Science.gov

Sample records for decamethylytterbocene additional examples

  1. Coordination of 1,4-Diazabutadiene Ligands to Decamethylytterbocene: Additional Examples of Spin Coupling in Ytterbocene Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, Richard; Walter, Marc D.; Berg, David J.; Andersen, Richard A.

    2006-11-04

    The paramagnetic 1:1 coordination complexes of (C5Me5)2Yb with a series of diazabutadiene ligands, RN=C(R')C(R')=NR, where R= CMe3, CHMe2, adamantyl, p-tolyl, p-anisyl, and mesityl when R'=H, and R= p-anisyl when R'= Me, have been prepared. The complexes are paramagnetic, but their magnetic moments are less than expected for the two uncoupled spin carriers, (C5Me5)2Yb(III, 4f13) and the diazabutadiene radical anions (S=1/2), which implies exchange coupling between the spins. The variable temperature 1H NMR spectra show that rotation about the R-N bond is hindered and these barriers are estimated. The barriers are largely determined by steric effects but electronic effects are not unimportant.

  2. Decamethylytterbocene complexes of bipyridines and diazabutadines: multiconfigurational ground states and open-shell singlet formation

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Eric D; Booth, C H; Walter, M D; Kazhdan, D; Hu, Y - J; Lukens, Wayne; Maron, Laurent; Eisentein, Odile; Anderson, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Partial ytterbium f-orbital occupancy (i.e. intermediate valence) and open-shell singlet Draft 12/formation are established for a variety of bipyridine and diazabutadiene adducts to decamethylytterbocene, (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5}){sub 2}Yb or Cp*{sub 2}Yb. Data used to support this claim includes ytterbium valence measurements using Yb Lm-edge x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy, magnetic susceptibility and Complete Active Space Self-Consistent Field (CASSCF) multi configurational calculations, as well as structural measurements compared to density-functional theory (DFT) calculations. The CASSCF calculations indicate that the intermediate valence is the result of a multiconfigurational ground state wave function that has both an open-shell singlet f{sup 13} and a closed-shell singlet f{sup 14} component. A number of other competing theories for the unusual magnetism in these materials are ruled out by the presence of intermediate valence and its lack of any significant temperature dependence. These results have implications for understanding chemical bonding not only in organolanthanide complexes, but also for organometallic chemistry in general, as well as understanding magnetic interactions in nanopartic1es and devices.

  3. Decamethylytterbocene Complexes of Bipyridines and Diazabutadienes: Multiconfigurational Ground States and Open-Shell Singlet Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, Corwin H.; Walter, Marc D.; Kazhdan, Daniel; Hu, Yung-Jin; Lukens, Wayne W.; Bauer, Eric D.; Maron, Laurent; Eisenstein, Odile; Andersen, Richard A.

    2009-04-22

    Partial ytterbium f-orbital occupancy (i.e., intermediate valence) and open-shell singlet formation are established for a variety of bipyridine and diazabutadiene adducts with decamethylytterbocene, (C5Me5)2Yb, abbreviated as Cp*2Yb. Data used to support this claim include ytterbium valence measurements using Yb LIII-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy, magnetic susceptibility, and complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) multiconfigurational calculations, as well as structural measurements compared to density functional theory calculations. The CASSCF calculations indicate that the intermediate valence is the result of a multiconfigurational ground-state wave function that has both an open-shell singlet f13(?*)1, where pi* is the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of the bipyridine or dpiazabutadiene ligands, and a closed-shell singlet f14 component. A number of other competing theories for the unusual magnetism in these materials are ruled out by the lack of temperature dependence of the measured intermediate valence. These results have implications for understanding chemical bonding not only in organolanthanide complexes but also for f-element chemistry in general, as well as understanding magnetic interactions in nanoparticles and devices.

  4. Phosphite radicals and their reactions. Examples of redox, substitution, and addition reactions. [Gamma rays and electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, K.; Asmus, K.D.

    1980-08-21

    Phosphite radicals HPO/sub 3/- and PO/sub 3//sup 2/-, which exist in an acid-base equilibrium with pK = 5.75, are shown to take part in various types of reactions. In the absence of scavengers, they disappear mainly by second-order disproportionation and combination; a first-order contribution to the decay is also indicated. HPO/sub 3/- and PO/sub 3//sup 2/- are good reductants toward electron acceptors such as tetranitromethane. In this reaction phosphate and C(NO/sub 2/)/sub 3/- are formed. Phosphite radicals can, however, also act as good oxidants, e.g., toward thiols and thiolate ions. These reactions lead to the formation of RS. radicals which were identified either directly, as in the case of penicillamine, through the optical absorption of PenS. or more indirectly through equilibration of RS. with RS- to the optically absorbing RSSR-. disulfide radical anion. A homolytic substitution reaction (S/sub H/2) occurs in the reaction of the phosphite radicals with aliphatic disulfides, yielding RS. radicals and phosphate thioester RSPO/sub 3//sup 2/-. Lipoic acid, as an example of a cyclic disulfide, is reduced to the corresponding RSSR-. radical anion and also undergoes the S/sub H/2 reaction with about equal probability. An addition reaction is observed between phosphite radicals and molecular oxygen. The resulting peroxo phosphate radicals establish an acid-base equilibrium HPO/sub 5//sup -/. reversible PO/sub 5//sup 2 -/. + H+ with a pK = 3.4. Absolute rate constants were determined for all reactions discussed.

  5. Cheap and Cheerful Stream Restoration - An Example of System Wide Woody Addition Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheaton, J. M.; Bennett, S. N.; Bouwes, N.; Camp, R.

    2012-12-01

    Stream restoration has been plagued with high price tags, limited spatial extents, and questionable effectiveness in light of largely absent monitoring efforts. One prominent example is the placement of large woody debris (LWD) structures and engineered log jams that are frequently employed to promote heterogeneity of instream habitat. Ironically, many of these treatments attempt to lock in place and over-engineer the woody structures as opposed to allowing them to adjust and rearrange themselves as natural LWD would have. We are in the midst of a large scale restoration experiment using LWD to recover ESA-listed steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) populations in the Asotin Creek Watershed of Southeast Washington. The project is an Intensively Monitored Watershed (IMW) where the restoration treatment and monitoring use a hierarchal staircase design maximizing the power to detect a population level response in steelhead. We are treating over 12 km of stream with enough LWD input (> 200 pieces per km) to mimic the historic background wood loading and encourage the stream to reshape and regularly rework itself leaving. We are using hundreds of structures we call DWS (dynamic woody structures), which generally consist of a series of wooden fence posts driven into the stream bed and complex LWD anchored between them to invoke a specific hydrogeomorphic response. The real advantage of these DWS are their cost. They can be installed quickly (15-30 minutes each) and cheaply (< $100/DWS); even in remote settings with a 2-3 person crew, hydraulic post pounder, very cheap materials, and avoiding impacts associated with operating heavy equipment. This allows us to install lots of the structures at high density (every 5-15 channel widths) over an entire stream system. We call this overall approach System Wide Woody Addition Treatment (SWWAT). In the long term, we hypothesize that the SWWAT will provide an intial input LWD that will become a part of study creeks which are more

  6. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  7. Taxonomic reassessment of the ichnogenus Beaconichnus and additional examples from the Carboniferous of Kansas, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buatois, L.A.; Mangano, M.G.; Maples, C.G.; Lanier, Wendy E.

    1996-01-01

    The ichnogenus Beaconichnus (Gevers 1973), an arthropod trace fossil, includes very different forms that comprise five ichnospecies, namely B. darwinum (Gevers 1971), B. gouldi (Gevers 1971), B. antarcticum (Gevers 1971), B. giganteum Gevers and Twomey 1982, and B. wrighti Gevers and Twomey 1982. The original diagnosis of Beaconichnus is rather vague and potentially may accomodate virtually every arthropod trackway described from the fossil record. In view of these problems, the validity of Beaconichnus is reassessed and each of its ichnospecies is reviewed. We conclude that B. darwinum is a junior synonym of Diplopodichnus biformis Brady 1947; B. antarcticum should be regarded as Palmichnium antarcticum; and B. wrighti is a nomen nudum. Additionally, we agree with previous proposals in considering B. gouldi as the senior synonym of B. giganteum, and including it in Diplichnites Dawson 1873. Therefore, we suggest that the ichnogenus Beaconichnus is best disregarded. Additionally, we describe specimens collected from the Late Carboniferous Tonganoxie Sandstone Member (Stranger Formation) of eastern Kansas, ascribed herein to Diplopodichnus biformis and Diplichnites gouldi, which include examples of intergradations between both ichnotaxa, and provide synonymy lists for both ichnospecies.

  8. The alpha 2-adrenoceptors of the human retinoblastoma cell line (Y79) may represent an additional example of the alpha 2C-adrenoceptor.

    PubMed Central

    Gleason, M. M.; Hieble, J. P.

    1992-01-01

    1. In agreement with the literature, correlation of the ability of a series of agonists and antagonists to displace [3H]-rauwolscine binding shows the alpha 2-adrenoceptors of HT29 cells, NG108-15 cells, OK cells and homogenates of rat sublingual gland to represent four distinct subtypes. 2. [3H]-rauwolscine also bound with high affinity (KD = 0.30 +/- 0.10 mM) to a human retinoblastoma cell line (Y79). Specific binding represents 73% of total binding, and a Bmax of 38 +/- 1 fmol mg-1 protein was determined. 3. Correlation of antagonist affinities against [3H]-rauwolscine with corresponding values in the other four tissue sources showed the Y79 cells to resemble most closely the OK cells, the prototype example of an alpha 2C-adrenoceptor, with a correlation coefficient of 0.90 and a regression slope of 1.01 being obtained for 10 antagonists in these two systems. 4. Comparison of KD values for [3H]-rauwolscine also showed a similarity between the OK cells (0.19 +/- 0.07 nM) and Y79 cells. 5. These data suggest that the human retinoblastoma cell line may represent an additional example of the alpha 2C-adrenoceptor subtype. PMID:1358385

  9. Dosage and duration effects of nitrogen additions on ectomycorrhizal sporocarp production and functioning: an example from two N-limited boreal forests

    PubMed Central

    Hasselquist, Niles J; Högberg, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Although it is well known that nitrogen (N) additions strongly affect ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungal community composition, less is known about how different N application rates and duration of N additions affect the functional role EM fungi play in the forest N cycle.We measured EM sporocarp abundance and species richness as well as determined the δ15N in EM sporocarps and tree foliage in two Pinus sylvestris forests characterized by short- and long-term N addition histories and multiple N addition treatments. After 20 and 39 years of N additions, two of the long-term N addition treatments were terminated, thereby providing a unique opportunity to examine the temporal recovery of EM sporocarps after cessation of high N loading.In general, increasing N availability significantly reduced EM sporocarp production, species richness, and the amount of N retained in EM sporocarps. However, these general responses were strongly dependent on the application rate and duration of N additions. The annual addition of 20 kg·N·ha−1 for the past 6 years resulted in a slight increase in the production and retention of N in EM sporocarps, whereas the addition of 100 kg·N·ha−1·yr−1 during the same period nearly eliminated EM sporocarps. In contrast, long-term additions of N at rates of ca. 35 or 70 kg·N·ha−1·yr−1 for the past 40 years did not eliminate tree carbon allocation to EM sporocarps, although there was a decrease in the abundance and a shift in the dominant EM sporocarp taxa. Despite no immediate recovery, EM sporocarp abundance and species richness approached those of the control 20 years after terminating N additions in the most heavily fertilized treatment, suggesting a recovery of carbon allocation to EM sporocarps after cessation of high N loading.Our results provide evidence for a tight coupling between tree carbon allocation to and N retention in EM sporocarps and moreover highlight the potential use of δ15N in EM sporocarps as a relative

  10. Modular cis-regulatory organization of developmentally expressed genes: two genes transcribed territorially in the sea urchin embryo, and additional examples.

    PubMed Central

    Kirchhamer, C V; Yuh, C H; Davidson, E H

    1996-01-01

    The cis-regulatory systems that control developmental expression of two sea urchin genes have been subjected to detailed functional analysis. Both systems are modular in organization: specific, separable fragments of the cis-regulatory DNA each containing multiple transcription factor target sites execute particular regulatory subfunctions when associated with reporter genes and introduced into the embryo. The studies summarized here were carried out on the CyIIIa gene, expressed in the embryonic aboral ectoderm and on the Endo16 gene, expressed in the embryonic vegetal plate, archenteron, and then midgut. The regulatory systems of both genes include modules that control particular aspects of temporal and spatial expression, and in both the territorial boundaries of expression depend on a combination of negative and positive functions. In both genes different regulatory modules control early and late embryonic expression. Modular cis-regulatory organization is widespread in developmentally regulated genes, and we present a tabular summary that includes many examples from mouse and Drosophila. We regard cis-regulatory modules as units of developmental transcription control, and also of evolution, in the assembly of transcription control systems. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8790328

  11. [Hospital pharmacist has a rule for best practice use and French hospital activity tariffs. Example of a pharmaceutical quality control for drugs reimbursed in addition of DRGs].

    PubMed

    Hedoux, S; Dode, X; Pivot, C; Couray-Targe, S; Aulagner, G

    2012-07-01

    The best practice contract has given a new objective to the hospital pharmacists for the reimbursement in addition to Diagnosis Related Groups' (DRGs) tariffs. We built our pharmaceutical quality control for the administration traceability follow-up regarding the DRGs and the cost of care, for two reasons: the nominal drugs dispensation in link with the prescription made by pharmacist and the important expenditure of these drugs. Our organization depends on the development level of the informatized drugs circuit and minimizes the risk of financial shortfalls or wrong benefits, possible causes of economic penalties for our hospital. On the basis of this follow-up, we highlighted our activity and identified problems of management and drugs circuit organization. The quality of the administration traceability impacts directly on the quality of the medical records and the reimbursements of the expensive drugs. A better knowledge of prescription software is also required for a better quality and security of the medical data used in the medical informatic systems. The drugs management and the personal treatment in and between the care units need to be improved too. We have to continue and improve our organization with the future financial model for ATU drugs and the FIDES project. The health personnel awareness and the development of best informatic tools are also required. PMID:22818260

  12. Food additives.

    PubMed

    Berglund, F

    1978-01-01

    The use of additives to food fulfils many purposes, as shown by the index issued by the Codex Committee on Food Additives: Acids, bases and salts; Preservatives, Antioxidants and antioxidant synergists; Anticaking agents; Colours; Emulfifiers; Thickening agents; Flour-treatment agents; Extraction solvents; Carrier solvents; Flavours (synthetic); Flavour enhancers; Non-nutritive sweeteners; Processing aids; Enzyme preparations. Many additives occur naturally in foods, but this does not exclude toxicity at higher levels. Some food additives are nutrients, or even essential nutritents, e.g. NaCl. Examples are known of food additives causing toxicity in man even when used according to regulations, e.g. cobalt in beer. In other instances, poisoning has been due to carry-over, e.g. by nitrate in cheese whey - when used for artificial feed for infants. Poisonings also occur as the result of the permitted substance being added at too high levels, by accident or carelessness, e.g. nitrite in fish. Finally, there are examples of hypersensitivity to food additives, e.g. to tartrazine and other food colours. The toxicological evaluation, based on animal feeding studies, may be complicated by impurities, e.g. orthotoluene-sulfonamide in saccharin; by transformation or disappearance of the additive in food processing in storage, e.g. bisulfite in raisins; by reaction products with food constituents, e.g. formation of ethylurethane from diethyl pyrocarbonate; by metabolic transformation products, e.g. formation in the gut of cyclohexylamine from cyclamate. Metabolic end products may differ in experimental animals and in man: guanylic acid and inosinic acid are metabolized to allantoin in the rat but to uric acid in man. The magnitude of the safety margin in man of the Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) is not identical to the "safety factor" used when calculating the ADI. The symptoms of Chinese Restaurant Syndrome, although not hazardous, furthermore illustrate that the whole ADI

  13. Potlining Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolf Keller

    2004-08-10

    In this project, a concept to improve the performance of aluminum production cells by introducing potlining additives was examined and tested. Boron oxide was added to cathode blocks, and titanium was dissolved in the metal pool; this resulted in the formation of titanium diboride and caused the molten aluminum to wet the carbonaceous cathode surface. Such wetting reportedly leads to operational improvements and extended cell life. In addition, boron oxide suppresses cyanide formation. This final report presents and discusses the results of this project. Substantial economic benefits for the practical implementation of the technology are projected, especially for modern cells with graphitized blocks. For example, with an energy savings of about 5% and an increase in pot life from 1500 to 2500 days, a cost savings of $ 0.023 per pound of aluminum produced is projected for a 200 kA pot.

  14. 1,3,5-Triazapentadienes by Nucleophilic Addition to 1,3- and 1,4-Dinitriles-Sterically Constrained Examples by Incorporation into Cyclic Peripheries: Synthesis, Aggregation, and Photophysical Properties.

    PubMed

    Wrobel, Agnes Johanna; Lucchesi, Ralph; Wibbeling, Birgit; Daniliuc, Constantin-Gabriel; Fröhlich, Roland; Würthwein, Ernst-Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    1,3,5-Triazapentadienes usually show U- or twisted S-shaped conformations along the N-C-N-C-N skeleton due to dominating n/π* interactions. If, however, the 1,3,5-triazapentadiene unit is part of a ring, its W conformation might be restricted to the plane. Here, we describe the synthesis of 13 new 1,3,5-triazapentadienes 10-12, which are sterically restrained by incorporation into six- or seven-membered ring systems, by addition of a lithiated primary amine or hydrazine 5 to a dinitrile 7, 8, or 9 with the two cyano groups in 1,3 or 1,4 distance. These novel compounds show very strong tendency for aggregation due to hydrogen bonding, especially to form homodimers as seen from X-ray data in the solid state. Additional hydrogen bonding generates also linear chains in the crystal. Several of the new compounds show fluorescence in solution. Quantum chemical DFT calculations were used for evaluation of the dimerization energies and for interpretation of the photophysical properties. PMID:26987891

  15. [Food additives and healthiness].

    PubMed

    Heinonen, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Additives are used for improving food structure or preventing its spoilage, for example. Many substances used as additives are also naturally present in food. The safety of additives is evaluated according to commonly agreed principles. If high concentrations of an additive cause adverse health effects for humans, a limit of acceptable daily intake (ADI) is set for it. An additive is a risk only when ADI is exceeded. The healthiness of food is measured on the basis of nutrient density and scientifically proven effects. PMID:24772784

  16. Food additives

    MedlinePlus

    Food additives are substances that become part of a food product when they are added during the processing or making of that food. "Direct" food additives are often added during processing to: Add nutrients ...

  17. Food additives

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Michael

    1974-01-01

    Food additives are discussed from the food technology point of view. The reasons for their use are summarized: (1) to protect food from chemical and microbiological attack; (2) to even out seasonal supplies; (3) to improve their eating quality; (4) to improve their nutritional value. The various types of food additives are considered, e.g. colours, flavours, emulsifiers, bread and flour additives, preservatives, and nutritional additives. The paper concludes with consideration of those circumstances in which the use of additives is (a) justified and (b) unjustified. PMID:4467857

  18. TOXIC EQUIVALENCY APPROACH FOR DIOXINS: AN EXAMPLE OF DOSE ADDITIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD; dioxin) is often called the most toxic man-made compound. However, it is but the prototype for a family of structurally related compounds which have a common mechanism of action, induce a common spectrum of biological responses, and are...

  19. Phosphazene additives

    SciTech Connect

    Harrup, Mason K; Rollins, Harry W

    2013-11-26

    An additive comprising a phosphazene compound that has at least two reactive functional groups and at least one capping functional group bonded to phosphorus atoms of the phosphazene compound. One of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with cellulose and the other of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with a resin, such as an amine resin of a polycarboxylic acid resin. The at least one capping functional group is selected from the group consisting of a short chain ether group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. Also disclosed are an additive-resin admixture, a method of treating a wood product, and a wood product.

  20. Generating Rules and Examples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grabinger, R. Scott; Jonassen, David H.

    1989-01-01

    This seventh in a series of articles discussing expert system construction focuses on two ways to create a structure that determines a decision: (1) rule-based, or deductive, implementation; and (2) example-based, or inductive, implementation. Probability factors and confidence levels are discussed, and an example is given for selecting an…

  1. Monte Carlo Example Programs

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2006-05-09

    The Monte Carlo example programs VARHATOM and DMCATOM are two small, simple FORTRAN programs that illustrate the use of the Monte Carlo Mathematical technique for calculating the ground state energy of the hydrogen atom.

  2. Code query by example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaucouleur, Sebastien

    2011-02-01

    We introduce code query by example for customisation of evolvable software products in general and of enterprise resource planning systems (ERPs) in particular. The concept is based on an initial empirical study on practices around ERP systems. We motivate our design choices based on those empirical results, and we show how the proposed solution helps with respect to the infamous upgrade problem: the conflict between the need for customisation and the need for upgrade of ERP systems. We further show how code query by example can be used as a form of lightweight static analysis, to detect automatically potential defects in large software products. Code query by example as a form of lightweight static analysis is particularly interesting in the context of ERP systems: it is often the case that programmers working in this field are not computer science specialists but more of domain experts. Hence, they require a simple language to express custom rules.

  3. Functional Generalized Additive Models.

    PubMed

    McLean, Mathew W; Hooker, Giles; Staicu, Ana-Maria; Scheipl, Fabian; Ruppert, David

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the functional generalized additive model (FGAM), a novel regression model for association studies between a scalar response and a functional predictor. We model the link-transformed mean response as the integral with respect to t of F{X(t), t} where F(·,·) is an unknown regression function and X(t) is a functional covariate. Rather than having an additive model in a finite number of principal components as in Müller and Yao (2008), our model incorporates the functional predictor directly and thus our model can be viewed as the natural functional extension of generalized additive models. We estimate F(·,·) using tensor-product B-splines with roughness penalties. A pointwise quantile transformation of the functional predictor is also considered to ensure each tensor-product B-spline has observed data on its support. The methods are evaluated using simulated data and their predictive performance is compared with other competing scalar-on-function regression alternatives. We illustrate the usefulness of our approach through an application to brain tractography, where X(t) is a signal from diffusion tensor imaging at position, t, along a tract in the brain. In one example, the response is disease-status (case or control) and in a second example, it is the score on a cognitive test. R code for performing the simulations and fitting the FGAM can be found in supplemental materials available online. PMID:24729671

  4. Teaching Responsibility through Example

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Notar, Toni A.

    2008-01-01

    As Literacy Outreach Coordinator for Opportunity to Read (OTR), the Watsonville (CA) Public Library literacy program, this author has recognized the concept of responsibility through example. Adult learners incorporate concepts easily when these concepts are specifically demonstrated for them by someone similar to them. Sounds simple, but putting…

  5. Cyclostationarity by examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoni, Jérôme

    2009-05-01

    This paper is a tutorial on cyclostationarity oriented towards mechanical applications. The approach is voluntarily intuitive and accessible to neophytes. It thrives on 20 examples devoted to illustrating key concepts on actual mechanical signals and demonstrating how cyclostationarity can be taken advantage of in machine diagnostics, identification of mechanical systems and separation of mechanical sources.

  6. Vinyl capped addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannucci, Raymond D. (Inventor); Malarik, Diane C. (Inventor); Delvigs, Peter (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Polyimide resins (PMR) are generally useful where high strength and temperature capabilities are required (at temperatures up to about 700 F). Polyimide resins are particularly useful in applications such as jet engine compressor components, for example, blades, vanes, air seals, air splitters, and engine casing parts. Aromatic vinyl capped addition polyimides are obtained by reacting a diamine, an ester of tetracarboxylic acid, and an aromatic vinyl compound. Low void materials with improved oxidative stability when exposed to 700 F air may be fabricated as fiber reinforced high molecular weight capped polyimide composites. The aromatic vinyl capped polyimides are provided with a more aromatic nature and are more thermally stable than highly aliphatic, norbornenyl-type end-capped polyimides employed in PMR resins. The substitution of aromatic vinyl end-caps for norbornenyl end-caps in addition polyimides results in polymers with improved oxidative stability.

  7. Systematic reviews. Some examples.

    PubMed

    Knipschild, P

    1994-09-17

    Reviewing the literature is a scientific inquiry that needs a clear design to preclude bias. It is a real enterprise if one aims at completeness of the literature on a certain subject. Going through refereed English language journals is not enough. On line databases are helpful, but mainly as a starting point. This article gives examples of systematic reviews on vitamin C and the common cold, pyridoxine against the premenstrual syndrome, homeopathy, and physiotherapy. PMID:7950526

  8. Systematic reviews. Some examples.

    PubMed Central

    Knipschild, P.

    1994-01-01

    Reviewing the literature is a scientific inquiry that needs a clear design to preclude bias. It is a real enterprise if one aims at completeness of the literature on a certain subject. Going through refereed English language journals is not enough. On line databases are helpful, but mainly as a starting point. This article gives examples of systematic reviews on vitamin C and the common cold, pyridoxine against the premenstrual syndrome, homeopathy, and physiotherapy. Images p720-a PMID:7950526

  9. Example based lesion segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Snehashis; He, Qing; Carass, Aaron; Jog, Amod; Cuzzocreo, Jennifer L.; Reich, Daniel S.; Prince, Jerry; Pham, Dzung

    2014-03-01

    Automatic and accurate detection of white matter lesions is a significant step toward understanding the progression of many diseases, like Alzheimer's disease or multiple sclerosis. Multi-modal MR images are often used to segment T2 white matter lesions that can represent regions of demyelination or ischemia. Some automated lesion segmentation methods describe the lesion intensities using generative models, and then classify the lesions with some combination of heuristics and cost minimization. In contrast, we propose a patch-based method, in which lesions are found using examples from an atlas containing multi-modal MR images and corresponding manual delineations of lesions. Patches from subject MR images are matched to patches from the atlas and lesion memberships are found based on patch similarity weights. We experiment on 43 subjects with MS, whose scans show various levels of lesion-load. We demonstrate significant improvement in Dice coefficient and total lesion volume compared to a state of the art model-based lesion segmentation method, indicating more accurate delineation of lesions.

  10. Lead By Example: Serving NASA HDF User Communities with Examples at hdfeos.org Website

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folk, M. J.; Lee, H.; Yang, M.

    2012-12-01

    Although many NASA data centers distribute and archive data in the HDF/HDF-EOS file format, new NASA data users may not know how to access it. It is also common that users misuse NASA data due to a lack of sophisticated knowledge in handling data with their applications that support the file format. To address these issues, The HDF Group maintains the hdfeos.org website that provides practical and comprehensive examples that novice users can follow easily. Such examples include programming examples (C, FORTRAN, IDL, MATLAB, NCL, etc.) and tools examples (GrADS, IDV, Panopy, McIDAS-V, GDL, etc.). In addition, the website provides complete codes and plots for many HDF/HDF-EOS products from different NASA data centers such as GES DISC, NSIDC, LP DAAC, LAADS, LaRC, PO.DAAC, and OBPG. This poster will highlight The HDF Group's effort of serving the NASA data users by examples.

  11. The power of example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liliana Gheorghian, Mariana

    2014-05-01

    beginning of the XXI century" with the participation of several schools in the country in 2009 and 2011. The papers presented were diverse and gave examples of various teaching experiences and scientific information. Topics by the teachers: The impact of tourism on the environment, Tornadoes, Natural science and environmental education in school, Air Pollution and health, Ecological education of children from primary school, The effects of electromagnetic radiation, Formation of an ecological mentality using chemistry, Why should we protect water, Environmental education, Education for the future, SOS Nature, Science in the twenty-first century, etc. Topics by students: Nature- the palace of thermal phenomena, Life depends on heat, Water Mysteries, Global Heating, The Mysterious universe, etc. In March 2013 our school hosted an interesting exchange of ideas on environmental issues between our students and those from Bulgaria, Poland and Turkey, during a symposium of the Comenius multilateral project "Conserving Nature". In order to present the results of protecting nature in their communities, two projects "Citizen" qualified in the Program Civitas in the autumn of 2013. "The Battle" continues both in nature and in classrooms, in order to preserve the environment.

  12. Constructing Programs from Example Computations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bierman, A. W.; Krishnaswamy, R.

    This paper describes the construction and implementation of an autoprogramming system. An autoprogrammer is an interactive computer programming system which automatically constructs computer programs from example computations executed by the user. The example calculations are done in a scratch pad fashion at a computer display, and the system…

  13. Rent Seeking: A Textbook Example

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pecorino, Paul

    2007-01-01

    The author argues that the college textbook market provides a clear example of monopoly seeking as described by Tullock (1967, 1980). This behavior is also known as rent seeking. Because this market is important to students, this example of rent seeking will be of particular interest to them. (Contains 24 notes.)

  14. Additive Manufacturing of Hybrid Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarobol, Pylin; Cook, Adam; Clem, Paul G.; Keicher, David; Hirschfeld, Deidre; Hall, Aaron C.; Bell, Nelson S.

    2016-07-01

    There is a rising interest in developing functional electronics using additively manufactured components. Considerations in materials selection and pathways to forming hybrid circuits and devices must demonstrate useful electronic function; must enable integration; and must complement the complex shape, low cost, high volume, and high functionality of structural but generally electronically passive additively manufactured components. This article reviews several emerging technologies being used in industry and research/development to provide integration advantages of fabricating multilayer hybrid circuits or devices. First, we review a maskless, noncontact, direct write (DW) technology that excels in the deposition of metallic colloid inks for electrical interconnects. Second, we review a complementary technology, aerosol deposition (AD), which excels in the deposition of metallic and ceramic powder as consolidated, thick conformal coatings and is additionally patternable through masking. Finally, we show examples of hybrid circuits/devices integrated beyond 2-D planes, using combinations of DW or AD processes and conventional, established processes.

  15. The Evolution of Children's Mental Addition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashcraft, Mark H.; Hamann, Mary Sue

    Students in grades 1, 4, 7, and 10 were tested in a two-part investigation of simple and complex mental addition (with college students as a reference point). One session involved a normal reaction time task in which children made true/false judgments about a series of addition examples. The other session involved a verbal protocol interview, the…

  16. Fundamental Travel Demand Model Example

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanssen, Joel

    2010-01-01

    Instances of transportation models are abundant and detailed "how to" instruction is available in the form of transportation software help documentation. The purpose of this paper is to look at the fundamental inputs required to build a transportation model by developing an example passenger travel demand model. The example model reduces the scale to a manageable size for the purpose of illustrating the data collection and analysis required before the first step of the model begins. This aspect of the model development would not reasonably be discussed in software help documentation (it is assumed the model developer comes prepared). Recommendations are derived from the example passenger travel demand model to suggest future work regarding the data collection and analysis required for a freight travel demand model.

  17. Learning Algebra from Worked Examples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lange, Karin E.; Booth, Julie L.; Newton, Kristie J.

    2014-01-01

    For students to be successful in algebra, they must have a truly conceptual understanding of key algebraic features as well as the procedural skills to complete a problem. One strategy to correct students' misconceptions combines the use of worked example problems in the classroom with student self-explanation. "Self-explanation" is…

  18. Categorization Using Chains of Examples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heit, Evan

    1992-01-01

    Presents a mathematical-categorization model using multiple-step chains of reasoning (CORs) and memory for examples. In 5 experiments, 144 undergraduates memorized descriptions of fictional people, then made predictions from incomplete descriptions using 1-, 2-, or 3-step CORs. The multiple-step context model with one- and two-step inference…

  19. Astrochemistry Examples in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Reggie L.

    2006-01-01

    Astronomy and astronomy-related topics have sufficient appeal and depth that they can be used to motivate students, illustrate important chemical concepts, and demonstrate that chemistry and chemists are concerned with all parts of nature. In this article some recent developments in astrochemistry are suggested as examples for the teaching of…

  20. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. R.; St. Clair, T. L.; Burks, H. D.; Stoakley, D. M.

    1987-01-01

    A method has been found for enhancing the melt flow of thermoplastic polyimides during processing. A high molecular weight 422 copoly(amic acid) or copolyimide was fused with approximately 0.05 to 5 pct by weight of a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive, and this melt was studied by capillary rheometry. Excellent flow and improved composite properties on graphite resulted from the addition of a PMDA-aniline additive to LARC-TPI. Solution viscosity studies imply that amic acid additives temporarily lower molecular weight and, hence, enlarge the processing window. Thus, compositions containing the additive have a lower melt viscosity for a longer time than those unmodified.

  1. Examples of conditional SIC-POVMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, Hiromichi; Petz, Dénes

    2015-10-01

    The state of a quantum system is a density matrix with several parameters. The concern herein is how to recover the parameters. Several possibilities exist for the optimal recovery method, and we consider some special cases. We assume that a few parameters are known and that the others are to be recovered. The optimal positive-operator-valued measure (POVM) for recovering unknown parameters with an additional condition is called a conditional symmetric informationally complete POVM (SIC-POVM). In this paper, we study the existence or nonexistence of conditional SIC-POVMs. We provide a necessary condition for existence and some examples.

  2. Active Learning with Irrelevant Examples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagstaff, Kiri; Mazzoni, Dominic

    2009-01-01

    An improved active learning method has been devised for training data classifiers. One example of a data classifier is the algorithm used by the United States Postal Service since the 1960s to recognize scans of handwritten digits for processing zip codes. Active learning algorithms enable rapid training with minimal investment of time on the part of human experts to provide training examples consisting of correctly classified (labeled) input data. They function by identifying which examples would be most profitable for a human expert to label. The goal is to maximize classifier accuracy while minimizing the number of examples the expert must label. Although there are several well-established methods for active learning, they may not operate well when irrelevant examples are present in the data set. That is, they may select an item for labeling that the expert simply cannot assign to any of the valid classes. In the context of classifying handwritten digits, the irrelevant items may include stray marks, smudges, and mis-scans. Querying the expert about these items results in wasted time or erroneous labels, if the expert is forced to assign the item to one of the valid classes. In contrast, the new algorithm provides a specific mechanism for avoiding querying the irrelevant items. This algorithm has two components: an active learner (which could be a conventional active learning algorithm) and a relevance classifier. The combination of these components yields a method, denoted Relevance Bias, that enables the active learner to avoid querying irrelevant data so as to increase its learning rate and efficiency when irrelevant items are present. The algorithm collects irrelevant data in a set of rejected examples, then trains the relevance classifier to distinguish between labeled (relevant) training examples and the rejected ones. The active learner combines its ranking of the items with the probability that they are relevant to yield a final decision about which item

  3. DYNA3D example problem manual

    SciTech Connect

    Lovejoy, S.C.; Whirley, R.G.

    1990-10-10

    This manual describes in detail the solution of ten example problems using the explicit nonlinear finite element code DYNA3D. The sample problems include solid, shell, and beam element types, and a variety of linear and nonlinear material models. For each example, there is first an engineering description of the physical problem to be studied. Next, the analytical techniques incorporated in the model are discussed and key features of DYNA3D are highlighted. INGRID commands used to generate the mesh are listed, and sample plots from the DYNA3D analysis are given. Finally, there is a description of the TAURUS post-processing commands used to generate the plots of the solution. This set of example problems is useful in verifying the installation of DYNA3D on a new computer system. In addition, these documented analyses illustrate the application of DYNA3D to a variety of engineering problems, and thus this manual should be helpful to new analysts getting started with DYNA3D. 7 refs., 56 figs., 9 tabs.

  4. Additive usage levels.

    PubMed

    Langlais, R

    1996-01-01

    With the adoption of the European Parliament and Council Directives on sweeteners, colours and miscellaneous additives the Commission is now embarking on the project of coordinating the activities of the European Union Member States in the collection of the data that are to make up the report on food additive intake requested by the European Parliament. This presentation looks at the inventory of available sources on additive use levels and concludes that for the time being national legislation is still the best source of information considering that the directives have yet to be transposed into national legislation. Furthermore, this presentation covers the correlation of the food categories as found in the additives directives with those used by national consumption surveys and finds that in a number of instances this correlation still leaves a lot to be desired. The intake of additives via food ingestion and the intake of substances which are chemically identical to additives but which occur naturally in fruits and vegetables is found in a number of cases to be higher than the intake of additives added during the manufacture of foodstuffs. While the difficulties are recognized in contributing to the compilation of food additive intake data, industry as a whole, i.e. the food manufacturing and food additive manufacturing industries, are confident that in a concerted effort, use data on food additives by industry can be made available. Lastly, the paper points out that with the transportation of the additives directives into national legislation and the time by which the food industry will be able to make use of the new food legislative environment several years will still go by; food additives use data by the food industry will thus have to be reviewed at the beginning of the next century. PMID:8792135

  5. An additional middle cuneiform?

    PubMed Central

    Brookes-Fazakerley, S.D.; Jackson, G.E.; Platt, S.R.

    2015-01-01

    Additional cuneiform bones of the foot have been described in reference to the medial bipartite cuneiform or as small accessory ossicles. An additional middle cuneiform has not been previously documented. We present the case of a patient with an additional ossicle that has the appearance and location of an additional middle cuneiform. Recognizing such an anatomical anomaly is essential for ruling out second metatarsal base or middle cuneiform fractures and for the preoperative planning of arthrodesis or open reduction and internal fixation procedures in this anatomical location. PMID:26224890

  6. Blackhole formula and example relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Philip

    Black hole formula 1) Second dimension (x,y) f(x)=y Energy E=m*c2 2) Third dimension (x,y,z) really x=y=z Black hole formula Root(c2)=c=Root(E/m) As mass go the velocity of light, mass become black hole so there are energy as multiply by mass. Example relativity When E=m*c2 1) Root(c2)=c=Root(E/m) 2) 3*c*Root(c2)=3*c*Root(E/m)=3*c2 From 1) to 2) as an example, As velocity is faster, mass increased. It means when velocity is increased, sec(time) is slower, and m(distance) is increased. The number is good to study physics.

  7. Generic Example Proving Criteria for All

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yopp, David; Ely, Rob; Johnson­-Leung, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    We review literature that discusses generic example proving and highlight ambiguities that pervade our research community's discourse about generic example arguments. We distinguish between pedagogical advice for choosing good examples that can serve as generic examples when teaching and advice for developing generic example arguments. We provide…

  8. 48 CFR 22.1003-5 - Some examples of contracts covered.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Standards statute (see 29 CFR 4.130 for additional examples): (a) Motor pool operation, parking, taxicab..., illustrating, graphic arts, stenographic reporting, or mortuary services. (j) Electronic equipment maintenance..., for example, aircraft, engines, electrical motors, vehicles, and electronic, office and...

  9. Whole Class Laboratories: More Examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouh, Minjoon

    2016-03-01

    Typically, introductory physics courses are taught with a combination of lectures and laboratories in which students have opportunities to discover the natural laws through hands-on activities in small groups. This article reports the use of Google Drive, a free online document-sharing tool, in physics laboratories for pooling experimental data from the whole class. This pedagogical method was reported earlier, and the present article offers a few more examples of such "whole class" laboratories.

  10. Carbamate deposit control additives

    SciTech Connect

    Honnen, L.R.; Lewis, R.A.

    1980-11-25

    Deposit control additives for internal combustion engines are provided which maintain cleanliness of intake systems without contributing to combustion chamber deposits. The additives are poly(oxyalkylene) carbamates comprising a hydrocarbyloxyterminated poly(Oxyalkylene) chain of 2-5 carbon oxyalkylene units bonded through an oxycarbonyl group to a nitrogen atom of ethylenediamine.

  11. Additive manufacturing of hybrid circuits

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bell, Nelson S.; Sarobol, Pylin; Cook, Adam; Clem, Paul G.; Keicher, David M.; Hirschfeld, Deidre; Hall, Aaron Christopher

    2016-03-26

    There is a rising interest in developing functional electronics using additively manufactured components. Considerations in materials selection and pathways to forming hybrid circuits and devices must demonstrate useful electronic function; must enable integration; and must complement the complex shape, low cost, high volume, and high functionality of structural but generally electronically passive additively manufactured components. This article reviews several emerging technologies being used in industry and research/development to provide integration advantages of fabricating multilayer hybrid circuits or devices. First, we review a maskless, noncontact, direct write (DW) technology that excels in the deposition of metallic colloid inks for electrical interconnects.more » Second, we review a complementary technology, aerosol deposition (AD), which excels in the deposition of metallic and ceramic powder as consolidated, thick conformal coatings and is additionally patternable through masking. As a result, we show examples of hybrid circuits/devices integrated beyond 2-D planes, using combinations of DW or AD processes and conventional, established processes.« less

  12. Addition of Fractions--The Unrecognized Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Arthur C.

    1991-01-01

    Discussed is why students have the tendency to apply an "add the numerators and add the denominators" approach to adding fractions. Suggested is providing examples exemplifying this intuitive approach from ratio, concentration, and distance problems to demonstrate under what conditions it is applicable in contrast to the addition algorithm. (MDH)

  13. Combined dispersant fluid loss control additives

    SciTech Connect

    Villa, J. L.; Zeiner, R. N.

    1985-12-31

    Water soluble polymer compositions containing polyacrylic acid and copolymer of itaconic acid and acrylamide are useful as combined dispersant and fluid loss control additives for aqueous drilling fluids, particularly fresh water, gypsum and seawater muds. An example is a polymer composition containing about 80% by weight polyacrylic acid and about 20% by weight copolymer of itaconic acid and acrylamide in its ammonium salt form.

  14. Monotonic Weighted Power Transformations to Additivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramsay, J. O.

    1977-01-01

    A class of monotonic transformations which generalize the power transformation is fit to the independent and dependent variables in multiple regression so that the resulting additive relationship is optimized. Examples of analysis of real and artificial data are presented. (Author/JKS)

  15. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Burks, Harold D. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A process for preparing polyimides having enhanced melt flow properties is described. The process consists of heating a mixture of a high molecular weight poly-(amic acid) or polyimide with a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive in the range of 0.05 to 15 percent by weight of the additive. The polyimide powders so obtained show improved processability, as evidenced by lower melt viscosity by capillary rheometry. Likewise, films prepared from mixtures of polymers with additives show improved processability with earlier onset of stretching by TMA.

  16. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, James C. (Inventor); Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Burks, Harold D. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A process for preparing polyimides having enhanced melt flow properties is described. The process consists of heating a mixture of a high molecular weight poly-(amic acid) or polyimide with a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive in the range of 0.05 to 15 percent by weight of additive. The polyimide powders so obtained show improved processability, as evidenced by lower melt viscosity by capillary rheometry. Likewise, films prepared from mixtures of polymers with additives show improved processability with earlier onset of stretching by TMA.

  17. Food Additives and Hyperkinesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wender, Ester H.

    1977-01-01

    The hypothesis that food additives are causally associated with hyperkinesis and learning disabilities in children is reviewed, and available data are summarized. Available from: American Medical Association 535 North Dearborn Street Chicago, Illinois 60610. (JG)

  18. Smog control fuel additives

    SciTech Connect

    Lundby, W.

    1993-06-29

    A method is described of controlling, reducing or eliminating, ozone and related smog resulting from photochemical reactions between ozone and automotive or industrial gases comprising the addition of iodine or compounds of iodine to hydrocarbon-base fuels prior to or during combustion in an amount of about 1 part iodine per 240 to 10,000,000 parts fuel, by weight, to be accomplished by: (a) the addition of these inhibitors during or after the refining or manufacturing process of liquid fuels; (b) the production of these inhibitors for addition into fuel tanks, such as automotive or industrial tanks; or (c) the addition of these inhibitors into combustion chambers of equipment utilizing solid fuels for the purpose of reducing ozone.

  19. Additional Types of Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... A A Listen En Español Additional Types of Neuropathy Charcot's Joint Charcot's Joint, also called neuropathic arthropathy, ... can stop bone destruction and aid healing. Cranial Neuropathy Cranial neuropathy affects the 12 pairs of nerves ...

  20. Projector Method: theory and examples

    SciTech Connect

    Dahl, E.D.

    1985-01-01

    The Projector Method technique for numerically analyzing lattice gauge theories was developed to take advantage of certain simplifying features of gauge theory models. Starting from a very general notion of what the Projector Method is, the techniques are applied to several model problems. After these examples have traced the development of the actual algorithm from the general principles of the Projector Method, a direct comparison between the Projector and the Euclidean Monte Carlo is made, followed by a discussion of the application to Periodic Quantum Electrodynamics in two and three spatial dimensions. Some methods for improving the efficiency of the Projector in various circumstances are outlined. 10 refs., 7 figs. (LEW)

  1. Spatial filtering through elementary examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gluskin, Emanuel

    2004-05-01

    The spatial filtering features of resistive grids have become important in microelectronics in the last two decades, in particular because of the current interest in the design of 'vision chips.' However, these features of the grids are unexpected for many who received a basic physics or electrical engineering education. The author's opinion is that the concept of spatial filtering is important in itself, and should be introduced and separately considered at an early educational stage. We thus discuss some simple examples, of both continuous and discrete systems in which spatial filtering may be observed, using only basic physics concepts.

  2. Asymptotic safety: A simple example

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, Jens; Gies, Holger; Scherer, Daniel D.

    2011-04-15

    We use the Gross-Neveu model in 2example for Weinberg's asymptotic safety scenario: despite being perturbatively nonrenormalizable, the model defines an interacting quantum field theory being valid to arbitrarily high momentum scales owing to the existence of a non-Gaussian fixed point. Using the functional renormalization group, we study the uv behavior of the model in both the purely fermionic as well as a partially bosonized language. We show that asymptotic safety is realized at non-Gaussian fixed points in both formulations, the universal critical exponents of which we determine quantitatively. The partially bosonized formulation allows to make contact to the large-N{sub f} expansion where the model is known to be renormalizable to all orders. In this limit, the fixed-point action as well as all universal critical exponents can be computed analytically. As asymptotic safety has become an important scenario for quantizing gravity, our description of a well-understood model is meant to provide for an easily accessible and controllable example of modern nonperturbative quantum field theory.

  3. Additive and Disruptive Pedagogies: The Use of Slowmation as an Example of Digital Technology Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vratulis, Vetta; Clarke, Tony; Hoban, Garry; Erickson, Gaalen

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of 35 preservice teachers as they were introduced to a new digital technology, "Slowmation" (abbreviated from Slow Animation), as a "disruptive" pedagogy over a period of 12 months. The participants in the study were 35 preservice teachers from an elementary cohort. Primary data sources…

  4. Additive Manufacturing Infrared Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaddy, Darrell

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing is a rapid prototyping technology that allows parts to be built in a series of thin layers from plastic, ceramics, and metallics. Metallic additive manufacturing is an emerging form of rapid prototyping that allows complex structures to be built using various metallic powders. Significant time and cost savings have also been observed using the metallic additive manufacturing compared with traditional techniques. Development of the metallic additive manufacturing technology has advanced significantly over the last decade, although many of the techniques to inspect parts made from these processes have not advanced significantly or have limitations. Several external geometry inspection techniques exist such as Coordinate Measurement Machines (CMM), Laser Scanners, Structured Light Scanning Systems, or even traditional calipers and gages. All of the aforementioned techniques are limited to external geometry and contours or must use a contact probe to inspect limited internal dimensions. This presentation will document the development of a process for real-time dimensional inspection technique and digital quality record of the additive manufacturing process using Infrared camera imaging and processing techniques.

  5. Phenylethynyl Containing Reactive Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Phenylethynyl containing reactive additives were prepared from aromatic diamine, containing phenylethvnvl groups and various ratios of phthalic anhydride and 4-phenylethynviphthalic anhydride in glacial acetic acid to form the imide in one step or in N-methyl-2-pvrrolidinone to form the amide acid intermediate. The reactive additives were mixed in various amounts (10% to 90%) with oligomers containing either terminal or pendent phenylethynyl groups (or both) to reduce the melt viscosity and thereby enhance processability. Upon thermal cure, the additives react and become chemically incorporated into the matrix and effect an increase in crosslink density relative to that of the host resin. This resultant increase in crosslink density has advantageous consequences on the cured resin properties such as higher glass transition temperature and higher modulus as compared to that of the host resin.

  6. Additives in plastics.

    PubMed Central

    Deanin, R D

    1975-01-01

    The polymers used in plastics are generally harmless. However, they are rarely used in pure form. In almost all commercial plastics, they are "compounded" with monomeric ingredients to improve their processing and end-use performance. In order of total volume used, these monomeric additives may be classified as follows: reinforcing fibers, fillers, and coupling agents; plasticizers; colorants; stabilizers (halogen stabilizers, antioxidants, ultraviolet absorbers, and biological preservatives); processing aids (lubricants, others, and flow controls); flame retardants, peroxides; and antistats. Some information is already available, and much more is needed, on potential toxicity and safe handling of these additives during processing and manufacture of plastics products. PMID:1175566

  7. 16 CFR 680.2 - Examples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Examples. 680.2 Section 680.2 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION THE FAIR CREDIT REPORTING ACT AFFILIATE MARKETING § 680.2 Examples. The examples in this part are not exclusive. Compliance with an example, to the extent applicable,...

  8. 16 CFR 680.2 - Examples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Examples. 680.2 Section 680.2 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION THE FAIR CREDIT REPORTING ACT AFFILIATE MARKETING § 680.2 Examples. The examples in this part are not exclusive. Compliance with an example, to the extent applicable,...

  9. 16 CFR 680.2 - Examples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Examples. 680.2 Section 680.2 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION THE FAIR CREDIT REPORTING ACT AFFILIATE MARKETING § 680.2 Examples. The examples in this part are not exclusive. Compliance with an example, to the extent applicable,...

  10. 16 CFR 680.2 - Examples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Examples. 680.2 Section 680.2 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION THE FAIR CREDIT REPORTING ACT AFFILIATE MARKETING § 680.2 Examples. The examples in this part are not exclusive. Compliance with an example, to the extent applicable,...

  11. 16 CFR 680.2 - Examples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Examples. 680.2 Section 680.2 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION THE FAIR CREDIT REPORTING ACT AFFILIATE MARKETING § 680.2 Examples. The examples in this part are not exclusive. Compliance with an example, to the extent applicable,...

  12. The Structuring of Personal Example Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinclair, Nathalie; Watson, Anne; Zazkis, Rina; Mason, John

    2011-01-01

    This paper elaborates the notion of a personal example space as the set of mathematical objects and construction techniques that a learner has access to as examples of a concept while working on a given task. This is different from the conventional space of examples that is represented by the worked examples and exercises in textbooks. We refer to…

  13. Secular Redemptions: Biopolitics by Example.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Cristiana

    2016-01-01

    In this article, I analyze the practices of a group of Catholic nuns who run shelters for 'victims of human trafficking' in Italy, and are thus involved in state-funded rehabilitation programs for former foreign prostitutes. This case shows how the state and the Church are deeply implicated in each other's projects of redemption and the creation of new forms of life. In Italy, the legal model for rehabilitating foreign prostitutes is avowedly secular yet also deeply shaped by a Catholic impetus to purify sinners. At the same time, however, the nuns themselves develop an understanding of redemption as a secular life-saving project in line with the state's project of recognition, and thus inscribe their practices within the biopolitical effort to transform lives. Ultimately, I argue, leading by example becomes a specific Catholic instantiation of biopolitics that characterizes both the state's and the Church's approach to foreigners. PMID:26258728

  14. Neutron spectrometry for radiation protection: Three examples

    SciTech Connect

    Goldhagen, P.

    1995-12-31

    Workers and the general public are exposed to neutron radiation from a variety of sources, including fission and fusion reactors, accelerators, the nuclear fuel and nuclear weapons cycles, and cosmic rays in space, in aircraft and on the earth. Because the health effects of neutrons depend strongly on their energy, neutron spectrometry is essential for accurate risk-related neutron dosimetry. In addition, the penetration of neutrons through protective shielding changes their energy and can be difficult to calculate reliably, so the measurement of energy spectra is often needed to verify neutron transport calculations. The Environmental Measurements Laboratory has been measuring neutron energy spectra for over 20 years, primarily with multisphere (or Bonner sphere) spectrometers. Because of this experience, the Laboratory has responded to a number of requests to provide reference neutron energy spectra at critical locations in or near nuclear facilities and radiation fields. This talk will describe the author`s instruments and three recent examples of their use: outside the Princeton Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), up to two kilometers from the Army Pulse Radiation Facility (APRF) bare reactor, and in a Canadian Forces jet aircraft at commercial aviation altitudes. All of these studies have implications beyond routine occupational radiation protection. For example, the APRF measurements are part of the broad effort to resolve the discrepancy between measured and calculated thermal neutron activation at Hiroshima, one of the most important unsolved problems in radiation dosimetry.

  15. Biobased lubricant additives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fully biobased lubricants are those formulated using all biobased ingredients, i.e. biobased base oils and biobased additives. Such formulations provide the maximum environmental, safety, and economic benefits expected from a biobased product. Currently, there are a number of biobased base oils that...

  16. Multifunctional fuel additives

    SciTech Connect

    Baillargeon, D.J.; Cardis, A.B.; Heck, D.B.

    1991-03-26

    This paper discusses a composition comprising a major amount of a liquid hydrocarbyl fuel and a minor low-temperature flow properties improving amount of an additive product of the reaction of a suitable diol and product of a benzophenone tetracarboxylic dianhydride and a long-chain hydrocarbyl aminoalcohol.

  17. Bioinformatics by Example: From Sequence to Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kossida, Sophia; Tahri, Nadia; Daizadeh, Iraj

    2002-12-01

    With the completion of the human genome, and the imminent completion of other large-scale sequencing and structure-determination projects, computer-assisted bioscience is aimed to become the new paradigm for conducting basic and applied research. The presence of these additional bioinformatics tools stirs great anxiety for experimental researchers (as well as for pedagogues), since they are now faced with a wider and deeper knowledge of differing disciplines (biology, chemistry, physics, mathematics, and computer science). This review targets those individuals who are interested in using computational methods in their teaching or research. By analyzing a real-life, pharmaceutical, multicomponent, target-based example the reader will experience this fascinating new discipline.

  18. Fire-Retardant Polymeric Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha K.; Smith, Trent M.

    2011-01-01

    Polyhydroxyamide (PHA) and polymethoxyamide (PMeOA) are fire-retardant (FR) thermoplastic polymers and have been found to be useful as an additive for imparting fire retardant properties to other compatible, thermoplastic polymers (including some elastomers). Examples of compatible flammable polymers include nylons, polyesters, and acrylics. Unlike most prior additives, PHA and PMeOA do not appreciably degrade the mechanical properties of the matrix polymer; indeed, in some cases, mechanical properties are enhanced. Also, unlike some prior additives, PHA and PMeOA do not decompose into large amounts of corrosive or toxic compounds during combustion and can be processed at elevated temperatures. PMeOA derivative formulations were synthesized and used as an FR additive in the fabrication of polyamide (PA) and polystyrene (PS) composites with notable reduction (>30 percent for PS) in peak heat release rates compared to the neat polymer as measured by a Cone Calorimeter (ASTM E1354). Synergistic effects were noted with nanosilica composites. These nanosilica composites had more than 50-percent reduction in peak heat release rates. In a typical application, a flammable thermoplastic, thermoplastic blend, or elastomer that one seeks to render flame-retardant is first dry-mixed with PHA or PMeOA or derivative thereof. The proportion of PHA or PMeOA or derivative in the mixture is typically chosen to lie between 1 and 20 weight percent. The dry blend can then be melt-extruded. The extruded polymer blend can further be extruded and/or molded into fibers, pipes, or any other of a variety of objects that may be required to be fire-retardant. The physical and chemical mechanisms which impart flame retardancy of the additive include inhibiting free-radical oxidation in the vapor phase, preventing vaporization of fuel (the polymer), and cooling through the formation of chemical bonds in either the vapor or the condensed phase. Under thermal stress, the cyclic hydroxyl/ methoxy

  19. Boron addition to alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Coad, B. C.

    1985-08-20

    A process for addition of boron to an alloy which involves forming a melt of the alloy and a reactive metal, selected from the group consisting of aluminum, titanium, zirconium and mixtures thereof to the melt, maintaining the resulting reactive mixture in the molten state and reacting the boric oxide with the reactive metal to convert at least a portion of the boric oxide to boron which dissolves in the resulting melt, and to convert at least portion of the reactive metal to the reactive metal oxide, which oxide remains with the resulting melt, and pouring the resulting melt into a gas stream to form a first atomized powder which is subsequently remelted with further addition of boric oxide, re-atomized, and thus reprocessed to convert essentially all the reactive metal to metal oxide to produce a powdered alloy containing specified amounts of boron.

  20. Tackifier for addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, J. M.; St.clair, T. L.

    1980-01-01

    A modification to the addition polyimide, LaRC-160, was prepared to improve tack and drape and increase prepeg out-time. The essentially solventless, high viscosity laminating resin is synthesized from low cost liquid monomers. The modified version takes advantage of a reactive, liquid plasticizer which is used in place of solvent and helps solve a major problem of maintaining good prepeg tack and drape, or the ability of the prepeg to adhere to adjacent plies and conform to a desired shape during the lay up process. This alternate solventless approach allows both longer life of the polymer prepeg and the processing of low void laminates. This approach appears to be applicable to all addition polyimide systems.

  1. [Biologically active food additives].

    PubMed

    Velichko, M A; Shevchenko, V P

    1998-07-01

    More than half out of 40 projects for the medical science development by the year of 2000 have been connected with the bio-active edible additives that are called "the food of XXI century", non-pharmacological means for many diseases. Most of these additives--nutricevtics and parapharmacevtics--are intended for the enrichment of food rations for the sick or healthy people. The ecologicaly safest and most effective are combined domestic adaptogens with immuno-modulating and antioxidating action that give anabolic and stimulating effect,--"leveton", "phytoton" and "adapton". The MKTs-229 tablets are residue discharge means. For atherosclerosis and general adiposis they recommend "tsar tablets" and "aiconol (ikhtien)"--on the base of cod-liver oil or "splat" made out of seaweed (algae). All these preparations have been clinically tested and received hygiene certificates from the Institute of Dietology of the Russian Academy of Medical Science. PMID:9752776

  2. Electrophilic addition of astatine

    SciTech Connect

    Norseev, Yu.V.; Vasaros, L.; Nhan, D.D.; Huan, N.K.

    1988-03-01

    It has been shown for the first time that astatine is capable of undergoing addition reactions to unsaturated hydrocarbons. A new compound of astatine, viz., ethylene astatohydrin, has been obtained, and its retention numbers of squalane, Apiezon, and tricresyl phosphate have been found. The influence of various factors on the formation of ethylene astatohydrin has been studied. It has been concluded on the basis of the results obtained that the univalent cations of astatine in an acidic medium is protonated hypoastatous acid.

  3. Hydrocarbon fuel additive

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrogio, S.

    1989-02-28

    This patent describes the method of fuel storage or combustion, wherein the fuel supply contains small amounts of water, the step of adding to the fuel supply an additive comprising a blend of a hydrophilic agent chosen from the group of ethylene glycol, n-butyl alcohol, and cellosolve in the range of 22-37% by weight; ethoxylated nonylphenol in the range of 26-35% by weight; nonylphenol polyethylene glycol ether in the range of 32-43% by weight.

  4. The use and generation of illustrative examples in computer-based instructional systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selig, William John; Johannes, James D.

    1987-01-01

    A method is proposed whereby the underlying domain knowledge is represented such that illustrative examples may be generated on demand. This method has the advantage that the generated example can follow changes in the domain in addition to allowing automatic customization of the example to the individual.

  5. Nonbright spot AVO: Two examples

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, C.P.; Kinman, D.L.

    1994-12-31

    Utilization of amplitude-versus-offset (AVO) attribute sections such as the product of the normal incidence trace and gradient trace have been used extensively in bright spot (Class 3) AVO analysis and interpretation. However, while these sections have often worked well with Class 3 responses they are not reliable indicators of non-bright spot (Class 2) seismic anomalies. Analyzing Class 2 seismic data with AVO products will: (1) not detect the gas-charged reservoir because of near-zero acoustic impedance contrast between the sands and encasing shales, or (2) yield an incorrect (negative) AVO product if the normal incidence and gradient values are opposite in sign. Class 2 offset responses are divided into two sub-categories: those with phase reversals (Class 2p) and those without phase reversals (Class 2). An AVO procedure for these types of Class 2 anomalies is presented through two examples. The technique better exploits the nature of the prestack response, yielding a more definitive AVO attribute section, and the technique is adaptive to both Class 2 and Class 2p responses. When compared to a conventionally processed relative amplitude seismic section with characteristically low amplitude responses for near-zero acoustic impedance sands, this procedure clearly denotes the presence of gas-charged pore fluids within the reservoir.

  6. Oil additive process

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, H.

    1988-10-18

    This patent describes a method of making an additive comprising: (a) adding 2 parts by volume of 3% sodium hypochlorite to 45 parts by volume of diesel oil fuel to form a sulphur free fuel, (b) removing all water and foreign matter formed by the sodium hypochlorite, (c) blending 30 parts by volume of 24% lead naphthanate with 15 parts by volume of the sulphur free fuel, 15 parts by volume of light-weight material oil to form a blended mixture, and (d) heating the blended mixture slowly and uniformly to 152F.

  7. Siloxane containing addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maudgal, S.; St. Clair, T. L.

    1984-01-01

    Addition polyimide oligomers have been synthesized from bis(gamma-aminopropyl) tetramethyldisiloxane and 3, 3', 4, 4'-benzophenonetetracarboxylic dianhydride using a variety of latent crosslinking groups as endcappers. The prepolymers were isolated and characterized for solubility (in amide, chlorinated and ether solvents), melt flow and cure properties. The most promising systems, maleimide and acetylene terminated prepolymers, were selected for detailed study. Graphite cloth reinforced composites were prepared and properties compared with those of graphite/Kerimid 601, a commercially available bismaleimide. Mixtures of the maleimide terminated system with Kerimid 601, in varying proportions, were also studied.

  8. Intermediate-Valence Tautomerism in Decamethylytterbocene Complexes of Methyl-Substituted Bipyridines

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, Corwin H.; Kazhdan, Daniel; Werkema, Evan L.; Walter, Marc D.; Lukens, Wayne W.; Bauer, Eric D.; Hu, Yung-Jin; Maron, Laurent; Eisenstein, Odile; Head-Gordon, Martin; Andersen, Richard A.

    2011-01-25

    Multiconfigurational, intermediate valent ground states are established in several methyl-substituted bipyridine complexes of bispentamethylcyclopentadienylytterbium, Cp*{sub 2} Yb(Me{sub x}-bipy). In contrast to Cp*{sub 2} Yb(bipy) and other substituted-bipy complexes, the nature of both the ground state and the first excited state are altered by changing the position of the methyl or dimethyl substitutions on the bipyridine rings. In particular, certain substitutions result in multiconfigurational, intermediate valent open-shell singlet states in both the ground state and the first excited state. These conclusions are reached after consideration of single-crystal x-ray diffraction (XRD), the temperature dependence of x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES), extended x-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS), and magnetic susceptibility data, and are supported by CASSCF-MP2 calculations. These results place the various Cp*{sub 2}Yb(bipy) complexes in a new tautomeric class, that is, intermediate-valence tautomers.

  9. Example Elaboration as a Neglected Instructional Strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Girill, T R

    2001-07-18

    Over the last decade an unfolding cognitive-psychology research program on how learners use examples to develop effective problem solving expertise has yielded well-established empirical findings. Chi et al., Renkl, Reimann, and Neubert (in various papers) have confirmed statistically significant differences in how good and poor learners inferentially elaborate (self explain) example steps as they study. Such example elaboration is highly relevant to software documentation and training, yet largely neglected in the current literature. This paper summarizes the neglected research on example use and puts its neglect in a disciplinary perspective. The author then shows that differences in support for example elaboration in commercial software documentation reveal previously over looked usability issues. These issues involve example summaries, using goals and goal structures to reinforce example elaborations, and prompting readers to recognize the role of example parts. Secondly, I show how these same example elaboration techniques can build cognitive maturity among underperforming high school students who study technical writing. Principle based elaborations, condition elaborations, and role recognition of example steps all have their place in innovative, high school level, technical writing exercises, and all promote far transfer problem solving. Finally, I use these studies to clarify the constructivist debate over what writers and readers contribute to text meaning. I argue that writers can influence how readers elaborate on examples, and that because of the great empirical differences in example study effectiveness (and reader choices) writers should do what they can (through within text design features) to encourage readers to elaborate examples in the most successful ways. Example elaboration is a uniquely effective way to learn from worked technical examples. This paper summarizes years of research that clarifies example elaboration. I then show how example

  10. Pedagogical Wishes for a Machine Dictionary: An Example from Russian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Howard H.

    1987-01-01

    Describes the uses for and advantages of a computerized foreign language/ English dictionary. Using Russian as an example, the additional teaching functions such a dictionary could provide include: (1) word frequency; (2) etymological information; (3) word family; (4) tergo listings; (5) synonym listings; (6) thesaurus listings; and (7) literary…

  11. Osteoporosis: Cloris Leachman Leads by Example

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn Javascript on. Feature: Osteoporosis Cloris Leachman Leads By Example Past Issues / Winter 2011 Table of ... age discrimination! Read More "Osteoporosis" Articles Cloris Leachman Leads By Example / Preventing and Treating Brittle Bones and ...

  12. Analog Computer Laboratory with Biological Examples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strebel, Donald E.

    1979-01-01

    The use of biological examples in teaching applications of the analog computer is discussed and several examples from mathematical ecology, enzyme kinetics, and tracer dynamics are described. (Author/GA)

  13. Sewage sludge additive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalvinskas, J. J.; Mueller, W. A.; Ingham, J. D. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    The additive is for a raw sewage treatment process of the type where settling tanks are used for the purpose of permitting the suspended matter in the raw sewage to be settled as well as to permit adsorption of the dissolved contaminants in the water of the sewage. The sludge, which settles down to the bottom of the settling tank is extracted, pyrolyzed and activated to form activated carbon and ash which is mixed with the sewage prior to its introduction into the settling tank. The sludge does not provide all of the activated carbon and ash required for adequate treatment of the raw sewage. It is necessary to add carbon to the process and instead of expensive commercial carbon, coal is used to provide the carbon supplement.

  14. Performance Boosting Additive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Mainstream Engineering Corporation was awarded Phase I and Phase II contracts from Goddard Space Flight Center's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program in early 1990. With support from the SBIR program, Mainstream Engineering Corporation has developed a unique low cost additive, QwikBoost (TM), that increases the performance of air conditioners, heat pumps, refrigerators, and freezers. Because of the energy and environmental benefits of QwikBoost, Mainstream received the Tibbetts Award at a White House Ceremony on October 16, 1997. QwikBoost was introduced at the 1998 International Air Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Exposition. QwikBoost is packaged in a handy 3-ounce can (pressurized with R-134a) and will be available for automotive air conditioning systems in summer 1998.

  15. New addition curing polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frimer, Aryeh A.; Cavano, Paul

    1991-01-01

    In an attempt to improve the thermal-oxidative stability (TOS) of PMR-type polymers, the use of 1,4-phenylenebis (phenylmaleic anhydride) PPMA, was evaluated. Two series of nadic end-capped addition curing polyimides were prepared by imidizing PPMA with either 4,4'-methylene dianiline or p-phenylenediamine. The first resulted in improved solubility and increased resin flow while the latter yielded a compression molded neat resin sample with a T(sub g) of 408 C, close to 70 C higher than PME-15. The performance of these materials in long term weight loss studies was below that of PMR-15, independent of post-cure conditions. These results can be rationalized in terms of the thermal lability of the pendant phenyl groups and the incomplete imidization of the sterically congested PPMA. The preparation of model compounds as well as future research directions are discussed.

  16. Perspectives on Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourell, David L.

    2016-07-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has skyrocketed in visibility commercially and in the public sector. This article describes the development of this field from early layered manufacturing approaches of photosculpture, topography, and material deposition. Certain precursors to modern AM processes are also briefly described. The growth of the field over the last 30 years is presented. Included is the standard delineation of AM technologies into seven broad categories. The economics of AM part generation is considered, and the impacts of the economics on application sectors are described. On the basis of current trends, the future outlook will include a convergence of AM fabricators, mass-produced AM fabricators, enabling of topology optimization designs, and specialization in the AM legal arena. Long-term developments with huge impact are organ printing and volume-based printing.

  17. Relative Stabilities of Organic Compounds Using Benson's Additivity Rules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vitale, Dale E.

    1986-01-01

    Shows how the structure-energy principle can be presented in organic chemistry (without having to resort to quantum mechanics) by use of Benson's Additive Rules. Examples of the application to several major classes of organic compounds are given.

  18. Chemical Mixture Risk Assessment Additivity-Based Approaches

    EPA Science Inventory

    Powerpoint presentation includes additivity-based chemical mixture risk assessment methods. Basic concepts, theory and example calculations are included. Several slides discuss the use of "common adverse outcomes" in analyzing phthalate mixtures.

  19. 12 CFR 171.92 - Examples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Examples. 171.92 Section 171.92 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FAIR CREDIT REPORTING Identity Theft Red Flags § 171.92 Examples. The examples in appendix J and supplement A to appendix J are not...

  20. 12 CFR 171.92 - Examples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Examples. 171.92 Section 171.92 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FAIR CREDIT REPORTING Identity Theft Red Flags § 171.92 Examples. The examples in appendix J and supplement A to appendix J are not...

  1. 12 CFR 171.92 - Examples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Examples. 171.92 Section 171.92 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FAIR CREDIT REPORTING Identity Theft Red Flags § 171.92 Examples. The examples in Appendix J and Supplement A to Appendix J are not...

  2. The Work of Examples in Classroom Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Yo-An

    2004-01-01

    Providing examples is part of the daily routine that classroom teachers carry out in the course of their lessons, and yet we rarely examine how examples are produced and what kinds of work they do in the lively context of classroom interaction. The present study inquires into how instructional examples are portrayed in prior literature by…

  3. 48 CFR 9.508 - Examples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Examples. 9.508 Section 9.508 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION ACQUISITION PLANNING CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS Organizational and Consultant Conflicts of Interest 9.508 Examples. The examples in paragraphs (a) through (i)...

  4. 48 CFR 25.504 - Evaluation Examples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Evaluation Examples. 25... PROGRAMS FOREIGN ACQUISITION Evaluating Foreign Offers-Supply Contracts 25.504 Evaluation Examples. The following examples illustrate the application of the evaluation procedures in 25.502 and 25.503....

  5. Conditions and Effects of Example Elaboration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stark, Robin; Mandl, Heinz; Gruber, Hans; Renkl, Alexander

    2002-01-01

    Reanalyzed findings of an earlier study on learning with worked-out examples (n=56 vocational school students) and identified different ways of dealing with worked-out examples and related them to learning outcomes and learners' mental efforts. Results show that elaboration training had a positive effect on the quality of example elaboration.…

  6. Copy to contiguous example using C descriptor

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, Craig E

    2011-01-18

    In N1838-2 there is an example of how to use the CFI-cdesc-t type in a C implementation of a BIND (C) interface. This paper provides another example of using the CFI-cdesc-t type in C. This new example provides code to copy an array (possibly noncontiguous) into a contiguous buffer.

  7. Additives in fibers and fabrics.

    PubMed Central

    Barker, R H

    1975-01-01

    The additives and contaminants which occur in textile fibers vary widely, depending on the type of fiber and the pretreatment which it has received. Synthetic fibers such as nylon and polyester contain trace amounts of contaminants such as catalysts and catalyst deactivators which remain after the synthesis of the basic polymers. In addition, there are frequently a number of materials which are added to perform specific functions in almost all man-made fibers. Examples of these would include traces of metals or metal salts used as tracers for identification of specific lots of fiber, TiO2 or similar materials added as delustrants, and a host of organic species added for such special purposes as antistatic agents or flame retardants. There may also be considerable quantities of residual monomer or small oligomers dissolved in the polymer matrix. The situation becomes even more complex after the fibers are converted into fabric form. Numerous materials are applied at various stages of fabric preparation to act as lubricants, sizing agents, antistats, bleaches, and wetting agents to facilitate the processing, but these are normally removed before the fabric reaches the cutters of the ultimate consumers and therefore usually do not constitute potential hazards. However, there are many other chemical agents which are frequently added during the later stages of fabric preparation and which are not designed to be removed. Aside from dyes and printing pigments, the most common additive for apparel fabrics is a durable press treatment. This generally involves the use of materials capable of crosslinking cellulosics by reacting through such functions as N-methylolated amides or related compounds such as ureas and carbamates. These materials pose some potential hazards due to both the nitrogenous bases and the formaldehyde which they usually release. There is usually also some residual catalyst in fabrics which have received such treatments. Other types of chemical treatments

  8. Neutron Characterization for Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, Thomas; Bilheux, Hassina; An, Ke; Payzant, Andrew; DeHoff, Ryan; Duty, Chad; Peter, William; Blue, Craig; Brice, Craig A.

    2013-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is leveraging decades of experience in neutron characterization of advanced materials together with resources such as the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) shown in Fig. 1 to solve challenging problems in additive manufacturing (AM). Additive manufacturing, or three-dimensional (3-D) printing, is a rapidly maturing technology wherein components are built by selectively adding feedstock material at locations specified by a computer model. The majority of these technologies use thermally driven phase change mechanisms to convert the feedstock into functioning material. As the molten material cools and solidifies, the component is subjected to significant thermal gradients, generating significant internal stresses throughout the part (Fig. 2). As layers are added, inherent residual stresses cause warping and distortions that lead to geometrical differences between the final part and the original computer generated design. This effect also limits geometries that can be fabricated using AM, such as thin-walled, high-aspect- ratio, and overhanging structures. Distortion may be minimized by intelligent toolpath planning or strategic placement of support structures, but these approaches are not well understood and often "Edisonian" in nature. Residual stresses can also impact component performance during operation. For example, in a thermally cycled environment such as a high-pressure turbine engine, residual stresses can cause components to distort unpredictably. Different thermal treatments on as-fabricated AM components have been used to minimize residual stress, but components still retain a nonhomogeneous stress state and/or demonstrate a relaxation-derived geometric distortion. Industry, federal laboratory, and university collaboration is needed to address these challenges and enable the U.S. to compete in the global market. Work is currently being conducted on AM technologies at the ORNL

  9. Additives in fibers and fabrics.

    PubMed

    Barker, R H

    1975-06-01

    The additives and contaminants which occur in textile fibers vary widely, depending on the type of fiber and the pretreatment which it has received. Synthetic fibers such as nylon and polyester contain trace amounts of contaminants such as catalysts and catalyst deactivators which remain after the synthesis of the basic polymers. In addition, there are frequently a number of materials which are added to perform specific functions in almost all man-made fibers. Examples of these would include traces of metals or metal salts used as tracers for identification of specific lots of fiber, TiO2 or similar materials added as delustrants, and a host of organic species added for such special purposes as antistatic agents or flame retardants. There may also be considerable quantities of residual monomer or small oligomers dissolved in the polymer matrix. The situation becomes even more complex after the fibers are converted into fabric form. Numerous materials are applied at various stages of fabric preparation to act as lubricants, sizing agents, antistats, bleaches, and wetting agents to facilitate the processing, but these are normally removed before the fabric reaches the cutters of the ultimate consumers and therefore usually do not constitute potential hazards. However, there are many other chemical agents which are frequently added during the later stages of fabric preparation and which are not designed to be removed. Aside from dyes and printing pigments, the most common additive for apparel fabrics is a durable press treatment. This generally involves the use of materials capable of crosslinking cellulosics by reacting through such functions as N-methylolated amides or related compounds such as ureas and carbamates. These materials pose some potential hazards due to both the nitrogenous bases and the formaldehyde which they usually release. There is usually also some residual catalyst in fabrics which have received such treatments. Other types of chemical treatments

  10. Additive for activating iron electrodes in alkaline batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, G.; Haschka, F.

    1981-02-10

    An additive is disclosed for the iron electrodes of alkaline batteries which prevents and counteracts the tendency of iron electrodes to become passive and ineffective. The additive consists of sulfide, selenide or telluride which is sparingly soluble in the electrolyte and has a decomposition potential more electronegative than the final charging potential of the iron electrode. The additive may be placed in the active electrode material during manufacture but may also be placed in the battery during or after manufacture, for example in tablet form. The additive may also be introduced in a manner permitting subsequent activation by electrochemical methods. A number of examples is presented.

  11. Design examples of diffraction-limited catadioptric objectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallert, Frank

    1996-08-01

    The paper relates to different inventions, comprising three diffraction-limited catadioptric designs. All the systems use only spherical shaped surfaces and are designed from one kind of optical material only. In the examples the glass BK7 from the Schott-catalogue was used. The first example gives a three element design reaching equal performance as a Schmidt camera but with only 25 percent of its length. Additionally the field is flat and conveniently located behind the system. The second example is designed to reduce the central obstruction. It's somewhat based on the principle of the Houghton-camera. For a f-number 4 system with 1000 millimeters focal length it gives outstanding image quality at a 5 degree's field--even capable for diffraction-limited visual use. For reduced f-number 5,6 the image is diffraction-limited at the whole field. In terms of color correction it outperforms every Schmidt-Cassegrain or apochromatic triplet of even arbitrarily more reduced light gathering power. The third example is the equivalent for the so-called Wynne corrector triplet that corrects the aberrations of a parabolical mirror. But the invented corrector corrects additionally the spherical aberration of a spherical mirror. The corrector is able to correct all third order aberrations without introducing longitudinal and lateral color.

  12. Does Generating Examples Aid Proof Production?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iannone, Paola; Inglis, Matthew; Mejia-Ramos, Juan Pablo; Simpson, Adrian; Weber, Keith

    2011-01-01

    Many mathematics education researchers have suggested that asking learners to generate examples of mathematical concepts is an effective way of learning about novel concepts. To date, however, this suggestion has limited empirical support. We asked undergraduate students to study a novel concept by either tackling example generation tasks or…

  13. Dynamic Programming: An Introduction by Example

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zietz, Joachim

    2007-01-01

    The author introduces some basic dynamic programming techniques, using examples, with the help of the computer algebra system "Maple". The emphasis is on building confidence and intuition for the solution of dynamic problems in economics. To integrate the material better, the same examples are used to introduce different techniques. One covers the…

  14. Using Worked Examples Assignments in Classroom Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paré-Blagoev, Juliana; Booth, Julie; Elliot, Andrew; Koedinger, Ken

    2013-01-01

    As highlighted by the National Math Panel Report (2008), consistent results from laboratory studies have demonstrated that interleaving worked examples with problems to solve improves learning for novices. The purpose of this work is to create materials and tests that can be used flexibly in classrooms and which employ worked examples interleaved…

  15. 29 CFR 4022.104 - Examples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...: where surviving beneficiary dies during certain period. Ellen survived Charlie and lived another year... reimburse him for those underpayments. (1) Example 3: where participant dies during certain period. Charlie... Ellen). (3) Example 5: where participant dies after certain period. Charlie died after receiving...

  16. 17 CFR 248.102 - Examples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Examples. 248.102 Section 248.102 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS S-P, S-AM, AND S-ID Regulation S-AM: Limitations on Affiliate Marketing § 248.102 Examples. The...

  17. Inspiring Examples in Rearrangements of Infinite Products

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramasinghe, W.

    2007-01-01

    It is well known that simple examples are really encouraging in the understanding of rearrangements of infinite series. In this paper a similar role is played by simple examples in the case of infinite products. Iterated products of double products seem to have a similar spirit of rearrangements of products, although they are not the same.…

  18. Additive manufacturing: From implants to organs.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Tania S

    2014-06-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) constructs 3D objects layer by layer under computer control from 3D models. 3D printing is one example of this kind of technology. AM offers geometric flexibility in its products and therefore allows customisation to suit individual needs. Clinical success has been shown with models for surgical planning, implants, assistive devices and scaffold-based tissue engineering. The use of AM to print tissues and organs that mimic nature in structure and function remains an elusive goal, but has the potential to transform personalised medicine, drug development and scientific understanding of the mechanisms of disease.  PMID:25214247

  19. Illustrating Arrays with a Finance Savings Example.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kost, Franklin

    1990-01-01

    Described is a learning activity which incorporates computer programing and the teaching of arrays. Using the newspaper as a source for ideas for programing assignments and classroom examples is emphasized. (KR)

  20. Solving Algebra Problems with Interactive Diagrams: Demonstration and Construction of Examples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naftaliev, Elena; Yerushalmy, Michal

    2011-01-01

    We investigated how students use the representation of data in a given example appearing in an interactive diagram (ID) and how they create additional examples with the ID. Students who worked with the ID that offered limited representations and tools ("illustrating ID") looked for ways to bypass the designed constraints: they changed the…

  1. 26 CFR 49.4261-8 - Examples of payments not subject to tax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Examples of payments not subject to tax. 49.4261... of payments not subject to tax. In addition to a payment specifically exempt under section 4263, 4292, 4293, or 4294 the following are examples of payments not subject to tax: (a) Exchange of prepaid...

  2. Application Examples for Handle System Usage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toussaint, F.; Weigel, T.; Thiemann, H.; Höck, H.; Stockhause, M.; Lautenschlager, M.

    2012-12-01

    Besides the well-known DOI (Digital Object Identifiers) as a special form of Handles that resolve to scientific publications there are various other applications in use. Others perhaps are just not yet. We present some examples for the existing ones and some ideas for the future. The national German project C3-Grid provides a framework to implement a first solution for provenance tracing and explore unforeseen implications. Though project-specific, the high-level architecture is generic and represents well a common notion of data derivation. Users select one or many input datasets and a workflow software module (an agent in this context) to execute on the data. The output data is deposited in a repository to be delivered to the user. All data is accompanied by an XML metadata document. All input and output data, metadata and the workflow module receive Handles and are linked together to establish a directed acyclic graph of derived data objects and involved agents. Data that has been modified by a workflow module is linked to its predecessor data and the workflow module involved. Version control systems such as svn or git provide Internet access to software repositories using URLs. To refer to a specific state of the source code of for instance a C3 workflow module, it is sufficient to reference the URL to the svn revision or git hash. In consequence, individual revisions and the repository as a whole receive PIDs. Moreover, the revision specific PIDs are linked to their respective predecessors and become part of the provenance graph. Another example for usage of PIDs in a current major project is given in EUDAT (European Data Infrastructure) which will link scientific data of several research communities together. In many fields it is necessary to provide data objects at multiple locations for a variety of applications. To ensure consistency, not only the master of a data object but also its copies shall be provided with a PID. To verify transaction safety and to

  3. MAMA Software Features: Visual Examples of Quantification

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggiero, Christy E.; Porter, Reid B.

    2014-05-20

    This document shows examples of the results from quantifying objects of certain sizes and types in the software. It is intended to give users a better feel for some of the quantification calculations, and, more importantly, to help users understand the challenges with using a small set of ‘shape’ quantification calculations for objects that can vary widely in shapes and features. We will add more examples to this in the coming year.

  4. Learning from examples: from theory to practice

    SciTech Connect

    Hush, D. R.; Scovel, James C.; Kelly, P. M.; Howse, J. W.; Fugate, M. L.; Cannon, A.

    2001-01-01

    This tutorial provides an overview of the problem of learning from examples. Emphasis is placed on fundamental limitations in three areas: approximation, estimation and computation. Each of these is compared and contrasted in situations where the problem is one of regression verses pattern classification, parametric versus nonparametric, and linear versus nonlinear. General methods for improving generalization and computation speed are discussed, and practical examples are used to illustrate these methods.

  5. 26 CFR 20.2013-6 - Examples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Examples. 20.2013-6 Section 20.2013-6 Internal...; ESTATES OF DECEDENTS DYING AFTER AUGUST 16, 1954 Credits Against Tax § 20.2013-6 Examples. The application....00 A's gross estate tax 233,200.00 Credit for State death taxes 23,280.00 A's net estate tax...

  6. Scenarios for Motivating the Learning of Variability: An Example in Finances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordani, Lisbeth K.

    2013-01-01

    This article explores an example in finances in order to motivate the random variable learning to the very beginners in statistics. In addition, it offers a relationship between standard deviation and range in a very specific situation.

  7. 48 CFR 22.1003-5 - Some examples of contracts covered.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... CFR 4.130 for additional examples): (a) Motor pool operation, parking, taxicab, and ambulance services..., stenographic reporting, or mortuary services. (j) Electronic equipment maintenance and operation and..., engines, electrical motors, vehicles, and electronic, office and related business and...

  8. 48 CFR 22.1003-5 - Some examples of contracts covered.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... CFR 4.130 for additional examples): (a) Motor pool operation, parking, taxicab, and ambulance services..., stenographic reporting, or mortuary services. (j) Electronic equipment maintenance and operation and..., engines, electrical motors, vehicles, and electronic, office and related business and...

  9. Effects of Studying Sequences of Process-Oriented and Product-Oriented Worked Examples on Troubleshooting Transfer Efficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Gog, Tamara; Paas, Fred; van Merrienboer, Jeroen J. G.

    2008-01-01

    Whereas product-oriented worked examples only present a problem solution, process-oriented worked examples additionally explain the rationale behind the presented solution. Given the importance of understanding this rationale for attaining transfer, process-oriented worked examples would be expected to result in more efficient transfer. However, a…

  10. Incorporation of additives into polymers

    DOEpatents

    McCleskey, T. Mark; Yates, Matthew Z.

    2003-07-29

    There has been invented a method for incorporating additives into polymers comprising: (a) forming an aqueous or alcohol-based colloidal system of the polymer; (b) emulsifying the colloidal system with a compressed fluid; and (c) contacting the colloidal polymer with the additive in the presence of the compressed fluid. The colloidal polymer can be contacted with the additive by having the additive in the compressed fluid used for emulsification or by adding the additive to the colloidal system before or after emulsification with the compressed fluid. The invention process can be carried out either as a batch process or as a continuous on-line process.

  11. Deciphering the roles of multiple additives in organocatalyzed Michael additions.

    PubMed

    Günler, Z Inci; Companyó, Xavier; Alfonso, Ignacio; Burés, Jordi; Jimeno, Ciril; Pericàs, Miquel A

    2016-05-21

    The synergistic effects of multiple additives (water and acetic acid) on the asymmetric Michael addition of acetone to nitrostyrene catalyzed by primary amine-thioureas (PAT) were precisely determined. Acetic acid facilitates hydrolysis of the imine intermediates, thus leading to catalytic behavior, and minimizes the formation of the double addition side product. In contrast, water slows down the reaction but minimizes catalyst deactivation, eventually leading to higher final yields. PMID:27128165

  12. Examples from Astronomy for High School Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieterich, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    A formal course in physics is increasingly becoming a standard requirement in the high school curriculum. With that dissemination comes the challenge of reaching and motivating a population that is more diverse in their academic abilities and intrinsic motivation. The abstract nature of pure physics is often made more accessible when motivated by examples from everyday life, and providing copious mathematical as well as conceptual examples has become standard practice in high school physics textbooks. Astronomy is a naturally captivating subject and astronomical examples are often successful in capturing the curiosity of high school students as well as the general population. This project seeks to diversify the range of pedagogical materials available to the high school physics instructor by compiling and publishing specific examples where an astronomical concept can be used to motivate the physics curriculum. This collection of examples will consist of both short problems suitable for daily homework assignments as well as longer project style activities. Collaborations are encouraged and inquiries should be directed to sdieterich at carnegiescience dot edu.This work is funded by the NSF Astronomy and Astrophysics Postdoctoral Fellowship Program through NSF grant AST-1400680.

  13. 26 CFR 1.663(c)-5 - Examples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Examples. Section 663(c) may be illustrated by the following examples: Example 1. (i) A single trust was..., subchapter J, chapter 1 of the Code, and the regulations thereunder. Example 2. (i) Facts. Testator, who dies..., respectively. Example 3. The facts are the same as in Example 2, except that in 2000 the executor makes...

  14. 26 CFR 1.663(c)-5 - Examples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Examples. Section 663(c) may be illustrated by the following examples: Example 1. (i) A single trust was..., subchapter J, chapter 1 of the Code, and the regulations thereunder. Example 2. (i) Facts. Testator, who dies..., respectively. Example 3. The facts are the same as in Example 2, except that in 2000 the executor makes...

  15. 26 CFR 1.663(c)-5 - Examples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Examples. Section 663(c) may be illustrated by the following examples: Example 1. (i) A single trust was..., subchapter J, chapter 1 of the Code, and the regulations thereunder. Example 2. (i) Facts. Testator, who dies..., respectively. Example 3. The facts are the same as in Example 2, except that in 2000 the executor makes...

  16. 26 CFR 1.663(c)-5 - Examples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Examples. Section 663(c) may be illustrated by the following examples: Example 1. (i) A single trust was..., subchapter J, chapter 1 of the Code, and the regulations thereunder. Example 2. (i) Facts. Testator, who dies..., respectively. Example 3. The facts are the same as in Example 2, except that in 2000 the executor makes...

  17. Enantioselective Michael Addition of Water

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bi-Shuang; Resch, Verena; Otten, Linda G; Hanefeld, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    The enantioselective Michael addition using water as both nucleophile and solvent has to date proved beyond the ability of synthetic chemists. Herein, the direct, enantioselective Michael addition of water in water to prepare important β-hydroxy carbonyl compounds using whole cells of Rhodococcus strains is described. Good yields and excellent enantioselectivities were achieved with this method. Deuterium labeling studies demonstrate that a Michael hydratase catalyzes the water addition exclusively with anti-stereochemistry. PMID:25529526

  18. Tutorial examples for uncertainty quantification methods.

    SciTech Connect

    De Bord, Sarah

    2015-08-01

    This report details the work accomplished during my 2015 SULI summer internship at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, CA. During this internship, I worked on multiple tasks with the common goal of making uncertainty quantification (UQ) methods more accessible to the general scientific community. As part of my work, I created a comprehensive numerical integration example to incorporate into the user manual of a UQ software package. Further, I developed examples involving heat transfer through a window to incorporate into tutorial lectures that serve as an introduction to UQ methods.

  19. Interesting examples of supervised continuous variable systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chase, Christopher; Serrano, Joe; Ramadge, Peter

    1990-01-01

    The authors analyze two simple deterministic flow models for multiple buffer servers which are examples of the supervision of continuous variable systems by a discrete controller. These systems exhibit what may be regarded as the two extremes of complexity of the closed loop behavior: one is eventually periodic, the other is chaotic. The first example exhibits chaotic behavior that could be characterized statistically. The dual system, the switched server system, exhibits very predictable behavior, which is modeled by a finite state automaton. This research has application to multimodal discrete time systems where the controller can choose from a set of transition maps to implement.

  20. Gasoline additives, emissions, and performance

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The papers included in this publication deal with the influence of fuel, additive, and hardware changes on a variety of vehicle performance characteristics. Advanced techniques for measuring these performance parameters are also described. Contents include: Fleet test evaluation of gasoline additives for intake valve and combustion chamber deposit clean up; A technique for evaluating octane requirement additives in modern engines on dynamometer test stands; A fleet test of two additive technologies comparing their effects on tailpipe emissions; Investigation into the vehicle exhaust emissions of high percentage ethanol blends; Variability in hydrocarbon speciation measurements at low emission (ULEV) levels; and more.

  1. Color Addition and Subtraction Apps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Frances; Ruiz, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Color addition and subtraction apps in HTML5 have been developed for students as an online hands-on experience so that they can more easily master principles introduced through traditional classroom demonstrations. The evolution of the additive RGB color model is traced through the early IBM color adapters so that students can proceed step by step…

  2. 75 FR 27313 - Proposed Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-14

    ... FROM PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED PROCUREMENT LIST Proposed Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed additions to the... or Severely Disabled, Jefferson Plaza 2, Suite 10800, 1421 Jefferson Davis Highway,...

  3. 48 CFR 225.504 - Evaluation examples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Evaluation examples. 225.504 Section 225.504 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS FOREIGN ACQUISITION Evaluating Foreign Offers-Supply...

  4. 48 CFR 225.504 - Evaluation examples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Evaluation examples. 225.504 Section 225.504 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS FOREIGN ACQUISITION Evaluating Foreign Offers-Supply...

  5. 48 CFR 225.504 - Evaluation examples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Evaluation examples. 225.504 Section 225.504 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS FOREIGN ACQUISITION Evaluating Foreign Offers-Supply...

  6. 48 CFR 225.504 - Evaluation examples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Evaluation examples. 225.504 Section 225.504 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS FOREIGN ACQUISITION Evaluating Foreign Offers-Supply...

  7. 48 CFR 225.504 - Evaluation examples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Evaluation examples. 225.504 Section 225.504 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS FOREIGN ACQUISITION Evaluating Foreign Offers-Supply...

  8. Jarzynski's Equality Illustrated by Simple Examples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hijar, Humberto; Ortiz de Zarate, Jose M.

    2010-01-01

    The Jarzynski theorem is perhaps the most recently discovered simple general formula in elementary statistical physics. In this paper, written with a pedagogical aim, we illustrate the physical concepts under the Jarzynski and related results by a detailed calculation with a representative example. The physics of the model is sufficiently…

  9. "Upbuilding Examples" for Adults Close to Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wivestad, Stein M.

    2013-01-01

    Both in formal situations (as school teachers, football trainers, etc.) and in many, often unpredictable informal situations (both inside and outside institutions)--adults come close to children. Whether we intend it or not, we continually give them examples of what it is to live as a human being, and thereby we have a pedagogical responsibility.…

  10. USEPA EXAMPLE EXIT LEVEL ANALYSIS RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Developed by NERL/ERD for the Office of Solid Waste, the enclosed product provides an example uncertainty analysis (UA) and initial process-based sensitivity analysis (SA) of hazardous waste "exit" concentrations for 7 chemicals and metals using the 3MRA Version 1.0 Modeling Syst...

  11. Diversity in the Classroom: Gender Related Examples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Martin G.; Peterson, Trudie K.

    To explore the possibility that the gender make-up of a class may predict the gender specificity of the language used by instructors, a study examined Graduate Teaching Assistants (GTA) and the number of gender examples they used. Subjects were eight graduate teaching assistants instructing a basic speech communication course and seven GTAs…

  12. 26 CFR 301.9000-6 - Examples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Examples. 301.9000-6 Section 301.9000-6 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION General Rules Application of Internal Revenue Laws §...

  13. 14 CFR Appendix - Example of SIFL Adjustment

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Example of SIFL Adjustment Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) POLICY STATEMENTS... 121 121 Passenger operating expense 14,833 2,294 17,127 17,462 Passenger fuel cost 11 4,103...

  14. 14 CFR Appendix - Example of SIFL Adjustment

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Example of SIFL Adjustment Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) POLICY STATEMENTS... 121 121 Passenger operating expense 14,833 2,294 17,127 17,462 Passenger fuel cost 11 4,103...

  15. 14 CFR Appendix - Example of SIFL Adjustment

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Example of SIFL Adjustment Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) POLICY STATEMENTS... 121 121 Passenger operating expense 14,833 2,294 17,127 17,462 Passenger fuel cost 11 4,103...

  16. 26 CFR 801.7 - Examples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... FOR MEASURING ORGANIZATIONAL AND EMPLOYEE PERFORMANCE WITHIN THE INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE § 801.7..., and employee satisfaction. Results are updated monthly to reflect how each organizational unit is..., and development of techniques of the case based upon a review of the case file. Example 4....

  17. 26 CFR 801.7 - Examples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... FOR MEASURING ORGANIZATIONAL AND EMPLOYEE PERFORMANCE WITHIN THE INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE § 801.7..., and employee satisfaction. Results are updated monthly to reflect how each organizational unit is..., and development of techniques of the case based upon a review of the case file. Example 4....

  18. 26 CFR 801.7 - Examples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... FOR MEASURING ORGANIZATIONAL AND EMPLOYEE PERFORMANCE WITHIN THE INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE § 801.7..., and employee satisfaction. Results are updated monthly to reflect how each organizational unit is..., and development of techniques of the case based upon a review of the case file. Example 4....

  19. 26 CFR 801.7 - Examples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... FOR MEASURING ORGANIZATIONAL AND EMPLOYEE PERFORMANCE WITHIN THE INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE § 801.7..., and employee satisfaction. Results are updated monthly to reflect how each organizational unit is..., and development of techniques of the case based upon a review of the case file. Example 4....

  20. Writing Integrative Literature Reviews: Guidelines and Examples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torraco, Richard J.

    2005-01-01

    The integrative literature review is a distinctive form of research that generates new knowledge about the topic reviewed. Little guidance is available on how to write an integrative literature review. This article discusses how to organize and write an integrative literature review and cites examples of published integrative literature reviews…

  1. Regression Analysis by Example. 5th Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chatterjee, Samprit; Hadi, Ali S.

    2012-01-01

    Regression analysis is a conceptually simple method for investigating relationships among variables. Carrying out a successful application of regression analysis, however, requires a balance of theoretical results, empirical rules, and subjective judgment. "Regression Analysis by Example, Fifth Edition" has been expanded and thoroughly…

  2. 10 CFR 1706.9 - Examples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Examples. 1706.9 Section 1706.9 Energy DEFENSE NUCLEAR... Board contractor studying the potential for a chemical explosion in waste tanks at a defense nuclear facility advises the Board that it has been offered a contract with DOE to study the chemical...

  3. 42 CFR 408.26 - Examples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... one full 12-month period. Mr. V's monthly premium, will be increased by 10 percent. Example 3. Ms. N... above the regular rate, beginning July 1968, the first month of her SMI coverage. Ms. N fails to pay the... end of her grace period. Ms. N enrolls for a second time in January 1971. The months to be included...

  4. 42 CFR 408.26 - Examples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... one full 12-month period. Mr. V's monthly premium, will be increased by 10 percent. Example 3. Ms. N... above the regular rate, beginning July 1968, the first month of her SMI coverage. Ms. N fails to pay the... end of her grace period. Ms. N enrolls for a second time in January 1971. The months to be included...

  5. 42 CFR 408.26 - Examples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... one full 12-month period. Mr. V's monthly premium, will be increased by 10 percent. Example 3. Ms. N... above the regular rate, beginning July 1968, the first month of her SMI coverage. Ms. N fails to pay the... end of her grace period. Ms. N enrolls for a second time in January 1971. The months to be included...

  6. 42 CFR 408.26 - Examples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... one full 12-month period. Mr. V's monthly premium, will be increased by 10 percent. Example 3. Ms. N... above the regular rate, beginning July 1968, the first month of her SMI coverage. Ms. N fails to pay the... end of her grace period. Ms. N enrolls for a second time in January 1971. The months to be included...

  7. 42 CFR 408.26 - Examples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... one full 12-month period. Mr. V's monthly premium, will be increased by 10 percent. Example 3. Ms. N... above the regular rate, beginning July 1968, the first month of her SMI coverage. Ms. N fails to pay the... end of her grace period. Ms. N enrolls for a second time in January 1971. The months to be included...

  8. Magnetic Force and Work: An Accessible Example

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gates, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    Despite their physics instructors' arguments to the contrary, introductory students can observe situations in which there seems to be compelling evidence for magnetic force doing work. The counterarguments are often highly technical and require physics knowledge beyond the experience of novice students, however. A simple example is presented…

  9. Computer-Based Information Networks: Selected Examples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardesty, Larry

    The history, purpose, and operation of six computer-based information networks are described in general and nontechnical terms. In the introduction the many definitions of an information network are explored. Ohio College Library Center's network (OCLC) is the first example. OCLC began in 1963, and since early 1973 has been extending its services…

  10. Students' Views of Example Generation Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breen, Sinead; O'Shea, Ann; Pfeiffer, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    We report here on students' views of example generation tasks assigned to them in two first year undergraduate Calculus courses. The design and use of such tasks was undertaken as part of a project which aimed to afford students opportunities to develop their thinking skills and their conceptual understanding. In interviews with 10 students, we…

  11. 14 CFR Appendix - Example of SIFL Adjustment

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Example of SIFL Adjustment Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) POLICY STATEMENTS STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY Policies Relating to Rates and Tariffs Treatment of deferred Federal income taxes for rate purposes. Pt. 399, Subpt....

  12. 14 CFR Appendix - Example of SIFL Adjustment

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Example of SIFL Adjustment Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) POLICY STATEMENTS STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY Policies Relating to Rates and Tariffs Treatment of deferred Federal income taxes for rate purposes. Pt. 399, Subpt....

  13. 26 CFR 1.1368-3 - Examples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Examples. 1.1368-3 Section 1.1368-3 Internal... distribution) is increased from zero to $19 per share ( / 10). Thirty dollars of the distribution is considered... per share ($19- - ). The balance in the AAA is $0, S's earnings and profits are $0, and B's basis...

  14. 26 CFR 1.1368-3 - Examples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Examples. 1.1368-3 Section 1.1368-3 Internal... distribution) is increased from zero to $19 per share ( / 10). Thirty dollars of the distribution is considered... per share ($19- - ). The balance in the AAA is $0, S's earnings and profits are $0, and B's basis...

  15. 26 CFR 1.1368-3 - Examples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Examples. 1.1368-3 Section 1.1368-3 Internal... distribution) is increased from zero to $19 per share ( / 10). Thirty dollars of the distribution is considered... per share ($19- - ). The balance in the AAA is $0, S's earnings and profits are $0, and B's basis...

  16. Microstructural Control of Additively Manufactured Metallic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, P. C.; Brice, D. A.; Samimi, P.; Ghamarian, I.; Fraser, H. L.

    2016-07-01

    In additively manufactured (AM) metallic materials, the fundamental interrelationships that exist between composition, processing, and microstructure govern these materials’ properties and potential improvements or reductions in performance. For example, by using AM, it is possible to achieve highly desirable microstructural features (e.g., highly refined precipitates) that could not otherwise be achieved by using conventional approaches. Simultaneously, opportunities exist to manage macro-level microstructural characteristics such as residual stress, porosity, and texture, the last of which might be desirable. To predictably realize optimal microstructures, it is necessary to establish a framework that integrates processing variables, alloy composition, and the resulting microstructure. Although such a framework is largely lacking for AM metallic materials, the basic scientific components of the framework exist in literature. This review considers these key components and presents them in a manner that highlights key interdependencies that would form an integrated framework to engineer microstructures using AM.

  17. Additive manufacturing: Overview and NDE challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slotwinski, J. A.

    2014-02-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) processes are capable of producing highly complex and customized parts, without the need for dedicated tooling, and can produce parts directly from the part design information. These types of processes are poised to revolutionize the manufacturing industry, yet there are several challenges that are currently preventing more widespread adoption of AM technologies. Traditional Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) methods could be utilized in both in-process and post-process applications to help overcome these challenges, although currently there are very few examples of in-situ sensors for monitoring AM processes. This paper gives an overview of AM technology, and discusses the potential benefits and challenges of using NDE in AM applications.

  18. Children's Understanding of the Relationship between Addition and Subtraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilmore, Camilla K.; Spelke, Elizabeth S.

    2008-01-01

    In learning mathematics, children must master fundamental logical relationships, including the inverse relationship between addition and subtraction. At the start of elementary school, children lack generalized understanding of this relationship in the context of exact arithmetic problems: they fail to judge, for example, that 12 + 9 - 9 yields…

  19. Automatic Element Addition and Deletion in Lens Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xuemin; Wang, Yongtian; Hao, Qun; Sasian, Jose

    2003-03-01

    A mechanism is established for the automatic addition and deletion of optical elements during the course of lens optimization. Two lens-form parameters, quantifying the symmetry of the optical system and the optical-power distribution among the individual lens elements, are used as criteria in this automatic procedure. Design examples are provided that demonstrate the practicability of the scheme.

  20. Color Addition and Subtraction Apps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Frances; Ruiz, Michael J.

    2015-10-01

    Color addition and subtraction apps in HTML5 have been developed for students as an online hands-on experience so that they can more easily master principles introduced through traditional classroom demonstrations. The evolution of the additive RGB color model is traced through the early IBM color adapters so that students can proceed step by step in understanding mathematical representations of RGB color. Finally, color addition and subtraction are presented for the X11 colors from web design to illustrate yet another real-life application of color mixing.

  1. The Columbia Debris Loan Program; Examples of Microscopic Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Rick; Thurston, Scott; Smith, Stephen; Marder, Arnold; Steckel, Gary

    2006-01-01

    Following the tragic loss of the Space Shuttle Columbia NASA formed The Columbia Recovery Office (CRO). The CRO was initially formed at the Johnson Space Center after the conclusion of recovery operations on May 1,2003 and then transferred .to the Kennedy Space Center on October 6,2003 and renamed The Columbia Recovery Office and Preservation. An integral part of the preservation project was the development of a process to loan Columbia debris to qualified researchers and technical educators. The purposes of this program include aiding in the advancement of advanced spacecraft design and flight safety development, the advancement of the study of hypersonic re-entry to enhance ground safety, to train and instruct accident investigators and to establish an enduring legacy for Space Shuttle Columbia and her crew. Along with a summary of the debris loan process examples of microscopic analysis of Columbia debris items will be presented. The first example will be from the reconstruction following the STS- 107 accident and how the Materials and Proessteesa m used microscopic analysis to confirm the accident scenario. Additionally, three examples of microstructural results from the debris loan process from NASA internal, academia and private industry will be presented.

  2. Calculators and Computers: Graphical Addition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spero, Samuel W.

    1978-01-01

    A computer program is presented that generates problem sets involving sketching graphs of trigonometric functions using graphical addition. The students use calculators to sketch the graphs and a computer solution is used to check it. (MP)

  3. Polyolefins as additives in plastics

    SciTech Connect

    Deanin, R.D.

    1993-12-31

    Polyolefins are not only major commodity plastics - they are also very useful as additives, both in other polyolefins and also in other types of plastics. This review covers ethylene, propylene, butylene and isobutylene polymers, in blends with each other, and as additives to natural rubber, styrene/butadiene rubber, polystyrene, polyvinyl chloride, polymethyl methacrylate, polyphenylene oxide, polycarbonate, thermoplastic polyesters, polyurethanes, polyamides, and mixed automotive plastics recycling.

  4. NASTRAN: User experience with four example problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivello, R. M.

    1972-01-01

    Four different structural problems are solved to gain familiarity with the NASTRAN computer program. The problems are: (1) a simply-supported beam subjected to lateral loads, (2) a rotating filamentary composite bar under the action of centrifugal forces, (3) a missile body with aerodynamic, gravitational, and inertial forces, and (4) a square simply-supported plate with in-plane temperature changes capable of buckling the plate. Input and output data are given for each problem. The results are compared with those obtained by other methods. However, except for the examples employing beam elements in which the agreement is excellent, the element breakup chosen for convenience in obtaining program familiarity is too coarse to draw conclusions regarding the program accuracy. The example problems disclosed errors in the plotting and thermal-buckling routines of the program.

  5. Supplier Selection Using Weighted Utility Additive Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karande, Prasad; Chakraborty, Shankar

    2015-10-01

    Supplier selection is a multi-criteria decision-making (MCDM) problem which mainly involves evaluating a number of available suppliers according to a set of common criteria for choosing the best one to meet the organizational needs. For any manufacturing or service organization, selecting the right upstream suppliers is a key success factor that will significantly reduce purchasing cost, increase downstream customer satisfaction and improve competitive ability. The past researchers have attempted to solve the supplier selection problem employing different MCDM techniques which involve active participation of the decision makers in the decision-making process. This paper deals with the application of weighted utility additive (WUTA) method for solving supplier selection problems. The WUTA method, an extension of utility additive approach, is based on ordinal regression and consists of building a piece-wise linear additive decision model from a preference structure using linear programming (LP). It adopts preference disaggregation principle and addresses the decision-making activities through operational models which need implicit preferences in the form of a preorder of reference alternatives or a subset of these alternatives present in the process. The preferential preorder provided by the decision maker is used as a restriction of a LP problem, which has its own objective function, minimization of the sum of the errors associated with the ranking of each alternative. Based on a given reference ranking of alternatives, one or more additive utility functions are derived. Using these utility functions, the weighted utilities for individual criterion values are combined into an overall weighted utility for a given alternative. It is observed that WUTA method, having a sound mathematical background, can provide accurate ranking to the candidate suppliers and choose the best one to fulfill the organizational requirements. Two real time examples are illustrated to prove

  6. INGRID by example: A pictorial tutorial

    SciTech Connect

    Rainsberger, R.

    1988-11-01

    The following examples of INGRID input files and results are from various sources including Doug Stillman. In many cases, they are the same as in the examples section of the INGRID manual by Doug Stillman. I have made some modest improvements so that they are all complete input files to be run with the latest version of INGRID. These files have been attached to the front end of the INGRID source as comments. I wish to invite all INGRID user's to submit any favorite input files to be included in this tutorial. Such an input file should not be too large, and the object being generated should have a natural appeal to INGRID users. Feel free to make suggestions. This tutorial will soon replace the examples section of the manual. The entire manual will be replaced a section at a time. I chose to do this section first, since it could give the most benefit in the shortest amount of time. As soon as I make INGRID interactive, I will then rewrite the section on standard parts.

  7. Query by image example: The CANDID approach

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, P.M.; Cannon, M.; Hush, D.R.

    1995-02-01

    CANDID (Comparison Algorithm for Navigating Digital Image Databases) was developed to enable content-based retrieval of digital imagery from large databases using a query-by-example methodology. A user provides an example image to the system, and images in the database that are similar to that example are retrieved. The development of CANDID was inspired by the N-gram approach to document fingerprinting, where a ``global signature`` is computed for every document in a database and these signatures are compared to one another to determine the similarity between any two documents. CANDID computes a global signature for every image in a database, where the signature is derived from various image features such as localized texture, shape, or color information. A distance between probability density functions of feature vectors is then used to compare signatures. In this paper, the authors present CANDID and highlight two results from their current research: subtracting a ``background`` signature from every signature in a database in an attempt to improve system performance when using inner-product similarity measures, and visualizing the contribution of individual pixels in the matching process. These ideas are applicable to any histogram-based comparison technique.

  8. ADDITIVITY ASSESSMENT OF TRIHALOMETHANE MIXTURES BY PROPORTIONAL RESPONSE ADDITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    If additivity is known or assumed, the toxicity of a chemical mixture may be predicted from the dose response curves of the individual chemicals comprising the mixture. As single chemical data are abundant and mixture data sparse, mixture risk methods that utilize single chemical...

  9. [INVITED] Lasers in additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinkerton, Andrew J.

    2016-04-01

    Additive manufacturing is a topic of considerable ongoing interest, with forecasts predicting it to have major impact on industry in the future. This paper focusses on the current status and potential future development of the technology, with particular reference to the role of lasers within it. It begins by making clear the types and roles of lasers in the different categories of additive manufacturing. This is followed by concise reviews of the economic benefits and disadvantages of the technology, current state of the market and use of additive manufacturing in different industries. Details of these fields are referenced rather than expanded in detail. The paper continues, focusing on current indicators to the future of additive manufacturing. Barriers to its development, trends and opportunities in major industrial sectors, and wider opportunities for its development are covered. Evidence indicates that additive manufacturing may not become the dominant manufacturing technology in all industries, but represents an excellent opportunity for lasers to increase their influence in manufacturing as a whole.

  10. Evaluation of certain food additives.

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of various food additives, including flavouring agents, and to prepare specifications for identity and purity. The first part of the report contains a general discussion of the principles governing the toxicological evaluation of and assessment of dietary exposure to food additives, including flavouring agents. A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of technical, toxicological and dietary exposure data for eight food additives (Benzoe tonkinensis; carrageenan; citric and fatty acid esters of glycerol; gardenia yellow; lutein esters from Tagetes erecta; octenyl succinic acid-modified gum arabic; octenyl succinic acid-modified starch; paprika extract; and pectin) and eight groups of flavouring agents (aliphatic and alicyclic hydrocarbons; aliphatic and aromatic ethers; ionones and structurally related substances; miscellaneous nitrogen-containing substances; monocyclic and bicyclic secondary alcohols, ketones and related esters; phenol and phenol derivatives; phenyl-substituted aliphatic alcohols and related aldehydes and esters; and sulfur-containing heterocyclic compounds). Specifications for the following food additives were revised: citric acid; gellan gum; polyoxyethylene (20) sorbitan monostearate; potassium aluminium silicate; and Quillaia extract (Type 2). Annexed to the report are tables summarizing the Committee's recommendations for dietary exposures to and toxicological evaluations of all of the food additives and flavouring agents considered at this meeting. PMID:26118220

  11. Manipulating crystallization with molecular additives.

    PubMed

    Shtukenberg, Alexander G; Lee, Stephanie S; Kahr, Bart; Ward, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    Given the importance of organic crystals in a wide range of industrial applications, the chemistry, biology, materials science, and chemical engineering communities have focused considerable attention on developing methods to control crystal structure, size, shape, and orientation. Tailored additives have been used to control crystallization to great effect, presumably by selectively binding to particular crystallographic surfaces and sites. However, substantial knowledge gaps still exist in the fundamental mechanisms that govern the formation and growth of organic crystals in both the absence and presence of additives. In this review, we highlight research discoveries that reveal the role of additives, either introduced by design or present adventitiously, on various stages of formation and growth of organic crystals, including nucleation, dislocation spiral growth mechanisms, growth inhibition, and nonclassical crystal morphologies. The insights from these investigations and others of their kind are likely to guide the development of innovative methods to manipulate crystallization for a wide range of materials and applications. PMID:24579880

  12. Tougher Addition Polyimides Containing Siloxane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Clair, T. L.; Maudgal, S.

    1986-01-01

    Laminates show increased impact resistances and other desirable mechanical properties. Bismaleamic acid extended by reaction of diaminosiloxane with maleic anhydride in 1:1 molar ratio, followed by reaction with half this molar ratio of aromatic dianhydride. Bismaleamic acid also extended by reaction of diaminosiloxane with maleic anhydride in 1:2 molar ratio, followed by reaction with half this molar ratio of aromatic diamine (Michael-addition reaction). Impact resistances improved over those of unmodified bismaleimide, showing significant increase in toughness. Aromatic addition polyimides developed as both matrix and adhesive resins for applications on future aircraft and spacecraft.

  13. Additional Language Education and Language Development Goals: The Example of Gaelic (Learners) Education in Highland Council, Scotland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dombrowski, Lindsay Milligan

    2014-01-01

    Language shift is the process whereby one language becomes increasingly lesser used in place of the use of another language. In Scotland, language shift is occurring for Gaelic, as English takes its place for a variety of functions in the home and wider community. Extensive literature has argued the important role that education can play in the…

  14. Out of bounds additive manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Holshouser, Chris; Newell, Clint; Palas, Sid; Love, Lonnie J.; Kunc, Vlastimil; Lind, Randall F.; Lloyd, Peter D.; Rowe, John C.; Blue, Craig A.; Duty, Chad E.; Peter, William H.; Dehoff, Ryan R.

    2013-03-01

    Lockheed Martin and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are working on an additive manufacturing system capable of manufacturing components measured not in terms of inches or feet, but multiple yards in all dimensions with the potential to manufacture parts that are completely unbounded in size.

  15. The Additive Property of Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsaoussis, Dimitris S.

    1995-01-01

    Presents exercises that analyze the additive property of energy. Concludes that if a body has more than one component of energy depending on the same physical quantity, the body's total energy will be the algebraic sum of the components if a linear relationship exists between the energy components and that physical quantity. (JRH)

  16. Tinkertoy Color-Addition Device.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Joe L.

    1995-01-01

    Describes construction and use of a simple home-built device, using an overhead projector, for use in demonstrations of the addition of various combinations of red, green, and blue light. Useful in connection with discussions of color, color vision, or color television. (JRH)

  17. Silage Additives and Management Issues

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inoculants are the most common silage additives in the United States. These products contain lactic acid bacteria to supplement the lactic acid bacteria naturally on the crop and help insure a consistent fermentation in the silo. There are three types of inoculants: homofermentative lactic acid bact...

  18. Tetrasulfide extreme pressure lubricant additives

    SciTech Connect

    Gast, L.E.; Kenney, H.E.; Schwab, A.W.

    1980-08-19

    A novel class of compounds has been prepared comprising the tetrasulfides of /sup 18/C hydrocarbons, /sup 18/C fatty acids, and /sup 18/C fatty and alkyl and triglyceride esters. These tetrasulfides are useful as extreme pressure lubricant additives and show potential as replacements for sulfurized sperm whale oil.

  19. Promoting Additive Acculturation in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Margaret A.

    1995-01-01

    A study focusing on 113 ninth graders of Mexican descent indicates that most students and their parents adhere to a strategy of additive acculturation (incorporating skills of the new culture and language), but that the school curriculum and general school climate devalue Mexican culture. (SLD)

  20. Individualized Additional Instruction for Calculus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takata, Ken

    2010-01-01

    College students enrolling in the calculus sequence have a wide variance in their preparation and abilities, yet they are usually taught from the same lecture. We describe another pedagogical model of Individualized Additional Instruction (IAI) that assesses each student frequently and prescribes further instruction and homework based on the…

  1. Evaluation of certain food additives.

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of various food additives, including flavouring agents, with a view to concluding as to safety concerns and to preparing specifications for identity and purity. The first part of the report contains a general discussion of the principles governing the toxicological evaluation of and assessment of dietary exposure to food additives, including flavouring agents. A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of technical, toxicological and dietary exposure data for five food additives (magnesium dihydrogen diphosphate; mineral oil (medium and low viscosity) classes II and III; 3-phytase from Aspergillus niger expressed in Aspergillus niger; serine protease (chymotrypsin) from Nocardiopsis prasina expressed in Bacillus licheniformis; and serine protease (trypsin) from Fusarium oxysporum expressed in Fusarium venenatum) and 16 groups of flavouring agents (aliphatic and aromatic amines and amides; aliphatic and aromatic ethers; aliphatic hydrocarbons, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and related esters, sulfides, disulfides and ethers containing furan substitution; aliphatic linear alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes, acids and related alcohols, acetals and esters; amino acids and related substances; epoxides; furfuryl alcohol and related substances; linear and branched-chain aliphatic, unsaturated, unconjugated alcohols, aldehydes, acids and related esters; miscellaneous nitrogen-containing substances; phenol and phenol derivatives; pyrazine derivatives; pyridine, pyrrole and quinoline derivatives; saturated aliphatic acyclic branched-chain primary alcohols, aldehydes and acids; simple aliphatic and aromatic sulfides and thiols; sulfur-containing heterocyclic compounds; and sulfur-substituted furan derivatives). Specifications for the following food additives were revised: ethyl cellulose, mineral oil (medium viscosity), modified starches and titanium

  2. Model reference adaptive systems some examples.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landau, I. D.; Sinner, E.; Courtiol, B.

    1972-01-01

    A direct design method is derived for several single-input single-output model reference adaptive systems (M.R.A.S.). The approach used helps to clarify the various steps involved in a design, which utilizes the hyperstability concept. An example of a multiinput, multioutput M.R.A.S. is also discussed. Attention is given to the problem of a series compensator. It is pointed out that a series compensator which contains derivative terms must generally be introduced in the adaptation mechanism in order to assure asymptotic hyperstability. Results obtained by the simulation of a M.R.A.S. on an analog computer are also presented.

  3. Practical algorithmic probability: an image inpainting example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potapov, Alexey; Scherbakov, Oleg; Zhdanov, Innokentii

    2013-12-01

    Possibility of practical application of algorithmic probability is analyzed on an example of image inpainting problem that precisely corresponds to the prediction problem. Such consideration is fruitful both for the theory of universal prediction and practical image inpaiting methods. Efficient application of algorithmic probability implies that its computation is essentially optimized for some specific data representation. In this paper, we considered one image representation, namely spectral representation, for which an image inpainting algorithm is proposed based on the spectrum entropy criterion. This algorithm showed promising results in spite of very simple representation. The same approach can be used for introducing ALP-based criterion for more powerful image representations.

  4. Amorphous computing: examples, mathematics and theory.

    PubMed

    Stark, W Richard

    2013-01-01

    The cellular automata model was described by John von Neumann and his friends in the 1950s as a representation of information processing in multicellular tissue. With crystalline arrays of cells and synchronous activity, it missed the mark (Stark and Hughes, BioSystems 55:107-117, 2000). Recently, amorphous computing, a valid model for morphogenesis in multicellular information processing, has begun to fill the void. Through simple examples and elementary mathematics, this paper begins a computation theory for this important new direction. PMID:23946719

  5. Planetary Protection: Two Relevant Terrestrial Examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chyba, C.

    2002-09-01

    Concerns about potential pathogens in returned samples from Mars ("Mars Sample Return: Issues and Recommendations", National Research Council, 1997) or planetary satellites ("Evaluating the Biological Potential in Samples Returned from Planetary Satellites and Small Solar System Bodies", National Research Council, 1998) focus on two potential types of pathogenesis, toxic and infectious. The National Research Council reports cited above state that the chances of extraterrestrial organisms proving either toxic or infectious to humans are extremely low, but cannot be entirely ruled out. Here I discuss recently discovered terrestrial examples relevant to each possibility, in order to make these concerns concrete. The first example concerns the production of hepatotoxins (toxins affecting the liver) and neurotoxins by cyanobacteria in glacial lakes on alpine pastures in Switzerland. In this example, mat-forming benthic cyanobacteria are implicated in a hundred cattle poisonings that have been reported from alpine pasteurs in southeastern Switzerland over the past twenty-five years (e.g. K. Mez et al, Hydrobiologia 368, 1-15 (1998)). It is unlikely that these cyanobacteria evolved the toxins in response to dairy cows; rather the susceptibility of cattle to these toxins seems simply to be an unfortunate coincidence of a toxin working across a large evolutionary distance. The second example concerns the recent demonstration that the decimation of shallow-water Caribbean elkhorn coral is due to infection by a common fecal enterobacterium associated with the human gut (K. L. Patterson et al., PNAS 99, 8725-8730 (2002)). The bacterium, Serratia marcenscens, is also a free-living microbe in water and soil, as well as an opportunistic pathogen in a variety of animal species. The distance between humans and corals emphasizes the possibility that certain organisms may prove pathogenic across a wide evolutionary divide. Of course, in neither of these cases are the evolutionary

  6. Truly random number generation: an example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frauchiger, Daniela; Renner, Renato

    2013-10-01

    Randomness is crucial for a variety of applications, ranging from gambling to computer simulations, and from cryptography to statistics. However, many of the currently used methods for generating randomness do not meet the criteria that are necessary for these applications to work properly and safely. A common problem is that a sequence of numbers may look random but nevertheless not be truly random. In fact, the sequence may pass all standard statistical tests and yet be perfectly predictable. This renders it useless for many applications. For example, in cryptography, the predictability of a "andomly" chosen password is obviously undesirable. Here, we review a recently developed approach to generating true | and hence unpredictable | randomness.

  7. [Janusz Korczak: an example of unlimited devotion].

    PubMed

    Urdaneta Carruyo, Eliéxer; Dairy Salcedo, Roxani

    2014-12-01

    Janusz Korczak was a prominent educator and humanist of the twentieth century. His ideas for reforming the education of children inspired generations of teachers and still remain valid. His main contribution was to introduce the pedagogical principle of autonomy, in order that the child be starring in their actions and accountable for their decisions, and in turn, he was respected as a person by their teachers. His heroic and touching life was a song of hope and love to abandoned children and his memory will live on as an example of devotion without limit. PMID:25643893

  8. Decontamination formulation with sorbent additive

    DOEpatents

    Tucker; Mark D. , Comstock; Robert H.

    2007-10-16

    A decontamination formulation and method of making that neutralizes the adverse health effects of both chemical and biological compounds, especially chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents, and toxic industrial chemicals. The formulation provides solubilizing compounds that serve to effectively render the chemical and biological compounds, particularly CW and BW compounds, susceptible to attack, and at least one reactive compound that serves to attack (and detoxify or kill) the compound. The formulation includes at least one solubilizing agent, a reactive compound, a bleaching activator, a sorbent additive, and water. The highly adsorbent, water-soluble sorbent additive (e.g., sorbitol or mannitol) is used to "dry out" one or more liquid ingredients, such as the liquid bleaching activator (e.g., propylene glycol diacetate or glycerol diacetate) and convert the activator into a dry, free-flowing powder that has an extended shelf life, and is more convenient to handle and mix in the field.

  9. Finding Feasible Abstract Counter-Examples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasareanu, Corina S.; Dwyer, Matthew B.; Visser, Willem; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A strength of model checking is its ability to automate the detection of subtle system errors and produce traces that exhibit those errors. Given the high computational cost of model checking most researchers advocate the use of aggressive property-preserving abstractions. Unfortunately, the more aggressively a system is abstracted the more infeasible behavior it will have. Thus, while abstraction enables efficient model checking it also threatens the usefulness of model checking as a defect detection tool, since it may be difficult to determine whether a counter-example is feasible and hence worth developer time to analyze. We have explored several strategies for addressing this problem by extending an explicit-state model checker, Java PathFinder (JPF), to search for and analyze counter-examples in the presence of abstractions. We demonstrate that these techniques effectively preserve the defect detection ability of model checking in the presence of aggressive abstraction by applying them to check properties of several abstracted multi-threaded Java programs. These new capabilities are not specific to JPF and can be easily adapted to other model checking frameworks; we describe how this was done for the Bandera toolset.

  10. Induction Cell Design Tradeoffs and Examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reginato, Louis L.; Briggs*, Richard J.

    A brief history of induction accelerator development was covered in Chap. 2 10.1007/978-3-642-13917-8_2". The induction accelerators constructed since the early 1960s can be categorized as short-pulse if the pulse duration is less than 100 ns and long-pulse if it is longer. The distinction between short-pulse and long-pulse is arbitrary; it mainly reflects the type of magnetic material that was typically used in the cell. Examples of short-pulse induction accelerators are the electron ring accelerator (ERA, Δ t=30 ns) [1], the advanced test accelerator (ATA, Δ t=70 ns) [2] and the experimental test accelerator (ETA-II, Δ t=70 ns) [3]. Examples of long-pulse accelerators are the Astron (Δ t=400 ns) [4, 5] and the second axis of the dual axis radiographic hydro test accelerator (DARHT-II, Δ t=2{,}000 ns) [6]. In this chapter the cell design of several of these accelerators will be described in detail. We will discuss how the physics, economics, and space requirements often lead to a non-optimum design from the accelerator systems vantage point. Although modulators are covered in Chap. 4 10.1007/978-3-642-13917-8_4, some specific designs will be discussed on how the constant voltage (flat-top) was achieved in concert with the cell design and compensation network .

  11. Induction Cell Design Tradeoffs and Examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reginato, Louis L.; Briggs*, Richard J.

    A brief history of induction accelerator development was covered in Chap. 2. The induction accelerators constructed since the early 1960s can be categorized as short-pulse if the pulse duration is less than 100 ns and long-pulse if it is longer. The distinction between short-pulse and long-pulse is arbitrary; it mainly reflects the type of magnetic material that was typically used in the cell. Examples of short-pulse induction accelerators are the electron ring accelerator (ERA, Δ t=30 ns) [1], the advanced test accelerator (ATA, Δ t=70 ns) [2] and the experimental test accelerator (ETA-II, Δ t=70 ns) [3]. Examples of long-pulse accelerators are the Astron (Δ t=400 ns) [4, 5] and the second axis of the dual axis radiographic hydro test accelerator (DARHT-II, Δ t=2{,}000 ns) [6]. In this chapter the cell design of several of these accelerators will be described in detail. We will discuss how the physics, economics, and space requirements often lead to a non-optimum design from the accelerator systems vantage point. Although modulators are covered in Chap. 4 , some specific designs will be discussed on how the constant voltage (flat-top) was achieved in concert with the cell design and compensation network .

  12. Robust stability under additive perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhaya, A.; Desoer, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    A MIMO linear time-invariant feedback system 1S(P,C) is considered which is assumed to be U-stable. The plant P is subjected to an additive perturbation Delta P which is proper but not necessarily stable. It is proved that the perturbed system is U-stable if and only if Delta P(I + Q x Delta P) exp -1 is U-stable.

  13. Evaluation of certain food additives.

    PubMed

    2009-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of various food additives, including flavouring agents, with a view to recommending acceptable daily intakes (ADIs) and to preparing specifications for identity and purity. The first part of the report contains a general discussion of the principles governing the toxicological evaluation and assessment of intake of food additives (in particular, flavouring agents). A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of technical, toxicological and intake data for certain food additives (asparaginase from Aspergillus niger expressed in A. niger, calcium lignosulfonate (40-65), ethyl lauroyl arginate, paprika extract, phospholipase C expressed in Pichia pastoris, phytosterols, phytostanols and their esters, polydimethylsiloxane, steviol glycosides and sulfites [assessment of dietary exposure]) and 10 groups of related flavouring agents (aliphatic branched-chain saturated and unsaturated alcohols, aldehydes, acids and related esters; aliphatic linear alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes, acids and related alcohols, acetals and esters; aliphatic secondary alcohols, ketones and related esters; alkoxy-substituted allylbenzenes present in foods and essential oils and used as flavouring agents; esters of aliphatic acyclic primary alcohols with aliphatic linear saturated carboxylic acids; furan-substituted aliphatic hydrocarbons, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and related esters, sulfides, disulfides and ethers; miscellaneous nitrogen-containing substances; monocyclic and bicyclic secondary alcohols, ketones and related esters; hydroxy- and alkoxy-substituted benzyl derivatives; and substances structurally related to menthol). Specifications for the following food additives were revised: canthaxanthin; carob bean gum and carob bean gum (clarified); chlorophyllin copper complexes, sodium and potassium salts; Fast Green FCF; guar gum and guar gum (clarified

  14. IO &Amalthea: Examples of acting wave processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemasov, G.

    Io and Amalthea and their "warm" yielding surfaces seem to be specially suitable for a demonstration of warping action of standing inertia-gravity waves sculpturing planetary surfaces and shaping bodies. "Orbits make structures". This fundamental finding seriously changing our understanding of origin of shapes and tectonic building of celestial bodies was demonstrated on many occasions. As examples were taken small and larger planets (solid and gaseous), Sun, small and large satellites, asteroids and comets (the recently acquired Borrelli's pictures are particularly revealing!).One circumstance which is universal and extremely important is the fact that all celestial bodies move in several orbits. In this respect satellites are of great interest because only in our Galaxy they have 3 orbits: around planets, Sun and the galactic center. All orbits induce their structures. The galactic orbit common to all bodies of the Solar system makes them through a wave modulation tectonically dichotomic (a trace of the fundamental wave). This fundamental wave as the lower side frequency appears in any body. The higher side frequencies also appear in any body and are in the ranges of microwaves and radiowaves depending on bodies dimensions and orbital frequencies [1]. In Io's case the galactic frequency 1/~200 000 000 y. modulates the circumsolar fr. 1/12 y. and the circumjovian fr. 1/1.769 days making oscillations with wavelengths 68 cm and 0.276 mm. For smaller and faster Amalthea these wavelengths are shorter: 4.88 cm and 0.0056 mm. Such a "microwave stove" heating, affecting the whole volume of a body, might be partially responsible for extraheat issued by these satellites. Yielding Amalthea's body is probably the best example in the Solar system clearly demonstrating its diamond - like shape produced by an interference of wave 2 warpings superimposed on the global convexo-concave shape (wave 1 feature). Not enough sharp images of its surface show however regularly crossing

  15. When Does an Argument Use a Generic Example?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yopp, David A.; Ely, Rob

    2016-01-01

    We offer criteria that an observer can use to determine whether an argument that uses an example to argue for a general claim appeals to that example generically. We review existing literature on generic example and note the strengths of each contribution, as well as inconsistencies among uses of the term. We offer several examples from the…

  16. 26 CFR 1.642(h)-5 - Example.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Example. 1.642(h)-5 Section 1.642(h)-5 Internal... TAXES (CONTINUED) Estates, Trusts, and Beneficiaries § 1.642(h)-5 Example. The application of section 642(h) may be illustrated by the following example: Example. (a) A decedent dies January 31,...

  17. 26 CFR 1.642(h)-5 - Example.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Example. 1.642(h)-5 Section 1.642(h)-5 Internal... TAXES (CONTINUED) Estates, Trusts, and Beneficiaries § 1.642(h)-5 Example. The application of section 642(h) may be illustrated by the following example: Example. (a) A decedent dies January 31,...

  18. 26 CFR 1.642(h)-5 - Example.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Example. 1.642(h)-5 Section 1.642(h)-5 Internal... TAXES (CONTINUED) Estates, Trusts, and Beneficiaries § 1.642(h)-5 Example. The application of section 642(h) may be illustrated by the following example: Example. (a) A decedent dies January 31,...

  19. 12 CFR 1016.2 - Model privacy form and examples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Model privacy form and examples. 1016.2 Section... INFORMATION (REGULATION P) § 1016.2 Model privacy form and examples. (a) Model privacy form. Use of the model... model privacy form is not required. (b) Examples. The examples in this part are not...

  20. 12 CFR 1016.2 - Model privacy form and examples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Model privacy form and examples. 1016.2 Section... INFORMATION (REGULATION P) § 1016.2 Model privacy form and examples. (a) Model privacy form. Use of the model... model privacy form is not required. (b) Examples. The examples in this part are not...

  1. 12 CFR 1016.2 - Model privacy form and examples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Model privacy form and examples. 1016.2 Section... INFORMATION (REGULATION P) § 1016.2 Model privacy form and examples. (a) Model privacy form. Use of the model... model privacy form is not required. (b) Examples. The examples in this part are not...

  2. 26 CFR 1.663(c)-5 - Examples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... Section 663(c) may be illustrated by the following examples: Example 1. (i) A single trust was created in... of the Code, and the regulations thereunder. Example 2. (i) Facts. Testator, who dies in 2000, is... surviving spouse and the trust must include in gross income $7,200 and $4,800, respectively. Example 3....

  3. 26 CFR 1.642(h)-5 - Example.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Example. 1.642(h)-5 Section 1.642(h)-5 Internal... TAXES (CONTINUED) Estates, Trusts, and Beneficiaries § 1.642(h)-5 Example. The application of section 642(h) may be illustrated by the following example: Example. (a) A decedent dies January 31,...

  4. Geometry of KDV (2): three examples

    SciTech Connect

    McKean, H.P.

    1987-03-01

    Let Q be a 1-dimensional Schroedinger operator with spectrum bounded from - infinity. By addition I mean a map of the form Q ..-->.. Q' = Q - 2D/sup 2/1g e with Qe = lambdae, lambda to the left of spec Q, and either integral/sub - infinity//sup 0/ e/sup 2/ or integral/sub 0//sup infinity/ e/sup 2/ finite. The additive class of Q is obtained by composite addition and a subsequent closure; it is a substitute for the KDV invariant manifold even if the individual KDV flows have no existence. KDV(1) = McKean (1987) suggested that the additive class of Q is the same as its unimodular spectral class defined in terms of the 2 x 2 spectral weight dF by fixing (a) the measure class of dF, and (b) the value of ..sqrt..det dF. The present paper verifies this for (1) the scattering case, (2) Hill's case, and (3) when the additive class is finite-dimensional (Neumann case).

  5. Water based drilling mud additive

    SciTech Connect

    McCrary, J.L.

    1983-12-13

    A water based fluid additive useful in drilling mud used during drilling of an oil or gas well is disclosed, produced by reacting water at temperatures between 210/sup 0/-280/sup 0/ F. with a mixture comprising in percent by weight: gilsonite 25-30%, tannin 7-15%, lignite 25-35%, sulfonating compound 15-25%, water soluble base compound 5-15%, methylene-yielding compound 1-5%, and then removing substantially all of the remaining water to produce a dried product.

  6. Additional evidence of Mercurian volcanism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trask, N.J.; Strom, R.G.

    1976-01-01

    Evidence concerned with (1) the character and distribution of terrain surrounding fresh basins, (2) albedo, color and temporal differences between a basin rim and smooth plains on its floor, and (3) the stratigraphic relations and local distribution of smooth plains in the hilly and lineated terrain are cited as additional evidence for an internal origin of much of the Mercurian smooth plains. Altough the question of Mercurian volcanism should be kept open, this evidence together with that presented in an earlier paper suggests that volcanism occurred on Mercury early in its history. ?? 1976.

  7. Individualized additional instruction for calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takata, Ken

    2010-10-01

    College students enrolling in the calculus sequence have a wide variance in their preparation and abilities, yet they are usually taught from the same lecture. We describe another pedagogical model of Individualized Additional Instruction (IAI) that assesses each student frequently and prescribes further instruction and homework based on the student's performance. Our study compares two calculus classes, one taught with mandatory remedial IAI and the other without. The class with mandatory remedial IAI did significantly better on comprehensive multiple-choice exams, participated more frequently in classroom discussion and showed greater interest in theorem-proving and other advanced topics.

  8. Metal Additive Manufacturing: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frazier, William E.

    2014-06-01

    This paper reviews the state-of-the-art of an important, rapidly emerging, manufacturing technology that is alternatively called additive manufacturing (AM), direct digital manufacturing, free form fabrication, or 3D printing, etc. A broad contextual overview of metallic AM is provided. AM has the potential to revolutionize the global parts manufacturing and logistics landscape. It enables distributed manufacturing and the productions of parts-on-demand while offering the potential to reduce cost, energy consumption, and carbon footprint. This paper explores the material science, processes, and business consideration associated with achieving these performance gains. It is concluded that a paradigm shift is required in order to fully exploit AM potential.

  9. Noncommutative ordered spaces: examples and counterexamples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besnard, Fabien

    2015-07-01

    In order to introduce the notion of causality in noncommutative geometry, it is necessary to extend Gelfand theory to the context of ordered spaces. In a previous work we have already given an algebraic characterization of the set of non-decreasing continuous functions on a certain class of topological ordered spaces. Such a set is called an isocone, and there exist at least two versions of them (strong and weak) which coincide in the commutative case. In this paper, we introduce yet another breed of isocones, ultraweak isocones, which has a simpler definition with a clear physical meaning. We show that ultraweak and weak isocones are in fact the same, and completely classify those that live in a finite-dimensional {C}*-algebra, hence corresponding to finite noncommutative ordered spaces. We also give some examples in infinite dimension.

  10. Screening tests: a review with examples

    PubMed Central

    Niebo, Ron; Utell, Mark J.

    2014-01-01

    Screening tests are widely used in medicine to assess the likelihood that members of a defined population have a particular disease. This article presents an overview of such tests including the definitions of key technical (sensitivity and specificity) and population characteristics necessary to assess the benefits and limitations of such tests. Several examples are used to illustrate calculations, including the characteristics of low dose computed tomography as a lung cancer screen, choice of an optimal PSA cutoff and selection of the population to undergo mammography. The importance of careful consideration of the consequences of both false positives and negatives is highlighted. Receiver operating characteristic curves are explained as is the need to carefully select the population group to be tested. PMID:25264934

  11. Noodle-map chaos - A simple example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roessler, O. E.; Hudson, J. L.; Farmer, J. D.

    Chaos-generating folded two-dimensional maps can be generalized to higher dimensions in two ways: as folded-towel (or pancake) maps and as bent-walking-stick (or noddle) maps. The noodle case is of mathematical interest because the topologically one-dimensional attractors involved may, despite their thinness, be of the 'non-sink' type (that is, stand in a bijective relation to their domain of attraction). Moreover, Shtern recently showed that the well-known Kaplan-Yorke conjecture on the fractal dimensionality of chaotic attractors may fail in the case of noodle maps. We present here an explicit 3-variable noodle map with constant divergence (constant Jacobian determinant). The example is a higher analogue to the Henon diffeomorphism. A map of similar shape was recently found experimentally by Rob Shaw in a study of the irregularly dripping faucet.

  12. Experimental Mathemataics: Examples, Methods andImplications

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, David H.; Borwein, Jonathan M.

    2005-01-31

    Recent years have seen the flowering of ''experimental'' mathematics, namely the utilization of modern computer technology as an active tool in mathematical research. This development is not limited to a handful of researchers, nor to a handful of universities, nor is it limited to one particular field of mathematics. Instead, it involves hundreds of individuals, at many different institutions, who have turned to the remarkable new computational tools now available to assist in their research, whether it be in number theory, algebra, analysis, geometry or even topology. These tools are being used to work out specific examples, generate plots, perform various algebraic and calculus manipulations, test conjectures, and explore routes to formal proof. Using computer tools to test conjectures is by itself a major time saver for mathematicians, as it permits them to quickly rule out false notions.

  13. Are earthquakes an example of deterministic chaos?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Jie; Turcotte, Donald L.

    1990-01-01

    A simple mass-spring model is used to systematically examine the dynamical behavior introduced by fault zone heterogeneities. The model consists of two sliding blocks coupled to each other and to a constant velocity driver by elastic springs. The state of this system can be characterized by the positions of the two blocks relative to the driver. A simple static/dynamic friction law is used. When the system is symmetric, cyclic behavior is observed. For an asymmetric system, where the frictional forces for the two blocks are not equal, the solutions exhibit deterministic chaos. Chaotic windows occur repeatedly between regions of limit cycles on bifurcation diagrams. The model behavior is similar to that of the one-dimensional logistic map. The results provide substantial evidence that earthquakes are an example of deterministic chaos.

  14. Hinduism and death with dignity: historic and contemporary case examples.

    PubMed

    Dewar, Rajan; Cahners, Nancy; Mitchell, Christine; Forrow, Lachlan

    2015-01-01

    An estimated 1.2 to 2.3 million Hindus live in the United States. End-of-life care choices for a subset of these patients may be driven by religious beliefs. In this article, we present Hindu beliefs that could strongly influence a devout person's decisions about medical care, including end-of-life care. We provide four case examples (one sacred epic, one historical example, and two cases from current practice) that illustrate Hindu notions surrounding pain and suffering at the end of life. Chief among those is the principle of karma, through which one reaps the benefits and penalties for past deeds. Deference to one's spouse or family is another important Hindu value, especially among Hindu women, which can impact the decision-making process and challenge the Western emphasis on autonomy. In addition, the Hindu embrace of astrology can lead to a desire to control the exact time of death. Confounding any generalizations, a Hindu patient may reject or accept treatments based on the individual patient's or family's interpretation of any given tradition. Through an awareness of some of the fundamental practices in Hinduism and the role of individual interpretation within the tradition, clinicians will be better able to support their Hindu patients and families at the end of life. PMID:25794293

  15. Friction Stir Additive Manufacturing: Route to High Structural Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanivel, S.; Sidhar, H.; Mishra, R. S.

    2015-03-01

    Aerospace and automotive industries provide the next big opportunities for additive manufacturing. Currently, the additive industry is confronted with four major challenges that have been identified in this article. These challenges need to be addressed for the additive technologies to march into new frontiers and create additional markets. Specific potential success in the transportation sectors is dependent on the ability to manufacture complicated structures with high performance. Most of the techniques used for metal-based additive manufacturing are fusion based because of their ability to fulfill the computer-aided design to component vision. Although these techniques aid in fabrication of complex shapes, achieving high structural performance is a key problem due to the liquid-solid phase transformation. In this article, friction stir additive manufacturing (FSAM) is shown as a potential solid-state process for attaining high-performance lightweight alloys for simpler geometrical applications. To illustrate FSAM as a high-performance route, manufactured builds of Mg-4Y-3Nd and AA5083 are shown as examples. In the Mg-based alloy, an average hardness of 120 HV was achieved in the built structure and was significantly higher than that of the base material (97 HV). Similarly for the Al-based alloy, compared with the base hardness of 88 HV, the average built hardness was 104 HV. A potential application of FSAM is illustrated by taking an example of a simple stiffener assembly.

  16. Ignoring connectivity: examples, reasons and consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Nikolaus J.; Greenwood, Philipp

    2013-04-01

    Connectivity in landscapes varies strongly with climate and land use. Drylands and humid regions show distinct differences in runoff generation connectivity, soil erosion and sediment deposition across hillslopes. While the driving agent of erosion, rainfall, is greater in humid regions, the lack of vegetation and soil cover often leads to greater runoff ratios and erosion in drylands. However, these effects are not linear because the controlling factors of the hillslope processes vary on different spatial scales. Rainfall can be considered to be fairly uniform on a given slope. However, patterns of infiltration capacity differ: on humid region slopes a more or less continuously evolving catena of soil development leads to gradual changes along a slope. In drylands, on the other hand, patterns of infiltration are often determined by the structure of the underlying rocks and the positive feedbacks for soil development and vegetation induced by these patterns. Similar to climate, land use introduces both barriers and pathways to runoff, erosion and sediment transfer. Examples include furrows surrounding cropland after ploughing, trampling paths on mountain pastures or change of slope morphology caused by long-term tillage. As a consequence, indices used to assess hillslope hydrology and geomorphology have to be adapted to the different set of controlling factors. Failing to do so can lead to erroneous observations of runoff coefficients or erosion rates, in particular when plots are installed disregarding the spatial scale of the surface properties controlling runoff and erosion. Similarly, modelling approaches that do not reflect these properties deliver, at best, the right results for the wrong reasons. This study illustrates a couple of (anonymous) examples where surface properties relevant for connectivity have been ignored and attempts to explore the reasons and consequences of such ignorance.

  17. Additive manufacturing of RF absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Matthew S.

    The ability of additive manufacturing techniques to fabricate integrated electromagnetic absorbers tuned for specific radio frequency bands within structural composites allows for unique combinations of mechanical and electromagnetic properties. These composites and films can be used for RF shielding of sensitive electromagnetic components through in-plane and out-of-plane RF absorption. Structural composites are a common building block of many commercial platforms. These platforms may be placed in situations in which there is a need for embedded RF absorbing properties along with structural properties. Instead of adding radar absorbing treatments to the external surface of existing structures, which adds increased size, weight and cost; it could prove to be advantageous to integrate the microwave absorbing properties directly into the composite during the fabrication process. In this thesis, a method based on additive manufacturing techniques of composites structures with prescribed electromagnetic loss, within the frequency range 1 to 26GHz, is presented. This method utilizes screen printing and nScrypt micro dispensing to pattern a carbon based ink onto low loss substrates. The materials chosen for this study will be presented, and the fabrication technique that these materials went through to create RF absorbing structures will be described. The calibration methods used, the modeling of the RF structures, and the applications in which this technology can be utilized will also be presented.

  18. High Flow Addition Curing Polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuang, Kathy C.; Vannucci, Raymond D.; Ansari, Irfan; Cerny, Lawrence L.; Scheiman, Daniel A.

    1994-01-01

    A new series of high flow PMR-type addition curing polyimides was developed, which employed the substitution of 2,2'-bis (trifluoromethyl) -4,4'-diaminobiphenyl (BTDB) for p-phenylenediamine (p -PDA) in a PMR-IL formulation. These thermoset polyimides, designated as 12F resins, were prepared from BTDB and the dimethyl ester of 4,4'- (hexafluo- roisopropylidene) -diphthalic acid (HFDE) with either nadic ester (NE) or p-aminostyrene (PAS) as the endcaps for addition curing. The 12F prepolymers displayed lower melting temperatures in DSC analysis, and higher melt flow in rheological studies than the cor- responding PMR-11 polyimides. Long-term isothermal aging studies showed that BTDB- based 12F resins exhibited comparable thermo-oxidative stability to P-PDA based PMR-11 polyimides. The noncoplanar 2- and 2'-disubstituted biphenyldiamine (BTDB) not only lowered the melt viscosities of 12F prepolymers, but also retained reasonable thermal sta- bility of the cured resins. The 12F polyimide resin with p-aminostyrene endcaps showed the best promise for long-term, high-temperature application at 343 C (650 F).

  19. Evaluation of integrated data sets: four examples. [Uranium deposits (exploration)

    SciTech Connect

    Bolivar, S.L.; Freeman, S.B.; Weaver, T.A.

    1982-01-01

    Several large data sets have been integrated and utilized for rapid evaluation on a reconnaissance scale for the Montrose 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ quadrangle, Colorado. The data sets include Landsat imagery, hydrogeochemical and stream sediment analyses, airborne geophysical data, known mineral occurrences, and a geologic map. All data sets were registered to a 179 x 119 rectangular grid and projected onto Universal Transverse Mercator coordinates. A grid resolution of 1 km was used. All possible combinations of three, for most data sets, were examined for general geologic correlations by utilizing a color microfilm output. In addition, gray-level pictures of statistical output, e.g., factor analysis, have been employed to aid evaluations. Examples for the data sets dysprosium-calcium, lead-copper-zinc, and equivalent uranium-uranium in water-uranium in sediment are described with respect to geologic applications, base-metal regimes, and geochemical associations.

  20. SAC-C mission, an example of international cooperation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colomb, F. R.; Alonso, C.; Hofmann, C.; Nollmann, I.

    2004-01-01

    The SAC-C is an international Earth observing satellite mission developed as a partnership between CONAE and NASA, with additional support in instrumentation and satellite development from the Danish DSRI, the Italian ASI, the French CNES and the Brazilian INPE. The SAC-C satellite was successfully launched by a Delta II rocket on November 21, 2000, from Vandenberg AFB, California, USA. The purpose of this mission is to carry out observations which bear interest both for the USA and Argentina, thus contributing effectively to NASA's Earth Science Program and to CONAE's National Space Program. The inclusion of SAC-C in the "morning constellation", jointly with NASA satellites Landsat 7, EO 1 and Terra, is another example of an important international cooperation which strengthens the output of any single mission.

  1. Actinide-Catalyzed Intermolecular Addition of Alcohols to Carbodiimides.

    PubMed

    Batrice, Rami J; Kefalidis, Christos E; Maron, Laurent; Eisen, Moris S

    2016-02-24

    The unprecedented actinide-catalyzed addition of alcohols to carbodiimides is presented. This represents a rare example of thorium-catalyzed transformations of an alcoholic substrate and the first example of uranium complexes showing catalytic reactivity with alcohols. Using the uranium and thorium amides U[N(SiMe3)2]3 and [(Me3Si)2N]2An[κ(2)-(N,C)-CH2Si(CH3)2N(SiMe3)] (An = Th or U), alcohol additions to unsaturated carbon-nitrogen bonds are achieved in short reaction times with excellent selectivities and high to excellent yields. Computational studies, supported by experimental thermodynamic data, suggest plausible models of the profile of the reaction which allow the system to overcome the high barrier of scission of the actinide-oxygen bond. Accompanied by experimentally determined kinetic parameters, a plausible mechanism is proposed for the catalytic cycle. PMID:26844823

  2. 26 CFR 1.825-3 - Examples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... TAXES Mutual Insurance Companies (other Than Life and Certain Marine Insurance Companies and Other Than...), has the following items: Taxable investment income 1 Underwriting loss 59 Addition to protection against loss account 8 Statutory underwriting loss 67 The subtractions from the protection against...

  3. Coordination Complexes of Decamethylytterbocene with4,4'-Disubstituted Bipyridines: An Experimental Study of Spin Coupling inLanthanide Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, Marc D.; Berg, David J.; Andersen, Richard A.

    2005-12-08

    The paramagnetic 1:1 coordination complexes of (C5Me5)2Ybwith a series of 4,4'-disubstituted bipyridines, bipy-X, where X is Me,tert-Bu, OMe, Ph, CO2Me, and CO2Et have been prepared. All of thecomplexes are paramagnetic and the values of the magnetic susceptibilityas a function of temperature show that these values are less thanexpected for the cation, [(C5Me5)2Yb(III)(bipy-X)]+, which have beenisolated as the cation-anion ion-pairs[(C5Me5)2Yb(III)(bipy-X)]+[(C5Me5)2YbI2]f fnfn where X is CO2Et, OMe andMe. The 1H NMR chemical shifts (293 K) for the methine resonances locatedat the 6,6' site in the bipy-X ring show a linear relationship with thevalues of chiT (300 K) for the neutral complexes which illustrates thatthe molecular behavior does not depend upon the phase with one exception,viz., (C5Me5)2Yb(bipy-Me). Single crystals of the 4,4'-dimethylbipyridinecomplex undergo an irreversible, abrupt first order phase change at 228 Kthat shatters the single crystals. The magnetic susceptibility,represented in a delta vs. T plot, on this complex, in polycrystallineform undergoes reversible abrupt changes in the temperature regime 205 -212 K, which is suggested to be due to the way the individual molec ularunits pack in the unit cell. A qualitative model is proposed thataccounts for the sub-normal magnetic moments in theseytterbocene-bipyridine complexes.

  4. An Additive Manufacturing Test Artifact

    PubMed Central

    Moylan, Shawn; Slotwinski, John; Cooke, April; Jurrens, Kevin; Donmez, M Alkan

    2014-01-01

    A test artifact, intended for standardization, is proposed for the purpose of evaluating the performance of additive manufacturing (AM) systems. A thorough analysis of previously proposed AM test artifacts as well as experience with machining test artifacts have inspired the design of the proposed test artifact. This new artifact is designed to provide a characterization of the capabilities and limitations of an AM system, as well as to allow system improvement by linking specific errors measured in the test artifact to specific sources in the AM system. The proposed test artifact has been built in multiple materials using multiple AM technologies. The results of several of the builds are discussed, demonstrating how the measurement results can be used to characterize and improve a specific AM system. PMID:26601039

  5. An Additive Manufacturing Test Artifact.

    PubMed

    Moylan, Shawn; Slotwinski, John; Cooke, April; Jurrens, Kevin; Donmez, M Alkan

    2014-01-01

    A test artifact, intended for standardization, is proposed for the purpose of evaluating the performance of additive manufacturing (AM) systems. A thorough analysis of previously proposed AM test artifacts as well as experience with machining test artifacts have inspired the design of the proposed test artifact. This new artifact is designed to provide a characterization of the capabilities and limitations of an AM system, as well as to allow system improvement by linking specific errors measured in the test artifact to specific sources in the AM system. The proposed test artifact has been built in multiple materials using multiple AM technologies. The results of several of the builds are discussed, demonstrating how the measurement results can be used to characterize and improve a specific AM system. PMID:26601039

  6. SIPSEY WILDERNESS AND ADDITIONS, ALABAMA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schweinfurth, Stanley P.; Mory, Peter C.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of geologic, geochemical, and mineral surveys the Sipsey Wilderness and additions are deemed to have little promise for the occurrence of metallic mineral resources. Although limestone, shale, and sandstone resources that occur in the area are physically suitable for a variety of uses, similar materials are available outside the area closer to transportation routes and potential markets. A small amount of coal has been identified in the area, occurring as nonpersistent beds less than 28 in. thick. Oil and (or) natural gas resources may be present if suitable structural traps exist in the subsurface. Therefore, the area has a probable oil and gas potential. Small amounts of asphaltic sandstone and limestone, commonly referred to as tar sands, may also occur in the subsurface. 5 refs.

  7. A novel addition polyimide adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, T. L.; Progar, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    An addition polyimide adhesive, LARC 13, was developed which shows promise for bonding both titanium and composites for applications which require service temperatures in excess of 533 K. The LARC 13 is based on an oligomeric bis nadimide containing a meta linked aromatic diamine. The adhesive melts prior to polymerization due to its oligomeric nature, thereby allowing it to be processed at 344 kPa or less. Therefore, LARC 13 is ideal for the bonding of honeycomb sandwich structures. After melting, the resin thermosets during the cure of the nadic endcaps to a highly crosslinked system. Few volatiles are evolved, thus allowing large enclosed structures to be bonded. Preparation of the adhesive as well as bonding, aging, and testing of lap shear and honeycomb samples are discussed.

  8. Optics of progressive addition lenses.

    PubMed

    Sheedy, J E; Buri, M; Bailey, I L; Azus, J; Borish, I M

    1987-02-01

    The optical characteristics of the major progressive addition lenses were measured using an automated lensometer with a specially designed lens holder to simulate eye rotation. Measurements were made every 3 degrees (about 1.5 mm) and graphs of isospherical equivalent lines and isocylinder lines were developed. Generally the near zone of these lenses is narrower and lower than in bifocal or trifocal lenses. Distinct differences exist between the various progressive lenses. The width of the near zone, rate of power progression, amount of unwanted cylinder (level with the distance center), and clarity of the distance zone are compared for the various lenses. The optical measurements demonstrate an apparent trade-off between the size of the cylinder-free area of the lens and the amount of the cylinder. PMID:3826294

  9. Addition polyimide end cap study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, T. L.

    1980-01-01

    The characterization of addition polyimides with various end caps for adhesive applications at 120-250 C environments is discussed. Oligometric polyimides were prepared from 3,3',4,4'-benzophenone tetracarboxylic dianhydride and 3,3'-methylenedianiline which were end-capped with functionally reactive moities which cause crosslinking when the oligomers are heated to 200-400 C. The syntheses of the oligomers are outlined. The thermolysis of the oligomers was studied by differential scanning calorimetry and the resulting polymers were characterized by differential thermal analysis and adhesive performance. The adhesive data include lap shear strengths on titanium 6-4 adherends both before and after aging for 1000 hours at 121 C and/or 232 C.

  10. Adverse reactions to food additives.

    PubMed

    Simon, R A

    1986-01-01

    There are thousands of agents that are intentionally added to the food that we consume. These include preservatives, stabilizers, conditioners, thickeners, colorings, flavorings, sweeteners, antioxidants, etc. etc. Yet only a surprisingly small number have been associated with hypersensitivity reactions. Amongst all the additives, FD&C dyes have been most frequently associated with adverse reactions. Tartrazine is the most notorious of them all; however, critical review of the medical literature and current Scripps Clinic studies would indicate that tartrazine has been confirmed to be at best only occasionally associated with flares of urticaria or asthma. There is no convincing evidence in the literature of reactivity to the other azo or nonazo dyes. This can also be said of BHA/BHT, nitrites/nitrates and sorbates. Parabens have been shown to elicit IgE mediated hypersensitivity reactions when used as pharmaceutical preservatives; however, as with the other additives noted above, ingested parabens have only occasionally been associated with adverse reactions. MSG, the cause of the 'Chinese restaurant syndrome' has only been linked to asthma in one report. Sulfiting agents used primarily as food fresheners and to control microbial growth in fermented beverages have been established as the cause of any where from mild to severe and even fatal reactions in at least 5% of the asthmatic population. Other reactions reported to follow sulfite ingestion include anaphylaxis, gastro intestinal complaints and dermatological eruptions. The prevalence of these non asthmatic reactions is unknown. The mechanism of sulfite sensitive asthma is also unknown but most likely involves hyperreactivity to inhale SO2 in the great majority of cases; however, there are reports of IgE mediated reactions and other sulfite sensitive asthmatics have been found with low levels of sulfite oxidase; necessary to oxidize endogenous sulfite to sulfate. PMID:3302664