largely unknown, as has its molecular requirements. Here, we established a method to visualize <span class="hlt">sister</span> resolution by sequential replication labelling with two distinct nucleotide derivatives. Quantitative three-dimensional imaging then allowed us to measure the resolution of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids throughout mitosis by calculating their non-overlapping volume within the whole chromosome. Unexpectedly, we found that <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid resolution starts already at the beginning of prophase, proceeds concomitantly with chromatin compaction and is largely completed by the end of prophase. <span class="hlt">Sister</span> chromatid resolution was abolished by inhibition of topoisomerase IIα and by depleting or preventing mitotic activation of condensin II, whereas blocking cohesin dissociation from chromosomes had little effect. Mitotic <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid resolution is thus an intrinsic part of mitotic chromosome formation in prophase that relies largely on DNA decatenation and shares the molecular requirement for condensin II with prophase compaction. PMID:27136266</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8055167','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8055167"><span id="translatedtitle">The USA's nurse managers and UK's ward <span class="hlt">sisters</span>: critical roles for empowerment.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Cameron-Buccheri, R; Ogier, M E</p> <p>1994-07-01</p> <p>The nurse manager/ward <span class="hlt">sister</span> role is becoming endangered as many of these nurses are being asked to take fiscal and personnel responsibility for multiple units/programmes and supervise more non-registered nursing staff. Loss of this important nurse manager/ward <span class="hlt">sister</span> role could severely decrease nursing's voice in the development and implementation of policies that affect nurses and the care they deliver. The authors review 20 years of literature from both the USA and the UK regarding supportive supervision and the role of the nurse manager/ward <span class="hlt">sister</span>. Nurse managers/ward <span class="hlt">sisters</span> were found to be key individuals within the entire health-care organization. Nurse managers/ward <span class="hlt">sisters</span> can empower the nurses they supervise to initiate changes that will improve patient care. Nurse managers/ward <span class="hlt">sisters</span> can also improve the working conditions and thus increase the job satisfaction and retention of those they supervise. Strategies for being more supportive of these overworked and endangered nurse managers/ward <span class="hlt">sisters</span> are suggested. PMID:8055167</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4817899','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4817899"><span id="translatedtitle">X-inactivation in the clinical phenotype of fragile X premutation carrier <span class="hlt">sisters</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Robertson-Dick, Erin E.; O'Keefe, Joan A.; Hadd, Andrew G.; Zhou, Lili; Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Objective: The purpose of this study is to describe a case series of 4 <span class="hlt">sisters</span> with discordant clinical phenotypes associated with fragile X–associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) that may be explained by varying CGG repeat sizes and activation ratios (ARs) (the ratio of cells carrying the normal fragile X mental retardation 1 [FMR1] allele on the active X chromosome). Methods: Four <span class="hlt">sisters</span> with premutation size FMR1 gene repeats underwent detailed clinical characterization. CGG repeat length was determined by PCR, and AR was determined using a newly developed commercial methylation PCR assay and was compared with the results from Southern blot with densitometric image analysis. Results: <span class="hlt">Sister</span> 1 had the largest CGG expansion (82) and the lowest AR (12%), with the most severe clinical presentation. <span class="hlt">Sister</span> 2 had a lower CGG expansion (70) and an AR of 10% but had a milder clinical presentation.<span class="hlt">Sister</span> 3 had a similar CGG expansion (79) but a slightly higher AR of 15% and less neurologic involvement. <span class="hlt">Sister</span> 4 had a similar CGG expansion size of 80 but had the largest AR (40%) and was the only <span class="hlt">sister</span> not to be affected by FXTAS or have any neurologic signs on examination. Conclusions: These results suggest that premutation carrier women who have higher ARs may be less likely to show manifestations of FXTAS. If larger studies show similar patterns, AR data could potentially be beneficial to supplement CGG repeat size when counseling premutation carrier women in the clinic. PMID:27066582</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3906944','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3906944"><span id="translatedtitle">The geography and ecology of plant speciation: range overlap and niche divergence in <span class="hlt">sister</span> species</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Anacker, Brian L.; Strauss, Sharon Y.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>A goal of evolutionary biology is to understand the roles of geography and ecology in speciation. The recent shared ancestry of <span class="hlt">sister</span> species can leave a major imprint on their geographical and ecological attributes, possibly revealing processes involved in speciation. We examined how ecological similarity, range overlap and range asymmetry are related to time since divergence of 71 <span class="hlt">sister</span> species pairs in the California Floristic Province (CFP). We found that plants exhibit strikingly different age-range correlation patterns from those found for animals; the latter broadly support allopatric speciation as the primary mode of speciation. By contrast, plant <span class="hlt">sisters</span> in the CFP were sympatric in 80% of cases and range sizes of <span class="hlt">sisters</span> differed by a mean of 10-fold. Range overlap and range asymmetry were greatest in younger <span class="hlt">sisters</span>. These results suggest that speciation mechanisms broadly grouped under ‘budding’ speciation, in which a larger ranged progenitor gives rise to a smaller ranged derivative species, are probably common. The ecological and reproductive similarity of <span class="hlt">sisters</span> was significantly greater than that of sister–non-<span class="hlt">sister</span> congeners for every trait assessed. However, shifts in at least one trait were present in 93% of the <span class="hlt">sister</span> pairs; habitat and soil shifts were especially common. Ecological divergence did not increase with range overlap contrary to expectations under character displacement in sympatry. Our results suggest that vicariant speciation is more ubiquitous in animals than plants, perhaps owing to the sensitivity of plants to fine-scale environmental heterogeneity. Despite high levels of range overlap, ecological shifts in the process of budding speciation may result in low rates of fine-scale spatial co-occurrence. These results have implications for ecological studies of trait evolution and community assembly; despite high levels of sympatry, <span class="hlt">sister</span> taxa and potentially other close relatives, may be missing from local communities</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25946564','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25946564"><span id="translatedtitle">The SUMO deconjugating peptidase Smt4 contributes to the mechanism required for transition from <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid arm cohesion to <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid pericentromere separation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Stephens, Andrew D; Snider, Chloe E; Bloom, Kerry</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The pericentromere chromatin protrudes orthogonally from the <span class="hlt">sister-sister</span> chromosome arm axis. Pericentric protrusions are organized in a series of loops with the centromere at the apex, maximizing its ability to interact with stochastically growing and shortening kinetochore microtubules. Each pericentromere loop is ∼50 kb in size and is organized further into secondary loops that are displaced from the primary spindle axis. Cohesin and condensin are integral to mechanisms of loop formation and generating resistance to outward forces from kinesin motors and anti-parallel spindle microtubules. A major unanswered question is how the boundary between chromosome arms and the pericentromere is established and maintained. We used <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid separation and dynamics of LacO arrays distal to the pericentromere to address this issue. Perturbation of chromatin spring components results in 2 distinct phenotypes. In cohesin and condensin mutants <span class="hlt">sister</span> pericentric LacO arrays separate a defined distance independent of spindle length. In the absence of Smt4, a peptidase that removes SUMO modifications from proteins, pericentric LacO arrays separate in proportion to spindle length increase. Deletion of Smt4, unlike depletion of cohesin and condensin, causes stretching of both proximal and distal pericentromere LacO arrays. The data suggest that the sumoylation state of chromatin topology adjusters, including cohesin, condensin, and topoisomerase II in the pericentromere, contribute to chromatin spring properties as well as the <span class="hlt">sister</span> cohesion boundary. PMID:25946564</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1691261','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1691261"><span id="translatedtitle">Wild female baboons bias their social behaviour towards paternal half-<span class="hlt">sisters</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Smith, Kerri; Alberts, Susan C; Altmann, Jeanne</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>Adult female cercopithecines have long been known to bias their social behaviour towards close maternal kin. However, much less is understood about the behaviour of paternal kin, especially in wild populations. Here, we show that wild adult female baboons bias their affiliative behaviour towards their adult paternal half-<span class="hlt">sisters</span> in the same manner and to the same extent that they bias their behaviour towards adult maternal half-<span class="hlt">sisters</span>. Females appear to rely heavily on social familiarity as a means of biasing their behaviour towards paternal half-<span class="hlt">sisters</span>, but may use phenotype matching as well. PMID:12641905</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12270007','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12270007"><span id="translatedtitle">Cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis: molecular characterization of two Scandinavian <span class="hlt">sisters</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Rystedt, E; Olin, M; Seyama, Y; Buchmann, M; Berstad, A; Eggertsen, G; Björkhem, I</p> <p>2002-09-01</p> <p>Cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX) is a hereditary disorder, which is inherited as an autosomally recessive disease, causing production of cholesterol and cholestanol xanthomas and mental retardation. The disease is caused by mutations in the gene for sterol 27-hydroxylase (CYP27A1). The only CTX patients diagnosed in Scandinavia are two Norwegian <span class="hlt">sisters</span> from a consanguineous marriage. Here we have characterized the mutation and its functional consequences for the enzyme. Analysis of genomic DNA from cultured fibroblasts identified a base exchange C > T in position 1441, causing arginine at amino acid position 441 to be replaced by tryptophan. The same mutation was introduced by mutagenesis in the complimentary DNA (cDNA) for CYP27, ligated into the expression vector pcDNA4/HisMax and transfected into HEK293 cells. The mutated enzyme had less than 5% of the enzyme activity compared with the native enzyme. No abnormal catalytic products could be identified in the cell culture medium. Probably the mutation affects the haem binding within the holoenzyme. The mutation has also previously been reported in a Japanese family. This is the second example of a CTX-causing mutation that has been recognized in more than one population. PMID:12270007</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20203608','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20203608"><span id="translatedtitle">Ecologically distinct dinosaurian <span class="hlt">sister</span> group shows early diversification of Ornithodira.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Nesbitt, Sterling J; Sidor, Christian A; Irmis, Randall B; Angielczyk, Kenneth D; Smith, Roger M H; Tsuji, Linda A</p> <p>2010-03-01</p> <p>The early evolutionary history of Ornithodira (avian-line archosaurs) has hitherto been documented by incomplete (Lagerpeton) or unusually specialized forms (pterosaurs and Silesaurus). Recently, a variety of Silesaurus-like taxa have been reported from the Triassic period of both Gondwana and Laurasia, but their relationships to each other and to dinosaurs remain a subject of debate. Here we report on a new avian-line archosaur from the early Middle Triassic (Anisian) of Tanzania. Phylogenetic analysis places Asilisaurus kongwe gen. et sp. nov. as an avian-line archosaur and a member of the Silesauridae, which is here considered the <span class="hlt">sister</span> taxon to Dinosauria. Silesaurids were diverse and had a wide distribution by the Late Triassic, with a novel ornithodiran bauplan including leaf-shaped teeth, a beak-like lower jaw, long, gracile limbs, and a quadrupedal stance. Our analysis suggests that the dentition and diet of silesaurids, ornithischians and sauropodomorphs evolved independently from a plesiomorphic carnivorous form. As the oldest avian-line archosaur, Asilisaurus demonstrates the antiquity of both Ornithodira and the dinosaurian lineage. The initial diversification of Archosauria, previously documented by crocodilian-line archosaurs in the Anisian, can now be shown to include a contemporaneous avian-line radiation. The unparalleled taxonomic diversity of the Manda archosaur assemblage indicates that archosaur diversification was well underway by the Middle Triassic or earlier. PMID:20203608</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2632674','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2632674"><span id="translatedtitle">Two <span class="hlt">sisters</span> in the same dress: Heliconius cryptic species</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>Background <span class="hlt">Sister</span> species divergence and reproductive isolation commonly results from ecological adaptation. In mimetic Heliconius butterflies, shifts in colour pattern contribute to pre- and post-mating reproductive isolation and are commonly correlated with speciation. Closely related mimetic species are therefore not expected, as they should lack several important sources of reproductive isolation. Results Here we present phenotypic, behavioral and genetic evidence for the coexistence of two sympatric 'cryptic' species near Florencia in the eastern Andes of Colombia that share the same orange rayed colour pattern. These represent H. melpomene malleti and a novel taxon in the H. cydno group, here designated as novel race of Heliconius timareta, Heliconius timareta florencia. No-choice mating experiments show that these sympatric forms have strong assortative mating (≈96%) despite great similarity in colour pattern, implying enhanced divergence in pheromonal signals. Conclusion We hypothesize that these species might have resulted from recent convergence in colour pattern, perhaps facilitated by hybrid introgression of wing pattern genes. PMID:19040737</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3848118','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3848118"><span id="translatedtitle">Monozygotic twin <span class="hlt">sisters</span> discordant for familial hemiplegic migraine</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Background The high concordance rate of migraine in monozygotic twin pairs has long been recognised. In the current study, we present a monozygotic twin pair discordant for familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM). Case presentations We evaluated 12 adult family members in 2012. The twin pair was separately examined by neurologists at different time points. Mutation screening was performed for known FHM-related genes. The monozygosity of the twins was verified. Eleven individuals had a history of migraine or paroxysmal neurological symptoms, including four patients with motor aura. No mutations were detected in the CACNA1A, ATP1A2, SCN1A, PRRT2 or NOTCH3 genes. The monozygotic twin <span class="hlt">sisters</span>, aged 52, were discordant for age of onset, motor aura and neuropsychological aura (forced thinking). Overall, the family members presented a wide range of phenotypical features. Conclusions Familial hemiplegic migraine is a monogenic disorder that is distinct from migraine with typical aura. However, in certain families with motor aura, such as this one, it is possible that the most severe phenotype is caused by an unlikely combination of polygenic traits and non-genetic factors. In these kindreds, we propose that hemiplegic aura is only a severe and complex form of typical aura. PMID:24041236</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27290759','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27290759"><span id="translatedtitle">'The <span class="hlt">Sister</span>' in the early days of the NHS.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ellis, Harold</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>All the readers of this journal will have read and heard about the ward and operating theatre <span class="hlt">sisters</span> in 'the old days'. What were they really like, and what was it like to work with them in the hospitals of those far-off times? I entered the old Radcliffe Infirmary Oxford in the summer of 1945, just as World War II was drawing to a close, as a 19 year old student to start my clinical training. I then qualified in July 1948, the very month the NHS came into being, and started my surgical career as house surgeon. The Radcliffe was the only acute hospital in the town and dealt with all emergency admissions. In addition, we worked at the Churchill Hospital, then a hutted hospital, erected during the War to deal with Canadian military casualties and now handed over for civilian use. Elective orthopaedics was carried out at the Wingfield Morris Hospital, later the Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre. The patients here were mostly children with bone and joint tuberculosis or poliomyelitis. The Slade Isolation Hospital dealt with the infectious fevers; I was admitted there twice as a student, with first chicken pox and then measles, both caught from my patients! PMID:27290759</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/001566.htm','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/001566.htm"><span id="translatedtitle">Sudden infant <span class="hlt">death</span> syndrome</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Crib <span class="hlt">death</span>; SIDS ... However, SIDS is still a major cause of <span class="hlt">death</span> in infants under 1 year old. Thousands of ... affects boys more often than girls. Most SIDS <span class="hlt">deaths</span> occur in the winter. The following may increase ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23054426','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23054426"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Death</span>: 'nothing' gives insight.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ettema, Eric J</p> <p>2013-08-01</p> <p>According to a widely accepted belief, we cannot know our own <span class="hlt">death--death</span> means 'nothing' to us. At first sight, the meaning of 'nothing' just implies the negation or absence of 'something'. <span class="hlt">Death</span> then simply refers to the negation or absence of life. As a consequence, however, <span class="hlt">death</span> has no meaning of itself. This leads to an ontological paradox in which <span class="hlt">death</span> is both acknowledged and denied: <span class="hlt">death</span> is … nothing. In this article, I investigate whether insight into the ontological paradox of the nothingness of <span class="hlt">death</span> can contribute to a good end-of-life. By analysing Aquinas', Heidegger's and Derrida's understanding of <span class="hlt">death</span> as nothingness, I explore how giving meaning to <span class="hlt">death</span> on different ontological levels connects to, and at the same time provides resistance against, the harsh reality of <span class="hlt">death</span>. By doing so, I intend to demonstrate that insight into the nothingness of <span class="hlt">death</span> can count as a framework for a meaningful dealing with <span class="hlt">death</span>. PMID:23054426</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/suddeninfantdeathsyndrome.html','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/suddeninfantdeathsyndrome.html"><span id="translatedtitle">Sudden Infant <span class="hlt">Death</span> Syndrome</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Sudden infant <span class="hlt">death</span> syndrome (SIDS) is the sudden, unexplained <span class="hlt">death</span> of an infant younger than one year old. Some people call SIDS "crib <span class="hlt">death</span>" because many babies who die of SIDS are found in their ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15288052','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15288052"><span id="translatedtitle">A molecular test of alternative hypotheses of tetraodontiform (Acanthomorpha: Tetraodontiformes) <span class="hlt">sister</span> group relationships using data from the RAG1 gene.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Holcroft, Nancy I</p> <p>2004-09-01</p> <p>Two primary competing hypotheses regarding the identity of the <span class="hlt">sister</span> group of the order Tetraodontiformes exist. The first hypothesis holds that some or all acanthuroid fishes represent the <span class="hlt">sister</span> of Tetraodontiformes. The second, proposed in 1984 by Rosen, holds that the order Zeiformes is <span class="hlt">sister</span> to Tetraodontiformes and that the family Caproidae is <span class="hlt">sister</span> to this Zeiformes + Tetraodontiformes clade. These two hypotheses were tested using data from the single-copy nuclear gene RAG1. Representatives of most major orders of acanthomorph fishes were included to provide an appropriate context in which to place Tetraodontiformes and its hypothesized <span class="hlt">sister</span> groups. The results of an unweighted parsimony analysis indicate that Zeiformes is not the <span class="hlt">sister</span> group of Tetraodontiformes. In addition, Caproidae appears unrelated to Zeiformes. A monophyletic Tetraodontiformes was recovered as the <span class="hlt">sister</span> group of the clade Ephippidae + Drepanidae and was more distantly related to the included zeiform and caproid representatives. PMID:15288052</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li class="active"><span>9</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_9 --> <div id="page_10" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li class="active"><span>10</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="181"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3212099','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3212099"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Sister</span> Circles as a Culturally Relevant Intervention for Anxious African American Women</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Neal-Barnett, Angela; Stadulis, Robert; Murray, Marsheena; Payne, Margaret Ralston; Thomas, Anisha; Salley, Bernadette B.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Research on anxiety treatment with African American women reveals a need to develop interventions that address factors relevant to their lives. Such factors include feelings of isolation, multiple roles undertaken by Black women, and faith. A recurrent theme across treatment studies is the importance of having support from other Black women. <span class="hlt">Sister</span> circles are support groups that build upon existing friendships, fictive kin networks, and the sense of community found among African Americans females. <span class="hlt">Sister</span> circles appear to offer many of the components Black women desire in an anxiety intervention. In this article, we explore <span class="hlt">sister</span> circles as an intervention for anxious African American women. Culturally-infused aspects from our <span class="hlt">sister</span> circle work with middle-class African American women are presented. Further research is needed. PMID:22081747</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title20-vol4/pdf/CFR-2012-title20-vol4-sec725-223.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title20-vol4/pdf/CFR-2012-title20-vol4-sec725-223.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">20 CFR 725.223 - Duration of entitlement; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-04-01</p> <p>... the parent dies. (c) The last month for which such brother or <span class="hlt">sister</span> is entitled to benefits is the month before the month in which any of the following events first occurs: (1) The individual dies;...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title20-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title20-vol3-sec725-223.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title20-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title20-vol3-sec725-223.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">20 CFR 725.223 - Duration of entitlement; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-04-01</p> <p>... the parent dies. (c) The last month for which such brother or <span class="hlt">sister</span> is entitled to benefits is the month before the month in which any of the following events first occurs: (1) The individual dies;...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title20-vol4/pdf/CFR-2014-title20-vol4-sec725-223.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title20-vol4/pdf/CFR-2014-title20-vol4-sec725-223.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">20 CFR 725.223 - Duration of entitlement; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-04-01</p> <p>... the parent dies. (c) The last month for which such brother or <span class="hlt">sister</span> is entitled to benefits is the month before the month in which any of the following events first occurs: (1) The individual dies;...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1128680','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1128680"><span id="translatedtitle">DNA single strand breakage, DNA adducts, and <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange in lymphocytes and phenanthrene and pyrene metabolites in urine of coke oven workers.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Popp, W; Vahrenholz, C; Schell, C; Grimmer, G; Dettbarn, G; Kraus, R; Brauksiepe, A; Schmeling, B; Gutzeit, T; von Bülow, J; Norpoth, K</p> <p>1997-01-01</p> <p>OBJECTIVES: To investigate the specificity of biological monitoring variables (excretion of phenanthrene and pyrene metabolites in urine) and the usefulness of some biomarkers of effect (alkaline filter elution, 32P postlabelling assay, measurement of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange) in workers exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). METHODS: 29 coke oven workers and a standardised control group were investigated for frequencies of DNA single strand breakage, DNA protein cross <span class="hlt">links</span> (alkaline filter elution assay), <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange, and DNA adducts (32P postlabelling assay) in lymphocytes. Phenanthrene and pyrene metabolites were measured in 24 hour urine samples. 19 different PAHs (including benzo(a)pyrene, pyrene, and phenanthrene) were measured at the workplace by personal air monitoring. The GSTT1 activity in erythrocytes and lymphocyte subpopulations in blood was also measured. RESULTS: Concentrations of phenanthrene, pyrene, and benzo(a)pyrene in air correlated well with the concentration of total PAHs in air; they could be used for comparisons of different workplaces if the emission compositions were known. The measurement of phenanthrene metabolites in urine proved to be a better biological monitoring variable than the measurement of 1-hydroxypyrene. Significantly more DNA strand breaks in lymphocytes of coke oven workers were found (alkaline filter elution assay); the DNA adduct rate was not significantly increased in workers, but correlated with exposure to PAHs in a semiquantitative manner. The number of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchanges was lower in coke oven workers but this was not significant; thus counting <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchanges was not a good variable for biomonitoring of coke oven workers. Also, indications for immunotoxic influences (changes in lymphocyte subpopulations) were found. CONCLUSIONS: The measurement of phenanthrene metabolites in urine seems to be a better biological monitoring variable for exposure to PAHs than</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4682810','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4682810"><span id="translatedtitle">Solution Radioactivated by Hadron Radiation Can Increase <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Chromatid Exchanges</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Maeda, Junko; Yurkon, Charles R.; Fujii, Yoshihiro; Fujisawa, Hiroshi; Kato, Sayaka; Brents, Colleen A.; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Fujimori, Akira; Kitamura, Hisashi; Kato, Takamitsu A.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>When energetic particles irradiate matter, it becomes activated by nuclear reactions. Radioactivation induced cellular effects are not clearly understood, but it could be a part of bystander effects. This investigation is aimed at understanding the biological effects from radioactivation in solution induced by hadron radiation. Water or phosphate buffered saline was activated by being exposed to hadron radiation including protons, carbon- and iron-ions. 1 mL of radioactivated solution was transferred to flasks with Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells cultured in 5 mL of complete media. The induction of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchanges (SCE) was used to observe any increase in DNA damage responses. The energy spectrum and the half-lives of the radioactivation were analyzed by NaI scintillation detector in order to identify generated radionuclides. In the radioactivated solution, 511 keV gamma-rays were observed, and their half-lives were approximately 2 min, 10 min, and 20 min. They respectively correspond to the beta+ decay of 15O, 13N, and 11C. The SCE frequencies in CHO cells increased depending on the amount of radioactivation in the solution. These were suppressed with a 2-hour delayed solution transfer or pretreatment with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Our results suggest that the SCE induction by radioactivated solution was mediated by free radicals produced by the annihilated gamma-rays. Since the SCE induction and DMSO modulation are also reported in radiation-induced bystander effects, our results imply that radioactivation of the solution may have some contribution to the bystander effects from hadron radiation. Further investigations are required to assess if radioactivation effects would attribute an additional level of cancer risk of the hadron radiation therapy itself. PMID:26657140</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26657140','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26657140"><span id="translatedtitle">Solution Radioactivated by Hadron Radiation Can Increase <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Chromatid Exchanges.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Maeda, Junko; Yurkon, Charles R; Fujii, Yoshihiro; Fujisawa, Hiroshi; Kato, Sayaka; Brents, Colleen A; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Fujimori, Akira; Kitamura, Hisashi; Kato, Takamitsu A</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>When energetic particles irradiate matter, it becomes activated by nuclear reactions. Radioactivation induced cellular effects are not clearly understood, but it could be a part of bystander effects. This investigation is aimed at understanding the biological effects from radioactivation in solution induced by hadron radiation. Water or phosphate buffered saline was activated by being exposed to hadron radiation including protons, carbon- and iron-ions. 1 mL of radioactivated solution was transferred to flasks with Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells cultured in 5 mL of complete media. The induction of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchanges (SCE) was used to observe any increase in DNA damage responses. The energy spectrum and the half-lives of the radioactivation were analyzed by NaI scintillation detector in order to identify generated radionuclides. In the radioactivated solution, 511 keV gamma-rays were observed, and their half-lives were approximately 2 min, 10 min, and 20 min. They respectively correspond to the beta+ decay of 15O, 13N, and 11C. The SCE frequencies in CHO cells increased depending on the amount of radioactivation in the solution. These were suppressed with a 2-hour delayed solution transfer or pretreatment with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Our results suggest that the SCE induction by radioactivated solution was mediated by free radicals produced by the annihilated gamma-rays. Since the SCE induction and DMSO modulation are also reported in radiation-induced bystander effects, our results imply that radioactivation of the solution may have some contribution to the bystander effects from hadron radiation. Further investigations are required to assess if radioactivation effects would attribute an additional level of cancer risk of the hadron radiation therapy itself. PMID:26657140</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27265374','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27265374"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Sister</span> chromatid exchange assay as a predictor of tumor chemoresponse.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mourelatos, D</p> <p>2016-06-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Sister</span> Chromatid Exchanges (SCEs) are known to enhance as a consequence of exposure to various mutagenic agents and appear to indicate DNA damaging effects and/or subsequent repair by homologous recombination (HR). DNA damage plays an interesting role in the majority of mechanisms underlying the effects of antitumor drugs, since the genetic activity of the plethora of these agents is due to their ability to damage the DNA. The DNA-effects of antitumor agents towards normal cells (genotoxicity) are great drawbacks of antitumor therapy and are connected to important adverse health effects in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. On the other hand, failure of chemotherapy in many cases is due to the DNA repair ability which cancer, like normal cells, also possess. As both DNA repair and genotoxic exposure are expected to vary among patients, correlating SCEs frequencies with only individual repair capacity may be feasible to predict. Cancer risk has not been observed to be associated with high SCEs levels. Since the administration of effective antitumor drugs with limited adverse effects is of great importance in the success of anticancer therapy, a lot of interest has been directed toward the development of methods and approaches that would enable the correct selection of appropriate drugs prior to the initiation of therapy on an individual basis. To this effect, more than 30 years ago, an investigation of the ability of the in vitro and the in vivo SCEs-assay to predict the in vitro and in vivo sensitivity of tumor cells to newly synthesized drugs or to those already in use began. In this short review a critical appraisal of the SCEs-assay as an important biomarker used for predicting cancer chemo-response as well as a summary of the key findings from several studies published within the last 20 years in this field is performed. PMID:27265374</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26621703','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26621703"><span id="translatedtitle">Genomic data do not support comb jellies as the <span class="hlt">sister</span> group to all other animals.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Pisani, Davide; Pett, Walker; Dohrmann, Martin; Feuda, Roberto; Rota-Stabelli, Omar; Philippe, Hervé; Lartillot, Nicolas; Wörheide, Gert</p> <p>2015-12-15</p> <p>Understanding how complex traits, such as epithelia, nervous systems, muscles, or guts, originated depends on a well-supported hypothesis about the phylogenetic relationships among major animal lineages. Traditionally, sponges (Porifera) have been interpreted as the <span class="hlt">sister</span> group to the remaining animals, a hypothesis consistent with the conventional view that the last common animal ancestor was relatively simple and more complex body plans arose later in evolution. However, this premise has recently been challenged by analyses of the genomes of comb jellies (Ctenophora), which, instead, found ctenophores as the <span class="hlt">sister</span> group to the remaining animals (the "Ctenophora-<span class="hlt">sister</span>" hypothesis). Because ctenophores are morphologically complex predators with true epithelia, nervous systems, muscles, and guts, this scenario implies these traits were either present in the last common ancestor of all animals and were lost secondarily in sponges and placozoans (Trichoplax) or, alternatively, evolved convergently in comb jellies. Here, we analyze representative datasets from recent studies supporting Ctenophora-<span class="hlt">sister</span>, including genome-scale alignments of concatenated protein sequences, as well as a genomic gene content dataset. We found no support for Ctenophora-<span class="hlt">sister</span> and conclude it is an artifact resulting from inadequate methodology, especially the use of simplistic evolutionary models and inappropriate choice of species to root the metazoan tree. Our results reinforce a traditional scenario for the evolution of complexity in animals, and indicate that inferences about the evolution of Metazoa based on the Ctenophora-<span class="hlt">sister</span> hypothesis are not supported by the currently available data. PMID:26621703</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=rose&pg=6&id=EJ1012746','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=rose&pg=6&id=EJ1012746"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Deaths</span> among Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults with Down Syndrome</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Miodrag, Nancy; Silverberg, Sophie E.; Urbano, Richard C.; Hodapp, Robert M.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Background: Although life expectancies in Down syndrome (DS) have doubled over the past 3-4 decades, there continue to be many early <span class="hlt">deaths</span>. Yet, most research focuses on infant mortality or later adult <span class="hlt">deaths</span>. Materials and Methods: In this US study, hospital discharge and <span class="hlt">death</span> records from the state of Tennessee were <span class="hlt">linked</span> to examine 2046…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2003AGUFM.V32D1049C&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2003AGUFM.V32D1049C&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">Silicic Eruptions of the Past 50 kyr at the Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> Volcanic Cluster</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Calvert, A. T.; Hildreth, W.; Fierstein, J.</p> <p>2003-12-01</p> <p>The Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> volcanic cluster in the central Oregon Cascades consists of mafic to intermediate stratovolcanoes surrounded by mafic and silicic flows and domes. The bulk of South and Middle <span class="hlt">Sister</span> are late Pleistocene while North <span class="hlt">Sister</span> is middle Pleistocene (Schmidt and Grunder, 2003 GSA abs.). Thick rhyolite and dacite lava flows and domes are rich in potassium, and young glaciation exposes holocrystalline groundmass textures ideal for argon geochronology. Several of these silicic flows bracket stratovolcano growth, and precise geochronology illuminates a rich basalt to rhyolite history in the cluster over the past 50 kyr. Careful step-heating 40Ar/39Ar experiments yield excellent plateau ages with radiogenic yields often above 5% on rocks as young as 20 ka. Most samples have well-determined isochrons with atmospheric (40/36 = 295.5) intercepts, although several have intercepts as low as 286. South <span class="hlt">Sister</span> is a composite cone with an andesite/dacite base (Hodge Crest) and a young andesite summit sequence. The basal flow of the 300m-thick, youngest conformable stack of andesite lavas at the summit is 27+/-3 ka. Unconformably underlying portions date back to at least 50 ka based on ages of overlapping silicic flows. The base of Middle <span class="hlt">Sister</span> is andesite overlain by ˜300m of olivine basalt. Some Middle <span class="hlt">Sister</span> andesites and all basalts overlie a distinctive dacite agglutinate (20+/-2 ka) in the South/Middle <span class="hlt">Sister</span> saddle. All Middle <span class="hlt">Sister</span> lavas underlie a thick dacite flow (14+/-3 ka) that vented at 8500 ft (2600m) on its S flank. Dacite lava flows erupted from the Middle/North <span class="hlt">Sister</span> saddle at 27+/-2 and 18+/-2 ka. Additionally, several >100m-thick rhyolite and dacite lavas vented low on the flanks of the cluster. Obsidian Cliff rhyolite (37.8+/-1.8 ka) and Lane Plateau dacite (21.4+/-1.9 ka) erupted W of Middle <span class="hlt">Sister</span>, the Dew Lake dacite (32.3+/-1.8 ka) located near the locus of the INSAR anomaly W of South <span class="hlt">Sister</span> flowed around a 148+/-4 ka (knob 6482) basalt</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3051424','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3051424"><span id="translatedtitle">Defining <span class="hlt">death</span>: organ transplants, tradition and technology in Japan.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Feldman, E A</p> <p>1988-01-01</p> <p>This article explores Japanese attitudes about brain <span class="hlt">death</span> and organ transplantation. First, ancient burial customs and <span class="hlt">death</span>-related rituals associated with Shinto and Buddhism are examined. Next, contemporary attitudes towards the dead are discussed in the context of current controversies surrounding brain <span class="hlt">death</span> and organ transplantation. Finally, an attempt is made to <span class="hlt">link</span> the traditional Japanese views of <span class="hlt">death</span> with modern medical dilemmas. PMID:3051424</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2567865','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2567865"><span id="translatedtitle">Shugoshin1 May Play Important Roles in Separation of Homologous Chromosomes and <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Chromatids during Mouse Oocyte Meiosis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Yin, Shen; Ai, Jun-Shu; Shi, Li-Hong; Wei, Liang; Yuan, Ju; Ouyang, Ying-Chun; Hou, Yi; Chen, Da-Yuan; Schatten, Heide; Sun, Qing-Yuan</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>Background Homologous chromosomes separate in meiosis I and <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids separate in meiosis II, generating haploid gametes. To address the question why <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids do not separate in meiosis I, we explored the roles of Shogoshin1 (Sgo1) in chromosome separation during oocyte meiosis. Methodology/Principal Findings Sgo1 function was evaluated by exogenous overexpression to enhance its roles and RNAi to suppress its roles during two meioses of mouse oocytes. Immunocytochemistry and chromosome spread were used to evaluate phenotypes. The exogenous Sgo1 overexpression kept homologous chromosomes and <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids not to separate in meiosis I and meiosis II, respectively, while the Sgo1 RNAi promoted premature separation of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids. Conclusions Our results reveal that prevention of premature separation of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids in meiosis I requires the retention of centromeric Sgo1, while normal separation of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids in meiosis II requires loss of centromeric Sgo1. PMID:18949044</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1221/','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1221/"><span id="translatedtitle">Digital Data for Volcano Hazards of the Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> Region, Oregon</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Schilling, S.P.; Doelger, S.; Scott, W.E.; Iverson, R.M.</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> is one of three active volcanic centers that lie close to rapidly growing communities and resort areas in Central Oregon. The major composite volcanoes of this area are clustered near the center of the region and include South <span class="hlt">Sister</span>, Middle <span class="hlt">Sister</span>, and Broken Top. Additionally, hundreds of mafic volcanoes are scattered throughout the Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> area. These range from small cinder cones to large shield volcanoes like North <span class="hlt">Sister</span> and Belknap Crater. Hazardous events include landslides from the steep flanks of large volcanoes and floods, which need not be triggered by eruptions, as well as eruption-triggered events such as fallout of tephra (volcanic ash) and lava flows. A proximal hazard zone roughly 20 kilometers (12 miles) in diameter surrounding the Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> and Broken Top could be affected within minutes of the onset of an eruption or large landslide. Distal hazard zones that follow river valleys downstream from the Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> and Broken Top could be inundated by lahars (rapid flows of water-laden rock and mud) generated either by melting of snow and ice during eruptions or by large landslides. Slow-moving lava flows could issue from new mafic volcanoes almost anywhere within the region. Fallout of tephra from eruption clouds can affect areas hundreds of kilometers (miles) downwind, so eruptions at volcanoes elsewhere in the Cascade Range also contribute to volcano hazards in Central Oregon. Scientists at the Cascades Volcano Observatory created a geographic information system (GIS) data set which depicts proximal and distal lahar hazard zones as well as a regional lava flow hazard zone for Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> (USGS Open-File Report 99-437, Scott and others, 1999). The various distal lahar zones were constructed from LaharZ software using 20, 100, and 500 million cubic meter input flow volumes. Additionally, scientists used the depositional history of past events in the Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> Region as well as experience and judgment derived from the</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3033573','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3033573"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Sister</span> cohesion and structural axis components mediate homolog bias of meiotic recombination</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Kim, Keun P.; Weiner, Beth M.; Zhang, Liangran; Jordan, Amy; Dekker, Job; Kleckner, Nancy</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>SUMMARY Meiotic recombination occurs between one chromatid of each maternal and paternal homolog (homolog bias) versus between <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids (<span class="hlt">sister</span> bias). Physical DNA analysis reveals that meiotic cohesin/axis component Rec8 promotes <span class="hlt">sister</span> bias, likely via its cohesion activity. Two meiosis-specific axis components, Red1/Mek1kinase, counteract this effect. With this precondition satisfied, other molecules directly specify homolog bias per se. Rec8 also acts positively to maintain homolog bias during crossover recombination. These observations point to sequential release of double-strand break ends from association with their <span class="hlt">sister</span>. Red1 and Rec8 are found to play distinct roles for <span class="hlt">sister</span> cohesion, DSB formation and recombination progression kinetics. Also, the two components are enriched in spatially distinct domains of axial structure that develop prior to DSB formation. We propose that Red1 and Rec8 domains provide functionally complementary environments whereby inputs evolved from DSB repair and late-stage chromosome morphogenesis are integrated to give the complete meiotic chromosomal program. PMID:21145459</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4224182','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4224182"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Sisters</span> Unbound Is Required for Meiotic Centromeric Cohesion in Drosophila melanogaster</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Krishnan, Badri; Thomas, Sharon E.; Yan, Rihui; Yamada, Hirotsugu; Zhulin, Igor B.; McKee, Bruce D.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Regular meiotic chromosome segregation requires <span class="hlt">sister</span> centromeres to mono-orient (orient to the same pole) during the first meiotic division (meiosis I) when homologous chromosomes segregate, and to bi-orient (orient to opposite poles) during the second meiotic division (meiosis II) when <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids segregate. Both orientation patterns require cohesion between <span class="hlt">sister</span> centromeres, which is established during meiotic DNA replication and persists until anaphase of meiosis II. Meiotic cohesion is mediated by a conserved four-protein complex called cohesin that includes two structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) subunits (SMC1 and SMC3) and two non-SMC subunits. In Drosophila melanogaster, however, the meiotic cohesion apparatus has not been fully characterized and the non-SMC subunits have not been identified. We have identified a novel Drosophila gene called <span class="hlt">sisters</span> unbound (sunn), which is required for stable <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion throughout meiosis. sunn mutations disrupt centromere cohesion during prophase I and cause high frequencies of non-disjunction (NDJ) at both meiotic divisions in both sexes. SUNN co-localizes at centromeres with the cohesion proteins SMC1 and SOLO in both sexes and is necessary for the recruitment of both proteins to centromeres. Although SUNN lacks sequence homology to cohesins, bioinformatic analysis indicates that SUNN may be a structural homolog of the non-SMC cohesin subunit stromalin (SA), suggesting that SUNN may serve as a meiosis-specific cohesin subunit. In conclusion, our data show that SUNN is an essential meiosis-specific Drosophila cohesion protein. PMID:25194162</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7773517','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7773517"><span id="translatedtitle">The management of professionals: the preferences of hospital <span class="hlt">sisters</span> and charge nurses.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Foster, D</p> <p>1995-05-01</p> <p>This analysis of the preferences of how <span class="hlt">sisters</span> and charge nurses are managed is the result of a two centre descriptive study using theoretical models of professionalism, developing preferences and exercising situational leadership. It was conducted to determine if the management structure preferred by <span class="hlt">sisters</span> and charge nurses, in a general acute hospital setting, supported the professionalism of nursing. The outcomes were intended to help develop a strategic plan for the future of nursing and the management of nurses. The research instruments were a self-completed questionnaire (19 were returned, a response rate of 31.1%) and four semi-structured interviews. The findings disclosed some dissatisfaction with the present management arrangements. The <span class="hlt">sisters</span> and charge nurses felt that their priorities for practice and professional issues were better supported by clinically involved, ward-based senior nurses than by unit-based senior nurses with a general management function. However, <span class="hlt">sisters</span>' and charge nurses' discussions with ward-based senior nurses were apparently less effective than discussions in peer groups which led to influential collegial autonomy. This preferred management style can be supported by the use of situational leadership theory which would enhance collegial autonomy and professional satisfaction. Recognition of the <span class="hlt">sisters</span> and charge nurses preferences and adjustment of their management would therefore enable them to participate effectively in organizational decision-making. PMID:7773517</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25194162','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25194162"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Sisters</span> unbound is required for meiotic centromeric cohesion in Drosophila melanogaster.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Krishnan, Badri; Thomas, Sharon E; Yan, Rihui; Yamada, Hirotsugu; Zhulin, Igor B; McKee, Bruce D</p> <p>2014-11-01</p> <p>Regular meiotic chromosome segregation requires <span class="hlt">sister</span> centromeres to mono-orient (orient to the same pole) during the first meiotic division (meiosis I) when homologous chromosomes segregate, and to bi-orient (orient to opposite poles) during the second meiotic division (meiosis II) when <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids segregate. Both orientation patterns require cohesion between <span class="hlt">sister</span> centromeres, which is established during meiotic DNA replication and persists until anaphase of meiosis II. Meiotic cohesion is mediated by a conserved four-protein complex called cohesin that includes two structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) subunits (SMC1 and SMC3) and two non-SMC subunits. In Drosophila melanogaster, however, the meiotic cohesion apparatus has not been fully characterized and the non-SMC subunits have not been identified. We have identified a novel Drosophila gene called <span class="hlt">sisters</span> unbound (sunn), which is required for stable <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion throughout meiosis. sunn mutations disrupt centromere cohesion during prophase I and cause high frequencies of non-disjunction (NDJ) at both meiotic divisions in both sexes. SUNN co-localizes at centromeres with the cohesion proteins SMC1 and SOLO in both sexes and is necessary for the recruitment of both proteins to centromeres. Although SUNN lacks sequence homology to cohesins, bioinformatic analysis indicates that SUNN may be a structural homolog of the non-SMC cohesin subunit stromalin (SA), suggesting that SUNN may serve as a meiosis-specific cohesin subunit. In conclusion, our data show that SUNN is an essential meiosis-specific Drosophila cohesion protein. PMID:25194162</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4687580','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4687580"><span id="translatedtitle">Genomic data do not support comb jellies as the <span class="hlt">sister</span> group to all other animals</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Pisani, Davide; Pett, Walker; Dohrmann, Martin; Feuda, Roberto; Rota-Stabelli, Omar; Philippe, Hervé; Lartillot, Nicolas; Wörheide, Gert</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Understanding how complex traits, such as epithelia, nervous systems, muscles, or guts, originated depends on a well-supported hypothesis about the phylogenetic relationships among major animal lineages. Traditionally, sponges (Porifera) have been interpreted as the <span class="hlt">sister</span> group to the remaining animals, a hypothesis consistent with the conventional view that the last common animal ancestor was relatively simple and more complex body plans arose later in evolution. However, this premise has recently been challenged by analyses of the genomes of comb jellies (Ctenophora), which, instead, found ctenophores as the <span class="hlt">sister</span> group to the remaining animals (the “Ctenophora-sister” hypothesis). Because ctenophores are morphologically complex predators with true epithelia, nervous systems, muscles, and guts, this scenario implies these traits were either present in the last common ancestor of all animals and were lost secondarily in sponges and placozoans (Trichoplax) or, alternatively, evolved convergently in comb jellies. Here, we analyze representative datasets from recent studies supporting Ctenophora-<span class="hlt">sister</span>, including genome-scale alignments of concatenated protein sequences, as well as a genomic gene content dataset. We found no support for Ctenophora-<span class="hlt">sister</span> and conclude it is an artifact resulting from inadequate methodology, especially the use of simplistic evolutionary models and inappropriate choice of species to root the metazoan tree. Our results reinforce a traditional scenario for the evolution of complexity in animals, and indicate that inferences about the evolution of Metazoa based on the Ctenophora-<span class="hlt">sister</span> hypothesis are not supported by the currently available data. PMID:26621703</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27170622','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27170622"><span id="translatedtitle">High density of REC8 constrains <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid axes and prevents illegitimate synaptonemal complex formation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Agostinho, Ana; Manneberg, Otto; van Schendel, Robin; Hernández-Hernández, Abrahan; Kouznetsova, Anna; Blom, Hans; Brismar, Hjalmar; Höög, Christer</p> <p>2016-06-01</p> <p>During meiosis, cohesin complexes mediate <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion (SCC), synaptonemal complex (SC) assembly and synapsis. Here, using super-resolution microscopy, we imaged <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid axes in mouse meiocytes that have normal or reduced levels of cohesin complexes, assessing the relationship between localization of cohesin complexes, SCC and SC formation. We show that REC8 foci are separated from each other by a distance smaller than 15% of the total chromosome axis length in wild-type meiocytes. Reduced levels of cohesin complexes result in a local separation of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid axial elements (LSAEs), as well as illegitimate SC formation at these sites. REC8 but not RAD21 or RAD21L cohesin complexes flank sites of LSAEs, whereas RAD21 and RAD21L appear predominantly along the separated <span class="hlt">sister</span>-chromatid axes. Based on these observations and a quantitative distribution analysis of REC8 along <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid axes, we propose that the high density of randomly distributed REC8 cohesin complexes promotes SCC and prevents illegitimate SC formation. PMID:27170622</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li class="active"><span>10</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_10 --> <div id="page_11" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li class="active"><span>11</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="201"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1012606','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1012606"><span id="translatedtitle">Autosomal recessive sudden unexpected <span class="hlt">death</span> in children probably caused by a cardiomyopathy associated with myopathy.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Fried, K; Beer, S; Vure, E; Algom, M; Shapira, Y</p> <p>1979-01-01</p> <p>The propositus, who died suddenly at the age of 22 months, was investigated because of an unusual myopathy. Family history revealed two <span class="hlt">sisters</span> and four cousins who had also died suddenly and unexpectedly. The finding of asymmetric septal hypertrophy by echocardiography in the propositus suggested that the cause of the sudden <span class="hlt">death</span> in the relatives was an undetected cardiomyopathy accompanying a mild and often subclinical myopathy. The affected children were in two sibships and both sets of parents were first cousins. The mother of one sibship was the <span class="hlt">sister</span> of the father of the other. It is suggested that a gene causes a mild autosomal recessive myopathy with cardiomyopathy that is often undiagnosed and usually ends in sudden unexpected <span class="hlt">death</span> in the second year of life. The same gene may manifest on echocardiogram in some heterozygotes as asymmetric septal hypertrophy. Images PMID:513079</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7771381','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7771381"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Death</span> by fraternity hazing.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Boglioli, L R; Taff, M L</p> <p>1995-03-01</p> <p>Fraternity hazing can cause a variety of injuries and <span class="hlt">deaths</span>. We recently had the opportunity to investigate a heat-related <span class="hlt">death</span> that occurred during a college fraternity event. The original <span class="hlt">death</span> investigation did not consider the circumstances of <span class="hlt">death</span>, environmental conditions, or the subtle autopsy findings related to heat stroke. This case is intended to alert health care professionals that <span class="hlt">deaths</span> on college campuses may be related to fraternity hazing and may require in-depth investigations. An analysis of the <span class="hlt">death</span> and a discussion of heat-related injuries are presented. PMID:7771381</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23076835','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23076835"><span id="translatedtitle">Using a sibling design to compare childhood adversities in female patients with BPD and their <span class="hlt">sisters</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Laporte, Lise; Paris, Joel; Guttman, Herta; Russell, Jennifer; Correa, José A</p> <p>2012-11-01</p> <p>Abuse and neglect are well-established risk correlates of borderline personality disorder (BPD). The goal of this study was to examine whether BPD probands can be differentiated from their <span class="hlt">sisters</span> with respect to a range of developmental adversity and maltreatment indicators, including retrospective self-reports of past experiences of childhood abuse and neglect, dysfunctional parent-child relationships and peer victimization and dysfunctional peer relationships. A total of 53 patients with BPD were compared to 53 <span class="hlt">sisters</span> who were currently free of psychopathology on measures assessing childhood adversities. Both probands and <span class="hlt">sisters</span> reported similar prevalence of intrafamilial abuse, although BPD patients reported more severe physical and emotional abuse. BPD patients reported higher prevalence of physical abuse by peers. These findings generally support the principle of multifinality, in which similar histories of adversities can be associated with a variety of outcomes, ranging from psychopathology to resilience. PMID:23076835</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2005NW.....92..586B&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2005NW.....92..586B&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">Osteological evidence for <span class="hlt">sister</span> group relationship between pseudo-toothed birds (Aves: Odontopterygiformes) and waterfowls (Anseriformes)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bourdon, Estelle</p> <p>2005-12-01</p> <p>The phylogenetic affinities of the extinct pseudo-toothed birds have remained controversial. Some authors noted that they resemble both pelicans and allies (Pelecaniformes) and tube-nosed birds (Procellariiformes), but assigned them to a distinct taxon, the Odontopterygiformes. In most recent studies, the pseudo-toothed birds are referred to the family Pelagornithidae inside the Pelecaniformes. Here, I perform a cladistic analysis with five taxa of the pseudo-toothed birds including two undescribed new species from the Early Tertiary of Morocco. The present hypothesis strongly supports a <span class="hlt">sister</span> group relationship of pseudo-toothed birds (Odontopterygiformes) and waterfowls (Anseriformes). The Odontoanserae (Odontopterygiformes plus Anseriformes) are the <span class="hlt">sister</span> group of Neoaves. The placement of the landfowls (Galliformes) as the <span class="hlt">sister</span> taxon of all other neognathous birds does not support the consensus view that the Galloanserae (Galliformes plus Anseriformes) are monophyletic.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21479528','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21479528"><span id="translatedtitle">Bartter syndrome in two <span class="hlt">sisters</span> with a novel mutation of the CLCNKB gene, one with deafness.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Robitaille, Pierre; Merouani, Aicha; He, Ning; Pei, York</p> <p>2011-09-01</p> <p>This article describes two <span class="hlt">sisters</span> with type III Bartter syndrome (BS) due to a novel missense variant of the CLCNKB gene. The phenotypic expression of the disease was very different in these two siblings. In one <span class="hlt">sister</span>, the disease followed a very severe course, especially in the neonatal period and as a toddler. Both the classic symptoms and the biochemical features of the syndrome were striking. In addition, she presented with sensorineural deafness, a complication yet unreported in this subtype of BS In contrast, the least affected <span class="hlt">sister</span> was symptom free and the biochemical features of the disease although present remained discrete throughout the prolonged follow-up. It is suggested that such a difference in the phenotypic expression of the disease is possibly secondary to the modifier effect of a gene and/or results from environmental factor(s). PMID:21479528</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://medlineplus.gov/suddeninfantdeathsyndrome.html','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="https://medlineplus.gov/suddeninfantdeathsyndrome.html"><span id="translatedtitle">Sudden Infant <span class="hlt">Death</span> Syndrome</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Sudden infant <span class="hlt">death</span> syndrome (SIDS) is the sudden, unexplained <span class="hlt">death</span> of an infant younger than one year old. Some people call ... boys, African Americans, and American Indian/Alaska Native infants have a higher risk of SIDS. Although health ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2279116','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2279116"><span id="translatedtitle">Single mitochondrial gene barcodes reliably identify <span class="hlt">sister</span>-species in diverse clades of birds</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>Background DNA barcoding of life using a standardized COI sequence was proposed as a species identification system, and as a method for detecting putative new species. Previous tests in birds showed that individuals can be correctly assigned to species in ~94% of the cases and suggested a threshold of 10× mean intraspecific difference to detect potential new species. However, these tests were criticized because they were based on a single maternally inherited gene rather than multiple nuclear genes, did not compare phylogenetically identified <span class="hlt">sister</span> species, and thus likely overestimated the efficacy of DNA barcodes in identifying species. Results To test the efficacy of DNA barcodes we compared ~650 bp of COI in 60 <span class="hlt">sister</span>-species pairs identified in multigene phylogenies from 10 orders of birds. In all pairs, individuals of each species were monophyletic in a neighbor-joining (NJ) tree, and each species possessed fixed mutational differences distinguishing them from their <span class="hlt">sister</span> species. Consequently, individuals were correctly assigned to species using a statistical coalescent framework. A coalescent test of taxonomic distinctiveness based on chance occurrence of reciprocal monophyly in two lineages was verified in known <span class="hlt">sister</span> species, and used to identify recently separated lineages that represent putative species. This approach avoids the use of a universal distance cutoff which is invalidated by variation in times to common ancestry of <span class="hlt">sister</span> species and in rates of evolution. Conclusion Closely related <span class="hlt">sister</span> species of birds can be identified reliably by barcodes of fixed diagnostic substitutions in COI sequences, verifying coalescent-based statistical tests of reciprocal monophyly for taxonomic distinctiveness. Contrary to recent criticisms, a single DNA barcode is a rapid way to discover monophyletic lineages within a metapopulation that might represent undiscovered cryptic species, as envisaged in the unified species concept. This identifies a smaller</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014Natur.506..249L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014Natur.506..249L"><span id="translatedtitle">RecA bundles mediate homology pairing between distant <span class="hlt">sisters</span> during DNA break repair</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lesterlin, Christian; Ball, Graeme; Schermelleh, Lothar; Sherratt, David J.</p> <p>2014-02-01</p> <p>DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair by homologous recombination has evolved to maintain genetic integrity in all organisms. Although many reactions that occur during homologous recombination are known, it is unclear where, when and how they occur in cells. Here, by using conventional and super-resolution microscopy, we describe the progression of DSB repair in live Escherichia coli. Specifically, we investigate whether homologous recombination can occur efficiently between distant <span class="hlt">sister</span> loci that have segregated to opposite halves of an E. coli cell. We show that a site-specific DSB in one <span class="hlt">sister</span> can be repaired efficiently using distant <span class="hlt">sister</span> homology. After RecBCD processing of the DSB, RecA is recruited to the cut locus, where it nucleates into a bundle that contains many more RecA molecules than can associate with the two single-stranded DNA regions that form at the DSB. Mature bundles extend along the long axis of the cell, in the space between the bulk nucleoid and the inner membrane. Bundle formation is followed by pairing, in which the two ends of the cut locus relocate at the periphery of the nucleoid and together move rapidly towards the homology of the uncut <span class="hlt">sister</span>. After <span class="hlt">sister</span> locus pairing, RecA bundles disassemble and proteins that act late in homologous recombination are recruited to give viable recombinants 1-2-generation-time equivalents after formation of the initial DSB. Mutated RecA proteins that do not form bundles are defective in <span class="hlt">sister</span> pairing and in DSB-induced repair. This work reveals an unanticipated role of RecA bundles in channelling the movement of the DNA DSB ends, thereby facilitating the long-range homology search that occurs before the strand invasion and transfer reactions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24362571','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24362571"><span id="translatedtitle">RecA bundles mediate homology pairing between distant <span class="hlt">sisters</span> during DNA break repair.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lesterlin, Christian; Ball, Graeme; Schermelleh, Lothar; Sherratt, David J</p> <p>2014-02-13</p> <p>DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair by homologous recombination has evolved to maintain genetic integrity in all organisms. Although many reactions that occur during homologous recombination are known, it is unclear where, when and how they occur in cells. Here, by using conventional and super-resolution microscopy, we describe the progression of DSB repair in live Escherichia coli. Specifically, we investigate whether homologous recombination can occur efficiently between distant <span class="hlt">sister</span> loci that have segregated to opposite halves of an E. coli cell. We show that a site-specific DSB in one <span class="hlt">sister</span> can be repaired efficiently using distant <span class="hlt">sister</span> homology. After RecBCD processing of the DSB, RecA is recruited to the cut locus, where it nucleates into a bundle that contains many more RecA molecules than can associate with the two single-stranded DNA regions that form at the DSB. Mature bundles extend along the long axis of the cell, in the space between the bulk nucleoid and the inner membrane. Bundle formation is followed by pairing, in which the two ends of the cut locus relocate at the periphery of the nucleoid and together move rapidly towards the homology of the uncut <span class="hlt">sister</span>. After <span class="hlt">sister</span> locus pairing, RecA bundles disassemble and proteins that act late in homologous recombination are recruited to give viable recombinants 1-2-generation-time equivalents after formation of the initial DSB. Mutated RecA proteins that do not form bundles are defective in <span class="hlt">sister</span> pairing and in DSB-induced repair. This work reveals an unanticipated role of RecA bundles in channelling the movement of the DNA DSB ends, thereby facilitating the long-range homology search that occurs before the strand invasion and transfer reactions. PMID:24362571</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED076237.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED076237.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Children's Experience with <span class="hlt">Death</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Zeligs, Rose</p> <p></p> <p>Children's concepts of <span class="hlt">death</span> grow with their age and development The three-year-old begins to notice that living things move and make sounds. The five-year-old thinks that life and <span class="hlt">death</span> are reversable, but the six-year-old knows that <span class="hlt">death</span> is final and brings sorrow. Children from eight through ten are interested in the causes of <span class="hlt">death</span> and what…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=sleep+AND+dreams&pg=5&id=EJ381557','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=sleep+AND+dreams&pg=5&id=EJ381557"><span id="translatedtitle">Dreams of <span class="hlt">Death</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Barrett, Deirdre</p> <p>1989-01-01</p> <p>Examined frequency and characteristics of overt dreams of dying among healthy young adults. Dreams of dying were found to be rare but distinctive content category, representing overwhelmingly pleasant dreams. Over one-half of <span class="hlt">death</span> dreams involved lengthy afterlife sequence, remainder focused on process of <span class="hlt">death</span>. <span class="hlt">Death</span> dreams of these healthy…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2595665','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2595665"><span id="translatedtitle">Sudden Cardiac <span class="hlt">Death</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Weinberg, Marc</p> <p>1978-01-01</p> <p>Over the past decade, there has been a significant decrease in the hospital mortality of patients with coronary artery disease. However, sudden cardiac <span class="hlt">death</span>, which accounts for the majority of <span class="hlt">deaths</span> from coronary artery disease, hasbeen little affected. This report reviews the pathology, electrophysiology, demographics and clinical presentation of sudden cardiac <span class="hlt">death</span>. Emergency care and possible preventative measures are examined. PMID:356435</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=consolation&pg=2&id=EJ556677','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=consolation&pg=2&id=EJ556677"><span id="translatedtitle">Separation, Part I: <span class="hlt">Death</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Jordan, Anne Devereaux</p> <p>1997-01-01</p> <p>Contends literature is the one place where <span class="hlt">death</span> still abides, where grief is felt and consolation can be sought. States that young readers can gain a recognition in books that <span class="hlt">death</span> is natural. Discusses <span class="hlt">death</span> in folk and fairy tales, in 17th-century didactic children's books and in modern and contemporary literature. Outlines characteristics of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=death&id=EJ927986','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=death&id=EJ927986"><span id="translatedtitle">Evidence That Thinking about <span class="hlt">Death</span> Relates to Time-Estimation Behavior</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Martens, Andy; Schmeichel, Brandon J.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Time and <span class="hlt">death</span> are <span class="hlt">linked</span>--the passing of time brings us closer to <span class="hlt">death</span>. Terror management theory proposes that awareness of <span class="hlt">death</span> represents a potent problem that motivates a variety of psychological defenses (Greenberg, Pyszczynski, & Solomon, 1997). We tested the hypothesis that thinking about <span class="hlt">death</span> motivates elongated perceptions of brief…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25642921','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25642921"><span id="translatedtitle">Infant <span class="hlt">death</span> scene investigation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Tabor, Pamela D; Ragan, Krista</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The sudden unexpected <span class="hlt">death</span> of an infant is a tragedy to the family, a concern to the community, and an indicator of national health. To accurately determine the cause and manner of the infant's <span class="hlt">death</span>, a thorough and accurate <span class="hlt">death</span> scene investigation by properly trained personnel is key. Funding and resources are directed based on autopsy reports, which are only as accurate as the scene investigation. The investigation should include a standardized format, body diagrams, and a photographed or videotaped scene recreation utilizing doll reenactment. Forensic nurses, with their basic nursing knowledge and additional forensic skills and abilities, are optimally suited to conduct infant <span class="hlt">death</span> scene investigations as well as train others to properly conduct <span class="hlt">death</span> scene investigations. Currently, 49 states have child <span class="hlt">death</span> review teams, which is an idea avenue for a forensic nurse to become involved in <span class="hlt">death</span> scene investigations. PMID:25642921</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4307833','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4307833"><span id="translatedtitle">Effect of Cause-of-<span class="hlt">Death</span> Training on Agreement Between Hospital Discharge Diagnoses and Cause of <span class="hlt">Death</span> Reported, Inpatient Hospital <span class="hlt">Deaths</span>, New York City, 2008–2010</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Ong, Paulina; Gambatese, Melissa; Begier, Elizabeth; Zimmerman, Regina; Soto, Antonio</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Introduction Accurate cause-of-<span class="hlt">death</span> reporting is required for mortality data to validly inform public health programming and evaluation. Research demonstrates overreporting of heart disease on New York City <span class="hlt">death</span> certificates. We describe changes in reported causes of <span class="hlt">death</span> following a New York City health department training conducted in 2009 to improve accuracy of cause-of-<span class="hlt">death</span> reporting at 8 hospitals. The objective of our study was to assess the degree to which <span class="hlt">death</span> certificates citing heart disease as cause of <span class="hlt">death</span> agreed with hospital discharge data and the degree to which training improved accuracy of reporting. Methods We analyzed 74,373 <span class="hlt">death</span> certificates for 2008 through 2010 that were <span class="hlt">linked</span> with hospital discharge records for New York City inpatient <span class="hlt">deaths</span> and calculated the proportion of discordant <span class="hlt">deaths</span>, that is, <span class="hlt">death</span> certificates reporting an underlying cause of heart disease with no corresponding discharge record diagnosis. We also summarized top principal diagnoses among discordant reports and calculated the proportion of inpatient <span class="hlt">deaths</span> reporting sepsis, a condition underreported in New York City, to assess whether documentation practices changed in response to clarifications made during the intervention. Results Citywide discordance between <span class="hlt">death</span> certificates and discharge data decreased from 14.9% in 2008 to 9.6% in 2010 (P < .001), driven by a decrease in discordance at intervention hospitals (20.2% in 2008 to 8.9% in 2010; P < .001). At intervention hospitals, reporting of sepsis increased from 3.7% of inpatient <span class="hlt">deaths</span> in 2008 to 20.6% in 2010 (P < .001). Conclusion Overreporting of heart disease as cause of <span class="hlt">death</span> declined at intervention hospitals, driving a citywide decline, and sepsis reporting practices changed in accordance with health department training. Researchers should consider the effect of overreporting and data-quality changes when analyzing New York City heart disease mortality trends. Other vital records jurisdictions</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=bsa&pg=2&id=ED390973','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=bsa&pg=2&id=ED390973"><span id="translatedtitle">Making a Difference. An Impact Study of Big Brothers/Big <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Tierney, Joseph P.; And Others</p> <p></p> <p>This report provides reliable evidence that mentoring programs can positively affect young people. The evidence is derived from research conducted at local affiliates of Big Brothers/Big <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> of America (BB/BSA), the oldest, best-known, and arguably most sophisticated of the country's mentoring programs. Public/Private Ventures, Inc. conducted…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED514909.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED514909.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Serving, Learning and Mentoring through the Big Brothers Big <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> Program</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Sivukamaran, Thillainatarajan; Holland, Glenda; Clark, Leonard J.</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>This study describes the collaborative partnership between a Big Brothers Big <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> organization, an elementary school and the College of Education at a public university. The partnership utilized a mentoring system consisting of elementary students, college students, elementary teachers and university faculty. Benefits of the various…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4426464','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4426464"><span id="translatedtitle">Error, signal, and the placement of Ctenophora <span class="hlt">sister</span> to all other animals</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Whelan, Nathan V.; Kocot, Kevin M.; Moroz, Leonid L.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Elucidating relationships among early animal lineages has been difficult, and recent phylogenomic analyses place Ctenophora <span class="hlt">sister</span> to all other extant animals, contrary to the traditional view of Porifera as the earliest-branching animal lineage. To date, phylogenetic support for either ctenophores or sponges as <span class="hlt">sister</span> to other animals has been limited and inconsistent among studies. Lack of agreement among phylogenomic analyses using different data and methods obscures how complex traits, such as epithelia, neurons, and muscles evolved. A consensus view of animal evolution will not be accepted until datasets and methods converge on a single hypothesis of early metazoan relationships and putative sources of systematic error (e.g., long-branch attraction, compositional bias, poor model choice) are assessed. Here, we investigate possible causes of systematic error by expanding taxon sampling with eight novel transcriptomes, strictly enforcing orthology inference criteria, and progressively examining potential causes of systematic error while using both maximum-likelihood with robust data partitioning and Bayesian inference with a site-heterogeneous model. We identified ribosomal protein genes as possessing a conflicting signal compared with other genes, which caused some past studies to infer ctenophores and cnidarians as <span class="hlt">sister</span>. Importantly, biases resulting from elevated compositional heterogeneity or elevated substitution rates are ruled out. Placement of ctenophores as <span class="hlt">sister</span> to all other animals, and sponge monophyly, are strongly supported under multiple analyses, herein. PMID:25902535</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=turner%27s+AND+syndrome&pg=2&id=EJ579567','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=turner%27s+AND+syndrome&pg=2&id=EJ579567"><span id="translatedtitle">Social Functioning among Girls with Fragile X or Turner Syndrome and Their <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Mazzocco, Michele M. M.; Baumgardner, Thomas; Freund, Lisa S.; Reiss, Allan L.</p> <p>1998-01-01</p> <p>Social behaviors among girls (ages 6-16) with fragile X (n=8) or Turner syndrome (n=9) were examined to address the role of family environment versus biological determinants of social dysfunction. Compared to their <span class="hlt">sisters</span>, subjects had lower IQS and higher rating of social and attention problems. (Author/CR)</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li class="active"><span>11</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_11 --> <div id="page_12" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li class="active"><span>12</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="221"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1006061.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1006061.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Catherine Spalding: Co-Foundress of the <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> of Charity of Nazareth</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Shaughnessy, Mary Angela</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> of Charity of Nazareth (SCN) maintain a vibrant presence in ministry in the US. This article presents an overview of their co-foundress, Catherine Spalding, and shows Mother Catherine to be the creative, mission-driven, and articulate leader that is still very much in need in today's society.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25902535','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25902535"><span id="translatedtitle">Error, signal, and the placement of Ctenophora <span class="hlt">sister</span> to all other animals.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Whelan, Nathan V; Kocot, Kevin M; Moroz, Leonid L; Halanych, Kenneth M</p> <p>2015-05-01</p> <p>Elucidating relationships among early animal lineages has been difficult, and recent phylogenomic analyses place Ctenophora <span class="hlt">sister</span> to all other extant animals, contrary to the traditional view of Porifera as the earliest-branching animal lineage. To date, phylogenetic support for either ctenophores or sponges as <span class="hlt">sister</span> to other animals has been limited and inconsistent among studies. Lack of agreement among phylogenomic analyses using different data and methods obscures how complex traits, such as epithelia, neurons, and muscles evolved. A consensus view of animal evolution will not be accepted until datasets and methods converge on a single hypothesis of early metazoan relationships and putative sources of systematic error (e.g., long-branch attraction, compositional bias, poor model choice) are assessed. Here, we investigate possible causes of systematic error by expanding taxon sampling with eight novel transcriptomes, strictly enforcing orthology inference criteria, and progressively examining potential causes of systematic error while using both maximum-likelihood with robust data partitioning and Bayesian inference with a site-heterogeneous model. We identified ribosomal protein genes as possessing a conflicting signal compared with other genes, which caused some past studies to infer ctenophores and cnidarians as <span class="hlt">sister</span>. Importantly, biases resulting from elevated compositional heterogeneity or elevated substitution rates are ruled out. Placement of ctenophores as <span class="hlt">sister</span> to all other animals, and sponge monophyly, are strongly supported under multiple analyses, herein. PMID:25902535</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title20-vol2/pdf/CFR-2010-title20-vol2-sec410-380.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title20-vol2/pdf/CFR-2010-title20-vol2-sec410-380.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">20 CFR 410.380 - Determination of dependency; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-04-01</p> <p>... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Determination of dependency; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>. 410.380 Section 410.380 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969, TITLE IV-BLACK LUNG BENEFITS (1969- ) Relationship and...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title20-vol2/pdf/CFR-2010-title20-vol2-sec410-340.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title20-vol2/pdf/CFR-2010-title20-vol2-sec410-340.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">20 CFR 410.340 - Determination of relationship; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-04-01</p> <p>... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Determination of relationship; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>. 410.340 Section 410.340 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969, TITLE IV-BLACK LUNG BENEFITS (1969- ) Relationship...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=summer+AND+camp+AND+benefits&pg=3&id=EJ587581','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=summer+AND+camp+AND+benefits&pg=3&id=EJ587581"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Sisters</span> in Science: An Intergenerational Science Program for Elementary School Girls.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Hammrich, Penny L.</p> <p>1998-01-01</p> <p>Once a week, several classrooms of Philadelphia 4th-grade girls participate in <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> in Science, an afterschool, intergenerational program sponsored by Temple University that provides hand-on activities exploring urban environmental issues. A two-week summer camp program helps these students explore the rivers of Philadelphia. Participants…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=testimonio&pg=3&id=EJ903417','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=testimonio&pg=3&id=EJ903417"><span id="translatedtitle">Transitioning from Doctoral Study to the Academy: Theorizing "Trenzas" of Identity for Latina <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Scholars</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Espino, Michelle M.; Munoz, Susana M.; Kiyama, Judy Marquez</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>This article focuses on multiple truths pertaining to doctoral education as expressed by three Latina doctoral recipients. These scholars successfully navigated various educational processes with the support of one another, their families, faculty, and their chosen discipline. The authors, as <span class="hlt">sister</span> scholars, retell their educational journeys…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3955356','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3955356"><span id="translatedtitle">Spotlights on our <span class="hlt">sister</span> journals: ChemistryOpen 1/2014</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>On these pages, we feature a selection of the excellent work that has recently been published in our <span class="hlt">sister</span> journals. If you are reading these pages on a computer, click on any of the items to read the full article. Otherwise please see the DOIs for easy online access through Wiley Online Library. PMID:24688888</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=bilingual+AND+children+AND+home&pg=5&id=EJ997719','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=bilingual+AND+children+AND+home&pg=5&id=EJ997719"><span id="translatedtitle">A Tale of Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>: Language Ideologies, Identities, and Negotiations in a Bilingual, Transnational Family</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>King, Kendall A.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>This longitudinal case study investigated how linguistic identity was constructed, constrained, and performed by three <span class="hlt">sisters</span>, aged 1, 12, and 17, within one bilingual, transnational Ecuadorian-U.S. family. Data were collected over 14 months through weekly home visits that included participant observation, informal interviews, and…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title20-vol2/pdf/CFR-2011-title20-vol2-sec410-340.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title20-vol2/pdf/CFR-2011-title20-vol2-sec410-340.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">20 CFR 410.340 - Determination of relationship; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-04-01</p> <p>... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Determination of relationship; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>. 410.340 Section 410.340 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969, TITLE IV-BLACK LUNG BENEFITS (1969- ) Relationship...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title20-vol2/pdf/CFR-2011-title20-vol2-sec410-380.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title20-vol2/pdf/CFR-2011-title20-vol2-sec410-380.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">20 CFR 410.380 - Determination of dependency; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-04-01</p> <p>... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Determination of dependency; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>. 410.380 Section 410.380 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969, TITLE IV-BLACK LUNG BENEFITS (1969- ) Relationship and...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title40-vol16/pdf/CFR-2010-title40-vol16-sec79-65.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title40-vol16/pdf/CFR-2010-title40-vol16-sec79-65.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">40 CFR 79.65 - In vivo <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange assay.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-07-01</p> <p>... references should be consulted. (1) 40 CFR 798.5915, In vivo <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Chromatid Exchange Assay. (2) Kato, H... peripheral blood lymphocytes, often from rodent species. (b) Definitions. For the purposes of this section... the end of the exposure period and blood lymphocyte cell cultures are prepared from study...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6704889','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6704889"><span id="translatedtitle">Do <span class="hlt">sister</span> forks of bidirectionally growing replicons proceed at unequal rates</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Dubey, D.D.; Raman, R.</p> <p>1987-02-01</p> <p>DNA fibre autoradiography in different tissues of the rodents Bandicota bengalensis and Nesokia indica reveals a high frequency of such bidirectionally replicating replicons whose <span class="hlt">sister</span> hot tracks are of unequal size. These results suggest intrarepliconic difference in the rates of fork migration in the two directions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Weed&pg=3&id=EJ797780','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Weed&pg=3&id=EJ797780"><span id="translatedtitle">Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>: Lessons of Traditional Story Honored in Assessment and Accreditation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Chenault, Venida S.</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>The three <span class="hlt">sisters</span> story is shared across many tribes. It explains the practice of planting corn, beans, and squash together. The corn stalks provide support for the bean vines; the beans provide nitrogen for the corn; and the squash prevents weed growth between the mounds. Such stories explain not only the science of agricultural methods in tribal…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=258716','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=258716"><span id="translatedtitle">A <span class="hlt">sister</span> group metabolomic contrast delineates the biochemical regulation underlying desiccation tolerance in Sporobolus stapfianus</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Understanding how plant cells tolerate dehydration is a vital prerequisite for developing strategies for improving drought tolerance. The desiccation tolerant grass Sporobolus stapfianus and the desiccation sensitive S. pyramidalis were used to form a <span class="hlt">sister</span>-group contrast to reveal adaptive metabo...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Teenage+AND+pregnancy&pg=5&id=EJ965819','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Teenage+AND+pregnancy&pg=5&id=EJ965819"><span id="translatedtitle">Youths' Caretaking of Their Adolescent <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>' Children: Its Costs and Benefits for Youths' Development</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>East, Patricia L.; Weisner, Thomas S.; Reyes, Barbara T.</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>This study examined how time spent caring for a teenage <span class="hlt">sister</span>'s child and experiences in providing care related to youths' young adult outcomes. Latino and African American youths (N = 108) were studied during middle and late adolescence. Results indicated that youths who provided many hours of child care were more stressed and had lower school…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=cancer+AND+terminal&pg=5&id=EJ484723','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=cancer+AND+terminal&pg=5&id=EJ484723"><span id="translatedtitle">Family Adaptation and Coping among Siblings of Cancer Patients, Their Brothers and <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>, and Nonclinical Controls.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Madan-Swain, Avi; And Others</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>Examined coping and family adaptation in siblings (n=32) of cancer patients, their ill brothers and <span class="hlt">sisters</span> (n=19), and control group of nonclinical children (n=10) with healthy siblings. Gender and age of sibling, birth order, and number of siblings were examined. Found better adaptation in larger families and decreased family involvement among…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=moral+AND+enhancement&id=EJ755531','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=moral+AND+enhancement&id=EJ755531"><span id="translatedtitle">Meanings of Sisterhood and Developmental Disability: Narratives from White Nondisabled <span class="hlt">Sisters</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>McGraw, Lori A.; Walker, Alexis J.</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>Integrating thought from critical feminist and disability theorists via a strategic social constructionist perspective, the authors analyzed 10 in-depth qualitative interviews to begin to understand the dialogue between (a) how nondisabled <span class="hlt">sisters</span> understand themselves and their siblings with developmental disabilities and (b) wider systems of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4764575','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4764575"><span id="translatedtitle">Super-resolution kinetochore tracking reveals the mechanisms of human <span class="hlt">sister</span> kinetochore directional switching</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Burroughs, Nigel J; Harry, Edward F; McAinsh, Andrew D</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The congression of chromosomes to the spindle equator involves the directed motility of bi-orientated <span class="hlt">sister</span> kinetochores. <span class="hlt">Sister</span> kinetochores bind bundles of dynamic microtubules and are physically connected through centromeric chromatin. A crucial question is to understand how <span class="hlt">sister</span> kinetochores are coordinated to generate motility and directional switches. Here, we combine super-resolution tracking of kinetochores with automated switching-point detection to analyse <span class="hlt">sister</span> switching dynamics over thousands of events. We discover that switching is initiated by both the leading (microtubules depolymerising) or trailing (microtubules polymerising) kinetochore. Surprisingly, trail-driven switching generates an overstretch of the chromatin that relaxes over the following half-period. This rules out the involvement of a tension sensor, the central premise of the long-standing tension-model. Instead, our data support a model in which clocks set the intrinsic-switching time of the two kinetochore-attached microtubule fibres, with the centromeric spring tension operating as a feedback to slow or accelerate the clocks. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09500.001 PMID:26460545</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Brother+AND+analysis&pg=4&id=EJ818749','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Brother+AND+analysis&pg=4&id=EJ818749"><span id="translatedtitle">Improving Emotion Regulation and Sibling Relationship Quality: The More Fun with <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> and Brothers Program</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Kennedy, Denise E.; Kramer, Laurie</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>We examined the role of emotion regulation (ER) in improving sibling relationship quality (SRQ) by evaluating the More Fun With <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> and Brothers Program where 4- to 8-year-old siblings from 95 families were taught emotional and social competencies. Parents reported on SRQ and ER, and sibling interactions were observed in homes. SRQ and ER…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=little+AND+sister&pg=2&id=ED503245','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=little+AND+sister&pg=2&id=ED503245"><span id="translatedtitle">Making a Difference in Schools: The Big Brothers Big <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> School-Based Mentoring Impact Study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Herrera, Carla; Grossman, Jean Baldwin; Kauh, Tina J.; Feldman, Amy F.; McMaken, Jennifer</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>School-based mentoring is one of the fastest growing forms of mentoring in the US today; yet, few studies have rigorously examined its impacts. This landmark random assignment impact study of Big Brothers Big <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> School-Based Mentoring is the first national study of this program model. It involves 10 agencies, 71 schools and 1,139 9- to…</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li class="active"><span>12</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_12 --> <div id="page_13" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li class="active"><span>13</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="241"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED205747.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED205747.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Variations in the Educational and Career Development Paths of Brothers and <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Mott, Frank L.; Haurin, R. Jean</p> <p></p> <p>A study examined the extent to which socioeconomic and internal characteristics of families differentially affect ability of matched pairs of brothers and <span class="hlt">sisters</span> to progress through the educational system. The data sets used were the National Longitudinal Surveys of Work Experience of Young Men and Women who were originally interviewed in 1966…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=little+AND+sister&pg=2&id=ED266892','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=little+AND+sister&pg=2&id=ED266892"><span id="translatedtitle">Walking with Grandfather and Great Wolf and Little Mouse <span class="hlt">Sister</span>. Teacher's Guide.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Lethbridge Univ. (Alberta).</p> <p></p> <p>Written for use with videotaped versions of the stories "Walking with Grandfather" and "Great Wolf and Little Mouse <span class="hlt">Sister</span>," this guide presents 20 lessons that teachers can adapt for students of various ages and use in integrated units or other curriculum approaches. The introductory material describes the use and philosophy of the video stories,…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=older+AND+brother&pg=2&id=EJ618677','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=older+AND+brother&pg=2&id=EJ618677"><span id="translatedtitle">The Role of Brothers and <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> in the Gender Development of Preschool Children.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Rust, John; Golombok, Susan; Hines, Melissa; Johnston, Katie; Golding, Jean</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>Examined whether the sex of older siblings influenced the gender role development of 3-year-olds. Found that boys with older brothers and girls with older <span class="hlt">sisters</span> were more sex-typed than same-sex singletons who, in turn, were more sex-typed than children with other-sex siblings. Having an older brother was associated with more masculine and less…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Families&pg=5&id=EJ1088123','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Families&pg=5&id=EJ1088123"><span id="translatedtitle">Living with a Brother Who Has an Autism Spectrum Disorder: A <span class="hlt">Sister</span>'s Perspective</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Connell, Zara O.; Halloran, Maeve O.; Doody, Owen</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>People with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) are born into families and influence family functioning both positively and negatively. One of the most enduring relationships a person with ASD will have is their relationship with a brother or <span class="hlt">sister</span>. Services for people with ASD should provide effective support to families, which include brothers,…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=deal+AND+bullying&pg=3&id=EJ830840','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=deal+AND+bullying&pg=3&id=EJ830840"><span id="translatedtitle">Brothers and <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>: A Source of Support for Children in School?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Hadfield, Lucy; Edwards, Rosalind; Mauthner, Melanie</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>Whilst UK schools move towards U.S "big brother" style mentoring systems for children, are actual brothers and <span class="hlt">sisters</span> becoming an invisible source of support to deal with bullying in everyday life? This paper reports on research with children aged 7-13 about their experiences and understandings of their relationships with their brothers and…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=daughter&pg=5&id=EJ1011495','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=daughter&pg=5&id=EJ1011495"><span id="translatedtitle">Brother-<span class="hlt">Sister</span> Incest: Data from Anonymous Computer-Assisted Self Interviews</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Stroebel, Sandra S.; O'Keefe, Stephen L.; Beard, Keith W.; Kuo, Shih-Ya; Swindell, Samuel; Stroupe, Walter</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Retrospective data were entered anonymously by 1,521 adult women using computer-assisted self interview. Forty were classified as victims of brother-<span class="hlt">sister</span> incest, 19 were classified as victims of father-daughter incest, and 232 were classified as victims of sexual abuse by an adult other than their father before reaching 18 years of age. The…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1017170','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1017170"><span id="translatedtitle">Two <span class="hlt">sisters</span> with mental retardation, cataract, ataxia, progressive hearing loss, and polyneuropathy.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Begeer, J H; Scholte, F A; van Essen, A J</p> <p>1991-01-01</p> <p>Two <span class="hlt">sisters</span> are described with a disorder characterised by mental retardation, congenital cataract, progressive spinocerebellar ataxia, sensorineural deafness, and signs of peripheral neuropathy. Progressive hearing loss, ataxia, and polyneuropathy became evident in the third decade. The differential diagnosis of this syndrome is discussed including the syndromes described by Berman et al and Koletzko et al. PMID:1661780</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=43487&keyword=cyclophosphamide&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=76238155&CFTOKEN=59583677','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=43487&keyword=cyclophosphamide&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=76238155&CFTOKEN=59583677"><span id="translatedtitle">EVIDENCE FOR THE CHROMOSOMAL REPLICONS AS UNITS OF <span class="hlt">SISTER</span> CHROMATID EXCHANGES</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Current hypotheses of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange (SCE) formation postulate that sites of SCE induction are associated with active replicons or replicon clusters. We have applied the FCC-SCD technique to in vivo studies of mouse bone marrow cells that have been treated with cycloph...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED452094.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED452094.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Sisters</span> in Science: Using Sports as a Vehicle for Science Learning.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Hammrich, Penny L.; Richardson, Greer M.; Green, Tina Sloan; Livingston, Beverly</p> <p></p> <p>This paper describes a project for upper elementary and middle school minority girl students called the <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> in Sport Science (SISS). The SISS program addresses the needs of urban girls in gaining access to equal education in science and mathematics by using athletics as a vehicle for learning. The program provides a non-competitive and…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/827476','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/827476"><span id="translatedtitle">Los Alamos National Laboratory's <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Laboratory Collaborations on Low and Intermediate Level Radioactive Waste Management</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Newell, D. L.; Sinkule, B. J.; Apt, K. E.</p> <p>2003-02-25</p> <p>The DOE/National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) ''<span class="hlt">Sister</span> Laboratory'' program allows for bilateral technical cooperation in peaceful uses of nuclear energy for developing nations. 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