Science.gov

Sample records for deconvolution analysis tool

  1. Analysis of Connected Climate Systems via Deconvolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemzadeh-Atoufi, M. B.; Reischmann, E.; Rial, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Deconvolution is a technique most often used in signal and image processing to remove the effects of a system's impulse response and recreate the input signal from a given output. In the context of paleoclimate, deconvolution by spectral division has been used to recover the climate system's impulse response, also known as its transfer function, given the δ18O time series record of the north pole as the input and the south as the output (or vice versa). The working hypothesis of polar synchronization justifies the use of deconvolution methods. Various regularization approaches and spectral analysis show a clear connection of millennial scale periodicity linking the polar climates over the past 100,000 years. Tests of spectral peak consistency across regularization factors and of peak validity indicate that the connection is a result of the data and is not an artifact of the method used. Deconvolution can be applied to other linearly connected climate systems including teleconnected systems. Sea surface temperature dipoles found in the North Atlantic Ocean basin, for example, also display potentially geographically linked features, and correlation between the dipoles themselves suggests synchronization of adjacent dipoles. Having identified this system of synchronized variations with linear phase relations, deconvolution methods can be used to investigate potential transfer functions across different scales.

  2. DECONV-TOOL: An IDL based deconvolution software package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varosi, F.; Landsman, W. B.

    1992-01-01

    There are a variety of algorithms for deconvolution of blurred images, each having its own criteria or statistic to be optimized in order to estimate the original image data. Using the Interactive Data Language (IDL), we have implemented the Maximum Likelihood, Maximum Entropy, Maximum Residual Likelihood, and sigma-CLEAN algorithms in a unified environment called DeConv_Tool. Most of the algorithms have as their goal the optimization of statistics such as standard deviation and mean of residuals. Shannon entropy, log-likelihood, and chi-square of the residual auto-correlation are computed by DeConv_Tool for the purpose of determining the performance and convergence of any particular method and comparisons between methods. DeConv_Tool allows interactive monitoring of the statistics and the deconvolved image during computation. The final results, and optionally, the intermediate results, are stored in a structure convenient for comparison between methods and review of the deconvolution computation. The routines comprising DeConv_Tool are available via anonymous FTP through the IDL Astronomy User's Library.

  3. Importance of FTIR Spectra Deconvolution for the Analysis of Amorphous Calcium Phosphates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brangule, Agnese; Agris Gross, Karlis

    2015-03-01

    This work will consider Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy - diffuse reflectance infrared reflection (FTIR-DRIFT) for collecting the spectra and deconvolution to identify changes in bonding as a means of more powerful detection. Spectra were recorded from amorphous calcium phosphate synthesized by wet precipitation, and from bone. FTIR-DRIFT was used to study the chemical environments of PO4, CO3 and amide. Deconvolution of spectra separated overlapping bands in the ʋ4PO4, ʋ2CO3, ʋ3CO3 and amide region allowing a more detailed analysis of changes at the atomic level. Amorphous calcium phosphate dried at 80 oC, despite showing an X-ray diffraction amorphous structure, displayed carbonate in positions resembling a carbonated hydroxyapatite. Additional peaks were designated as A1 type, A2 type or B type. Deconvolution allowed the separation of CO3 positions in bone from amide peaks. FTIR-DRIFT spectrometry in combination with deconvolution offers an advanced tool for qualitative and quantitative determination of CO3, PO4 and HPO4 and shows promise to measure the degree of order.

  4. Deconvolution of variability and uncertainty in the Cassini safety analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampas, Frank J.; Loughin, Stephen

    1998-01-01

    The standard method for propagation of uncertainty in a risk analysis requires rerunning the risk calculation numerous times with model parameters chosen from their uncertainty distributions. This was not practical for the Cassini nuclear safety analysis, due to the computationally intense nature of the risk calculation. A less computationally intense procedure was developed which requires only two calculations for each accident case. The first of these is the standard ``best-estimate'' calculation. In the second calculation, variables and parameters change simultaneously. The mathematical technique of deconvolution is then used to separate out an uncertainty multiplier distribution, which can be used to calculate distribution functions at various levels of confidence.

  5. Deconvolution Program

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1999-02-18

    The program is suitable for a lot of applications in applied mathematics, experimental physics, signal analytical system and some engineering applications range i.e. deconvolution spectrum, signal analysis and system property analysis etc.

  6. Facilitating high resolution mass spectrometry data processing for screening of environmental water samples: An evaluation of two deconvolution tools.

    PubMed

    Bade, Richard; Causanilles, Ana; Emke, Erik; Bijlsma, Lubertus; Sancho, Juan V; Hernandez, Felix; de Voogt, Pim

    2016-11-01

    A screening approach was applied to influent and effluent wastewater samples. After injection in a LC-LTQ-Orbitrap, data analysis was performed using two deconvolution tools, MsXelerator (modules MPeaks and MS Compare) and Sieve 2.1. The outputs were searched incorporating an in-house database of >200 pharmaceuticals and illicit drugs or ChemSpider. This hidden target screening approach led to the detection of numerous compounds including the illicit drug cocaine and its metabolite benzoylecgonine and the pharmaceuticals carbamazepine, gemfibrozil and losartan. The compounds found using both approaches were combined, and isotopic pattern and retention time prediction were used to filter out false positives. The remaining potential positives were reanalysed in MS/MS mode and their product ions were compared with literature and/or mass spectral libraries. The inclusion of the chemical database ChemSpider led to the tentative identification of several metabolites, including paraxanthine, theobromine, theophylline and carboxylosartan, as well as the pharmaceutical phenazone. The first three of these compounds are isomers and they were subsequently distinguished based on their product ions and predicted retention times. This work has shown that the use deconvolution tools facilitates non-target screening and enables the identification of a higher number of compounds. PMID:27351148

  7. Use of new spectral analysis methods in gamma spectra deconvolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinault, Jean Louis

    1991-07-01

    A general deconvolution method applicable to X and gamma ray spectrometry is proposed. Using new spectral analysis methods, it is applied to an actual case: the accurate on-line analysis of three elements (Ca, Si, Fe) in a cement plant using neutron capture gamma rays. Neutrons are provided by a low activity (5 μg) 252Cf source; the detector is a BGO 3 in. × 8 in. scintillator. The principle of the method rests on the Fourier transform of the spectrum. The search for peaks and determination of peak areas are worked out in the Fourier representation, which enables separation of background and peaks and very efficiently discriminates peaks, or elements represented by several peaks. First the spectrum is transformed so that in the new representation the full width at half maximum (FWHM) is independent of energy. Thus, the spectrum is arranged symmetrically and transformed into the Fourier representation. The latter is multiplied by a function in order to transform original Gaussian into Lorentzian peaks. An autoregressive filter is calculated, leading to a characteristic polynomial whose complex roots represent both the location and the width of each peak, provided that the absolute value is lower than unit. The amplitude of each component (the area of each peak or the sum of areas of peaks characterizing an element) is fitted by the weighted least squares method, taking into account that errors in spectra are independent and follow a Poisson law. Very accurate results are obtained, which would be hard to achieve by other methods. The DECO FORTRAN code has been developed for compatible PC microcomputers. Some features of the code are given.

  8. CAM-CM: a signal deconvolution tool for in vivo dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging of complex tissues

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li; Chan, Tsung-Han; Choyke, Peter L.; Hillman, Elizabeth M. C.; Chi, Chong−Yung; Bhujwalla, Zaver M.; Wang, Ge; Wang, Sean S.; Szabo, Zsolt; Wang, Yue

    2011-01-01

    Summary:In vivo dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging tools provide non-invasive methods for analyzing various functional changes associated with disease initiation, progression and responses to therapy. The quantitative application of these tools has been hindered by its inability to accurately resolve and characterize targeted tissues due to spatially mixed tissue heterogeneity. Convex Analysis of Mixtures – Compartment Modeling (CAM-CM) signal deconvolution tool has been developed to automatically identify pure-volume pixels located at the corners of the clustered pixel time series scatter simplex and subsequently estimate tissue-specific pharmacokinetic parameters. CAM-CM can dissect complex tissues into regions with differential tracer kinetics at pixel-wise resolution and provide a systems biology tool for defining imaging signatures predictive of phenotypes. Availability: The MATLAB source code can be downloaded at the authors′ website www.cbil.ece.vt.edu/software.htm Contact: yuewang@vt.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:21785131

  9. Richardson-Lucy deconvolution as a general tool for combining images with complementary strengths

    PubMed Central

    Ingaramo, Maria; York, Andrew G.; Hoogendoorn, Eelco; Postma, Marten; Shroff, Hari

    2014-01-01

    We use Richardson-Lucy (RL) deconvolution to combine multiple images of a simulated object into a single image in the context of modern fluorescence microscopy techniques. RL deconvolution can merge images with very different point spread functions, such as in multiview light-sheet microscopes [1, 2], while preserving the best resolution information present in each image. We show RL deconvolution is also easily applied to merge high-resolution, high noise images with low-resolution, low noise images, relevant when complementing conventional microscopy with localization microscopy. We also use RL deconvolution to merge images produced via different simulated illumination patterns, relevant to structured illumination microscopy (SIM) [3, 4] and image scanning microscopy (ISM). The quality of our ISM reconstructions are at least as good as standard inversion algorithms for ISM data, but our method follows a simpler recipe that requires no mathematical insight. Finally, we apply RL deconvolution to merge a series of ten images with varying signal and resolution levels. This combination is relevant to gated stimulated-emission depletion (STED) microscopy, and shows that high-quality image merges are possible even in cases where a non-iterative inversion algorithm is unknown. PMID:24436314

  10. Richardson-Lucy deconvolution as a general tool for combining images with complementary strengths.

    PubMed

    Ingaramo, Maria; York, Andrew G; Hoogendoorn, Eelco; Postma, Marten; Shroff, Hari; Patterson, George H

    2014-03-17

    We use Richardson-Lucy (RL) deconvolution to combine multiple images of a simulated object into a single image in the context of modern fluorescence microscopy techniques. RL deconvolution can merge images with very different point-spread functions, such as in multiview light-sheet microscopes,1, 2 while preserving the best resolution information present in each image. We show that RL deconvolution is also easily applied to merge high-resolution, high-noise images with low-resolution, low-noise images, relevant when complementing conventional microscopy with localization microscopy. We also use RL deconvolution to merge images produced by different simulated illumination patterns, relevant to structured illumination microscopy (SIM)3, 4 and image scanning microscopy (ISM). The quality of our ISM reconstructions is at least as good as reconstructions using standard inversion algorithms for ISM data, but our method follows a simpler recipe that requires no mathematical insight. Finally, we apply RL deconvolution to merge a series of ten images with varying signal and resolution levels. This combination is relevant to gated stimulated-emission depletion (STED) microscopy, and shows that merges of high-quality images are possible even in cases for which a non-iterative inversion algorithm is unknown. PMID:24436314

  11. Isotope pattern deconvolution as rising tool for isotope tracer studies in environmental research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irrgeher, Johanna; Zitek, Andreas; Prohaska, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    During the last decade stable isotope tracers have emerged as versatile tool in ecological research. Besides 'intrinsic' isotope tracers caused by the natural variation of isotopes, the intentional introduction of 'extrinsic' enriched stable isotope tracers into biological systems has gained significant interest. Hereby the induced change in the natural isotopic composition of an element allows amongst others for studying the fate and fluxes of metals, trace elements and species in organisms or provides an intrinsic marker or tag of particular biological samples. Due to the shoreless potential of this methodology, the number of publications dealing with applications of isotope (double) spikes as tracers to address research questions in 'real world systems' is constantly increasing. However, some isotope systems like the natural Sr isotopic system, although potentially very powerful for this type of application, are still rarely used, mainly because their adequate measurement/determination poses major analytical challenges; as e.g. Sr is available in significant amounts in natural samples. In addition, biological systems underlie complex processes such as metabolism, adsorption/desorption or oxidation/reduction. As a consequence, classic evaluation approaches such as the isotope dilution mass spectrometry equation are often not applicable because of the unknown amount of tracer finally present in the sample. Isotope pattern deconvolution (IPD), based on multiple linear regression, serves as simplified alternative data processing strategy to double spike isotope dilution calculations. The outstanding advantage of this mathematical tool lies in the possibility of deconvolving the isotope pattern in a spiked sample without knowing the quantities of enriched isotope tracer being incorporated into the natural sample matrix as well as the degree of impurities and species-interconversion (e.g. from sample preparation). Here, the potential of IPD for environmental tracer

  12. PECA: a novel statistical tool for deconvoluting time-dependent gene expression regulation.

    PubMed

    Teo, Guoshou; Vogel, Christine; Ghosh, Debashis; Kim, Sinae; Choi, Hyungwon

    2014-01-01

    Protein expression varies as a result of intricate regulation of synthesis and degradation of messenger RNAs (mRNA) and proteins. Studies of dynamic regulation typically rely on time-course data sets of mRNA and protein expression, yet there are no statistical methods that integrate these multiomics data and deconvolute individual regulatory processes of gene expression control underlying the observed concentration changes. To address this challenge, we developed Protein Expression Control Analysis (PECA), a method to quantitatively dissect protein expression variation into the contributions of mRNA synthesis/degradation and protein synthesis/degradation, termed RNA-level and protein-level regulation respectively. PECA computes the rate ratios of synthesis versus degradation as the statistical summary of expression control during a given time interval at each molecular level and computes the probability that the rate ratio changed between adjacent time intervals, indicating regulation change at the time point. Along with the associated false-discovery rates, PECA gives the complete description of dynamic expression control, that is, which proteins were up- or down-regulated at each molecular level and each time point. Using PECA, we analyzed two yeast data sets monitoring the cellular response to hyperosmotic and oxidative stress. The rate ratio profiles reported by PECA highlighted a large magnitude of RNA-level up-regulation of stress response genes in the early response and concordant protein-level regulation with time delay. However, the contributions of RNA- and protein-level regulation and their temporal patterns were different between the two data sets. We also observed several cases where protein-level regulation counterbalanced transcriptomic changes in the early stress response to maintain the stability of protein concentrations, suggesting that proteostasis is a proteome-wide phenomenon mediated by post-transcriptional regulation. PMID:24229407

  13. Improving the precision of fMRI BOLD signal deconvolution with implications for connectivity analysis.

    PubMed

    Bush, Keith; Cisler, Josh; Bian, Jiang; Hazaroglu, Gokce; Hazaroglu, Onder; Kilts, Clint

    2015-12-01

    An important, open problem in neuroimaging analyses is developing analytical methods that ensure precise inferences about neural activity underlying fMRI BOLD signal despite the known presence of confounds. Here, we develop and test a new meta-algorithm for conducting semi-blind (i.e., no knowledge of stimulus timings) deconvolution of the BOLD signal that estimates, via bootstrapping, both the underlying neural events driving BOLD as well as the confidence of these estimates. Our approach includes two improvements over the current best performing deconvolution approach; 1) we optimize the parametric form of the deconvolution feature space; and, 2) we pre-classify neural event estimates into two subgroups, either known or unknown, based on the confidence of the estimates prior to conducting neural event classification. This knows-what-it-knows approach significantly improves neural event classification over the current best performing algorithm, as tested in a detailed computer simulation of highly-confounded fMRI BOLD signal. We then implemented a massively parallelized version of the bootstrapping-based deconvolution algorithm and executed it on a high-performance computer to conduct large scale (i.e., voxelwise) estimation of the neural events for a group of 17 human subjects. We show that by restricting the computation of inter-regional correlation to include only those neural events estimated with high-confidence the method appeared to have higher sensitivity for identifying the default mode network compared to a standard BOLD signal correlation analysis when compared across subjects. PMID:26226647

  14. Deconvolution analysis in radionuclide quantitation of left-to-right cardiac shunts.

    PubMed

    Alderson, P O; Douglass, K H; Mendenhall, K G; Guadiani, V A; Watson, D C; Links, J M; Wagner, H N

    1979-06-01

    A poor bolus injection results in an unsatisfactory quantitative radionuclide angiocardiogram in as many as 20% of children with possible, left-to-right (L-R) cardiac shunts. Deconvolution analysis was applied to similar studies in experimental animals to determine whether dependence on the input bolus could be minimized. Repeated good-bolus, prolonged (greater than 2.5 sec), or multiple-peak injections were made in four normal dogs and seven dogs with surgically created atrial septal defects (ASD). QP/QS was determined using the gamma function. The mean QP/QS from ten good-bolus studies in each animal was used as the standard for comparison. In five trials in normal animals, where a prolonged or double-peak bolus led to a shunt calculation (QP/QS greater than 1.2 : 1), deconvolution resulted in QP/QS = 1.0. Deconvolution improved shunt quantitation in eight of ten trials in animals that received a prolonged bolus. The correlation between the reference QP/QS and the QP/QS calculated from uncorrected bad bolus studies was only 0.39 (p greater than 0.20). After deconvolution using a low pass filter, the correlation improved significantly (r = 0.77, p less than 0.01). The technique gave inconsistent results with multiple-peak bolus injections. Deconvolution analysis in these studies is useful in preventing normals from being classified as shunts, and in improving shunt quantitation after a prolonged bolus. Clinical testing of this technique in children with suspected L-R shunts seems warranted. PMID:536823

  15. Punch stretching process monitoring using acoustic emission signal analysis. II - Application of frequency domain deconvolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Steven Y.; Dornfeld, David A.; Nickerson, Jackson A.

    1987-01-01

    The coloring effect on the acoustic emission signal due to the frequency response of the data acquisition/processing instrumentation may bias the interpretation of AE signal characteristics. In this paper, a frequency domain deconvolution technique, which involves the identification of the instrumentation transfer functions and multiplication of the AE signal spectrum by the inverse of these system functions, has been carried out. In this way, the change in AE signal characteristics can be better interpreted as the result of the change in only the states of the process. Punch stretching process was used as an example to demonstrate the application of the technique. Results showed that, through the deconvolution, the frequency characteristics of AE signals generated during the stretching became more distinctive and can be more effectively used as tools for process monitoring.

  16. CT-perfusion imaging of the human brain: advanced deconvolution analysis using circulant singular value decomposition.

    PubMed

    Wittsack, H J; Wohlschläger, A M; Ritzl, E K; Kleiser, R; Cohnen, M; Seitz, R J; Mödder, U

    2008-01-01

    According to indicator dilution theory tissue time-concentration curves have to be deconvolved with arterial input curves in order to get valid perfusion results. Our aim was to adapt and validate a deconvolution method originating from magnetic resonance techniques and apply it to the calculation of dynamic contrast enhanced computed tomography perfusion imaging. The application of a block-circulant matrix approach for singular value decomposition renders the analysis independent of tracer arrival time to improve the results. PMID:18029143

  17. Introduction to deconvolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansson, Peter A.

    2005-09-01

    Deconvolution tasks will always lie at the frontier of human knowledge in many fields, almost by definition. Rising in the latter 20th century from near disreputability, first to usefulness, then necessity in some disciplines, the varied techniques of deconvolution have assumed an important role in the scientists tool kit. This talk will trace deconvolutions development with examples, including many ``firsts,'' drawn from spectroscopy, radio astronomy, photography, cell biology, color science and diverse other fields. Following a tutorial introduction, detail will be provided on modern super-resolving methods and lesser known topics such as selected-ordinate image (SORI) processing.

  18. Application of spectral deconvolution and inverse mechanistic modelling as a tool for root cause investigation in protein chromatography.

    PubMed

    Brestrich, Nina; Hahn, Tobias; Hubbuch, Jürgen

    2016-03-11

    In chromatographic protein purification, process variations, aging of columns, or processing errors can lead to deviations of the expected elution behavior of product and contaminants and can result in a decreased pool purity or yield. A different elution behavior of all or several involved species leads to a deviating chromatogram. The causes for deviations are however hard to identify by visual inspection and complicate the correction of a problem in the next cycle or batch. To overcome this issue, a tool for root cause investigation in protein chromatography was developed. The tool combines a spectral deconvolution with inverse mechanistic modelling. Mid-UV spectral data and Partial Least Squares Regression were first applied to deconvolute peaks to obtain the individual elution profiles of co-eluting proteins. The individual elution profiles were subsequently used to identify errors in process parameters by curve fitting to a mechanistic chromatography model. The functionality of the tool for root cause investigation was successfully demonstrated in a model protein study with lysozyme, cytochrome c, and ribonuclease A. Deviating chromatograms were generated by deliberately caused errors in the process parameters flow rate and sodium-ion concentration in loading and elution buffer according to a design of experiments. The actual values of the three process parameters and, thus, the causes of the deviations were estimated with errors of less than 4.4%. Consequently, the established tool for root cause investigation is a valuable approach to rapidly identify process variations, aging of columns, or processing errors. This might help to minimize batch rejections or contribute to an increased productivity. PMID:26879457

  19. A further analysis for the minimum-variance deconvolution filter performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chi, Chong-Yung

    1987-01-01

    Chi and Mendel (1984) analyzed the performance of minimum-variance deconvolution (MVD). In this correspondence, a further analysis of the performance of the MVD filter is presented. It is shown that the MVD filter performs like an inverse filter and a whitening filter as SNR goes to infinity, and like a matched filter as SNR goes to zero. The estimation error of the MVD filter is colored noise, but it becomes white when SNR goes to zero. This analysis also conects the error power-spectral density of the MVD filter with the spectrum of the causal-prediction error filter.

  20. A further analysis for the minimum-variance deconvolution filter performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Chong-Yung

    1987-06-01

    Chi and Mendel (1984) analyzed the performance of minimum-variance deconvolution (MVD). In this correspondence, a further analysis of the performance of the MVD filter is presented. It is shown that the MVD filter performs like an inverse filter and a whitening filter as SNR goes to infinity, and like a matched filter as SNR goes to zero. The estimation error of the MVD filter is colored noise, but it becomes white when SNR goes to zero. This analysis also conects the error power-spectral density of the MVD filter with the spectrum of the causal-prediction error filter.

  1. Application of automated mass spectrometry deconvolution and identification software for pesticide analysis in surface waters.

    PubMed

    Furtula, Vesna; Derksen, George; Colodey, Alan

    2006-01-01

    A new approach to surface water analysis has been investigated in order to enhance the detection of different organic contaminants in Nathan Creek, British Columbia. Water samples from Nathan Creek were prepared by liquid/liquid extraction using dichloromethane (DCM) as an extraction solvent and analyzed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry method in scan mode (GC-MS scan). To increase sensitivity for pesticides detection, acquired scan data were further analyzed by Automated Mass Spectrometry Deconvolution and Identification Software (AMDIS) incorporated into the Agilent Deconvolution Reporting Software (DRS), which also includes mass spectral libraries for 567 pesticides. Extracts were reanalyzed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry single ion monitoring (GC-MS-SIM) to confirm and quantitate detected pesticides. Pesticides: atrazine, dimethoate, diazinone, metalaxyl, myclobutanil, napropamide, oxadiazon, propazine and simazine were detected at three sampling sites on the mainstream of the Nathan Creek. Results of the study are further discussed in terms of detectivity and identification level for each pesticide found. The proposed approach of monitoring pesticides in surface waters enables their detection and identification at trace levels. PMID:17090491

  2. The appended curve technique for deconvolutional analysis--method and validation.

    PubMed

    Juni, J E; Thrall, J H; Froelich, J W; Wiggins, R C; Campbell, D A; Tuscan, M

    1988-01-01

    Deconvolutional analysis (DCA) is useful in correction of organ time activity curves (response function) for variations in blood activity (input function). Despite enthusiastic reports of applications of DCA in renal and cardiac scintigraphy, routine use has awaited an easily implemented algorithm which is insensitive to statistical noise. The matrix method suffers from the propagation of errors in early data points through the entire curve. Curve fitting or constraint methods require prior knowledge of the expected form of the results. DCA by Fourier transforms (FT) is less influenced by single data points but often suffers from high frequency artifacts which result from the abrupt termination of data acquisition at a nonzero value. To reduce this artifact, we extend the input (i) and response curves to three to five times the initial period of data acquisition (P) by appending a smooth low frequency curve with a gradual taper to zero. Satisfactory results have been obtained using a half cosine curve of length 2-3P. The FTs of the input and response I and R, are computed and R/I determined. The inverse FT is performed and the curve segment corresponding to the initial period of acquisition (P) is retained. We have validated this technique in a dog model by comparing the mean renal transit times of 131I-iodohippuran by direct renal artery injection to that calculated by deconvolution of an intravenous injection. The correlation was excellent (r = 0.97, P less than 0.005). The extension of the data curves by appending a low frequency "tail" before DCA reduces the data termination artifact. This method is rapid, simple, and easily implemented on a microcomputer.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3181190

  3. Analysis of force-deconvolution methods in frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Illek, Esther; Giessibl, Franz J

    2012-01-01

    Summary In frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy the direct observable is the frequency shift of an oscillating cantilever in a force field. This frequency shift is not a direct measure of the actual force, and thus, to obtain the force, deconvolution methods are necessary. Two prominent methods proposed by Sader and Jarvis (Sader–Jarvis method) and Giessibl (matrix method) are investigated with respect to the deconvolution quality. Both methods show a nontrivial dependence of the deconvolution quality on the oscillation amplitude. The matrix method exhibits spikelike features originating from a numerical artifact. By interpolation of the data, the spikelike features can be circumvented. The Sader–Jarvis method has a continuous amplitude dependence showing two minima and one maximum, which is an inherent property of the deconvolution algorithm. The optimal deconvolution depends on the ratio of the amplitude and the characteristic decay length of the force for the Sader–Jarvis method. However, the matrix method generally provides the higher deconvolution quality. PMID:22496997

  4. Charge ratio analysis method: approach for the deconvolution of electrospray mass spectra.

    PubMed

    Maleknia, Simin D; Downard, Kevin M

    2005-01-01

    A new method to interpret electrospray mass spectral data based on calculating the ratio of mass-to-charge (m/z) values of multiply charged ions is described. The mass-to-charge ratios of any two multiply charged ions corresponding to a single compound are unique numbers that enable the charge states for each ion to be unequivocally identified. The multiply charged ions in electrospray mass spectra originate from the addition or abstraction of protons, cations, or anions to and from a compound under analysis. In contrast to existing deconvolution processes, the charge ratio analysis method (CRAM), identifies the charge states of multiply charged ions without any prior knowledge of the nature of the charge-carrying species. In the case of high-resolution electrospray mass spectral data, in which multiply charged ions are resolved to their isotopic components, the CRAM is capable of correlating the isotope peaks of different multiply charged ions that share the same isotopic composition. This relative ratio method is illustrated here for electrospray mass spectral data of lysozyme and oxidized ubiquitin recorded at low- to high-mass resolution on quadrupole ion trap and Fourier transform ion cyclotron mass spectrometers, and theoretical data for the protein calmodulin based upon a reported spectrum recorded on the latter. PMID:15623285

  5. Data enhancement and analysis through mathematical deconvolution of signals from scientific measuring instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, G. M.; Rayborn, G. H.; Ioup, J. W.; Ioup, G. E.; Upchurch, B. T.; Howard, S. J.

    1981-01-01

    Mathematical deconvolution of digitized analog signals from scientific measuring instruments is shown to be a means of extracting important information which is otherwise hidden due to time-constant and other broadening or distortion effects caused by the experiment. Three different approaches to deconvolution and their subsequent application to recorded data from three analytical instruments are considered. To demonstrate the efficacy of deconvolution, the use of these approaches to solve the convolution integral for the gas chromatograph, magnetic mass spectrometer, and the time-of-flight mass spectrometer are described. Other possible applications of these types of numerical treatment of data to yield superior results from analog signals of the physical parameters normally measured in aerospace simulation facilities are suggested and briefly discussed.

  6. Toward robust deconvolution of pass-through paleomagnetic measurements: new tool to estimate magnetometer sensor response and laser interferometry of sample positioning accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Hirokuni; Xuan, Chuang; Yamamoto, Yuhji

    2016-07-01

    Pass-through superconducting rock magnetometers (SRM) offer rapid and high-precision remanence measurements for continuous samples that are essential for modern paleomagnetism studies. However, continuous SRM measurements are inevitably smoothed and distorted due to the convolution effect of SRM sensor response. Deconvolution is necessary to restore accurate magnetization from pass-through SRM data, and robust deconvolution requires reliable estimate of SRM sensor response as well as understanding of uncertainties associated with the SRM measurement system. In this paper, we use the SRM at Kochi Core Center (KCC), Japan, as an example to introduce new tool and procedure for accurate and efficient estimate of SRM sensor response. To quantify uncertainties associated with the SRM measurement due to track positioning errors and test their effects on deconvolution, we employed laser interferometry for precise monitoring of track positions both with and without placing a u-channel sample on the SRM tray. The acquired KCC SRM sensor response shows significant cross-term of Z-axis magnetization on the X-axis pick-up coil and full widths of ~46-54 mm at half-maximum response for the three pick-up coils, which are significantly narrower than those (~73-80 mm) for the liquid He-free SRM at Oregon State University. Laser interferometry measurements on the KCC SRM tracking system indicate positioning uncertainties of ~0.1-0.2 and ~0.5 mm for tracking with and without u-channel sample on the tray, respectively. Positioning errors appear to have reproducible components of up to ~0.5 mm possibly due to patterns or damages on tray surface or rope used for the tracking system. Deconvolution of 50,000 simulated measurement data with realistic error introduced based on the position uncertainties indicates that although the SRM tracking system has recognizable positioning uncertainties, they do not significantly debilitate the use of deconvolution to accurately restore high

  7. OEXP Analysis Tools Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, L. Bernard; Wright, Robert L.; Badi, Deborah; Findlay, John T.

    1988-01-01

    This publication summarizes the software needs and available analysis tools presented at the OEXP Analysis Tools Workshop held at the NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia on June 21 to 22, 1988. The objective of the workshop was to identify available spacecraft system (and subsystem) analysis and engineering design tools, and mission planning and analysis software that could be used for various NASA Office of Exploration (code Z) studies, specifically lunar and Mars missions.

  8. Demand Response Analysis Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2012-03-01

    Demand Response Analysis Tool is a software developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. It is initially funded by Southern California Edison. Our goal in developing this tool is to provide an online, useable, with standardized methods, an analysis tool to evaluate demand and demand response performance of commercial and industrial facilities. The tool provides load variability and weather sensitivity analysis capabilities as well as development of various types of baselines. It can be usedmore » by researchers, real estate management firms, utilities, or any individuals who are interested in analyzing their demand and demand response capabilities.« less

  9. Demand Response Analysis Tool

    SciTech Connect

    2012-03-01

    Demand Response Analysis Tool is a software developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. It is initially funded by Southern California Edison. Our goal in developing this tool is to provide an online, useable, with standardized methods, an analysis tool to evaluate demand and demand response performance of commercial and industrial facilities. The tool provides load variability and weather sensitivity analysis capabilities as well as development of various types of baselines. It can be used by researchers, real estate management firms, utilities, or any individuals who are interested in analyzing their demand and demand response capabilities.

  10. MS-DIAL: Data Independent MS/MS Deconvolution for Comprehensive Metabolome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tsugawa, Hiroshi; Cajka, Tomas; Kind, Tobias; Ma, Yan; Higgins, Brendan; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Kanazawa, Mitsuhiro; VanderGheynst, Jean; Fiehn, Oliver; Arita, Masanori

    2015-01-01

    Data-independent acquisition (DIA) in liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) provides more comprehensive untargeted acquisition of molecular data. Here we provide an open-source software pipeline, MS-DIAL, to demonstrate how DIA improves simultaneous identification and quantification of small molecules by mass spectral deconvolution. For reversed phase LC-MS/MS, our program with an enriched LipidBlast library identified total 1,023 lipid compounds from nine algal strains to highlight their chemotaxonomic relationships. PMID:25938372

  11. ATAMM analysis tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Robert; Stoughton, John; Mielke, Roland

    1991-10-01

    Diagnostics software for analyzing Algorithm to Architecture Mapping Model (ATAMM) based concurrent processing systems is presented. ATAMM is capable of modeling the execution of large grain algorithms on distributed data flow architectures. The tool graphically displays algorithm activities and processor activities for evaluation of the behavior and performance of an ATAMM based system. The tool's measurement capabilities indicate computing speed, throughput, concurrency, resource utilization, and overhead. Evaluations are performed on a simulated system using the software tool. The tool is used to estimate theoretical lower bound performance. Analysis results are shown to be comparable to the predictions.

  12. ATAMM analysis tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Robert; Stoughton, John; Mielke, Roland

    1991-01-01

    Diagnostics software for analyzing Algorithm to Architecture Mapping Model (ATAMM) based concurrent processing systems is presented. ATAMM is capable of modeling the execution of large grain algorithms on distributed data flow architectures. The tool graphically displays algorithm activities and processor activities for evaluation of the behavior and performance of an ATAMM based system. The tool's measurement capabilities indicate computing speed, throughput, concurrency, resource utilization, and overhead. Evaluations are performed on a simulated system using the software tool. The tool is used to estimate theoretical lower bound performance. Analysis results are shown to be comparable to the predictions.

  13. Nondestructive 3D confocal laser imaging with deconvolution of seven whole stardust tracks with complementary XRF and quantitative analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, M.; Ebel, D.S.

    2009-03-19

    We present a nondestructive 3D system for analysis of whole Stardust tracks, using a combination of Laser Confocal Scanning Microscopy and synchrotron XRF. 3D deconvolution is used for optical corrections, and results of quantitative analyses of several tracks are presented. The Stardust mission to comet Wild 2 trapped many cometary and ISM particles in aerogel, leaving behind 'tracks' of melted silica aerogel on both sides of the collector. Collected particles and their tracks range in size from submicron to millimeter scale. Interstellar dust collected on the obverse of the aerogel collector is thought to have an average track length of {approx}15 {micro}m. It has been our goal to perform a total non-destructive 3D textural and XRF chemical analysis on both types of tracks. To that end, we use a combination of Laser Confocal Scanning Microscopy (LCSM) and X Ray Florescence (XRF) spectrometry. Utilized properly, the combination of 3D optical data and chemical data provides total nondestructive characterization of full tracks, prior to flattening or other destructive analysis methods. Our LCSM techniques allow imaging at 0.075 {micro}m/pixel, without the use of oil-based lenses. A full textural analysis on track No.82 is presented here as well as analysis of 6 additional tracks contained within 3 keystones (No.128, No.129 and No.140). We present a method of removing the axial distortion inherent in LCSM images, by means of a computational 3D Deconvolution algorithm, and present some preliminary experiments with computed point spread functions. The combination of 3D LCSM data and XRF data provides invaluable information, while preserving the integrity of the samples for further analysis. It is imperative that these samples, the first extraterrestrial solids returned since the Apollo era, be fully mapped nondestructively in 3D, to preserve the maximum amount of information prior to other, destructive analysis.

  14. Independent component analysis (ICA) algorithms for improved spectral deconvolution of overlapped signals in 1H NMR analysis: application to foods and related products.

    PubMed

    Monakhova, Yulia B; Tsikin, Alexey M; Kuballa, Thomas; Lachenmeier, Dirk W; Mushtakova, Svetlana P

    2014-05-01

    The major challenge facing NMR spectroscopic mixture analysis is the overlapping of signals and the arising impossibility to easily recover the structures for identification of the individual components and to integrate separated signals for quantification. In this paper, various independent component analysis (ICA) algorithms [mutual information least dependent component analysis (MILCA); stochastic non-negative ICA (SNICA); joint approximate diagonalization of eigenmatrices (JADE); and robust, accurate, direct ICA algorithm (RADICAL)] as well as deconvolution methods [simple-to-use-interactive self-modeling mixture analysis (SIMPLISMA) and multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS)] are applied for simultaneous (1)H NMR spectroscopic determination of organic substances in complex mixtures. Among others, we studied constituents of the following matrices: honey, soft drinks, and liquids used in electronic cigarettes. Good quality spectral resolution of up to eight-component mixtures was achieved (correlation coefficients between resolved and experimental spectra were not less than 0.90). In general, the relative errors in the recovered concentrations were below 12%. SIMPLISMA and MILCA algorithms were found to be preferable for NMR spectra deconvolution and showed similar performance. The proposed method was used for analysis of authentic samples. The resolved ICA concentrations match well with the results of reference gas chromatography-mass spectrometry as well as the MCR-ALS algorithm used for comparison. ICA deconvolution considerably improves the application range of direct NMR spectroscopy for analysis of complex mixtures. PMID:24604756

  15. State Analysis Database Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasmussen, Robert; Bennett, Matthew

    2006-01-01

    The State Analysis Database Tool software establishes a productive environment for collaboration among software and system engineers engaged in the development of complex interacting systems. The tool embodies State Analysis, a model-based system engineering methodology founded on a state-based control architecture (see figure). A state represents a momentary condition of an evolving system, and a model may describe how a state evolves and is affected by other states. The State Analysis methodology is a process for capturing system and software requirements in the form of explicit models and states, and defining goal-based operational plans consistent with the models. Requirements, models, and operational concerns have traditionally been documented in a variety of system engineering artifacts that address different aspects of a mission s lifecycle. In State Analysis, requirements, models, and operations information are State Analysis artifacts that are consistent and stored in a State Analysis Database. The tool includes a back-end database, a multi-platform front-end client, and Web-based administrative functions. The tool is structured to prompt an engineer to follow the State Analysis methodology, to encourage state discovery and model description, and to make software requirements and operations plans consistent with model descriptions.

  16. Physics analysis tools

    SciTech Connect

    Kunz, P.F.

    1991-04-01

    There are many tools used in analysis in High Energy Physics (HEP). They range from low level tools such as a programming language to high level such as a detector simulation package. This paper will discuss some aspects of these tools that are directly associated with the process of analyzing HEP data. Physics analysis tools cover the whole range from the simulation of the interactions of particles to the display and fitting of statistical data. For purposes of this paper, the stages of analysis is broken down to five main stages. The categories are also classified as areas of generation, reconstruction, and analysis. Different detector groups use different terms for these stages thus it is useful to define what is meant by them in this paper. The particle generation stage is a simulation of the initial interaction, the production of particles, and the decay of the short lived particles. The detector simulation stage simulates the behavior of an event in a detector. The track reconstruction stage does pattern recognition on the measured or simulated space points, calorimeter information, etc., and reconstructs track segments of the original event. The event reconstruction stage takes the reconstructed tracks, along with particle identification information and assigns masses to produce 4-vectors. Finally the display and fit stage displays statistical data accumulated in the preceding stages in the form of histograms, scatter plots, etc. The remainder of this paper will consider what analysis tools are available today, and what one might expect in the future. In each stage, the integration of the tools with other stages and the portability of the tool will be analyzed.

  17. Graphical Contingency Analysis Tool

    SciTech Connect

    2010-03-02

    GCA is a visual analytic tool for power grid contingency analysis to provide more decision support for power grid operations. GCA allows power grid operators to quickly gain situational awareness of power grid by converting large amounts of operational data to graphic domain with a color contoured map; identify system trend and foresee and discern emergencies by performing trending analysis; identify the relationships between system configurations and affected assets by conducting clustering analysis; and identify the best action by interactively evaluate candidate actions.

  18. A Bayesian deconvolution strategy for immunoprecipitation-based DNA methylome analysis.

    PubMed

    Down, Thomas A; Rakyan, Vardhman K; Turner, Daniel J; Flicek, Paul; Li, Heng; Kulesha, Eugene; Gräf, Stefan; Johnson, Nathan; Herrero, Javier; Tomazou, Eleni M; Thorne, Natalie P; Bäckdahl, Liselotte; Herberth, Marlis; Howe, Kevin L; Jackson, David K; Miretti, Marcos M; Marioni, John C; Birney, Ewan; Hubbard, Tim J P; Durbin, Richard; Tavaré, Simon; Beck, Stephan

    2008-07-01

    DNA methylation is an indispensible epigenetic modification required for regulating the expression of mammalian genomes. Immunoprecipitation-based methods for DNA methylome analysis are rapidly shifting the bottleneck in this field from data generation to data analysis, necessitating the development of better analytical tools. In particular, an inability to estimate absolute methylation levels remains a major analytical difficulty associated with immunoprecipitation-based DNA methylation profiling. To address this issue, we developed a cross-platform algorithm-Bayesian tool for methylation analysis (Batman)-for analyzing methylated DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP) profiles generated using oligonucleotide arrays (MeDIP-chip) or next-generation sequencing (MeDIP-seq). We developed the latter approach to provide a high-resolution whole-genome DNA methylation profile (DNA methylome) of a mammalian genome. Strong correlation of our data, obtained using mature human spermatozoa, with those obtained using bisulfite sequencing suggest that combining MeDIP-seq or MeDIP-chip with Batman provides a robust, quantitative and cost-effective functional genomic strategy for elucidating the function of DNA methylation. PMID:18612301

  19. Building energy analysis tool

    DOEpatents

    Brackney, Larry; Parker, Andrew; Long, Nicholas; Metzger, Ian; Dean, Jesse; Lisell, Lars

    2016-04-12

    A building energy analysis system includes a building component library configured to store a plurality of building components, a modeling tool configured to access the building component library and create a building model of a building under analysis using building spatial data and using selected building components of the plurality of building components stored in the building component library, a building analysis engine configured to operate the building model and generate a baseline energy model of the building under analysis and further configured to apply one or more energy conservation measures to the baseline energy model in order to generate one or more corresponding optimized energy models, and a recommendation tool configured to assess the one or more optimized energy models against the baseline energy model and generate recommendations for substitute building components or modifications.

  20. Deconvolution Analysis for Classifying Gastric Adenocarcinoma Patients Based on Differential Scanning Calorimetry Serum Thermograms

    PubMed Central

    Vega, Sonia; Garcia-Gonzalez, María Asuncion; Lanas, Angel; Velazquez-Campoy, Adrian; Abian, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Recently, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) has been acknowledged as a novel tool for diagnosing and monitoring several diseases. This highly sensitive technique has been traditionally used to study thermally induced protein folding/unfolding transitions. In previous research papers, DSC profiles from blood samples of patients were analyzed and they exhibited marked differences in the thermal denaturation profile. Thus, we investigated the use of this novel technology in blood serum samples from 25 healthy subjects and 30 patients with gastric adenocarcinoma (GAC) at different stages of tumor development with a new multiparametric approach. The analysis of the calorimetric profiles of blood serum from GAC patients allowed us to discriminate three stages of cancer development (I to III) from those of healthy individuals. After a multiparametric analysis, a classification of blood serum DSC parameters from patients with GAC is proposed. Certain parameters exhibited significant differences (P < 0.05) and allowed the discrimination of healthy subjects/patients from patients at different tumor stages. The results of this work validate DSC as a novel technique for GAC patient classification and staging, and offer new graphical tools and value ranges for the acquired parameters in order to discriminate healthy from diseased subjects with increased disease burden. PMID:25614381

  1. Extended Testability Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melcher, Kevin; Maul, William A.; Fulton, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    The Extended Testability Analysis (ETA) Tool is a software application that supports fault management (FM) by performing testability analyses on the fault propagation model of a given system. Fault management includes the prevention of faults through robust design margins and quality assurance methods, or the mitigation of system failures. Fault management requires an understanding of the system design and operation, potential failure mechanisms within the system, and the propagation of those potential failures through the system. The purpose of the ETA Tool software is to process the testability analysis results from a commercial software program called TEAMS Designer in order to provide a detailed set of diagnostic assessment reports. The ETA Tool is a command-line process with several user-selectable report output options. The ETA Tool also extends the COTS testability analysis and enables variation studies with sensor sensitivity impacts on system diagnostics and component isolation using a single testability output. The ETA Tool can also provide extended analyses from a single set of testability output files. The following analysis reports are available to the user: (1) the Detectability Report provides a breakdown of how each tested failure mode was detected, (2) the Test Utilization Report identifies all the failure modes that each test detects, (3) the Failure Mode Isolation Report demonstrates the system s ability to discriminate between failure modes, (4) the Component Isolation Report demonstrates the system s ability to discriminate between failure modes relative to the components containing the failure modes, (5) the Sensor Sensor Sensitivity Analysis Report shows the diagnostic impact due to loss of sensor information, and (6) the Effect Mapping Report identifies failure modes that result in specified system-level effects.

  2. PCard Data Analysis Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-04-01

    The Procurement Card data analysis and monitoring tool enables due-diligence review using predefined user-created queries and reports. The system tracks individual compliance emails. More specifically, the tool: - Helps identify exceptions or questionable and non-compliant purchases, - Creates audit random sample on request, - Allows users to create and run new or ad-hoc queries and reports, - Monitors disputed charges, - Creates predefined Emails to Cardholders requesting documentation and/or clarification, - Tracks audit status, notes,more » Email status (date sent, response), audit resolution.« less

  3. PCard Data Analysis Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Hilts, Jim

    2005-04-01

    The Procurement Card data analysis and monitoring tool enables due-diligence review using predefined user-created queries and reports. The system tracks individual compliance emails. More specifically, the tool: - Helps identify exceptions or questionable and non-compliant purchases, - Creates audit random sample on request, - Allows users to create and run new or ad-hoc queries and reports, - Monitors disputed charges, - Creates predefined Emails to Cardholders requesting documentation and/or clarification, - Tracks audit status, notes, Email status (date sent, response), audit resolution.

  4. Systematic forensic toxicological analysis by GC-MS in serum using automated mass spectral deconvolution and identification system.

    PubMed

    Grapp, Marcel; Maurer, Hans H; Desel, Herbert

    2016-08-01

    Non-targeted screening of body fluids for psychoactive agents is an essential task for forensic toxicology. The challenge is the identification of xenobiotics of interest from background noise and endogenous matrix components. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the use of an Automated Mass Spectral Deconvolution and Identification System (AMDIS) for gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) based toxicological serum screening. One hundred fifty serum samples submitted to the authors´ laboratory for systematic forensic toxicological analysis underwent GC-MS screening after neutral and basic liquid-liquid extraction. Recorded datasets were routinely evaluated both by experienced personnel and automatically using the AMDIS software combined with the Maurer/Pfleger/Weber GC-MS library MPW_2011. The results from manual and automated data evaluation were then systematically compared. AMDIS parameters for data deconvolution and substance identification had been successfully adapted to the GC-MS screening procedure in serum. The number of false positive hits could substantially be reduced without increasing the risk of overlooking relevant compounds. With AMDIS-based data evaluation, additional drugs were identified in 25 samples (17%) that had not been detected by manual data evaluation. Importantly, among these drugs, there were frequently prescribed and toxicologically relevant antidepressants and antipsychotic drugs such as citalopram, mirtazapine, quetiapine, or venlafaxine. For most of the identified drugs, their serum concentrations were in the therapeutic or subtherapeutic range. Thus, our study indicated that automated data evaluation by AMDIS provided reliable screening results. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26333204

  5. Graphical Contingency Analysis Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2010-03-02

    GCA is a visual analytic tool for power grid contingency analysis to provide more decision support for power grid operations. GCA allows power grid operators to quickly gain situational awareness of power grid by converting large amounts of operational data to graphic domain with a color contoured map; identify system trend and foresee and discern emergencies by performing trending analysis; identify the relationships between system configurations and affected assets by conducting clustering analysis; and identifymore » the best action by interactively evaluate candidate actions.« less

  6. Transmission Planning Analysis Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2015-06-23

    Developed to solve specific problem: Assist transmission planning for regional transfers in interconnected power systems. This work was originated in a study for the U.S. Department of State, to recommend transmission reinforcements for the Central American regional system that interconnects 6 countries. Transmission planning analysis is currently performed by engineers with domainspecific and systemspecific knowledge without a unique methodology. The software codes of this disclosure assists engineers by defining systematic analysis procedures to help identifymore » weak points and make decisions on transmission planning of regional interconnected power systems. Transmission Planning Analysis Tool groups PSS/E results of multiple AC contingency analysis and voltage stability analysis and QV analysis of many scenarios of study and arrange them in a systematic way to aid power system planning engineers or transmission operators in effective decision]making process or in the off]line study environment.« less

  7. Transmission Planning Analysis Tool

    SciTech Connect

    2015-06-23

    Developed to solve specific problem: Assist transmission planning for regional transfers in interconnected power systems. This work was originated in a study for the U.S. Department of State, to recommend transmission reinforcements for the Central American regional system that interconnects 6 countries. Transmission planning analysis is currently performed by engineers with domainspecific and systemspecific knowledge without a unique methodology. The software codes of this disclosure assists engineers by defining systematic analysis procedures to help identify weak points and make decisions on transmission planning of regional interconnected power systems. Transmission Planning Analysis Tool groups PSS/E results of multiple AC contingency analysis and voltage stability analysis and QV analysis of many scenarios of study and arrange them in a systematic way to aid power system planning engineers or transmission operators in effective decision]making process or in the off]line study environment.

  8. Swift Science Analysis Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, F. E.; Swift Team Team

    2003-05-01

    Swift is an autonomous, multiwavelength observatory selected by NASA to study gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and their afterglows. Its Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) is a large coded mask instrument that will image GRBs in the 15 to 150 keV band. The X-ray Telescope (XRT) focuses X-rays in the 0.2 to 10 keV band onto CCDs, and the co-aligned Ultra-Violet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) has filters and grisms for low-resolution spectroscopy. The Swift team is developing mission-specific tools for processing the telemetry into FITS files and for calibrating and selecting the data for further analysis with such mission-independent tools as XIMAGE and XSPEC. The FTOOLS-based suite of tools will be released to the community before launch with additional updates after launch. Documentation for the tools and standard receipes for their use will be available on the Swift Science Center (SSC) Web site (http://swiftsc.gsfc.nasa.gov), and the SSC will provide user assistance with an e-mail help desk. After the verification phase of the mission, all data will be available to the community as soon as it is processed in the Swift Data Center (SDC). Once all the data for an observation is available, the data will be transferred to the HEASARC and data centers in England and Italy. The data can then be searched and accessed using standard tools such as Browse. Before this transfer the quick-look data will be available on an ftp site at the SDC. The SSC will also provide documentation and simulation tools in support of the Swift Guest Investigator program.

  9. Contamination Analysis Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brieda, Lubos

    2015-01-01

    This talk presents 3 different tools developed recently for contamination analysis:HTML QCM analyzer: runs in a web browser, and allows for data analysis of QCM log filesJava RGA extractor: can load in multiple SRS.ana files and extract pressure vs. time dataC++ Contamination Simulation code: 3D particle tracing code for modeling transport of dust particulates and molecules. Uses residence time to determine if molecules stick. Particulates can be sampled from IEST-STD-1246 and be accelerated by aerodynamic forces.

  10. Convolution-deconvolution in DIGES

    SciTech Connect

    Philippacopoulos, A.J.; Simos, N.

    1995-05-01

    Convolution and deconvolution operations is by all means a very important aspect of SSI analysis since it influences the input to the seismic analysis. This paper documents some of the convolution/deconvolution procedures which have been implemented into the DIGES code. The 1-D propagation of shear and dilatational waves in typical layered configurations involving a stack of layers overlying a rock is treated by DIGES in a similar fashion to that of available codes, e.g. CARES, SHAKE. For certain configurations, however, there is no need to perform such analyses since the corresponding solutions can be obtained in analytic form. Typical cases involve deposits which can be modeled by a uniform halfspace or simple layered halfspaces. For such cases DIGES uses closed-form solutions. These solutions are given for one as well as two dimensional deconvolution. The type of waves considered include P, SV and SH waves. The non-vertical incidence is given special attention since deconvolution can be defined differently depending on the problem of interest. For all wave cases considered, corresponding transfer functions are presented in closed-form. Transient solutions are obtained in the frequency domain. Finally, a variety of forms are considered for representing the free field motion both in terms of deterministic as well as probabilistic representations. These include (a) acceleration time histories, (b) response spectra (c) Fourier spectra and (d) cross-spectral densities.

  11. Flight Operations Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Easter, Robert; Herrell, Linda; Pomphrey, Richard; Chase, James; Wertz Chen, Julie; Smith, Jeffrey; Carter, Rebecca

    2006-01-01

    Flight Operations Analysis Tool (FLOAT) is a computer program that partly automates the process of assessing the benefits of planning spacecraft missions to incorporate various combinations of launch vehicles and payloads. Designed primarily for use by an experienced systems engineer, FLOAT makes it possible to perform a preliminary analysis of trade-offs and costs of a proposed mission in days, whereas previously, such an analysis typically lasted months. FLOAT surveys a variety of prior missions by querying data from authoritative NASA sources pertaining to 20 to 30 mission and interface parameters that define space missions. FLOAT provides automated, flexible means for comparing the parameters to determine compatibility or the lack thereof among payloads, spacecraft, and launch vehicles, and for displaying the results of such comparisons. Sparseness, typical of the data available for analysis, does not confound this software. FLOAT effects an iterative process that identifies modifications of parameters that could render compatible an otherwise incompatible mission set.

  12. A System Analysis Tool

    SciTech Connect

    CAMPBELL,PHILIP L.; ESPINOZA,JUAN

    2000-06-01

    In this paper we describe a tool for analyzing systems. The analysis is based on program slicing. It answers the following question for the software: if the value of a particular variable changes, what other variable values also change, and what is the path in between? program slicing was developed based on intra-procedure control and data flow. It has been expanded commercially to inter-procedure flow. However, we extend slicing to collections of programs and non-program entities, which we term multi-domain systems. The value of our tool is that an analyst can model the entirety of a system, not just the software, and we believe that this makes for a significant increase in power. We are building a prototype system.

  13. Stack Trace Analysis Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2008-01-16

    STAT is a light weight debugging tool that gathers and merges stack traces from all of the processes in a parallel application. STAT uses the MRNet free based overlay network to broadcast commands from the tool front-end to the STAT daemons and for the front-end to gather the traces from the STAT daemons. As the traces propagate through the MRNet network tree, they are merged across all tasks to form a single call prefix tree.more » The call prefix tree can be examined to identify tasks with similar function call patterns and to delineate a small set of equivalence classes. A representative task from each of these classes can then be fed into a full feature debugger like TotalView for root cause analysis.« less

  14. Stack Trace Analysis Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2013-02-19

    STAT is a light weight debugging tool that gathers and merges stack traces from all of the processes in a parallell application. STAT uses the MRNet tree based overlay network to broadcast commands from the tool front-end to the STAT daemons and for the front-end to gather the traces from the STAT daemons. As the traces propagate through the MRNet network tree, they are merged across all tasks to from a single call prefix tree.more » The call prefix tree can be examined to identify tasks with similar function call patterns and to delineate a small set of equivalence slasses. A representative task from each of these classes can then be fed into a full feature debugger like TotalView for root cause analysis.« less

  15. Stack Trace Analysis Tool

    SciTech Connect

    2013-02-19

    STAT is a light weight debugging tool that gathers and merges stack traces from all of the processes in a parallell application. STAT uses the MRNet tree based overlay network to broadcast commands from the tool front-end to the STAT daemons and for the front-end to gather the traces from the STAT daemons. As the traces propagate through the MRNet network tree, they are merged across all tasks to from a single call prefix tree. The call prefix tree can be examined to identify tasks with similar function call patterns and to delineate a small set of equivalence slasses. A representative task from each of these classes can then be fed into a full feature debugger like TotalView for root cause analysis.

  16. Stack Trace Analysis Tool

    SciTech Connect

    2008-01-16

    STAT is a light weight debugging tool that gathers and merges stack traces from all of the processes in a parallel application. STAT uses the MRNet free based overlay network to broadcast commands from the tool front-end to the STAT daemons and for the front-end to gather the traces from the STAT daemons. As the traces propagate through the MRNet network tree, they are merged across all tasks to form a single call prefix tree. The call prefix tree can be examined to identify tasks with similar function call patterns and to delineate a small set of equivalence classes. A representative task from each of these classes can then be fed into a full feature debugger like TotalView for root cause analysis.

  17. Computational deconvolution of genome wide expression data from Parkinson's and Huntington's disease brain tissues using population-specific expression analysis

    PubMed Central

    Capurro, Alberto; Bodea, Liviu-Gabriel; Schaefer, Patrick; Luthi-Carter, Ruth; Perreau, Victoria M.

    2015-01-01

    The characterization of molecular changes in diseased tissues gives insight into pathophysiological mechanisms and is important for therapeutic development. Genome-wide gene expression analysis has proven valuable for identifying biological processes in neurodegenerative diseases using post mortem human brain tissue and numerous datasets are publically available. However, many studies utilize heterogeneous tissue samples consisting of multiple cell types, all of which contribute to global gene expression values, confounding biological interpretation of the data. In particular, changes in numbers of neuronal and glial cells occurring in neurodegeneration confound transcriptomic analyses, particularly in human brain tissues where sample availability and controls are limited. To identify cell specific gene expression changes in neurodegenerative disease, we have applied our recently published computational deconvolution method, population specific expression analysis (PSEA). PSEA estimates cell-type-specific expression values using reference expression measures, which in the case of brain tissue comprises mRNAs with cell-type-specific expression in neurons, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and microglia. As an exercise in PSEA implementation and hypothesis development regarding neurodegenerative diseases, we applied PSEA to Parkinson's and Huntington's disease (PD, HD) datasets. Genes identified as differentially expressed in substantia nigra pars compacta neurons by PSEA were validated using external laser capture microdissection data. Network analysis and Annotation Clustering (DAVID) identified molecular processes implicated by differential gene expression in specific cell types. The results of these analyses provided new insights into the implementation of PSEA in brain tissues and additional refinement of molecular signatures in human HD and PD. PMID:25620908

  18. Frequency Response Analysis Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Etingov, Pavel V.; Kosterev, Dmitry; Dai, T.

    2014-12-31

    Frequency response has received a lot of attention in recent years at the national level, which culminated in the development and approval of North American Electricity Reliability Corporation (NERC) BAL-003-1 Frequency Response and Frequency Bias Setting Reliability Standard. This report is prepared to describe the details of the work conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in collaboration with the Bonneville Power Administration and Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) Joint Synchronized Information Subcommittee (JSIS) to develop a frequency response analysis tool (FRAT). The document provides the details on the methodology and main features of the FRAT. The tool manages the database of under-frequency events and calculates the frequency response baseline. Frequency response calculations are consistent with frequency response measure (FRM) in NERC BAL-003-1 for an interconnection and balancing authority. The FRAT can use both phasor measurement unit (PMU) data, where available, and supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) data. The tool is also capable of automatically generating NERC Frequency Response Survey (FRS) forms required by BAL-003-1 Standard.

  19. Neutron multiplicity analysis tool

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Scott L

    2010-01-01

    I describe the capabilities of the EXCOM (EXcel based COincidence and Multiplicity) calculation tool which is used to analyze experimental data or simulated neutron multiplicity data. The input to the program is the count-rate data (including the multiplicity distribution) for a measurement, the isotopic composition of the sample and relevant dates. The program carries out deadtime correction and background subtraction and then performs a number of analyses. These are: passive calibration curve, known alpha and multiplicity analysis. The latter is done with both the point model and with the weighted point model. In the current application EXCOM carries out the rapid analysis of Monte Carlo calculated quantities and allows the user to determine the magnitude of sample perturbations that lead to systematic errors. Neutron multiplicity counting is an assay method used in the analysis of plutonium for safeguards applications. It is widely used in nuclear material accountancy by international (IAEA) and national inspectors. The method uses the measurement of the correlations in a pulse train to extract information on the spontaneous fission rate in the presence of neutrons from ({alpha},n) reactions and induced fission. The measurement is relatively simple to perform and gives results very quickly ({le} 1 hour). By contrast, destructive analysis techniques are extremely costly and time consuming (several days). By improving the achievable accuracy of neutron multiplicity counting, a nondestructive analysis technique, it could be possible to reduce the use of destructive analysis measurements required in safeguards applications. The accuracy of a neutron multiplicity measurement can be affected by a number of variables such as density, isotopic composition, chemical composition and moisture in the material. In order to determine the magnitude of these effects on the measured plutonium mass a calculational tool, EXCOM, has been produced using VBA within Excel. This

  20. A new spectral deconvolution - selected ion monitoring method for the analysis of alkylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in complex mixtures.

    PubMed

    Robbat, Albert; Wilton, Nicholas M

    2014-07-01

    A new gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) method is proffered for the analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and their alkylated homologs in complex samples. Recent work elucidated the fragmentation pathways of alkylated PAH, concluding that multiple fragmentation patterns per homolog (MFPPH) are needed to correctly identify all isomers. Programming the MS in selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode to detect homolog-specific MFPPH ions delivers the selectivity and sensitivity that the conventional SIM and/or full scan mass spectrometry methods fail to provide. New spectral deconvolution software eliminates the practice of assigning alkylated homolog peaks via pattern recognition within laboratory-defined retention windows. Findings show that differences in concentration by SIM/molecular ion detection of C1-C4 PAH, now the standard, yield concentration differences compared to SIM/MFPPH of thousands of percent for some homologs. The SIM/MFPPH methodology is also amenable to the analysis of polycyclic aromatic sulfur heterocycles (PASH) and their alkylated homologs, since many PASH have the same m/z ions as those of PAH and, thus, are false positives in SIM/1-ion PAH detection methods. PMID:24840423

  1. Geodetic Strain Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kedar, Sharon; Baxter, Sean C.; Parker, Jay W.; Webb, Frank H.; Owen, Susan E.; Sibthorpe, Anthony J.; Dong, Danan

    2011-01-01

    A geodetic software analysis tool enables the user to analyze 2D crustal strain from geodetic ground motion, and create models of crustal deformation using a graphical interface. Users can use any geodetic measurements of ground motion and derive the 2D crustal strain interactively. This software also provides a forward-modeling tool that calculates a geodetic velocity and strain field for a given fault model, and lets the user compare the modeled strain field with the strain field obtained from the user s data. Users may change parameters on-the-fly and obtain a real-time recalculation of the resulting strain field. Four data products are computed: maximum shear, dilatation, shear angle, and principal components. The current view and data dependencies are processed first. The remaining data products and views are then computed in a round-robin fashion to anticipate view changes. When an analysis or display parameter is changed, the affected data products and views are invalidated and progressively re-displayed as available. This software is designed to facilitate the derivation of the strain fields from the GPS and strain meter data that sample it to facilitate the understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of the strain field derivation from continuous GPS (CGPS) and other geodetic data from a variety of tectonic settings, to converge on the "best practices" strain derivation strategy for the Solid Earth Science ESDR System (SESES) project given the CGPS station distribution in the western U.S., and to provide SESES users with a scientific and educational tool to explore the strain field on their own with user-defined parameters.

  2. Draper Station Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bedrossian, Nazareth; Jang, Jiann-Woei; McCants, Edward; Omohundro, Zachary; Ring, Tom; Templeton, Jeremy; Zoss, Jeremy; Wallace, Jonathan; Ziegler, Philip

    2011-01-01

    Draper Station Analysis Tool (DSAT) is a computer program, built on commercially available software, for simulating and analyzing complex dynamic systems. Heretofore used in designing and verifying guidance, navigation, and control systems of the International Space Station, DSAT has a modular architecture that lends itself to modification for application to spacecraft or terrestrial systems. DSAT consists of user-interface, data-structures, simulation-generation, analysis, plotting, documentation, and help components. DSAT automates the construction of simulations and the process of analysis. DSAT provides a graphical user interface (GUI), plus a Web-enabled interface, similar to the GUI, that enables a remotely located user to gain access to the full capabilities of DSAT via the Internet and Webbrowser software. Data structures are used to define the GUI, the Web-enabled interface, simulations, and analyses. Three data structures define the type of analysis to be performed: closed-loop simulation, frequency response, and/or stability margins. DSAT can be executed on almost any workstation, desktop, or laptop computer. DSAT provides better than an order of magnitude improvement in cost, schedule, and risk assessment for simulation based design and verification of complex dynamic systems.

  3. Climate Data Analysis Tools

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2009-12-01

    Climate Data Analysis Tools (CDAT) is a software infrastructure that uses an object-oriented scripting language to link together separate software subsystems and packages thus forming an integrated environment for solving model diagnosis problems, The power of the system comes from Python and its ability to seamlissly interconnect software. Python provides a general purpose and full-featured scripting language with a variety of user interfaces including command-line interaction, stand-alone scripts (applications) and fraphical user interfaces (GUI). Themore » CDAT subsystems, implemented as modules, provide access to and management of gridded data (Climate Data Management Systems or CDMS); large-array numerical operations (Numerical Python); and visualization (Visualization and Control System or VCS).« less

  4. Climate Data Analysis Tools

    SciTech Connect

    2009-12-01

    Climate Data Analysis Tools (CDAT) is a software infrastructure that uses an object-oriented scripting language to link together separate software subsystems and packages thus forming an integrated environment for solving model diagnosis problems, The power of the system comes from Python and its ability to seamlissly interconnect software. Python provides a general purpose and full-featured scripting language with a variety of user interfaces including command-line interaction, stand-alone scripts (applications) and fraphical user interfaces (GUI). The CDAT subsystems, implemented as modules, provide access to and management of gridded data (Climate Data Management Systems or CDMS); large-array numerical operations (Numerical Python); and visualization (Visualization and Control System or VCS).

  5. New spectral deconvolution algorithms for the analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and sulfur heterocycles by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-quadrupole mass spectrometery.

    PubMed

    Antle, Patrick M; Zeigler, Christian D; Gankin, Yuriy; Robbat, Albert

    2013-11-01

    New mass spectral deconvolution algorithms have been developed for comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography/quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC × GC/qMS). This paper reports the first use of spectral deconvolution of full scan quadrupole GC × GC/MS data for the quantitative analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and polycyclic aromatic sulfur heterocycles (PASH) in coal tar-contaminated soil. A method employing four ions per isomer and multiple fragmentation patterns per alkylated homologue (MFPPH) is used to quantify target compounds. These results are in good agreement with GC/MS concentrations, and an examination of method precision, accuracy, selectivity, and sensitivity is discussed. MFPPH and SIM/1-ion concentration differences are also examined. PMID:24063305

  6. Portfolio Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Tim; Zapata, Edgar; Benjamin, Perakath; Graul, Mike; Jones, Doug

    2005-01-01

    Portfolio Analysis Tool (PAT) is a Web-based, client/server computer program that helps managers of multiple projects funded by different customers to make decisions regarding investments in those projects. PAT facilitates analysis on a macroscopic level, without distraction by parochial concerns or tactical details of individual projects, so that managers decisions can reflect the broad strategy of their organization. PAT is accessible via almost any Web-browser software. Experts in specific projects can contribute to a broad database that managers can use in analyzing the costs and benefits of all projects, but do not have access for modifying criteria for analyzing projects: access for modifying criteria is limited to managers according to levels of administrative privilege. PAT affords flexibility for modifying criteria for particular "focus areas" so as to enable standardization of criteria among similar projects, thereby making it possible to improve assessments without need to rewrite computer code or to rehire experts, and thereby further reducing the cost of maintaining and upgrading computer code. Information in the PAT database and results of PAT analyses can be incorporated into a variety of ready-made or customizable tabular or graphical displays.

  7. Hurricane Data Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Zhong; Ostrenga, Dana; Leptoukh, Gregory

    2011-01-01

    In order to facilitate Earth science data access, the NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Data Information Services Center (GES DISC) has developed a web prototype, the Hurricane Data Analysis Tool (HDAT; URL: http://disc.gsfc.nasa.gov/HDAT), to allow users to conduct online visualization and analysis of several remote sensing and model datasets for educational activities and studies of tropical cyclones and other weather phenomena. With a web browser and few mouse clicks, users can have a full access to terabytes of data and generate 2-D or time-series plots and animation without downloading any software and data. HDAT includes data from the NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), the NASA Quick Scatterometer(QuikSCAT) and NECP Reanalysis, and the NCEP/CPC half-hourly, 4-km Global (60 N - 60 S) IR Dataset. The GES DISC archives TRMM data. The daily global rainfall product derived from the 3-hourly multi-satellite precipitation product (3B42 V6) is available in HDAT. The TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) sea surface temperature from the Remote Sensing Systems is in HDAT as well. The NASA QuikSCAT ocean surface wind and the NCEP Reanalysis provide ocean surface and atmospheric conditions, respectively. The global merged IR product, also known as, the NCEP/CPC half-hourly, 4-km Global (60 N -60 S) IR Dataset, is one of TRMM ancillary datasets. They are globally-merged pixel-resolution IR brightness temperature data (equivalent blackbody temperatures), merged from all available geostationary satellites (GOES-8/10, METEOSAT-7/5 & GMS). The GES DISC has collected over 10 years of the data beginning from February of 2000. This high temporal resolution (every 30 minutes) dataset not only provides additional background information to TRMM and other satellite missions, but also allows observing a wide range of meteorological phenomena from space, such as, hurricanes, typhoons, tropical cyclones, mesoscale convection system, etc. Basic functions include selection of area of

  8. Java Radar Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaczek, Mariusz P.

    2005-01-01

    Java Radar Analysis Tool (JRAT) is a computer program for analyzing two-dimensional (2D) scatter plots derived from radar returns showing pieces of the disintegrating Space Shuttle Columbia. JRAT can also be applied to similar plots representing radar returns showing aviation accidents, and to scatter plots in general. The 2D scatter plots include overhead map views and side altitude views. The superposition of points in these views makes searching difficult. JRAT enables three-dimensional (3D) viewing: by use of a mouse and keyboard, the user can rotate to any desired viewing angle. The 3D view can include overlaid trajectories and search footprints to enhance situational awareness in searching for pieces. JRAT also enables playback: time-tagged radar-return data can be displayed in time order and an animated 3D model can be moved through the scene to show the locations of the Columbia (or other vehicle) at the times of the corresponding radar events. The combination of overlays and playback enables the user to correlate a radar return with a position of the vehicle to determine whether the return is valid. JRAT can optionally filter single radar returns, enabling the user to selectively hide or highlight a desired radar return.

  9. Library Optimization in EDXRF Spectral Deconvolution for Multi-element Analysis of Ambient Aerosols

    EPA Science Inventory

    In multi-element analysis of atmospheric aerosols, attempts are made to fit overlapping elemental spectral lines for many elements that may be undetectable in samples due to low concentrations. Fitting with many library reference spectra has the unwanted effect of raising the an...

  10. Digital Deconvolution Filter Derived from Linear Discriminant Analysis and Application for Multiphoton Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A digital filter derived from linear discriminant analysis (LDA) is developed for recovering impulse responses in photon counting from a high speed photodetector (rise time of ∼1 ns) and applied to remove ringing distortions from impedance mismatch in multiphoton fluorescence microscopy. Training of the digital filter was achieved by defining temporally coincident and noncoincident transients and identifying the projection within filter-space that best separated the two classes. Once trained, data analysis by digital filtering can be performed quickly. Assessment of the reliability of the approach was performed through comparisons of simulated voltage transients, in which the ground truth results were known a priori. The LDA filter was also found to recover deconvolved impulses for single photon counting from highly distorted ringing waveforms from an impedance mismatched photomultiplier tube. The LDA filter was successful in removing these ringing distortions from two-photon excited fluorescence micrographs and through data simulations was found to extend the dynamic range of photon counting by approximately 3 orders of magnitude through minimization of detector paralysis. PMID:24559143

  11. Digital deconvolution filter derived from linear discriminant analysis and application for multiphoton fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Shane Z; Schmitt, Paul D; Muir, Ryan D; DeWalt, Emma L; Simpson, Garth J

    2014-04-01

    A digital filter derived from linear discriminant analysis (LDA) is developed for recovering impulse responses in photon counting from a high speed photodetector (rise time of ~1 ns) and applied to remove ringing distortions from impedance mismatch in multiphoton fluorescence microscopy. Training of the digital filter was achieved by defining temporally coincident and noncoincident transients and identifying the projection within filter-space that best separated the two classes. Once trained, data analysis by digital filtering can be performed quickly. Assessment of the reliability of the approach was performed through comparisons of simulated voltage transients, in which the ground truth results were known a priori. The LDA filter was also found to recover deconvolved impulses for single photon counting from highly distorted ringing waveforms from an impedance mismatched photomultiplier tube. The LDA filter was successful in removing these ringing distortions from two-photon excited fluorescence micrographs and through data simulations was found to extend the dynamic range of photon counting by approximately 3 orders of magnitude through minimization of detector paralysis. PMID:24559143

  12. FSSC Science Tools: Pulsar Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Dave

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the typical pulsar analysis, giving tips for screening of the data, the use of time series analysis, and utility tools. Specific information about analyzing Vela data is reviewed.

  13. Failure Environment Analysis Tool (FEAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawler, D. G.

    1991-01-01

    Information is given in viewgraph form on the Failure Environment Analysis Tool (FEAT), a tool designed to demonstrate advanced modeling and analysis techniques to better understand and capture the flow of failures within and between elements of the Space Station Freedom (SSF) and other large complex systems. Topics covered include objectives, development background, the technical approach, SSF baseline integration, and FEAT growth and evolution.

  14. Blind decorrelation and deconvolution algorithm for multiple-input multiple-output system: II. Analysis and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Da-Ching; Yu, Tommy; Yao, Kung; Pottie, Gregory J.

    1999-11-01

    For single-input multiple-output (SIMO) systems blind deconvolution based on second-order statistics has been shown promising given that the sources and channels meet certain assumptions. In our previous paper we extend the work to multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) systems by introducing a blind deconvolution algorithm to remove all channel dispersion followed by a blind decorrelation algorithm to separate different sources from their instantaneous mixture. In this paper we first explore more details embedded in our algorithm. Then we present simulation results to show that our algorithm is applicable to MIMO systems excited by a broad class of signals such as speech, music and digitally modulated symbols.

  15. Unsupervised Blind Deconvolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baena-Galle, R.; Kann, L.; Mugnier, L.; Gudimetla, R.; Johnson, R.; Gladysz, S.

    2013-09-01

    "Blind" deconvolution is rarely executed blindly. All available methods have parameters which the user fine-tunes until the most visually-appealing reconstruction is achieved. The "art" of deconvolution is to find constraints which allow for the best estimate of an object to be recovered, but in practice these parameterized constraints often reduce deconvolution to the struggle of trial and error. In the course of AFOSR-sponsored activities we are developing a general maximum a posteriori framework for the problem of imaging through atmospheric turbulence, with the emphasis on multi-frame blind deconvolution. Our aim is to develop deconvolution strategy which is reference-less, i.e. no calibration PSF is required, extendable to longer exposures, and applicable to imaging with adaptive optics. In the first part of the project the focus has been on developing a new theory of statistics of images taken through turbulence, both with-, and without adaptive optics. Images and their Fourier transforms have been described as random phasor sums, their fluctuations controlled by wavefront "cells" and moments of the phase. The models were validated using simulations and real data from the 3.5m telescope at the Starfire Optical Range in New Mexico. Another important ingredient of the new framework is the capability to estimate the average PSF automatically from the target observations. A general approach, applicable to any type of object, has been proposed. Here use is made of an object-cancelling transformation of the image sequence. This transformation yields information about the atmospheric PSF. Currently, the PSF estimation module and the theoretical constraints on PSF variability are being incorporated into multi-frame blind deconvolution. In preliminary simulation tests we obtained significantly sharper images with respect to the starting observations and PSF estimates which closely track the input kernels. Thanks to access to the SOR 3.5m telescope we are now testing

  16. Analysis/Design Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Excelerator II, developed by INTERSOLV, Inc., provides a complete environment for rules-based expert systems. The software incorporates NASA's C Language Integrated Production System (CLIPS), a shell for constructing expert systems. Excelerator II provides complex verification and transformation routines based on matching that is simple and inexpensive. *Excelerator II was sold to SELECT Software Tools in June 1997 and is now called SELECT Excelerator. SELECT has assumed full support and maintenance for the product line.

  17. Logistics Process Analysis ToolProcess Analysis Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2008-03-31

    LPAT is the resulting integrated system between ANL-developed Enhanced Logistics Intra Theater Support Tool (ELIST) sponsored by SDDC-TEA and the Fort Future Virtual Installation Tool (sponsored by CERL). The Fort Future Simulation Engine was an application written in the ANL Repast Simphony framework and used as the basis for the process Anlysis Tool (PAT) which evolved into a stand=-along tool for detailed process analysis at a location. Combined with ELIST, an inter-installation logistics component wasmore » added to enable users to define large logistical agent-based models without having to program. PAT is the evolution of an ANL-developed software system called Fort Future Virtual Installation Tool (sponsored by CERL). The Fort Future Simulation Engine was an application written in the ANL Repast Simphony framework and used as the basis for the Process Analysis Tool(PAT) which evolved into a stand-alone tool for detailed process analysis at a location (sponsored by the SDDC-TEA).« less

  18. Wavespace-Based Coherent Deconvolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahr, Christopher J.; Cattafesta, Louis N., III

    2012-01-01

    Array deconvolution is commonly used in aeroacoustic analysis to remove the influence of a microphone array's point spread function from a conventional beamforming map. Unfortunately, the majority of deconvolution algorithms assume that the acoustic sources in a measurement are incoherent, which can be problematic for some aeroacoustic phenomena with coherent, spatially-distributed characteristics. While several algorithms have been proposed to handle coherent sources, some are computationally intractable for many problems while others require restrictive assumptions about the source field. Newer generalized inverse techniques hold promise, but are still under investigation for general use. An alternate coherent deconvolution method is proposed based on a wavespace transformation of the array data. Wavespace analysis offers advantages over curved-wave array processing, such as providing an explicit shift-invariance in the convolution of the array sampling function with the acoustic wave field. However, usage of the wavespace transformation assumes the acoustic wave field is accurately approximated as a superposition of plane wave fields, regardless of true wavefront curvature. The wavespace technique leverages Fourier transforms to quickly evaluate a shift-invariant convolution. The method is derived for and applied to ideal incoherent and coherent plane wave fields to demonstrate its ability to determine magnitude and relative phase of multiple coherent sources. Multi-scale processing is explored as a means of accelerating solution convergence. A case with a spherical wave front is evaluated. Finally, a trailing edge noise experiment case is considered. Results show the method successfully deconvolves incoherent, partially-coherent, and coherent plane wave fields to a degree necessary for quantitative evaluation. Curved wave front cases warrant further investigation. A potential extension to nearfield beamforming is proposed.

  19. RSAT: regulatory sequence analysis tools.

    PubMed

    Thomas-Chollier, Morgane; Sand, Olivier; Turatsinze, Jean-Valéry; Janky, Rekin's; Defrance, Matthieu; Vervisch, Eric; Brohée, Sylvain; van Helden, Jacques

    2008-07-01

    The regulatory sequence analysis tools (RSAT, http://rsat.ulb.ac.be/rsat/) is a software suite that integrates a wide collection of modular tools for the detection of cis-regulatory elements in genome sequences. The suite includes programs for sequence retrieval, pattern discovery, phylogenetic footprint detection, pattern matching, genome scanning and feature map drawing. Random controls can be performed with random gene selections or by generating random sequences according to a variety of background models (Bernoulli, Markov). Beyond the original word-based pattern-discovery tools (oligo-analysis and dyad-analysis), we recently added a battery of tools for matrix-based detection of cis-acting elements, with some original features (adaptive background models, Markov-chain estimation of P-values) that do not exist in other matrix-based scanning tools. The web server offers an intuitive interface, where each program can be accessed either separately or connected to the other tools. In addition, the tools are now available as web services, enabling their integration in programmatic workflows. Genomes are regularly updated from various genome repositories (NCBI and EnsEMBL) and 682 organisms are currently supported. Since 1998, the tools have been used by several hundreds of researchers from all over the world. Several predictions made with RSAT were validated experimentally and published. PMID:18495751

  20. Comparison of environmental TLD (thermoluminescent dosimeter) results obtained using glow curve deconvolution and region of interest analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    We tested a Harshaw Model 4000 TLD Reader in the Sandia Environmental TLD Program. An extra set of LiF TLD-700 chips were prepared for each field location and calibration level. At the end of quarter one, half of the TLDs were read on the Model 4000 and the other half were read on our standard Harshaw Model 2000. This presentation compares the results of the two systems. The Model 4000 results are reported for two regions of interest and for background subtraction using Harshaw Glow Curve Deconvolution Software.

  1. Atlas Distributed Analysis Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Hoz, Santiago Gonzalez; Ruiz, Luis March; Liko, Dietrich

    2008-06-01

    The ATLAS production system has been successfully used to run production of simulation data at an unprecedented scale. Up to 10000 jobs were processed in one day. The experiences obtained operating the system on several grid flavours was essential to perform a user analysis using grid resources. First tests of the distributed analysis system were then performed. In the preparation phase data was registered in the LHC File Catalog (LFC) and replicated in external sites. For the main test, few resources were used. All these tests are only a first step towards the validation of the computing model. The ATLAS management computing board decided to integrate the collaboration efforts in distributed analysis in only one project, GANGA. The goal is to test the reconstruction and analysis software in a large scale Data production using Grid flavors in several sites. GANGA allows trivial switching between running test jobs on a local batch system and running large-scale analyses on the Grid; it provides job splitting and merging, and includes automated job monitoring and output retrieval.

  2. Tiling Microarray Analysis Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Nix, Davis Austin

    2005-05-04

    TiMAT is a package of 23 command line Java applications for use in the analysis of Affymetrix tiled genomic microarray data. TiMAT enables: 1) Rebuilding the genome annotation for entire tiled arrays (repeat filtering, chromosomal coordinate assignment). 2) Post processing of oligo intensity values (quantile normalization, median scaling, PMMM transformation), 3) Significance testing (Wilcoxon rank sum and signed rank tests, intensity difference and ratio tests) and Interval refinement (filtering based on multiple statistics, overlap comparisons), 4) Data visualization (detailed thumbnail/zoomed view with Interval Plots and data export to Affymetrix's Integrated Genome Browser) and Data reports (spreadsheet summaries and detailed profiles)

  3. Tiling Microarray Analysis Tools

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-05-04

    TiMAT is a package of 23 command line Java applications for use in the analysis of Affymetrix tiled genomic microarray data. TiMAT enables: 1) Rebuilding the genome annotation for entire tiled arrays (repeat filtering, chromosomal coordinate assignment). 2) Post processing of oligo intensity values (quantile normalization, median scaling, PMMM transformation), 3) Significance testing (Wilcoxon rank sum and signed rank tests, intensity difference and ratio tests) and Interval refinement (filtering based on multiple statistics, overlap comparisons),more » 4) Data visualization (detailed thumbnail/zoomed view with Interval Plots and data export to Affymetrix's Integrated Genome Browser) and Data reports (spreadsheet summaries and detailed profiles)« less

  4. Sandia PUF Analysis Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2014-06-11

    This program is a graphical user interface for measuring and performing inter-active analysis of physical unclonable functions (PUFs). It is intended for demonstration and education purposes. See license.txt for license details. The program features a PUF visualization that demonstrates how signatures differ between PUFs and how they exhibit noise over repeated measurements. A similarity scoreboard shows the user how close the current measurement is to the closest chip signatures in the database. Other metrics suchmore » as average noise and inter-chip Hamming distances are presented to the user. Randomness tests published in NIST SP 800-22 can be computed and displayed. Noise and inter-chip histograms for the sample of PUFs and repeated PUF measurements can be drawn.« less

  5. Sandia PUF Analysis Tool

    SciTech Connect

    2014-06-11

    This program is a graphical user interface for measuring and performing inter-active analysis of physical unclonable functions (PUFs). It is intended for demonstration and education purposes. See license.txt for license details. The program features a PUF visualization that demonstrates how signatures differ between PUFs and how they exhibit noise over repeated measurements. A similarity scoreboard shows the user how close the current measurement is to the closest chip signatures in the database. Other metrics such as average noise and inter-chip Hamming distances are presented to the user. Randomness tests published in NIST SP 800-22 can be computed and displayed. Noise and inter-chip histograms for the sample of PUFs and repeated PUF measurements can be drawn.

  6. VCAT: Visual Crosswalk Analysis Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Cleland, Timothy J.; Forslund, David W.; Cleland, Catherine A.

    2012-08-31

    VCAT is a knowledge modeling and analysis tool. It was synthesized from ideas in functional analysis, business process modeling, and complex network science. VCAT discovers synergies by analyzing natural language descriptions. Specifically, it creates visual analytic perspectives that capture intended organization structures, then overlays the serendipitous relationships that point to potential synergies within an organization or across multiple organizations.

  7. Heliostat cost-analysis tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, L. D.; Chang, R. E.

    1981-10-01

    A heliostat cost analysis tool (HELCAT) that processes manufacturing transportation, and installation cost data was developed which provides a consistent structure for cost analyses. The HELCAT calculates a representation product price based on direct input data and various economic, financial, and accounting assumptions. The characteristics of this tool and its initial application in the evaluation of second generation heliostat cost estimates are discussed. A set of nominal economic and financial parameters is also suggested.

  8. EASY-GOING deconvolution: Automated MQMAS NMR spectrum analysis based on a model with analytical crystallite excitation efficiencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimminck, Dennis L. A. G.; van Meerten, Bas; Verkuijlen, Margriet H. W.; van Eck, Ernst R. H.; Leo Meerts, W.; Kentgens, Arno P. M.

    2013-03-01

    The EASY-GOING deconvolution (EGdeconv) program is extended to enable fast and automated fitting of multiple quantum magic angle spinning (MQMAS) spectra guided by evolutionary algorithms. We implemented an analytical crystallite excitation model for spectrum simulation. Currently these efficiencies are limited to two-pulse and z-filtered 3QMAS spectra of spin 3/2 and 5/2 nuclei, whereas for higher spin-quantum numbers ideal excitation is assumed. The analytical expressions are explained in full to avoid ambiguity and facilitate others to use them. The EGdeconv program can fit interaction parameter distributions. It currently includes a Gaussian distribution for the chemical shift and an (extended) Czjzek distribution for the quadrupolar interaction. We provide three case studies to illustrate EGdeconv's capabilities for fitting MQMAS spectra. The EGdeconv program is available as is on our website http://egdeconv.science.ru.nl for 64-bit Linux operating systems.

  9. Subcellular Microanatomy by 3D Deconvolution Brightfield Microscopy: Method and Analysis Using Human Chromatin in the Interphase Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Tadrous, Paul Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Anatomy has advanced using 3-dimensional (3D) studies at macroscopic (e.g., dissection, injection moulding of vessels, radiology) and microscopic (e.g., serial section reconstruction with light and electron microscopy) levels. This paper presents the first results in human cells of a new method of subcellular 3D brightfield microscopy. Unlike traditional 3D deconvolution and confocal techniques, this method is suitable for general application to brightfield microscopy. Unlike brightfield serial sectioning it has subcellular resolution. Results are presented of the 3D structure of chromatin in the interphase nucleus of two human cell types, hepatocyte and plasma cell. I show how the freedom to examine these structures in 3D allows greater morphological discrimination between and within cell types and the 3D structural basis for the classical “clock-face” motif of the plasma cell nucleus is revealed. Potential for further applications discussed. PMID:22567315

  10. Compact multiframe blind deconvolution.

    PubMed

    Hope, Douglas A; Jefferies, Stuart M

    2011-03-15

    We describe a multiframe blind deconvolution (MFBD) algorithm that uses spectral ratios (the ratio of the Fourier spectra of two data frames) to model the inherent temporal signatures encoded by the observed images. In addition, by focusing on the separation of the object spectrum and system transfer functions only at spatial frequencies where the measured signal is above the noise level, we significantly reduce the number of unknowns to be determined. This "compact" MFBD yields high-quality restorations in a much shorter time than is achieved with MFBD algorithms that do not model the temporal signatures; it may also provide higher-fidelity solutions. PMID:21403711

  11. Extension of deconvolution algorithms for the mapping of moving acoustic sources.

    PubMed

    Fleury, Vincent; Bulté, Jean

    2011-03-01

    Several deconvolution algorithms are commonly used in aeroacoustics to estimate the power level radiated by static sources, for instance, the deconvolution approach for the mapping of acoustic sources (DAMAS), DAMAS2, CLEAN, and the CLEAN based on spatial source coherence algorithm (CLEAN-SC). However, few efficient methodologies are available for moving sources. In this paper, several deconvolution approaches are proposed to estimate the narrow-band spectra of low-Mach number uncorrelated sources. All of them are based on a beamformer output. Due to velocity, the beamformer output is inherently related to the source spectra over the whole frequency range, which makes the deconvolution very complex from a computational point of view. Using the conventional Doppler approximation and for limited time analysis, the problem can be separated into multiple independent problems, each involving a single source frequency, as for static sources. DAMAS, DAMAS2, CLEAN, and CLEAN-SC are then extended to moving sources. These extensions are validated from both synthesized data and real aircraft flyover noise measurements. Comparable performances to those of the corresponding static methodologies are recovered. All these approaches constitute complementary and efficient tools in order to quantify the noise level emitted from moving acoustic sources. PMID:21428506

  12. Windprofiler optimization using digital deconvolution procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hocking, W. K.; Hocking, A.; Hocking, D. G.; Garbanzo-Salas, M.

    2014-10-01

    Digital improvements to data acquisition procedures used for windprofiler radars have the potential for improving the height coverage at optimum resolution, and permit improved height resolution. A few newer systems already use this capability. Real-time deconvolution procedures offer even further optimization, and this has not been effectively employed in recent years. In this paper we demonstrate the advantages of combining these features, with particular emphasis on the advantages of real-time deconvolution. Using several multi-core CPUs, we have been able to achieve speeds of up to 40 GHz from a standard commercial motherboard, allowing data to be digitized and processed without the need for any type of hardware except for a transmitter (and associated drivers), a receiver and a digitizer. No Digital Signal Processor chips are needed, allowing great flexibility with analysis algorithms. By using deconvolution procedures, we have then been able to not only optimize height resolution, but also have been able to make advances in dealing with spectral contaminants like ground echoes and other near-zero-Hz spectral contamination. Our results also demonstrate the ability to produce fine-resolution measurements, revealing small-scale structures within the backscattered echoes that were previously not possible to see. Resolutions of 30 m are possible for VHF radars. Furthermore, our deconvolution technique allows the removal of range-aliasing effects in real time, a major bonus in many instances. Results are shown using new radars in Canada and Costa Rica.

  13. Grid Stiffened Structure Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The Grid Stiffened Analysis Tool contract is contract performed by Boeing under NASA purchase order H30249D. The contract calls for a "best effort" study comprised of two tasks: (1) Create documentation for a composite grid-stiffened structure analysis tool, in the form of a Microsoft EXCEL spread sheet, that was developed by originally at Stanford University and later further developed by the Air Force, and (2) Write a program that functions as a NASTRAN pre-processor to generate an FEM code for grid-stiffened structure. In performing this contract, Task 1 was given higher priority because it enables NASA to make efficient use of a unique tool they already have; Task 2 was proposed by Boeing because it also would be beneficial to the analysis of composite grid-stiffened structures, specifically in generating models for preliminary design studies. The contract is now complete, this package includes copies of the user's documentation for Task 1 and a CD ROM & diskette with an electronic copy of the user's documentation and an updated version of the "GRID 99" spreadsheet.

  14. Failure environment analysis tool applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pack, Ginger L.; Wadsworth, David B.

    1993-01-01

    Understanding risks and avoiding failure are daily concerns for the women and men of NASA. Although NASA's mission propels us to push the limits of technology, and though the risks are considerable, the NASA community has instilled within, the determination to preserve the integrity of the systems upon which our mission and, our employees lives and well-being depend. One of the ways this is being done is by expanding and improving the tools used to perform risk assessment. The Failure Environment Analysis Tool (FEAT) was developed to help engineers and analysts more thoroughly and reliably conduct risk assessment and failure analysis. FEAT accomplishes this by providing answers to questions regarding what might have caused a particular failure; or, conversely, what effect the occurrence of a failure might have on an entire system. Additionally, FEAT can determine what common causes could have resulted in other combinations of failures. FEAT will even help determine the vulnerability of a system to failures, in light of reduced capability. FEAT also is useful in training personnel who must develop an understanding of particular systems. FEAT facilitates training on system behavior, by providing an automated environment in which to conduct 'what-if' evaluation. These types of analyses make FEAT a valuable tool for engineers and operations personnel in the design, analysis, and operation of NASA space systems.

  15. Failure environment analysis tool applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pack, Ginger L.; Wadsworth, David B.

    1994-01-01

    Understanding risks and avoiding failure are daily concerns for the women and men of NASA. Although NASA's mission propels us to push the limits of technology, and though the risks are considerable, the NASA community has instilled within it, the determination to preserve the integrity of the systems upon which our mission and, our employees lives and well-being depend. One of the ways this is being done is by expanding and improving the tools used to perform risk assessment. The Failure Environment Analysis Tool (FEAT) was developed to help engineers and analysts more thoroughly and reliably conduct risk assessment and failure analysis. FEAT accomplishes this by providing answers to questions regarding what might have caused a particular failure; or, conversely, what effect the occurrence of a failure might have on an entire system. Additionally, FEAT can determine what common causes could have resulted in other combinations of failures. FEAT will even help determine the vulnerability of a system to failures, in light of reduced capability. FEAT also is useful in training personnel who must develop an understanding of particular systems. FEAT facilitates training on system behavior, by providing an automated environment in which to conduct 'what-if' evaluation. These types of analyses make FEAT a valuable tool for engineers and operations personnel in the design, analysis, and operation of NASA space systems.

  16. IMPAIR: massively parallel deconvolution on the GPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherry, Michael; Shearer, Andy

    2013-02-01

    The IMPAIR software is a high throughput image deconvolution tool for processing large out-of-core datasets of images, varying from large images with spatially varying PSFs to large numbers of images with spatially invariant PSFs. IMPAIR implements a parallel version of the tried and tested Richardson-Lucy deconvolution algorithm regularised via a custom wavelet thresholding library. It exploits the inherently parallel nature of the convolution operation to achieve quality results on consumer grade hardware: through the NVIDIA Tesla GPU implementation, the multi-core OpenMP implementation, and the cluster computing MPI implementation of the software. IMPAIR aims to address the problem of parallel processing in both top-down and bottom-up approaches: by managing the input data at the image level, and by managing the execution at the instruction level. These combined techniques will lead to a scalable solution with minimal resource consumption and maximal load balancing. IMPAIR is being developed as both a stand-alone tool for image processing, and as a library which can be embedded into non-parallel code to transparently provide parallel high throughput deconvolution.

  17. Common Bolted Joint Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imtiaz, Kauser

    2011-01-01

    Common Bolted Joint Analysis Tool (comBAT) is an Excel/VB-based bolted joint analysis/optimization program that lays out a systematic foundation for an inexperienced or seasoned analyst to determine fastener size, material, and assembly torque for a given design. Analysts are able to perform numerous what-if scenarios within minutes to arrive at an optimal solution. The program evaluates input design parameters, performs joint assembly checks, and steps through numerous calculations to arrive at several key margins of safety for each member in a joint. It also checks for joint gapping, provides fatigue calculations, and generates joint diagrams for a visual reference. Optimum fastener size and material, as well as correct torque, can then be provided. Analysis methodology, equations, and guidelines are provided throughout the solution sequence so that this program does not become a "black box:" for the analyst. There are built-in databases that reduce the legwork required by the analyst. Each step is clearly identified and results are provided in number format, as well as color-coded spelled-out words to draw user attention. The three key features of the software are robust technical content, innovative and user friendly I/O, and a large database. The program addresses every aspect of bolted joint analysis and proves to be an instructional tool at the same time. It saves analysis time, has intelligent messaging features, and catches operator errors in real time.

  18. Dynamic Hurricane Data Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knosp, Brian W.; Li, Peggy; Vu, Quoc A.

    2009-01-01

    A dynamic hurricane data analysis tool allows users of the JPL Tropical Cyclone Information System (TCIS) to analyze data over a Web medium. The TCIS software is described in the previous article, Tropical Cyclone Information System (TCIS) (NPO-45748). This tool interfaces with the TCIS database to pull in data from several different atmospheric and oceanic data sets, both observed by instruments. Users can use this information to generate histograms, maps, and profile plots for specific storms. The tool also displays statistical values for the user-selected parameter for the mean, standard deviation, median, minimum, and maximum values. There is little wait time, allowing for fast data plots over date and spatial ranges. Users may also zoom-in for a closer look at a particular spatial range. This is version 1 of the software. Researchers will use the data and tools on the TCIS to understand hurricane processes, improve hurricane forecast models and identify what types of measurements the next generation of instruments will need to collect.

  19. Bayesian least squares deconvolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asensio Ramos, A.; Petit, P.

    2015-11-01

    Aims: We develop a fully Bayesian least squares deconvolution (LSD) that can be applied to the reliable detection of magnetic signals in noise-limited stellar spectropolarimetric observations using multiline techniques. Methods: We consider LSD under the Bayesian framework and we introduce a flexible Gaussian process (GP) prior for the LSD profile. This prior allows the result to automatically adapt to the presence of signal. We exploit several linear algebra identities to accelerate the calculations. The final algorithm can deal with thousands of spectral lines in a few seconds. Results: We demonstrate the reliability of the method with synthetic experiments and we apply it to real spectropolarimetric observations of magnetic stars. We are able to recover the magnetic signals using a small number of spectral lines, together with the uncertainty at each velocity bin. This allows the user to consider if the detected signal is reliable. The code to compute the Bayesian LSD profile is freely available.

  20. Shot Planning and Analysis Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, A; Beeler, R; Conder, A; Fallejo, R; Flegel, M; Hutton, M; Jancaitis, K; Lakamsani, V; Potter, D; Reisdorf, S; Tappero, J; Whitman, P; Carr, W; Liao, Z

    2011-07-25

    Shot planning and analysis tools (SPLAT) integrate components necessary to help achieve a high over-all operational efficiency of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) by combining near and long-term shot planning, final optics demand and supply loops, target diagnostics planning, and target fabrication requirements. Currently, the SPLAT project is comprised of two primary tool suites for shot planning and optics demand. The shot planning component provides a web-based interface to selecting and building a sequence of proposed shots for the NIF. These shot sequences, or 'lanes' as they are referred to by shot planners, provide for planning both near-term shots in the Facility and long-term 'campaigns' in the months and years to come. The shot planning capabilities integrate with the Configuration Management Tool (CMT) for experiment details and the NIF calendar for availability. Future enhancements will additionally integrate with target diagnostics planning and target fabrication requirements tools. The optics demand component is built upon predictive modelling of maintenance requirements on the final optics as a result of the proposed shots assembled during shot planning. The predictive models integrate energetics from a Laser Performance Operations Model (LPOM), the status of the deployed optics as provided by the online Final Optics Inspection system, and physics-based mathematical 'rules' that predict optic flaw growth and new flaw initiations. These models are then run on an analytical cluster comprised of forty-eight Linux-based compute nodes. Results from the predictive models are used to produce decision-support reports in the areas of optics inspection planning, optics maintenance exchanges, and optics beam blocker placement advisories. Over time, the SPLAT project will evolve to provide a variety of decision-support and operation optimization tools.

  1. Flow Analysis Tool White Paper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boscia, Nichole K.

    2012-01-01

    Faster networks are continually being built to accommodate larger data transfers. While it is intuitive to think that implementing faster networks will result in higher throughput rates, this is often not the case. There are many elements involved in data transfer, many of which are beyond the scope of the network itself. Although networks may get bigger and support faster technologies, the presence of other legacy components, such as older application software or kernel parameters, can often cause bottlenecks. Engineers must be able to identify when data flows are reaching a bottleneck that is not imposed by the network and then troubleshoot it using the tools available to them. The current best practice is to collect as much information as possible on the network traffic flows so that analysis is quick and easy. Unfortunately, no single method of collecting this information can sufficiently capture the whole endto- end picture. This becomes even more of a hurdle when large, multi-user systems are involved. In order to capture all the necessary information, multiple data sources are required. This paper presents a method for developing a flow analysis tool to effectively collect network flow data from multiple sources and provide that information to engineers in a clear, concise way for analysis. The purpose of this method is to collect enough information to quickly (and automatically) identify poorly performing flows along with the cause of the problem. The method involves the development of a set of database tables that can be populated with flow data from multiple sources, along with an easyto- use, web-based front-end interface to help network engineers access, organize, analyze, and manage all the information.

  2. General Mission Analysis Tool (GMAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Steven P. (Compiler)

    2016-01-01

    This is a software tutorial and presentation demonstrating the application of the General Mission Analysis Tool (GMAT) to the critical design phase of NASA missions. The demonstration discusses GMAT basics, then presents a detailed example of GMAT application to the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) mission. Other examples include OSIRIS-Rex. This talk is a combination of existing presentations; a GMAT basics and overview, and technical presentations from the TESS and OSIRIS-REx projects on their application of GMAT to critical mission design. The GMAT basics slides are taken from the open source training material. The OSIRIS-REx slides are from a previous conference presentation. The TESS slides are a streamlined version of the CDR package provided by the project with SBU and ITAR data removed by the TESS project.

  3. Automated resolution of chromatographic signals by independent component analysis-orthogonal signal deconvolution in comprehensive gas chromatography/mass spectrometry-based metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Domingo-Almenara, Xavier; Perera, Alexandre; Ramírez, Noelia; Brezmes, Jesus

    2016-07-01

    Comprehensive gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC×GC-MS) provides a different perspective in metabolomics profiling of samples. However, algorithms for GC×GC-MS data processing are needed in order to automatically process the data and extract the purest information about the compounds appearing in complex biological samples. This study shows the capability of independent component analysis-orthogonal signal deconvolution (ICA-OSD), an algorithm based on blind source separation and distributed in an R package called osd, to extract the spectra of the compounds appearing in GC×GC-MS chromatograms in an automated manner. We studied the performance of ICA-OSD by the quantification of 38 metabolites through a set of 20 Jurkat cell samples analyzed by GC×GC-MS. The quantification by ICA-OSD was compared with a supervised quantification by selective ions, and most of the R(2) coefficients of determination were in good agreement (R(2)>0.90) while up to 24 cases exhibited an excellent linear relation (R(2)>0.95). We concluded that ICA-OSD can be used to resolve co-eluted compounds in GC×GC-MS. PMID:27208528

  4. Climate Data Analysis Tools - (CDAT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doutriaux, C.; Jennifer, A.; Drach, R.; Dubois, P.; Williams, D.

    2003-12-01

    Climate Data Analysis Tools (CDAT) is a software infrastructure that uses an object-oriented scripting language to link together separate software subsystems and packages thus forming an integrated environment for solving model diagnosis problems. The power of the system comes from Python and its ability to seamlessly interconnect software. Python provides a general purpose and full-featured scripting language with a variety of user interfaces including command-line interaction, stand-alone scripts (applications) and graphical user interfaces (GUI). The CDAT subsystems, implemented as modules, provide access to and management of gridded data (Climate Data Management System or CDMS); large-array numerical operations (Numerical Python); and visualization (Visualization and Control System or VCS). One of the most difficult challenges facing climate researchers today is the cataloging and analysis of massive amounts of multi-dimensional global atmospheric and oceanic model data. To reduce the labor intensive and time-consuming process of data management, retrieval, and analysis, PCMDI and other DOE sites have come together to develop intelligent filing system and data management software for the linking of storage devices located throughout the United States and the international climate research community. This effort, headed by PCMDI, NCAR, and ANL will allow users anywhere to remotely access this distributed multi-petabyte archive and perform analysis. PCMDI's CDAT is an innovative system that supports exploration and visualization of climate scientific datasets. As an "open system", the software sub-systems (i.e., modules) are independent and freely available to the global climate community. CDAT is easily extended to include new modules and as a result of its flexibility, PCMDI has integrated other popular software components, such as: the popular Live Access Server (LAS) and the Distributed Oceanographic Data System (DODS). Together with ANL's Globus middleware

  5. Deconvolution of the vestibular evoked myogenic potential.

    PubMed

    Lütkenhöner, Bernd; Basel, Türker

    2012-02-01

    The vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) and the associated variance modulation can be understood by a convolution model. Two functions of time are incorporated into the model: the motor unit action potential (MUAP) of an average motor unit, and the temporal modulation of the MUAP rate of all contributing motor units, briefly called rate modulation. The latter is the function of interest, whereas the MUAP acts as a filter that distorts the information contained in the measured data. Here, it is shown how to recover the rate modulation by undoing the filtering using a deconvolution approach. The key aspects of our deconvolution algorithm are as follows: (1) the rate modulation is described in terms of just a few parameters; (2) the MUAP is calculated by Wiener deconvolution of the VEMP with the rate modulation; (3) the model parameters are optimized using a figure-of-merit function where the most important term quantifies the difference between measured and model-predicted variance modulation. The effectiveness of the algorithm is demonstrated with simulated data. An analysis of real data confirms the view that there are basically two components, which roughly correspond to the waves p13-n23 and n34-p44 of the VEMP. The rate modulation corresponding to the first, inhibitory component is much stronger than that corresponding to the second, excitatory component. But the latter is more extended so that the two modulations have almost the same equivalent rectangular duration. PMID:22079097

  6. System analysis: Developing tools for the future

    SciTech Connect

    De Jong, K.; clever, J.; Draper, J.V.; Davies, B.; Lonks, A.

    1996-02-01

    This report introduces and evaluates system analysis tools that were developed, or are under development, for the Robotics Technology Development Program (RTDP). Additionally, it discusses system analysis work completed using these tools aimed at completing a system analysis of the retrieval of waste from underground storage tanks on the Hanford Reservation near Richland, Washington. The tools developed and evaluated include a mixture of commercially available tools adapted to RTDP requirements, and some tools developed in house. The tools that are included in this report include: a Process Diagramming Tool, a Cost Modeling Tool, an Amortization Modeling Tool, a graphical simulation linked to the Cost Modeling Tool, a decision assistance tool, and a system thinking tool. Additionally, the importance of performance testing to the RTDP and the results of such testing executed is discussed. Further, the results of the Tank Waste Retrieval (TWR) System Diagram, the TWR Operations Cost Model, and the TWR Amortization Model are presented, and the implication of the results are discussed. Finally, the RTDP system analysis tools are assessed and some recommendations are made regarding continuing development of the tools and process.

  7. Survey of visualization and analysis tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, P. J.

    1994-01-01

    A large number of commercially available visualization and analysis tools are available to the researcher. Some of the strengths and limitations of some of these tools, from the viewpoint of the earth sciences discipline, are discussed. Visualization and analysis tools fall into one of two categories: those that are designed to a specific purpose and are non-extensive and those that are generic visual programming tools that are extensible. Most of the extensible packages examined incorporate a data flow paradigm.

  8. ADVANCED POWER SYSTEMS ANALYSIS TOOLS

    SciTech Connect

    Robert R. Jensen; Steven A. Benson; Jason D. Laumb

    2001-08-31

    The use of Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) modeling tools and improved analytical methods has provided key information in optimizing advanced power system design and operating conditions for efficiency, producing minimal air pollutant emissions and utilizing a wide range of fossil fuel properties. This project was divided into four tasks: the demonstration of the ash transformation model, upgrading spreadsheet tools, enhancements to analytical capabilities using the scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and improvements to the slag viscosity model. The ash transformation model, Atran, was used to predict the size and composition of ash particles, which has a major impact on the fate of the combustion system. To optimize Atran key factors such as mineral fragmentation and coalescence, the heterogeneous and homogeneous interaction of the organically associated elements must be considered as they are applied to the operating conditions. The resulting model's ash composition compares favorably to measured results. Enhancements to existing EERC spreadsheet application included upgrading interactive spreadsheets to calculate the thermodynamic properties for fuels, reactants, products, and steam with Newton Raphson algorithms to perform calculations on mass, energy, and elemental balances, isentropic expansion of steam, and gasifier equilibrium conditions. Derivative calculations can be performed to estimate fuel heating values, adiabatic flame temperatures, emission factors, comparative fuel costs, and per-unit carbon taxes from fuel analyses. Using state-of-the-art computer-controlled scanning electron microscopes and associated microanalysis systems, a method to determine viscosity using the incorporation of grey-scale binning acquired by the SEM image was developed. The image analysis capabilities of a backscattered electron image can be subdivided into various grey-scale ranges that can be analyzed separately. Since the grey scale's intensity is

  9. Deconvolution of gas chromatographic data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, S.; Rayborn, G. H.

    1980-01-01

    The use of deconvolution methods on gas chromatographic data to obtain an accurate determination of the relative amounts of each material present by mathematically separating the merged peaks is discussed. Data were obtained on a gas chromatograph with a flame ionization detector. Chromatograms of five xylenes with differing degrees of separation were generated by varying the column temperature at selected rates. The merged peaks were then successfully separated by deconvolution. The concept of function continuation in the frequency domain was introduced in striving to reach the theoretical limit of accuracy, but proved to be only partially successful.

  10. Analysis Tools for CFD Multigrid Solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mineck, Raymond E.; Thomas, James L.; Diskin, Boris

    2004-01-01

    Analysis tools are needed to guide the development and evaluate the performance of multigrid solvers for the fluid flow equations. Classical analysis tools, such as local mode analysis, often fail to accurately predict performance. Two-grid analysis tools, herein referred to as Idealized Coarse Grid and Idealized Relaxation iterations, have been developed and evaluated within a pilot multigrid solver. These new tools are applicable to general systems of equations and/or discretizations and point to problem areas within an existing multigrid solver. Idealized Relaxation and Idealized Coarse Grid are applied in developing textbook-efficient multigrid solvers for incompressible stagnation flow problems.

  11. Deconvolution using the complex cepstrum

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, H B

    1980-12-01

    The theory, description, and implementation of a generalized linear filtering system for the nonlinear filtering of convolved signals are presented. A detailed look at the problems and requirements associated with the deconvolution of signal components is undertaken. Related properties are also developed. A synthetic example is shown and is followed by an application using real seismic data. 29 figures.

  12. General Mission Analysis Tool (GMAT) Mathematical Specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Steve

    2007-01-01

    The General Mission Analysis Tool (GMAT) is a space trajectory optimization and mission analysis system developed by NASA and private industry in the spirit of the NASA Mission. GMAT contains new technology and is a testbed for future technology development.

  13. Multi-mission telecom analysis tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanks, D.; Kordon, M.; Baker, J.

    2002-01-01

    In the early formulation phase of a mission it is critically important to have fast, easy to use, easy to integrate space vehicle subsystem analysis tools so that engineers can rapidly perform trade studies not only by themselves but in coordination with other subsystem engineers as well. The Multi-Mission Telecom Analysis Tool (MMTAT) is designed for just this purpose.

  14. Integrating Reliability Analysis with a Performance Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, David M.; Palumbo, Daniel L.; Ulrey, Michael

    1995-01-01

    A large number of commercial simulation tools support performance oriented studies of complex computer and communication systems. Reliability of these systems, when desired, must be obtained by remodeling the system in a different tool. This has obvious drawbacks: (1) substantial extra effort is required to create the reliability model; (2) through modeling error the reliability model may not reflect precisely the same system as the performance model; (3) as the performance model evolves one must continuously reevaluate the validity of assumptions made in that model. In this paper we describe an approach, and a tool that implements this approach, for integrating a reliability analysis engine into a production quality simulation based performance modeling tool, and for modeling within such an integrated tool. The integrated tool allows one to use the same modeling formalisms to conduct both performance and reliability studies. We describe how the reliability analysis engine is integrated into the performance tool, describe the extensions made to the performance tool to support the reliability analysis, and consider the tool's performance.

  15. Model Analysis ToolKit

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2015-05-15

    MATK provides basic functionality to facilitate model analysis within the Python computational environment. Model analysis setup within MATK includes: - define parameters - define observations - define model (python function) - define samplesets (sets of parameter combinations) Currently supported functionality includes: - forward model runs - Latin-Hypercube sampling of parameters - multi-dimensional parameter studies - parallel execution of parameter samples - model calibration using internal Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm - model calibration using lmfit package - modelmore » calibration using levmar package - Markov Chain Monte Carlo using pymc package MATK facilitates model analysis using: - scipy - calibration (scipy.optimize) - rpy2 - Python interface to R« less

  16. Model Analysis ToolKit

    SciTech Connect

    Harp, Dylan R.

    2015-05-15

    MATK provides basic functionality to facilitate model analysis within the Python computational environment. Model analysis setup within MATK includes: - define parameters - define observations - define model (python function) - define samplesets (sets of parameter combinations) Currently supported functionality includes: - forward model runs - Latin-Hypercube sampling of parameters - multi-dimensional parameter studies - parallel execution of parameter samples - model calibration using internal Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm - model calibration using lmfit package - model calibration using levmar package - Markov Chain Monte Carlo using pymc package MATK facilitates model analysis using: - scipy - calibration (scipy.optimize) - rpy2 - Python interface to R

  17. 2010 Solar Market Transformation Analysis and Tools

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2010-04-01

    This document describes the DOE-funded solar market transformation analysis and tools under development in Fiscal Year 2010 so that stakeholders can access available resources and get engaged where interested.

  18. Linear deconvolution of ATR-IR spectra of mineral mixtures for planetary surface studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemtob, S. M.; Glotch, T. D.; Rossman, G. R.

    2007-12-01

    Attenuated total reflectance (ATR) is an infrared spectroscopic method useful for compositional analysis of powdered samples. ATR-IR is frequently used for chemical phase ID, but is seldom used in geological studies. Because it is effective with small grain sizes, ATR-IR could be a powerful tool for in situ mineral identification on future planetary lander missions, especially for the analysis of fine-grained regoliths, atmospheric dust, and outcrop grindings. Here we test the ability of the ATR-IR technique to quantitatively determine the modal mineralogy of powdered mineral mixtures. Mixtures were prepared from four mineral endmembers - olivine (Fo90), plagioclase (An60), calcite and gypsum - in known volumetric proportions and in a variety of grain sizes. ATR spectra of mineral mixtures and endmembers were collected in the range 400-4000 cm-1. Spectra of mixtures were modeled using the deconvolution method of Rogers et al. (2006), modified so that a measured grain-size distribution (GSD) could be included as a weighted factor in the fit. The signal-to-noise ratio increased for each mineral with decreasing grain size. This is expected because finer grain sizes have a better contact with the ATR crystal. For mixtures of a single grain size, the deconvolution-modeled proportions generally matched actual proportions within 10-20%. Occasionally, the deconvolution model produced poor matches to actual mineralogy and observed spectral shape. To assess the effect of clinging fines, fine-grained (<10 μm) calcite and gypsum were added in increments from 0 to 30% to a mixture of coarsely particulate (74- 147 μm) olivine and plagioclase. The fine-grained components of these mixtures were strongly overrepresented in the model - possibly the result of non-ideal mixing and surface area dominating over volume in linear spectral addition. Increasing the weight of the GSD in the deconvolution model mitigated the overestimation of fines, but increased the RMS error of the

  19. Target deconvolution techniques in modern phenotypic profiling

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jiyoun; Bogyo, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    The past decade has seen rapid growth in the use of diverse compound libraries in classical phenotypic screens to identify modulators of a given process. The subsequent process of identifying the molecular targets of active hits, also called ‘target deconvolution’, is an essential step for understanding compound mechanism of action and for using the identified hits as tools for further dissection of a given biological process. Recent advances in ‘omics’ technologies, coupled with in silico approaches and the reduced cost of whole genome sequencing, have greatly improved the workflow of target deconvolution and have contributed to a renaissance of ‘modern’ phenotypic profiling. In this review, we will outline how both new and old techniques are being used in the difficult process of target identification and validation as well as discuss some of the ongoing challenges remaining for phenotypic screening. PMID:23337810

  20. Budget Risk & Prioritization Analysis Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2010-12-31

    BRPAtool performs the following: •Assists managers in making solid decisions on what scope/activities to reduce and/or eliminate, to meet constrained budgets, based on multiple risk factors •Enables analysis of different budget scenarios •Can analyze risks and cost for each activity based on technical, quantifiable risk criteria and management-determined risks •Real-time analysis •Enables managers to determine the multipliers and where funding is best applied •Promotes solid budget defense

  1. Statistical Tools for Forensic Analysis of Toolmarks

    SciTech Connect

    David Baldwin; Max Morris; Stan Bajic; Zhigang Zhou; James Kreiser

    2004-04-22

    Recovery and comparison of toolmarks, footprint impressions, and fractured surfaces connected to a crime scene are of great importance in forensic science. The purpose of this project is to provide statistical tools for the validation of the proposition that particular manufacturing processes produce marks on the work-product (or tool) that are substantially different from tool to tool. The approach to validation involves the collection of digital images of toolmarks produced by various tool manufacturing methods on produced work-products and the development of statistical methods for data reduction and analysis of the images. The developed statistical methods provide a means to objectively calculate a ''degree of association'' between matches of similarly produced toolmarks. The basis for statistical method development relies on ''discriminating criteria'' that examiners use to identify features and spatial relationships in their analysis of forensic samples. The developed data reduction algorithms utilize the same rules used by examiners for classification and association of toolmarks.

  2. Deconvolution procedure of the UV-vis spectra. A powerful tool for the estimation of the binding of a model drug to specific solubilisation loci of bio-compatible aqueous surfactant-forming micelle.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Ilaria; Merli, Marcello; Turco Liveri, Maria Liria

    2015-05-01

    UV-vis-spectra evolution of Nile Red loaded into Tween 20 micelles with pH and [Tween 20] have been analysed in a non-conventional manner by exploiting the deconvolution method. The number of buried sub-bands has been found to depend on both pH and bio-surfactant concentration, whose positions have been associated to Nile Red confined in aqueous solution and in the three micellar solubilisation sites. For the first time, by using an extended classical two-pseudo-phases-model, the robust treatment of the spectrophotometric data allows the estimation of Nile Red binding constant to the available loci. Hosting capability towards Nile Red is exalted by the pH enhancement. Comparison between binding constant values classically evaluated and those estimated by the deconvolution protocol unveiled that overall binding values perfectly match with the mean values of the local binding sites. This result suggests that deconvolution procedure provides more precise and reliable values, which are more representative of drug confinement. PMID:25703359

  3. Deconvolution procedure of the UV-vis spectra. A powerful tool for the estimation of the binding of a model drug to specific solubilisation loci of bio-compatible aqueous surfactant-forming micelle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calabrese, Ilaria; Merli, Marcello; Turco Liveri, Maria Liria

    2015-05-01

    UV-vis-spectra evolution of Nile Red loaded into Tween 20 micelles with pH and [Tween 20] have been analysed in a non-conventional manner by exploiting the deconvolution method. The number of buried sub-bands has been found to depend on both pH and bio-surfactant concentration, whose positions have been associated to Nile Red confined in aqueous solution and in the three micellar solubilisation sites. For the first time, by using an extended classical two-pseudo-phases-model, the robust treatment of the spectrophotometric data allows the estimation of Nile Red binding constant to the available loci. Hosting capability towards Nile Red is exalted by the pH enhancement. Comparison between binding constant values classically evaluated and those estimated by the deconvolution protocol unveiled that overall binding values perfectly match with the mean values of the local binding sites. This result suggests that deconvolution procedure provides more precise and reliable values, which are more representative of drug confinement.

  4. Tools for Basic Statistical Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luz, Paul L.

    2005-01-01

    Statistical Analysis Toolset is a collection of eight Microsoft Excel spreadsheet programs, each of which performs calculations pertaining to an aspect of statistical analysis. These programs present input and output data in user-friendly, menu-driven formats, with automatic execution. The following types of calculations are performed: Descriptive statistics are computed for a set of data x(i) (i = 1, 2, 3 . . . ) entered by the user. Normal Distribution Estimates will calculate the statistical value that corresponds to cumulative probability values, given a sample mean and standard deviation of the normal distribution. Normal Distribution from two Data Points will extend and generate a cumulative normal distribution for the user, given two data points and their associated probability values. Two programs perform two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with no replication or generalized ANOVA for two factors with four levels and three repetitions. Linear Regression-ANOVA will curvefit data to the linear equation y=f(x) and will do an ANOVA to check its significance.

  5. Surface analysis of stone and bone tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stemp, W. James; Watson, Adam S.; Evans, Adrian A.

    2016-03-01

    Microwear (use-wear) analysis is a powerful method for identifying tool use that archaeologists and anthropologists employ to determine the activities undertaken by both humans and their hominin ancestors. Knowledge of tool use allows for more accurate and detailed reconstructions of past behavior, particularly in relation to subsistence practices, economic activities, conflict and ritual. It can also be used to document changes in these activities over time, in different locations, and by different members of society, in terms of gender and status, for example. Both stone and bone tools have been analyzed using a variety of techniques that focus on the observation, documentation and interpretation of wear traces. Traditionally, microwear analysis relied on the qualitative assessment of wear features using microscopes and often included comparisons between replicated tools used experimentally and the recovered artifacts, as well as functional analogies dependent upon modern implements and those used by indigenous peoples from various places around the world. Determination of tool use has also relied on the recovery and analysis of both organic and inorganic residues of past worked materials that survived in and on artifact surfaces. To determine tool use and better understand the mechanics of wear formation, particularly on stone and bone, archaeologists and anthropologists have increasingly turned to surface metrology and tribology to assist them in their research. This paper provides a history of the development of traditional microwear analysis in archaeology and anthropology and also explores the introduction and adoption of more modern methods and technologies for documenting and identifying wear on stone and bone tools, specifically those developed for the engineering sciences to study surface structures on micro- and nanoscales. The current state of microwear analysis is discussed as are the future directions in the study of microwear on stone and bone tools.

  6. Stochastic Simulation Tool for Aerospace Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F.; Moore, David F.

    2006-01-01

    Stochastic simulation refers to incorporating the effects of design tolerances and uncertainties into the design analysis model and then determining their influence on the design. A high-level evaluation of one such stochastic simulation tool, the MSC.Robust Design tool by MSC.Software Corporation, has been conducted. This stochastic simulation tool provides structural analysts with a tool to interrogate their structural design based on their mathematical description of the design problem using finite element analysis methods. This tool leverages the analyst's prior investment in finite element model development of a particular design. The original finite element model is treated as the baseline structural analysis model for the stochastic simulations that are to be performed. A Monte Carlo approach is used by MSC.Robust Design to determine the effects of scatter in design input variables on response output parameters. The tool was not designed to provide a probabilistic assessment, but to assist engineers in understanding cause and effect. It is driven by a graphical-user interface and retains the engineer-in-the-loop strategy for design evaluation and improvement. The application problem for the evaluation is chosen to be a two-dimensional shell finite element model of a Space Shuttle wing leading-edge panel under re-entry aerodynamic loading. MSC.Robust Design adds value to the analysis effort by rapidly being able to identify design input variables whose variability causes the most influence in response output parameters.

  7. PepTool and GeneTool: platform-independent tools for biological sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Wishart, D S; Stothard, P; Van Domselaar, G H

    2000-01-01

    Although we are unable to discuss all of the functionality available in PepTool and GeneTool, it should be evident from this brief review that both packages offer a great deal in terms of functionality and ease-of-use. Furthermore, a number of useful innovations including platform-independent GUI design, networked parallelism, direct internet connectivity, database compression, and a variety of enhanced or improved algorithms should make these two programs particularly useful in the rapidly changing world of biological sequence analysis. More complete descriptions of the programs, algorithms and operation of PepTool and GeneTool are available on the BioTools web site (www.biotools.com), in the associated program user manuals and in the on-line Help pages. PMID:10547833

  8. Photogrammetry Tool for Forensic Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, John

    2012-01-01

    A system allows crime scene and accident scene investigators the ability to acquire visual scene data using cameras for processing at a later time. This system uses a COTS digital camera, a photogrammetry calibration cube, and 3D photogrammetry processing software. In a previous instrument developed by NASA, the laser scaling device made use of parallel laser beams to provide a photogrammetry solution in 2D. This device and associated software work well under certain conditions. In order to make use of a full 3D photogrammetry system, a different approach was needed. When using multiple cubes, whose locations relative to each other are unknown, a procedure that would merge the data from each cube would be as follows: 1. One marks a reference point on cube 1, then marks points on cube 2 as unknowns. This locates cube 2 in cube 1 s coordinate system. 2. One marks reference points on cube 2, then marks points on cube 1 as unknowns. This locates cube 1 in cube 2 s coordinate system. 3. This procedure is continued for all combinations of cubes. 4. The coordinate of all of the found coordinate systems is then merged into a single global coordinate system. In order to achieve maximum accuracy, measurements are done in one of two ways, depending on scale: when measuring the size of objects, the coordinate system corresponding to the nearest cube is used, or when measuring the location of objects relative to a global coordinate system, a merged coordinate system is used. Presently, traffic accident analysis is time-consuming and not very accurate. Using cubes with differential GPS would give absolute positions of cubes in the accident area, so that individual cubes would provide local photogrammetry calibration to objects near a cube.

  9. Fourier Transform Based Deconvolution Analysis of Frequency Modulation Lineshapes; Fluorocarbon Radical Densities in AN Ecr Etcher from Infrared Diode Laser Spectroscopy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jian-Zhong

    1995-11-01

    Highly sensitive modulation detection techniques produce a distorted and more complicated form of the original line shape. In this thesis many existing theories for analysis of these modulation lineshapes are mathematically compared. The Fourier transform of the modulation spectrum is shown to be always a product of the Fourier transform of the original spectrum and a known modulation function. If the latter is divided out, then the inverse transform will give the original spectrum as it would have appeared with no modulation. Mathematical expressions of modulation functions are also derived for several more general modulation of waveforms: one-tone frequency modulation by an arbitrary waveform, two-tone frequency modulation (TTFM) by sine waveforms, and tone-burst frequency modulation (TBFM) by sine waveforms. The two seemingly different modulation schemes, TTFM and TBFM, are proven to be actually the same, when no AM is involved and the modulation index is low. Based on the fast Fourier transform (FFT) the deconvolution procedure for one-tone low frequency wavelength modulation has been implemented in FORTRAN. This recovery procedure is applied to some computer simulated modulation spectra of a Gaussian and then to actual multiple line, second harmonic diode laser spectral data taken from a plasma. Also included are infrared absorption measurements of CF, CF_2, CF_3, and COF_2 in an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma etcher with CHF _3 and rm C_2H_2F _4 as the main feed gases. The role of CF _{x} (x=1, 2, 3) radicals on Si/SiO_2 etch selectivity has been examined by measuring the neutral CF_{x} absolute concentrations in the gas phase for the same sets of conditions employed in etch rate measurements. We have observed P(10.5) and P(11.5) of ^2 Pi_{1/2} and P(10.5) of ^2Pi_{3/2} in the fundamental band of CF in the ECR etcher, and used these transitions in CF absolute density determinations in rm C_2H_2F_4 or CHF_3 in the power range of 500 W to 1200 W and

  10. Genomic sequence analysis tools: a user's guide.

    PubMed

    Fortna, A; Gardiner, K

    2001-03-01

    The wealth of information from various genome sequencing projects provides the biologist with a new perspective from which to analyze, and design experiments with, mammalian systems. The complexity of the information, however, requires new software tools, and numerous such tools are now available. Which type and which specific system is most effective depends, in part, upon how much sequence is to be analyzed and with what level of experimental support. Here we survey a number of mammalian genomic sequence analysis systems with respect to the data they provide and the ease of their use. The hope is to aid the experimental biologist in choosing the most appropriate tool for their analyses. PMID:11226611

  11. Built Environment Energy Analysis Tool Overview (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, C.

    2013-04-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the Built Environment Energy Analysis Tool, which is designed to assess impacts of future land use/built environment patterns on transportation-related energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The tool can be used to evaluate a range of population distribution and urban design scenarios for 2030 and 2050. This tool was produced as part of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  12. A new scoring function for top-down spectral deconvolution

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kou, Qiang; Wu, Si; Liu, Xiaowen

    2014-12-18

    Background: Top-down mass spectrometry plays an important role in intact protein identification and characterization. Top-down mass spectra are more complex than bottom-up mass spectra because they often contain many isotopomer envelopes from highly charged ions, which may overlap with one another. As a result, spectral deconvolution, which converts a complex top-down mass spectrum into a monoisotopic mass list, is a key step in top-down spectral interpretation. Results: In this paper, we propose a new scoring function, L-score, for evaluating isotopomer envelopes. By combining L-score with MS-Deconv, a new software tool, MS-Deconv+, was developed for top-down spectral deconvolution. Experimental results showedmore » that MS-Deconv+ outperformed existing software tools in top-down spectral deconvolution. Conclusions: L-score shows high discriminative ability in identification of isotopomer envelopes. Using L-score, MS-Deconv+ reports many correct monoisotopic masses missed by other software tools, which are valuable for proteoform identification and characterization.« less

  13. A new scoring function for top-down spectral deconvolution

    SciTech Connect

    Kou, Qiang; Wu, Si; Liu, Xiaowen

    2014-12-18

    Background: Top-down mass spectrometry plays an important role in intact protein identification and characterization. Top-down mass spectra are more complex than bottom-up mass spectra because they often contain many isotopomer envelopes from highly charged ions, which may overlap with one another. As a result, spectral deconvolution, which converts a complex top-down mass spectrum into a monoisotopic mass list, is a key step in top-down spectral interpretation. Results: In this paper, we propose a new scoring function, L-score, for evaluating isotopomer envelopes. By combining L-score with MS-Deconv, a new software tool, MS-Deconv+, was developed for top-down spectral deconvolution. Experimental results showed that MS-Deconv+ outperformed existing software tools in top-down spectral deconvolution. Conclusions: L-score shows high discriminative ability in identification of isotopomer envelopes. Using L-score, MS-Deconv+ reports many correct monoisotopic masses missed by other software tools, which are valuable for proteoform identification and characterization.

  14. Performance Analysis of GYRO: A Tool Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Worley, P.; Roth, P.; Candy, J.; Shan, Hongzhang; Mahinthakumar,G.; Sreepathi, S.; Carrington, L.; Kaiser, T.; Snavely, A.; Reed, D.; Zhang, Y.; Huck, K.; Malony, A.; Shende, S.; Moore, S.; Wolf, F.

    2005-06-26

    The performance of the Eulerian gyrokinetic-Maxwell solver code GYRO is analyzed on five high performance computing systems. First, a manual approach is taken, using custom scripts to analyze the output of embedded wall clock timers, floating point operation counts collected using hardware performance counters, and traces of user and communication events collected using the profiling interface to Message Passing Interface (MPI) libraries. Parts of the analysis are then repeated or extended using a number of sophisticated performance analysis tools: IPM, KOJAK, SvPablo, TAU, and the PMaC modeling tool suite. The paper briefly discusses what has been discovered via this manual analysis process, what performance analyses are inconvenient or infeasible to attempt manually, and to what extent the tools show promise in accelerating or significantly extending the manual performance analyses.

  15. Dynamic contrast-enhanced CT of head and neck tumors: perfusion measurements using a distributed-parameter tracer kinetic model. Initial results and comparison with deconvolution-based analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisdas, Sotirios; Konstantinou, George N.; Sherng Lee, Puor; Thng, Choon Hua; Wagenblast, Jens; Baghi, Mehran; San Koh, Tong

    2007-10-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the feasibility of a two-compartment distributed-parameter (DP) tracer kinetic model to generate functional images of several physiologic parameters from dynamic contrast-enhanced CT data obtained of patients with extracranial head and neck tumors and to compare the DP functional images to those obtained by deconvolution-based DCE-CT data analysis. We performed post-processing of DCE-CT studies, obtained from 15 patients with benign and malignant head and neck cancer. We introduced a DP model of the impulse residue function for a capillary-tissue exchange unit, which accounts for the processes of convective transport and capillary-tissue exchange. The calculated parametric maps represented blood flow (F), intravascular blood volume (v1), extravascular extracellular blood volume (v2), vascular transit time (t1), permeability-surface area product (PS), transfer ratios k12 and k21, and the fraction of extracted tracer (E). Based on the same regions of interest (ROI) analysis, we calculated the tumor blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV) and mean transit time (MTT) by using a modified deconvolution-based analysis taking into account the extravasation of the contrast agent for PS imaging. We compared the corresponding values by using Bland-Altman plot analysis. We outlined 73 ROIs including tumor sites, lymph nodes and normal tissue. The Bland-Altman plot analysis revealed that the two methods showed an accepted degree of agreement for blood flow, and, thus, can be used interchangeably for measuring this parameter. Slightly worse agreement was observed between v1 in the DP model and BV but even here the two tracer kinetic analyses can be used interchangeably. Under consideration of whether both techniques may be used interchangeably was the case of t1 and MTT, as well as for measurements of the PS values. The application of the proposed DP model is feasible in the clinical routine and it can be used interchangeably for measuring

  16. Design and Analysis Tools for Supersonic Inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, John W.; Folk, Thomas C.

    2009-01-01

    Computational tools are being developed for the design and analysis of supersonic inlets. The objective is to update existing tools and provide design and low-order aerodynamic analysis capability for advanced inlet concepts. The Inlet Tools effort includes aspects of creating an electronic database of inlet design information, a document describing inlet design and analysis methods, a geometry model for describing the shape of inlets, and computer tools that implement the geometry model and methods. The geometry model has a set of basic inlet shapes that include pitot, two-dimensional, axisymmetric, and stream-traced inlet shapes. The inlet model divides the inlet flow field into parts that facilitate the design and analysis methods. The inlet geometry model constructs the inlet surfaces through the generation and transformation of planar entities based on key inlet design factors. Future efforts will focus on developing the inlet geometry model, the inlet design and analysis methods, a Fortran 95 code to implement the model and methods. Other computational platforms, such as Java, will also be explored.

  17. Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Uplink Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khanampompan, Teerapat; Gladden, Roy; Fisher, Forest; Hwang, Pauline

    2008-01-01

    This software analyzes Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) orbital geometry with respect to Mars Exploration Rover (MER) contact windows, and is the first tool of its kind designed specifically to support MRO-MER interface coordination. Prior to this automated tool, this analysis was done manually with Excel and the UNIX command line. In total, the process would take approximately 30 minutes for each analysis. The current automated analysis takes less than 30 seconds. This tool resides on the flight machine and uses a PHP interface that does the entire analysis of the input files and takes into account one-way light time from another input file. Input flies are copied over to the proper directories and are dynamically read into the tool s interface. The user can then choose the corresponding input files based on the time frame desired for analysis. After submission of the Web form, the tool merges the two files into a single, time-ordered listing of events for both spacecraft. The times are converted to the same reference time (Earth Transmit Time) by reading in a light time file and performing the calculations necessary to shift the time formats. The program also has the ability to vary the size of the keep-out window on the main page of the analysis tool by inputting a custom time for padding each MRO event time. The parameters on the form are read in and passed to the second page for analysis. Everything is fully coded in PHP and can be accessed by anyone with access to the machine via Web page. This uplink tool will continue to be used for the duration of the MER mission's needs for X-band uplinks. Future missions also can use the tools to check overflight times as well as potential site observation times. Adaptation of the input files to the proper format, and the window keep-out times, would allow for other analyses. Any operations task that uses the idea of keep-out windows will have a use for this program.

  18. Possibilities of deconvolution of image sampling structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hozman, Jiri

    2006-03-01

    The paper deals with influence of the 2D sampling process upon image quality. The Optical Transfer Function (OTF), which is closely related to the Point Spread Function (PSF) of optical and electro-optical imaging systems, can be regarded as an objective measure of their quality. The main goal was the implementation of direct and blind deconvolution methods in MATLAB environment, in order to estimate these parameters and use them for computation of other characteristics, such as the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) and the Phase Transfer Function (PTF). Relations between these functions are very useful in deriving the MTF for various geometrical shapes of elementary detectors of image sensors. This paper is focused on direct deconvolution by inverse and Wiener filtering, special focus is held on blind deconvolution using Iterative Blind Deconvolution (IBD), Simulated Annealing (SA) and Blind Deconvolution by Genetic Algorithm (BDGA). The whole process has been modeled in MATLAB. The Graphical User Interface (GUI) was also developed for setting of the deconvolution methods parameters. The parameter PSNR was also used for comparison and evaluation. The image deconvolution method based on the Blind Deconvolution by Genetic Algorithm seems to be very useful, especially from the point of view of computational requirement and results as well.

  19. 3D image restoration for confocal microscopy: toward a wavelet deconvolution for the study of complex biological structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutet de Monvel, Jacques; Le Calvez, Sophie; Ulfendahl, Mats

    2000-05-01

    Image restoration algorithms provide efficient tools for recovering part of the information lost in the imaging process of a microscope. We describe recent progress in the application of deconvolution to confocal microscopy. The point spread function of a Biorad-MRC1024 confocal microscope was measured under various imaging conditions, and used to process 3D-confocal images acquired in an intact preparation of the inner ear developed at Karolinska Institutet. Using these experiments we investigate the application of denoising methods based on wavelet analysis as a natural regularization of the deconvolution process. Within the Bayesian approach to image restoration, we compare wavelet denoising with the use of a maximum entropy constraint as another natural regularization method. Numerical experiments performed with test images show a clear advantage of the wavelet denoising approach, allowing to `cool down' the image with respect to the signal, while suppressing much of the fine-scale artifacts appearing during deconvolution due to the presence of noise, incomplete knowledge of the point spread function, or undersampling problems. We further describe a natural development of this approach, which consists of performing the Bayesian inference directly in the wavelet domain.

  20. Comparing Work Skills Analysis Tools. Project Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Kathryn

    This document outlines the processes and outcomes of a research project conducted to review work skills analysis tools (products and/or services) that profile required job skills and/or assess individuals' acquired skills. The document begins with a brief literature review and discussion of pertinent terminology. Presented next is a list of…

  1. Paramedir: A Tool for Programmable Performance Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jost, Gabriele; Labarta, Jesus; Gimenez, Judit

    2004-01-01

    Performance analysis of parallel scientific applications is time consuming and requires great expertise in areas such as programming paradigms, system software, and computer hardware architectures. In this paper we describe a tool that facilitates the programmability of performance metric calculations thereby allowing the automation of the analysis and reducing the application development time. We demonstrate how the system can be used to capture knowledge and intuition acquired by advanced parallel programmers in order to be transferred to novice users.

  2. Integrated multidisciplinary analysis tool IMAT users' guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meissner, Frances T. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The Integrated Multidisciplinary Analysis Tool (IMAT) is a computer software system developed at Langley Research Center. IMAT provides researchers and analysts with an efficient capability to analyze satellite controls systems influenced by structural dynamics. Using a menu-driven executive system, IMAT leads the user through the program options. IMAT links a relational database manager to commercial and in-house structural and controls analysis codes. This paper describes the IMAT software system and how to use it.

  3. An alternating minimization method for blind deconvolution from Poisson data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prato, Marco; La Camera, Andrea; Bonettini, Silvia

    2014-10-01

    Blind deconvolution is a particularly challenging inverse problem since information on both the desired target and the acquisition system have to be inferred from the measured data. When the collected data are affected by Poisson noise, this problem is typically addressed by the minimization of the Kullback-Leibler divergence, in which the unknowns are sought in particular feasible sets depending on the a priori information provided by the specific application. If these sets are separated, then the resulting constrained minimization problem can be addressed with an inexact alternating strategy. In this paper we apply this optimization tool to the problem of reconstructing astronomical images from adaptive optics systems, and we show that the proposed approach succeeds in providing very good results in the blind deconvolution of nondense stellar clusters.

  4. From sensor networks to connected analysis tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawes, N.; Bavay, M.; Egger, T.; Sarni, S.; Salehi, A.; Davison, A.; Jeung, H.; Aberer, K.; Lehning, M.

    2012-04-01

    Multi-disciplinary data systems provide excellent tools for locating data, but most eventually provide a series of local files for further processing, providing marginal advantages for the regular user. The Swiss Experiment Platform (SwissEx) was built with the primary goal of enabling high density measurements, integrating them with lower density existing measurements and encouraging cross/inter-disciplinary collaborations. Nearing the end of the project, we have exceeded these goals, also providing connected tools for direct data access from analysis applications. SwissEx (www.swiss-experiment.ch) provides self-organising networks for rapid deployment and integrates these data with existing measurements from across environmental research. The data are categorised and documented according to their originating experiments and fieldsites as well as being searchable globally. Data from SwissEx are available for download, but we also provide tools to directly access data from within common scientific applications (Matlab, LabView, R) and numerical models such as Alpine3D (using a data acquisition plugin and preprocessing library, MeteoIO). The continuation project (the Swiss Environmental Data and Knowledge Platform) will aim to continue the ideas developed within SwissEx and (alongside cloud enablement and standardisation) work on the development of these tools for application specific tasks. We will work alongside several projects from a wide range of disciplines to help them to develop tools which either require real-time data, or large data samples. As well as developing domain specific tools, we will also be working on tools for the utilisation of the latest knowledge in data control, trend analysis, spatio-temporal statistics and downscaling (developed within the CCES Extremes project), which will be a particularly interesting application when combined with the large range of measurements already held in the system. This presentation will look at the

  5. Rock fracture characterization with GPR by means of deterministic deconvolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arosio, Diego

    2016-03-01

    In this work I address GPR characterization of rock fracture parameters, namely thickness and filling material. Rock fractures can generally be considered as thin beds, i.e., two interfaces whose separation is smaller than the resolution limit dictated by the Rayleigh's criterion. The analysis of the amplitude of the thin bed response in the time domain might permit to estimate fracture features for arbitrarily thin beds, but it is difficult to achieve and could be applied only to favorable cases (i.e., when all factors affecting amplitude are identified and corrected for). Here I explore the possibility to estimate fracture thickness and filling in the frequency domain by means of GPR. After introducing some theoretical aspects of thin bed response, I simulate GPR data on sandstone blocks with air- and water-filled fractures of known thickness. On the basis of some simplifying assumptions, I propose a 4-step procedure in which deterministic deconvolution is used to retrieve the magnitude and phase of the thin bed response in the selected frequency band. After deconvolved curves are obtained, fracture thickness and filling are estimated by means of a fitting process, which presents higher sensitivity to fracture thickness. Results are encouraging and suggest that GPR could be a fast and effective tool to determine fracture parameters in non-destructive manner. Further GPR experiments in the lab are needed to test the proposed processing sequence and to validate the results obtained so far.

  6. Decision Analysis Tools for Volcano Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hincks, T. H.; Aspinall, W.; Woo, G.

    2005-12-01

    Staff at volcano observatories are predominantly engaged in scientific activities related to volcano monitoring and instrumentation, data acquisition and analysis. Accordingly, the academic education and professional training of observatory staff tend to focus on these scientific functions. From time to time, however, staff may be called upon to provide decision support to government officials responsible for civil protection. Recognizing that Earth scientists may have limited technical familiarity with formal decision analysis methods, specialist software tools that assist decision support in a crisis should be welcome. A review is given of two software tools that have been under development recently. The first is for probabilistic risk assessment of human and economic loss from volcanic eruptions, and is of practical use in short and medium-term risk-informed planning of exclusion zones, post-disaster response, etc. A multiple branch event-tree architecture for the software, together with a formalism for ascribing probabilities to branches, have been developed within the context of the European Community EXPLORIS project. The second software tool utilizes the principles of the Bayesian Belief Network (BBN) for evidence-based assessment of volcanic state and probabilistic threat evaluation. This is of practical application in short-term volcano hazard forecasting and real-time crisis management, including the difficult challenge of deciding when an eruption is over. An open-source BBN library is the software foundation for this tool, which is capable of combining synoptically different strands of observational data from diverse monitoring sources. A conceptual vision is presented of the practical deployment of these decision analysis tools in a future volcano observatory environment. Summary retrospective analyses are given of previous volcanic crises to illustrate the hazard and risk insights gained from use of these tools.

  7. Deconvolution of dynamic mechanical networks

    PubMed Central

    Hinczewski, Michael; von Hansen, Yann; Netz, Roland R.

    2010-01-01

    Time-resolved single-molecule biophysical experiments yield data that contain a wealth of dynamic information, in addition to the equilibrium distributions derived from histograms of the time series. In typical force spectroscopic setups the molecule is connected via linkers to a readout device, forming a mechanically coupled dynamic network. Deconvolution of equilibrium distributions, filtering out the influence of the linkers, is a straightforward and common practice. We have developed an analogous dynamic deconvolution theory for the more challenging task of extracting kinetic properties of individual components in networks of arbitrary complexity and topology. Our method determines the intrinsic linear response functions of a given object in the network, describing the power spectrum of conformational fluctuations. The practicality of our approach is demonstrated for the particular case of a protein linked via DNA handles to two optically trapped beads at constant stretching force, which we mimic through Brownian dynamics simulations. Each well in the protein free energy landscape (corresponding to folded, unfolded, or possibly intermediate states) will have its own characteristic equilibrium fluctuations. The associated linear response function is rich in physical content, because it depends both on the shape of the well and its diffusivity—a measure of the internal friction arising from such processes as the transient breaking and reformation of bonds in the protein structure. Starting from the autocorrelation functions of the equilibrium bead fluctuations measured in this force clamp setup, we show how an experimentalist can accurately extract the state-dependent protein diffusivity using a straightforward two-step procedure. PMID:21118989

  8. Fairing Separation Analysis Using SepTOOL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalewski, Bart F.; Dial, William B.; Kosareo, Daniel N.

    2015-01-01

    This document describes the relevant equations programmed in spreadsheet software, SepTOOL, developed by ZIN Technologies, Inc. (ZIN) to determine the separation clearance between a launch vehicle payload fairing and remaining stages. The software uses closed form rigid body dynamic solutions of the vehicle in combination with flexible body dynamics of the fairing, which is obtained from flexible body dynamic analysis or from test data, and superimposes the two results to obtain minimum separation clearance for any given set of flight trajectory conditions. Using closed form solutions allows SepTOOL to perform separation calculations several orders of magnitude faster compared to numerical methods which allows users to perform real time parameter studies. Moreover, SepTOOL can optimize vehicle performance to minimize separation clearance. This tool can evaluate various shapes and sizes of fairings along with different vehicle configurations and trajectories. These geometries and parameters are inputted in a user friendly interface. Although the software was specifically developed for evaluating the separation clearance of launch vehicle payload fairings, separation dynamics of other launch vehicle components can be evaluated provided that aerodynamic loads acting on the vehicle during the separation event are negligible. This document describes the development of SepTOOL providing analytical procedure and theoretical equations whose implementation of these equations is not disclosed. Realistic examples are presented, and the results are verified with ADAMS (MSC Software Corporation) simulations. It should be noted that SepTOOL is a preliminary separation clearance assessment software for payload fairings and should not be used for final clearance analysis.

  9. Deconvolution of wellbore pressure and flow rate

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchuk, F.J. ); Carter, R.G. . Langley Research Center); Ayestaran, L. )

    1990-03-01

    Determination of the influence function of a well/reservoir system from the deconvolution of wellbore flow rate and pressure is presented. Deconvolution is fundamental and is particularly applicable to system identification. A variety of different deconvolution algorithms are presented. The simplest algorithm is a direct method that works well for data without measurement noise but that fails in the presence of even small amounts of noise. The authors show, however, that a modified algorithm that imposes constraints on the solution set works well, even with significant measurement errors.

  10. Fuzzy logic components for iterative deconvolution systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Northan, Brian M.

    2013-02-01

    Deconvolution systems rely heavily on expert knowledge and would benefit from approaches that capture this expert knowledge. Fuzzy logic is an approach that is used to capture expert knowledge rules and produce outputs that range in degree. This paper describes a fuzzy-deconvolution-system that integrates traditional Richardson-Lucy deconvolution with fuzzy components. The system is intended for restoration of 3D widefield images taken under conditions of refractive index mismatch. The system uses a fuzzy rule set for calculating sample refractive index, a fuzzy median filter for inter-iteration noise reduction, and a fuzzy rule set for stopping criteria.

  11. Vibration analysis as a predictive maintenance tool

    SciTech Connect

    Dischner, J.M.

    1995-09-01

    Vibration analysis is a powerful and effective tool in both predicting and isolating incipient fault conditions. Vibration can assist in the identification of root cause failure analysis and can be used to establish maintenance procedures on a condition assessment basis rather than a scheduled or calendar basis. Recent advances in technology allow for not only new types of testing to be performed, but when integrated with other types of machine information, can lead to even greater insight and accuracy of the entire predictive maintenance program. Case studies and recent findings will be presented along with a discussion of how vibration is used as an invaluable tool in the detection of defects in gearboxes, mill stands, and roll chatter detection and correction. Acceptable vibration criteria and cost benefit summaries will be included.

  12. Integrated tools for control-system analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostroff, Aaron J.; Proffitt, Melissa S.; Clark, David R.

    1989-01-01

    The basic functions embedded within a user friendly software package (MATRIXx) are used to provide a high level systems approach to the analysis of linear control systems. Various control system analysis configurations are assembled automatically to minimize the amount of work by the user. Interactive decision making is incorporated via menu options and at selected points, such as in the plotting section, by inputting data. There are five evaluations such as the singular value robustness test, singular value loop transfer frequency response, Bode frequency response, steady-state covariance analysis, and closed-loop eigenvalues. Another section describes time response simulations. A time response for random white noise disturbance is available. The configurations and key equations used for each type of analysis, the restrictions that apply, the type of data required, and an example problem are described. One approach for integrating the design and analysis tools is also presented.

  13. Challenges Facing Design and Analysis Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Broduer, Steve (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The design and analysis of future aerospace systems will strongly rely on advanced engineering analysis tools used in combination with risk mitigation procedures. The implications of such a trend place increased demands on these tools to assess off-nominal conditions, residual strength, damage propagation, and extreme loading conditions in order to understand and quantify these effects as they affect mission success. Advances in computer hardware such as CPU processing speed, memory, secondary storage, and visualization provide significant resources for the engineer to exploit in engineering design. The challenges facing design and analysis tools fall into three primary areas. The first area involves mechanics needs such as constitutive modeling, contact and penetration simulation, crack growth prediction, damage initiation and progression prediction, transient dynamics and deployment simulations, and solution algorithms. The second area involves computational needs such as fast, robust solvers, adaptivity for model and solution strategies, control processes for concurrent, distributed computing for uncertainty assessments, and immersive technology. Traditional finite element codes still require fast direct solvers which when coupled to current CPU power enables new insight as a result of high-fidelity modeling. The third area involves decision making by the analyst. This area involves the integration and interrogation of vast amounts of information - some global in character while local details are critical and often drive the design. The proposed presentation will describe and illustrate these areas using composite structures, energy-absorbing structures, and inflatable space structures. While certain engineering approximations within the finite element model may be adequate for global response prediction, they generally are inadequate in a design setting or when local response prediction is critical. Pitfalls to be avoided and trends for emerging analysis tools

  14. RSAT 2015: Regulatory Sequence Analysis Tools.

    PubMed

    Medina-Rivera, Alejandra; Defrance, Matthieu; Sand, Olivier; Herrmann, Carl; Castro-Mondragon, Jaime A; Delerce, Jeremy; Jaeger, Sébastien; Blanchet, Christophe; Vincens, Pierre; Caron, Christophe; Staines, Daniel M; Contreras-Moreira, Bruno; Artufel, Marie; Charbonnier-Khamvongsa, Lucie; Hernandez, Céline; Thieffry, Denis; Thomas-Chollier, Morgane; van Helden, Jacques

    2015-07-01

    RSAT (Regulatory Sequence Analysis Tools) is a modular software suite for the analysis of cis-regulatory elements in genome sequences. Its main applications are (i) motif discovery, appropriate to genome-wide data sets like ChIP-seq, (ii) transcription factor binding motif analysis (quality assessment, comparisons and clustering), (iii) comparative genomics and (iv) analysis of regulatory variations. Nine new programs have been added to the 43 described in the 2011 NAR Web Software Issue, including a tool to extract sequences from a list of coordinates (fetch-sequences from UCSC), novel programs dedicated to the analysis of regulatory variants from GWAS or population genomics (retrieve-variation-seq and variation-scan), a program to cluster motifs and visualize the similarities as trees (matrix-clustering). To deal with the drastic increase of sequenced genomes, RSAT public sites have been reorganized into taxon-specific servers. The suite is well-documented with tutorials and published protocols. The software suite is available through Web sites, SOAP/WSDL Web services, virtual machines and stand-alone programs at http://www.rsat.eu/. PMID:25904632

  15. RSAT 2015: Regulatory Sequence Analysis Tools

    PubMed Central

    Medina-Rivera, Alejandra; Defrance, Matthieu; Sand, Olivier; Herrmann, Carl; Castro-Mondragon, Jaime A.; Delerce, Jeremy; Jaeger, Sébastien; Blanchet, Christophe; Vincens, Pierre; Caron, Christophe; Staines, Daniel M.; Contreras-Moreira, Bruno; Artufel, Marie; Charbonnier-Khamvongsa, Lucie; Hernandez, Céline; Thieffry, Denis; Thomas-Chollier, Morgane; van Helden, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    RSAT (Regulatory Sequence Analysis Tools) is a modular software suite for the analysis of cis-regulatory elements in genome sequences. Its main applications are (i) motif discovery, appropriate to genome-wide data sets like ChIP-seq, (ii) transcription factor binding motif analysis (quality assessment, comparisons and clustering), (iii) comparative genomics and (iv) analysis of regulatory variations. Nine new programs have been added to the 43 described in the 2011 NAR Web Software Issue, including a tool to extract sequences from a list of coordinates (fetch-sequences from UCSC), novel programs dedicated to the analysis of regulatory variants from GWAS or population genomics (retrieve-variation-seq and variation-scan), a program to cluster motifs and visualize the similarities as trees (matrix-clustering). To deal with the drastic increase of sequenced genomes, RSAT public sites have been reorganized into taxon-specific servers. The suite is well-documented with tutorials and published protocols. The software suite is available through Web sites, SOAP/WSDL Web services, virtual machines and stand-alone programs at http://www.rsat.eu/. PMID:25904632

  16. Deconvolution of sinusoidal rapid EPR scans.

    PubMed

    Tseitlin, Mark; Rinard, George A; Quine, Richard W; Eaton, Sandra S; Eaton, Gareth R

    2011-02-01

    In rapid scan EPR the magnetic field is scanned through the signal in a time that is short relative to electron spin relaxation times. Previously it was shown that the slow-scan lineshape could be recovered from triangular rapid scans by Fourier deconvolution. In this paper a general Fourier deconvolution method is described and demonstrated to recover the slow-scan lineshape from sinusoidal rapid scans. Since an analytical expression for the Fourier transform of the driving function for a sinusoidal scan was not readily apparent, a numerical method was developed to do the deconvolution. The slow scan EPR lineshapes recovered from rapid triangular and sinusoidal scans are in excellent agreement for lithium phthalocyanine, a trityl radical, and the nitroxyl radical, tempone. The availability of a method to deconvolute sinusoidal rapid scans makes it possible to scan faster than is feasible for triangular scans because of hardware limitations on triangular scans. PMID:21163677

  17. Deconvolution of Sinusoidal Rapid EPR Scans

    PubMed Central

    Tseitlin, Mark; Rinard, George A.; Quine, Richard W.; Eaton, Sandra S.; Eaton, Gareth R.

    2011-01-01

    In rapid scan EPR the magnetic field is scanned through the signal in a time that is short relative to electron spin relaxation times. Previously it was shown that the slow scan lineshape could be recovered from triangular rapid scans by Fourier deconvolution. In this paper a general Fourier deconvolution method is described and demonstrated to recover the slow scan lineshape from sinusoidal rapid scans. Since an analytical expression for the Fourier transform of the driving function for a sinusoidal scan was not readily apparent, a numerical method was developed to do the deconvolution. The slow scan EPR lineshapes recovered from rapid triangular and sinusoidal scans are in excellent agreement for lithium phthalocyanine, a trityl radical, and the nitroxyl radical, tempone. The availability of a method to deconvolute sinusoidal rapid scans makes it possible to scan faster than is feasible for triangular scans because of hardware limitations on triangular scans. PMID:21163677

  18. Minimum entropy deconvolution and blind equalisation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Satorius, E. H.; Mulligan, J. J.

    1992-01-01

    Relationships between minimum entropy deconvolution, developed primarily for geophysics applications, and blind equalization are pointed out. It is seen that a large class of existing blind equalization algorithms are directly related to the scale-invariant cost functions used in minimum entropy deconvolution. Thus the extensive analyses of these cost functions can be directly applied to blind equalization, including the important asymptotic results of Donoho.

  19. Efficient Bayesian-based multiview deconvolution.

    PubMed

    Preibisch, Stephan; Amat, Fernando; Stamataki, Evangelia; Sarov, Mihail; Singer, Robert H; Myers, Eugene; Tomancak, Pavel

    2014-06-01

    Light-sheet fluorescence microscopy is able to image large specimens with high resolution by capturing the samples from multiple angles. Multiview deconvolution can substantially improve the resolution and contrast of the images, but its application has been limited owing to the large size of the data sets. Here we present a Bayesian-based derivation of multiview deconvolution that drastically improves the convergence time, and we provide a fast implementation using graphics hardware. PMID:24747812

  20. Efficient Bayesian-based multiview deconvolution

    PubMed Central

    Preibisch, Stephan; Amat, Fernando; Stamataki, Evangelia; Sarov, Mihail; Singer, Robert H; Myers, Eugene; Tomancak, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Light-sheet fluorescence microscopy is able to image large specimens with high resolution by capturing the samples from multiple angles. Multiview deconvolution can substantially improve the resolution and contrast of the images, but its application has been limited owing to the large size of the data sets. Here we present a Bayesian-based derivation of multiview deconvolution that drastically improves the convergence time, and we provide a fast implementation using graphics hardware. PMID:24747812

  1. X-ray deconvolution microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ehn, Sebastian; Epple, Franz Michael; Fehringer, Andreas; Pennicard, David; Graafsma, Heinz; Noël, Peter; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in single-photon-counting detectors are enabling the development of novel approaches to reach micrometer-scale resolution in x-ray imaging. One example of such a technology are the MEDIPIX3RX-based detectors, such as the LAMBDA which can be operated with a small pixel size in combination with real-time on-chip charge-sharing correction. This characteristic results in a close to ideal, box-like point spread function which we made use of in this study. The proposed method is based on raster-scanning the sample with sub-pixel sized steps in front of the detector. Subsequently, a deconvolution algorithm is employed to compensate for blurring introduced by the overlap of pixels with a well defined point spread function during the raster-scanning. The presented approach utilizes standard laboratory x-ray equipment while we report resolutions close to 10 μm. The achieved resolution is shown to follow the relationship pn with the pixel-size p of the detector and the number of raster-scanning steps n. PMID:27446649

  2. Spatial deconvolution of IRAS galaxies at 60 UM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Low, Frank J.

    1987-01-01

    Using IRAS in a slow scan observing mode to increase the spatial sampling rate and a deconvolution analysis to increase the spatial resolution, several bright galaxies were resolved at 60 micron. Preliminary results for M 82, NGC 1068, NGC 3079 and NGC 2623 show partially resolved emission from 10 to 26 arcsec., full width at half maximum, and extended emission from 30 to 90 arcsec. from the center. In addition, the interacting system, Arp 82, along with Mark 231 and Arp 220 were studied using the program ADDSCAN to average all available survey mode observations. The Arp 82 system is well resolved after deconvolution and its brighter component is extended; the two most luminous objects are not resolved with an upper limit of 15 arcsec. for Arp 220.

  3. Data Analysis with Graphical Models: Software Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buntine, Wray L.

    1994-01-01

    Probabilistic graphical models (directed and undirected Markov fields, and combined in chain graphs) are used widely in expert systems, image processing and other areas as a framework for representing and reasoning with probabilities. They come with corresponding algorithms for performing probabilistic inference. This paper discusses an extension to these models by Spiegelhalter and Gilks, plates, used to graphically model the notion of a sample. This offers a graphical specification language for representing data analysis problems. When combined with general methods for statistical inference, this also offers a unifying framework for prototyping and/or generating data analysis algorithms from graphical specifications. This paper outlines the framework and then presents some basic tools for the task: a graphical version of the Pitman-Koopman Theorem for the exponential family, problem decomposition, and the calculation of exact Bayes factors. Other tools already developed, such as automatic differentiation, Gibbs sampling, and use of the EM algorithm, make this a broad basis for the generation of data analysis software.

  4. Enhancement of Local Climate Analysis Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horsfall, F. M.; Timofeyeva, M. M.; Dutton, J.

    2012-12-01

    The National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Weather Service (NWS) will enhance its Local Climate Analysis Tool (LCAT) to incorporate specific capabilities to meet the needs of various users including energy, health, and other communities. LCAT is an online interactive tool that provides quick and easy access to climate data and allows users to conduct analyses at the local level such as time series analysis, trend analysis, compositing, correlation and regression techniques, with others to be incorporated as needed. LCAT uses principles of Artificial Intelligence in connecting human and computer perceptions on application of data and scientific techniques in multiprocessing simultaneous users' tasks. Future development includes expanding the type of data currently imported by LCAT (historical data at stations and climate divisions) to gridded reanalysis and General Circulation Model (GCM) data, which are available on global grids and thus will allow for climate studies to be conducted at international locations. We will describe ongoing activities to incorporate NOAA Climate Forecast System (CFS) reanalysis data (CFSR), NOAA model output data, including output from the National Multi Model Ensemble Prediction System (NMME) and longer term projection models, and plans to integrate LCAT into the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) and its protocols for accessing model output and observational data to ensure there is no redundancy in development of tools that facilitate scientific advancements and use of climate model information in applications. Validation and inter-comparison of forecast models will be included as part of the enhancement to LCAT. To ensure sustained development, we will investigate options for open sourcing LCAT development, in particular, through the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR).

  5. Data analysis tool for comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Sandra; Mattila, Ismo; Miettinen, Jarkko; Orešič, Matej; Hyötyläinen, Tuulia

    2011-04-15

    Data processing and identification of unknown compounds in comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography combined with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC/TOFMS) analysis is a major challenge, particularly when large sample sets are analyzed. Herein, we present a method for efficient treatment of large data sets produced by GC×GC/TOFMS implemented as a freely available open source software package, Guineu. To handle large data sets and to efficiently utilize all the features available in the vendor software (baseline correction, mass spectral deconvolution, peak picking, integration, library search, and signal-to-noise filtering), data preprocessed by instrument software are used as a starting point for further processing. Our software affords alignment of the data, normalization, data filtering, and utilization of retention indexes in the verification of identification as well as a novel tool for automated group-type identification of the compounds. Herein, different features of the software are studied in detail and the performance of the system is verified by the analysis of a large set of standard samples as well as of a large set of authentic biological samples, including the control samples. The quantitative features of our GC×GC/TOFMS methodology are also studied to further demonstrate the method performance and the experimental results confirm the reliability of the developed procedure. The methodology has already been successfully used for the analysis of several thousand samples in the field of metabolomics. PMID:21434611

  6. Reduction of blurring in broadband volume holographic imaging using a deconvolution method

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Yanlu; Zhang, Xuanxuan; Zhang, Dong; Zhang, Lin; Luo, Yuan; Luo, Jianwen

    2016-01-01

    Volume holographic imaging (VHI) is a promising biomedical imaging tool that can simultaneously provide multi-depth or multispectral information. When a VHI system is probed with a broadband source, the intensity spreads in the horizontal direction, causing degradation of the image contrast. We theoretically analyzed the reason of the horizontal intensity spread, and the analysis was validated by the simulation and experimental results of the broadband impulse response of the VHI system. We proposed a deconvolution method to reduce the horizontal intensity spread and increase the image contrast. Imaging experiments with three different objects, including bright field illuminated USAF test target and lung tissue specimen and fluorescent beads, were carried out to test the performance of the proposed method. The results demonstrated that the proposed method can significantly improve the horizontal contrast of the image acquire by broadband VHI system. PMID:27570703

  7. Reduction of blurring in broadband volume holographic imaging using a deconvolution method.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yanlu; Zhang, Xuanxuan; Zhang, Dong; Zhang, Lin; Luo, Yuan; Luo, Jianwen

    2016-08-01

    Volume holographic imaging (VHI) is a promising biomedical imaging tool that can simultaneously provide multi-depth or multispectral information. When a VHI system is probed with a broadband source, the intensity spreads in the horizontal direction, causing degradation of the image contrast. We theoretically analyzed the reason of the horizontal intensity spread, and the analysis was validated by the simulation and experimental results of the broadband impulse response of the VHI system. We proposed a deconvolution method to reduce the horizontal intensity spread and increase the image contrast. Imaging experiments with three different objects, including bright field illuminated USAF test target and lung tissue specimen and fluorescent beads, were carried out to test the performance of the proposed method. The results demonstrated that the proposed method can significantly improve the horizontal contrast of the image acquire by broadband VHI system. PMID:27570703

  8. Integrated FDIR Analysis Tool for Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piras, Annamaria; Malucchi, Giovanni; Di Tommaso, Umberto

    2013-08-01

    The crucial role of health management in space applications has been the subject of many studies carried out by NASA and ESA and is held in high regard by Thales Alenia Space. The common objective is to improve reliability and availability of space systems. This paper will briefly illustrate the evolution of IDEHAS (IntegrateD Engineering Harness Avionics and Software), an advanced tool currently used in Thales Alenia Space - Italy in several space programs and recently enhanced to fully support FDIR (Fault Detection Isolation and Recovery) analysis. The FDIR analysis logic flow will be presented, emphasizing the improvements offered to Mission Support & Operations activities. Finally the benefits provided to the Company and a list of possible future enhancements will be given.

  9. Constrained iterations for blind deconvolution and convexity issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spaletta, Giulia; Caucci, Luca

    2006-12-01

    The need for image restoration arises in many applications of various scientific disciplines, such as medicine and astronomy and, in general, whenever an unknown image must be recovered from blurred and noisy data [M. Bertero, P. Boccacci, Introduction to Inverse Problems in Imaging, Institute of Physics Publishing, Philadelphia, PA, USA, 1998]. The algorithm studied in this work restores the image without the knowledge of the blur, using little a priori information and a blind inverse filter iteration. It represents a variation of the methods proposed in Kundur and Hatzinakos [A novel blind deconvolution scheme for image restoration using recursive filtering, IEEE Trans. Signal Process. 46(2) (1998) 375-390] and Ng et al. [Regularization of RIF blind image deconvolution, IEEE Trans. Image Process. 9(6) (2000) 1130-1134]. The problem of interest here is an inverse one, that cannot be solved by simple filtering since it is ill-posed. The imaging system is assumed to be linear and space-invariant: this allows a simplified relationship between unknown and observed images, described by a point spread function modeling the distortion. The blurring, though, makes the restoration ill-conditioned: regularization is therefore also needed, obtained by adding constraints to the formulation. The restoration is modeled as a constrained minimization: particular attention is given here to the analysis of the objective function and on establishing whether or not it is a convex function, whose minima can be located by classic optimization techniques and descent methods. Numerical examples are applied to simulated data and to real data derived from various applications. Comparison with the behavior of methods [D. Kundur, D. Hatzinakos, A novel blind deconvolution scheme for image restoration using recursive filtering, IEEE Trans. Signal Process. 46(2) (1998) 375-390] and [M. Ng, R.J. Plemmons, S. Qiao, Regularization of RIF Blind Image Deconvolution, IEEE Trans. Image Process. 9

  10. Deconvolution of immittance data: some old and new methods

    SciTech Connect

    Tuncer, Enis; Macdonald, Ross J.

    2007-01-01

    The background and history of various deconvolution approaches are briefly summarized; different methods are compared; and available computational resources are described. These underutilized data analysis methods are valuable in both electrochemistry and immittance spectroscopy areas, and freely available computer programs are cited that provide an automatic test of the appropriateness of Kronig-Kramers transforms, a powerful nonlinear-least-squares inversion method, and a new Monte-Carlo inversion method. The important distinction, usually ignored, between discrete-point distributions and continuous ones is emphasized, and both recent parametric and non-parametric deconvolution/inversion procedures for frequency-response data are discussed and compared. Information missing in a recent parametric measurement-model deconvolution approach is pointed out and remedied, and its priority evaluated. Comparisons are presented between the standard parametric least squares inversion method and a new non-parametric Monte Carlo one that allows complicated composite distributions of relaxation times (DRT) to be accurately estimated without the uncertainty present with regularization methods. Also, detailed Monte-Carlo DRT estimates for the supercooled liquid 0.4Ca(NO) 0.6KNO3(CKN) at 350 K are compared with appropriate frequency-response-model fit results. These composite models were derived from stretched-exponential Kohlrausch temporal response with the inclusion of either of two different series electrode-polarization functions.

  11. A Robust Deconvolution Method based on Transdimensional Hierarchical Bayesian Inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, J.; Lekic, V.

    2012-12-01

    Analysis of P-S and S-P conversions allows us to map receiver side crustal and lithospheric structure. This analysis often involves deconvolution of the parent wave field from the scattered wave field as a means of suppressing source-side complexity. A variety of deconvolution techniques exist including damped spectral division, Wiener filtering, iterative time-domain deconvolution, and the multitaper method. All of these techniques require estimates of noise characteristics as input parameters. We present a deconvolution method based on transdimensional Hierarchical Bayesian inference in which both noise magnitude and noise correlation are used as parameters in calculating the likelihood probability distribution. Because the noise for P-S and S-P conversion analysis in terms of receiver functions is a combination of both background noise - which is relatively easy to characterize - and signal-generated noise - which is much more difficult to quantify - we treat measurement errors as an known quantity, characterized by a probability density function whose mean and variance are model parameters. This transdimensional Hierarchical Bayesian approach has been successfully used previously in the inversion of receiver functions in terms of shear and compressional wave speeds of an unknown number of layers [1]. In our method we used a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm to find the receiver function that best fits the data while accurately assessing the noise parameters. In order to parameterize the receiver function we model the receiver function as an unknown number of Gaussians of unknown amplitude and width. The algorithm takes multiple steps before calculating the acceptance probability of a new model, in order to avoid getting trapped in local misfit minima. Using both observed and synthetic data, we show that the MCMC deconvolution method can accurately obtain a receiver function as well as an estimate of the noise parameters given the parent and daughter

  12. Automated Steel Cleanliness Analysis Tool (ASCAT)

    SciTech Connect

    Gary Casuccio; Michael Potter; Fred Schwerer; Dr. Richard J. Fruehan; Dr. Scott Story

    2005-12-30

    The objective of this study was to develop the Automated Steel Cleanliness Analysis Tool (ASCATTM) to permit steelmakers to evaluate the quality of the steel through the analysis of individual inclusions. By characterizing individual inclusions, determinations can be made as to the cleanliness of the steel. Understanding the complicating effects of inclusions in the steelmaking process and on the resulting properties of steel allows the steel producer to increase throughput, better control the process, reduce remelts, and improve the quality of the product. The ASCAT (Figure 1) is a steel-smart inclusion analysis tool developed around a customized next-generation computer controlled scanning electron microscopy (NG-CCSEM) hardware platform that permits acquisition of inclusion size and composition data at a rate never before possible in SEM-based instruments. With built-in customized ''intelligent'' software, the inclusion data is automatically sorted into clusters representing different inclusion types to define the characteristics of a particular heat (Figure 2). The ASCAT represents an innovative new tool for the collection of statistically meaningful data on inclusions, and provides a means of understanding the complicated effects of inclusions in the steel making process and on the resulting properties of steel. Research conducted by RJLG with AISI (American Iron and Steel Institute) and SMA (Steel Manufactures of America) members indicates that the ASCAT has application in high-grade bar, sheet, plate, tin products, pipes, SBQ, tire cord, welding rod, and specialty steels and alloys where control of inclusions, whether natural or engineered, are crucial to their specification for a given end-use. Example applications include castability of calcium treated steel; interstitial free (IF) degasser grade slag conditioning practice; tundish clogging and erosion minimization; degasser circulation and optimization; quality assessment/steel cleanliness; slab, billet

  13. Simplified building energy analysis tool for architects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaisuparasmikul, Pongsak

    Energy Modeler is an energy software program designed to study the relative change of energy uses (heating, cooling, and lighting loads) in different architectural design schemes. This research focuses on developing a tool to improve energy efficiency of the built environment. The research studied the impact of different architectural design response for two distinct global climates: temperate and tropical climatic zones. This energy-based interfacing program is intended to help architects, engineers, educators, students, building designers, major consumers of architectural services, and other professionals whose work interfaces with that of architects, perceive, quickly visualize, and compare energy performance and savings of different design schemes. The buildings in which we live or work have a great impact on our natural environment. Energy savings and consumption reductions in our buildings probably are the best indications of solutions to help environmental sustainability; by reducing the depletion of the world's fossil fuel (oil, natural gas, coal etc.). Architects when they set about designing an environmentally responsive building for an owner or the public, often lack the energy-based information and design tools to tell them whether the building loads and energy consumption are very responsive to the modifications that they made. Buildings are dynamic in nature and changeable over time, with many design variables involved. Architects really need energy-based rules or tools to assist them in the design process. Energy efficient design for sustainable solutions requires attention throughout the design process and is very related to architectural solutions. Early involvement is the only guaranteed way of properly considering fundamental building design issues related to building site, form and exposure. The research presents the methodology and process, which leads to the discussion of the research findings. The innovative work is to make these tools

  14. A Distributed, Parallel Visualization and Analysis Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2007-12-01

    VisIt is an interactive parallel visualization and graphical analysis tool for viewing scientific date on UNIX and PC platforms. Users can quickly generate visualizations from their data, animate them through time, manipulate them, and save the resulting images for presentations. VisIt contains a rich set of visualization features so that you can view your data in a variety of ways. It can be used to visualize scalar and vector fields defined on two- and three-more » dimensional (2D and 3D) structured and unstructured meshes. VisIt was designed to handle very large data set sizes in the terascale range and yet can also handle small data sets in the kilobyte range.« less

  15. Multi-Mission Power Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broderick, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Multi-Mission Power Analysis Tool (MMPAT) Version 2 simulates spacecraft power generation, use, and storage in order to support spacecraft design, mission planning, and spacecraft operations. It can simulate all major aspects of a spacecraft power subsystem. It is parametrically driven to reduce or eliminate the need for a programmer. A user-friendly GUI (graphical user interface) makes it easy to use. Multiple deployments allow use on the desktop, in batch mode, or as a callable library. It includes detailed models of solar arrays, radioisotope thermoelectric generators, nickel-hydrogen and lithium-ion batteries, and various load types. There is built-in flexibility through user-designed state models and table-driven parameters.

  16. Method and tool for network vulnerability analysis

    DOEpatents

    Swiler, Laura Painton; Phillips, Cynthia A.

    2006-03-14

    A computer system analysis tool and method that will allow for qualitative and quantitative assessment of security attributes and vulnerabilities in systems including computer networks. The invention is based on generation of attack graphs wherein each node represents a possible attack state and each edge represents a change in state caused by a single action taken by an attacker or unwitting assistant. Edges are weighted using metrics such as attacker effort, likelihood of attack success, or time to succeed. Generation of an attack graph is accomplished by matching information about attack requirements (specified in "attack templates") to information about computer system configuration (contained in a configuration file that can be updated to reflect system changes occurring during the course of an attack) and assumed attacker capabilities (reflected in "attacker profiles"). High risk attack paths, which correspond to those considered suited to application of attack countermeasures given limited resources for applying countermeasures, are identified by finding "epsilon optimal paths."

  17. Deconvolution of images with periodic striping noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zuoguan; Xu, Wujun; Fu, Yutian

    2008-03-01

    In this paper a new deconvolution algorithm is presented concerning images contaminated by periodic stripes. Inspired by the 2-D power spectrum distribution property of periodic stripes in the frequency domain, we construct a novel regularized inverse filter which allows the algorithm to suppress the amplification of striping noise in the Fourier inverse step and further get rid of most of them, and mirror-wavelet denoising is followed to remove the left colored noise. In simulations with striped images, this algorithm outperforms the traditional mirror-wavelet based deconvolution in terms of both visual effect and SNR comparison, only at the expense of slightly heavier computation load. The same idea about regularized inverse filter can also be used to improve other deconvolution algorithms, such as wavelet packets and wiener filters, when they are employed to images stained by periodic stripes.

  18. Increasing axial resolution of 3D data sets using deconvolution algorithms.

    PubMed

    Topor, P; Zimanyi, M; Mateasik, A

    2011-09-01

    Deconvolution algorithms are tools for the restoration of data degraded by blur and noise. An incorporation of regularization functions into the iterative form of reconstruction algorithms can improve the restoration performance and characteristics (e.g. noise and artefact handling). In this study, algorithms based on Richardson-Lucy deconvolution algorithm are tested. The ability of these algorithms to improve axial resolution of three-dimensional data sets is evaluated on model synthetic data. Finally, unregularized Richardson-Lucy algorithm is selected for the evaluation and reconstruction of three-dimensional chromosomal data sets of Drosophila melanogaster. Problems concerning the reconstruction process are discussed and further improvements are proposed. PMID:21599665

  19. Built Environment Analysis Tool: April 2013

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, C.

    2013-05-01

    This documentation describes the tool development. It was created to evaluate the effects of built environment scenarios on transportation energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. This documentation also provides guidance on how to apply the tool.

  20. Gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry analysis of volatiles, sugars, organic acids and aminoacids in Valencia Late orange juice and reliability of the Automated Mass Spectral Deconvolution and Identification System for their automatic identification and quantification.

    PubMed

    Cerdán-Calero, Manuela; Sendra, José María; Sentandreu, Enrique

    2012-06-01

    Neutral volatiles and non-volatile polar compounds (sugars, organics acids and aminoacids) present in Valencia Late orange juice have been analysed by Gas Chromatography coupled to Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS). Before analysis, the neutral volatiles have been extracted by Headspace-Solid Phase Microextraction (HS-SPME), and the non-volatile polar compounds have been transformed to their corresponding volatile trimethylsilyl (TMS) derivatives. From the resulting raw GC-MS data files, the reliability of the Automated Mass Spectral Deconvolution and Identification System (AMDIS) to perform accurate identification and quantification of the compounds present in the sample has been tested. Hence, both raw GC-MS data files have been processed automatically by using AMDIS and manually by using Xcalibur™, the manufacturer's data processing software for the GC-MS platform used. Results indicate that the reliability of AMDIS for accurate identification and quantification of the compounds present in the sample strongly depends on a number of operational settings, for both the MS and AMDIS, which must be optimized for the particular type of assayed sample. After optimization of these settings, AMDIS and Xcalibur™ yield practically the same results. A total of 85 volatiles and 22 polar compounds have been identified and quantified in Valencia Late orange juice. PMID:22533907

  1. Infrastructure Analysis Tools: A Focus on Cash Flow Analysis (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Melaina, M.; Penev, M.

    2012-09-01

    NREL has developed and maintains a variety of infrastructure analysis models for the U.S. Department of Energy. Business case analysis has recently been added to this tool set. This presentation focuses on cash flow analysis. Cash flows depend upon infrastructure costs, optimized spatially and temporally, and assumptions about financing and revenue. NREL has incorporated detailed metrics on financing and incentives into the models. Next steps in modeling include continuing to collect feedback on regional/local infrastructure development activities and 'roadmap' dynamics, and incorporating consumer preference assumptions on infrastructure to provide direct feedback between vehicles and station rollout.

  2. ISHM Decision Analysis Tool: Operations Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    The state-of-the-practice Shuttle caution and warning system warns the crew of conditions that may create a hazard to orbiter operations and/or crew. Depending on the severity of the alarm, the crew is alerted with a combination of sirens, tones, annunciator lights, or fault messages. The combination of anomalies (and hence alarms) indicates the problem. Even with much training, determining what problem a particular combination represents is not trivial. In many situations, an automated diagnosis system can help the crew more easily determine an underlying root cause. Due to limitations of diagnosis systems,however, it is not always possible to explain a set of alarms with a single root cause. Rather, the system generates a set of hypotheses that the crew can select from. The ISHM Decision Analysis Tool (IDAT) assists with this task. It presents the crew relevant information that could help them resolve the ambiguity of multiple root causes and determine a method for mitigating the problem. IDAT follows graphical user interface design guidelines and incorporates a decision analysis system. I describe both of these aspects.

  3. Numerical Uncertainty Quantification for Radiation Analysis Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Brooke; Blattnig, Steve; Clowdsley, Martha

    2007-01-01

    Recently a new emphasis has been placed on engineering applications of space radiation analyses and thus a systematic effort of Verification, Validation and Uncertainty Quantification (VV&UQ) of the tools commonly used for radiation analysis for vehicle design and mission planning has begun. There are two sources of uncertainty in geometric discretization addressed in this paper that need to be quantified in order to understand the total uncertainty in estimating space radiation exposures. One source of uncertainty is in ray tracing, as the number of rays increase the associated uncertainty decreases, but the computational expense increases. Thus, a cost benefit analysis optimizing computational time versus uncertainty is needed and is addressed in this paper. The second source of uncertainty results from the interpolation over the dose vs. depth curves that is needed to determine the radiation exposure. The question, then, is what is the number of thicknesses that is needed to get an accurate result. So convergence testing is performed to quantify the uncertainty associated with interpolating over different shield thickness spatial grids.

  4. Solar Array Verification Analysis Tool (SAVANT) Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Long, KIenwyn J.; Curtis, Henry B.; Gardner, Barbara; Davis, Victoria; Messenger, Scott; Walters, Robert

    1999-01-01

    Modeling solar cell performance for a specific radiation environment to obtain the end-of-life photovoltaic array performance has become both increasingly important and, with the rapid advent of new types of cell technology, more difficult. For large constellations of satellites, a few percent difference in the lifetime prediction can have an enormous economic impact. The tool described here automates the assessment of solar array on-orbit end-of-life performance and assists in the development and design of ground test protocols for different solar cell designs. Once established, these protocols can be used to calculate on-orbit end-of-life performance from ground test results. The Solar Array Verification Analysis Tool (SAVANT) utilizes the radiation environment from the Environment Work Bench (EWB) model developed by the NASA Lewis Research Center s Photovoltaic and Space Environmental Effects Branch in conjunction with Maxwell Technologies. It then modifies and combines this information with the displacement damage model proposed by Summers et al. (ref. 1) of the Naval Research Laboratory to determine solar cell performance during the course of a given mission. The resulting predictions can then be compared with flight data. The Environment WorkBench (ref. 2) uses the NASA AE8 (electron) and AP8 (proton) models of the radiation belts to calculate the trapped radiation flux. These fluxes are integrated over the defined spacecraft orbit for the duration of the mission to obtain the total omnidirectional fluence spectra. Components such as the solar cell coverglass, adhesive, and antireflective coatings can slow and attenuate the particle fluence reaching the solar cell. In SAVANT, a continuous slowing down approximation is used to model this effect.

  5. PyRAT - python radiography analysis tool (u)

    SciTech Connect

    Temple, Brian A; Buescher, Kevin L; Armstrong, Jerawan C

    2011-01-14

    PyRAT is a radiography analysis tool used to reconstruction images of unknown 1-0 objects. The tool is written in Python and developed for use on LINUX and Windows platforms. The tool is capable of performing nonlinear inversions of the images with minimal manual interaction in the optimization process. The tool utilizes the NOMAD mixed variable optimization tool to perform the optimization.

  6. Calibration of Wide-Field Deconvolution Microscopy for Quantitative Fluorescence Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji-Sook; Wee, Tse-Luen (Erika); Brown, Claire M.

    2014-01-01

    Deconvolution enhances contrast in fluorescence microscopy images, especially in low-contrast, high-background wide-field microscope images, improving characterization of features within the sample. Deconvolution can also be combined with other imaging modalities, such as confocal microscopy, and most software programs seek to improve resolution as well as contrast. Quantitative image analyses require instrument calibration and with deconvolution, necessitate that this process itself preserves the relative quantitative relationships between fluorescence intensities. To ensure that the quantitative nature of the data remains unaltered, deconvolution algorithms need to be tested thoroughly. This study investigated whether the deconvolution algorithms in AutoQuant X3 preserve relative quantitative intensity data. InSpeck Green calibration microspheres were prepared for imaging, z-stacks were collected using a wide-field microscope, and the images were deconvolved using the iterative deconvolution algorithms with default settings. Afterwards, the mean intensities and volumes of microspheres in the original and the deconvolved images were measured. Deconvolved data sets showed higher average microsphere intensities and smaller volumes than the original wide-field data sets. In original and deconvolved data sets, intensity means showed linear relationships with the relative microsphere intensities given by the manufacturer. Importantly, upon normalization, the trend lines were found to have similar slopes. In original and deconvolved images, the volumes of the microspheres were quite uniform for all relative microsphere intensities. We were able to show that AutoQuant X3 deconvolution software data are quantitative. In general, the protocol presented can be used to calibrate any fluorescence microscope or image processing and analysis procedure. PMID:24688321

  7. Scalable analysis tools for sensitivity analysis and UQ (3160) results.

    SciTech Connect

    Karelitz, David B.; Ice, Lisa G.; Thompson, David C.; Bennett, Janine C.; Fabian, Nathan; Scott, W. Alan; Moreland, Kenneth D.

    2009-09-01

    The 9/30/2009 ASC Level 2 Scalable Analysis Tools for Sensitivity Analysis and UQ (Milestone 3160) contains feature recognition capability required by the user community for certain verification and validation tasks focused around sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification (UQ). These feature recognition capabilities include crater detection, characterization, and analysis from CTH simulation data; the ability to call fragment and crater identification code from within a CTH simulation; and the ability to output fragments in a geometric format that includes data values over the fragments. The feature recognition capabilities were tested extensively on sample and actual simulations. In addition, a number of stretch criteria were met including the ability to visualize CTH tracer particles and the ability to visualize output from within an S3D simulation.

  8. Spacecraft Electrical Power System (EPS) generic analysis tools and techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Gladys M.; Sheppard, Mark A.

    1992-01-01

    An overview is provided of the analysis tools and techiques used in modeling the Space Station Freedom electrical power system, as well as future space vehicle power systems. The analysis capabilities of the Electrical Power System (EPS) are described and the EPS analysis tools are surveyed.

  9. Knowledge base navigator facilitating regional analysis inter-tool communication.

    SciTech Connect

    Hampton, Jeffery Wade; Chael, Eric Paul; Hart, Darren M.; Merchant, Bion John; Chown, Matthew N.

    2004-08-01

    To make use of some portions of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Knowledge Base (KB) for which no current operational monitoring applications were available, Sandia National Laboratories have developed a set of prototype regional analysis tools (MatSeis, EventID Tool, CodaMag Tool, PhaseMatch Tool, Dendro Tool, Infra Tool, etc.), and we continue to maintain and improve these. Individually, these tools have proven effective in addressing specific monitoring tasks, but collectively their number and variety tend to overwhelm KB users, so we developed another application - the KB Navigator - to launch the tools and facilitate their use for real monitoring tasks. The KB Navigator is a flexible, extensible java application that includes a browser for KB data content, as well as support to launch any of the regional analysis tools. In this paper, we will discuss the latest versions of KB Navigator and the regional analysis tools, with special emphasis on the new overarching inter-tool communication methodology that we have developed to make the KB Navigator and the tools function together seamlessly. We use a peer-to-peer communication model, which allows any tool to communicate with any other. The messages themselves are passed as serialized XML, and the conversion from Java to XML (and vice versa) is done using Java Architecture for XML Binding (JAXB).

  10. ProMAT: protein microarray analysis tool

    SciTech Connect

    White, Amanda M.; Daly, Don S.; Varnum, Susan M.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Bollinger, Nikki; Zangar, Richard C.

    2006-04-04

    Summary: ProMAT is a software tool for statistically analyzing data from ELISA microarray experiments. The software estimates standard curves, sample protein concentrations and their uncertainties for multiple assays. ProMAT generates a set of comprehensive figures for assessing results and diagnosing process quality. The tool is available for Windows or Mac, and is distributed as open-source Java and R code. Availability: ProMAT is available at http://www.pnl.gov/statistics/ProMAT. ProMAT requires Java version 1.5.0 and R version 1.9.1 (or more recent versions) which are distributed with the tool.

  11. Ball Bearing Analysis with the ORBIS Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpin, Jacob D.

    2016-01-01

    Ball bearing design is critical to the success of aerospace mechanisms. Key bearing performance parameters, such as load capability, stiffness, torque, and life all depend on accurate determination of the internal load distribution. Hence, a good analytical bearing tool that provides both comprehensive capabilities and reliable results becomes a significant asset to the engineer. This paper introduces the ORBIS bearing tool. A discussion of key modeling assumptions and a technical overview is provided. Numerous validation studies and case studies using the ORBIS tool are presented. All results suggest the ORBIS code closely correlates to predictions on bearing internal load distributions, stiffness, deflection and stresses.

  12. Usage-Based Evolution of Visual Analysis Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Hetzler, Elizabeth G.; Rose, Stuart J.; McQuerry, Dennis L.; Medvick, Patricia A.

    2005-06-12

    Visual analysis tools have been developed to help people in many different domains more effectively explore, understand, and make decisions from their information. Challenges in making a successful tool include suitability within a user's work processes, and tradeoffs between analytic power and tool complexity, both of which impact ease of learning. This paper describes experience working with users to help them apply visual analysis tools in several different domains, and examples of how the tools evolved significantly to better match users' goals and processes.

  13. Tools for Knowledge Analysis, Synthesis, and Sharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medland, Michael B.

    2007-04-01

    Change and complexity are creating a need for increasing levels of literacy in science and technology. Presently, we are beginning to provide students with clear contexts in which to learn, including clearly written text, visual displays and maps, and more effective instruction. We are also beginning to give students tools that promote their own literacy by helping them to interact with the learning context. These tools include peer-group skills as well as strategies to analyze text and to indicate comprehension by way of text summaries and concept maps. Even with these tools, more appears to be needed. Disparate backgrounds and languages interfere with the comprehension and the sharing of knowledge. To meet this need, two new tools are proposed. The first tool fractures language ontologically, giving all learners who use it a language to talk about what has, and what has not, been uttered in text or talk about the world. The second fractures language epistemologically, giving those involved in working with text or on the world around them a way to talk about what they have done and what remains to be done. Together, these tools operate as a two- tiered knowledge representation of knowledge. This representation promotes both an individual meta-cognitive and a social meta-cognitive approach to what is known and to what is not known, both ontologically and epistemologically. Two hypotheses guide the presentation: If the tools are taught during early childhood, children will be prepared to master science and technology content. If the tools are used by both students and those who design and deliver instruction, the learning of such content will be accelerated.

  14. Friction analysis between tool and chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Min; Xu, Binshi; Zhang, Jiaying; Dong, Shiyun

    2010-12-01

    The elastic-plasticity mechanics are applied to analyze the friction between tool and chip. According to the slip-line field theory, a series of theoretical formula and the friction coefficient is derived between the tool and chip. So the cutting process can be investigated. Based on the Orthogonal Cutting Model and the Mohr's circle stress, the cutting mechanism of the cladding and the surface integrity of machining can be studied.

  15. Friction analysis between tool and chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Min; Xu, Binshi; Zhang, Jiaying; Dong, Shiyun

    2011-05-01

    The elastic-plasticity mechanics are applied to analyze the friction between tool and chip. According to the slip-line field theory, a series of theoretical formula and the friction coefficient is derived between the tool and chip. So the cutting process can be investigated. Based on the Orthogonal Cutting Model and the Mohr's circle stress, the cutting mechanism of the cladding and the surface integrity of machining can be studied.

  16. Single frame blind image deconvolution by non-negative sparse matrix factorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopriva, Ivica; Garrood, Dennis J.; Borjanović, Vesna

    2006-10-01

    Novel approach to single frame multichannel blind image deconvolution has been formulated recently as non-negative matrix factorization problem with sparseness constraints imposed on the unknown mixing vector that accounts for the case of non-sparse source image. Unlike most of the blind image deconvolution algorithms, the novel approach assumed no a priori knowledge about the blurring kernel and original image. Our contributions in this paper are: (i) we have formulated generalized non-negative matrix factorization approach to blind image deconvolution with sparseness constraints imposed on either unknown mixing vector or unknown source image; (ii) the criteria are established to distinguish whether unknown source image was sparse or not as well as to estimate appropriate sparseness constraint from degraded image itself, thus making the proposed approach completely unsupervised; (iii) an extensive experimental performance evaluation of the non-negative matrix factorization algorithm is presented on the images degraded by the blur caused by the photon sieve, out-of-focus blur with sparse and non-sparse images and blur caused by atmospheric turbulence. The algorithm is compared with the state-of-the-art single frame blind image deconvolution algorithms such as blind Richardson-Lucy algorithm and single frame multichannel independent component analysis based algorithm and non-blind image restoration algorithms such as multiplicative algebraic restoration technique and Van-Cittert algorithms. It has been experimentally demonstrated that proposed algorithm outperforms mentioned non-blind and blind image deconvolution methods.

  17. Integrated Turbopump Thermo-Mechanical Design and Analysis Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platt, Mike

    2002-07-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the thermo-mechanical design and analysis tools used to control the steady and transient thermo-mechanical effects which drive life, reliability, and cost. The thermo-mechanical analysis tools provide upfront design capability by effectively leveraging existing component design tools to analyze and control: fits, clearance, preload; cooling requirements; stress levels, LCF (low cycle fatigue) limits, and HCF (high cycle fatigue) margin.

  18. Millennial scale system impulse response of polar climates - deconvolution results between δ 18O records from Greenland and Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reischmann, E.; Yang, X.; Rial, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    Deconvolution has long been used in science to recover real input given a system's impulse response and output. In this study, we applied spectral division deconvolution to select, polar, δ 18O time series to investigate the possible relationship between the climates of the Polar Regions, i.e. the equivalent to a climate system's ';impulse response.' While the records may be the result of nonlinear processes, deconvolution remains an appropriate tool because the two polar climates are synchronized, forming a Hilbert transform pair. In order to compare records, the age models of three Greenland and four Antarctica records have been matched via a Monte Carlo method using the methane-matched pair GRIP and BYRD as a basis for the calculations. For all twelve polar pairs, various deconvolution schemes (Wiener, Damped Least Squares, Tikhonov, Kalman filter) give consistent, quasi-periodic, impulse responses of the system. Multitaper analysis reveals strong, millennia scale, quasi-periodic oscillations in these system responses with a range of 2,500 to 1,000 years. These are not symmetric, as the transfer function from north to south differs from that of south to north. However, the difference is systematic and occurs in the predominant period of the deconvolved signals. Specifically, the north to south transfer function is generally of longer period than the south to north transfer function. High amplitude power peaks at 5.0ky to 1.7ky characterize the former, while the latter contains peaks at mostly short periods, with a range of 2.5ky to 1.0ky. Consistent with many observations, the deconvolved, quasi-periodic, transfer functions share the predominant periodicities found in the data, some of which are likely related to solar forcing (2.5-1.0ky), while some are probably indicative of the internal oscillations of the climate system (1.6-1.4ky). The approximately 1.5 ky transfer function may represent the internal periodicity of the system, perhaps even related to the

  19. Interactive Graphics Tools for Analysis of MOLA and Other Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, H.; Roark, J.; Sakimoto, S.

    2000-01-01

    We have developed several interactive analysis tools based on the IDL programming language for the analysis of Mars Orbiting Laser Altimeter (MOLA) profile and gridded data which are available to the general community.

  20. General Mission Analysis Tool (GMAT) User's Guide (Draft)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Steven P.

    2007-01-01

    4The General Mission Analysis Tool (GMAT) is a space trajectory optimization and mission analysis system. This document is a draft of the users guide for the tool. Included in the guide is information about Configuring Objects/Resources, Object Fields: Quick Look-up Tables, and Commands and Events.

  1. FDTD simulation tools for UWB antenna analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Brocato, Robert Wesley

    2005-02-01

    This paper describes the development of a set of software tools useful for analyzing ultra-wideband (UWB) antennas and structures. These tools are used to perform finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulation of a conical antenna with continuous wave (CW) and UWB pulsed excitations. The antenna is analyzed using spherical coordinate-based FDTD equations that are derived from first principles. The simulation results for CW excitation are compared to simulation and measured results from published sources; the results for UWB excitation are new.

  2. FDTD simulation tools for UWB antenna analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Brocato, Robert Wesley

    2004-12-01

    This paper describes the development of a set of software tools useful for analyzing ultra-wideband (UWB) antennas and structures. These tools are used to perform finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulation of a conical antenna with continuous wave (CW) and UWB pulsed excitations. The antenna is analyzed using spherical coordinate-based FDTD equations that are derived from first principles. The simulation results for CW excitation are compared to simulation and measured results from published sources; the results for UWB excitation are new.

  3. A Multidimensional Analysis Tool for Visualizing Online Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Minjeong; Lee, Eunchul

    2012-01-01

    This study proposes and verifies the performance of an analysis tool for visualizing online interactions. A review of the most widely used methods for analyzing online interactions, including quantitative analysis, content analysis, and social network analysis methods, indicates these analysis methods have some limitations resulting from their…

  4. Using Kepler for Tool Integration in Microarray Analysis Workflows

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Zhuohui; Stowe, Jennifer C.; Altintas, Ilkay; McCulloch, Andrew D.; Zambon, Alexander C.

    2015-01-01

    Increasing numbers of genomic technologies are leading to massive amounts of genomic data, all of which requires complex analysis. More and more bioinformatics analysis tools are being developed by scientist to simplify these analyses. However, different pipelines have been developed using different software environments. This makes integrations of these diverse bioinformatics tools difficult. Kepler provides an open source environment to integrate these disparate packages. Using Kepler, we integrated several external tools including Bioconductor packages, AltAnalyze, a python-based open source tool, and R-based comparison tool to build an automated workflow to meta-analyze both online and local microarray data. The automated workflow connects the integrated tools seamlessly, delivers data flow between the tools smoothly, and hence improves efficiency and accuracy of complex data analyses. Our workflow exemplifies the usage of Kepler as a scientific workflow platform for bioinformatics pipelines. PMID:26605000

  5. Deconvolution/identification techniques for nonnegative signals

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, D.M.; Yu, D.R.

    1991-11-01

    Several methods for solving the nonparametric deconvolution/identification problem when the unknown is nonnegative are presented. First we consider the constrained least squares method and discuss three ways to estimate the regularization parameter: the discrepancy principle, Mallow`s C{sub L}, and generalized cross validation. Next we consider maximum entropy methods. Last, we present a new conjugate gradient algorithm. A preliminary comparison is presented; detailed Monte-Carlo experiments will be presented at the conference. 13 refs.

  6. Blind Poissonian images deconvolution with framelet regularization.

    PubMed

    Fang, Houzhang; Yan, Luxin; Liu, Hai; Chang, Yi

    2013-02-15

    We propose a maximum a posteriori blind Poissonian images deconvolution approach with framelet regularization for the image and total variation (TV) regularization for the point spread function. Compared with the TV based methods, our algorithm not only suppresses noise effectively but also recovers edges and detailed information. Moreover, the split Bregman method is exploited to solve the resulting minimization problem. Comparative results on both simulated and real images are reported. PMID:23455078

  7. Statistical methods for the forensic analysis of striated tool marks

    SciTech Connect

    Hoeksema, Amy Beth

    2013-01-01

    In forensics, fingerprints can be used to uniquely identify suspects in a crime. Similarly, a tool mark left at a crime scene can be used to identify the tool that was used. However, the current practice of identifying matching tool marks involves visual inspection of marks by forensic experts which can be a very subjective process. As a result, declared matches are often successfully challenged in court, so law enforcement agencies are particularly interested in encouraging research in more objective approaches. Our analysis is based on comparisons of profilometry data, essentially depth contours of a tool mark surface taken along a linear path. In current practice, for stronger support of a match or non-match, multiple marks are made in the lab under the same conditions by the suspect tool. We propose the use of a likelihood ratio test to analyze the difference between a sample of comparisons of lab tool marks to a field tool mark, against a sample of comparisons of two lab tool marks. Chumbley et al. (2010) point out that the angle of incidence between the tool and the marked surface can have a substantial impact on the tool mark and on the effectiveness of both manual and algorithmic matching procedures. To better address this problem, we describe how the analysis can be enhanced to model the effect of tool angle and allow for angle estimation for a tool mark left at a crime scene. With sufficient development, such methods may lead to more defensible forensic analyses.

  8. Tools for Knowledge Analysis, Synthesis, and Sharing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medland, Michael B.

    2007-01-01

    Change and complexity are creating a need for increasing levels of literacy in science and technology. Presently, we are beginning to provide students with clear contexts in which to learn, including clearly written text, visual displays and maps, and more effective instruction. We are also beginning to give students tools that promote their own…

  9. An Integrated Tool for System Analysis of Sample Return Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samareh, Jamshid A.; Maddock, Robert W.; Winski, Richard G.

    2012-01-01

    The next important step in space exploration is the return of sample materials from extraterrestrial locations to Earth for analysis. Most mission concepts that return sample material to Earth share one common element: an Earth entry vehicle. The analysis and design of entry vehicles is multidisciplinary in nature, requiring the application of mass sizing, flight mechanics, aerodynamics, aerothermodynamics, thermal analysis, structural analysis, and impact analysis tools. Integration of a multidisciplinary problem is a challenging task; the execution process and data transfer among disciplines should be automated and consistent. This paper describes an integrated analysis tool for the design and sizing of an Earth entry vehicle. The current tool includes the following disciplines: mass sizing, flight mechanics, aerodynamics, aerothermodynamics, and impact analysis tools. Python and Java languages are used for integration. Results are presented and compared with the results from previous studies.

  10. Quantifying mineral abundances of complex mixtures by coupling spectral deconvolution of SWIR spectra (2.1-2.4 μm) and regression tree analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mulder, V.L.; Plotze, Michael; de Bruin, Sytze; Schaepman, Michael E.; Mavris, C.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Egli, Markus

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a methodology for assessing mineral abundances of mixtures having more than two constituents using absorption features in the 2.1-2.4 μm wavelength region. In the first step, the absorption behaviour of mineral mixtures is parameterised by exponential Gaussian optimisation. Next, mineral abundances are predicted by regression tree analysis using these parameters as inputs. The approach is demonstrated on a range of prepared samples with known abundances of kaolinite, dioctahedral mica, smectite, calcite and quartz and on a set of field samples from Morocco. The latter contained varying quantities of other minerals, some of which did not have diagnostic absorption features in the 2.1-2.4 μm region. Cross validation showed that the prepared samples of kaolinite, dioctahedral mica, smectite and calcite were predicted with a root mean square error (RMSE) less than 9 wt.%. For the field samples, the RMSE was less than 8 wt.% for calcite, dioctahedral mica and kaolinite abundances. Smectite could not be well predicted, which was attributed to spectral variation of the cations within the dioctahedral layered smectites. Substitution of part of the quartz by chlorite at the prediction phase hardly affected the accuracy of the predicted mineral content; this suggests that the method is robust in handling the omission of minerals during the training phase. The degree of expression of absorption components was different between the field sample and the laboratory mixtures. This demonstrates that the method should be calibrated and trained on local samples. Our method allows the simultaneous quantification of more than two minerals within a complex mixture and thereby enhances the perspectives of spectral analysis for mineral abundances.

  11. FEAT - FAILURE ENVIRONMENT ANALYSIS TOOL (UNIX VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pack, G.

    1994-01-01

    The Failure Environment Analysis Tool, FEAT, enables people to see and better understand the effects of failures in a system. FEAT uses digraph models to determine what will happen to a system if a set of failure events occurs and to identify the possible causes of a selected set of failures. Failures can be user-selected from either engineering schematic or digraph model graphics, and the effects or potential causes of the failures will be color highlighted on the same schematic or model graphic. As a design tool, FEAT helps design reviewers understand exactly what redundancies have been built into a system and where weaknesses need to be protected or designed out. A properly developed digraph will reflect how a system functionally degrades as failures accumulate. FEAT is also useful in operations, where it can help identify causes of failures after they occur. Finally, FEAT is valuable both in conceptual development and as a training aid, since digraphs can identify weaknesses in scenarios as well as hardware. Digraphs models for use with FEAT are generally built with the Digraph Editor, a Macintosh-based application which is distributed with FEAT. The Digraph Editor was developed specifically with the needs of FEAT users in mind and offers several time-saving features. It includes an icon toolbox of components required in a digraph model and a menu of functions for manipulating these components. It also offers FEAT users a convenient way to attach a formatted textual description to each digraph node. FEAT needs these node descriptions in order to recognize nodes and propagate failures within the digraph. FEAT users store their node descriptions in modelling tables using any word processing or spreadsheet package capable of saving data to an ASCII text file. From within the Digraph Editor they can then interactively attach a properly formatted textual description to each node in a digraph. Once descriptions are attached to them, a selected set of nodes can be

  12. FEAT - FAILURE ENVIRONMENT ANALYSIS TOOL (UNIX VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pack, G.

    1994-01-01

    The Failure Environment Analysis Tool, FEAT, enables people to see and better understand the effects of failures in a system. FEAT uses digraph models to determine what will happen to a system if a set of failure events occurs and to identify the possible causes of a selected set of failures. Failures can be user-selected from either engineering schematic or digraph model graphics, and the effects or potential causes of the failures will be color highlighted on the same schematic or model graphic. As a design tool, FEAT helps design reviewers understand exactly what redundancies have been built into a system and where weaknesses need to be protected or designed out. A properly developed digraph will reflect how a system functionally degrades as failures accumulate. FEAT is also useful in operations, where it can help identify causes of failures after they occur. Finally, FEAT is valuable both in conceptual development and as a training aid, since digraphs can identify weaknesses in scenarios as well as hardware. Digraphs models for use with FEAT are generally built with the Digraph Editor, a Macintosh-based application which is distributed with FEAT. The Digraph Editor was developed specifically with the needs of FEAT users in mind and offers several time-saving features. It includes an icon toolbox of components required in a digraph model and a menu of functions for manipulating these components. It also offers FEAT users a convenient way to attach a formatted textual description to each digraph node. FEAT needs these node descriptions in order to recognize nodes and propagate failures within the digraph. FEAT users store their node descriptions in modelling tables using any word processing or spreadsheet package capable of saving data to an ASCII text file. From within the Digraph Editor they can then interactively attach a properly formatted textual description to each node in a digraph. Once descriptions are attached to them, a selected set of nodes can be

  13. Self-Constrained Euler Deconvolution Using Potential Field Data of Different Altitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wenna; Nan, Zeyu; Li, Jiyan

    2016-06-01

    Euler deconvolution has been developed as almost the most common tool in potential field data semi-automatic interpretation. The structural index (SI) is a main determining factor of the quality of depth estimation. In this paper, we first present an improved Euler deconvolution method to eliminate the influence of SI using potential field data of different altitudes. The different altitudes data can be obtained by the upward continuation or can be directly obtained by the airborne measurement realization. Euler deconvolution at different altitudes of a certain range has very similar calculation equation. Therefore, the ratio of Euler equations of two different altitudes can be calculated to discard the SI. Thus, the depth and location of geologic source can be directly calculated using the improved Euler deconvolution without any prior information. Particularly, the noise influence can be decreased using the upward continuation of different altitudes. The new method is called self-constrained Euler deconvolution (SED). Subsequently, based on the SED algorithm, we deduce the full tensor gradient (FTG) calculation form of the new improved method. As we all know, using multi-components data of FTG have added advantages in data interpretation. The FTG form is composed by x-, y- and z-directional components. Due to the using more components, the FTG form can get more accurate results and more information in detail. The proposed modification method is tested using different synthetic models, and the satisfactory results are obtained. Finally, we applied the new approach to Bishop model magnetic data and real gravity data. All the results demonstrate that the new approach is utility tool to interpret the potential field and full tensor gradient data.

  14. Software Users Manual (SUM): Extended Testability Analysis (ETA) Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maul, William A.; Fulton, Christopher E.

    2011-01-01

    This software user manual describes the implementation and use the Extended Testability Analysis (ETA) Tool. The ETA Tool is a software program that augments the analysis and reporting capabilities of a commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) testability analysis software package called the Testability Engineering And Maintenance System (TEAMS) Designer. An initial diagnostic assessment is performed by the TEAMS Designer software using a qualitative, directed-graph model of the system being analyzed. The ETA Tool utilizes system design information captured within the diagnostic model and testability analysis output from the TEAMS Designer software to create a series of six reports for various system engineering needs. The ETA Tool allows the user to perform additional studies on the testability analysis results by determining the detection sensitivity to the loss of certain sensors or tests. The ETA Tool was developed to support design and development of the NASA Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle. The diagnostic analysis provided by the ETA Tool was proven to be valuable system engineering output that provided consistency in the verification of system engineering requirements. This software user manual provides a description of each output report generated by the ETA Tool. The manual also describes the example diagnostic model and supporting documentation - also provided with the ETA Tool software release package - that were used to generate the reports presented in the manual

  15. Development of wavelet analysis tools for turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertelrud, A.; Erlebacher, G.; Dussouillez, PH.; Liandrat, M. P.; Liandrat, J.; Bailly, F. Moret; Tchamitchian, PH.

    1992-01-01

    Presented here is the general framework and the initial results of a joint effort to derive novel research tools and easy to use software to analyze and model turbulence and transition. Given here is a brief review of the issues, a summary of some basic properties of wavelets, and preliminary results. Technical aspects of the implementation, the physical conclusions reached at this time, and current developments are discussed.

  16. Graphical Acoustic Liner Design and Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howerton, Brian M. (Inventor); Jones, Michael G. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An interactive liner design and impedance modeling tool comprises software utilized to design acoustic liners for use in constrained spaces, both regularly and irregularly shaped. A graphical user interface allows the acoustic channel geometry to be drawn in a liner volume while the surface impedance calculations are updated and displayed in real-time. A one-dimensional transmission line model may be used as the basis for the impedance calculations.

  17. Polarimeter blind deconvolution using image diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strong, David M.

    This research presents an algorithm that improves the ability to view objects using an electro-optical imaging system with at least one polarization sensitive channel in addition to the primary channel. Following the review of historical methodologies applicable to this research area, the statistical Cramer-Rio lower bound (CRLB) is developed for a two- channel polarimeter. The CRLB is developed using the system's ability to resolve two point sources in the presence of atmospheric turbulence. The bounds show that such a polarimeter has an advantage over previous imaging methods at smaller separations. A small optical laboratory is set up to generate a set of calibrated images for verification of the simulation results and validation of algorithm development. Defocus is the aberration chosen for algorithm development and testing due to its significant presence when imaging through turbulence and its ease of production in the laboratory. An innovative algorithm for detection and estimation of the defocus aberration present in an image is also developed. Using a known defocus aberration, an iterative polarimeter deconvolution algorithm is developed using a generalized expectation-maximization (GEM) model that produces results as predicted by the CRLB results. Using an example bar target set with a degree of polarization of one, the polarimeter deconvolution algorithm can resolve the two bars down to half the bar separation as the Richardson-Lucy (RL) algorithm can do. In addition, a fidelity metric is used that shows the polarimeter deconvolution algorithm deconvolves simulated targets with approximately half of the error present in objects deconvolved using the RL algorithm. The polarimeter deconvolution algorithm is extended to an iterative polarimeter multiframe blind deconvolution (PMFBD) algorithm with an unknown aberration. Using both simulated and laboratory images, the results of the new PMFBD algorithm clearly outperforms an RL-based MFBD algorithm. The

  18. A quantitative evaluation of various deconvolution methods and their applications in the deconvolution of plasma spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Yanwei; Shi, Yuejiang; Li, Yingying; Fu, Jia; Lu, Bo; Zhang, Hongming; Wang, Xiaoguang; Wang, Fudi; Shen, Yongcai

    2013-06-01

    A quantitative evaluation of various deconvolution methods and their applications in processing plasma emitted spectra was performed. The iterative deconvolution algorithms evaluated here include Jansson's method, Richardson-Lucy's method, the maximum a posteriori method and Gold's method. The evaluation criteria include minimization of the sum of squared errors and the sum of squared relative error of parameters, and their rate of convergence. After comparing deconvolved results using these methods, it was concluded that Jansson's and Gold's methods were able to provide good profiles that are visually close to the original spectra. Additionally, Gold's method generally gives the best results when considering all the criteria above. The applications to the actual plasma spectra obtained from the EAST tokamak with these methods are also presented in this paper. The deconvolution results with Gold's and Jansson's methods show that the effects of instruments can be satisfactorily eliminated and clear spectra are recovered.

  19. Application of regularized Richardson-Lucy algorithm for deconvolution of confocal microscopy images.

    PubMed

    Laasmaa, M; Vendelin, M; Peterson, P

    2011-08-01

    Although confocal microscopes have considerably smaller contribution of out-of-focus light than widefield microscopes, the confocal images can still be enhanced mathematically if the optical and data acquisition effects are accounted for. For that, several deconvolution algorithms have been proposed. As a practical solution, maximum-likelihood algorithms with regularization have been used. However, the choice of regularization parameters is often unknown although it has considerable effect on the result of deconvolution process. The aims of this work were: to find good estimates of deconvolution parameters; and to develop an open source software package that would allow testing different deconvolution algorithms and that would be easy to use in practice. Here, Richardson-Lucy algorithm has been implemented together with the total variation regularization in an open source software package IOCBio Microscope. The influence of total variation regularization on deconvolution process is determined by one parameter. We derived a formula to estimate this regularization parameter automatically from the images as the algorithm progresses. To assess the effectiveness of this algorithm, synthetic images were composed on the basis of confocal images of rat cardiomyocytes. From the analysis of deconvolved results, we have determined under which conditions our estimation of total variation regularization parameter gives good results. The estimated total variation regularization parameter can be monitored during deconvolution process and used as a stopping criterion. An inverse relation between the optimal regularization parameter and the peak signal-to-noise ratio of an image is shown. Finally, we demonstrate the use of the developed software by deconvolving images of rat cardiomyocytes with stained mitochondria and sarcolemma obtained by confocal and widefield microscopes. PMID:21323670

  20. Parachute system design, analysis, and simulation tool

    SciTech Connect

    Sundberg, W.D.; McBride, D.D.; Gwinn, K.W.; Waye, D.E.; Hailey, C.E.

    1992-01-01

    For over twenty years designers at Sandia National Laboratories have developed various parachute simulation codes to model deployment, inflation, loading, trajectories, aircraft downwash and line sail. In addition to these codes, material property data bases have been acquired. Recently we have initiated project to integrate these codes and data bases into a single software tool entitled SPARSYS (Sandia PARachute SYstem Simulation). We have constructed a graphical user interface as the driver and framework for SPARSYS. In this paper we present a status report on SPARSYS describing progress in developing and incorporating independent modules, in developing an integrated trajectory package, and in developing a materials data base including high-rate-of-strain data.

  1. SPLAT-VO: Spectral Analysis Tool for the Virtual Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Neves, Margarida; Draper, Peter W.

    2014-02-01

    SPLAT-VO is an extension of the SPLAT (Spectral Analysis Tool, ascl:1402.007) graphical tool for displaying, comparing, modifying and analyzing astronomical spectra; it includes facilities that allow it to work as part of the Virtual Observatory (VO). SPLAT-VO comes in two different forms, one for querying and downloading spectra from SSAP servers and one for interoperating with VO tools, such as TOPCAT (ascl:1101.010).

  2. Klonos: A Similarity Analysis Based Tool for Software Porting

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2014-07-30

    The Klonos is a compiler-based tool that can help users for scientific application porting. The tool is based on the similarity analysis with the help of the OpenUH compiler (a branch of Open64 compiler). This tool combines syntactic and cost-model-provided metrics clusters, which aggregate similar subroutines that can be ported similarity. The generated porting plan, which allows programmers and compilers to reuse porting experience as much as possible during the porting process.

  3. Fully Parallel MHD Stability Analysis Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svidzinski, Vladimir; Galkin, Sergei; Kim, Jin-Soo; Liu, Yueqiang

    2014-10-01

    Progress on full parallelization of the plasma stability code MARS will be reported. MARS calculates eigenmodes in 2D axisymmetric toroidal equilibria in MHD-kinetic plasma models. It is a powerful tool for studying MHD and MHD-kinetic instabilities and it is widely used by fusion community. Parallel version of MARS is intended for simulations on local parallel clusters. It will be an efficient tool for simulation of MHD instabilities with low, intermediate and high toroidal mode numbers within both fluid and kinetic plasma models, already implemented in MARS. Parallelization of the code includes parallelization of the construction of the matrix for the eigenvalue problem and parallelization of the inverse iterations algorithm, implemented in MARS for the solution of the formulated eigenvalue problem. Construction of the matrix is parallelized by distributing the load among processors assigned to different magnetic surfaces. Parallelization of the solution of the eigenvalue problem is made by repeating steps of the present MARS algorithm using parallel libraries and procedures. Initial results of the code parallelization will be reported. Work is supported by the U.S. DOE SBIR program.

  4. Fully Parallel MHD Stability Analysis Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svidzinski, Vladimir; Galkin, Sergei; Kim, Jin-Soo; Liu, Yueqiang

    2013-10-01

    Progress on full parallelization of the plasma stability code MARS will be reported. MARS calculates eigenmodes in 2D axisymmetric toroidal equilibria in MHD-kinetic plasma models. It is a powerful tool for studying MHD and MHD-kinetic instabilities and it is widely used by fusion community. Parallel version of MARS is intended for simulations on local parallel clusters. It will be an efficient tool for simulation of MHD instabilities with low, intermediate and high toroidal mode numbers within both fluid and kinetic plasma models, already implemented in MARS. Parallelization of the code includes parallelization of the construction of the matrix for the eigenvalue problem and parallelization of the inverse iterations algorithm, implemented in MARS for the solution of the formulated eigenvalue problem. Construction of the matrix is parallelized by distributing the load among processors assigned to different magnetic surfaces. Parallelization of the solution of the eigenvalue problem is made by repeating steps of the present MARS algorithm using parallel libraries and procedures. Preliminary results of the code parallelization will be reported. Work is supported by the U.S. DOE SBIR program.

  5. Fully Parallel MHD Stability Analysis Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svidzinski, Vladimir; Galkin, Sergei; Kim, Jin-Soo; Liu, Yueqiang

    2015-11-01

    Progress on full parallelization of the plasma stability code MARS will be reported. MARS calculates eigenmodes in 2D axisymmetric toroidal equilibria in MHD-kinetic plasma models. It is a powerful tool for studying MHD and MHD-kinetic instabilities and it is widely used by fusion community. Parallel version of MARS is intended for simulations on local parallel clusters. It will be an efficient tool for simulation of MHD instabilities with low, intermediate and high toroidal mode numbers within both fluid and kinetic plasma models, already implemented in MARS. Parallelization of the code includes parallelization of the construction of the matrix for the eigenvalue problem and parallelization of the inverse iterations algorithm, implemented in MARS for the solution of the formulated eigenvalue problem. Construction of the matrix is parallelized by distributing the load among processors assigned to different magnetic surfaces. Parallelization of the solution of the eigenvalue problem is made by repeating steps of the present MARS algorithm using parallel libraries and procedures. Results of MARS parallelization and of the development of a new fix boundary equilibrium code adapted for MARS input will be reported. Work is supported by the U.S. DOE SBIR program.

  6. Lightweight Object Oriented Structure analysis: Tools for building Tools to Analyze Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Romo, Tod D.; Leioatts, Nicholas; Grossfield, Alan

    2014-01-01

    LOOS (Lightweight Object-Oriented Structure-analysis) is a C++ library designed to facilitate making novel tools for analyzing molecular dynamics simulations by abstracting out the repetitive tasks, allowing developers to focus on the scientifically relevant part of the problem. LOOS supports input using the native file formats of most common biomolecular simulation packages, including CHARMM, NAMD, Amber, Tinker, and Gromacs. A dynamic atom selection language based on the C expression syntax is included and is easily accessible to the tool-writer. In addition, LOOS is bundled with over 120 pre-built tools, including suites of tools for analyzing simulation convergence, 3D histograms, and elastic network models. Through modern C++ design, LOOS is both simple to develop with (requiring knowledge of only 4 core classes and a few utility functions) and is easily extensible. A python interface to the core classes is also provided, further facilitating tool development. PMID:25327784

  7. Making Culturally Responsive Mathematics Teaching Explicit: A Lesson Analysis Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguirre, Julia M.; Zavala, Maria del Rosario

    2013-01-01

    In the United States, there is a need for pedagogical tools that help teachers develop essential pedagogical content knowledge and practices to meet the mathematical education needs of a growing culturally and linguistically diverse student population. In this article, we introduce an innovative lesson analysis tool that focuses on integrating…

  8. JAVA based LCD Reconstruction and Analysis Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Bower, G.

    2004-10-11

    We summarize the current status and future developments of the North American Group's Java-based system for studying physics and detector design issues at a linear collider. The system is built around Java Analysis Studio (JAS) an experiment-independent Java-based utility for data analysis. Although the system is an integrated package running in JAS, many parts of it are also standalone Java utilities.

  9. The environment power system analysis tool development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jongeward, Gary A.; Kuharski, Robert A.; Kennedy, Eric M.; Stevens, N. John; Putnam, Rand M.; Roche, James C.; Wilcox, Katherine G.

    1990-01-01

    The Environment Power System Analysis Tool (EPSAT) is being developed to provide space power system design engineers with an analysis tool for determining system performance of power systems in both naturally occurring and self-induced environments. The program is producing an easy to use computer aided engineering (CAE) tool general enough to provide a vehicle for technology transfer from space scientists and engineers to power system design engineers. The results of the project after two years of a three year development program are given. The EPSAT approach separates the CAE tool into three distinct functional units: a modern user interface to present information, a data dictionary interpreter to coordinate analysis; and a data base for storing system designs and results of analysis.

  10. HISTORICAL ANALYSIS OF ECOLOGICAL EFFECTS: A USEFUL EDUCATIONAL TOOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    An historical analysis that presents the ecological consequences of development can be a valuable educational tool for citizens, students, and environmental managers. In highly impacted areas, the cumulative impacts of multiple stressors can result in complex environmental condit...

  11. Analysis tools for turbulence studies at Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, C.; Shehata, S.; White, A. E.; Cziegler, I.; Dominguez, A.; Terry, J. L.; Pace, D. C.

    2010-11-01

    A new suite of analysis tools written in IDL is being developed to support experimental investigation of turbulence at Alcator C-Mod. The tools include GUIs for spectral analysis (coherence, cross-phase and bicoherence) and characteristic frequency calculations. A user-friendly interface for the GENRAY code, to facilitate in-between shot ray-tracing analysis, is also being developed. The spectral analysis tool is being used to analyze data from existing edge turbulence diagnostics, such as the O-mode correlation reflectometer and Gas Puff Imaging, during I-mode, ITB and EDA H-mode plasmas. GENRAY and the characteristic frequency tool are being used to study diagnostic accessibility limits set by wave propagation and refraction for X-mode Doppler Backscattering and Correlation Electron Cyclotron Emission (CECE) systems that are being planned for core turbulence studies at Alcator C-Mod.

  12. Nonparametric, nonnegative deconvolution of large time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirpka, O. A.

    2006-12-01

    There is a long tradition of characterizing hydrologic systems by linear models, in which the response of the system to a time-varying stimulus is computed by convolution of a system-specific transfer function with the input signal. Despite its limitations, the transfer-function concept has been shown valuable for many situations such as the precipitation/run-off relationships of catchments and solute transport in agricultural soils and aquifers. A practical difficulty lies in the identification of the transfer function. A common approach is to fit a parametric function, enforcing a particular shape of the transfer function, which may be in contradiction to the real behavior (e.g., multimodal transfer functions, long tails, etc.). In our nonparametric deconvolution, the transfer function is assumed an auto-correlated random time function, which is conditioned on the data by a Bayesian approach. Nonnegativity, which is a vital constraint for solute-transport applications, is enforced by the method of Lagrange multipliers. This makes the inverse problem nonlinear. In nonparametric deconvolution, identifying the auto-correlation parameters is crucial. Enforcing too much smoothness prohibits the identification of important features, whereas insufficient smoothing leads to physically meaningless transfer functions, mapping noise components in the two data series onto each other. We identify optimal smoothness parameters by the expectation-maximization method, which requires the repeated generation of many conditional realizations. The overall approach, however, is still significantly faster than Markov-Chain Monte-Carlo methods presented recently. We apply our approach to electric-conductivity time series measured in a river and monitoring wells in the adjacent aquifer. The data cover 1.5 years with a temporal resolution of 1h. The identified transfer functions have lengths of up to 60 days, making up 1440 parameters. We believe that nonparametric deconvolution is an

  13. Recursive deconvolution of combinatorial chemical libraries.

    PubMed

    Erb, E; Janda, K D; Brenner, S

    1994-11-22

    A recursive strategy that solves for the active members of a chemical library is presented. A pentapeptide library with an alphabet of Gly, Leu, Phe, and Tyr (1024 members) was constructed on a solid support by the method of split synthesis. One member of this library (NH2-Tyr-Gly-Gly-Phe-Leu) is a native binder to a beta-endorphin antibody. A variation of the split synthesis approach is used to build the combinatorial library. In four vials, a member of the library's alphabet is coupled to a solid support. After each coupling, a portion of the resin from each of the four reaction vials was set aside and catalogued. The solid support from each vial is then combined, mixed, and redivided. The steps of (i) coupling, (ii) saving and cataloging, and (iii) randomizing were repeated until a pentapeptide library was obtained. The four pentapeptide libraries where the N-terminal amino acid is defined were screened against the beta-endorphin antibody and quantitated via an ELISA. The amino acid of the four pools that demonstrated the most binding was then coupled to the four tetrapeptide partial libraries that had been set aside and catalogued during the split synthesis. This recursive deconvolution was repeated until the best binders were deduced. Besides the anticipated native binder, two other members of the library displayed significant binding. This recursive method of deconvolution does not use a molecular tag, requires only one split synthesis, and can be applied to the deconvolution of nonlinear small-molecule combinatorial libraries and linear oligomeric combinatorial libraries, since it is based only on the procedure of the synthesis. PMID:7972077

  14. Strategies for the deconvolution of hypertelescope images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aime, C.; Lantéri, H.; Diet, M.; Carlotti, A.

    2012-07-01

    Aims: We study the possibility of deconvolving hypertelescope images and propose a procedure that can be used provided that the densification factor is small enough to make the process reversible. Methods: We present the simulation of hypertelescope images for an array of cophased densified apertures. We distinguish between two types of aperture densification, one called FAD (full aperture densification) corresponding to Labeyrie's original technique, and the other FSD (full spectrum densification) corresponding to a densification factor twice as low. Images are compared to the Fizeau mode. A single image of the observed object is obtained in the hypertelescope modes, while in the Fizeau mode the response produces an ensemble of replicas of the object. Simulations are performed for noiseless images and in a photodetection regime. Assuming first that the point spread function (PSF) does not change much over the object extent, we use two classical techniques to deconvolve the images, namely the Richardson-Lucy and image space reconstruction algorithms. Results: Both algorithms fail to achieve satisfying results. We interpret this as meaning that it is inappropriate to deconvolve a relation that is not a convolution, even if the variation in the PSF is very small across the object extent. We propose instead the application of a redilution to the densified image prior to its deconvolution, i.e. to recover an image similar to the Fizeau observation. This inverse operation is possible only when the rate of densification is no more than in the FSD case. This being done, the deconvolution algorithms become efficient. The deconvolution brings together the replicas into a single high-quality image of the object. This is heuristically explained as an inpainting of the Fourier plane. This procedure makes it possible to obtain improved images while retaining the benefits of hypertelescopes for image acquisition consisting of detectors with a small number of pixels.

  15. Analysis and computer tools for separation processes involving nonideal mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Lucia, A.

    1992-05-01

    The objectives of this research, were to continue to further both the theoretical understanding of and the development of computer tools (algorithms) for separation processes involving nonideal mixtures. These objectives were divided into three interrelated major areas -- the mathematical analysis of the number of steady-state solutions to multistage separation processes, the numerical analysis of general, related fixed-point methods, and the development and implementation of computer tools for process simulation.

  16. Iterative blind deconvolution of adaptive optics images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Ying; Rao, Changhui; Li, Mei; Geng, Zexun

    2006-04-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) technique has been extensively used for large ground-based optical telescopes to overcome the effect of atmospheric turbulence. But the correction is often partial. An iterative blind deconvolution (IBD) algorithm based on maximum-likelihood (ML) method is proposed to restore the details of the object image corrected by AO. IBD algorithm and the procedure are briefly introduced and the experiment results are presented. The results show that IBD algorithm is efficient for the restoration of some useful high-frequency of the image.

  17. Comparison of Deconvolution Filters for Photoacoustic Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Van de Sompel, Dominique; Sasportas, Laura S.; Jokerst, Jesse V.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we compare the merits of three temporal data deconvolution methods for use in the filtered backprojection algorithm for photoacoustic tomography (PAT). We evaluate the standard Fourier division technique, the Wiener deconvolution filter, and a Tikhonov L-2 norm regularized matrix inversion method. Our experiments were carried out on subjects of various appearances, namely a pencil lead, two man-made phantoms, an in vivo subcutaneous mouse tumor model, and a perfused and excised mouse brain. All subjects were scanned using an imaging system with a rotatable hemispherical bowl, into which 128 ultrasound transducer elements were embedded in a spiral pattern. We characterized the frequency response of each deconvolution method, compared the final image quality achieved by each deconvolution technique, and evaluated each method’s robustness to noise. The frequency response was quantified by measuring the accuracy with which each filter recovered the ideal flat frequency spectrum of an experimentally measured impulse response. Image quality under the various scenarios was quantified by computing noise versus resolution curves for a point source phantom, as well as the full width at half maximum (FWHM) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of selected image features such as dots and linear structures in additional imaging subjects. It was found that the Tikhonov filter yielded the most accurate balance of lower and higher frequency content (as measured by comparing the spectra of deconvolved impulse response signals to the ideal flat frequency spectrum), achieved a competitive image resolution and contrast-to-noise ratio, and yielded the greatest robustness to noise. While the Wiener filter achieved a similar image resolution, it tended to underrepresent the lower frequency content of the deconvolved signals, and hence of the reconstructed images after backprojection. In addition, its robustness to noise was poorer than that of the Tikhonov filter. The

  18. A fast approach to identification using deconvolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chi, C.-Y.; Mendel, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a fast approach to impulse response and noise-variance identification for a finite-order, linear, time-invariant, single-input/single-output system, whose input driving noise is white (stationary or nonstationary) and measurement noise is stationary, white and Gaussian. Our algorithm is an iterative block component method that includes two stages, deconvolution and prediction-error identification. Experiences with our method indicate that it works well and saves about an order of magnitude in computation. Analyses and examples are given in this paper to support this claim.

  19. Capabilities of the analysis tools of the IMPEx infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Génot, V.; Khodachenko, M. L.; Kallio, E. J.; Topf, F.; Al-Ubaidi, T.; Gangloff, M.; Budnik, E.; Bouchemit, M.; Renard, B.; Bourel, N.; Penou, E.; André, N.; Modolo, R.; Hess, S.; Schmidt, W.; Alexeev, I. I.; Belenkaya, E. S.

    2012-09-01

    The EU-FP7 Project "Integrated Medium for Planetary Exploration" was established as a result of scientific collaboration between institutions across Europe and is working on the integration of a set of interactive data analysis and modeling tools in the field of space plasma and planetary physics. According to [1] these tools are comprised of AMDA, Clweb and 3DView from the data analysis and visualisation sector as well as Hybrid/MHD and Paraboloid magnetospheric models from the simulation sector. This presentation focuses on how these various tools will access observational and modeled data and display them in innovative and interactive ways.

  20. Hydrogen Financial Analysis Scenario Tool (H2FAST). Web Tool User's Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Bush, B.; Penev, M.; Melaina, M.; Zuboy, J.

    2015-05-11

    The Hydrogen Financial Analysis Scenario Tool (H2FAST) provides a quick and convenient indepth financial analysis for hydrogen fueling stations. This manual describes how to use the H2FAST web tool, which is one of three H2FAST formats developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Although all of the formats are based on the same financial computations and conform to generally accepted accounting principles (FASAB 2014, Investopedia 2014), each format provides a different level of complexity and user interactivity.

  1. A 3D image analysis tool for SPECT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontos, Despina; Wang, Qiang; Megalooikonomou, Vasileios; Maurer, Alan H.; Knight, Linda C.; Kantor, Steve; Fisher, Robert S.; Simonian, Hrair P.; Parkman, Henry P.

    2005-04-01

    We have developed semi-automated and fully-automated tools for the analysis of 3D single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images. The focus is on the efficient boundary delineation of complex 3D structures that enables accurate measurement of their structural and physiologic properties. We employ intensity based thresholding algorithms for interactive and semi-automated analysis. We also explore fuzzy-connectedness concepts for fully automating the segmentation process. We apply the proposed tools to SPECT image data capturing variation of gastric accommodation and emptying. These image analysis tools were developed within the framework of a noninvasive scintigraphic test to measure simultaneously both gastric emptying and gastric volume after ingestion of a solid or a liquid meal. The clinical focus of the particular analysis was to probe associations between gastric accommodation/emptying and functional dyspepsia. Employing the proposed tools, we outline effectively the complex three dimensional gastric boundaries shown in the 3D SPECT images. We also perform accurate volume calculations in order to quantitatively assess the gastric mass variation. This analysis was performed both with the semi-automated and fully-automated tools. The results were validated against manual segmentation performed by a human expert. We believe that the development of an automated segmentation tool for SPECT imaging of the gastric volume variability will allow for other new applications of SPECT imaging where there is a need to evaluate complex organ function or tumor masses.

  2. Tool for Rapid Analysis of Monte Carlo Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Restrepo, Carolina; McCall, Kurt E.; Hurtado, John E.

    2011-01-01

    Designing a spacecraft, or any other complex engineering system, requires extensive simulation and analysis work. Oftentimes, the large amounts of simulation data generated are very di cult and time consuming to analyze, with the added risk of overlooking potentially critical problems in the design. The authors have developed a generic data analysis tool that can quickly sort through large data sets and point an analyst to the areas in the data set that cause specific types of failures. The Tool for Rapid Analysis of Monte Carlo simulations (TRAM) has been used in recent design and analysis work for the Orion vehicle, greatly decreasing the time it takes to evaluate performance requirements. A previous version of this tool was developed to automatically identify driving design variables in Monte Carlo data sets. This paper describes a new, parallel version, of TRAM implemented on a graphical processing unit, and presents analysis results for NASA's Orion Monte Carlo data to demonstrate its capabilities.

  3. Tool for Rapid Analysis of Monte Carlo Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Restrepo, Carolina; McCall, Kurt E.; Hurtado, John E.

    2013-01-01

    Designing a spacecraft, or any other complex engineering system, requires extensive simulation and analysis work. Oftentimes, the large amounts of simulation data generated are very difficult and time consuming to analyze, with the added risk of overlooking potentially critical problems in the design. The authors have developed a generic data analysis tool that can quickly sort through large data sets and point an analyst to the areas in the data set that cause specific types of failures. The first version of this tool was a serial code and the current version is a parallel code, which has greatly increased the analysis capabilities. This paper describes the new implementation of this analysis tool on a graphical processing unit, and presents analysis results for NASA's Orion Monte Carlo data to demonstrate its capabilities.

  4. Compressive Deconvolution in Medical Ultrasound Imaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhouye; Basarab, Adrian; Kouame, Denis

    2016-03-01

    The interest of compressive sampling in ultrasound imaging has been recently extensively evaluated by several research teams. Following the different application setups, it has been shown that the RF data may be reconstructed from a small number of measurements and/or using a reduced number of ultrasound pulse emissions. Nevertheless, RF image spatial resolution, contrast and signal to noise ratio are affected by the limited bandwidth of the imaging transducer and the physical phenomenon related to US wave propagation. To overcome these limitations, several deconvolution-based image processing techniques have been proposed to enhance the ultrasound images. In this paper, we propose a novel framework, named compressive deconvolution, that reconstructs enhanced RF images from compressed measurements. Exploiting an unified formulation of the direct acquisition model, combining random projections and 2D convolution with a spatially invariant point spread function, the benefit of our approach is the joint data volume reduction and image quality improvement. The proposed optimization method, based on the Alternating Direction Method of Multipliers, is evaluated on both simulated and in vivo data. PMID:26513780

  5. Real-time multi-view deconvolution

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Benjamin; Huisken, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Summary: In light-sheet microscopy, overall image content and resolution are improved by acquiring and fusing multiple views of the sample from different directions. State-of-the-art multi-view (MV) deconvolution simultaneously fuses and deconvolves the images in 3D, but processing takes a multiple of the acquisition time and constitutes the bottleneck in the imaging pipeline. Here, we show that MV deconvolution in 3D can finally be achieved in real-time by processing cross-sectional planes individually on the massively parallel architecture of a graphics processing unit (GPU). Our approximation is valid in the typical case where the rotation axis lies in the imaging plane. Availability and implementation: Source code and binaries are available on github (https://github.com/bene51/), native code under the repository ‘gpu_deconvolution’, Java wrappers implementing Fiji plugins under ‘SPIM_Reconstruction_Cuda’. Contact: bschmid@mpi-cbg.de or huisken@mpi-cbg.de Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26112291

  6. Improved Gabor Deconvolution and Its Extended Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xuekai; Sun, Sam Zandong

    2016-02-01

    In log time-frequency spectra, the nonstationary convolution model is a linear equation and thus we improved the Gabor deconvolution by employing a log hyperbolic smoothing scheme which can be implemented as an iteration process. Numerical tests and practical applications demonstrate that improved Gabor deconvolution can further broaden frequency bandwidth with less computational expenses than the ordinary method. Moreover, we attempt to enlarge this method's application value by addressing nonstationary and evaluating Q values. In fact, energy relationship of each hyperbolic bin (i.e., attenuation curve) can be taken as a quantitative indicator in balancing nonstationarity and conditioning seismic traces to the assumption of unchanging wavelet, which resultantly reveals more useful information for constrained reflectivity inversion. Meanwhile, a statistical method on Q-value estimation is also proposed by utilizing this linear model's gradient. In practice, not only estimations well agree with geologic settings, but also applications on Q-compensation migration are favorable in characterizing deep geologic structures, such as the pinch-out boundary and water channel.

  7. Structure preserving color deconvolution for immunohistochemistry images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ting; Srinivas, Chukka

    2015-03-01

    Immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining is an important technique for the detection of one or more biomarkers within a single tissue section. In digital pathology applications, the correct unmixing of the tissue image into its individual constituent dyes for each biomarker is a prerequisite for accurate detection and identification of the underlying cellular structures. A popular technique thus far is the color deconvolution method1 proposed by Ruifrok et al. However, Ruifrok's method independently estimates the individual dye contributions at each pixel which potentially leads to "holes and cracks" in the cells in the unmixed images. This is clearly inadequate since strong spatial dependencies exist in the tissue images which contain rich cellular structures. In this paper, we formulate the unmixing algorithm into a least-square framework of image patches, and propose a novel color deconvolution method which explicitly incorporates the spatial smoothness and structure continuity constraint into a neighborhood graph regularizer. An analytical closed-form solution to the cost function is derived for this algorithm for fast implementation. The algorithm is evaluated on a clinical data set containing a number of 3,3-Diaminobenzidine (DAB) and hematoxylin (HTX) stained IHC slides and demonstrates better unmixing results than the existing strategy.

  8. Deconvolution methods for structured illumination microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chakrova, Nadya; Rieger, Bernd; Stallinga, Sjoerd

    2016-07-01

    We compare two recently developed multiple-frame deconvolution approaches for the reconstruction of structured illumination microscopy (SIM) data: the pattern-illuminated Fourier ptychography algorithm (piFP) and the joint Richardson-Lucy deconvolution (jRL). The quality of the images reconstructed by these methods is compared in terms of the achieved resolution improvement, noise enhancement, and inherent artifacts. Furthermore, we study the issue of object-dependent resolution improvement by considering the modulation transfer functions derived from different types of objects. The performance of the considered methods is tested in experiments and benchmarked with a commercial SIM microscope. We find that the piFP method resolves periodic and isolated structures equally well, whereas the jRL method provides significantly higher resolution for isolated objects compared to periodic ones. Images reconstructed by the piFP and jRL algorithms are comparable to the images reconstructed using the generalized Wiener filter applied in most commercial SIM microscopes. An advantage of the discussed algorithms is that they allow the reconstruction of SIM images acquired under different types of illumination, such as multi-spot or random illumination. PMID:27409703

  9. SOFAST: Sandia Optical Fringe Analysis Slope Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2015-10-20

    SOFAST is used to characterize the surface slope of reflective mirrors for solar applications. SOFAST uses a large monitor or projections screen to display fringe patterns, and a machine vision camera to image the reflection of these patterns in the subject mirror. From these images, a detailed map of surface normals can be generated and compared to design or fitted mirror shapes. SOFAST uses standard Fringe Reflection (Deflectometry) approaches to measure the mirror surface normals.more » SOFAST uses an extrinsic analysis of key points on the facet to locate the camera and monitor relative to the facet coordinate system. It then refines this position based on the measured surface slope and integrated shape of the mirror facet. The facet is placed into a reference frame such that key points on the facet match the design facet in orientation and position. This is key to evaluating a facet as suitable for a specific solar application. SOFAST reports the measurements of the facet as detailed surface normal location in a format suitable for ray tracing optical analysis codes. SOFAST also reports summary information as to the facet fitted shape (monomial) and error parameters. Useful plots of the error distribution are also presented.« less

  10. SOFAST: Sandia Optical Fringe Analysis Slope Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Andraka, Charles E.

    2015-10-20

    SOFAST is used to characterize the surface slope of reflective mirrors for solar applications. SOFAST uses a large monitor or projections screen to display fringe patterns, and a machine vision camera to image the reflection of these patterns in the subject mirror. From these images, a detailed map of surface normals can be generated and compared to design or fitted mirror shapes. SOFAST uses standard Fringe Reflection (Deflectometry) approaches to measure the mirror surface normals. SOFAST uses an extrinsic analysis of key points on the facet to locate the camera and monitor relative to the facet coordinate system. It then refines this position based on the measured surface slope and integrated shape of the mirror facet. The facet is placed into a reference frame such that key points on the facet match the design facet in orientation and position. This is key to evaluating a facet as suitable for a specific solar application. SOFAST reports the measurements of the facet as detailed surface normal location in a format suitable for ray tracing optical analysis codes. SOFAST also reports summary information as to the facet fitted shape (monomial) and error parameters. Useful plots of the error distribution are also presented.

  11. RCytoscape: tools for exploratory network analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Biomolecular pathways and networks are dynamic and complex, and the perturbations to them which cause disease are often multiple, heterogeneous and contingent. Pathway and network visualizations, rendered on a computer or published on paper, however, tend to be static, lacking in detail, and ill-equipped to explore the variety and quantities of data available today, and the complex causes we seek to understand. Results RCytoscape integrates R (an open-ended programming environment rich in statistical power and data-handling facilities) and Cytoscape (powerful network visualization and analysis software). RCytoscape extends Cytoscape's functionality beyond what is possible with the Cytoscape graphical user interface. To illustrate the power of RCytoscape, a portion of the Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) data set from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) is examined. Network visualization reveals previously unreported patterns in the data suggesting heterogeneous signaling mechanisms active in GBM Proneural tumors, with possible clinical relevance. Conclusions Progress in bioinformatics and computational biology depends upon exploratory and confirmatory data analysis, upon inference, and upon modeling. These activities will eventually permit the prediction and control of complex biological systems. Network visualizations -- molecular maps -- created from an open-ended programming environment rich in statistical power and data-handling facilities, such as RCytoscape, will play an essential role in this progression. PMID:23837656

  12. GATB: Genome Assembly & Analysis Tool Box

    PubMed Central

    Drezen, Erwan; Rizk, Guillaume; Chikhi, Rayan; Deltel, Charles; Lemaitre, Claire; Peterlongo, Pierre; Lavenier, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Efficient and fast next-generation sequencing (NGS) algorithms are essential to analyze the terabytes of data generated by the NGS machines. A serious bottleneck can be the design of such algorithms, as they require sophisticated data structures and advanced hardware implementation. Results: We propose an open-source library dedicated to genome assembly and analysis to fasten the process of developing efficient software. The library is based on a recent optimized de-Bruijn graph implementation allowing complex genomes to be processed on desktop computers using fast algorithms with low memory footprints. Availability and implementation: The GATB library is written in C++ and is available at the following Web site http://gatb.inria.fr under the A-GPL license. Contact: lavenier@irisa.fr Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:24990603

  13. Serial concept maps: tools for concept analysis.

    PubMed

    All, Anita C; Huycke, LaRae I

    2007-05-01

    Nursing theory challenges students to think abstractly and is often a difficult introduction to graduate study. Traditionally, concept analysis is useful in facilitating this abstract thinking. Concept maps are a way to visualize an individual's knowledge about a specific topic. Serial concept maps express the sequential evolution of a student's perceptions of a selected concept. Maps reveal individual differences in learning and perceptions, as well as progress in understanding the concept. Relationships are assessed and suggestions are made during serial mapping, which actively engages the students and faculty in dialogue that leads to increased understanding of the link between nursing theory and practice. Serial concept mapping lends itself well to both online and traditional classroom environments. PMID:17547345

  14. Nonlinear Robustness Analysis Tools for Flight Control Law Validation & Verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Abhijit

    Loss of control in flight is among the highest aviation accident categories for both the number of accidents and the number of fatalities. The flight controls community is seeking an improved validation tools for safety critical flight control systems. Current validation tools rely heavily on linear analysis, which ignore the inherent nonlinear nature of the aircraft dynamics and flight control system. Specifically, current practices in validating the flight control system involve gridding the flight envelope and checking various criteria based on linear analysis to ensure safety of the flight control system. The analysis and certification methods currently applied assume the aircrafts' dynamics is linear. In reality, the behavior of the aircraft is always nonlinear due to its aerodynamic characteristics and physical limitations imposed by the actuators. This thesis develops nonlinear analysis tools capable of certifying flight control laws for nonlinear aircraft dynamics. The proposed analysis tools can handle both the aerodynamic nonlinearities and the physical limitations imposed by the actuators in the aircrafts' dynamics. This proposed validation technique will extend and enrich the predictive capability of existing flight control law validation methods to analyze nonlinearities. The objective of this thesis is to provide the flight control community with an advanced set of analysis tools to reduce aviation fatalities and accidents rate.

  15. [Factor Analysis: Principles to Evaluate Measurement Tools for Mental Health].

    PubMed

    Campo-Arias, Adalberto; Herazo, Edwin; Oviedo, Heidi Celina

    2012-09-01

    The validation of a measurement tool in mental health is a complex process that usually starts by estimating reliability, to later approach its validity. Factor analysis is a way to know the number of dimensions, domains or factors of a measuring tool, generally related to the construct validity of the scale. The analysis could be exploratory or confirmatory, and helps in the selection of the items with better performance. For an acceptable factor analysis, it is necessary to follow some steps and recommendations, conduct some statistical tests, and rely on a proper sample of participants. PMID:26572119

  16. Development of data analysis tool for combat system integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Seung-Chun; Shin, Jong-Gye; Oh, Dae-Kyun

    2013-03-01

    System integration is an important element for the construction of naval combat ships. In particular, because impeccable combat system integration together with the sensors and weapons can ensure the combat capability and survivability of the ship, the integrated performance of the combat system should be verified and validated whether or not it fulfills the requirements of the end user. In order to conduct systematic verification and validation, a data analysis tool is requisite. This paper suggests the Data Extraction, Recording and Analysis Tool (DERAT) for the data analysis of the integrated performance of the combat system, including the functional definition, architecture and effectiveness of the DERAT by presenting the test results.

  17. Vulnerability assessment using two complementary analysis tools

    SciTech Connect

    Paulus, W.K.

    1993-07-01

    To analyze the vulnerability of nuclear materials to theft or sabotage, Department of Energy facilities have been using, since 1989, a computer program called ASSESS, Analytic System and Software for Evaluation of Safeguards and Security. During the past year Sandia National Laboratories has begun using an additional program, SEES, Security Exercise Evaluation Simulation, enhancing the picture of vulnerability beyond what either program achieves alone. Assess analyzes all possible paths of attack on a target and, assuming that an attack occurs, ranks them by the probability that a response force of adequate size can interrupt the attack before theft or sabotage is accomplished. A Neutralization module pits, collectively, a security force against the interrupted adversary force in a fire fight and calculates the probability that the adversaries are defeated. SEES examines a single scenario and simulates in detail the interactions among all combatants. its output includes shots fired between shooter and target, and the hits and kills. Whereas ASSESS gives breadth of analysis, expressed statistically and performed relatively quickly, SEES adds depth of detail, modeling tactical behavior. ASSESS finds scenarios that exploit the greatest weakness of a facility. SEES explores these scenarios to demonstrate in detail how various tactics to nullify the attack might work out. Without ASSESS to find the facility weakness, it is difficult to focus SEES objectively on scenarios worth analyzing. Without SEES to simulate the details of response vs. adversary interaction, it is not possible to test tactical assumptions and hypotheses. Using both programs together, vulnerability analyses achieve both breadth and depth.

  18. Vulnerability assessment using two complementary analysis tools

    SciTech Connect

    Paulus, W.K.

    1993-07-01

    To analyze the vulnerability of nuclear materials to theft or sabotage, Department of Energy facilities have been using, since 1989, a computer program called ASSESS, Analytic System and Software for Evaluation of Safeguards and Security. During the past year Sandia National Laboratories has began using an additional program, SEES, Security Exercise Evaluation Simulation, enhancing the picture of vulnerability beyond what either program achieves alone. ASSESS analyzes all possible paths of attack on a target and, assuming that an attack occurs, ranks them by the probability that a response force of adequate size can interrupt the attack before theft or sabotage is accomplished. A Neutralization module pits, collectively, a security force against the interrupted adversary force in a fire fight and calculates the probability that the adversaries are defeated. SEES examines a single scenario and simulates in detail the interactions among all combatants. Its output includes shots fired between shooter and target, and the hits and kills. Whereas ASSESS gives breadth of analysis, expressed statistically and performed relatively quickly, SEES adds depth of detail, modeling tactical behavior. ASSESS finds scenarios that exploit the greatest weaknesses of a facility. SEES explores these scenarios to demonstrate in detail how various tactics to nullify the attack might work out. Without ASSESS to find the facility weaknesses, it is difficult to focus SEES objectively on scenarios worth analyzing. Without SEES to simulate the details of response vs. adversary interaction, it is not possible to test tactical assumptions and hypotheses. Using both programs together, vulnerability analyses achieve both breadth and depth.

  19. SAGE Research Methods Datasets: A Data Analysis Educational Tool.

    PubMed

    Vardell, Emily

    2016-01-01

    SAGE Research Methods Datasets (SRMD) is an educational tool designed to offer users the opportunity to obtain hands-on experience with data analysis. Users can search for and browse authentic datasets by method, discipline, and data type. Each of the datasets are supplemented with educational material on the research method and clear guidelines for how to approach data analysis. PMID:27391182

  20. Restoring Detailed Geomagnetic and Environmental Information from Continuous Sediment Paleomagnetic Measurement through Optimised Deconvolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuan, C.; Oda, H.

    2013-12-01

    The development of pass-through cryogenic magnetometers has greatly improved our efficiency in collecting paleomagnetic and rock magnetic data from continuous samples such as sediment half-core sections and u-channels. During a pass-through measurement, the magnetometer sensor response inevitably convolves with remanence of the continuous sample. The convolution process results in smoothed measurement and can seriously distort the paleomagnetic signal due to differences in sensor response along different measurement axes. Previous studies have demonstrated that deconvolution can effectively overcome the convolution effect of sensor response and improve the resolution for continuous paleomagnetic data. However, the lack of an easy-to-use deconvolution tool and the difficulty in accurately measuring the magnetometer sensor response have greatly hindered the application of deconvolution. Here, we acquire reliable estimate of sensor response of a pass-through cryogenic magnetometer at the Oregon State University by integrating repeated measurements of a magnetic point source. The point source is fixed in the center of a well-shaped polycarbonate cube with 5 mm edge length, and measured at every 1 mm position along a 40-cm interval while placing the polycarbonate cube at each of the 5 × 5 grid positions over a 2 × 2 cm2 area on the cross section. The acquired sensor response reveals that cross terms (i.e. response of pick-up coil for one axis to magnetic signal along other axes) that were often omitted in previous deconvolution practices are clearly not negligible. Utilizing the detailed estimate of magnetometer sensor response, we present UDECON, a graphical tool for convenient application of optimised deconvolution based on Akaike's Bayesian Information Criterion (ABIC) minimization (Oda and Shibuya, 1996). UDECON directly reads a paleomagnetic measurement file, and allows user to view, compare, and save data before and after deconvolution. Optimised deconvolution

  1. Development of a climate data analysis tool (CDAT)

    SciTech Connect

    Marlais, S.M.

    1997-09-01

    The Climate Data Analysis Tool (CDAT) is designed to provide the Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, California, with the capabilities needed to analyze model data with little effort on the part of the scientist, while performing complex mathematical calculations, and graphically displaying the results. This computer software will meet the demanding need of climate scientists by providing the necessary tools to diagnose, validate, and intercompare large observational and global climate model datasets.

  2. Free software tools for atlas-based volumetric neuroimage analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazin, Pierre-Louis; Pham, Dzung L.; Gandler, William; McAuliffe, Matthew

    2005-04-01

    We describe new and freely available software tools for measuring volumes in subregions of the brain. The method is fast, flexible, and employs well-studied techniques based on the Talairach-Tournoux atlas. The software tools are released as plug-ins for MIPAV, a freely available and user-friendly image analysis software package developed by the National Institutes of Health. Our software tools include a digital Talairach atlas that consists of labels for 148 different substructures of the brain at various scales.

  3. A Semi-Automated Functional Test Data Analysis Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Peng; Haves, Philip; Kim, Moosung

    2005-05-01

    The growing interest in commissioning is creating a demand that will increasingly be met by mechanical contractors and less experienced commissioning agents. They will need tools to help them perform commissioning effectively and efficiently. The widespread availability of standardized procedures, accessible in the field, will allow commissioning to be specified with greater certainty as to what will be delivered, enhancing the acceptance and credibility of commissioning. In response, a functional test data analysis tool is being developed to analyze the data collected during functional tests for air-handling units. The functional test data analysis tool is designed to analyze test data, assess performance of the unit under test and identify the likely causes of the failure. The tool has a convenient user interface to facilitate manual entry of measurements made during a test. A graphical display shows the measured performance versus the expected performance, highlighting significant differences that indicate the unit is not able to pass the test. The tool is described as semiautomated because the measured data need to be entered manually, instead of being passed from the building control system automatically. However, the data analysis and visualization are fully automated. The tool is designed to be used by commissioning providers conducting functional tests as part of either new building commissioning or retro-commissioning, as well as building owners and operators interested in conducting routine tests periodically to check the performance of their HVAC systems.

  4. Spatial deconvolution of spectropolarimetric data: an application to quiet Sun magnetic elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintero Noda, C.; Asensio Ramos, A.; Orozco Suárez, D.; Ruiz Cobo, B.

    2015-07-01

    for the magnetic field intensity and for its inclination. Moreover, the discontinuity between the magnetic and non magnetic environment in the flux tube gets sharper. Conclusions: The deconvolution process used in this paper reveals information that the smearing induced by the point spread function (PSF) of the telescope hides. Additionally, the deconvolution is done with a low computational load, making it appealing for its use on the analysis of large data sets. A copy of the IDL code is available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/579/A3

  5. Towards robust deconvolution of low-dose perfusion CT: sparse perfusion deconvolution using online dictionary learning.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ruogu; Chen, Tsuhan; Sanelli, Pina C

    2013-05-01

    Computed tomography perfusion (CTP) is an important functional imaging modality in the evaluation of cerebrovascular diseases, particularly in acute stroke and vasospasm. However, the post-processed parametric maps of blood flow tend to be noisy, especially in low-dose CTP, due to the noisy contrast enhancement profile and the oscillatory nature of the results generated by the current computational methods. In this paper, we propose a robust sparse perfusion deconvolution method (SPD) to estimate cerebral blood flow in CTP performed at low radiation dose. We first build a dictionary from high-dose perfusion maps using online dictionary learning and then perform deconvolution-based hemodynamic parameters estimation on the low-dose CTP data. Our method is validated on clinical data of patients with normal and pathological CBF maps. The results show that we achieve superior performance than existing methods, and potentially improve the differentiation between normal and ischemic tissue in the brain. PMID:23542422

  6. Towards robust deconvolution of low-dose perfusion CT: Sparse perfusion deconvolution using online dictionary learning

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Ruogu; Chen, Tsuhan; Sanelli, Pina C.

    2014-01-01

    Computed tomography perfusion (CTP) is an important functional imaging modality in the evaluation of cerebrovascular diseases, particularly in acute stroke and vasospasm. However, the post-processed parametric maps of blood flow tend to be noisy, especially in low-dose CTP, due to the noisy contrast enhancement profile and the oscillatory nature of the results generated by the current computational methods. In this paper, we propose a robust sparse perfusion deconvolution method (SPD) to estimate cerebral blood flow in CTP performed at low radiation dose. We first build a dictionary from high-dose perfusion maps using online dictionary learning and then perform deconvolution-based hemodynamic parameters estimation on the low-dose CTP data. Our method is validated on clinical data of patients with normal and pathological CBF maps. The results show that we achieve superior performance than existing methods, and potentially improve the differentiation between normal and ischemic tissue in the brain. PMID:23542422

  7. Least-squares (LS) deconvolution of a series of overlapping cortical auditory evoked potentials: a simulation and experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardy, Fabrice; Van Dun, Bram; Dillon, Harvey; Cowan, Robert

    2014-08-01

    Objective. To evaluate the viability of disentangling a series of overlapping ‘cortical auditory evoked potentials’ (CAEPs) elicited by different stimuli using least-squares (LS) deconvolution, and to assess the adaptation of CAEPs for different stimulus onset-asynchronies (SOAs). Approach. Optimal aperiodic stimulus sequences were designed by controlling the condition number of matrices associated with the LS deconvolution technique. First, theoretical considerations of LS deconvolution were assessed in simulations in which multiple artificial overlapping responses were recovered. Second, biological CAEPs were recorded in response to continuously repeated stimulus trains containing six different tone-bursts with frequencies 8, 4, 2, 1, 0.5, 0.25 kHz separated by SOAs jittered around 150 (120-185), 250 (220-285) and 650 (620-685) ms. The control condition had a fixed SOA of 1175 ms. In a second condition, using the same SOAs, trains of six stimuli were separated by a silence gap of 1600 ms. Twenty-four adults with normal hearing (<20 dB HL) were assessed. Main results. Results showed disentangling of a series of overlapping responses using LS deconvolution on simulated waveforms as well as on real EEG data. The use of rapid presentation and LS deconvolution did not however, allow the recovered CAEPs to have a higher signal-to-noise ratio than for slowly presented stimuli. The LS deconvolution technique enables the analysis of a series of overlapping responses in EEG. Significance. LS deconvolution is a useful technique for the study of adaptation mechanisms of CAEPs for closely spaced stimuli whose characteristics change from stimulus to stimulus. High-rate presentation is necessary to develop an understanding of how the auditory system encodes natural speech or other intrinsically high-rate stimuli.

  8. Perceived Image Quality Improvements from the Application of Image Deconvolution to Retinal Images from an Adaptive Optics Fundus Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soliz, P.; Nemeth, S. C.; Erry, G. R. G.; Otten, L. J.; Yang, S. Y.

    Aim: The objective of this project was to apply an image restoration methodology based on wavefront measurements obtained with a Shack-Hartmann sensor and evaluating the restored image quality based on medical criteria.Methods: Implementing an adaptive optics (AO) technique, a fundus imager was used to achieve low-order correction to images of the retina. The high-order correction was provided by deconvolution. A Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor measures aberrations. The wavefront measurement is the basis for activating a deformable mirror. Image restoration to remove remaining aberrations is achieved by direct deconvolution using the point spread function (PSF) or a blind deconvolution. The PSF is estimated using measured wavefront aberrations. Direct application of classical deconvolution methods such as inverse filtering, Wiener filtering or iterative blind deconvolution (IBD) to the AO retinal images obtained from the adaptive optical imaging system is not satisfactory because of the very large image size, dificulty in modeling the system noise, and inaccuracy in PSF estimation. Our approach combines direct and blind deconvolution to exploit available system information, avoid non-convergence, and time-consuming iterative processes. Results: The deconvolution was applied to human subject data and resulting restored images compared by a trained ophthalmic researcher. Qualitative analysis showed significant improvements. Neovascularization can be visualized with the adaptive optics device that cannot be resolved with the standard fundus camera. The individual nerve fiber bundles are easily resolved as are melanin structures in the choroid. Conclusion: This project demonstrated that computer-enhanced, adaptive optic images have greater detail of anatomical and pathological structures.

  9. A Software Tool for Integrated Optical Design Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Jim; Troy, Ed; DePlachett, Charles; Montgomery, Edward (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Design of large precision optical systems requires multi-disciplinary analysis, modeling, and design. Thermal, structural and optical characteristics of the hardware must be accurately understood in order to design a system capable of accomplishing the performance requirements. The interactions between each of the disciplines become stronger as systems are designed lighter weight for space applications. This coupling dictates a concurrent engineering design approach. In the past, integrated modeling tools have been developed that attempt to integrate all of the complex analysis within the framework of a single model. This often results in modeling simplifications and it requires engineering specialist to learn new applications. The software described in this presentation addresses the concurrent engineering task using a different approach. The software tool, Integrated Optical Design Analysis (IODA), uses data fusion technology to enable a cross discipline team of engineering experts to concurrently design an optical system using their standard validated engineering design tools.

  10. Rapid Modeling and Analysis Tools: Evolution, Status, Needs and Directions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Stone, Thomas J.; Ransom, Jonathan B. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Advanced aerospace systems are becoming increasingly more complex, and customers are demanding lower cost, higher performance, and high reliability. Increased demands are placed on the design engineers to collaborate and integrate design needs and objectives early in the design process to minimize risks that may occur later in the design development stage. High performance systems require better understanding of system sensitivities much earlier in the design process to meet these goals. The knowledge, skills, intuition, and experience of an individual design engineer will need to be extended significantly for the next generation of aerospace system designs. Then a collaborative effort involving the designer, rapid and reliable analysis tools and virtual experts will result in advanced aerospace systems that are safe, reliable, and efficient. This paper discusses the evolution, status, needs and directions for rapid modeling and analysis tools for structural analysis. First, the evolution of computerized design and analysis tools is briefly described. Next, the status of representative design and analysis tools is described along with a brief statement on their functionality. Then technology advancements to achieve rapid modeling and analysis are identified. Finally, potential future directions including possible prototype configurations are proposed.

  11. Quantitative deconvolution of human thermal infrared emittance.

    PubMed

    Arthur, D T J; Khan, M M

    2013-01-01

    The bioheat transfer models conventionally employed in etiology of human thermal infrared (TIR) emittance rely upon two assumptions; universal graybody emissivity and significant transmission of heat from subsurface tissue layers. In this work, a series of clinical and laboratory experiments were designed and carried out to conclusively evaluate the validity of the two assumptions. Results obtained from the objective analyses of TIR images of human facial and tibial regions demonstrated significant variations in spectral thermophysical properties at different anatomic locations on human body. The limited validity of the two assumptions signifies need for quantitative deconvolution of human TIR emittance in clinical, psychophysiological and critical applications. A novel approach to joint inversion of the bioheat transfer model is also introduced, levering the deterministic temperature-dependency of proton resonance frequency in low-lipid human soft tissue for characterizing the relationship between subsurface 3D tissue temperature profiles and corresponding TIR emittance. PMID:23086533

  12. Deconvolution of mixed magnetism in multilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swain, Akshaya Kumar; Bahadur, Dhirendra

    2014-06-01

    Magnetic properties of graphite modified at the edges by KCl and exfoliated graphite in the form of twisted multilayered graphene (<4 layers) are analyzed to understand the evolution of magnetic behavior in the absence of any magnetic impurities. The mixed magnetism in multilayer graphene is deconvoluted using Low field-high field hysteresis loops at different temperatures. In addition to temperature and the applied magnetic field, the density of edge state spins and the interaction between them decides the nature of the magnetic state. By virtue of magnetometry and electron spin resonance studies, we demonstrate that ferromagnetism is intrinsic and is due to the interactions among various paramagnetic centers. The strength of these magnetic correlations can be controlled by modifying the structure.

  13. Deconvolution of mixed magnetism in multilayer graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Swain, Akshaya Kumar; Bahadur, Dhirendra

    2014-06-16

    Magnetic properties of graphite modified at the edges by KCl and exfoliated graphite in the form of twisted multilayered graphene (<4 layers) are analyzed to understand the evolution of magnetic behavior in the absence of any magnetic impurities. The mixed magnetism in multilayer graphene is deconvoluted using Low field-high field hysteresis loops at different temperatures. In addition to temperature and the applied magnetic field, the density of edge state spins and the interaction between them decides the nature of the magnetic state. By virtue of magnetometry and electron spin resonance studies, we demonstrate that ferromagnetism is intrinsic and is due to the interactions among various paramagnetic centers. The strength of these magnetic correlations can be controlled by modifying the structure.

  14. Generalized iterative deconvolution for receiver function estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yinzhi; Pavlis, Gary L.

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes a generalization of the iterative deconvolution method commonly used as a component of passive array wavefield imaging. We show that the iterative method should be thought of as a sparse output deconvolution method with the number of terms retained dependent on the convergence criteria. The generalized method we introduce uses an inverse operator to shape the assumed wavelet to a peaked function at zero lag. We show that the conventional method is equivalent to using a damped least-squares spiking filter with extremely large damping and proper scaling. In that case, the inverse operator used in the generalized method reduces to the cross-correlation operator. The theoretical insight of realizing the output is a sparse series provides a basis for the second important addition of the generalized method-an output shaping wavelet. A constant output shaping wavelet is a critical component in scattered wave imaging to avoid mixing data of variable bandwidth. We demonstrate the new approach can improve resolution by using an inverse operator tuned to maximize resolution. We also show that the signal-to-noise ratio of the result can be improved by applying a different convergence criterion than the standard method, which measures the energy left after each iteration. The efficacy of the approach was evaluated with synthetic experiment in various signal and noise conditions. We further validated the approach with real data from the USArray. We compared our results with data from the EarthScope Automated Receiver Survey and found that our results show modest improvements in consistency measured by correlation coefficients with station stacks and a reduced number of outliers.

  15. Design and analysis tools for concurrent blackboard systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmanus, John W.

    1991-01-01

    A set of blackboard system design and analysis tools that consists of a knowledge source organizer, a knowledge source input/output connectivity analyzer, and a validated blackboard system simulation model is discussed. The author presents the structure and functionality of the knowledge source input/output connectivity analyzer. An example outlining the use of the analyzer to aid in the design of a concurrent tactical decision generator for air-to-air combat is presented. The blackboard system design and analysis tools were designed for generic blackboard systems and are application independent.

  16. Software Construction and Analysis Tools for Future Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowry, Michael R.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    NASA and its international partners will increasingly depend on software-based systems to implement advanced functions for future space missions, such as Martian rovers that autonomously navigate long distances exploring geographic features formed by surface water early in the planet's history. The software-based functions for these missions will need to be robust and highly reliable, raising significant challenges in the context of recent Mars mission failures attributed to software faults. After reviewing these challenges, this paper describes tools that have been developed at NASA Ames that could contribute to meeting these challenges; 1) Program synthesis tools based on automated inference that generate documentation for manual review and annotations for automated certification. 2) Model-checking tools for concurrent object-oriented software that achieve memorability through synergy with program abstraction and static analysis tools.

  17. Interoperability of the analysis tools within the IMPEx project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Génot, Vincent; Khodachenko, Maxim; Kallio, Esa; Al-Ubaidi, Tarek; Gangloff, Michel; Budnik, Elena; Bouchemit, Myriam; Renard, Benjamin; Bourel, Natacha; Modolo, Ronan; Hess, Sébastien; André, Nicolas; Penou, Emmanuel; Topf, Florian; Alexeev, Igor; Belenkaya, Elena; Kalegaev, Vladimir; Schmidt, Walter

    2013-04-01

    The growing amount of data in planetary sciences requires adequate tools for visualisation enabling in depth analysis. Within the FP7 IMPEx infrastructure data will originate from heterogeneous sources : large observational databases (CDAWeb, AMDA at CDPP, ...), simulation databases for hybrid and MHD codes (FMI, LATMOS), planetary magnetic field models database and online services (SINP). Together with the common "time series" visualisation functionality for both in-situ and modeled data (provided by AMDA and CLWeb tools), IMPEx will also provide immersion capabilities into the complex 3D data originating from models (provided by 3DView). The functionalities of these tools will be described. The emphasis will be put on how these tools 1/ can share information (for instance Time Tables or user composed parameters) and 2/ be operated synchronously via dynamic connections based on Virtual Observatory standards.

  18. Parallel Analysis Tools for Ultra-Large Climate Data Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, Robert; Krishna, Jayesh; Xu, Xiabing; Mickelson, Sheri; Wilde, Mike; Peterson, Kara; Bochev, Pavel; Latham, Robert; Tautges, Tim; Brown, David; Brownrigg, Richard; Haley, Mary; Shea, Dennis; Huang, Wei; Middleton, Don; Schuchardt, Karen; Yin, Jian

    2013-04-01

    While climate models have used parallelism for several years, the post-processing tools are still mostly single-threaded applications and many are closed source. These tools are becoming a bottleneck in the production of new climate knowledge when they confront terabyte-sized output from high-resolution climate models. The ParVis project is using and creating Free and Open Source tools that bring data and task parallelism to climate model analysis to enable analysis of large climate data sets. ParVis is using the Swift task-parallel language to implement a diagnostic suite that generates over 600 plots of atmospheric quantities. ParVis has also created a Parallel Gridded Analysis Library (ParGAL) which implements many common climate analysis operations in a data-parallel fashion using the Message Passing Interface. ParGAL has in turn been built on sophisticated packages for describing grids in parallel (the Mesh Oriented database (MOAB), performing vector operations on arbitrary grids (Intrepid) and reading data in parallel (PnetCDF). ParGAL is being used to implement a parallel version of the NCAR Command Language (NCL) called ParNCL. ParNCL/ParCAL not only speeds up analysis of large datasets but also allows operations to be performed on native grids, eliminating the need to transform data to latitude-longitude grids. All of the tools ParVis is creating are available as free and open source software.

  19. Computational Tools for the Secondary Analysis of Metabolomics Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Sean C.; Weljie, Aalim M.; Turner, Raymond J.

    2013-01-01

    Metabolomics experiments have become commonplace in a wide variety of disciplines. By identifying and quantifying metabolites researchers can achieve a systems level understanding of metabolism. These studies produce vast swaths of data which are often only lightly interpreted due to the overwhelmingly large amount of variables that are measured. Recently, a number of computational tools have been developed which enable much deeper analysis of metabolomics data. These data have been difficult to interpret as understanding the connections between dozens of altered metabolites has often relied on the biochemical knowledge of researchers and their speculations. Modern biochemical databases provide information about the interconnectivity of metabolism which can be automatically polled using metabolomics secondary analysis tools. Starting with lists of altered metabolites, there are two main types of analysis: enrichment analysis computes which metabolic pathways have been significantly altered whereas metabolite mapping contextualizes the abundances and significances of measured metabolites into network visualizations. Many different tools have been developed for one or both of these applications. In this review the functionality and use of these software is discussed. Together these novel secondary analysis tools will enable metabolomics researchers to plumb the depths of their data and produce farther reaching biological conclusions than ever before. PMID:24688685

  20. Phonological assessment and analysis tools for Tagalog: Preliminary development.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rachelle Kay; Bernhardt, B May; Stemberger, Joseph P

    2016-01-01

    Information and assessment tools concerning Tagalog phonological development are minimally available. The current study thus sets out to develop elicitation and analysis tools for Tagalog. A picture elicitation task was designed with a warm-up, screener and two extension lists, one with more complex and one with simpler words. A nonlinear phonological analysis form was adapted from English (Bernhardt & Stemberger, 2000) to capture key characteristics of Tagalog. The tools were piloted on a primarily Tagalog-speaking 4-year-old boy living in a Canadian-English-speaking environment. The data provided initial guidance for revision of the elicitation tool (available at phonodevelopment.sites.olt.ubc.ca). The analysis provides preliminary observations about possible expectations for primarily Tagalog-speaking 4-year-olds in English-speaking environments: Lack of mastery for tap/trill 'r', and minor mismatches for vowels, /l/, /h/ and word stress. Further research is required in order to develop the tool into a norm-referenced instrument for Tagalog in both monolingual and multilingual environments. PMID:27096390

  1. An Automated Data Analysis Tool for Livestock Market Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Galen S.; Raper, Kellie Curry

    2011-01-01

    This article describes an automated data analysis tool that allows Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service educators to disseminate results in a timely manner. Primary data collected at Oklahoma Quality Beef Network (OQBN) certified calf auctions across the state results in a large amount of data per sale site. Sale summaries for an individual sale…

  2. Orienting the Neighborhood: A Subdivision Energy Analysis Tool; Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, C.; Horowitz, S.

    2008-07-01

    This paper describes a new computerized Subdivision Energy Analysis Tool being developed to allow users to interactively design subdivision street layouts while receiving feedback about energy impacts based on user-specified building design variants and availability of roof surfaces for photovoltaic and solar water heating systems.

  3. The Adversarial Route Analysis Tool: A Web Application

    SciTech Connect

    Casson, William H. Jr.

    2012-08-02

    The Adversarial Route Analysis Tool is a type of Google maps for adversaries. It's a web-based Geospatial application similar to Google Maps. It helps the U.S. government plan operations that predict where an adversary might be. It's easily accessible and maintainble and it's simple to use without much training.

  4. An Online Image Analysis Tool for Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raeside, L.; Busschots, B.; Waddington, S.; Keating, J. G.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes an online image analysis tool developed as part of an iterative, user-centered development of an online Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) called the Education through Virtual Experience (EVE) Portal. The VLE provides a Web portal through which schoolchildren and their teachers create scientific proposals, retrieve images and…

  5. Recursive Frame Analysis: A Practitioner's Tool for Mapping Therapeutic Conversation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeney, Hillary; Keeney, Bradford; Chenail, Ronald J.

    2012-01-01

    Recursive frame analysis (RFA), both a practical therapeutic tool and an advanced qualitative research method that maps the structure of therapeutic conversation, is introduced with a clinical case vignette. We present and illustrate a means of mapping metaphorical themes that contextualize the performance taking place in the room, recursively…

  6. Limited-memory scaled gradient projection methods for real-time image deconvolution in microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porta, F.; Zanella, R.; Zanghirati, G.; Zanni, L.

    2015-04-01

    Gradient projection methods have given rise to effective tools for image deconvolution in several relevant areas, such as microscopy, medical imaging and astronomy. Due to the large scale of the optimization problems arising in nowadays imaging applications and to the growing request of real-time reconstructions, an interesting challenge to be faced consists in designing new acceleration techniques for the gradient schemes, able to preserve their simplicity and low computational cost of each iteration. In this work we propose an acceleration strategy for a state-of-the-art scaled gradient projection method for image deconvolution in microscopy. The acceleration idea is derived by adapting a step-length selection rule, recently introduced for limited-memory steepest descent methods in unconstrained optimization, to the special constrained optimization framework arising in image reconstruction. We describe how important issues related to the generalization of the step-length rule to the imaging optimization problem have been faced and we evaluate the improvements due to the acceleration strategy by numerical experiments on large-scale image deconvolution problems.

  7. Deconvolution of Complex 1D NMR Spectra Using Objective Model Selection.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Travis S; Wilson, Henry D; de Vera, Ian Mitchelle S; Kojetin, Douglas J

    2015-01-01

    Fluorine (19F) NMR has emerged as a useful tool for characterization of slow dynamics in 19F-labeled proteins. One-dimensional (1D) 19F NMR spectra of proteins can be broad, irregular and complex, due to exchange of probe nuclei between distinct electrostatic environments; and therefore cannot be deconvoluted and analyzed in an objective way using currently available software. We have developed a Python-based deconvolution program, decon1d, which uses Bayesian information criteria (BIC) to objectively determine which model (number of peaks) would most likely produce the experimentally obtained data. The method also allows for fitting of intermediate exchange spectra, which is not supported by current software in the absence of a specific kinetic model. In current methods, determination of the deconvolution model best supported by the data is done manually through comparison of residual error values, which can be time consuming and requires model selection by the user. In contrast, the BIC method used by decond1d provides a quantitative method for model comparison that penalizes for model complexity helping to prevent over-fitting of the data and allows identification of the most parsimonious model. The decon1d program is freely available as a downloadable Python script at the project website (https://github.com/hughests/decon1d/). PMID:26241959

  8. Discovery and New Frontiers Project Budget Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newhouse, Marilyn E.

    2011-01-01

    The Discovery and New Frontiers (D&NF) programs are multi-project, uncoupled programs that currently comprise 13 missions in phases A through F. The ability to fly frequent science missions to explore the solar system is the primary measure of program success. The program office uses a Budget Analysis Tool to perform "what-if" analyses and compare mission scenarios to the current program budget, and rapidly forecast the programs ability to meet their launch rate requirements. The tool allows the user to specify the total mission cost (fixed year), mission development and operations profile by phase (percent total mission cost and duration), launch vehicle, and launch date for multiple missions. The tool automatically applies inflation and rolls up the total program costs (in real year dollars) for comparison against available program budget. Thus, the tool allows the user to rapidly and easily explore a variety of launch rates and analyze the effect of changes in future mission or launch vehicle costs, the differing development profiles or operational durations of a future mission, or a replan of a current mission on the overall program budget. Because the tool also reports average monthly costs for the specified mission profile, the development or operations cost profile can easily be validate against program experience for similar missions. While specifically designed for predicting overall program budgets for programs that develop and operate multiple missions concurrently, the basic concept of the tool (rolling up multiple, independently-budget lines) could easily be adapted to other applications.

  9. V-Lab{trademark}: Virtual laboratories -- The analysis tool for structural analysis of composite components

    SciTech Connect

    1999-07-01

    V-Lab{trademark}, an acronym for Virtual Laboratories, is a design and analysis tool for fiber-reinforced composite components. This program allows the user to perform analysis, numerical experimentation, and design prototyping using advanced composite stress and failure analysis tools. The software was designed to be intuitive and easy to use, even by designers who are not experts in composite materials or structural analysis. V-Lab{trademark} is the software tool every specialist in design engineering, structural analysis, research and development and repair needs to perform accurate, fast and economical analysis of composite components.

  10. Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) Assistant Tool Feasibility Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flores, Melissa; Malin, Jane T.

    2013-01-01

    An effort to determine the feasibility of a software tool to assist in Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) has been completed. This new and unique approach to FMEA uses model based systems engineering concepts to recommend failure modes, causes, and effects to the user after they have made several selections from pick lists about a component s functions and inputs/outputs. Recommendations are made based on a library using common failure modes identified over the course of several major human spaceflight programs. However, the tool could be adapted for use in a wide range of applications from NASA to the energy industry.

  11. Advanced Technology Lifecycle Analysis System (ATLAS) Technology Tool Box (TTB)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, Monica; ONeil, Daniel A.; Christensen, Carissa B.

    2005-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Lifecycle Analysis System (ATLAS) is a decision support tool designed to aid program managers and strategic planners in determining how to invest technology research and development dollars. It is an Excel-based modeling package that allows a user to build complex space architectures and evaluate the impact of various technology choices. ATLAS contains system models, cost and operations models, a campaign timeline and a centralized technology database. Technology data for all system models is drawn from a common database, the ATLAS Technology Tool Box (TTB). The TTB provides a comprehensive, architecture-independent technology database that is keyed to current and future timeframes.

  12. A dataflow analysis tool for parallel processing of algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Robert L., III

    1993-01-01

    A graph-theoretic design process and software tool is presented for selecting a multiprocessing scheduling solution for a class of computational problems. The problems of interest are those that can be described using a dataflow graph and are intended to be executed repetitively on a set of identical parallel processors. Typical applications include signal processing and control law problems. Graph analysis techniques are introduced and shown to effectively determine performance bounds, scheduling constraints, and resource requirements. The software tool is shown to facilitate the application of the design process to a given problem.

  13. The Cube Analysis and Rendering Tool for Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosolowsky, E.; Kern, J.; Federl, P.; Jacobs, J.; Loveland, S.; Taylor, J.; Sivakoff, G.; Taylor, R.

    2015-09-01

    We present the design principles and current status of the Cube Analysis and Rendering Tool for Astronomy (CARTA). The CARTA project is designing a cube visualization tool for the Atacama Large Millimetre/submillimeter array. CARTA will join the domain-specific software already developed for millimetre-wave interferometry with sever-side visualization solution. This connection will enable archive-hosted exploration of three-dimensional data cubes. CARTA will also provide an indistinguishable desktop client. While such a goal is ambitious for a short project, the team is focusing on a well-developed framework which can readily accommodate community code development through plugins.

  14. Tool Support for Parametric Analysis of Large Software Simulation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schumann, Johann; Gundy-Burlet, Karen; Pasareanu, Corina; Menzies, Tim; Barrett, Tony

    2008-01-01

    The analysis of large and complex parameterized software systems, e.g., systems simulation in aerospace, is very complicated and time-consuming due to the large parameter space, and the complex, highly coupled nonlinear nature of the different system components. Thus, such systems are generally validated only in regions local to anticipated operating points rather than through characterization of the entire feasible operational envelope of the system. We have addressed the factors deterring such an analysis with a tool to support envelope assessment: we utilize a combination of advanced Monte Carlo generation with n-factor combinatorial parameter variations to limit the number of cases, but still explore important interactions in the parameter space in a systematic fashion. Additional test-cases, automatically generated from models (e.g., UML, Simulink, Stateflow) improve the coverage. The distributed test runs of the software system produce vast amounts of data, making manual analysis impossible. Our tool automatically analyzes the generated data through a combination of unsupervised Bayesian clustering techniques (AutoBayes) and supervised learning of critical parameter ranges using the treatment learner TAR3. The tool has been developed around the Trick simulation environment, which is widely used within NASA. We will present this tool with a GN&C (Guidance, Navigation and Control) simulation of a small satellite system.

  15. Advanced Vibration Analysis Tool Developed for Robust Engine Rotor Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, James B.

    2005-01-01

    The primary objective of this research program is to develop vibration analysis tools, design tools, and design strategies to significantly improve the safety and robustness of turbine engine rotors. Bladed disks in turbine engines always feature small, random blade-to-blade differences, or mistuning. Mistuning can lead to a dramatic increase in blade forced-response amplitudes and stresses. Ultimately, this results in high-cycle fatigue, which is a major safety and cost concern. In this research program, the necessary steps will be taken to transform a state-of-the-art vibration analysis tool, the Turbo- Reduce forced-response prediction code, into an effective design tool by enhancing and extending the underlying modeling and analysis methods. Furthermore, novel techniques will be developed to assess the safety of a given design. In particular, a procedure will be established for using natural-frequency curve veerings to identify ranges of operating conditions (rotational speeds and engine orders) in which there is a great risk that the rotor blades will suffer high stresses. This work also will aid statistical studies of the forced response by reducing the necessary number of simulations. Finally, new strategies for improving the design of rotors will be pursued.

  16. The discrete Kalman filtering approach for seismic signals deconvolution

    SciTech Connect

    Kurniadi, Rizal; Nurhandoko, Bagus Endar B.

    2012-06-20

    Seismic signals are a convolution of reflectivity and seismic wavelet. One of the most important stages in seismic data processing is deconvolution process; the process of deconvolution is inverse filters based on Wiener filter theory. This theory is limited by certain modelling assumptions, which may not always valid. The discrete form of the Kalman filter is then used to generate an estimate of the reflectivity function. The main advantage of Kalman filtering is capability of technique to handling continually time varying models and has high resolution capabilities. In this work, we use discrete Kalman filter that it was combined with primitive deconvolution. Filtering process works on reflectivity function, hence the work flow of filtering is started with primitive deconvolution using inverse of wavelet. The seismic signals then are obtained by convoluting of filtered reflectivity function with energy waveform which is referred to as the seismic wavelet. The higher frequency of wavelet gives smaller wave length, the graphs of these results are presented.

  17. Suspension array technology: new tools for gene and protein analysis.

    PubMed

    Nolan, J P; Mandy, F F

    2001-11-01

    Flow cytometry has long been a key tool in the analysis of lymphocytes and other cells, owing to its ability to make quantitative, homogeneous, multiparameter measurements of particles. New developments in illumination sources, digital signal processing and microsphere chemistry are driving the development of flow cytometry in new areas of biomedical research. In particular. the maturation of approaches to perform highly parallel analyses using suspension arrays of microspheres with different morphospectral features is making flow cytometry an important tool in protein and genetic analysis. In this paper, we review the development of suspension array technology (SAT), current applications in protein and genomic analysis, and the prospects for this platform in a variety of large scale screening applications. PMID:11838973

  18. Tools for Large-Scale Mobile Malware Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bierma, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Analyzing mobile applications for malicious behavior is an important area of re- search, and is made di cult, in part, by the increasingly large number of appli- cations available for the major operating systems. There are currently over 1.2 million apps available in both the Google Play and Apple App stores (the respec- tive o cial marketplaces for the Android and iOS operating systems)[1, 2]. Our research provides two large-scale analysis tools to aid in the detection and analysis of mobile malware. The rst tool we present, Andlantis, is a scalable dynamic analysis system capa- ble of processing over 3000 Android applications per hour. Traditionally, Android dynamic analysis techniques have been relatively limited in scale due to the compu- tational resources required to emulate the full Android system to achieve accurate execution. Andlantis is the most scalable Android dynamic analysis framework to date, and is able to collect valuable forensic data, which helps reverse-engineers and malware researchers identify and understand anomalous application behavior. We discuss the results of running 1261 malware samples through the system, and provide examples of malware analysis performed with the resulting data. While techniques exist to perform static analysis on a large number of appli- cations, large-scale analysis of iOS applications has been relatively small scale due to the closed nature of the iOS ecosystem, and the di culty of acquiring appli- cations for analysis. The second tool we present, iClone, addresses the challenges associated with iOS research in order to detect application clones within a dataset of over 20,000 iOS applications.

  19. SMART: Statistical Metabolomics Analysis-An R Tool.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yu-Jen; Lin, Yu-Ting; Chen, Chia-Wei; Lin, Chien-Wei; Chao, Kun-Mao; Pan, Wen-Harn; Yang, Hsin-Chou

    2016-06-21

    Metabolomics data provide unprecedented opportunities to decipher metabolic mechanisms by analyzing hundreds to thousands of metabolites. Data quality concerns and complex batch effects in metabolomics must be appropriately addressed through statistical analysis. This study developed an integrated analysis tool for metabolomics studies to streamline the complete analysis flow from initial data preprocessing to downstream association analysis. We developed Statistical Metabolomics Analysis-An R Tool (SMART), which can analyze input files with different formats, visually represent various types of data features, implement peak alignment and annotation, conduct quality control for samples and peaks, explore batch effects, and perform association analysis. A pharmacometabolomics study of antihypertensive medication was conducted and data were analyzed using SMART. Neuromedin N was identified as a metabolite significantly associated with angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors in our metabolome-wide association analysis (p = 1.56 × 10(-4) in an analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) with an adjustment for unknown latent groups and p = 1.02 × 10(-4) in an ANCOVA with an adjustment for hidden substructures). This endogenous neuropeptide is highly related to neurotensin and neuromedin U, which are involved in blood pressure regulation and smooth muscle contraction. The SMART software, a user guide, and example data can be downloaded from http://www.stat.sinica.edu.tw/hsinchou/metabolomics/SMART.htm . PMID:27248514

  20. Methods and Apparatus for Reducing Multipath Signal Error Using Deconvolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Rajendra (Inventor); Lau, Kenneth H. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A deconvolution approach to adaptive signal processing has been applied to the elimination of signal multipath errors as embodied in one preferred embodiment in a global positioning system receiver. The method and receiver of the present invention estimates then compensates for multipath effects in a comprehensive manner. Application of deconvolution, along with other adaptive identification and estimation techniques, results in completely novel GPS (Global Positioning System) receiver architecture.

  1. Virtual Tool Mark Generation for Efficient Striation Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ekstrand, Laura; Zhang, Song; Grieve, Taylor; Chumbley, L Scott; Kreiser, M James

    2014-02-16

    This study introduces a tool mark analysis approach based upon 3D scans of screwdriver tip and marked plate surfaces at the micrometer scale from an optical microscope. An open-source 3D graphics software package is utilized to simulate the marking process as the projection of the tip's geometry in the direction of tool travel. The edge of this projection becomes a virtual tool mark that is compared to cross-sections of the marked plate geometry using the statistical likelihood algorithm introduced by Chumbley et al. In a study with both sides of six screwdriver tips and 34 corresponding marks, the method distinguished known matches from known nonmatches with zero false-positive matches and two false-negative matches. For matches, it could predict the correct marking angle within ±5–10°. Individual comparisons could be made in seconds on a desktop computer, suggesting that the method could save time for examiners.

  2. Field Quality Analysis as a Tool to Monitor Magnet Production

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.; Anerella, M.; Cozzolino, J.; Fisher, D.; Ghosh, A.; Jain, A.; Sampson, W.; Schmalzle, J.; Thompson, P.; Wanderer, P.; Willen, E.

    1997-10-18

    Field harmonics offer a powerful tool to examine the mechanical structure of accelerator magnets. A large deviation from the nominal values suggests a mechanical defect. Magnets with such defects are likely to have a poor quench performance. Similarly, a trend suggests a wear in tooling or a gradual change in the magnet assem-bly or in the size of a component. This paper presents the use of the field quality as a tool to monitor the magnet production of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Several examples are briefly described. Field quality analysis can also rule out a suspected geometric error if it can not be supported by the symmetry and the magnitude of the measured harmonics.

  3. Microscopy image segmentation tool: Robust image data analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Valmianski, Ilya Monton, Carlos; Schuller, Ivan K.

    2014-03-15

    We present a software package called Microscopy Image Segmentation Tool (MIST). MIST is designed for analysis of microscopy images which contain large collections of small regions of interest (ROIs). Originally developed for analysis of porous anodic alumina scanning electron images, MIST capabilities have been expanded to allow use in a large variety of problems including analysis of biological tissue, inorganic and organic film grain structure, as well as nano- and meso-scopic structures. MIST provides a robust segmentation algorithm for the ROIs, includes many useful analysis capabilities, and is highly flexible allowing incorporation of specialized user developed analysis. We describe the unique advantages MIST has over existing analysis software. In addition, we present a number of diverse applications to scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, magnetic force microscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy, and fluorescent confocal laser scanning microscopy.

  4. Nonparametric hemodynamic deconvolution of FMRI using homomorphic filtering.

    PubMed

    Sreenivasan, Karthik Ramakrishnan; Havlicek, Martin; Deshpande, Gopikrishna

    2015-05-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is an indirect measure of neural activity which is modeled as a convolution of the latent neuronal response and the hemodynamic response function (HRF). Since the sources of HRF variability can be nonneural in nature, the measured fMRI signal does not faithfully represent underlying neural activity. Therefore, it is advantageous to deconvolve the HRF from the fMRI signal. However, since both latent neural activity and the voxel-specific HRF is unknown, the deconvolution must be blind. Existing blind deconvolution approaches employ highly parameterized models, and it is unclear whether these models have an over fitting problem. In order to address these issues, we 1) present a nonparametric deconvolution method based on homomorphic filtering to obtain the latent neuronal response from the fMRI signal and, 2) compare our approach to the best performing existing parametric model based on the estimation of the biophysical hemodynamic model using the Cubature Kalman Filter/Smoother. We hypothesized that if the results from nonparametric deconvolution closely resembled that obtained from parametric deconvolution, then the problem of over fitting during estimation in highly parameterized deconvolution models of fMRI could possibly be over stated. Both simulations and experimental results demonstrate support for our hypothesis since the estimated latent neural response from both parametric and nonparametric methods were highly correlated in the visual cortex. Further, simulations showed that both methods were effective in recovering the simulated ground truth of the latent neural response. PMID:25531878

  5. MISR Data Visualization and Analysis Using the hdfscan Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crean, K. A.; Diner, D. J.; Banerjee, P. K.

    2001-05-01

    A new software tool called hdfscan is available to display and analyze data formatted using the HDF-EOS grid and swath interfaces, as well as the native HDF SDS, vdata, vgroup, and raster interfaces. The hdfscan tool can display data in both image and textual form, and can also display attributes, metadata, annotations, file structure, projection information, and simple data statistics. hdfscan also includes a data editing capability. In addition, the tool contains unique features to aid in the interpretation of data from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument, which currently flies aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft. These features include the ability to unscale and unpack MISR data fields; the ability to display MISR data flag values according to their interpreted values as well as their raw values; and knowledge of special MISR fill values. MISR measures upwelling radiance from Earth in 4 spectral bands corresponding to blue, green, red, and near-infrared wavelengths, at each of 9 view angles including the nadir (vertical) direction plus 26.1, 45.6, 60.0, and 70.5 degrees forward and aftward of nadir. Data products derived from MISR measurements aim at improving our understanding of the Earth's environment and climate. The hdfscan tool runs in one of two modes, as selected by the user: command-line mode, or via a graphical user interface (GUI). This provides a user with flexibility in using the tool for either batch mode processing or interactive analysis. This presentation will describe features and functionalities of the hdfscan tool. The user interface will be shown, and menu options will be explained. Information on how to obtain the tool will be provided.

  6. Systematic Omics Analysis Review (SOAR) tool to support risk assessment.

    PubMed

    McConnell, Emma R; Bell, Shannon M; Cote, Ila; Wang, Rong-Lin; Perkins, Edward J; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Gong, Ping; Burgoon, Lyle D

    2014-01-01

    Environmental health risk assessors are challenged to understand and incorporate new data streams as the field of toxicology continues to adopt new molecular and systems biology technologies. Systematic screening reviews can help risk assessors and assessment teams determine which studies to consider for inclusion in a human health assessment. A tool for systematic reviews should be standardized and transparent in order to consistently determine which studies meet minimum quality criteria prior to performing in-depth analyses of the data. The Systematic Omics Analysis Review (SOAR) tool is focused on assisting risk assessment support teams in performing systematic reviews of transcriptomic studies. SOAR is a spreadsheet tool of 35 objective questions developed by domain experts, focused on transcriptomic microarray studies, and including four main topics: test system, test substance, experimental design, and microarray data. The tool will be used as a guide to identify studies that meet basic published quality criteria, such as those defined by the Minimum Information About a Microarray Experiment standard and the Toxicological Data Reliability Assessment Tool. Seven scientists were recruited to test the tool by using it to independently rate 15 published manuscripts that study chemical exposures with microarrays. Using their feedback, questions were weighted based on importance of the information and a suitability cutoff was set for each of the four topic sections. The final validation resulted in 100% agreement between the users on four separate manuscripts, showing that the SOAR tool may be used to facilitate the standardized and transparent screening of microarray literature for environmental human health risk assessment. PMID:25531884

  7. Systematic Omics Analysis Review (SOAR) Tool to Support Risk Assessment

    PubMed Central

    McConnell, Emma R.; Bell, Shannon M.; Cote, Ila; Wang, Rong-Lin; Perkins, Edward J.; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Gong, Ping; Burgoon, Lyle D.

    2014-01-01

    Environmental health risk assessors are challenged to understand and incorporate new data streams as the field of toxicology continues to adopt new molecular and systems biology technologies. Systematic screening reviews can help risk assessors and assessment teams determine which studies to consider for inclusion in a human health assessment. A tool for systematic reviews should be standardized and transparent in order to consistently determine which studies meet minimum quality criteria prior to performing in-depth analyses of the data. The Systematic Omics Analysis Review (SOAR) tool is focused on assisting risk assessment support teams in performing systematic reviews of transcriptomic studies. SOAR is a spreadsheet tool of 35 objective questions developed by domain experts, focused on transcriptomic microarray studies, and including four main topics: test system, test substance, experimental design, and microarray data. The tool will be used as a guide to identify studies that meet basic published quality criteria, such as those defined by the Minimum Information About a Microarray Experiment standard and the Toxicological Data Reliability Assessment Tool. Seven scientists were recruited to test the tool by using it to independently rate 15 published manuscripts that study chemical exposures with microarrays. Using their feedback, questions were weighted based on importance of the information and a suitability cutoff was set for each of the four topic sections. The final validation resulted in 100% agreement between the users on four separate manuscripts, showing that the SOAR tool may be used to facilitate the standardized and transparent screening of microarray literature for environmental human health risk assessment. PMID:25531884

  8. Industrial Geospatial Analysis Tool for Energy Evaluation (IGATE-E)

    SciTech Connect

    Alkadi, Nasr E; Starke, Michael R; Ma, Ookie; Nimbalkar, Sachin U; Cox, Daryl

    2013-01-01

    IGATE-E is an energy analysis tool for industrial energy evaluation. The tool applies statistical modeling to multiple publicly available datasets and provides information at the geospatial resolution of zip code using bottom up approaches. Within each zip code, the current version of the tool estimates electrical energy consumption of manufacturing industries based on each type of industries using DOE s Industrial Assessment Center database (IAC-DB) and DOE s Energy Information Administration Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey database (EIA-MECS DB), in addition to other commercially available databases such as the Manufacturing News database (MNI, Inc.). Ongoing and future work include adding modules for the predictions of fuel energy consumption streams, manufacturing process steps energy consumption, major energy intensive processes (EIPs) within each industry type among other metrics of interest. The tool provides validation against DOE s EIA-MECS state level energy estimations and permits several statistical examinations. IGATE-E is intended to be a decision support and planning tool to a wide spectrum of energy analysts, researchers, government organizations, private consultants, industry partners, and alike.

  9. Advanced Technology Lifecycle Analysis System (ATLAS) Technology Tool Box (TTB)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Monica M.; O'Neil, Daniel A.; Christensen, Carissa B.

    2005-02-01

    Forecasting technology capabilities requires a tool and a process for capturing state-of-the-art technology metrics and estimates for future metrics. A decision support tool, known as the Advanced Technology Lifecycle Analysis System (ATLAS), contains a Technology Tool Box (TTB) database designed to accomplish this goal. Sections of this database correspond to a Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) developed by NASA's Exploration Systems Research and Technology (ESRT) Program. These sections cover the waterfront of technologies required for human and robotic space exploration. Records in each section include technology performance, operations, and programmatic metrics. Timeframes in the database provide metric values for the state of the art (Timeframe 0) and forecasts for timeframes that correspond to spiral development milestones in NASA's Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD) development strategy. Collecting and vetting data for the TTB will involve technologists from across the agency, the aerospace industry and academia. Technologists will have opportunities to submit technology metrics and forecasts to the TTB development team. Semi-annual forums will facilitate discussions about the basis of forecast estimates. As the tool and process mature, the TTB will serve as a powerful communication and decision support tool for the ESRT program.

  10. Volumetric measurements of pulmonary nodules: variability in automated analysis tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juluru, Krishna; Kim, Woojin; Boonn, William; King, Tara; Siddiqui, Khan; Siegel, Eliot

    2007-03-01

    Over the past decade, several computerized tools have been developed for detection of lung nodules and for providing volumetric analysis. Incidentally detected lung nodules have traditionally been followed over time by measurements of their axial dimensions on CT scans to ensure stability or document progression. A recently published article by the Fleischner Society offers guidelines on the management of incidentally detected nodules based on size criteria. For this reason, differences in measurements obtained by automated tools from various vendors may have significant implications on management, yet the degree of variability in these measurements is not well understood. The goal of this study is to quantify the differences in nodule maximum diameter and volume among different automated analysis software. Using a dataset of lung scans obtained with both "ultra-low" and conventional doses, we identified a subset of nodules in each of five size-based categories. Using automated analysis tools provided by three different vendors, we obtained size and volumetric measurements on these nodules, and compared these data using descriptive as well as ANOVA and t-test analysis. Results showed significant differences in nodule maximum diameter measurements among the various automated lung nodule analysis tools but no significant differences in nodule volume measurements. These data suggest that when using automated commercial software, volume measurements may be a more reliable marker of tumor progression than maximum diameter. The data also suggest that volumetric nodule measurements may be relatively reproducible among various commercial workstations, in contrast to the variability documented when performing human mark-ups, as is seen in the LIDC (lung imaging database consortium) study.

  11. Sampling-based Uncertainty Quantification in Deconvolution of X-ray Radiographs

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, M.; Luttman, A.; Fowler, M.

    2014-11-01

    In imaging applications that focus on quantitative analysis{such as X-ray radiography in the security sciences--it is necessary to be able to reliably estimate the uncertainties in the processing algorithms applied to the image data, and deconvolving the system blur out of the image is usually an essential step. In this work we solve the deconvolution problem within a Bayesian framework for edge-enhancing reconstruction with uncertainty quantification. The likelihood is a normal approximation to the Poisson likelihood, and the prior is generated from a classical total variation regularized Poisson deconvolution. Samples from the corresponding posterior distribution are computed using a Markov chain Monte Carlo approach, giving a pointwise measure of uncertainty in the final, deconvolved signal. We demonstrate the results on real data used to calibrate a high-energy X-ray source and show that this approach gives reconstructions as good as classical regularization methods, while mitigating many of their drawbacks.

  12. Deconvoluting nonaxial recoil in Coulomb explosion measurements of molecular axis alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Lauge; Christiansen, Lars; Shepperson, Benjamin; Stapelfeldt, Henrik

    2016-08-01

    We report a quantitative study of the effect of nonaxial recoil during Coulomb explosion of laser-aligned molecules and introduce a method to remove the blurring caused by nonaxial recoil in the fragment-ion angular distributions. Simulations show that nonaxial recoil affects correlations between the emission directions of fragment ions differently from the effect caused by imperfect molecular alignment. The method, based on analysis of the correlation between the emission directions of the fragment ions from Coulomb explosion, is used to deconvolute the effect of nonaxial recoil from experimental fragment angular distributions. The deconvolution method is then applied to a number of experimental data sets to correct the degree of alignment for nonaxial recoil, to select optimal Coulomb explosion channels for probing molecular alignment, and to estimate the highest degree of alignment that can be observed from selected Coulomb explosion channels.

  13. Optimizing Laguerre expansion based deconvolution methods for analysing bi-exponential fluorescence lifetime images.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongliang; Chen, Yu; Li, David Day-Uei

    2016-06-27

    Fast deconvolution is an essential step to calibrate instrument responses in big fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) image analysis. This paper examined a computationally effective least squares deconvolution method based on Laguerre expansion (LSD-LE), recently developed for clinical diagnosis applications, and proposed new criteria for selecting Laguerre basis functions (LBFs) without considering the mutual orthonormalities between LBFs. Compared with the previously reported LSD-LE, the improved LSD-LE allows to use a higher laser repetition rate, reducing the acquisition time per measurement. Moreover, we extended it, for the first time, to analyze bi-exponential fluorescence decays for more general FLIM-FRET applications. The proposed method was tested on both synthesized bi-exponential and realistic FLIM data for studying the endocytosis of gold nanorods in Hek293 cells. Compared with the previously reported constrained LSD-LE, it shows promising results. PMID:27410552

  14. Nonnegative image reconstruction from sparse Fourier data: a new deconvolution algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonettini, S.; Prato, M.

    2010-09-01

    This paper deals with image restoration problems where the data are nonuniform samples of the Fourier transform of the unknown object. We study the inverse problem in both semidiscrete and fully discrete formulations, and our analysis leads to an optimization problem involving the minimization of the data discrepancy under nonnegativity constraints. In particular, we show that such a problem is equivalent to a deconvolution problem in the image space. We propose a practical algorithm, based on the gradient projection method, to compute a regularized solution in the discrete case. The key point in our deconvolution-based approach is that the fast Fourier transform can be employed in the algorithm implementation without the need of preprocessing the data. A numerical experimentation on simulated and real data from the NASA RHESSI mission is also performed.

  15. Knickpoint finder: A software tool that improves neotectonic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queiroz, G. L.; Salamuni, E.; Nascimento, E. R.

    2015-03-01

    This work presents a new software tool for morphometric analysis of drainage networks based on the methods of Hack (1973) and Etchebehere et al. (2004). This tool is applicable to studies of morphotectonics and neotectonics. The software used a digital elevation model (DEM) to identify the relief breakpoints along drainage profiles (knickpoints). The program was coded in Python for use on the ArcGIS platform and is called Knickpoint Finder. A study area was selected to test and evaluate the software's ability to analyze and identify neotectonic morphostructures based on the morphology of the terrain. For an assessment of its validity, we chose an area of the James River basin, which covers most of the Piedmont area of Virginia (USA), which is an area of constant intraplate seismicity and non-orogenic active tectonics and exhibits a relatively homogeneous geodesic surface currently being altered by the seismogenic features of the region. After using the tool in the chosen area, we found that the knickpoint locations are associated with the geologic structures, epicenters of recent earthquakes, and drainages with rectilinear anomalies. The regional analysis demanded the use of a spatial representation of the data after processing using Knickpoint Finder. The results were satisfactory in terms of the correlation of dense areas of knickpoints with active lineaments and the rapidity of the identification of deformed areas. Therefore, this software tool may be considered useful in neotectonic analyses of large areas and may be applied to any area where there is DEM coverage.

  16. A conceptual design tool for RBCC engine performance analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olds, John R.; Saks, Greg

    1997-01-01

    Future reusable launch vehicles will depend on new propulsion technologies to lower system operational costs while maintaining adequate performance. Recently, a number of vehicle systems utilizing rocket-based combined-cycle (RBCC) propulsion have been proposed as possible low-cost space launch solutions. Vehicles using RBCC propulsion have the potential to combine the best aspects of airbreathing propulsion (high average Isp) with the best aspects of rocket propulsion (high propellant bulk density and engine T/W). Proper conceptual assessment of each proposed vehicle will require computer-based tools that allow for quick and cheap, yet sufficiently accurate disciplinary analyses. At Georgia Tech, a spreadsheet-based tool has been developed that uses quasi-1D flow analysis with component efficiencies to parametrically model RBCC engine performance in ejector, fan-ramjet, ramjet and pure rocket modes. The technique is similar to an earlier RBCC modeling technique developed by the Marquardt Corporation in the mid-1960's. For a given sea-level static thrust requirement, the current tool generates engine weight and size data, as well as Isp and thrust data vs. altitude and Mach number. The latter is output in tabular form for use in a trajectory optimization program. This paper reviews the current state of the RBCC analysis tool and the effort to upgrade it from a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet to a design-oriented UNIX program in C suitable for integration into a multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO) framework.

  17. Multi-Spacecraft Analysis with Generic Visualization Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, J.; Vela, L.; Gonzalez, C.; Jeffers, S.

    2010-12-01

    To handle the needs of scientists today and in the future, software tools are going to have to take better advantage of the currently available hardware. Specifically, computing power, memory, and disk space have become cheaper, while bandwidth has become more expensive due to the explosion of online applications. To overcome these limitations, we have enhanced our Southwest Data Display and Analysis System (SDDAS) to take better advantage of the hardware by utilizing threads and data caching. Furthermore, the system was enhanced to support a framework for adding data formats and data visualization methods without costly rewrites. Visualization tools can speed analysis of many common scientific tasks and we will present a suite of tools that encompass the entire process of retrieving data from multiple data stores to common visualizations of the data. The goals for the end user are ease of use and interactivity with the data and the resulting plots. The data can be simultaneously plotted in a variety of formats and/or time and spatial resolutions. The software will allow one to slice and separate data to achieve other visualizations. Furthermore, one can interact with the data using the GUI or through an embedded language based on the Lua scripting language. The data presented will be primarily from the Cluster and Mars Express missions; however, the tools are data type agnostic and can be used for virtually any type of data.

  18. A conceptual design tool for RBCC engine performance analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Olds, J.R.; Saks, G.

    1997-01-01

    Future reusable launch vehicles will depend on new propulsion technologies to lower system operational costs while maintaining adequate performance. Recently, a number of vehicle systems utilizing rocket-based combined-cycle (RBCC) propulsion have been proposed as possible low-cost space launch solutions. Vehicles using RBCC propulsion have the potential to combine the best aspects of airbreathing propulsion (high average Isp) with the best aspects of rocket propulsion (high propellant bulk density and engine T/W). Proper conceptual assessment of each proposed vehicle will require computer-based tools that allow for quick and cheap, yet sufficiently accurate disciplinary analyses. At Georgia Tech, a spreadsheet-based tool has been developed that uses quasi-1D flow analysis with component efficiencies to parametrically model RBCC engine performance in ejector, fan-ramjet, ramjet and pure rocket modes. The technique is similar to an earlier RBCC modeling technique developed by the Marquardt Corporation in the mid-1960{close_quote}s. For a given sea-level static thrust requirement, the current tool generates engine weight and size data, as well as Isp and thrust data vs. altitude and Mach number. The latter is output in tabular form for use in a trajectory optimization program. This paper reviews the current state of the RBCC analysis tool and the effort to upgrade it from a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet to a design-oriented UNIX program in C suitable for integration into a multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO) framework. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Risk analysis for confined space entries: Critical analysis of four tools applied to three risk scenarios.

    PubMed

    Burlet-Vienney, Damien; Chinniah, Yuvin; Bahloul, Ali; Roberge, Brigitte

    2016-06-01

    Investigation reports of fatal confined space accidents nearly always point to a problem of identifying or underestimating risks. This paper compares 4 different risk analysis tools developed for confined spaces by applying them to 3 hazardous scenarios. The tools were namely 1. a checklist without risk estimation (Tool A), 2. a checklist with a risk scale (Tool B), 3. a risk calculation without a formal hazard identification stage (Tool C), and 4. a questionnaire followed by a risk matrix (Tool D). Each tool's structure and practical application were studied. Tools A and B gave crude results comparable to those of more analytic tools in less time. Their main limitations were lack of contextual information for the identified hazards and greater dependency on the user's expertise and ability to tackle hazards of different nature. Tools C and D utilized more systematic approaches than tools A and B by supporting risk reduction based on the description of the risk factors. Tool D is distinctive because of 1. its comprehensive structure with respect to the steps suggested in risk management, 2. its dynamic approach to hazard identification, and 3. its use of data resulting from the risk analysis. PMID:26864350

  20. Applying AI tools to operational space environmental analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krajnak, Mike; Jesse, Lisa; Mucks, John

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Air Force and National Oceanic Atmospheric Agency (NOAA) space environmental operations centers are facing increasingly complex challenges meeting the needs of their growing user community. These centers provide current space environmental information and short term forecasts of geomagnetic activity. Recent advances in modeling and data access have provided sophisticated tools for making accurate and timely forecasts, but have introduced new problems associated with handling and analyzing large quantities of complex data. AI (Artificial Intelligence) techniques have been considered as potential solutions to some of these problems. Fielding AI systems has proven more difficult than expected, in part because of operational constraints. Using systems which have been demonstrated successfully in the operational environment will provide a basis for a useful data fusion and analysis capability. Our approach uses a general purpose AI system already in operational use within the military intelligence community, called the Temporal Analysis System (TAS). TAS is an operational suite of tools supporting data processing, data visualization, historical analysis, situation assessment and predictive analysis. TAS includes expert system tools to analyze incoming events for indications of particular situations and predicts future activity. The expert system operates on a knowledge base of temporal patterns encoded using a knowledge representation called Temporal Transition Models (TTM's) and an event database maintained by the other TAS tools. The system also includes a robust knowledge acquisition and maintenance tool for creating TTM's using a graphical specification language. The ability to manipulate TTM's in a graphical format gives non-computer specialists an intuitive way of accessing and editing the knowledge base. To support space environmental analyses, we used TAS's ability to define domain specific event analysis abstractions. The prototype system defines

  1. Space mission scenario development and performance analysis tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kordon, Mark; Baker, John; Gilbert, John; Hanks, David

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses a new and innovative approach for a rapid spacecraft multi-disciplinary performance analysis using a tool called the Mission Scenario Development Workbench (MSDW). To meet the needs of new classes of space missions, analysis tools with proven models were developed and integrated into a framework to enable rapid trades and analyses between spacecraft designs and operational scenarios during the formulation phase of a mission. Generally speaking, spacecraft resources are highly constrained on deep space missions and this approach makes it possible to maximize the use of existing resources to attain the best possible science return. This approach also has the potential benefit of reducing the risk of costly design changes made later in the design cycle necessary to meet the mission requirements by understanding system design sensitivities early and adding appropriate margins. This paper will describe the approach used by the Mars Science Laboratory Project to accomplish this result.

  2. Analysis Tools for Next-Generation Hadron Spectroscopy Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglieri, M.; Briscoe, B. J.; Celentano, A.; Chung, S.-U.; D'Angelo, A.; De Vita, R.; Döring, M.; Dudek, J.; Eidelman, S.; Fegan, S.; Ferretti, J.; Filippi, A.; Fox, G.; Galata, G.; García-Tecocoatzi, H.; Glazier, D. I.; Grube, B.; Hanhart, C.; Hoferichter, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Ireland, D. G.; Ketzer, B.; Klein, F. J.; Kubis, B.; Liu, B.; Masjuan, P.; Mathieu, V.; McKinnon, B.; Mitchel, R.; Nerling, F.; Paul, S.; Peláez, J. R.; Rademacker, J.; Rizzo, A.; Salgado, C.; Santopinto, E.; Sarantsev, A. V.; Sato, T.; Schlüter, T.; [Silva]da Silva, M. L. L.; Stankovic, I.; Strakovsky, I.; Szczepaniak, A.; Vassallo, A.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Zana, L.

    The series of workshops on New Partial-Wave Analysis Tools for Next-Generation Hadron Spectroscopy Experiments was initiated with the ATHOS 2012 meeting, which took place in Camogli, Italy, June 20-22, 2012. It was followed by ATHOS 2013 in Kloster Seeon near Munich, Germany, May 21-24, 2013. The third, ATHOS3, meeting is planned for April 13-17, 2015 at The George Washington University Virginia Science and Technology Campus, USA. The workshops focus on the development of amplitude analysis tools for meson and baryon spectroscopy, and complement other programs in hadron spectroscopy organized in the recent past including the INT-JLab Workshop on Hadron Spectroscopy in Seattle in 2009, the International Workshop on Amplitude Analysis in Hadron Spectroscopy at the ECT*-Trento in 2011, the School on Amplitude Analysis in Modern Physics in Bad Honnef in 2011, the Jefferson Lab Advanced Study Institute Summer School in 2012, and the School on Concepts of Modern Amplitude Analysis Techniques in Flecken-Zechlin near Berlin in September 2013. The aim of this document is to summarize the discussions that took place at the ATHOS 2012 and ATHOS 2013 meetings. We do not attempt a comprehensive review of the field of amplitude analysis, but offer a collection of thoughts that we hope may lay the ground for such a document.

  3. Analysis Tools for Next-Generation Hadron Spectroscopy Experiments

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Battaglieri, Marco; Briscoe, William; Celentano, Andrea; Chung, Suh-Urk; D'Angelo, Annalisa; De Vita, Rafaella; Döring, Michael; Dudek, Jozef; Eidelman, S.; Fegan, Stuart; et al

    2015-01-01

    The series of workshops on New Partial-Wave Analysis Tools for Next-Generation Hadron Spectroscopy Experiments was initiated with the ATHOS 2012 meeting, which took place in Camogli, Italy, June 20-22, 2012. It was followed by ATHOS 2013 in Kloster Seeon near Munich, Germany, May 21-24, 2013. The third, ATHOS3, meeting is planned for April 13-17, 2015 at The George Washington University Virginia Science and Technology Campus, USA. The workshops focus on the development of amplitude analysis tools for meson and baryon spectroscopy, and complement other programs in hadron spectroscopy organized in the recent past including the INT-JLab Workshop on Hadron Spectroscopymore » in Seattle in 2009, the International Workshop on Amplitude Analysis in Hadron Spectroscopy at the ECT*-Trento in 2011, the School on Amplitude Analysis in Modern Physics in Bad Honnef in 2011, the Jefferson Lab Advanced Study Institute Summer School in 2012, and the School on Concepts of Modern Amplitude Analysis Techniques in Flecken-Zechlin near Berlin in September 2013. The aim of this document is to summarize the discussions that took place at the ATHOS 2012 and ATHOS 2013 meetings. We do not attempt a comprehensive review of the field of amplitude analysis, but offer a collection of thoughts that we hope may lay the ground for such a document.« less

  4. Analysis Tools for Next-Generation Hadron Spectroscopy Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Battaglieri, Marco; Briscoe, William; Celentano, Andrea; Chung, Suh-Urk; D'Angelo, Annalisa; De Vita, Rafaella; Döring, Michael; Dudek, Jozef; Eidelman, S.; Fegan, Stuart; Ferretti, J.; Filippi, A.; Fox, G.; Galata, G.; García-Tecocoatzi, H.; Glazier, Derek; Grube, B.; Hanhart, C.; Hoferichter, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Ireland, David G.; Ketzer, B.; Klein, Franz J.; Kubis, B.; Liu, B.; Masjuan, P.; Mathieu, Vincent; McKinnon, Brian; Mitchel, R.; Nerling, F.; Paul, S.; Peláez, J. R.; Rademacker, J.; Rizzo, Alessandro; Salgado, Carlos; Santopinto, E.; Sarantsev, Andrey V.; Sato, Toru; Schlüter, T.; da Silva, M. L.L.; Stankovic, I.; Strakovsky, Igor; Szczepaniak, Adam; Vassallo, A.; Walford, Natalie K.; Watts, Daniel P.

    2015-01-01

    The series of workshops on New Partial-Wave Analysis Tools for Next-Generation Hadron Spectroscopy Experiments was initiated with the ATHOS 2012 meeting, which took place in Camogli, Italy, June 20-22, 2012. It was followed by ATHOS 2013 in Kloster Seeon near Munich, Germany, May 21-24, 2013. The third, ATHOS3, meeting is planned for April 13-17, 2015 at The George Washington University Virginia Science and Technology Campus, USA. The workshops focus on the development of amplitude analysis tools for meson and baryon spectroscopy, and complement other programs in hadron spectroscopy organized in the recent past including the INT-JLab Workshop on Hadron Spectroscopy in Seattle in 2009, the International Workshop on Amplitude Analysis in Hadron Spectroscopy at the ECT*-Trento in 2011, the School on Amplitude Analysis in Modern Physics in Bad Honnef in 2011, the Jefferson Lab Advanced Study Institute Summer School in 2012, and the School on Concepts of Modern Amplitude Analysis Techniques in Flecken-Zechlin near Berlin in September 2013. The aim of this document is to summarize the discussions that took place at the ATHOS 2012 and ATHOS 2013 meetings. We do not attempt a comprehensive review of the field of amplitude analysis, but offer a collection of thoughts that we hope may lay the ground for such a document.

  5. SMART (Shop floor Modeling, Analysis and Reporting Tool Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centeno, Martha A.; Garcia, Maretys L.; Mendoza, Alicia C.; Molina, Louis A.; Correa, Daisy; Wint, Steve; Doice, Gregorie; Reyes, M. Florencia

    1999-01-01

    This document presents summarizes the design and prototype of the Shop floor Modeling, Analysis, and Reporting Tool (S.M.A.R.T.) A detailed description of it is found on the full documentation given to the NASA liaison. This documentation is also found on the A.R.I.S.E. Center web site, under a projected directory. Only authorized users can gain access to this site.

  6. Spectrophotometric Determination of the Dissociation Constant of an Acid-Base Indicator Using a Mathematical Deconvolution Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alter, Krystyn P.; Molloy, John L.; Niemeyer, Emily D.

    2005-01-01

    A laboratory experiment reinforces the concept of acid-base equilibria while introducing a common application of spectrophotometry and can easily be completed within a standard four-hour laboratory period. It provides students with an opportunity to use advanced data analysis techniques like data smoothing and spectral deconvolution to…

  7. On the next generation of reliability analysis tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babcock, Philip S., IV; Leong, Frank; Gai, Eli

    1987-01-01

    The current generation of reliability analysis tools concentrates on improving the efficiency of the description and solution of the fault-handling processes and providing a solution algorithm for the full system model. The tools have improved user efficiency in these areas to the extent that the problem of constructing the fault-occurrence model is now the major analysis bottleneck. For the next generation of reliability tools, it is proposed that techniques be developed to improve the efficiency of the fault-occurrence model generation and input. Further, the goal is to provide an environment permitting a user to provide a top-down design description of the system from which a Markov reliability model is automatically constructed. Thus, the user is relieved of the tedious and error-prone process of model construction, permitting an efficient exploration of the design space, and an independent validation of the system's operation is obtained. An additional benefit of automating the model construction process is the opportunity to reduce the specialized knowledge required. Hence, the user need only be an expert in the system he is analyzing; the expertise in reliability analysis techniques is supplied.

  8. Remote-Sensing Time Series Analysis, a Vegetation Monitoring Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKellip, Rodney; Prados, Donald; Ryan, Robert; Ross, Kenton; Spruce, Joseph; Gasser, Gerald; Greer, Randall

    2008-01-01

    The Time Series Product Tool (TSPT) is software, developed in MATLAB , which creates and displays high signal-to- noise Vegetation Indices imagery and other higher-level products derived from remotely sensed data. This tool enables automated, rapid, large-scale regional surveillance of crops, forests, and other vegetation. TSPT temporally processes high-revisit-rate satellite imagery produced by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and by other remote-sensing systems. Although MODIS imagery is acquired daily, cloudiness and other sources of noise can greatly reduce the effective temporal resolution. To improve cloud statistics, the TSPT combines MODIS data from multiple satellites (Aqua and Terra). The TSPT produces MODIS products as single time-frame and multitemporal change images, as time-series plots at a selected location, or as temporally processed image videos. Using the TSPT program, MODIS metadata is used to remove and/or correct bad and suspect data. Bad pixel removal, multiple satellite data fusion, and temporal processing techniques create high-quality plots and animated image video sequences that depict changes in vegetation greenness. This tool provides several temporal processing options not found in other comparable imaging software tools. Because the framework to generate and use other algorithms is established, small modifications to this tool will enable the use of a large range of remotely sensed data types. An effective remote-sensing crop monitoring system must be able to detect subtle changes in plant health in the earliest stages, before the effects of a disease outbreak or other adverse environmental conditions can become widespread and devastating. The integration of the time series analysis tool with ground-based information, soil types, crop types, meteorological data, and crop growth models in a Geographic Information System, could provide the foundation for a large-area crop-surveillance system that could identify

  9. Aerospace Power Systems Design and Analysis (APSDA) Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truong, Long V.

    1998-01-01

    The conceptual design of space and/or planetary electrical power systems has required considerable effort. Traditionally, in the early stages of the design cycle (conceptual design), the researchers have had to thoroughly study and analyze tradeoffs between system components, hardware architectures, and operating parameters (such as frequencies) to optimize system mass, efficiency, reliability, and cost. This process could take anywhere from several months to several years (as for the former Space Station Freedom), depending on the scale of the system. Although there are many sophisticated commercial software design tools for personal computers (PC's), none of them can support or provide total system design. To meet this need, researchers at the NASA Lewis Research Center cooperated with Professor George Kusic from the University of Pittsburgh to develop a new tool to help project managers and design engineers choose the best system parameters as quickly as possible in the early design stages (in days instead of months). It is called the Aerospace Power Systems Design and Analysis (APSDA) Tool. By using this tool, users can obtain desirable system design and operating parameters such as system weight, electrical distribution efficiency, bus power, and electrical load schedule. With APSDA, a large-scale specific power system was designed in a matter of days. It is an excellent tool to help designers make tradeoffs between system components, hardware architectures, and operation parameters in the early stages of the design cycle. user interface. It operates on any PC running the MS-DOS (Microsoft Corp.) operating system, version 5.0 or later. A color monitor (EGA or VGA) and two-button mouse are required. The APSDA tool was presented at the 30th Intersociety Energy Conversion Engineering Conference (IECEC) and is being beta tested at several NASA centers. Beta test packages are available for evaluation by contacting the author.

  10. Application of the Lucy–Richardson Deconvolution Procedure to High Resolution Photoemission Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Rameau, J.; Yang, H.-B.; Johnson, P.D.

    2010-07-01

    Angle-resolved photoemission has developed into one of the leading probes of the electronic structure and associated dynamics of condensed matter systems. As with any experimental technique the ability to resolve features in the spectra is ultimately limited by the resolution of the instrumentation used in the measurement. Previously developed for sharpening astronomical images, the Lucy-Richardson deconvolution technique proves to be a useful tool for improving the photoemission spectra obtained in modern hemispherical electron spectrometers where the photoelectron spectrum is displayed as a 2D image in energy and momentum space.

  11. ISAC: A tool for aeroservoelastic modeling and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, William M., Jr.; Hoadley, Sherwood Tiffany

    1993-01-01

    The capabilities of the Interaction of Structures, Aerodynamics, and Controls (ISAC) system of program modules is discussed. The major modeling, analysis, and data management components of ISAC are identified. Equations of motion are displayed for a Laplace-domain representation of the unsteady aerodynamic forces. Options for approximating a frequency-domain representation of unsteady aerodynamic forces with rational functions of the Laplace variable are shown. Linear time invariant state-space equations of motion that result are discussed. Model generation and analyses of stability and dynamic response characteristics are shown for an aeroelastic vehicle which illustrates some of the capabilities of ISAC as a modeling and analysis tool for aeroelastic applications.

  12. Federal metering data analysis needs and existing tools

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Jordan W.; Fowler, Kimberly M.

    2015-07-01

    Agencies have been working to improve their metering data collection, management, and analysis efforts over the last decade (since EPAct 2005) and will continue to address these challenges as new requirements and data needs come into place. Unfortunately there is no “one-size-fits-all” solution. As agencies continue to expand their capabilities to use metered consumption data to reducing resource use and improve operations, the hope is that shared knowledge will empower others to follow suit. This paper discusses the Federal metering data analysis needs and some existing tools.

  13. Deconvolution for three-dimensional acoustic source identification based on spherical harmonics beamforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Zhigang; Yang, Yang; He, Yansong

    2015-05-01

    Spherical Harmonics Beamforming (SHB) with solid spherical arrays has become a particularly attractive tool for doing acoustic sources identification in cabin environments. However, it presents some intrinsic limitations, specifically poor spatial resolution and severe sidelobe contaminations. This paper focuses on overcoming these limitations effectively by deconvolution. First and foremost, a new formulation is proposed, which expresses SHB's output as a convolution of the true source strength distribution and the point spread function (PSF) defined as SHB's response to a unit-strength point source. Additionally, the typical deconvolution methods initially suggested for planar arrays, deconvolution approach for the mapping of acoustic sources (DAMAS), nonnegative least-squares (NNLS), Richardson-Lucy (RL) and CLEAN, are adapted to SHB successfully, which are capable of giving rise to highly resolved and deblurred maps. Finally, the merits of the deconvolution methods are validated and the relationships of source strength and pressure contribution reconstructed by the deconvolution methods vs. focus distance are explored both with computer simulations and experimentally. Several interesting results have emerged from this study: (1) compared with SHB, DAMAS, NNLS, RL and CLEAN all can not only improve the spatial resolution dramatically but also reduce or even eliminate the sidelobes effectively, allowing clear and unambiguous identification of single source or incoherent sources. (2) The availability of RL for coherent sources is highest, then DAMAS and NNLS, and that of CLEAN is lowest due to its failure in suppressing sidelobes. (3) Whether or not the real distance from the source to the array center equals the assumed one that is referred to as focus distance, the previous two results hold. (4) The true source strength can be recovered by dividing the reconstructed one by a coefficient that is the square of the focus distance divided by the real distance from

  14. Computational Modeling, Formal Analysis, and Tools for Systems Biology

    PubMed Central

    Bartocci, Ezio; Lió, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    As the amount of biological data in the public domain grows, so does the range of modeling and analysis techniques employed in systems biology. In recent years, a number of theoretical computer science developments have enabled modeling methodology to keep pace. The growing interest in systems biology in executable models and their analysis has necessitated the borrowing of terms and methods from computer science, such as formal analysis, model checking, static analysis, and runtime verification. Here, we discuss the most important and exciting computational methods and tools currently available to systems biologists. We believe that a deeper understanding of the concepts and theory highlighted in this review will produce better software practice, improved investigation of complex biological processes, and even new ideas and better feedback into computer science. PMID:26795950

  15. Informed constrained spherical deconvolution (iCSD).

    PubMed

    Roine, Timo; Jeurissen, Ben; Perrone, Daniele; Aelterman, Jan; Philips, Wilfried; Leemans, Alexander; Sijbers, Jan

    2015-08-01

    Diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive imaging method, which can be used to investigate neural tracts in the white matter (WM) of the brain. However, the voxel sizes used in DW-MRI are relatively large, making DW-MRI prone to significant partial volume effects (PVE). These PVEs can be caused both by complex (e.g. crossing) WM fiber configurations and non-WM tissue, such as gray matter (GM) and cerebrospinal fluid. High angular resolution diffusion imaging methods have been developed to correctly characterize complex WM fiber configurations, but significant non-WM PVEs are also present in a large proportion of WM voxels. In constrained spherical deconvolution (CSD), the full fiber orientation distribution function (fODF) is deconvolved from clinically feasible DW data using a response function (RF) representing the signal of a single coherently oriented population of fibers. Non-WM PVEs cause a loss of precision in the detected fiber orientations and an emergence of false peaks in CSD, more prominently in voxels with GM PVEs. We propose a method, informed CSD (iCSD), to improve the estimation of fODFs under non-WM PVEs by modifying the RF to account for non-WM PVEs locally. In practice, the RF is modified based on tissue fractions estimated from high-resolution anatomical data. Results from simulation and in-vivo bootstrapping experiments demonstrate a significant improvement in the precision of the identified fiber orientations and in the number of false peaks detected under GM PVEs. Probabilistic whole brain tractography shows fiber density is increased in the major WM tracts and decreased in subcortical GM regions. The iCSD method significantly improves the fiber orientation estimation at the WM-GM interface, which is especially important in connectomics, where the connectivity between GM regions is analyzed. PMID:25660002

  16. Design and Application of the Exploration Maintainability Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stromgren, Chel; Terry, Michelle; Crillo, William; Goodliff, Kandyce; Maxwell, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Conducting human exploration missions beyond Low Earth Orbit (LEO) will present unique challenges in the areas of supportability and maintainability. The durations of proposed missions can be relatively long and re-supply of logistics, including maintenance and repair items, will be limited or non-existent. In addition, mass and volume constraints in the transportation system will limit the total amount of logistics that can be flown along with the crew. These constraints will require that new strategies be developed with regards to how spacecraft systems are designed and maintained. NASA is currently developing Design Reference Missions (DRMs) as an initial step in defining future human missions. These DRMs establish destinations and concepts of operation for future missions, and begin to define technology and capability requirements. Because of the unique supportability challenges, historical supportability data and models are not directly applicable for establishing requirements for beyond LEO missions. However, supportability requirements could have a major impact on the development of the DRMs. The mass, volume, and crew resources required to support the mission could all be first order drivers in the design of missions, elements, and operations. Therefore, there is a need for enhanced analysis capabilities to more accurately establish mass, volume, and time requirements for supporting beyond LEO missions. Additionally, as new technologies and operations are proposed to reduce these requirements, it is necessary to have accurate tools to evaluate the efficacy of those approaches. In order to improve the analysis of supportability requirements for beyond LEO missions, the Space Missions Analysis Branch at the NASA Langley Research Center is developing the Exploration Maintainability Analysis Tool (EMAT). This tool is a probabilistic simulator that evaluates the need for repair and maintenance activities during space missions and the logistics and crew

  17. The Moon: Determining Minerals and their Abundances with Mid-IR Spectral Deconvolution II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlowski, Richard W.; Donaldson Hanna, K.; Sprague, A. L.; Grosse, F. A.; Boop, T. S.; Warell, J.; Boccafola, K.

    2007-10-01

    We determine the mineral compositions and abundances at three locations on the lunar surface using an established spectral deconvolution algorithm (Ramsey 1996, Ph.D. Dissertation, ASU; Ramsey and Christiansen 1998, JGR 103, 577-596) for mid-infrared spectral libraries of mineral separates of varying grain sizes. Spectral measurements of the lunar surface were obtained at the Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) on Mauna Kea, HI with Boston University's Mid-Infrared Spectrometer and Imager (MIRSI). Our chosen locations, Aristarchus, Grimaldi and Mersenius C, have been previously observed in the VIS near-IR from ground-based telescopes and spacecraft (Zisk et al. 1977, The Moon 17, 59-99; Hawke et al. 1993, GRL 20, 419-422; McEwen et al. 1994, Science 266, 1858-1862; Peterson et al. 1995, 22, 3055-3058; Warell et al. 2006, Icarus 180, 281-291), however there are no sample returns for analysis. Surface mineral deconvolutions of the Grimaldi Basin infill are suggestive of anorthosite, labradorite, orthopyroxene, olivine, garnet and phosphate. Peterson et al. (1995) indicated the infill of Grimaldi Basin has a noritic anorthosite or anorthositic norite composition. Our spectral deconvolution supports these results. Modeling of other lunar locations is underway. We have also successfully modeled laboratory spectra of HED meteorites, Vesta, and Mercury (see meteorites and mercurian abstracts this meeting). These results demonstrate the spectral deconvolution method to be robust for making mineral identifications on remotely observed objects, in particular main-belt asteroids, the Moon, and Mercury. This work was funded by NSF AST406796.

  18. Nonlinear deconvolution of hyperspectral data with MCMC for studying the kinematics of galaxies.

    PubMed

    Villeneuve, Emma; Carfantan, Hervé

    2014-10-01

    Hyperspectral imaging has been an area of active research in image processing and analysis for more than 10 years, mainly for remote sensing applications. Astronomical ground-based hyperspectral imagers offer new challenges to the community, which differ from the previous ones in the nature of the observed objects, but also in the quality of the data, with a low signal-to-noise ratio and a low resolution, due to the atmospheric turbulence. In this paper, we focus on a deconvolution problem specific to hyperspectral astronomical data, to improve the study of the kinematics of galaxies. The aim is to estimate the flux, the relative velocity, and the velocity dispersion, integrated along the line-of-sight, for each spatial pixel of an observed galaxy. Thanks to the Doppler effect, this is equivalent to estimate the amplitude, center, and width of spectral emission lines, in a small spectral range, for every spatial pixel of the hyperspectral data. We consider a parametric model for the spectral lines and propose to compute the posterior mean estimators, in a Bayesian framework, using Monte Carlo Markov chain algorithms. Various estimation schemes are proposed for this nonlinear deconvolution problem, taking advantage of the linearity of the model with respect to the flux parameters. We differentiate between methods taking into account the spatial blurring of the data (deconvolution) or not (estimation). The performances of the methods are compared with classical ones, on two simulated data sets. It is shown that the proposed deconvolution method significantly improves the resolution of the estimated kinematic parameters. PMID:25073172

  19. Joint deconvolution and classification with applications to passive acoustic underwater multipath.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Hyrum S; Gupta, Maya R

    2008-11-01

    This paper addresses the problem of classifying signals that have been corrupted by noise and unknown linear time-invariant (LTI) filtering such as multipath, given labeled uncorrupted training signals. A maximum a posteriori approach to the deconvolution and classification is considered, which produces estimates of the desired signal, the unknown channel, and the class label. For cases in which only a class label is needed, the classification accuracy can be improved by not committing to an estimate of the channel or signal. A variant of the quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA) classifier is proposed that probabilistically accounts for the unknown LTI filtering, and which avoids deconvolution. The proposed QDA classifier can work either directly on the signal or on features whose transformation by LTI filtering can be analyzed; as an example a classifier for subband-power features is derived. Results on simulated data and real Bowhead whale vocalizations show that jointly considering deconvolution with classification can dramatically improve classification performance over traditional methods over a range of signal-to-noise ratios. PMID:19045785

  20. Extravehicular Activity System Sizing Analysis Tool (EVAS_SAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Cheryl B.; Conger, Bruce C.; Miranda, Bruno M.; Bue, Grant C.; Rouen, Michael N.

    2007-01-01

    An effort was initiated by NASA/JSC in 2001 to develop an Extravehicular Activity System Sizing Analysis Tool (EVAS_SAT) for the sizing of Extravehicular Activity System (EVAS) architecture and studies. Its intent was to support space suit development efforts and to aid in conceptual designs for future human exploration missions. Its basis was the Life Support Options Performance Program (LSOPP), a spacesuit and portable life support system (PLSS) sizing program developed for NASA/JSC circa 1990. EVAS_SAT estimates the mass, power, and volume characteristics for user-defined EVAS architectures, including Suit Systems, Airlock Systems, Tools and Translation Aids, and Vehicle Support equipment. The tool has undergone annual changes and has been updated as new data have become available. Certain sizing algorithms have been developed based on industry standards, while others are based on the LSOPP sizing routines. The sizing algorithms used by EVAS_SAT are preliminary. Because EVAS_SAT was designed for use by members of the EVA community, subsystem familiarity on the part of the intended user group and in the analysis of results is assumed. The current EVAS_SAT is operated within Microsoft Excel 2003 using a Visual Basic interface system.

  1. VMPLOT: A versatile analysis tool for mission operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bucher, Allen W.

    1993-01-01

    VMPLOT is a versatile analysis tool designed by the Magellan Spacecraft Team to graphically display engineering data used to support mission operations. While there is nothing revolutionary or innovative about graphical data analysis tools, VMPLOT has some distinguishing features that set it apart from other custom or commercially available software packages. These features include the ability to utilize time in a Universal Time Coordinated (UTC) or Spacecraft Clock (SCLK) format as an enumerated data type, the ability to automatically scale both axes based on the data to be displayed (including time), the ability to combine data from different files, and the ability to utilize the program either interactively or in batch mode, thereby enhancing automation. Another important feature of VMPLOT not visible to the user is the software engineering philosophies utilized. A layered approach was used to isolate program functionality to different layers. This was done to increase program portability to different platforms and to ease maintenance and enhancements due to changing requirements. The functionality of the unique features of VMPLOT as well as highlighting the algorithms that make these features possible are described. The software engineering philosophies used in the creation of the software tool are also summarized.

  2. SATRAT: Staphylococcus aureus transcript regulatory network analysis tool

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, Vijayaraj; Elasri, Mohamed O.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a commensal organism that primarily colonizes the nose of healthy individuals. S. aureus causes a spectrum of infections that range from skin and soft-tissue infections to fatal invasive diseases. S. aureus uses a large number of virulence factors that are regulated in a coordinated fashion. The complex regulatory mechanisms have been investigated in numerous high-throughput experiments. Access to this data is critical to studying this pathogen. Previously, we developed a compilation of microarray experimental data to enable researchers to search, browse, compare, and contrast transcript profiles. We have substantially updated this database and have built a novel exploratory tool—SATRAT—the S. aureus transcript regulatory network analysis tool, based on the updated database. This tool is capable of performing deep searches using a query and generating an interactive regulatory network based on associations among the regulators of any query gene. We believe this integrated regulatory network analysis tool would help researchers explore the missing links and identify novel pathways that regulate virulence in S. aureus. Also, the data model and the network generation code used to build this resource is open sourced, enabling researchers to build similar resources for other bacterial systems. PMID:25653902

  3. Networking Sensor Observations, Forecast Models & Data Analysis Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falke, S. R.; Roberts, G.; Sullivan, D.; Dibner, P. C.; Husar, R. B.

    2009-12-01

    This presentation explores the interaction between sensor webs and forecast models and data analysis processes within service oriented architectures (SOA). Earth observation data from surface monitors and satellite sensors and output from earth science models are increasingly available through open interfaces that adhere to web standards, such as the OGC Web Coverage Service (WCS), OGC Sensor Observation Service (SOS), OGC Web Processing Service (WPS), SOAP-Web Services Description Language (WSDL), or RESTful web services. We examine the implementation of these standards from the perspective of forecast models and analysis tools. Interoperable interfaces for model inputs, outputs, and settings are defined with the purpose of connecting them with data access services in service oriented frameworks. We review current best practices in modular modeling, such as OpenMI and ESMF/Mapl, and examine the applicability of those practices to service oriented sensor webs. In particular, we apply sensor-model-analysis interfaces within the context of wildfire smoke analysis and forecasting scenario used in the recent GEOSS Architecture Implementation Pilot. Fire locations derived from satellites and surface observations and reconciled through a US Forest Service SOAP web service are used to initialize a CALPUFF smoke forecast model. The results of the smoke forecast model are served through an OGC WCS interface that is accessed from an analysis tool that extract areas of high particulate matter concentrations and a data comparison tool that compares the forecasted smoke with Unattended Aerial System (UAS) collected imagery and satellite-derived aerosol indices. An OGC WPS that calculates population statistics based on polygon areas is used with the extract area of high particulate matter to derive information on the population expected to be impacted by smoke from the wildfires. We described the process for enabling the fire location, smoke forecast, smoke observation, and

  4. Coastal Online Analysis and Synthesis Tool 2.0 (COAST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Richard B.; Navard, Andrew R.; Nguyen, Beth T.

    2009-01-01

    The Coastal Online Assessment and Synthesis Tool (COAST) 3D geobrowser has been developed to integrate disparate coastal datasets from NASA and other sources into a desktop tool that provides new data visualization and analysis capabilities for coastal researchers, managers, and residents. It is built upon the widely used NASA-developed open source World Wind geobrowser from NASA Ames (Patrick Hogan et al.) .Net and C# version is used for development. It is leveraged off of World Wind community shared code samples and COAST 2.0 enhancement direction is based on Coastal science community feedback and needs assessment (GOMA). The main objective is to empower the user to bring more user-meaningful data into multi-layered, multi-temporal spatial context.

  5. Colossal Tooling Design: 3D Simulation for Ergonomic Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Steve L.; Dischinger, Charles; Thomas, Robert E.; Babai, Majid

    2003-01-01

    The application of high-level 3D simulation software to the design phase of colossal mandrel tooling for composite aerospace fuel tanks was accomplished to discover and resolve safety and human engineering problems. The analyses were conducted to determine safety, ergonomic and human engineering aspects of the disassembly process of the fuel tank composite shell mandrel. Three-dimensional graphics high-level software, incorporating various ergonomic analysis algorithms, was utilized to determine if the process was within safety and health boundaries for the workers carrying out these tasks. In addition, the graphical software was extremely helpful in the identification of material handling equipment and devices for the mandrel tooling assembly/disassembly process.

  6. HiRes Deconvolution of Outflow Cavities Imaged by Spitzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velusamy, Thangasamy; Langer, W. D.; Marsh, K. A.

    2007-05-01

    Circumstellar outflows are believed to play a central role in the dispersal of the envelope and the ejection of angular momentum from protostars and their associated disks. The opening angle of the outflow is an important indicator of the time evolution of the outflow and its effects on infall and accretion. The scattered light emission escaping out the outflow cavities can be observed in the deep Spitzer images in the IRAC bands. We present examples of HiRes deconvolved Spitzer IRAC images of outflow cavities. HiRes achieves sub-arcsec resolution (< 0.8") for IRAC channels at 3.6 and 4.5 microns and 1" at 5.8 and 8 microns. Furthermore, HiRes deconvolution removes all the diffraction lobes producing cleaner looking narrow image of the protostar and nearby bright stars. Thus HiRes analysis improves our ability to trace the outflow cavities. We also present geometric models of the outflow (inclination and deprojected opening angles) derived by fitting SEDs and images of the outflow cavities. This work was performed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  7. Protocol analysis as a tool for behavior analysis

    PubMed Central

    Austin, John; Delaney, Peter F.

    1998-01-01

    The study of thinking is made difficult by the fact that many of the relevant stimuli and responses are not apparent. Although the use of verbal reports has a long history in psychology, it is only recently that Ericsson and Simon's (1993) book on verbal reports explicated the conditions under which such reports may be reliable and valid. We review some studies in behavior analysis and cognitive psychology that have used talk-aloud reporting. We review particular methods for collecting reliable and valid verbal reports using the “talk-aloud” method as well as discuss alternatives to the talk-aloud procedure that are effective under different task conditions, such as the use of reports after completion of very rapid task performances. We specifically caution against the practice of asking subjects to reflect on the causes of their own behavior and the less frequently discussed problems associated with providing inappropriate social stimulation to participants during experimental sessions. PMID:22477126

  8. Improving space debris detection in GEO ring using image deconvolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Núñez, Jorge; Núñez, Anna; Montojo, Francisco Javier; Condominas, Marta

    2015-07-01

    In this paper we present a method based on image deconvolution to improve the detection of space debris, mainly in the geostationary ring. Among the deconvolution methods we chose the iterative Richardson-Lucy (R-L), as the method that achieves better goals with a reasonable amount of computation. For this work, we used two sets of real 4096 × 4096 pixel test images obtained with the Telescope Fabra-ROA at Montsec (TFRM). Using the first set of data, we establish the optimal number of iterations in 7, and applying the R-L method with 7 iterations to the images, we show that the astrometric accuracy does not vary significantly while the limiting magnitude of the deconvolved images increases significantly compared to the original ones. The increase is in average about 1.0 magnitude, which means that objects up to 2.5 times fainter can be detected after deconvolution. The application of the method to the second set of test images, which includes several faint objects, shows that, after deconvolution, up to four previously undetected faint objects are detected in a single frame. Finally, we carried out a study of some economic aspects of applying the deconvolution method, showing that an important economic impact can be envisaged.

  9. TA-DA: A TOOL FOR ASTROPHYSICAL DATA ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Da Rio, Nicola; Robberto, Massimo

    2012-12-01

    We present the Tool for Astrophysical Data Analysis (TA-DA), a new software aimed to greatly simplify and improve the analysis of stellar photometric data in comparison with theoretical models, and allow the derivation of stellar parameters from multi-band photometry. Its flexibility allows one to address a number of such problems: from the interpolation of stellar models, or sets of stellar physical parameters in general, to the computation of synthetic photometry in arbitrary filters or units; from the analysis of observed color-magnitude diagrams to a Bayesian derivation of stellar parameters (and extinction) based on multi-band data. TA-DA is available as a pre-compiled Interactive Data Language widget-based application; its graphical user interface makes it considerably user-friendly. In this paper, we describe the software and its functionalities.

  10. Regional deconvolution method for partial volume correction in brain PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusinek, Henry; Tsui, Wai-Hon; de Leon, Mony J.

    2001-05-01

    Correction of PET images for partial volume effects (PVE) is of particular utility in studies of metabolism in brain aging and brain disorders. PVE is commonly corrected using voxel-by- voxel factors obtained from a high resolution brain mask (obtained from the coregistered MR scan), after convolution with the point spread function (PSF) of the imaging system. In a recently proposed regional deconvolution (RD) method, the observed regional activity is expressed as linear combinations of the true metabolic activity. The weights are obtained by integrating the PSF over the geometric extent of the brain regions. We have analyzed the accuracy of RD and two other PVE correction algorithms under a variety of conditions using simulated PET scans. Each of the brain regions was assigned a distribution of metabolic activity, with gray matter/white matter contrast representative of subjects in several age categories. Simulations were performed over a wide range of PET resolutions. The influence of PET/MR misregistration and heterogeneity of brain metabolism were also evaluated. Our results demonstrate the importance of correcting PET metabolic images for PVE. Without such correction, the regional brain activity values are contaminated with 30 - 40% errors. Under most conditions studied, the accuracy of RD and of the three- compartmental method were superior to the accuracy of the two- compartmental method. Our study provides the first demonstration of the feasibility of RD algorithm to provide accurate correction for a large number (n equals 109) of brain compartments. PVE correction methods appear to be promising tools in studies of metabolism in normal brain, brain aging, and brain disorders.

  11. Principles and tools for collaborative entity-based intelligence analysis.

    PubMed

    Bier, Eric A; Card, Stuart K; Bodnar, John W

    2010-01-01

    Software tools that make it easier for analysts to collaborate as a natural part of their work will lead to better analysis that is informed by more perspectives. We are interested to know if software tools can be designed that support collaboration even as they allow analysts to find documents and organize information (including evidence, schemas, and hypotheses). We have modified the Entity Workspace system, described previously, to test such designs. We have evaluated the resulting design in both a laboratory study and a study where it is situated with an analysis team. In both cases, effects on collaboration appear to be positive. Key aspects of the design include an evidence notebook optimized for organizing entities (rather than text characters), information structures that can be collapsed and expanded, visualization of evidence that emphasizes events and documents (rather than emphasizing the entity graph), and a notification system that finds entities of mutual interest to multiple analysts. Long-term tests suggest that this approach can support both top-down and bottom-up styles of analysis. PMID:20075480

  12. Operations other than war: Requirements for analysis tools research report

    SciTech Connect

    Hartley, D.S. III

    1996-12-01

    This report documents the research effort to determine the requirements for new or improved analysis tools to support decisions at the strategic and operational levels for military Operations Other than War (OOTW). The work was performed for the Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Command (USCINCPAC). The data collection was based on workshops attended by experts in OOTWs: analysis personnel from each of the Combatant Commands, the Services, the Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD), the Joint Staff, and other knowledgeable personnel. Further data were gathered from other workshops and conferences and from the literature. The results of this research begin with the creation of a taxonomy of OOTWs: categories of operations, attributes of operations, and tasks requiring analytical support. The tasks are connected to the Joint Staff`s Universal Joint Task List (UJTL). Historical OOTWs are analyzed to produce frequency distributions by category and responsible CINC. The analysis products are synthesized into a list of requirements for analytical tools and definitions of the requirements. The report concludes with a timeline or roadmap for satisfying the requirements.

  13. Analysis of Cryogenic Cycle with Process Modeling Tool: Aspen HYSYS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, D. M.; Patel, H. K.

    2015-10-01

    Cryogenic engineering deals with the development and improvement of low temperature techniques, processes and equipment. A process simulator such as Aspen HYSYS, for the design, analysis, and optimization of process plants, has features that accommodate the special requirements and therefore can be used to simulate most cryogenic liquefaction and refrigeration processes. Liquefaction is the process of cooling or refrigerating a gas to a temperature below its critical temperature so that liquid can be formed at some suitable pressure which is below the critical pressure. Cryogenic processes require special attention in terms of the integration of various components like heat exchangers, Joule-Thompson Valve, Turbo expander and Compressor. Here, Aspen HYSYS, a process modeling tool, is used to understand the behavior of the complete plant. This paper presents the analysis of an air liquefaction plant based on the Linde cryogenic cycle, performed using the Aspen HYSYS process modeling tool. It covers the technique used to find the optimum values for getting the maximum liquefaction of the plant considering different constraints of other parameters. The analysis result so obtained gives clear idea in deciding various parameter values before implementation of the actual plant in the field. It also gives an idea about the productivity and profitability of the given configuration plant which leads to the design of an efficient productive plant.

  14. The Smooth Decomposition as a nonlinear modal analysis tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellizzi, Sergio; Sampaio, Rubens

    2015-12-01

    The Smooth Decomposition (SD) is a statistical analysis technique for finding structures in an ensemble of spatially distributed data such that the vector directions not only keep the maximum possible variance but also the motions, along the vector directions, are as smooth in time as possible. In this paper, the notion of the dual smooth modes is introduced and used in the framework of oblique projection to expand a random response of a system. The dual modes define a tool that transforms the SD in an efficient modal analysis tool. The main properties of the SD are discussed and some new optimality properties of the expansion are deduced. The parameters of the SD give access to modal parameters of a linear system (mode shapes, resonance frequencies and modal energy participations). In case of nonlinear systems, a richer picture of the evolution of the modes versus energy can be obtained analyzing the responses under several excitation levels. This novel analysis of a nonlinear system is illustrated by an example.

  15. The Precision Formation Flying Integrated Analysis Tool (PFFIAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoneking, Eric; Lyon, Richard G.; Sears, Edie; Lu, Victor

    2004-01-01

    Several space missions presently in the concept phase (e.g. Stellar Imager, Sub- millimeter Probe of Evolutionary Cosmic Structure, Terrestrial Planet Finder) plan to use multiple spacecraft flying in precise formation to synthesize unprecedently large aperture optical systems. These architectures present challenges to the attitude and position determination and control system; optical performance is directly coupled to spacecraft pointing with typical control requirements being on the scale of milliarcseconds and nanometers. To investigate control strategies, rejection of environmental disturbances, and sensor and actuator requirements, a capability is needed to model both the dynamical and optical behavior of such a distributed telescope system. This paper describes work ongoing at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center toward the integration of a set of optical analysis tools (Optical System Characterization and Analysis Research software, or OSCAR) with the Formation J?lying Test Bed (FFTB). The resulting system is called the Precision Formation Flying Integrated Analysis Tool (PFFIAT), and it provides the capability to simulate closed-loop control of optical systems composed of elements mounted on multiple spacecraft. The attitude and translation spacecraft dynamics are simulated in the FFTB, including effects of the space environment (e.g. solar radiation pressure, differential orbital motion). The resulting optical configuration is then processed by OSCAR to determine an optical image. From this image, wavefront sensing (e.g. phase retrieval) techniques are being developed to derive attitude and position errors. These error signals will be fed back to the spacecraft control systems, completing the control loop. A simple case study is presented to demonstrate the present capabilities of the tool.

  16. The Precision Formation Flying Integrated Analysis Tool (PFFIAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoneking, Eric; Lyon, Richard G.; Sears, Edie; Lu, Victor

    2004-01-01

    Several space missions presently in the concept phase (e.g. Stellar Imager, Submillimeter Probe of Evolutionary Cosmic Structure, Terrestrial Planet Finder) plan to use multiple spacecraft flying in precise formation to synthesize unprecedently large aperture optical systems. These architectures present challenges to the attitude and position determination and control system; optical performance is directly coupled to spacecraft pointing with typical control requirements being on the scale of milliarcseconds and nanometers. To investigate control strategies, rejection of environmental disturbances, and sensor and actuator requirements, a capability is needed to model both the dynamical and optical behavior of such a distributed telescope system. This paper describes work ongoing at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center toward the integration of a set of optical analysis tools (Optical System Characterization and Analysis Research software, or OSCAR) with the Formation Flying Test Bed (FFTB). The resulting system is called the Precision Formation Flying Integrated Analysis Tool (PFFIAT), and it provides the capability to simulate closed-loop control of optical systems composed of elements mounted on multiple spacecraft. The attitude and translation spacecraft dynamics are simulated in the FFTB, including effects of the space environment (e.g. solar radiation pressure, differential orbital motion). The resulting optical configuration is then processed by OSCAR to determine an optical image. From this image, wavefront sensing (e.g. phase retrieval) techniques are being developed to derive attitude and position errors. These error signals will be fed back to the spacecraft control systems, completing the control loop. A simple case study is presented to demonstrate the present capabilities of the tool.

  17. NASA's Aeroacoustic Tools and Methods for Analysis of Aircraft Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.; Lopes, Leonard V.; Burley, Casey L.

    2015-01-01

    Aircraft community noise is a significant concern due to continued growth in air traffic, increasingly stringent environmental goals, and operational limitations imposed by airport authorities. The ability to quantify aircraft noise at the source and ultimately at observers is required to develop low noise aircraft designs and flight procedures. Predicting noise at the source, accounting for scattering and propagation through the atmosphere to the observer, and assessing the perception and impact on a community requires physics-based aeroacoustics tools. Along with the analyses for aero-performance, weights and fuel burn, these tools can provide the acoustic component for aircraft MDAO (Multidisciplinary Design Analysis and Optimization). Over the last decade significant progress has been made in advancing the aeroacoustic tools such that acoustic analyses can now be performed during the design process. One major and enabling advance has been the development of the system noise framework known as Aircraft NOise Prediction Program2 (ANOPP2). ANOPP2 is NASA's aeroacoustic toolset and is designed to facilitate the combination of acoustic approaches of varying fidelity for the analysis of noise from conventional and unconventional aircraft. The toolset includes a framework that integrates noise prediction and propagation methods into a unified system for use within general aircraft analysis software. This includes acoustic analyses, signal processing and interfaces that allow for the assessment of perception of noise on a community. ANOPP2's capability to incorporate medium fidelity shielding predictions and wind tunnel experiments into a design environment is presented. An assessment of noise from a conventional and Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) aircraft using medium fidelity scattering methods combined with noise measurements from a model-scale HWB recently placed in NASA's 14x22 wind tunnel are presented. The results are in the form of community noise metrics and

  18. Image and Data-analysis Tools For Paleoclimatic Reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozzi, M.

    It comes here proposed a directory of instruments and computer science resources chosen in order to resolve the problematic ones that regard the paleoclimatic recon- structions. They will come discussed in particular the following points: 1) Numerical analysis of paleo-data (fossils abundances, species analyses, isotopic signals, chemical-physical parameters, biological data): a) statistical analyses (uni- variate, diversity, rarefaction, correlation, ANOVA, F and T tests, Chi^2) b) multidi- mensional analyses (principal components, corrispondence, cluster analysis, seriation, discriminant, autocorrelation, spectral analysis) neural analyses (backpropagation net, kohonen feature map, hopfield net genetic algorithms) 2) Graphical analysis (visu- alization tools) of paleo-data (quantitative and qualitative fossils abundances, species analyses, isotopic signals, chemical-physical parameters): a) 2-D data analyses (graph, histogram, ternary, survivorship) b) 3-D data analyses (direct volume rendering, iso- surfaces, segmentation, surface reconstruction, surface simplification,generation of tetrahedral grids). 3) Quantitative and qualitative digital image analysis (macro and microfossils image analysis, Scanning Electron Microscope. and Optical Polarized Microscope images capture and analysis, morphometric data analysis, 3-D reconstruc- tions): a) 2D image analysis (correction of image defects, enhancement of image de- tail, converting texture and directionality to grey scale or colour differences, visual enhancement using pseudo-colour, pseudo-3D, thresholding of image features, binary image processing, measurements, stereological measurements, measuring features on a white background) b) 3D image analysis (basic stereological procedures, two dimen- sional structures; area fraction from the point count, volume fraction from the point count, three dimensional structures: surface area and the line intercept count, three dimensional microstructures; line length and the

  19. A POST ANALYSIS OF A PREVENTIVE AND CHRONIC HEALTHCARE TOOL.

    PubMed

    Borrayo, Brooke D; O'Lawrence, Henry

    2016-01-01

    This study uses the data set from Kaiser Permanente to examine the post implementation of a preventive and chronic care that utilizes clinical information system, delivery system design, and clinical decision support to maximize the office visit. The analysis suggests a significant positive relationship between frequency of utilization rates to address preventive and chronic care gaps. There is no implication of a significant positive relationship with the successfully captured rate, which satisfies closing the care gap within 45 days. The use of the preventive care tool will assist members in satisfying the preventive care gap, cervical cancer screening, within 45 days of the encounter. PMID:27483973

  20. CFD Methods and Tools for Multi-Element Airfoil Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Stuart E.; George, Michael W. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    This lecture will discuss the computational tools currently available for high-lift multi-element airfoil analysis. It will present an overview of a number of different numerical approaches, their current capabilities, short-comings, and computational costs. The lecture will be limited to viscous methods, including inviscid/boundary layer coupling methods, and incompressible and compressible Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes methods. Both structured and unstructured grid generation approaches will be presented. Two different structured grid procedures are outlined, one which uses multi-block patched grids, the other uses overset chimera grids. Turbulence and transition modeling will be discussed.

  1. EEG analysis using wavelet-based information tools.

    PubMed

    Rosso, O A; Martin, M T; Figliola, A; Keller, K; Plastino, A

    2006-06-15

    Wavelet-based informational tools for quantitative electroencephalogram (EEG) record analysis are reviewed. Relative wavelet energies, wavelet entropies and wavelet statistical complexities are used in the characterization of scalp EEG records corresponding to secondary generalized tonic-clonic epileptic seizures. In particular, we show that the epileptic recruitment rhythm observed during seizure development is well described in terms of the relative wavelet energies. In addition, during the concomitant time-period the entropy diminishes while complexity grows. This is construed as evidence supporting the conjecture that an epileptic focus, for this kind of seizures, triggers a self-organized brain state characterized by both order and maximal complexity. PMID:16675027

  2. A mobile data collection tool for workflow analysis.

    PubMed

    Moss, Jacqueline; Berner, Eta S; Savell, Kathy

    2007-01-01

    Faulty exchange and impaired access to clinical information is a major contributing factor to the incidence of medical error and occurrence of adverse events. Traditional methods utilized for systems analysis and information technology design fail to capture the nature of information use in highly dynamic healthcare environments. This paper describes a study designed to identify information task components in a cardiovascular intensive care unit and the development of an observational data collection tool to characterize the use of information in this environment. Direct observation can be a time-consuming process and without easy to use, reliable and valid methods of documentation, may not be reproducible across observers or settings. The following attributes were found to be necessary components for the characterization of information tasks in this setting: purpose, action, role, target, mode, and duration. The identified information task components were incorporated into the design of an electronic data collection tool to allow coding of information tasks. The reliability and validity of this tool in practice is discussed and an illustration of observational data output is provided. PMID:17911676

  3. SAVANT: Solar Array Verification and Analysis Tool Demonstrated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chock, Ricaurte

    2000-01-01

    The photovoltaics (PV) industry is now being held to strict specifications, such as end-oflife power requirements, that force them to overengineer their products to avoid contractual penalties. Such overengineering has been the only reliable way to meet such specifications. Unfortunately, it also results in a more costly process than is probably necessary. In our conversations with the PV industry, the issue of cost has been raised again and again. Consequently, the Photovoltaics and Space Environment Effects branch at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field has been developing a software tool to address this problem. SAVANT, Glenn's tool for solar array verification and analysis is in the technology demonstration phase. Ongoing work has proven that more efficient and less costly PV designs should be possible by using SAVANT to predict the on-orbit life-cycle performance. The ultimate goal of the SAVANT project is to provide a user-friendly computer tool to predict PV on-orbit life-cycle performance. This should greatly simplify the tasks of scaling and designing the PV power component of any given flight or mission. By being able to predict how a particular PV article will perform, designers will be able to balance mission power requirements (both beginning-of-life and end-of-life) with survivability concerns such as power degradation due to radiation and/or contamination. Recent comparisons with actual flight data from the Photovoltaic Array Space Power Plus Diagnostics (PASP Plus) mission validate this approach.

  4. A Design and Performance Analysis Tool for Superconducting RF Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilcher, Th.; Simrock, S. N.; Merminga, L.; Wang, D. X.

    1997-05-01

    Superconducting rf systems are usually operated with continuous rf power or with rf pulse lengths exceeding 1 ms to maximize the overall plug power efficiency. Typical examples are CEBAF at Jefferson Lab and the TESLA Test Facility at DESY. The long pulses allow for effective application of feedback to stabilize the accelerating field in presence of microphonics, Lorentz force detuning, and fluctuations of the beam current. In this paper we describe a set of tools to be used with MATLAB and SIMULINK, which allow to analyse the quality of field regulation for a given design. The tools include models for the cavities, the rf power source, the beam, sources of field perturbations, and the rf feedback system. The rf control relevant electrical and mechanical characteristics of the cavity are described in form of time-varying state space models. The power source is modeled as a current generator and includes saturation characteristics and noise. An arbitrary time structure can be imposed on the beam current to reflect a macro-pulse stucture and bunch charge fluctuations. For rf feedback several schemes can be selected: Traditional amplitude and phase control as well as I/Q control. The choices for the feedback controller include analog or digital approaches and various choices of frequency response. Feedforward can be added to further supress repetitive errors. The results of a performance analysis of the CEBAF and the TESLA Linac rf system using these tools are presented.

  5. A design and performance analysis tool for superconducting RF systems

    SciTech Connect

    T. Schilcher; S.N. Simrock; L. Merminga; D.X. Wang

    1997-05-01

    Superconducting rf systems are usually operated with continuous rf power or with rf pulse lengths exceeding 1 ms to maximize the overall wall plug power efficiency. Typical examples are CEBAF at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) and the TESLA Test Facility at DESY. The long pulses allow for effective application of feedback to stabilize the accelerating field in presence of microphonics, Lorentz force detuning, and fluctuations of the beam current. In this paper the authors describe a set of tools to be used with MATLAB and SIMULINK, which allow to analyze the quality of field regulation for a given design. The tools include models for the cavities, the rf power source, the beam, sources of field perturbations, and the rf feedback system. The rf control relevant electrical and mechanical characteristics of the cavity are described in form of time-varying state space models. The power source is modeled as a current generator and includes saturation characteristics and noise.An arbitrary time structure can be imposed on the beam current to reflect a macro-pulse structure and bunch charge fluctuations. For rf feedback several schemes can be selected: Traditional amplitude and phase control as well as I/Q control. The choices for the feedback controller include analog or digital approaches and various choices of frequency response. Feed forward can be added to further suppress repetitive errors. The results of a performance analysis of the CEBAF and the TESLA Linac rf system using these tools are presented.

  6. Java Analysis Tools for Element Production Calculations in Computational Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingerfelt, E.; Hix, W.; Guidry, M.; Smith, M.

    2002-12-01

    We are developing a set of extendable, cross-platform tools and interfaces using Java and vector graphic technologies such as SVG and SWF to facilitate element production calculations in computational astrophysics. The Java technologies are customizable and portable, and can be utilized as stand-alone applications or distributed across a network. These tools, which have broad applications in general scientific visualization, are currently being used to explore and analyze a large library of nuclear reaction rates and visualize results of explosive nucleosynthesis calculations with compact, high quality vector graphics. The facilities for reading and plotting nuclear reaction rates and their components from a network or library permit the user to easily include new rates and compare and adjust current ones. Sophisticated visualization and graphical analysis tools offer the ability to view results in an interactive, scalable vector graphics format, which leads to a dramatic (ten-fold) reduction in visualization file sizes while maintaining high visual quality and interactive control. ORNL Physics Division is managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  7. Battery Lifetime Analysis and Simulation Tool (BLAST) Documentation

    SciTech Connect

    Neubauer, J.

    2014-12-01

    The deployment and use of lithium-ion batteries in automotive and stationary energy storage applications must be optimized to justify their high up-front costs. Given that batteries degrade with use and storage, such optimizations must evaluate many years of operation. As the degradation mechanisms are sensitive to temperature, state-of-charge histories, current levels, and cycle depth and frequency, it is important to model both the battery and the application to a high level of detail to ensure battery response is accurately predicted. To address these issues, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory has developed the Battery Lifetime Analysis and Simulation Tool (BLAST) suite of tools. This suite of tools pairs NREL's high-fidelity battery degradation model with a battery electrical and thermal performance model, application-specific electrical and thermal performance models of the larger system (e.g., an electric vehicle), application-specific system use data (e.g., vehicle travel patterns and driving data), and historic climate data from cities across the United States. This provides highly realistic, long-term predictions of battery response and thereby enables quantitative comparisons of varied battery use strategies.

  8. Risk analysis systems for veterinary biologicals: a regulator's tool box.

    PubMed

    Osborne, C G; McElvaine, M D; Ahl, A S; Glosser, J W

    1995-12-01

    Recent advances in biology and technology have significantly improved our ability to produce veterinary biologicals of high purity, efficacy and safety, virtually anywhere in the world. At the same time, increasing trade and comprehensive trade agreements, such as the Uruguay Round of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT: now the World Trade Organisation [WTO]), have put pressure on governments to use scientific principles in the regulation of trade for a wide range of products, including veterinary biologicals. In many cases, however, nations have been reluctant to allow the movement of veterinary biologicals, due to the perceived threat of importing an exotic disease. This paper discusses the history of risk analysis as a decision support tool and provides examples of how this tool may be used in a science-based regulatory system for veterinary biologicals. A wide variety of tools are described, including qualitative, semi-quantitative and quantitative methods, most with a long history of use in engineering and the health and environmental sciences. PMID:8639961

  9. Image analysis tools and emerging algorithms for expression proteomics

    PubMed Central

    English, Jane A.; Lisacek, Frederique; Morris, Jeffrey S.; Yang, Guang-Zhong; Dunn, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Since their origins in academic endeavours in the 1970s, computational analysis tools have matured into a number of established commercial packages that underpin research in expression proteomics. In this paper we describe the image analysis pipeline for the established 2-D Gel Electrophoresis (2-DE) technique of protein separation, and by first covering signal analysis for Mass Spectrometry (MS), we also explain the current image analysis workflow for the emerging high-throughput ‘shotgun’ proteomics platform of Liquid Chromatography coupled to MS (LC/MS). The bioinformatics challenges for both methods are illustrated and compared, whilst existing commercial and academic packages and their workflows are described from both a user’s and a technical perspective. Attention is given to the importance of sound statistical treatment of the resultant quantifications in the search for differential expression. Despite wide availability of proteomics software, a number of challenges have yet to be overcome regarding algorithm accuracy, objectivity and automation, generally due to deterministic spot-centric approaches that discard information early in the pipeline, propagating errors. We review recent advances in signal and image analysis algorithms in 2-DE, MS, LC/MS and Imaging MS. Particular attention is given to wavelet techniques, automated image-based alignment and differential analysis in 2-DE, Bayesian peak mixture models and functional mixed modelling in MS, and group-wise consensus alignment methods for LC/MS. PMID:21046614

  10. Image deconvolution in digital autoradiography: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mutian; Chen, Qing; Li, Xiao-Feng; O'Donoghue, Joseph; Ruan, Shutian; Zanzonico, Pat; Ling, C Clifton; Humm, John L

    2008-02-01

    Digital autoradiography (DAR) is a powerful method to determine quantitatively the "small-scale" (i.e., submillimeter) distribution of a radiotracer within a tissue section. However, the limited spatial resolution of the DAR image, due to blurring by the point spread function (PSF), can result in a poor correlation with tissue histology and immunohistochemistry. The authors attempt to overcome this limitation by recovering the radiotracer distribution by image deconvolution using the Richardson-Lucy algorithm and a measured PSF obtained from a small radioactive source on hydrophobic microscope slide. Simulation studies have shown that the deconvolution algorithm reliably recovers the pixel values corresponding to the radioactivity distributions. As an example, the proposed image restoration approach has been tested with DAR images of different radiolabeled markers on tumor sections obtained from clinical and preclinical animal model studies. Digital autoradiograms following deconvolution show improved sharpness and contrast relative to the unprocessed autoradiograms. PMID:18383673

  11. Extracting ocean surface information from altimeter returns - The deconvolution method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, Ernesto; Chapman, Bruce

    1989-01-01

    An evaluation of the deconvolution method for estimating ocean surface parameters from ocean altimeter waveforms is presented. It is shown that this method presents a fast, accurate way of determining the ocean surface parameters from noisy altimeter data. Three parameters may be estimated by using this method, including the altimeter-height error, the ocean-surface standard deviation, and the ocean-surface skewness. By means of a Monte Carlo experiment, an 'optimum' deconvolution algorithm and the accuracies with which the above parameters may be estimated using this algorithm are determined. Then the influence of instrument effects, such as errors in calibration and pointing-angle estimation, on the estimated parameters is examined. Finally, the deconvolution algorithm is used to estimate height and ocean-surface parameters from Seasat data.

  12. MetaNetVar: Pipeline for applying network analysis tools for genomic variants analysis

    PubMed Central

    Moyer, Eric; Hagenauer, Megan; Lesko, Matthew; Francis, Felix; Rodriguez, Oscar; Nagarajan, Vijayaraj; Huser, Vojtech; Busby, Ben

    2016-01-01

    Network analysis can make variant analysis better. There are existing tools like HotNet2 and dmGWAS that can provide various analytical methods. We developed a prototype of a pipeline called MetaNetVar that allows execution of multiple tools. The code is published at https://github.com/NCBI-Hackathons/Network_SNPs. A working prototype is published as an Amazon Machine Image - ami-4510312f . PMID:27158457

  13. General Mission Analysis Tool (GMAT) Architectural Specification. Draft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Steven P.; Conway, Darrel, J.

    2007-01-01

    Early in 2002, Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) began to identify requirements for the flight dynamics software needed to fly upcoming missions that use formations of spacecraft to collect data. These requirements ranged from low level modeling features to large scale interoperability requirements. In 2003 we began work on a system designed to meet these requirement; this system is GMAT. The General Mission Analysis Tool (GMAT) is a general purpose flight dynamics modeling tool built on open source principles. The GMAT code is written in C++, and uses modern C++ constructs extensively. GMAT can be run through either a fully functional Graphical User Interface (GUI) or as a command line program with minimal user feedback. The system is built and runs on Microsoft Windows, Linux, and Macintosh OS X platforms. The GMAT GUI is written using wxWidgets, a cross platform library of components that streamlines the development and extension of the user interface Flight dynamics modeling is performed in GMAT by building components that represent the players in the analysis problem that is being modeled. These components interact through the sequential execution of instructions, embodied in the GMAT Mission Sequence. A typical Mission Sequence will model the trajectories of a set of spacecraft evolving over time, calculating relevant parameters during this propagation, and maneuvering individual spacecraft to maintain a set of mission constraints as established by the mission analyst. All of the elements used in GMAT for mission analysis can be viewed in the GMAT GUI or through a custom scripting language. Analysis problems modeled in GMAT are saved as script files, and these files can be read into GMAT. When a script is read into the GMAT GUI, the corresponding user interface elements are constructed in the GMAT GUI. The GMAT system was developed from the ground up to run in a platform agnostic environment. The source code compiles on numerous different platforms, and is

  14. The Lagrangian analysis tool LAGRANTO - version 2.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprenger, M.; Wernli, H.

    2015-02-01

    Lagrangian trajectories are widely used in the atmospheric sciences, for instance to identify flow structures in extratropical cyclones (e.g., warm conveyor belts) and long-range transport pathways of moisture and trace substances. Here a new version of the Lagrangian analysis tool LAGRANTO (Wernli and Davies, 1997) is introduced, which offers considerably enhanced functionalities: (i) trajectory starting positions can be described easily based on different geometrical and/or meteorological conditions; e.g., equidistantly spaced within a prescribed region and on a stack of pressure (or isentropic) levels; (ii) a versatile selection of trajectories is offered based on single or combined criteria; these criteria are passed to LAGRANTO with a simple command language (e.g., "GT:PV:2" readily translates into a selection of all trajectories with potential vorticity (PV) greater than 2 PVU); and (iii) full versions are available for global ECMWF and regional COSMO data; core functionality is also provided for the regional WRF and UM models, and for the global 20th Century Reanalysis data set. The intuitive application of LAGRANTO is first presented for the identification of a warm conveyor belt in the North Atlantic. A further case study then shows how LAGRANTO is used to quasi-operationally diagnose stratosphere-troposphere exchange events over Europe. Whereas these example rely on the ECMWF version, the COSMO version and input fields with 7 km horizontal resolution are needed to adequately resolve the rather complex flow structure associated with orographic blocking due to the Alps. Finally, an example of backward trajectories presents the tool's application in source-receptor analysis studies. The new distribution of LAGRANTO is publicly available and includes simple tools, e.g., to visualize and merge trajectories. Furthermore, a detailed user guide exists, which describes all LAGRANTO capabilities.

  15. The LAGRANTO Lagrangian analysis tool - version 2.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprenger, M.; Wernli, H.

    2015-08-01

    Lagrangian trajectories are widely used in the atmospheric sciences, for instance to identify flow structures in extratropical cyclones (e.g., warm conveyor belts) and long-range transport pathways of moisture and trace substances. Here a new version of the Lagrangian analysis tool LAGRANTO (Wernli and Davies, 1997) is introduced, which offers considerably enhanced functionalities. Trajectory starting positions can be defined easily and flexibly based on different geometrical and/or meteorological conditions, e.g., equidistantly spaced within a prescribed region and on a stack of pressure (or isentropic) levels. After the computation of the trajectories, a versatile selection of trajectories is offered based on single or combined criteria. These criteria are passed to LAGRANTO with a simple command language (e.g., "GT:PV:2" readily translates into a selection of all trajectories with potential vorticity, PV, greater than 2 PVU; 1 PVU = 10-6 K m2 kg-1 s-1). Full versions of this new version of LAGRANTO are available for global ECMWF and regional COSMO data, and core functionality is provided for the regional WRF and MetUM models and the global 20th Century Reanalysis data set. The paper first presents the intuitive application of LAGRANTO for the identification of a warm conveyor belt in the North Atlantic. A further case study then shows how LAGRANTO can be used to quasi-operationally diagnose stratosphere-troposphere exchange events. Whereas these examples rely on the ECMWF version, the COSMO version and input fields with 7 km horizontal resolution serve to resolve the rather complex flow structure associated with orographic blocking due to the Alps, as shown in a third example. A final example illustrates the tool's application in source-receptor analysis studies. The new distribution of LAGRANTO is publicly available and includes auxiliary tools, e.g., to visualize trajectories. A detailed user guide describes all LAGRANTO capabilities.

  16. Net energy analysis - powerful tool for selecting elective power options

    SciTech Connect

    Baron, S.

    1995-12-01

    A number of net energy analysis studies have been conducted in recent years for electric power production from coal, oil and uranium fuels; synthetic fuels from coal and oil shale; and heat and electric power from solar energy. This technique is an excellent indicator of investment costs, environmental impact and potential economic competitiveness of alternative electric power systems for energy planners from the Eastern European countries considering future options. Energy conservation is also important to energy planners and the net energy analysis technique is an excellent accounting system on the extent of energy resource conservation. The author proposes to discuss the technique and to present the results of his studies and others in the field. The information supplied to the attendees will serve as a powerful tool to the energy planners considering their electric power options in the future.

  17. Mechanical System Analysis/Design Tool (MSAT) Quick Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, HauHua; Kolb, Mark; Madelone, Jack

    1998-01-01

    MSAT is a unique multi-component multi-disciplinary tool that organizes design analysis tasks around object-oriented representations of configuration components, analysis programs and modules, and data transfer links between them. This creative modular architecture enables rapid generation of input stream for trade-off studies of various engine configurations. The data transfer links automatically transport output from one application as relevant input to the next application once the sequence is set up by the user. The computations are managed via constraint propagation - the constraints supplied by the user as part of any optimization module. The software can be used in the preliminary design stage as well as during the detail design of product development process.

  18. A new tool for accelerator system modeling and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gillespie, G.H.; Hill, B.W.; Jameson, R.A.

    1994-09-01

    A novel computer code is being developed to generate system level designs of radiofrequency ion accelerators. The goal of the Accelerator System Model (ASM) code is to create a modeling and analysis tool that is easy to use, automates many of the initial design calculations, supports trade studies used in assessing alternate designs and yet is flexible enough to incorporate new technology concepts as they emerge. Hardware engineering parameters and beam dynamics are modeled at comparable levels of fidelity. Existing scaling models of accelerator subsystems were sued to produce a prototype of ASM (version 1.0) working within the Shell for Particle Accelerator Related Codes (SPARC) graphical user interface. A small user group has been testing and evaluating the prototype for about a year. Several enhancements and improvements are now being developed. The current version (1.1) of ASM is briefly described and an example of the modeling and analysis capabilities is illustrated.

  19. Advanced computational tools for 3-D seismic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Barhen, J.; Glover, C.W.; Protopopescu, V.A.

    1996-06-01

    The global objective of this effort is to develop advanced computational tools for 3-D seismic analysis, and test the products using a model dataset developed under the joint aegis of the United States` Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) and the European Association of Exploration Geophysicists (EAEG). The goal is to enhance the value to the oil industry of the SEG/EAEG modeling project, carried out with US Department of Energy (DOE) funding in FY` 93-95. The primary objective of the ORNL Center for Engineering Systems Advanced Research (CESAR) is to spearhead the computational innovations techniques that would enable a revolutionary advance in 3-D seismic analysis. The CESAR effort is carried out in collaboration with world-class domain experts from leading universities, and in close coordination with other national laboratories and oil industry partners.

  20. Improved seismic data analysis tool in hydrogeophysical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholtz, P.

    2003-04-01

    To study the near-surface environment several geophysical measurement techniques exist. Seismic methods are widely and successfully used to aid the solution of different geological tasks. Unfortunately the financial background of environmental related efforts are limited, hence it is vital to get the most information out of our geophysical field data. Hydrogeological investigations require special accuracy and resolution from the applied seismic methods. A dispersion analysis tool will be presented, which is insensitive to inaccuracies, works under noisy conditions and can separate close arrivals. We show a wavelet transformation based method, where the choice of the appropriate basic wavelet improves the quality of the results. Applying this analysis technique to the inversion of frequency-velocity functions of wave guiding sequences or in mapping inhomogeneities of the near-surface by group traveltime tomography will yield to more reliable physical parameters needed by hydrogeologists.

  1. PyRAT (python radiography analysis tool): overview

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Jerawan C; Temple, Brian A; Buescher, Kevin L

    2011-01-14

    PyRAT was developed as a quantitative tool for robustly characterizing objects from radiographs to solve problems such as the hybrid nonlinear inverse problem. The optimization software library that was used is the nonsmooth optimization by MADS algorithm (NOMAD). Some of PyRAT's features are: (1) hybrid nonlinear inverse problem with calculated x-ray spectrum and detector response; (2) optimization based inversion approach with goal of identifying unknown object configurations - MVO problem; (3) using functionalities of Python libraries for radiographic image processing and analysis; (4) using the Tikhonov regularization method of linear inverse problem to recover partial information of object configurations; (5) using a priori knowledge of problem solutions to define feasible region and discrete neighbor for the MVO problem - initial data analysis + material library {yields} a priori knowledge; and (6) using the NOMAD (C++ version) software in the object.

  2. Stacks: an analysis tool set for population genomics

    PubMed Central

    CATCHEN, JULIAN; HOHENLOHE, PAUL A.; BASSHAM, SUSAN; AMORES, ANGEL; CRESKO, WILLIAM A.

    2014-01-01

    Massively parallel short-read sequencing technologies, coupled with powerful software platforms, are enabling investigators to analyse tens of thousands of genetic markers. This wealth of data is rapidly expanding and allowing biological questions to be addressed with unprecedented scope and precision. The sizes of the data sets are now posing significant data processing and analysis challenges. Here we describe an extension of the Stacks software package to efficiently use genotype-by-sequencing data for studies of populations of organisms. Stacks now produces core population genomic summary statistics and SNP-by-SNP statistical tests. These statistics can be analysed across a reference genome using a smoothed sliding window. Stacks also now provides several output formats for several commonly used downstream analysis packages. The expanded population genomics functions in Stacks will make it a useful tool to harness the newest generation of massively parallel genotyping data for ecological and evolutionary genetics. PMID:23701397

  3. The Climate Data Analysis Tools (CDAT): Scientific Discovery Made Easy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doutriaux, C. M.; Williams, D. N.; Drach, R. S.; McCoy, R. B.; Mlaker, V.

    2008-12-01

    In recent years, amount of data available to climate scientists has grown exponentially. Whether we're looking at the increasing number of organizations providing data, the finer resolutions of climate models, or the escalating number of experiments and realizations for those experiments, every aspect of climate research leads to an unprecedented growth of the volume of data to analyze. The recent success and visibility of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Annual Report 4 (IPCC AR4) is boosting the demand to unprecedented levels and keeping the numbers increasing. Meanwhile, technology available for scientists to analyze the data has remained largely unchanged since the early days. One tool, however, has proven itself flexible enough not only to follow the trend of escalating demand, but also to be ahead of the game: the Climate Data Analysis Tools (CDAT) from the Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Comparison (PCMDI). While providing the cutting edge technology necessary to distribute the IPCC AR4 data via the Earth System Grid, PCMDI has continuously evolved CDAT to handle new grids and higher definitions, and provide new diagnostics. In the near future, in time for AR5, PCMDI will use CDAT for state-of-the-art remote data analysis in a grid computing environment.

  4. Ganalyzer: A Tool for Automatic Galaxy Image Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamir, Lior

    2011-08-01

    We describe Ganalyzer, a model-based tool that can automatically analyze and classify galaxy images. Ganalyzer works by separating the galaxy pixels from the background pixels, finding the center and radius of the galaxy, generating the radial intensity plot, and then computing the slopes of the peaks detected in the radial intensity plot to measure the spirality of the galaxy and determine its morphological class. Unlike algorithms that are based on machine learning, Ganalyzer is based on measuring the spirality of the galaxy, a task that is difficult to perform manually, and in many cases can provide a more accurate analysis compared to manual observation. Ganalyzer is simple to use, and can be easily embedded into other image analysis applications. Another advantage is its speed, which allows it to analyze ~10,000,000 galaxy images in five days using a standard modern desktop computer. These capabilities can make Ganalyzer a useful tool in analyzing large data sets of galaxy images collected by autonomous sky surveys such as SDSS, LSST, or DES. The software is available for free download at http://vfacstaff.ltu.edu/lshamir/downloads/ganalyzer, and the data used in the experiment are available at http://vfacstaff.ltu.edu/lshamir/downloads/ganalyzer/GalaxyImages.zip.

  5. GANALYZER: A TOOL FOR AUTOMATIC GALAXY IMAGE ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Shamir, Lior

    2011-08-01

    We describe Ganalyzer, a model-based tool that can automatically analyze and classify galaxy images. Ganalyzer works by separating the galaxy pixels from the background pixels, finding the center and radius of the galaxy, generating the radial intensity plot, and then computing the slopes of the peaks detected in the radial intensity plot to measure the spirality of the galaxy and determine its morphological class. Unlike algorithms that are based on machine learning, Ganalyzer is based on measuring the spirality of the galaxy, a task that is difficult to perform manually, and in many cases can provide a more accurate analysis compared to manual observation. Ganalyzer is simple to use, and can be easily embedded into other image analysis applications. Another advantage is its speed, which allows it to analyze {approx}10,000,000 galaxy images in five days using a standard modern desktop computer. These capabilities can make Ganalyzer a useful tool in analyzing large data sets of galaxy images collected by autonomous sky surveys such as SDSS, LSST, or DES. The software is available for free download at http://vfacstaff.ltu.edu/lshamir/downloads/ganalyzer, and the data used in the experiment are available at http://vfacstaff.ltu.edu/lshamir/downloads/ganalyzer/GalaxyImages.zip.

  6. CRITICA: coding region identification tool invoking comparative analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badger, J. H.; Olsen, G. J.; Woese, C. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Gene recognition is essential to understanding existing and future DNA sequence data. CRITICA (Coding Region Identification Tool Invoking Comparative Analysis) is a suite of programs for identifying likely protein-coding sequences in DNA by combining comparative analysis of DNA sequences with more common noncomparative methods. In the comparative component of the analysis, regions of DNA are aligned with related sequences from the DNA databases; if the translation of the aligned sequences has greater amino acid identity than expected for the observed percentage nucleotide identity, this is interpreted as evidence for coding. CRITICA also incorporates noncomparative information derived from the relative frequencies of hexanucleotides in coding frames versus other contexts (i.e., dicodon bias). The dicodon usage information is derived by iterative analysis of the data, such that CRITICA is not dependent on the existence or accuracy of coding sequence annotations in the databases. This independence makes the method particularly well suited for the analysis of novel genomes. CRITICA was tested by analyzing the available Salmonella typhimurium DNA sequences. Its predictions were compared with the DNA sequence annotations and with the predictions of GenMark. CRITICA proved to be more accurate than GenMark, and moreover, many of its predictions that would seem to be errors instead reflect problems in the sequence databases. The source code of CRITICA is freely available by anonymous FTP (rdp.life.uiuc.edu in/pub/critica) and on the World Wide Web (http:/(/)rdpwww.life.uiuc.edu).

  7. Improved Cell Typing by Charge-State Deconvolution of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization Mass Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkes, Jon G.; Buzantu, Dan A.; Dare, Diane J.; Dragan, Yvonne P.; Chiarelli, M. Paul; Holland, Ricky D.; Beaudoin, Michael; Heinze, Thomas M.; Nayak, Rajesh; Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.

    2006-05-30

    Robust, specific, and rapid identification of toxic strains of bacteria and viruses, to guide the mitigation of their adverse health effects and optimum implementation of other response actions, remains a major analytical challenge. This need has driven the development of methods for classification of microorganisms using mass spectrometry, particularly matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization MS (MALDI) that allows high throughput analyses with minimum sample preparation. We describe a novel approach to cell typing based on pattern recognition of MALDI spectra, which involves charge-state deconvolution in conjunction with a new correlation analysis procedure. The method is applicable to both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Charge-state deconvolution improves the quantitative reproducibility of spectra because multiply-charged ions resulting from the same biomarker attaching a different number of protons are recognized and their abundances are combined. This allows a clearer distinction of bacterial strains or of cancerous and normal liver cells. Improved class distinction provided by charge-state deconvolution was demonstrated by cluster spacing on canonical variate score charts and by correlation analyses. Deconvolution may enhance detection of early disease state or therapy progress markers in various tissues analyzed by MALDI.

  8. Receiver function deconvolution using transdimensional hierarchical Bayesian inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, J. M.; Lekić, V.

    2014-06-01

    Teleseismic waves can convert from shear to compressional (Sp) or compressional to shear (Ps) across impedance contrasts in the subsurface. Deconvolving the parent waveforms (P for Ps or S for Sp) from the daughter waveforms (S for Ps or P for Sp) generates receiver functions which can be used to analyse velocity structure beneath the receiver. Though a variety of deconvolution techniques have been developed, they are all adversely affected by background and signal-generated noise. In order to take into account the unknown noise characteristics, we propose a method based on transdimensional hierarchical Bayesian inference in which both the noise magnitude and noise spectral character are parameters in calculating the likelihood probability distribution. We use a reversible-jump implementation of a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm to find an ensemble of receiver functions whose relative fits to the data have been calculated while simultaneously inferring the values of the noise parameters. Our noise parametrization is determined from pre-event noise so that it approximates observed noise characteristics. We test the algorithm on synthetic waveforms contaminated with noise generated from a covariance matrix obtained from observed noise. We show that the method retrieves easily interpretable receiver functions even in the presence of high noise levels. We also show that we can obtain useful estimates of noise amplitude and frequency content. Analysis of the ensemble solutions produced by our method can be used to quantify the uncertainties associated with individual receiver functions as well as with individual features within them, providing an objective way for deciding which features warrant geological interpretation. This method should make possible more robust inferences on subsurface structure using receiver function analysis, especially in areas of poor data coverage or under noisy station conditions.

  9. Design and Analysis Tool for External-Compression Supersonic Inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, John W.

    2012-01-01

    A computational tool named SUPIN has been developed to design and analyze external-compression supersonic inlets for aircraft at cruise speeds from Mach 1.6 to 2.0. The inlet types available include the axisymmetric outward-turning, two-dimensional single-duct, two-dimensional bifurcated-duct, and streamline-traced Busemann inlets. The aerodynamic performance is characterized by the flow rates, total pressure recovery, and drag. The inlet flowfield is divided into parts to provide a framework for the geometry and aerodynamic modeling and the parts are defined in terms of geometric factors. The low-fidelity aerodynamic analysis and design methods are based on analytic, empirical, and numerical methods which provide for quick analysis. SUPIN provides inlet geometry in the form of coordinates and surface grids useable by grid generation methods for higher-fidelity computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. SUPIN is demonstrated through a series of design studies and CFD analyses were performed to verify some of the analysis results.

  10. Second generation sequencing allows for mtDNA mixture deconvolution and high resolution detection of heteroplasmy

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Mitchell M.; McQuillan, Megan R.; O’Hanlon, Katherine A.

    2011-01-01

    Aim To use parallel array pyrosequencing to deconvolute mixtures of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence and provide high resolution analysis of mtDNA heteroplasmy. Methods The hypervariable segment 1 (HV1) of the mtDNA control region was analyzed from 30 individuals using the 454 GS Junior instrument. Mock mixtures were used to evaluate the system’s ability to deconvolute mixtures and to reliably detect heteroplasmy, including heteroplasmic differences between 5 family members of the same maternal lineage. Amplicon sequencing was performed on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products generated with primers that included multiplex identifiers (MID) and adaptors for pyrosequencing. Data analysis was performed using NextGENe® software. The analysis of an autosomal short tandem repeat (STR) locus (D18S51) and a Y-STR locus (DYS389 I/II) was performed simultaneously with a portion of HV1 to illustrate that multiplexing can encompass different markers of forensic interest. Results Mixtures, including heteroplasmic variants, can be detected routinely down to a component ratio of 1:250 (20 minor variant copies with a coverage rate of 5000 sequences) and can be readily detected down to 1:1000 (0.1%) with expanded coverage. Amplicon sequences from D18S51, DYS389 I/II, and the second half of HV1 were successfully partitioned and analyzed. Conclusions The ability to routinely deconvolute mtDNA mixtures down to a level of 1:250 allows for high resolution analysis of mtDNA heteroplasmy, and for differentiation of individuals from the same maternal lineage. The pyrosequencing approach results in poor resolution of homopolymeric sequences, and PCR/sequencing artifacts require a filtering mechanism similar to that for STR stutter and spectral bleed through. In addition, chimeric sequences from jumping PCR must be addressed to make the method operational. PMID:21674826

  11. Assessing Extremes Climatology Using NWS Local Climate Analysis Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeyeva, M. M.; Hollingshead, A.; Hilderbrand, D.; Mayes, B.; Hartley, T.; Kempf McGavock, N. M.; Lau, E.; Olenic, E. A.; Motta, B.; Bunge, R.; Brown, L. E.; Fritsch, F.

    2010-12-01

    The Local Climate Analysis Tool (LCAT) is evolving out of a need to support and enhance the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Weather Service (NWS) field offices’ ability to access, manipulate, and interpret local climate data and characterize climate variability and change impacts. LCAT will enable NWS Regional Headquarters, Weather Forecast Offices, Weather Service Offices, and River Forecast Centers the ability to conduct regional and local climate studies using station and reanalysis gridded data and various statistical techniques for climate analysis. The analysis results will be used for climate services to guide local decision makers in weather and climate sensitive actions and to deliver information to the general public. Field offices need standardized, scientifically sound methodology for local climate analysis (such as trend, composites, and principal statistical and time-series analysis) that is comprehensive, accessible, and efficient, with the potential to expand with growing NOAA Climate Services needs. The methodology for climate analyses is practiced by the NWS Climate Prediction Center (CPC), NOAA National Climatic Data Center, and NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, as well as NWS field office staff. LCAT will extend this practice at the local level, allowing it to become both widespread and standardized, and thus improve NWS climate services capabilities. LCAT focus is on the local scale (as opposed to national and global scales of CPC products). The LCAT will: -Improve professional competency of local office staff and expertise in providing local information to their users. LCAT will improve quality of local climate services -Ensure adequate local input to CPC products that depend on local information, such as the U.S. Drought Monitor. LCAT will allow improvement of CPC climate products -Allow testing of local climate variables beyond temperature averages and precipitation totals such as climatology of

  12. Risk D&D Rapid Prototype: Scenario Documentation and Analysis Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Unwin, Stephen D.; Seiple, Timothy E.

    2009-05-28

    Report describes process and methodology associated with a rapid prototype tool for integrating project risk analysis and health & safety risk analysis for decontamination and decommissioning projects.

  13. A Decision Analysis Tool for Climate Impacts, Adaptations, and Vulnerabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Omitaomu, Olufemi A; Parish, Esther S; Nugent, Philip J

    2016-01-01

    Climate change related extreme events (such as flooding, storms, and drought) are already impacting millions of people globally at a cost of billions of dollars annually. Hence, there are urgent needs for urban areas to develop adaptation strategies that will alleviate the impacts of these extreme events. However, lack of appropriate decision support tools that match local applications is limiting local planning efforts. In this paper, we present a quantitative analysis and optimization system with customized decision support modules built on geographic information system (GIS) platform to bridge this gap. This platform is called Urban Climate Adaptation Tool (Urban-CAT). For all Urban-CAT models, we divide a city into a grid with tens of thousands of cells; then compute a list of metrics for each cell from the GIS data. These metrics are used as independent variables to predict climate impacts, compute vulnerability score, and evaluate adaptation options. Overall, the Urban-CAT system has three layers: data layer (that contains spatial data, socio-economic and environmental data, and analytic data), middle layer (that handles data processing, model management, and GIS operation), and application layer (that provides climate impacts forecast, adaptation optimization, and site evaluation). The Urban-CAT platform can guide city and county governments in identifying and planning for effective climate change adaptation strategies.

  14. Verification and Validation of the General Mission Analysis Tool (GMAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Steven P.; Qureshi, Rizwan H.; Cooley, D. Steven; Parker, Joel J. K.; Grubb, Thomas G.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the processes and results of Verification and Validation (V&V) efforts for the General Mission Analysis Tool (GMAT). We describe the test program and environments, the tools used for independent test data, and comparison results. The V&V effort produced approximately 13,000 test scripts that are run as part of the nightly buildtest process. In addition, we created approximately 3000 automated GUI tests that are run every two weeks. Presenting all test results are beyond the scope of a single paper. Here we present high-level test results in most areas, and detailed test results for key areas. The final product of the V&V effort presented in this paper was GMAT version R2013a, the first Gold release of the software with completely updated documentation and greatly improved quality. Release R2013a was the staging release for flight qualification performed at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) ultimately resulting in GMAT version R2013b.

  15. Analysis and specification tools in relation to the APSE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, John W.

    1986-01-01

    Ada and the Ada Programming Support Environment (APSE) specifically address the phases of the system/software life cycle which follow after the user's problem was translated into system and software development specifications. The waterfall model of the life cycle identifies the analysis and requirements definition phases as preceeding program design and coding. Since Ada is a programming language and the APSE is a programming support environment, they are primarily targeted to support program (code) development, tecting, and maintenance. The use of Ada based or Ada related specification languages (SLs) and program design languages (PDLs) can extend the use of Ada back into the software design phases of the life cycle. Recall that the standardization of the APSE as a programming support environment is only now happening after many years of evolutionary experience with diverse sets of programming support tools. Restricting consideration to one, or even a few chosen specification and design tools, could be a real mistake for an organization or a major project such as the Space Station, which will need to deal with an increasingly complex level of system problems. To require that everything be Ada-like, be implemented in Ada, run directly under the APSE, and fit into a rigid waterfall model of the life cycle would turn a promising support environment into a straight jacket for progress.

  16. Multi-Mission Power Analysis Tool (MMPAT) Version 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Eric G.; Chang, George W.; Chen, Fannie C.

    2012-01-01

    The Multi-Mission Power Analysis Tool (MMPAT) simulates a spacecraft power subsystem including the power source (solar array and/or radioisotope thermoelectric generator), bus-voltage control, secondary battery (lithium-ion or nickel-hydrogen), thermostatic heaters, and power-consuming equipment. It handles multiple mission types including heliocentric orbiters, planetary orbiters, and surface operations. Being parametrically driven along with its user-programmable features can reduce or even eliminate any need for software modifications when configuring it for a particular spacecraft. It provides multiple levels of fidelity, thereby fulfilling the vast majority of a project s power simulation needs throughout the lifecycle. It can operate in a stand-alone mode with a graphical user interface, in batch mode, or as a library linked with other tools. This software can simulate all major aspects of a spacecraft power subsystem. It is parametrically driven to reduce or eliminate the need for a programmer. Added flexibility is provided through user-designed state models and table-driven parameters. MMPAT is designed to be used by a variety of users, such as power subsystem engineers for sizing power subsystem components; mission planners for adjusting mission scenarios using power profiles generated by the model; system engineers for performing system- level trade studies using the results of the model during the early design phases of a spacecraft; and operations personnel for high-fidelity modeling of the essential power aspect of the planning picture.

  17. Deconvolution of astronomical images using SOR with adaptive relaxation.

    PubMed

    Vorontsov, S V; Strakhov, V N; Jefferies, S M; Borelli, K J

    2011-07-01

    We address the potential performance of the successive overrelaxation technique (SOR) in image deconvolution, focusing our attention on the restoration of astronomical images distorted by atmospheric turbulence. SOR is the classical Gauss-Seidel iteration, supplemented with relaxation. As indicated by earlier work, the convergence properties of SOR, and its ultimate performance in the deconvolution of blurred and noisy images, can be made competitive to other iterative techniques, including conjugate gradients, by a proper choice of the relaxation parameter. The question of how to choose the relaxation parameter, however, remained open, and in the practical work one had to rely on experimentation. In this paper, using constructive (rather than exact) arguments, we suggest a simple strategy for choosing the relaxation parameter and for updating its value in consecutive iterations to optimize the performance of the SOR algorithm (and its positivity-constrained version, +SOR) at finite iteration counts. We suggest an extension of the algorithm to the notoriously difficult problem of "blind" deconvolution, where both the true object and the point-spread function have to be recovered from the blurred image. We report the results of numerical inversions with artificial and real data, where the algorithm is compared with techniques based on conjugate gradients. In all of our experiments +SOR provides the highest quality results. In addition +SOR is found to be able to detect moderately small changes in the true object between separate data frames: an important quality for multi-frame blind deconvolution where stationarity of the object is a necesessity. PMID:21747506

  18. Blind deconvolution subject to sparse representation for fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Dai, Qionghai; Cai, Qiang; Guo, Peiyuan; Liu, Zaiwen

    2013-01-01

    Blind deconvolution is an effective fluorescence microscopic image processing technique to improve the quality of degraded digital images resulting from photon counting noise and out-of-focus blur. For solving the severely ill-posed problem of deconvolution, in this paper we propose an alternate minimized blind deconvolution method which considers sparse representation as constraint condition to confine the solution space of traditional Richardson-Lucy method and Gaussian model as initial value of point spread function (PSF). We assume that Poisson noise is dominating during the course of imaging. The maximum-likelihood estimation on a fluorescence image and corresponding point spread function (PSF) is developed. By solving the Euler-Lagrange equation of the total cost function, including the data term obtained by the hypothetical Poisson noise distribution model and the regularized term corresponding to the sparse representation constraint, and using gradient descent method we can get the iterative equations of the original fluorescence image and PSF respectively. Compared with the related blind deconvolution methods, our model shows superior performance in terms of both objective criteria and subjective human vision via processing simulated and real fluorescence microscopic degraded images.

  19. Machine learning deconvolution filter kernels for image restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mainali, Pradip; Wittebrood, Rimmert

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel algorithm to recover a sharp image from its corrupted form by deconvolution. The algorithm learns the deconvolution process. This is achieved by learning the deconvolution filter kernels for the set of learnt basic pixel patterns. The algorithm consists of the offline learning and online filtering stages. In the one-time offline learning stage, the algorithm learns the dictionary of various local characteristics of the pixel patch as the basic pixel patterns from a huge number of natural images in the training database. Later, the deconvolution filter coefficients for each pixel pattern is optimized by using the source and the corrupted image pairs in the training database. In the online stage, the algorithm only needs to find the nearest matching pixel pattern in the dictionary for each pixel and filter it using the filter optimized for the corresponding pixel pattern. Experimental results on natural images show that our method achieves the state-of-art result on an image deblurring. The proposed approach can be applied to recover a sharp image for applications such as camera, HD/UHD TV, document scanning systems etc.

  20. Validation of tool mark analysis of cut costal cartilage.

    PubMed

    Love, Jennifer C; Derrick, Sharon M; Wiersema, Jason M; Peters, Charles

    2012-03-01

    This study was designed to establish the potential error rate associated with the generally accepted method of tool mark analysis of cut marks in costal cartilage. Three knives with different blade types were used to make experimental cut marks in costal cartilage of pigs. Each cut surface was cast, and each cast was examined by three analysts working independently. The presence of striations, regularity of striations, and presence of a primary and secondary striation pattern were recorded for each cast. The distance between each striation was measured. The results showed that striations were not consistently impressed on the cut surface by the blade's cutting edge. Also, blade type classification by the presence or absence of striations led to a 65% misclassification rate. Use of the classification tree and cross-validation methods and inclusion of the mean interstriation distance decreased the error rate to c. 50%. PMID:22081951

  1. Gnome--an Internet-based sequence analysis tool.

    PubMed

    Nakai, K; Tokimori, T; Ogiwara, A; Uchiyama, I; Niiyama, T

    1994-09-01

    Gnome (GenomeNet Open Mail-service Environment) is a sequence analysis tool that enables an end-user to make use of several Internet- (mainly e-mail) based services with an easy-to-use graphical user interface. Users can conduct homology and motif searches, and database-entry retrieval against the latest databases by emitting search requests to and receiving their results form a search-server by e-mail. The search results are viewed and managed efficiently with this system. The Macintosh and X (Motif) versions of the Gnome client and the UNIX version of the Gnome server are available to academic users free of charge. PMID:7828072

  2. Input Range Testing for the General Mission Analysis Tool (GMAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Steven P.

    2007-01-01

    This document contains a test plan for testing input values to the General Mission Analysis Tool (GMAT). The plan includes four primary types of information, which rigorously define all tests that should be performed to validate that GMAT will accept allowable inputs and deny disallowed inputs. The first is a complete list of all allowed object fields in GMAT. The second type of information, is test input to be attempted for each field. The third type of information is allowable input values for all objects fields in GMAT. The final piece of information is how GMAT should respond to both valid and invalid information. It is VERY important to note that the tests below must be performed for both the Graphical User Interface and the script!! The examples are illustrated using a scripting perspective, because it is simpler to write up. However, the test must be performed for both interfaces to GMAT.

  3. System-of-Systems Technology-Portfolio-Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neil, Daniel; Mankins, John; Feingold, Harvey; Johnson, Wayne

    2012-01-01

    Advanced Technology Life-cycle Analysis System (ATLAS) is a system-of-systems technology-portfolio-analysis software tool. ATLAS affords capabilities to (1) compare estimates of the mass and cost of an engineering system based on competing technological concepts; (2) estimate life-cycle costs of an outer-space-exploration architecture for a specified technology portfolio; (3) collect data on state-of-the-art and forecasted technology performance, and on operations and programs; and (4) calculate an index of the relative programmatic value of a technology portfolio. ATLAS facilitates analysis by providing a library of analytical spreadsheet models for a variety of systems. A single analyst can assemble a representation of a system of systems from the models and build a technology portfolio. Each system model estimates mass, and life-cycle costs are estimated by a common set of cost models. Other components of ATLAS include graphical-user-interface (GUI) software, algorithms for calculating the aforementioned index, a technology database, a report generator, and a form generator for creating the GUI for the system models. At the time of this reporting, ATLAS is a prototype, embodied in Microsoft Excel and several thousand lines of Visual Basic for Applications that run on both Windows and Macintosh computers.

  4. Breast image feature learning with adaptive deconvolutional networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamieson, Andrew R.; Drukker, Karen; Giger, Maryellen L.

    2012-03-01

    Feature extraction is a critical component of medical image analysis. Many computer-aided diagnosis approaches employ hand-designed, heuristic lesion extracted features. An alternative approach is to learn features directly from images. In this preliminary study, we explored the use of Adaptive Deconvolutional Networks (ADN) for learning high-level features in diagnostic breast mass lesion images with potential application to computer-aided diagnosis (CADx) and content-based image retrieval (CBIR). ADNs (Zeiler, et. al., 2011), are recently-proposed unsupervised, generative hierarchical models that decompose images via convolution sparse coding and max pooling. We trained the ADNs to learn multiple layers of representation for two breast image data sets on two different modalities (739 full field digital mammography (FFDM) and 2393 ultrasound images). Feature map calculations were accelerated by use of GPUs. Following Zeiler et. al., we applied the Spatial Pyramid Matching (SPM) kernel (Lazebnik, et. al., 2006) on the inferred feature maps and combined this with a linear support vector machine (SVM) classifier for the task of binary classification between cancer and non-cancer breast mass lesions. Non-linear, local structure preserving dimension reduction, Elastic Embedding (Carreira-Perpiñán, 2010), was then used to visualize the SPM kernel output in 2D and qualitatively inspect image relationships learned. Performance was found to be competitive with current CADx schemes that use human-designed features, e.g., achieving a 0.632+ bootstrap AUC (by case) of 0.83 [0.78, 0.89] for an ultrasound image set (1125 cases).

  5. TARGET - TASK ANALYSIS REPORT GENERATION TOOL, VERSION 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortiz, C. J.

    1994-01-01

    The Task Analysis Report Generation Tool, TARGET, is a graphical interface tool used to capture procedural knowledge and translate that knowledge into a hierarchical report. TARGET is based on VISTA, a knowledge acquisition tool developed by the Naval Systems Training Center. TARGET assists a programmer and/or task expert organize and understand the steps involved in accomplishing a task. The user can label individual steps in the task through a dialogue-box and get immediate graphical feedback for analysis. TARGET users can decompose tasks into basic action kernels or minimal steps to provide a clear picture of all basic actions needed to accomplish a job. This method allows the user to go back and critically examine the overall flow and makeup of the process. The user can switch between graphics (box flow diagrams) and text (task hierarchy) versions to more easily study the process being documented. As the practice of decomposition continues, tasks and their subtasks can be continually modified to more accurately reflect the user's procedures and rationale. This program is designed to help a programmer document an expert's task thus allowing the programmer to build an expert system which can help others perform the task. Flexibility is a key element of the system design and of the knowledge acquisition session. If the expert is not able to find time to work on the knowledge acquisition process with the program developer, the developer and subject matter expert may work in iterative sessions. TARGET is easy to use and is tailored to accommodate users ranging from the novice to the experienced expert systems builder. TARGET is written in C-language for IBM PC series and compatible computers running MS-DOS and Microsoft Windows version 3.0 or 3.1. No source code is supplied. The executable also requires 2Mb of RAM, a Microsoft compatible mouse, a VGA display and an 80286, 386 or 486 processor machine. The standard distribution medium for TARGET is one 5.25 inch 360K

  6. Usage of a Responsible Gambling Tool: A Descriptive Analysis and Latent Class Analysis of User Behavior.

    PubMed

    Forsström, David; Hesser, Hugo; Carlbring, Per

    2016-09-01

    Gambling is a common pastime around the world. Most gamblers can engage in gambling activities without negative consequences, but some run the risk of developing an excessive gambling pattern. Excessive gambling has severe negative economic and psychological consequences, which makes the development of responsible gambling strategies vital to protecting individuals from these risks. One such strategy is responsible gambling (RG) tools. These tools track an individual's gambling history and supplies personalized feedback and might be one way to decrease excessive gambling behavior. However, research is lacking in this area and little is known about the usage of these tools. The aim of this article is to describe user behavior and to investigate if there are different subclasses of users by conducting a latent class analysis. The user behaviour of 9528 online gamblers who voluntarily used a RG tool was analysed. Number of visits to the site, self-tests made, and advice used were the observed variables included in the latent class analysis. Descriptive statistics show that overall the functions of the tool had a high initial usage and a low repeated usage. Latent class analysis yielded five distinct classes of users: self-testers, multi-function users, advice users, site visitors, and non-users. Multinomial regression revealed that classes were associated with different risk levels of excessive gambling. The self-testers and multi-function users used the tool to a higher extent and were found to have a greater risk of excessive gambling than the other classes. PMID:26753878

  7. Lagrangian analysis. Modern tool of the dynamics of solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cagnoux, J.; Chartagnac, P.; Hereil, P.; Perez, M.; Seaman, L.

    Explosive metal-working, material synthesis under shock loading, terminal ballistics, and explosive rock-blasting, are some of the civil and military fields of activity that call for a wider knowledge about the behavior of materials subjected to strong dynamic pressures. It is in these fields that Lagrangian analysis methods, the subject of this work, prove to be a useful investigative tool for the physicist. Lagrangian analysis was developed around 1970 by Fowles and Williams. The idea is based on the integration of the conservation equations of mechanics using stress or particle velocity records obtained by means of transducers placed in the path of a stress wave. In this way, all the kinematical and mechanical quantities contained in the conservation equations are obtained. In the first chapter the authors introduce the mathematical tools used to analyze plane and spherical one-dimensional motions. For plane motion, they describe the mathematical analysis methods pertinent to the three regimes of wave propagation encountered : the non-attenuating unsteady wave, the simple wave, and the attenuating unsteady wave. In each of these regimes, cases are treated for which either stress or particle velocity records are initially available. The authors insist that one or the other groups of data (stress and particle velocity) are sufficient to integrate the conservation equations in the case of the plane motion when both groups of data are necessary in the case of the spherical motion. However, in spite of this additional difficulty, Lagrangian analysis of the spherical motion remains particularly interesting for the physicist because it allows access to the behavior of the material under deformation processes other than that imposed by plane one-dimensional motion. The methods expounded in the first chapter are based on Lagrangian measurement of particle velocity and stress in relation to time in a material compressed by a plane or spherical dilatational wave. The

  8. Quantifying traces of tool use: a novel morphometric analysis of damage patterns on percussive tools.

    PubMed

    Caruana, Matthew V; Carvalho, Susana; Braun, David R; Presnyakova, Darya; Haslam, Michael; Archer, Will; Bobe, Rene; Harris, John W K

    2014-01-01

    Percussive technology continues to play an increasingly important role in understanding the evolution of tool use. Comparing the archaeological record with extractive foraging behaviors in nonhuman primates has focused on percussive implements as a key to investigating the origins of lithic technology. Despite this, archaeological approaches towards percussive tools have been obscured by a lack of standardized methodologies. Central to this issue have been the use of qualitative, non-diagnostic techniques to identify percussive tools from archaeological contexts. Here we describe a new morphometric method for distinguishing anthropogenically-generated damage patterns on percussive tools from naturally damaged river cobbles. We employ a geomatic approach through the use of three-dimensional scanning and geographical information systems software to statistically quantify the identification process in percussive technology research. This will strengthen current technological analyses of percussive tools in archaeological frameworks and open new avenues for translating behavioral inferences of early hominins from percussive damage patterns. PMID:25415303

  9. Quantifying Traces of Tool Use: A Novel Morphometric Analysis of Damage Patterns on Percussive Tools

    PubMed Central

    Caruana, Matthew V.; Carvalho, Susana; Braun, David R.; Presnyakova, Darya; Haslam, Michael; Archer, Will; Bobe, Rene; Harris, John W. K.

    2014-01-01

    Percussive technology continues to play an increasingly important role in understanding the evolution of tool use. Comparing the archaeological record with extractive foraging behaviors in nonhuman primates has focused on percussive implements as a key to investigating the origins of lithic technology. Despite this, archaeological approaches towards percussive tools have been obscured by a lack of standardized methodologies. Central to this issue have been the use of qualitative, non-diagnostic techniques to identify percussive tools from archaeological contexts. Here we describe a new morphometric method for distinguishing anthropogenically-generated damage patterns on percussive tools from naturally damaged river cobbles. We employ a geomatic approach through the use of three-dimensional scanning and geographical information systems software to statistically quantify the identification process in percussive technology research. This will strengthen current technological analyses of percussive tools in archaeological frameworks and open new avenues for translating behavioral inferences of early hominins from percussive damage patterns. PMID:25415303

  10. A method of PSF generation for 3D brightfield deconvolution.

    PubMed

    Tadrous, P J

    2010-02-01

    This paper addresses the problem of 3D deconvolution of through focus widefield microscope datasets (Z-stacks). One of the most difficult stages in brightfield deconvolution is finding the point spread function. A theoretically calculated point spread function (called a 'synthetic PSF' in this paper) requires foreknowledge of many system parameters and still gives only approximate results. A point spread function measured from a sub-resolution bead suffers from low signal-to-noise ratio, compounded in the brightfield setting (by contrast to fluorescence) by absorptive, refractive and dispersal effects. This paper describes a method of point spread function estimation based on measurements of a Z-stack through a thin sample. This Z-stack is deconvolved by an idealized point spread function derived from the same Z-stack to yield a point spread function of high signal-to-noise ratio that is also inherently tailored to the imaging system. The theory is validated by a practical experiment comparing the non-blind 3D deconvolution of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae with the point spread function generated using the method presented in this paper (called the 'extracted PSF') to a synthetic point spread function. Restoration of both high- and low-contrast brightfield structures is achieved with fewer artefacts using the extracted point spread function obtained with this method. Furthermore the deconvolution progresses further (more iterations are allowed before the error function reaches its nadir) with the extracted point spread function compared to the synthetic point spread function indicating that the extracted point spread function is a better fit to the brightfield deconvolution model than the synthetic point spread function. PMID:20096049

  11. Fluence estimation by deconvolution via l1-norm minimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García Hernández, J. C.; Lazaro-Ponthus, D.; Gmar, M.; Barthe, J.

    2011-03-01

    Advances in radiotherapy irradiation techniques have led to very complex treatments requiring for a more stringent control. The dosimetric properties of electronic portal imaging devices (EPID) encouraged their use for treatment verification. Two main approaches have been proposed: the forward approach, where measured portal dose images are compared to predicted dose images and the backward approach, where EPID images are used to estimate the dose delivered to the patient. Both approaches need EPID images to be converted into a fluence distribution by deconvolution. However, deconvolution is an ill-posed problem which is very sensitive to small variations on input data. This study presents the application of a deconvolution method based on l1-norm minimization; this is a method known for being very stable while working with noisy data. The algorithm was first evaluated on synthetic images with different noise levels, the results were satisfactory. Deconvolution algorithm was then applied to experimental portal images; the required EPID response kernel and energy fluence images were computed by Monte-Carlo calculation, accelerator treatment head and EPID models had already been commissioned in a previous work. The obtained fluence images were in good agreement with simulated fluence images. This deconvolution algorithm may be generalized to an inverse problem with a general operator, where image formation is not longer modeled by a convolution but by a linear operation that might be seen as a position-dependent convolution. Moreover, this procedure would be detector independent and could be used for any detector type provided its response function is known.

  12. Generalized Analysis Tools for Multi-Spacecraft Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanteur, G. M.

    2011-12-01

    Analysis tools for multi-spacecraft missions like CLUSTER or MMS have been designed since the end of the 90's to estimate gradients of fields or to characterize discontinuities crossed by a cluster of spacecraft. Different approaches have been presented and discussed in the book "Analysis Methods for Multi-Spacecraft Data" published as Scientific Report 001 of the International Space Science Institute in Bern, Switzerland (G. Paschmann and P. Daly Eds., 1998). On one hand the approach using methods of least squares has the advantage to apply to any number of spacecraft [1] but is not convenient to perform analytical computation especially when considering the error analysis. On the other hand the barycentric approach is powerful as it provides simple analytical formulas involving the reciprocal vectors of the tetrahedron [2] but appears limited to clusters of four spacecraft. Moreover the barycentric approach allows to derive theoretical formulas for errors affecting the estimators built from the reciprocal vectors [2,3,4]. Following a first generalization of reciprocal vectors proposed by Vogt et al [4] and despite the present lack of projects with more than four spacecraft we present generalized reciprocal vectors for a cluster made of any number of spacecraft : each spacecraft is given a positive or nul weight. The non-coplanarity of at least four spacecraft with strictly positive weights is a necessary and sufficient condition for this analysis to be enabled. Weights given to spacecraft allow to minimize the influence of some spacecraft if its location or the quality of its data are not appropriate, or simply to extract subsets of spacecraft from the cluster. Estimators presented in [2] are generalized within this new frame except for the error analysis which is still under investigation. References [1] Harvey, C. C.: Spatial Gradients and the Volumetric Tensor, in: Analysis Methods for Multi-Spacecraft Data, G. Paschmann and P. Daly (eds.), pp. 307-322, ISSI

  13. Abstract Interfaces for Data Analysis - Component Architecture for Data Analysis Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Barrand, Guy

    2002-08-20

    The fast turnover of software technologies, in particular in the domain of interactivity (covering user interface and visualization), makes it difficult for a small group of people to produce complete and polished software-tools before the underlying technologies make them obsolete. At the HepVis '99 workshop, a working group has been formed to improve the production of software tools for data analysis in HENP. Beside promoting a distributed development organization, one goal of the group is to systematically design a set of abstract interfaces based on using modern OO analysis and OO design techniques. An initial domain analysis has come up with several categories (components) found in typical data analysis tools: Histograms, Ntuples, Functions, Vectors, Fitter, Plotter, Analyzer and Controller. Special emphasis was put on reducing the couplings between the categories to a minimum, thus optimizing re-use and maintainability of any component individually. The interfaces have been defined in Java and C++ and implementations exist in the form of libraries and tools using C++ (Anaphe/Lizard, OpenScientist) and Java (Java Analysis Studio). A special implementation aims at accessing the Java libraries (through their Abstract Interfaces) from C++. This paper gives an overview of the architecture and design of the various components for data analysis as discussed in AIDA.

  14. Distortion Analysis Toolkit—A Software Tool for Easy Analysis of Nonlinear Audio Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakarinen, Jyri

    2010-12-01

    Several audio effects devices deliberately add nonlinear distortion to the processed signal in order to create a desired sound. When creating virtual analog models of nonlinearly distorting devices, it would be very useful to carefully analyze the type of distortion, so that the model could be made as realistic as possible. While traditional system analysis tools such as the frequency response give detailed information on the operation of linear and time-invariant systems, they are less useful for analyzing nonlinear devices. Furthermore, although there do exist separate algorithms for nonlinear distortion analysis, there is currently no unified, easy-to-use tool for rapid analysis of distorting audio systems. This paper offers a remedy by introducing a new software tool for easy analysis of distorting effects. A comparison between a well-known guitar tube amplifier and two commercial software simulations is presented as a case study. This freely available software is written in Matlab language, but the analysis tool can also run as a standalone program, so the user does not need to have Matlab installed in order to perform the analysis.

  15. Micropollutants in urban watersheds : substance flow analysis as management tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, L.; Copin, P. J.; Barry, A. D.; Bader, H.-P.; Scheidegger, R.; Chèvre, N.

    2009-04-01

    Micropollutants released by cities into water are of increasing concern as they are suspected of inducing long-term effects on both aquatic organisms and humans (eg., hormonally active substances). Substances found in the urban water cycle have different sources in the urban area and different fates in this cycle. For example, the pollutants emitted from traffic, like copper or PAHs get to surface water during rain events often without any treatment. Pharmaceuticals resulting from human medical treatments get to surface water mainly through wastewater treatment plants, where they are only partly treated and eliminated. One other source of contamination in urban areas for these compounds are combined sewer overflows (CSOs). Once in the receiving waters (lakes, rivers, groundwater), these substances may re-enter the cycle through drinking water. It is therefore crucial to study the behaviour of micropollutants in the urban water cycle and to get flexible tools for urban water management. Substance flow analysis (SFA) has recently been proposed as instrument for water pollution management in urban water systems. This kind of analysis is an extension of material flow analysis (MFA) originally developed in the economic sector and later adapted to regional investigations. In this study, we propose to test the application of SFA for a large number of classes of micropollutants to evaluate its use for urban water management. We chose the city of Lausanne as case study since the receiving water of this city (Lake Geneva) is an important source of drinking water for the surrounding population. Moreover a profound system-knowledge and many data were available, both on the sewer system and the water quality. We focus our study on one heavy metal (copper) and four pharmaceuticals (diclofenac, ibuprofen, carbamazepine and naproxen). Results conducted on copper reveals that around 1500 kg of copper enter the aquatic compartment yearly. This amount contributes to sediment

  16. New tools for the analysis and design of building envelopes

    SciTech Connect

    Papamichael, K.; Winkelmann, F.C.; Buhl, W.F.; Chauvet, H.

    1994-08-01

    We describe the integrated development of PowerDOE, a new version of the DOE-2 building energy analysis program, and the Building Design Advisor (BDA), a multimedia-based design tool that assists building designers with the concurrent consideration of multiple design solutions with respect to multiple design criteria. PowerDOE has a windows-based Graphical User Interface (GUI) that makes it easier to use than DOE-2, while retaining DOE-2`s calculation power and accuracy. BDA, with a similar GUI, is designed to link to multiple analytical models and databases. In its first release it is linked to PowerDOE and a Daylighting Analysis Module, as well as to a Case Studies Database and a Schematic Graphic Editor. These allow building designers to set performance goals and address key building envelope parameters from the initial, schematic phases of building design to the detailed specification of building components and systems required by PowerDOE. The consideration of the thermal performance of building envelopes through PowerDOE and BDA is integrated with non-thermal envelope performance aspects, such as daylighting, as well as with the performance of non-envelope building components and systems, such as electric lighting and HVAC. Future versions of BDA will support links to CAD and electronic product catalogs, as well as provide context-dependent design advice to improve performance.

  17. Tool for Sizing Analysis of the Advanced Life Support System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, Hue-Hsie Jannivine; Brown, Cheryl B.; Jeng, Frank J.

    2005-01-01

    Advanced Life Support Sizing Analysis Tool (ALSSAT) is a computer model for sizing and analyzing designs of environmental-control and life support systems (ECLSS) for spacecraft and surface habitats involved in the exploration of Mars and Moon. It performs conceptual designs of advanced life support (ALS) subsystems that utilize physicochemical and biological processes to recycle air and water, and process wastes in order to reduce the need of resource resupply. By assuming steady-state operations, ALSSAT is a means of investigating combinations of such subsystems technologies and thereby assisting in determining the most cost-effective technology combination available. In fact, ALSSAT can perform sizing analysis of the ALS subsystems that are operated dynamically or steady in nature. Using the Microsoft Excel spreadsheet software with Visual Basic programming language, ALSSAT has been developed to perform multiple-case trade studies based on the calculated ECLSS mass, volume, power, and Equivalent System Mass, as well as parametric studies by varying the input parameters. ALSSAT s modular format is specifically designed for the ease of future maintenance and upgrades.

  18. NCC: A Multidisciplinary Design/Analysis Tool for Combustion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Nan-Suey; Quealy, Angela

    1999-01-01

    A multi-disciplinary design/analysis tool for combustion systems is critical for optimizing the low-emission, high-performance combustor design process. Based on discussions between NASA Lewis Research Center and the jet engine companies, an industry-government team was formed in early 1995 to develop the National Combustion Code (NCC), which is an integrated system of computer codes for the design and analysis of combustion systems. NCC has advanced features that address the need to meet designer's requirements such as "assured accuracy", "fast turnaround", and "acceptable cost". The NCC development team is comprised of Allison Engine Company (Allison), CFD Research Corporation (CFDRC), GE Aircraft Engines (GEAE), NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC), and Pratt & Whitney (P&W). This development team operates under the guidance of the NCC steering committee. The "unstructured mesh" capability and "parallel computing" are fundamental features of NCC from its inception. The NCC system is composed of a set of "elements" which includes grid generator, main flow solver, turbulence module, turbulence and chemistry interaction module, chemistry module, spray module, radiation heat transfer module, data visualization module, and a post-processor for evaluating engine performance parameters. Each element may have contributions from several team members. Such a multi-source multi-element system needs to be integrated in a way that facilitates inter-module data communication, flexibility in module selection, and ease of integration.

  19. Wavelet analysis as a nonstationary plasma fluctuation diagnostic tool

    SciTech Connect

    Santoso, S.; Powers, E.J.; Ouroua, A.; Heard, J.W.; Bengtson, R.D.

    1996-12-31

    Analysis of nonstationary plasma fluctuation data has been a long-time challenge for the plasma diagnostic community. For this reason, in this paper the authors present and apply wavelet transforms as a new diagnostic tool to analyze nonstationary plasma fluctuation data. Unlike the Fourier transform, which represents a given signal globally without temporal resolution, the wavelet transform provides a local representation of the given signal in the time-scale domain. The fundamental concepts and multiresolution properties of wavelet transforms, along with a brief comparison with the short-time Fourier transform, are presented in this paper. The selection of a prototype wavelet or a mother wavelet is also discussed. Digital implementation of wavelet spectral analysis, which include time-scale power spectra and scale power spectra are described. The efficacy of the wavelet approach is demonstrated by analyzing transient broadband electrostatic potential fluctuations inside the inversion radius of sawtoothing TEXT-U plasmas during electron cyclotron resonance heating. The potential signals are collected using a 2 MeV heavy ion beam probe.

  20. jSIPRO - analysis tool for magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Jiru, Filip; Skoch, Antonin; Wagnerova, Dita; Dezortova, Monika; Hajek, Milan

    2013-10-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) involves a huge number of spectra to be processed and analyzed. Several tools enabling MRSI data processing have been developed and widely used. However, the processing programs primarily focus on sophisticated spectra processing and offer limited support for the analysis of the calculated spectroscopic maps. In this paper the jSIPRO (java Spectroscopic Imaging PROcessing) program is presented, which is a java-based graphical interface enabling post-processing, viewing, analysis and result reporting of MRSI data. Interactive graphical processing as well as protocol controlled batch processing are available in jSIPRO. jSIPRO does not contain a built-in fitting program. Instead, it makes use of fitting programs from third parties and manages the data flows. Currently, automatic spectra processing using LCModel, TARQUIN and jMRUI programs are supported. Concentration and error values, fitted spectra, metabolite images and various parametric maps can be viewed for each calculated dataset. Metabolite images can be exported in the DICOM format either for archiving purposes or for the use in neurosurgery navigation systems. PMID:23870172

  1. Spectral Analysis Tool 6.2 for Windows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Feiming; Sue, Miles; Peng, Ted; Tan, Harry; Liang, Robert; Kinman, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Spectral Analysis Tool 6.2 is the latest version of a computer program that assists in analysis of interference between radio signals of the types most commonly used in Earth/spacecraft radio communications. [An earlier version was reported in Software for Analyzing Earth/Spacecraft Radio Interference (NPO-20422), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 25, No. 4 (April 2001), page 52.] SAT 6.2 calculates signal spectra, bandwidths, and interference effects for several families of modulation schemes. Several types of filters can be modeled, and the program calculates and displays signal spectra after filtering by any of the modeled filters. The program accommodates two simultaneous signals: a desired signal and an interferer. The interference-to-signal power ratio can be calculated for the filtered desired and interfering signals. Bandwidth-occupancy and link-budget calculators are included for the user s convenience. SAT 6.2 has a new software structure and provides a new user interface that is both intuitive and convenient. SAT 6.2 incorporates multi-tasking, multi-threaded execution, virtual memory management, and a dynamic link library. SAT 6.2 is designed for use on 32- bit computers employing Microsoft Windows operating systems.

  2. Seismic Canvas: Evolution as a Data Exploration and Analysis Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroeger, G. C.

    2015-12-01

    SeismicCanvas, originally developed as a prototype interactive waveform display and printing application for educational use has evolved to include significant data exploration and analysis functionality. The most recent version supports data import from a variety of standard file formats including SAC and mini-SEED, as well as search and download capabilities via IRIS/FDSN Web Services. Data processing tools now include removal of means and trends, interactive windowing, filtering, smoothing, tapering, resampling. Waveforms can be displayed in a free-form canvas or as a record section based on angular or great circle distance, azimuth or back azimuth. Integrated tau-p code allows the calculation and display of theoretical phase arrivals from a variety of radial Earth models. Waveforms can be aligned by absolute time, event time, picked or theoretical arrival times and can be stacked after alignment. Interactive measurements include means, amplitudes, time delays, ray parameters and apparent velocities. Interactive picking of an arbitrary list of seismic phases is supported. Bode plots of amplitude and phase spectra and spectrograms can be created from multiple seismograms or selected windows of seismograms. Direct printing is implemented on all supported platforms along with output of high-resolution pdf files. With these added capabilities, the application is now being used as a data exploration tool for research. Coded in C++ and using the cross-platform Qt framework, the most recent version is available as a 64-bit application for Windows 7-10, Mac OS X 10.6-10.11, and most distributions of Linux, and a 32-bit version for Windows XP and 7. With the latest improvements and refactoring of trace display classes, the 64-bit versions have been tested with over 250 million samples and remain responsive in interactive operations. The source code is available under a LPGLv3 license and both source and executables are available through the IRIS SeisCode repository.

  3. Study of academic achievements using spatial analysis tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, C.; Velilla, C.; Sánchez-Girón, V.

    2012-04-01

    In the 2010/12 academic year the College of Agricultural Engineering of the Technical University of Madrid implemented three new degrees all of them adapted to the European Space for Higher Education. These degrees are namely: Graduate in Agricultural Engineering and Science, Graduate in Food Engineering and Graduate in Agro-Environmental Engineering. A total of 382 new incoming students were finally registered and a survey study was carried out with these students about their academic achievement with the aim of finding the level of dependence among the following variables: the final mark in their secondary studies, the option followed in the secondary studies (Art, Science and Technology, and Humanities and Social Sciences), the mark obtained in the entering examination to the university and in which of the two opportunities per year this examination takes place the latter mark was obtained. Similarly, another group of 77 students were evaluated independently to the former group. These students were those entering the College in the previous academic year (2009/10) and decided to change their curricula to the new ones. Subsequently, using the tools of spatial analysis of geographic information systems, we analyzed the possible relationship between the success or failure at school and the socioeconomic profile of new students in a grade. For this purpose every student was referenced assigning UTM coordinates to their postal addresses. Furthermore, all students' secondary schools were geographically coded considering their typology (public, private, and private subsidized) and fares. Each student was represented by its average geometric point in order to be correlated to their respective record. Following this procedure a map of the performance of each student could be drawn. This map can be used as a reference system, as it includes variables as the distance from the student home to the College, that can be used as a tool to calculate the probability of success or

  4. In vivo dynamics of luteinizing hormone secretion and clearance in man: assessment by deconvolution mechanics.

    PubMed

    Veldhuis, J D; Johnson, M L

    1988-06-01

    The dynamics of LH secretion and clearance were studied in vivo in eight healthy young men using a novel multiple parameter deconvolution procedure to resolve underlying secretion and clearance rates simultaneously from serial serum immunoactive LH concentrations. This deconvolution analysis disclosed random LH secretory bursts occurring at a mean (+/- SEM) interpulse interval of 72 +/- 5 min. The frequency of these secretory bursts was 6.9 +/- 0.6 episodes/8 h. Each resolved LH secretory event had an average half-duration of only 7.8 +/- 0.5 min, which was remarkably shorter than the LH concentration peak duration of 60 +/- 6 min. The maximal LH secretory rate achieved within a secretory burst averaged 0.40 +/- 0.05 mIU/min.mL (0.14 IU/min.L), which corresponded to a mass of LH released of 3.2 +/- 0.3 mIU/mL distribution vol (IU/L). By linear regression analysis, both the maximal rate and mass of LH released per secretory burst were positively correlated with the duration of the subsequent interpulse interval (P less than 0.001). In physiological experiments, the mass of LH released per secretory burst was increased by iv GnRH injections or primary gonadal failure, and decreased by sc administration of a selective GnRH antagonist (Nal,Glu-GnRH). The mean endogenous LH production rate calculated by deconvolution [180 +/- 40 mIU/min (0.18 IU/min)] was not different from a nominal value of 228 +/- 80 mIU/min (0.228 IU/min) extrapolated from earlier steady state LH infusions. Deconvolution estimated single phase half-times of endogenous LH disappearance of 87 +/- 8 min, were in general harmony with values of 44-106 min obtained previously in four LH-deficient men injected with purified LH. Moreover, creation of synthetic LH series using our deconvolution estimates yielded 24-h LH pulse profiles similar quantitatively and qualitatively to those in normal men. In summary, we applied a new multiple parameter deconvolution procedure to immunoactive LH pulse profiles to

  5. Non-parametric PSF estimation from celestial transit solar images using blind deconvolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Adriana; Delouille, Véronique; Jacques, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Context: Characterization of instrumental effects in astronomical imaging is important in order to extract accurate physical information from the observations. The measured image in a real optical instrument is usually represented by the convolution of an ideal image with a Point Spread Function (PSF). Additionally, the image acquisition process is also contaminated by other sources of noise (read-out, photon-counting). The problem of estimating both the PSF and a denoised image is called blind deconvolution and is ill-posed. Aims: We propose a blind deconvolution scheme that relies on image regularization. Contrarily to most methods presented in the literature, our method does not assume a parametric model of the PSF and can thus be applied to any telescope. Methods: Our scheme uses a wavelet analysis prior model on the image and weak assumptions on the PSF. We use observations from a celestial transit, where the occulting body can be assumed to be a black disk. These constraints allow us to retain meaningful solutions for the filter and the image, eliminating trivial, translated, and interchanged solutions. Under an additive Gaussian noise assumption, they also enforce noise canceling and avoid reconstruction artifacts by promoting the whiteness of the residual between the blurred observations and the cleaned data. Results: Our method is applied to synthetic and experimental data. The PSF is estimated for the SECCHI/EUVI instrument using the 2007 Lunar transit, and for SDO/AIA using the 2012 Venus transit. Results show that the proposed non-parametric blind deconvolution method is able to estimate the core of the PSF with a similar quality to parametric methods proposed in the literature. We also show that, if these parametric estimations are incorporated in the acquisition model, the resulting PSF outperforms both the parametric and non-parametric methods.

  6. De-convoluting mixed crude oil in Prudhoe Bay Field, North Slope, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, K.E.; Scott, Ramos L.; Zumberge, J.E.; Valin, Z.C.; Bird, K.J.

    2008-01-01

    Seventy-four crude oil samples from the Barrow arch on the North Slope of Alaska were studied to assess the relative volumetric contributions from different source rocks to the giant Prudhoe Bay Field. We applied alternating least squares to concentration data (ALS-C) for 46 biomarkers in the range C19-C35 to de-convolute mixtures of oil generated from carbonate rich Triassic Shublik Formation and clay rich Jurassic Kingak Shale and Cretaceous Hue Shale-gamma ray zone (Hue-GRZ) source rocks. ALS-C results for 23 oil samples from the prolific Ivishak Formation reservoir of the Prudhoe Bay Field indicate approximately equal contributions from Shublik Formation and Hue-GRZ source rocks (37% each), less from the Kingak Shale (26%), and little or no contribution from other source rocks. These results differ from published interpretations that most oil in the Prudhoe Bay Field originated from the Shublik Formation source rock. With few exceptions, the relative contribution of oil from the Shublik Formation decreases, while that from the Hue-GRZ increases in reservoirs along the Barrow arch from Point Barrow in the northwest to Point Thomson in the southeast (???250 miles or 400 km). The Shublik contribution also decreases to a lesser degree between fault blocks within the Ivishak pool from west to east across the Prudhoe Bay Field. ALS-C provides a robust means to calculate the relative amounts of two or more oil types in a mixture. Furthermore, ALS-C does not require that pure end member oils be identified prior to analysis or that laboratory mixtures of these oils be prepared to evaluate mixing. ALS-C of biomarkers reliably de-convolutes mixtures because the concentrations of compounds in mixtures vary as linear functions of the amount of each oil type. ALS of biomarker ratios (ALS-R) cannot be used to de-convolute mixtures because compound ratios vary as nonlinear functions of the amount of each oil type.

  7. Immunoglobulin analysis tool: a novel tool for the analysis of human and mouse heavy and light chain transcripts.

    PubMed

    Rogosch, Tobias; Kerzel, Sebastian; Hoi, Kam Hon; Zhang, Zhixin; Maier, Rolf F; Ippolito, Gregory C; Zemlin, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Sequence analysis of immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy and light chain transcripts can refine categorization of B cell subpopulations and can shed light on the selective forces that act during immune responses or immune dysregulation, such as autoimmunity, allergy, and B cell malignancy. High-throughput sequencing yields Ig transcript collections of unprecedented size. The authoritative web-based IMGT/HighV-QUEST program is capable of analyzing large collections of transcripts and provides annotated output files to describe many key properties of Ig transcripts. However, additional processing of these flat files is required to create figures, or to facilitate analysis of additional features and comparisons between sequence sets. We present an easy-to-use Microsoft(®) Excel(®) based software, named Immunoglobulin Analysis Tool (IgAT), for the summary, interrogation, and further processing of IMGT/HighV-QUEST output files. IgAT generates descriptive statistics and high-quality figures for collections of murine or human Ig heavy or light chain transcripts ranging from 1 to 150,000 sequences. In addition to traditionally studied properties of Ig transcripts - such as the usage of germline gene segments, or the length and composition of the CDR-3 region - IgAT also uses published algorithms to calculate the probability of antigen selection based on somatic mutational patterns, the average hydrophobicity of the antigen-binding sites, and predictable structural properties of the CDR-H3 loop according to Shirai's H3-rules. These refined analyses provide in-depth information about the selective forces acting upon Ig repertoires and allow the statistical and graphical comparison of two or more sequence sets. IgAT is easy to use on any computer running Excel(®) 2003 or higher. Thus, IgAT is a useful tool to gain insights into the selective forces and functional properties of small to extremely large collections of Ig transcripts, thereby assisting a researcher to mine a data set

  8. Tools4miRs – one place to gather all the tools for miRNA analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lukasik, Anna; Wójcikowski, Maciej; Zielenkiewicz, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Summary: MiRNAs are short, non-coding molecules that negatively regulate gene expression and thereby play several important roles in living organisms. Dozens of computational methods for miRNA-related research have been developed, which greatly differ in various aspects. The substantial availability of difficult-to-compare approaches makes it challenging for the user to select a proper tool and prompts the need for a solution that will collect and categorize all the methods. Here, we present tools4miRs, the first platform that gathers currently more than 160 methods for broadly defined miRNA analysis. The collected tools are classified into several general and more detailed categories in which the users can additionally filter the available methods according to their specific research needs, capabilities and preferences. Tools4miRs is also a web-based target prediction meta-server that incorporates user-designated target prediction methods into the analysis of user-provided data. Availability and Implementation: Tools4miRs is implemented in Python using Django and is freely available at tools4mirs.org. Contact: piotr@ibb.waw.pl Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27153626

  9. Analysis of the influence of tool dynamics in diamond turning

    SciTech Connect

    Fawcett, S.C.; Luttrell, D.E.; Keltie, R.F.

    1988-12-01

    This report describes the progress in defining the role of machine and interface dynamics on the surface finish in diamond turning. It contains a review of literature from conventional and diamond machining processes relating tool dynamics, material interactions and tool wear to surface finish. Data from experimental measurements of tool/work piece interface dynamics are presented as well as machine dynamics for the DTM at the Center.

  10. HPLC analysis as a tool for assessing targeted liposome composition.

    PubMed

    Oswald, Mira; Platscher, Michael; Geissler, Simon; Goepferich, Achim

    2016-01-30

    Functionalized phospholipids are indispensable materials for the design of targeted liposomes. Control over the quality and quantity of phospholipids is thereby key in the successful development and manufacture of such formulations. This was also the case for a complex liposomal preparation composed of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC), Cholesterol (CHO), 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[amino(polyethylene glycol)-2000] (DSPE-PEG2000). To this end, an RP-HPLC method was developed. Detection was done via evaporative light scattering (ELS) for liposomal components. The method was validated for linearity, precision, accuracy, sensitivity and robustness. The liposomal compounds had a non-linear quadratic response in the concentration range of 0.012-0.42 mg/ml with a correlation coefficient greater than 0.99 with an accuracy of method confirmed 95-105% of the theoretical concentration. Furthermore, degradation products from the liposomal formulation could be identified. The presented method was successfully implemented as a control tool during the preparation of functionalized liposomes. It underlined the benefit of HPLC analysis of phospholipids during liposome preparation as an easy and rapid control method for the functionalized lipid at each preparation step as well as for the quantification of all components. PMID:26570988

  11. Thermal Management Tools for Propulsion System Trade Studies and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCarthy, Kevin; Hodge, Ernie

    2011-01-01

    Energy-related subsystems in modern aircraft are more tightly coupled with less design margin. These subsystems include thermal management subsystems, vehicle electric power generation and distribution, aircraft engines, and flight control. Tighter coupling, lower design margins, and higher system complexity all make preliminary trade studies difficult. A suite of thermal management analysis tools has been developed to facilitate trade studies during preliminary design of air-vehicle propulsion systems. Simulink blocksets (from MathWorks) for developing quasi-steady-state and transient system models of aircraft thermal management systems and related energy systems have been developed. These blocksets extend the Simulink modeling environment in the thermal sciences and aircraft systems disciplines. The blocksets include blocks for modeling aircraft system heat loads, heat exchangers, pumps, reservoirs, fuel tanks, and other components at varying levels of model fidelity. The blocksets have been applied in a first-principles, physics-based modeling and simulation architecture for rapid prototyping of aircraft thermal management and related systems. They have been applied in representative modern aircraft thermal management system studies. The modeling and simulation architecture has also been used to conduct trade studies in a vehicle level model that incorporates coupling effects among the aircraft mission, engine cycle, fuel, and multi-phase heat-transfer materials.

  12. SEM analysis as a diagnostic tool for photovoltaic cell degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osayemwenre, Gilbert; Meyer, E. L.

    2013-04-01

    The importance of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis as a diagnostic tool for analyzing the degradation of a polycrystalline Photovoltaic cell has been studied. The main aim of this study is to characterize the surface morphology of hot spot regions (degraded) cells in photovoltaic solar cells. In recent years, production of hetero and multi-junction solar cells has experience tremendous growth as compared to conventional silicon (Si) solar cells. Thin film photovoltaic solar cells generally are more prone to exhibiting defects and associated degradation modes. To improve the lifetime of these cells and modules, it is imperative to fully understand the cause and effect of defects and degradation modes. The objective of this paper is to diagnose the observed degradation in polycrystalline silicon cells, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In this study poly-Si cells were characterize before and after reverse biasing, the reverse biasing was done to evaluate the cells' susceptibility to leakage currents and hotspots formation. After reverse biasing, some cells were found to exhibit hotspots as confirmed by infrared thermography. The surface morphology of these hotspots re

  13. Bioelectrical impedance analysis: A new tool for assessing fish condition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hartman, Kyle J.; Margraf, F. Joseph; Hafs, Andrew W.; Cox, M. Keith

    2015-01-01

    Bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) is commonly used in human health and nutrition fields but has only recently been considered as a potential tool for assessing fish condition. Once BIA is calibrated, it estimates fat/moisture levels and energy content without the need to kill fish. Despite the promise held by BIA, published studies have been divided on whether BIA can provide accurate estimates of body composition in fish. In cases where BIA was not successful, the models lacked the range of fat levels or sample sizes we determined were needed for model success (range of dry fat levels of 29%, n = 60, yielding an R2 of 0.8). Reduced range of fat levels requires an increased sample size to achieve that benchmark; therefore, standardization of methods is needed. Here we discuss standardized methods based on a decade of research, identify sources of error, discuss where BIA is headed, and suggest areas for future research.

  14. ADVISOR: a systems analysis tool for advanced vehicle modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markel, T.; Brooker, A.; Hendricks, T.; Johnson, V.; Kelly, K.; Kramer, B.; O'Keefe, M.; Sprik, S.; Wipke, K.

    This paper provides an overview of Advanced Vehicle Simulator (ADVISOR)—the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) ADVISOR written in the MATLAB/Simulink environment and developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. ADVISOR provides the vehicle engineering community with an easy-to-use, flexible, yet robust and supported analysis package for advanced vehicle modeling. It is primarily used to quantify the fuel economy, the performance, and the emissions of vehicles that use alternative technologies including fuel cells, batteries, electric motors, and internal combustion engines in hybrid (i.e. multiple power sources) configurations. It excels at quantifying the relative change that can be expected due to the implementation of technology compared to a baseline scenario. ADVISOR's capabilities and limitations are presented and the power source models that are included in ADVISOR are discussed. Finally, several applications of the tool are presented to highlight ADVISOR's functionality. The content of this paper is based on a presentation made at the 'Development of Advanced Battery Engineering Models' workshop held in Crystal City, Virginia in August 2001.

  15. A measuring tool for tree-rings analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shumilov, Oleg; Kanatjev, Alexander; Kasatkina, Elena

    2013-04-01

    A special tool has been created for the annual tree-ring widths measurement and analysis. It consists of professional scanner, computer system and software. This created complex in many aspects does not yield the similar systems (LINTAB, WinDENDRO), but in comparison to manual measurement systems, it offers a number of advantages: productivity gain, possibility of archiving the results of the measurements at any stage of the processing, operator comfort. It has been developed a new software, allowing processing of samples of different types (cores, saw cuts), including those which is difficult to process, having got a complex wood structure (inhomogeneity of growing in different directions, missed, light and false rings etc.). This software can analyze pictures made with optical scanners, analog or digital cameras. The complex software program was created on programming language C++, being compatible with modern operating systems like Windows X. Annual ring widths are measured along paths traced interactively. These paths can have any orientation and can be created so that ring widths are measured perpendicular to ring boundaries. A graphic of ring-widths in function of the year is displayed on a screen during the analysis and it can be used for visual and numerical cross-dating and comparison with other series or master-chronologies. Ring widths are saved to the text files in a special format, and those files are converted to the format accepted for data conservation in the International Tree-Ring Data Bank. The created complex is universal in application that will allow its use for decision of the different problems in biology and ecology. With help of this complex it has been reconstructed a long-term juniper (1328-2004) and pine (1445-2005) tree-ring chronologies on the base of samples collected at Kola Peninsula (northwestern Russia).

  16. New Access and Analysis Tools for Voyager LECP Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, L. E.; Hill, M. E.; Decker, R. B.; Cooper, J. F.; Krimigis, S. M.; Vandegriff, J. D.

    2008-12-01

    The Low Energy Charged Particle (LECP) instruments on the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft have been returning unique scientific measurements since launching in 1977, most notably observations from the historic tour of the giant planets. As these spacecraft continue on their exit trajectories from the Solar system they have become an interstellar mission and have begun to probe the boundary between the heliosphere and the interstellar cloud and continue to make exciting discoveries. As the mission changed from one focused on discrete encounters to an open ended search for heliospheric boundaries and transitory disturbances, the positions and timing of which are not known, the data processing needs have changed. Open data policies and the push to draw data under the umbrella of emerging Virtual Observatories have added a data sharing component that was not a part of the original mission plans. We present our work in utilizing new, reusable software analysis tools to access legacy data in a way that leverages pre-existing data analysis techniques. We took an existing Applied Physics Laboratory application, Mission Independent Data Layer (MIDL) -- developed originally under a NASA Applied Information Research Program (AISRP) and subsequently used with data from Geotail, Cassini, IMP-8, ACE, Messenger, and New Horizons -- and applied it to Voyager data. We use the MIDL codebase to automatically generate standard data products such as daily summary plots and associated tabulated data that increase our ability to monitor the heliospheric environment on a regular basis. These data products will be publicly available and updated automatically and can be analyzed by the community using the ultra portable MIDL software launched from the data distribution website. The currently available LECP data will also be described with SPASE metadata and incorporated into the emerging Virtual Energetic Particle Observatory (VEPO).

  17. Social dataset analysis and mapping tools for Risk Perception: resilience, people preparation and communication tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters-Guarin, Graciela; Garcia, Carolina; Frigerio, Simone

    2010-05-01

    Perception has been identified as resource and part of the resilience of a community to disasters. Risk perception, if present, may determine the potential damage a household or community experience. Different levels of risk perception and preparedness can influence directly people's susceptibility and the way they might react in case of an emergency caused by natural hazards. In spite of the profuse literature about risk perception, works to spatially portray this feature are really scarce. The spatial relationship to danger or hazard is being recognised as an important factor of the risk equation; it can be used as a powerful tool either for better knowledge or for operational reasons (e.g. management of preventive information). Risk perception and people's awareness when displayed in a spatial format can be useful for several actors in the risk management arena. Local authorities and civil protection can better address educational activities to increase the preparation of particularly vulnerable groups of clusters of households within a community. It can also be useful for the emergency personal in order to optimally direct the actions in case of an emergency. In the framework of the Marie Curie Research Project, a Community Based Early Warning System (CBEWS) it's been developed in the Mountain Community Valtellina of Tirano, northern Italy. This community has been continuously exposed to different mass movements and floods, in particular, a large event in 1987 which affected a large portion of the valley and left 58 dead. The actual emergency plan for the study area is composed by a real time, highly detailed, decision support system. This emergency plan contains detailed instructions for the rapid deployment of civil protection and other emergency personal in case of emergency, for risk scenarios previously defined. Especially in case of a large event, where timely reaction is crucial for reducing casualties, it is important for those in charge of emergency

  18. Mission operations data analysis tools for Mars Observer guidance and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kan, Edwin P.

    1994-01-01

    Mission operations for the Mars Observer (MO) Project at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory were supported by a variety of ground data processing software and analysis tools. Some of these tools were generic to multimission spacecraft mission operations, some were specific to the MO spacecraft, and others were custom tailored to the operation and control of the Attitude and Articulation Control Subsystem (AACS). The focus of this paper is on the data analysis tools for the AACS. Four different categories of analysis tools are presented; with details offered for specific tools. Valuable experience was gained from the use of these tools and through their development. These tools formed the backbone and enhanced the efficiency of the AACS Unit in the Mission Operations Spacecraft Team. These same tools, and extensions thereof, have been adopted by the Galileo mission operations, and are being designed into Cassini and other future spacecraft mission operations.

  19. Principal Angle Enrichment Analysis (PAEA): Dimensionally Reduced Multivariate Gene Set Enrichment Analysis Tool

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Neil R.; Szymkiewicz, Maciej; Wang, Zichen; Monteiro, Caroline D.; Jones, Matthew R.; Ma’ayan, Avi

    2016-01-01

    Gene set analysis of differential expression, which identifies collectively differentially expressed gene sets, has become an important tool for biology. The power of this approach lies in its reduction of the dimensionality of the statistical problem and its incorporation of biological interpretation by construction. Many approaches to gene set analysis have been proposed, but benchmarking their performance in the setting of real biological data is difficult due to the lack of a gold standard. In a previously published work we proposed a geometrical approach to differential expression which performed highly in benchmarking tests and compared well to the most popular methods of differential gene expression. As reported, this approach has a natural extension to gene set analysis which we call Principal Angle Enrichment Analysis (PAEA). PAEA employs dimensionality reduction and a multivariate approach for gene set enrichment analysis. However, the performance of this method has not been assessed nor its implementation as a web-based tool. Here we describe new benchmarking protocols for gene set analysis methods and find that PAEA performs highly. The PAEA method is implemented as a user-friendly web-based tool, which contains 70 gene set libraries and is freely available to the community. PMID:26848405

  20. Image deconvolution under Poisson noise using SURE-LET approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Feng; Liu, Jiaqi; Meng, Gang; Yan, Jing; Zhao, Min

    2015-10-01

    We propose an image deconvolution algorithm when the data is contaminated by Poisson noise. By minimizing Stein's unbiased risk estimate (SURE), the SURE-LET method was firstly proposed to deal with Gaussian noise corruption. Our key contribution is to demonstrate that the SURE-LET algorithm is also applicable for Poisson noisy image and proposed an efficient algorithm. The formulation of SURE requires knowledge of Gaussian noise variance. We experimentally found a simple and direct link between the noise variance estimated by median absolute difference (MAD) method and the optimal one that leads to the best deconvolution performance in terms of mean squared error (MSE). Extensive experiments show that this optimal noise variance works satisfactorily for a wide range of natural images.

  1. Deconvolution Kalman filtering for force measurements of revolving wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vester, R.; Percin, M.; van Oudheusden, B.

    2016-09-01

    The applicability of a deconvolution Kalman filtering approach is assessed for the force measurements on a flat plate undergoing a revolving motion, as an alternative procedure to correct for test setup vibrations. The system identification process required for the correct implementation of the deconvolution Kalman filter is explained in detail. It is found that in the presence of a relatively complex forcing history, the DK filter is better suited to filter out structural test rig vibrations than conventional filtering techniques that are based on, for example, low-pass or moving-average filtering. The improvement is especially found in the characterization of the generated force peaks. Consequently, more reliable force data is obtained, which is vital to validate semi-empirical estimation models, but is also relevant to correlate identified flow phenomena to the force production.

  2. Astronomical Coma Image Restoration Through the Use of Localized Deconvolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gifford, Steve

    2008-05-01

    This paper discusses an image restoration technique to effectively post-process astronomical images to remove coma artifacts. Coma is a common problem for imprecise optical systems that manifest its self as distortions that worsen near the edge of the image. Conventional full-image deconvolution techniques will not remove this artifact because the coma exhibits a positionally variant distortion of the image, i.e., the optical point spread function (PSF) varies as a function of position at the focal plane. Coma repair is accomplished by partitioning the image into small blocks, estimating the PSF of the block, applying the Richardson-Lucy deconvolution algorithm to each block and then reassembly of the blocks into the final image.

  3. SOURCE PULSE ENHANCEMENT BY DECONVOLUTION OF AN EMPIRICAL GREEN'S FUNCTION.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, Charles S.

    1985-01-01

    Observations of the earthquake source-time function are enhanced if path, recording-site, and instrument complexities can be removed from seismograms. Assuming that a small earthquake has a simple source, its seismogram can be treated as an empirical Green's function and deconvolved from the seismogram of a larger and/or more complex earthquake by spectral division. When the deconvolution is well posed, the quotient spectrum represents the apparent source-time function of the larger event. This study shows that with high-quality locally recorded earthquake data it is feasible to Fourier transform the quotient and obtain a useful result in the time domain. In practice, the deconvolution can be stabilized by one of several simple techniques. Application of the method is given. Refs.

  4. A pitfall in the reconstruction of fibre ODFs using spherical deconvolution of diffusion MRI data.

    PubMed

    Parker, G D; Marshall, D; Rosin, P L; Drage, N; Richmond, S; Jones, D K

    2013-01-15

    Diffusion weighted (DW) MRI facilitates non-invasive quantification of tissue microstructure and, in combination with appropriate signal processing, three-dimensional estimates of fibrous orientation. In recent years, attention has shifted from the diffusion tensor model, which assumes a unimodal Gaussian diffusion displacement profile to recover fibre orientation (with various well-documented limitations), towards more complex high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) analysis techniques. Spherical deconvolution (SD) approaches assume that the fibre orientation density function (fODF) within a voxel can be obtained by deconvolving a 'common' single fibre response function from the observed set of DW signals. In practice, this common response function is not known a priori and thus an estimated fibre response must be used. Here the establishment of this single-fibre response function is referred to as 'calibration'. This work examines the vulnerability of two different SD approaches to inappropriate response function calibration: (1) constrained spherical harmonic deconvolution (CSHD)--a technique that exploits spherical harmonic basis sets and (2) damped Richardson-Lucy (dRL) deconvolution--a technique based on the standard Richardson-Lucy deconvolution. Through simulations, the impact of a discrepancy between the calibrated diffusion profiles and the observed ('Target') DW-signals in both single and crossing-fibre configurations was investigated. The results show that CSHD produces spurious fODF peaks (consistent with well known ringing artefacts) as the discrepancy between calibration and target response increases, while dRL demonstrates a lower over-all sensitivity to miscalibration (with a calibration response function for a highly anisotropic fibre being optimal). However, dRL demonstrates a reduced ability to resolve low anisotropy crossing-fibres compared to CSHD. It is concluded that the range and spatial-distribution of expected single

  5. Bayesian Deconvolution of Mass and Ion Mobility Spectra: From Binary Interactions to Polydisperse Ensembles

    PubMed Central

    Marty, Michael T.; Baldwin, Andrew J.; Marklund, Erik G.; Hochberg, Georg K. A.; Benesch, Justin L. P.; Robinson, Carol V.

    2015-01-01

    Interpretation of mass spectra is challenging because they report a ratio of two physical quantities, mass and charge, which may each have multiple components that overlap in m/z. Previous approaches to disentangling the two have focused on peak assignment or fitting. However, the former struggle with complex spectra, and the latter are generally computationally intensive and may require substantial manual intervention. We propose a new data analysis approach that employs a Bayesian framework to separate the mass and charge dimensions. Based on this approach, we developed UniDec (Universal Deconvolution), software that provides a rapid, robust, and flexible deconvolution of mass spectra and ion mobility-mass spectra with minimal user intervention. Incorporation of the charge-state distribution in the Bayesian prior probabilities provides separation of the m/z spectrum into its physical mass and charge components. We have evaluated our approach using systems of increasing complexity, enabling us to deduce lipid binding to membrane proteins, to probe the dynamics of subunit exchange reactions, and to characterize polydispersity in both protein assemblies and lipoprotein Nanodiscs. The general utility of our approach will greatly facilitate analysis of ion mobility and mass spectra. PMID:25799115

  6. Exothermic Behavior of Thermal Decomposition of Sodium Percarbonate: Kinetic Deconvolution of Successive Endothermic and Exothermic Processes.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Masayoshi; Wada, Takeshi; Koga, Nobuyoshi

    2015-09-24

    This study focused on the kinetic modeling of the thermal decomposition of sodium percarbonate (SPC, sodium carbonate-hydrogen peroxide (2/3)). The reaction is characterized by apparently different kinetic profiles of mass-loss and exothermic behavior as recorded by thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry, respectively. This phenomenon results from a combination of different kinetic features of the reaction involving two overlapping mass-loss steps controlled by the physico-geometry of the reaction and successive endothermic and exothermic processes caused by the detachment and decomposition of H2O2(g). For kinetic modeling, the overall reaction was initially separated into endothermic and exothermic processes using kinetic deconvolution analysis. Then, both of the endothermic and exothermic processes were further separated into two reaction steps accounting for the physico-geometrically controlled reaction that occurs in two steps. Kinetic modeling through kinetic deconvolution analysis clearly illustrates the appearance of the net exothermic effect is the result of a slight delay of the exothermic process to the endothermic process in each physico-geometrically controlled reaction step. This demonstrates that kinetic modeling attempted in this study is useful for interpreting the exothermic behavior of solid-state reactions such as the oxidative decomposition of solids and thermal decomposition of oxidizing agent. PMID:26371394

  7. Dual-use tools and systematics-aware analysis workflows in the ATLAS Run-2 analysis model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, David; Calafiura, Paolo; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Elsing, Markus; Farrell, Steven; Koeneke, Karsten; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Krumnack, Nils; Lancon, Eric; Lavrijsen, Wim; Laycock, Paul; Lei, Xiaowen; Strandberg, Sara; Verkerke, Wouter; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Woudstra, Martin

    2015-12-01

    The ATLAS analysis model has been overhauled for the upcoming run of data collection in 2015 at 13 TeV. One key component of this upgrade was the Event Data Model (EDM), which now allows for greater flexibility in the choice of analysis software framework and provides powerful new features that can be exploited by analysis software tools. A second key component of the upgrade is the introduction of a dual-use tool technology, which provides abstract interfaces for analysis software tools to run in either the Athena framework or a ROOT-based framework. The tool interfaces, including a new interface for handling systematic uncertainties, have been standardized for the development of improved analysis workflows and consolidation of high-level analysis tools. This paper will cover the details of the dual-use tool functionality, the systematics interface, and how these features fit into a centrally supported analysis environment.

  8. An Analysis of Teacher Selection Tools in Pennsylvania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vitale, Tracy L.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine teacher screening and selection tools currently being utilized by public school districts in Pennsylvania and to compare these tools to the research on qualities of effective teachers. The researcher developed four research questions that guided her study. The Pennsylvania Association of School Personnel…

  9. Seismic interferometry by multidimensional deconvolution without wavefield separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravasi, Matteo; Meles, Giovanni; Curtis, Andrew; Rawlinson, Zara; Yikuo, Liu

    2015-07-01

    Seismic interferometry comprises a suite of methods to redatum recorded wavefields to those that would have been recorded if different sources (so-called virtual sources) had been activated. Seismic interferometry by cross-correlation has been formulated using either two-way (for full wavefields) or one-way (for directionally decomposed wavefields) representation theorems. To obtain improved Green's function estimates, the cross-correlation result can be deconvolved by a quantity that identifies the smearing of the virtual source in space and time, the so-called point-spread function. This type of interferometry, known as interferometry by multidimensional deconvolution (MDD), has so far been applied only to one-way directionally decomposed fields, requiring accurate wavefield decomposition from dual (e.g. pressure and velocity) recordings. Here we propose a form of interferometry by multidimensional deconvolution that uses full wavefields with two-way representations, and simultaneously invert for pressure and (normal) velocity Green's functions, rather than only velocity responses as for its one-way counterpart. Tests on synthetic data show that two-way MDD improves on results of interferometry by cross-correlation, and generally produces estimates of similar quality to those obtained by one-way MDD, suggesting that the preliminary decomposition into up- and downgoing components of the pressure field is not required if pressure and velocity data are jointly used in the deconvolution. We also show that constraints on the directionality of the Green's functions sought can be added directly into the MDD inversion process to further improve two-way multidimensional deconvolution. Finally, as a by-product of having pressure and particle velocity measurements, we adapt one- and two-way representation theorems to convert any particle velocity receiver into its corresponding virtual dipole/gradient source by means of MDD. Thus data recorded from standard monopolar (e

  10. Blind deconvolution estimation of fluorescence measurements through quadratic programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos-Delgado, Daniel U.; Gutierrez-Navarro, Omar; Arce-Santana, Edgar R.; Skala, Melissa C.; Walsh, Alex J.; Jo, Javier A.

    2015-07-01

    Time-deconvolution of the instrument response from fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) data is usually necessary for accurate fluorescence lifetime estimation. In many applications, however, the instrument response is not available. In such cases, a blind deconvolution approach is required. An iterative methodology is proposed to address the blind deconvolution problem departing from a dataset of FLIM measurements. A linear combination of a base conformed by Laguerre functions models the fluorescence impulse response of the sample at each spatial point in our formulation. Our blind deconvolution estimation (BDE) algorithm is formulated as a quadratic approximation problem, where the decision variables are the samples of the instrument response and the scaling coefficients of the basis functions. In the approximation cost function, there is a bilinear dependence on the decision variables. Hence, due to the nonlinear nature of the estimation process, an alternating least-squares scheme iteratively solves the approximation problem. Our proposal searches for the samples of the instrument response with a global perspective, and the scaling coefficients of the basis functions locally at each spatial point. First, the iterative methodology relies on a least-squares solution for the instrument response, and quadratic programming for the scaling coefficients applied just to a subset of the measured fluorescence decays to initially estimate the instrument response to speed up the convergence. After convergence, the final stage computes the fluorescence impulse response at all spatial points. A comprehensive validation stage considers synthetic and experimental FLIM datasets of ex vivo atherosclerotic plaques and human breast cancer cell samples that highlight the advantages of the proposed BDE algorithm under different noise and initial conditions in the iterative scheme and parameters of the proposal.

  11. Impregnating unconsolidated pyroclastic sequences: A tool for detailed facies analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klapper, Daniel; Kueppers, Ulrich; Castro, Jon M.; Pacheco, Jose M. R.; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2010-05-01

    -size distribution, componentry, and grain morphology in situ in a 2D-plane. In a first step, the sample surface has been scanned and analysed by means of image analysis software (Image J). After that, selected areas were investigated through thin section analysis. We were able to define depositional units in the (sub)-mm scale and the show the varying relative importance of 1) eruptive style, 2) transportation mode, and 3) the influence of wind and (air) humidity. The presented method is an easy and efficient tool for a detailed stratigraphic investigation of unconsolidated pyroclastic units.

  12. Impregnating unconsolidated pyroclastic sequences: A tool for detailed facies analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klapper, D.; Kueppers, U.; Castro, J. M.

    2009-12-01

    -size distribution, componentry, and grain morphology in situ in a 2D-plane. In a first step, the sample surface has been scanned and analysed by means of image analysis software (Image J). After that, selected areas were investigated through thin section analysis. We were able to define depositional units in the (sub)-mm scale and the show the varying relative importance of 1) eruptive style, 2) transportation mode, and 3) the influence of wind and (air) humidity. The presented method is an easy and efficient tool for a detailed stratigraphic investigation of unconsolidated pyroclastic units.

  13. Dynamic support region-based astronomical image deconvolution algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Ze-xun; Chen, Bo; Xu, Qing; Zhang, Bao-ming; Gong, Zhi-hui

    2008-07-01

    The performance of high-resolution imaging with large optical instruments is severely limited by atmospheric turbulence, and an image deconvolution is required for reaching the diffraction limit. A new astronomical image deconvolution algorithm is proposed, which incorporates dynamic support region and improved cost function to NAS-RIF algorithm. The enhanced NAS-RIF (ENAS-RIF) method takes into account the noise in the image and can dynamically shrink support region (SR) in application. In restoration process, initial SR is set to approximate counter of the true object, and then SR automatically contracts with iteration going. The approximate counter of interested object is detected by means of beamlet transform detecting edge. The ENAS-RIF algorithm is applied to the restorations of in-door Laser point source and long exposure extended object images. The experimental results demonstrate that the ENAS-RIF algorithm works better than classical NAS-RIF algorithm in deconvolution of the degraded image with low SNR and convergence speed is faster.

  14. Iterative blind deconvolution in magnetic resonance brain perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Grüner, Renate; Taxt, Torfinn

    2006-04-01

    In first pass magnetic resonance brain perfusion imaging, arterial input functions are used in the deconvolution of the observed contrast concentrations to obtain quantitative hemodynamic parameters. Ideally, arterial input functions should be measured in each imaged voxel to eliminate the effects of delay and dispersion of the contrast agent from the injection site. An approach based on iterative blind deconvolution with the Richardson-Lucy algorithm is proposed for the simultaneous estimation of voxel-specific arterial input functions and voxel-specific tissue residue functions. An extended contrast concentration model was used to separate the first pass bolus from additional recirculation and leakage signals. The extended model was evaluated using in vivo data. Computer simulations examined the feasibility of iterative blind deconvolution in perfusion imaging. Preliminary in vivo results from a patient with fibromuscular dysplasia showed territories with delayed/dispersed arterial input functions that coincided with the location of territories supplied by collateral circulation as described from the complete radiologic examination. Higher flow values and shorter mean transit times compared to conventional methods were obtained in these areas, suggesting that the effects of dispersion were minimized. The in vivo estimated arterial input functions visualized the patient's blood supply patterns as a function of time. PMID:16526016

  15. Point spread functions and deconvolution of ultrasonic images.

    PubMed

    Dalitz, Christoph; Pohle-Fröhlich, Regina; Michalk, Thorsten

    2015-03-01

    This article investigates the restoration of ultrasonic pulse-echo C-scan images by means of deconvolution with a point spread function (PSF). The deconvolution concept from linear system theory (LST) is linked to the wave equation formulation of the imaging process, and an analytic formula for the PSF of planar transducers is derived. For this analytic expression, different numerical and analytic approximation schemes for evaluating the PSF are presented. By comparing simulated images with measured C-scan images, we demonstrate that the assumptions of LST in combination with our formula for the PSF are a good model for the pulse-echo imaging process. To reconstruct the object from a C-scan image, we compare different deconvolution schemes: the Wiener filter, the ForWaRD algorithm, and the Richardson-Lucy algorithm. The best results are obtained with the Richardson-Lucy algorithm with total variation regularization. For distances greater or equal twice the near field distance, our experiments show that the numerically computed PSF can be replaced with a simple closed analytic term based on a far field approximation. PMID:25768819

  16. High-resolution seismic processing by Gabor deconvolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zengbao; Wang, Yanghua; Chen, Xiaohong; Li, Jingye

    2013-12-01

    Since viscoelastic attenuation effects are ubiquitous in subsurface media, the seismic source wavelet rapidly evolves as the wave travels through the subsurface. Eliminating the source wavelet and compensating the attenuation effect together may improve seismic resolution. Gabor deconvolution can achieve these two processes simultaneously, by removing the propagating wavelet which is the combination of the source wavelet and the attenuation effect. The Gabor deconvolution operator is determined based on the Gabor spectrum of a nonstationary seismic trace. By assuming white reflectivity, the Gabor amplitude spectrum can be smoothed to produce the required amplitude spectrum of the propagating wavelet. In this paper, smoothing is set as a least-squares inverse problem, and is referred to as regularized smoothing. By assuming that the source wavelet and the attenuation process are both minimum phased, the phase spectrum of the propagating wavelet can be defined by the Hilbert transform of the natural logarithm of the smoothed amplitude spectrum. The inverse of the complex spectrum of the propagating wavelet is the Gabor deconvolution operator. Applying it to the original time-frequency spectrum of the nonstationary trace produces an estimated time-frequency spectrum of reflectivity series. The final time-domain high-resolution trace, obtained by an inverse Gabor transform, is close to a band-pass filtered version of the reflectivity series.

  17. Joint deconvolution and interpolation of remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, Jonathan A.; Rodi, William

    2004-02-01

    We present a method for the simultaneous deconvolution and interpolation of remote sensing data in a single joint inverse problem. Joint inversion allows sparsely sampled data to improve deconvolution results and, conversely, allows large-scale blurred data to improve the interpolation of sampled data. Geostatistical interpolation and geostatistically damped deconvolution are special cases such a joint inverse problem. Our method is posed in the Bayesian framework and requires the definition of likelihood functions for each data set involved, as well as a prior model of the parameter field of interest. The solution of such a problem is the posterior probability distribution. We present an algorithm for finding the maximum of this distribution. The particular application we apply our algorithm to is the fusion of digital elevation model and global positioning system data sets. The former data is a larger scale blurred image of topography, while the latter represent point samples of the same field. A synthetic data set is constructed to first show the performance of the method. Real data is then inverted.

  18. Deconvolution of interferometric data using interior point iterative algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theys, C.; Lantéri, H.; Aime, C.

    2016-09-01

    We address the problem of deconvolution of astronomical images that could be obtained with future large interferometers in space. The presentation is made in two complementary parts. The first part gives an introduction to the image deconvolution with linear and nonlinear algorithms. The emphasis is made on nonlinear iterative algorithms that verify the constraints of non-negativity and constant flux. The Richardson-Lucy algorithm appears there as a special case for photon counting conditions. More generally, the algorithm published recently by Lanteri et al. (2015) is based on scale invariant divergences without assumption on the statistic model of the data. The two proposed algorithms are interior-point algorithms, the latter being more efficient in terms of speed of calculation. These algorithms are applied to the deconvolution of simulated images corresponding to an interferometric system of 16 diluted telescopes in space. Two non-redundant configurations, one disposed around a circle and the other on an hexagonal lattice, are compared for their effectiveness on a simple astronomical object. The comparison is made in the direct and Fourier spaces. Raw "dirty" images have many artifacts due to replicas of the original object. Linear methods cannot remove these replicas while iterative methods clearly show their efficacy in these examples.

  19. Static Analysis Tools, a Practical Approach for Safety-Critical Software Verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, R.; Vicente, D.; Silva, N.

    2009-05-01

    Static code analysis tools available today range from Lintbased syntax parsers to standards' compliance checkers to tools using more formal methods for verification. As safety critical software complexity is increasing, these tools provide a mean to ensure code quality, safety and dependability attributes. They also provide a mean to introduce further automation in code analysis activities. The features presented by static code analysis tools are particularly interesting for V&V activities. In the scope of Independent Code Verification (IVE), two different static analysis tools have been used during Code Verification activities of the LISA Pathfinder onboard software in order to assess their contribution to the efficiency of the process and quality of the results. Polyspace (The MathWorks) and FlexeLint (Gimpel) tools have been used as examples of high-budget and low-budget tools respectively. Several aspects have been addressed: effort has been categorised for closer analysis (e.g. setup and configuration time, execution time, analysis of the results, etc), reported issues have been categorised according to their type and the coverage of traditional IVE tasks by the static code analysis tools has been evaluated. Final observations have been performed by analysing the previously referred subjects, namely regarding cost effectiveness, quality of results, complementarities between the results of different static code analysis tools and relation between automated code analysis and manual code inspection.

  20. Applications of a broad-spectrum tool for conservation and fisheries analysis: aquatic gap analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKenna, James E.; Steen, Paul J.; Lyons, John; Stewart, Jana S.

    2009-01-01

    Natural resources support all of our social and economic activities, as well as our biological existence. Humans have little control over most of the physical, biological, and sociological conditions dictating the status and capacity of natural resources in any particular area. However, the most rapid and threatening influences on natural resources typically are anthropogenic overuse and degradation. In addition, living natural resources (i.e., organisms) do not respect political boundaries, but are aware of their optimal habitat and environmental conditions. Most organisms have wider spatial ranges than the jurisdictional boundaries of environmental agencies that deal with them; even within those jurisdictions, information is patchy and disconnected. Planning and projecting effects of ecological management are difficult, because many organisms, habitat conditions, and interactions are involved. Conservation and responsible resource use involves wise management and manipulation of the aspects of the environment and biological communities that can be effectively changed. Tools and data sets that provide new insights and analysis capabilities can enhance the ability of resource managers to make wise decisions and plan effective, long-term management strategies. Aquatic gap analysis has been developed to provide those benefits. Gap analysis is more than just the assessment of the match or mis-match (i.e., gaps) between habitats of ecological value and areas with an appropriate level of environmental protection (e.g., refuges, parks, preserves), as the name suggests. Rather, a Gap Analysis project is a process which leads to an organized database of georeferenced information and previously available tools to examine conservation and other ecological issues; it provides a geographic analysis platform that serves as a foundation for aquatic ecological studies. This analytical tool box allows one to conduct assessments of all habitat elements within an area of interest

  1. AnalyzeHOLE - An Integrated Wellbore Flow Analysis Tool

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Halford, Keith

    2009-01-01

    Conventional interpretation of flow logs assumes that hydraulic conductivity is directly proportional to flow change with depth. However, well construction can significantly alter the expected relation between changes in fluid velocity and hydraulic conductivity. Strong hydraulic conductivity contrasts between lithologic intervals can be masked in continuously screened wells. Alternating intervals of screen and blank casing also can greatly complicate the relation between flow and hydraulic properties. More permeable units are not necessarily associated with rapid fluid-velocity increases. Thin, highly permeable units can be misinterpreted as thick and less permeable intervals or not identified at all. These conditions compromise standard flow-log interpretation because vertical flow fields are induced near the wellbore. AnalyzeHOLE, an integrated wellbore analysis tool for simulating flow and transport in wells and aquifer systems, provides a better alternative for simulating and evaluating complex well-aquifer system interaction. A pumping well and adjacent aquifer system are simulated with an axisymmetric, radial geometry in a two-dimensional MODFLOW model. Hydraulic conductivities are distributed by depth and estimated with PEST by minimizing squared differences between simulated and measured flows and drawdowns. Hydraulic conductivity can vary within a lithology but variance is limited with regularization. Transmissivity of the simulated system also can be constrained to estimates from single-well, pumping tests. Water-quality changes in the pumping well are simulated with simple mixing models between zones of differing water quality. These zones are differentiated by backtracking thousands of particles from the well screens with MODPATH. An Excel spreadsheet is used to interface the various components of AnalyzeHOLE by (1) creating model input files, (2) executing MODFLOW, MODPATH, PEST, and supporting FORTRAN routines, and (3) importing and graphically

  2. AnalyzeHOLE: An Integrated Wellbore Flow Analysis Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Keith J. Halford

    2009-10-01

    Conventional interpretation of flow logs assumes that hydraulic conductivity is directly proportional to flow change with depth. However, well construction can significantly alter the expected relation between changes in fluid velocity and hydraulic conductivity. Strong hydraulic conductivity contrasts between lithologic intervals can be masked in continuously screened wells. Alternating intervals of screen and blank casing also can greatly complicate the relation between flow and hydraulic properties. More permeable units are not necessarily associated with rapid fluid-velocity increases. Thin, highly permeable units can be misinterpreted as thick and less permeable intervals or not identified at all. These conditions compromise standard flow-log interpretation because vertical flow fields are induced near the wellbore. AnalyzeHOLE, an integrated wellbore analysis tool for simulating flow and transport in wells and aquifer systems, provides a better alternative for simulating and evaluating complex well-aquifer system interaction. A pumping well and adjacent aquifer system are simulated with an axisymmetric, radial geometry in a two-dimensional MODFLOW model. Hydraulic conductivities are distributed by depth and estimated with PEST by minimizing squared differences between simulated and measured flows and drawdowns. Hydraulic conductivity can vary within a lithology but variance is limited with regularization. Transmissivity of the simulated system also can be constrained to estimates from single-well, pumping tests. Water-quality changes in the pumping well are simulated with simple mixing models between zones of differing water quality. These zones are differentiated by backtracking thousands of particles from the well screens with MODPATH. An Excel spreadsheet is used to interface the various components of AnalyzeHOLE by (1) creating model input files, (2) executing MODFLOW, MODPATH, PEST, and supporting FORTRAN routines, and (3) importing and graphically

  3. General Mission Analysis Tool (GMAT) Acceptance Test Plan [Draft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dove, Edwin; Hughes, Steve

    2007-01-01

    The information presented in this Acceptance Test Plan document shows the current status of the General Mission Analysis Tool (GMAT). GMAT is a software system developed by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in collaboration with the private sector. The GMAT development team continuously performs acceptance tests in order to verify that the software continues to operate properly after updates are made. The GMAT Development team consists of NASA/GSFC Code 583 software developers, NASA/GSFC Code 595 analysts, and contractors of varying professions. GMAT was developed to provide a development approach that maintains involvement from the private sector and academia, encourages collaborative funding from multiple government agencies and the private sector, and promotes the transfer of technology from government funded research to the private sector. GMAT contains many capabilities, such as integrated formation flying modeling and MATLAB compatibility. The propagation capabilities in GMAT allow for fully coupled dynamics modeling of multiple spacecraft, in any flight regime. Other capabilities in GMAT inclucle: user definable coordinate systems, 3-D graphics in any coordinate system GMAT can calculate, 2-D plots, branch commands, solvers, optimizers, GMAT functions, planetary ephemeris sources including DE405, DE200, SLP and analytic models, script events, impulsive and finite maneuver models, and many more. GMAT runs on Windows, Mac, and Linux platforms. Both the Graphical User Interface (GUI) and the GMAT engine were built and tested on all of the mentioned platforms. GMAT was designed for intuitive use from both the GUI and with an importable script language similar to that of MATLAB.

  4. Photomat: A Mobile Tool for Aiding in Student Construction of Research Questions and Data Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shelley, Tia Renee; Dasgupta, Chandan; Silva, Alexandra; Lyons, Leilah; Moher, Tom

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a new mobile software tool, PhotoMAT (Photo Management and Analysis Tool), and students' experiences with this tool within a scaffolded curricular unit--Neighborhood Safari. PhotoMAT was designed to support learners' investigations of backyard animal behavior and works with image sets obtained using fixed-position field cameras…

  5. Overview of the Hydrogen Financial Analysis Scenario Tool (H2FAST); NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    Melaina, Marc; Bush, Brian; Penev, Michael

    2015-05-12

    This presentation provides an introduction to the Hydrogen Financial Analysis Scenario Tool (H2FAST) and includes an overview of each of the three versions of H2FAST: the Web tool, the Excel spreadsheet version, and the beta version of the H2FAST Business Case Scenario tool.

  6. Hydrogen Financial Analysis Scenario Tool (H2FAST); NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    Melaina, Marc

    2015-04-21

    This presentation describes the Hydrogen Financial Analysis Scenario Tool, H2FAST, and provides an overview of each of the three H2FAST formats: the H2FAST web tool, the H2FAST Excel spreadsheet, and the H2FAST Business Case Scenario (BCS) tool. Examples are presented to illustrate the types of questions that H2FAST can help answer.

  7. Online Analysis of Wind and Solar Part II: Transmission Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Makarov, Yuri V.; Etingov, Pavel V.; Ma, Jian; Subbarao, Krishnappa

    2012-01-31

    To facilitate wider penetration of renewable resources without compromising system reliability concerns arising from the lack of predictability of intermittent renewable resources, a tool for use by California Independent System Operator (CAISO) power grid operators was developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in conjunction with CAISO with funding from California Energy Commission. The tool analyzes and displays the impacts of uncertainties in forecasts of loads and renewable generation on: (1) congestion, (2)voltage and transient stability margins, and (3)voltage reductions and reactive power margins. The impacts are analyzed in the base case and under user-specified contingencies.A prototype of the tool has been developed and implemented in software.

  8. Online Analysis of Wind and Solar Part I: Ramping Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Etingov, Pavel V.; Ma, Jian; Makarov, Yuri V.; Subbarao, Krishnappa

    2012-01-31

    To facilitate wider penetration of renewable resources without compromising system reliability concerns arising from the lack of predictability of intermittent renewable resources, a tool for use by California Independent System Operator (CAISO) power grid operators was developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in conjunction with CAISO with funding from California Energy Commission. This tool predicts and displays additional capacity and ramping requirements caused by uncertainties in forecasts of loads and renewable generation. The tool is currently operational in the CAISO operations center. This is one of two final reports on the project.

  9. Computational Tools for Parsimony Phylogenetic Analysis of Omics Data.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Jose; Amri, Hakima; Noursi, David; Abu-Asab, Mones

    2015-08-01

    High-throughput assays from genomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and next generation sequencing produce massive omics datasets that are challenging to analyze in biological or clinical contexts. Thus far, there is no publicly available program for converting quantitative omics data into input formats to be used in off-the-shelf robust phylogenetic programs. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on creation of two Windows-based programs, OmicsTract and SynpExtractor, to address this gap. We note, as a way of introduction and development of these programs, that one particularly useful bioinformatics inferential modeling is the phylogenetic cladogram. Cladograms are multidimensional tools that show the relatedness between subgroups of healthy and diseased individuals and the latter's shared aberrations; they also reveal some characteristics of a disease that would not otherwise be apparent by other analytical methods. The OmicsTract and SynpExtractor were written for the respective tasks of (1) accommodating advanced phylogenetic parsimony analysis (through standard programs of MIX [from PHYLIP] and TNT), and (2) extracting shared aberrations at the cladogram nodes. OmicsTract converts comma-delimited data tables through assigning each data point into a binary value ("0" for normal states and "1" for abnormal states) then outputs the converted data tables into the proper input file formats for MIX or with embedded commands for TNT. SynapExtractor uses outfiles from MIX and TNT to extract the shared aberrations of each node of the cladogram, matching them with identifying labels from the dataset and exporting them into a comma-delimited file. Labels may be gene identifiers in gene-expression datasets or m/z values in mass spectrometry datasets. By automating these steps, OmicsTract and SynpExtractor offer a veritable opportunity for rapid and standardized phylogenetic analyses of omics data; their model can also be extended to next generation sequencing

  10. Optimizing end-to-end system performance for millimeter and submillimeter spectroscopy of protostars : wideband heterodyne receivers and sideband-deconvolution techniques for rapid molecular-line surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumner, Matthew Casey

    signal and broader tuning range of the Gunn continue to make it the preferred choice. The receiver and high-resolution spectrometer system were brought into a fully operational state late in 2007, when they were used to perform unbiased molecular-line surveys of several galactic sources, including the Orion KL hot core and a position in the L1157 outflow. In order to analyze these data, a new data pipeline was needed to deconvolve the double-sideband signals from the receiver and to model the molecular spectra. A highly automated sideband-deconvolution system has been created, and spectral-analysis tools are currently being developed. The sideband deconvolution relies on chi-square minimization to determine the optimal single-sideband spectrum in the presence of unknown sideband-gain imbalances and spectral baselines. Analytic results are presented for several different methods of approaching the problem, including direct optimization, nonlinear root finding, and a hybrid approach that utilizes a two-stage process to separate out the relatively weak nonlinearities so that the majority of the parameters can be found with a fast linear solver. Analytic derivations of the Jacobian matrices for all three cases are presented, along with a new Mathematica utility that enables the calculation of arbitrary gradients. The direct-optimization method has been incorporated into software, along with a spectral simulation engine that allows different deconvolution scenarios to be tested. The software has been validated through the deconvolution of simulated data sets, and initial results from L1157 and Orion are presented. Both surveys demonstrate the power of the wideband receivers and improved data pipeline to enable exciting scientific studies. The L1157 survey was completed in only 20 hours of telescope time and offers moderate sensitivity over a > 50-GHz range, from 220 GHz to approximately 270 or 280 GHz. The speed with which this survey was completed implies that the new

  11. Overview of the Development for a Suite of Low-Thrust Trajectory Analysis Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kos, Larry D.; Polsgrove, Tara; Hopkins, Randall; Thomas, Dan; Sims, Jon A.

    2006-01-01

    A NASA intercenter team has developed a suite of low-thrust trajectory analysis tools to make a significant improvement in three major facets of low-thrust trajectory and mission analysis. These are: 1) ease of use, 2) ability to more robustly converge to solutions, and 3) higher fidelity modeling and accuracy of results. Due mostly to the short duration of the development, the team concluded that a suite of tools was preferred over having one integrated tool. This tool-suite, their characteristics, and their applicability will be described. Trajectory analysts can read this paper and determine which tool is most appropriate for their problem.

  12. Technology Combination Analysis Tool (TCAT) for Active Debris Removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamot, B.; Richard, M.; Salmon, T.; Pisseloup, A.; Cougnet, C.; Axthelm, R.; Saunder, C.; Dupont, C.; Lequette, L.

    2013-08-01

    This paper present the work of the Swiss Space Center EPFL within the CNES-funded OTV-2 study. In order to find the most performant Active Debris Removal (ADR) mission architectures and technologies, a tool was developed in order to design and compare ADR spacecraft, and to plan ADR campaigns to remove large debris. Two types of architectures are considered to be efficient: the Chaser (single-debris spacecraft), the Mothership/ Kits (multiple-debris spacecraft). Both are able to perform controlled re-entry. The tool includes modules to optimise the launch dates and the order of capture, to design missions and spacecraft, and to select launch vehicles. The propulsion, power and structure subsystems are sized by the tool thanks to high-level parametric models whilst the other ones are defined by their mass and power consumption. Final results are still under investigation by the consortium but two concrete examples of the tool's outputs are presented in the paper.

  13. Application of the ORIGEN Fallout Analysis Tool and the DELFIC Fallout Planning Tool to National Technical Nuclear Forensics

    SciTech Connect

    Jodoin, Vincent J; Lee, Ronald W; Peplow, Douglas E.; Lefebvre, Jordan P

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this project was to provide a robust fallout analysis and planning tool for the National Technical Nuclear Forensics interagency ground sample collection team. Their application called for a fast-running, portable mission-planning tool for use in response to emerging improvised nuclear device (IND) post-detonation situations. The project met those goals by research and development of models to predict the physical, chemical, and radiological properties of fallout debris. ORNL has developed new graphical user interfaces for two existing codes, the Oak Ridge Isotope Generation (ORIGEN) code and the Defense Land Fallout Interpretive Code (DELFIC). ORIGEN is a validated, radionuclide production and decay code that has been implemented into the Fallout Analysis Tool to predict the fallout source term nuclide inventory after the detonation of an IND. DELFIC is a validated, physics-based, research reference fallout prediction software package. It has been implemented into the Fallout Planning Tool and is used to predict the fractionated isotope concentrations in fallout, particle sizes, fractionation ratios, dose rate, and integrated dose over the planned collection routes - information vital to ensure quality samples for nuclear forensic analysis while predicting dose to the sample collectors. DELFIC contains a particle activity module, which models the radiochemical fractionation of the elements in a cooling fireball as they condense into and onto particles to predict the fractionated activity size distribution for a given scenario. This provides the most detailed physics-based characterization of the fallout source term phenomenology available in an operational fallout model.

  14. Firedec: a two-channel finite-resolution image deconvolution algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantale, N.; Courbin, F.; Tewes, M.; Jablonka, P.; Meylan, G.

    2016-05-01

    We present a two-channel deconvolution method that decomposes images into a parametric point-source channel and a pixelized extended-source channel. Based on the central idea of the deconvolution algorithm proposed by Magain et al. (1998, ApJ, 494, 472), the method aims at improving the resolution of the data rather than at completely removing the point spread function (PSF). Improvements over the original method include a better regularization of the pixel channel of the image, based on wavelet filtering and multiscale analysis, and a better controlled separation of the point source vs. the extended source. In addition, the method is able to simultaneously deconvolve many individual frames of the same object taken with different instruments under different PSF conditions. For this purpose, we introduce a general geometric transformation between individual images. This transformation allows the combination of the images without having to interpolate them. We illustrate the capability of our algorithm using real and simulated images with complex diffraction-limited PSF.

  15. Blind deconvolution of 3D fluorescence microscopy using depth-variant asymmetric PSF.

    PubMed

    Kim, Boyoung; Naemura, Takeshi

    2016-06-01

    The 3D wide-field fluorescence microscopy suffers from depth-variant asymmetric blur. The depth-variance and axial asymmetry are due to refractive index mismatch between the immersion and the specimen layer. The radial asymmetry is due to lens imperfections and local refractive index inhomogeneities in the specimen. To obtain the PSF that has these characteristics, there were PSF premeasurement trials. However, they are useless since imaging conditions such as camera position and refractive index of the specimen are changed between the premeasurement and actual imaging. In this article, we focus on removing unknown depth-variant asymmetric blur in such an optical system under the assumption of refractive index homogeneities in the specimen. We propose finding few parameters in the mathematical PSF model from observed images in which the PSF model has a depth-variant asymmetric shape. After generating an initial PSF from the analysis of intensities in the observed image, the parameters are estimated based on a maximum likelihood estimator. Using the estimated PSF, we implement an accelerated GEM algorithm for image deconvolution. Deconvolution result shows the superiority of our algorithm in terms of accuracy, which quantitatively evaluated by FWHM, relative contrast, standard deviation values of intensity peaks and FWHM. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:480-494, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27062314

  16. Thorium concentrations in the lunar surface. V - Deconvolution of the central highlands region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzger, A. E.; Etchegaray-Ramirez, M. I.; Haines, E. L.

    1982-01-01

    The distribution of thorium in the lunar central highlands measured from orbit by the Apollo 16 gamma-ray spectrometer is subjected to a deconvolution analysis to yield improved spatial resolution and contrast. Use of two overlapping data fields for complete coverage also provides a demonstration of the technique's ability to model concentrations several degrees beyond the data track. Deconvolution reveals an association between Th concentration and the Kant Plateau, Descartes Mountain and Cayley plains surface formations. The Kant Plateau and Descartes Mountains model with Th less than 1 part per million, which is typical of farside highlands but is infrequently seen over any other nearside highland portions of the Apollo 15 and 16 ground tracks. It is noted that, if the Cayley plains are the result of basin-forming impact ejecta, the distribution of Th concentration with longitude supports an origin from the Imbrium basin rather than the Nectaris or Orientale basins. Nectaris basin materials are found to have a Th concentration similar to that of the Descartes Mountains, evidence that the latter may have been emplaced as Nectaris basin impact deposits.

  17. A Finite-Element Analysis of Transient Vibration of an Ultrasonic Welding Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, Yoshikazu; Ueha, Sadayuki

    1993-05-01

    Transient vibration of an ultrasonic welding tool is computed in order to estimate the fracture of the tool. Equations for this analysis have been formulated by means of the finite-element method (FEM) and Newmark-β method. With the use of these equations, the transient stress distribution of the ultrasonic welding tool driven by a bolt-clamped Langevin-type transducer is calculated. Then, the effect of the transient state of the tool is investigated.

  18. An open-source deconvolution software package for 3-D quantitative fluorescence microscopy imaging

    PubMed Central

    SUN, Y.; DAVIS, P.; KOSMACEK, E. A.; IANZINI, F.; MACKEY, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Deconvolution techniques have been widely used for restoring the 3-D quantitative information of an unknown specimen observed using a wide-field fluorescence microscope. Deconv, an open-source deconvolution software package, was developed for 3-D quantitative fluorescence microscopy imaging and was released under the GNU Public License. Deconv provides numerical routines for simulation of a 3-D point spread function and deconvolution routines implemented three constrained iterative deconvolution algorithms: one based on a Poisson noise model and two others based on a Gaussian noise model. These algorithms are presented and evaluated using synthetic images and experimentally obtained microscope images, and the use of the library is explained. Deconv allows users to assess the utility of these deconvolution algorithms and to determine which are suited for a particular imaging application. The design of Deconv makes it easy for deconvolution capabilities to be incorporated into existing imaging applications. PMID:19941558

  19. CASSIS - Web based tools for the analysis of astrophysical spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, Adam D.; Klotz, Alain; Caux, Emmanuel; Crovisier, Jacques

    Future instruments for submillimeter and FIR astronomy like the Herschel Space Observatory and Alma will offer the possibility to make high-resolution wide-frequency spectral surveys of the interstellar and circumstellar media. The CASSIS project aims to facilitate the analysis of these spectra by a maximum number of interested researchers. We will give a demonstration of the present state of CASSIS software which is beginning to be made available for testing and validation through the web. By connecting to the CASSIS server a user will be able to visualise a synthetic spectrum created from a choice of models and associated parameters and compare this simulation with the observations. By choosing a template closest to that of the object being observed the user will obtain a set of starting conditions including the principal chemical species, their abundance and linked physical parameters. Various computer tools will then allow the inversion of the spectra to obtain the best set of parameters. In order to run the model chosen the CASSIS server will have access to a variety of different databases and will automatically transform this data into a common format. As of May 2005, two spectroscopic data bases (JPL and CDMS) are periodically updated and combined on the server allowing rapid injection into the models. Access to bases giving collisional parameters is planned in the near future. At this time two models are available: a general Local Thermal Equilibrium model with a correction for the optical depth and a specialised model for comets written by J. Crovisier. Two working modes can be used: (1) a line-by-line mode that steps automatically from one transition of a given species to the next allowing a comparison between the predictions and the observations to be made for each line; (2) a sum mode which shows the convoluted spectra of a variety of species. For the ETL model it is possible to create interactively a rotational diagram to determine N and T for each

  20. Teaching Advanced Data Analysis Tools to High School Astronomy Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, David V.; Herring, Julie; Hintz, Eric G.

    2015-01-01

    A major barrier to becoming an astronomer is learning how to analyze astronomical data, such as using photometry to compare the brightness of stars. Most fledgling astronomers learn observation, data reduction, and analysis skills through an upper division college class. If the same skills could be taught in an introductory high school astronomy class, then more students would have an opportunity to do authentic science earlier, with implications for how many choose to become astronomers. Several software tools have been developed that can analyze astronomical data ranging from fairly straightforward (AstroImageJ and DS9) to very complex (IRAF and DAOphot). During the summer of 2014, a study was undertaken at Brigham Young University through a Research Experience for Teachers (RET) program to evaluate the effectiveness and ease-of-use of these four software packages. Standard tasks tested included creating a false-color IR image using WISE data in DS9, Adobe Photoshop, and The Gimp; a multi-aperture analyses of variable stars over time using AstroImageJ; creating Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs) of stars using photometry at multiple wavelengths in AstroImageJ and DS9; and color-magnitude and hydrogen alpha index diagrams for open star clusters using IRAF and DAOphot. Tutorials were then written and combined with screen captures to teach high school astronomy students at Walden School of Liberal Arts in Provo, UT how to perform these same tasks. They analyzed image data using the four software packages, imported it into Microsoft Excel, and created charts using images from BYU's 36-inch telescope at their West Mountain Observatory. The students' attempts to complete these tasks were observed, mentoring was provided, and the students then reported on their experience through a self-reflection essay and concept test. Results indicate that high school astronomy students can successfully complete professional-level astronomy data analyses when given detailed

  1. MSP-Tool: a VBA-based software tool for the analysis of multispecimen paleointensity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monster, Marilyn; de Groot, Lennart; Dekkers, Mark

    2015-12-01

    The multispecimen protocol (MSP) is a method to estimate the Earth's magnetic field's past strength from volcanic rocks or archeological materials. By reducing the amount of heating steps and aligning the specimens parallel to the applied field, thermochemical alteration and multi-domain effects are minimized. We present a new software tool, written for Microsoft Excel 2010 in Visual Basic for Applications (VBA), that evaluates paleointensity data acquired using this protocol. In addition to the three ratios (standard, fraction-corrected and domain-state-corrected) calculated following Dekkers and Böhnel (2006) and Fabian and Leonhardt (2010) and a number of other parameters proposed by Fabian and Leonhardt (2010), it also provides several reliability criteria. These include an alteration criterion, whether or not the linear regression intersects the y axis within the theoretically prescribed range, and two directional checks. Overprints and misalignment are detected by isolating the remaining natural remanent magnetization (NRM) and the partial thermoremanent magnetization (pTRM) gained and comparing their declinations and inclinations. The NRM remaining and pTRM gained are then used to calculate alignment-corrected multispecimen plots. Data are analyzed using bootstrap statistics. The program was tested on lava samples that were given a full TRM and that acquired their pTRMs at angles of 0, 15, 30 and 90° with respect to their NRMs. MSP-Tool adequately detected and largely corrected these artificial alignment errors.

  2. Systematic studies of the Richardson-Lucy deconvolution algorithm applied to VHE gamma data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinz, S.; Jung, I.; Stegmann, C.

    2012-08-01

    The Richardson-Lucy deconvolution algorithm was applied to astronomical images in the very high-energy regime with photon energies above 100 GeV. Through a systematic study with respect to source significance, background level and source morphology we were able to derive optimal deconvolution parameters. The results presented show that deconvolution makes it possible to study structural details well below the angular resolution of the very high-energy γ-ray experiment.

  3. The ISOPHOT Interactive Analysis PIA, a Calibration and Scientific Analysis Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, C.; Acosta-Pulido, J.; Heinrichsen, I.; Morris, H.; Tai, W.-M.

    ISOPHOT is one of the instruments on board the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), launched in November 1995 by the European Space Agency. ISOPHOT Interactive Analysis, PIA, is a scientific and calibration data analysis tool for ISOPHOT data reduction. The PIA software was designed both as a tool for use by the instrument team for calibration of the PHT instrument during and after the ISO mission, and as an interactive tool for ISOPHOT data analysis by general observers. It has been jointly developed by the ESA Astrophysics Division (responsible for planning, direction, and execution) and scientific institutes forming the ISOPHOT consortium. PIA is entirely based on the Interactive Data Language IDL (IDL92). All the capabilities of input/output, processing, and visualization can be reached from window menus for all the different ISOPHOT sub-systems, in all levels of data reduction from digital raw data, coming from the ISO telemetry, to the final level of calibrated images, spectra, and multi-filter, multi-aperture photometry. In this article, we describe the structure of the package, putting special emphasis on the internal data organization and management.

  4. Tools-4-Metatool (T4M): online suite of web-tools to process stoichiometric network analysis data from Metatool.

    PubMed

    Xavier, Daniela; Vázquez, Sara; Higuera, Clara; Morán, Federico; Montero, Francisco

    2011-08-01

    Tools-4-Metatool (T4M) is a suite of web-tools, implemented in PERL, which analyses, parses, and manipulates files related to Metatool. Its main goal is to assist the work with Metatool. T4M has two major sets of tools: Analysis and Compare. Analysis visualizes the results of Metatool (convex basis, elementary flux modes, and enzyme subsets) and facilitates the study of metabolic networks. It is composed of five tools: MDigraph, MetaMatrix, CBGraph, EMGraph, and SortEM. Compare was developed to compare different Metatool results from different networks. This set consists of: Compara and ComparaSub which compare network subsets providing outputs in different formats and ComparaEM that seeks for identical elementary modes in two metabolic networks. The suite T4M also includes one script that generates Metatool input: CBasis2Metatool, based on a Metatool output file that is filtered by a list of convex basis' metabolites. Finally, the utility CheckMIn checks the consistency of the Metatool input file. T4M is available at http://solea.quim.ucm.es/t4m. PMID:21554926

  5. Lagrangian analysis. Modern tool of the dynamics of solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cagnoux, J.; Chartagnac, P.; Hereil, P.; Perez, M.; Seaman, L.

    Explosive metal-working, material synthesis under shock loading, terminal ballistics, and explosive rock-blasting, are some of the civil and military fields of activity that call for a wider knowledge about the behavior of materials subjected to strong dynamic pressures. It is in these fields that Lagrangian analysis methods, the subject of this work, prove to be a useful investigative tool for the physicist. Lagrangian analysis was developed around 1970 by Fowles and Williams. The idea is based on the integration of the conservation equations of mechanics using stress or particle velocity records obtained by means of transducers placed in the path of a stress wave. In this way, all the kinematical and mechanical quantities contained in the conservation equations are obtained. In the first chapter the authors introduce the mathematical tools used to analyze plane and spherical one-dimensional motions. For plane motion, they describe the mathematical analysis methods pertinent to the three regimes of wave propagation encountered : the non-attenuating unsteady wave, the simple wave, and the attenuating unsteady wave. In each of these regimes, cases are treated for which either stress or particle velocity records are initially available. The authors insist that one or the other groups of data (stress and particle velocity) are sufficient to integrate the conservation equations in the case of the plane motion when both groups of data are necessary in the case of the spherical motion. However, in spite of this additional difficulty, Lagrangian analysis of the spherical motion remains particularly interesting for the physicist because it allows access to the behavior of the material under deformation processes other than that imposed by plane one-dimensional motion. The methods expounded in the first chapter are based on Lagrangian measurement of particle velocity and stress in relation to time in a material compressed by a plane or spherical dilatational wave. The

  6. Automation Tools for Finite Element Analysis of Adhesively Bonded Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tahmasebi, Farhad; Brodeur, Stephen J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This article presents two new automation creation tools that obtain stresses and strains (Shear and peel) in adhesively bonded joints. For a given adhesively bonded joint Finite Element model, in which the adhesive is characterised using springs, these automation tools read the corresponding input and output files, use the spring forces and deformations to obtain the adhesive stresses and strains, sort the stresses and strains in descending order, and generate plot files for 3D visualisation of the stress and strain fields. Grids (nodes) and elements can be numbered in any order that is convenient for the user. Using the automation tools, trade-off studies, which are needed for design of adhesively bonded joints, can be performed very quickly.

  7. Comparison of active-set method deconvolution and matched-filtering for derivation of an ultrasound transit time spectrum.

    PubMed

    Wille, M-L; Zapf, M; Ruiter, N V; Gemmeke, H; Langton, C M

    2015-06-21

    The quality of ultrasound computed tomography imaging is primarily determined by the accuracy of ultrasound transit time measurement. A major problem in analysis is the overlap of signals making it difficult to detect the correct transit time. The current standard is to apply a matched-filtering approach to the input and output signals. This study compares the matched-filtering technique with active set deconvolution to derive a transit time spectrum from a coded excitation chirp signal and the measured output signal. The ultrasound wave travels in a direct and a reflected path to the receiver, resulting in an overlap in the recorded output signal. The matched-filtering and deconvolution techniques were applied to determine the transit times associated with the two signal paths. Both techniques were able to detect the two different transit times; while matched-filtering has a better accuracy (0.13 μs versus 0.18 μs standard deviations), deconvolution has a 3.5 times improved side-lobe to main-lobe ratio. A higher side-lobe suppression is important to further improve image fidelity. These results suggest that a future combination of both techniques would provide improved signal detection and hence improved image fidelity. PMID:26047163

  8. The application of a time-domain deconvolution technique for identification of experimental acoustic-emission signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houghton, J. R.; Townsend, M. A.; Packman, P. F.

    1978-01-01

    A method is presented for the signature analysis of pulses by reconstructing in the time domain the shape of the pulse prior to its passing through the measurement system. This deconvolution technique is first evaluated using an idealized system and analytical pulse models and is shown to provide improved results. An experimental situation is then treated; system-component models are developed for the digitizer, tape recorder, filter, transducer and mechanical structure. To accommodate both calibration results and manufacturer's data, and to provide stable mathematical models entails considerable effort: some 30 parameters must be identified to model this system - which is still a substantial approximation - albeit of very high order. Experimental pulses generated by a ball drop, spark discharge and a tearing crack are then deconvoluted 'back through' the system as modeled, using this technique. These results are compared and indicate (a) that consistent shapes may be expected from a given type of source and (b) that some sources can be identified with greater clarity using the deconvolution approach.

  9. Determination of design and operation parameters for upper atmospheric research instrumentation to yield optimum resolution with deconvolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ioup, George E.; Ioup, Juliette W.

    1991-01-01

    The final report for work on the determination of design and operation parameters for upper atmospheric research instrumentation to yield optimum resolution with deconvolution is presented. Papers and theses prepared during the research report period are included. Among all the research results reported, note should be made of the specific investigation of the determination of design and operation parameters for upper atmospheric research instrumentation to yield optimum resolution with deconvolution. A methodology was developed to determine design and operation parameters for error minimization when deconvolution is included in data analysis. An error surface is plotted versus the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and all parameters of interest. Instrumental characteristics will determine a curve in this space. The SNR and parameter values which give the projection from the curve to the surface, corresponding to the smallest value for the error, are the optimum values. These values are constrained by the curve and so will not necessarily correspond to an absolute minimum in the error surface.

  10. Automated Multivariate Optimization Tool for Energy Analysis: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, P. G.; Griffith, B. T.; Long, N.; Torcellini, P. A.; Crawley, D.

    2006-07-01

    Building energy simulations are often used for trial-and-error evaluation of ''what-if'' options in building design--a limited search for an optimal solution, or ''optimization''. Computerized searching has the potential to automate the input and output, evaluate many options, and perform enough simulations to account for the complex interactions among combinations of options. This paper describes ongoing efforts to develop such a tool. The optimization tool employs multiple modules, including a graphical user interface, a database, a preprocessor, the EnergyPlus simulation engine, an optimization engine, and a simulation run manager. Each module is described and the overall application architecture is summarized.

  11. Isogeometric analysis: a powerful numerical tool for the elastic analysis of historical masonry arches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazzani, Antonio; Malagù, Marcello; Turco, Emilio

    2016-03-01

    We illustrate a numerical tool for analyzing plane arches such as those frequently used in historical masonry heritage. It is based on a refined elastic mechanical model derived from the isogeometric approach. In particular, geometry and displacements are modeled by means of non-uniform rational B-splines. After a brief introduction, outlining the basic assumptions of this approach and the corresponding modeling choices, several numerical applications to arches, which are typical of masonry structures, show the performance of this novel technique. These are discussed in detail to emphasize the advantage and potential developments of isogeometric analysis in the field of structural analysis of historical masonry buildings with complex geometries.

  12. Primordia Vita. Deconvolution from Modern Sequences.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifonov, Edward N.; Gabdank, Idan; Barash, Danny; Sobolevsky, Yehoshua

    2006-12-01

    Evolution of the triplet code is reconstructed on the basis of consensus temporal order of appearance of amino acids. Several important predictions are confirmed by computational sequence analyses. The earliest amino acids, alanine and glycine, have been encoded by GCC and GGC codons, as today. They were succeeded, respectively, by A- and G-series of amino acids, encoded by pyrimidine-central and purine-central codons. The length of the earliest proteins is estimated to be 6 7 residues. The earliest mRNAs were short G+C-rich molecules. These short sequences could have formed hairpins. This is confirmed by analysis of modern prokaryotic mRNA sequences. Predominant size of detected ancient hairpins also corresponds to 6 7 amino acids, as above. Vestiges of last common ancestor can be found in extant proteins in form of entirely conserved short sequences of size six to nine residues present in all or almost all sequenced prokaryotic proteomes (omnipresent motifs). The functions of the topmost conserved octamers are not involved in the basic elementary syntheses. This suggests an initial abiotic supply of amino acids, bases and sugars.

  13. TriageTools: tools for partitioning and prioritizing analysis of high-throughput sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Fimereli, Danai; Detours, Vincent; Konopka, Tomasz

    2013-04-01

    High-throughput sequencing is becoming a popular research tool but carries with it considerable costs in terms of computation time, data storage and bandwidth. Meanwhile, some research applications focusing on individual genes or pathways do not necessitate processing of a full sequencing dataset. Thus, it is desirable to partition a large dataset into smaller, manageable, but relevant pieces. We present a toolkit for partitioning raw sequencing data that includes a method for extracting reads that are likely to map onto pre-defined regions of interest. We show the method can be used to extract information about genes of interest from DNA or RNA sequencing samples in a fraction of the time and disk space required to process and store a full dataset. We report speedup factors between 2.6 and 96, depending on settings and samples used. The software is available at http://www.sourceforge.net/projects/triagetools/. PMID:23408855

  14. Design of a novel biomedical signal processing and analysis tool for functional neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Kaçar, Sezgin; Sakoğlu, Ünal

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a MATLAB-based graphical user interface (GUI) software tool for general biomedical signal processing and analysis of functional neuroimaging data is introduced. Specifically, electroencephalography (EEG) and electrocardiography (ECG) signals can be processed and analyzed by the developed tool, which incorporates commonly used temporal and frequency analysis methods. In addition to common methods, the tool also provides non-linear chaos analysis with Lyapunov exponents and entropies; multivariate analysis with principal and independent component analyses; and pattern classification with discriminant analysis. This tool can also be utilized for training in biomedical engineering education. This easy-to-use and easy-to-learn, intuitive tool is described in detail in this paper. PMID:26679001

  15. An automated technique for detailed ?-FTIR mapping of diamond and spectral deconvolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Dan; Griffin, Bill; O'Neill, Craig; O'Reilly, Suzanne; Pearson, Norman; Handley, Heather

    2010-05-01

    Since the original classification of diamonds based upon their absorption in the one-phonon region of the mid-infrared (IR) range was first introduced, a vast amount of research has been carried out in this field. The result today is that IR analysis has become the principle tool for classifying diamonds based upon the concentration and aggregation state of nitrogen, the most common impurity found within their crystal lattice. These studies have shown that diamonds can contain a large range of nitrogen, from nominally nitrogen free i.e. below detection limits (termed Type II) to nitrogen rich (termed Type I) with up to 5000 ppm. It has also been shown that the nitrogen concentration, aggregation and distribution in an individual stone can be either homogeneous or heterogeneous. Nitrogen has been shown to reside within diamond in three different aggregation states. The first is in the form of single substitutional nitrogen atoms, known as C centres. Diamonds that contain nitrogen only in this form are termed Type Ib. The second aggregation state is pairs of nitrogen atoms forming A centres (termed Type IaA diamonds) and the final state is four nitrogen atoms tetrahedrally arrange around a vacancy, forming a B centre (termed Type IaB). The sequence of aggregation has been shown to progress from C centres to A centres to B centres and is a function of time and temperature. As such it is a commonly used tool in the geological study of diamonds to gauge their mantle residence time / temperature history. The first step in the sequence is thought to occur relatively quickly in geological terms; the vast age of most diamonds therefore makes Type Ib samples rare in cratonic diamond deposits. The second step takes considerably more time, meaning that the A to B centre conversion may not always continue through to completion. So diamonds containing a mixture of both A and B centres are commonly termed Type IaAB. IR analysis of diamond also has the capability of identifying

  16. Tools for Education Policy Analysis [with CD-ROM].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mingat, Alain; Tan, Jee-Peng

    This manual contains a set of tools to assist policymakers in analyzing and revamping educational policy. Its main focus is on some economic and financial aspects of education and selected features in the arrangements for service delivery. Originally offered as a series of training workshops for World Bank staff to work with clients in the…

  17. PDAs as Lifelong Learning Tools: An Activity Theory Based Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waycott, Jenny; Jones, Ann; Scanlon, Eileen

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the use of an activity theory (AT) framework to analyze the ways that distance part time learners and mobile workers adapted and appropriated mobile devices for their activities and in turn how their use of these new tools changed the ways that they carried out their learning or their work. It is argued that there are two key…

  18. INTRODUCTION TO THE LANDSCAPE ANALYSIS TOOLS ARCVIEW EXTENSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Geographic Information Systems (GIS) have become a powerful tool in the field of landscape ecology. A common application of GIS is the generation of landscape indicators, which are quantitative measurements of the status or potential health of an area (e.g. watershed or county). ...

  19. Mapping and spatiotemporal analysis tool for hydrological data: Spellmap

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lack of data management and analyses tools is one of the major limitations to effectively evaluate and use large datasets of high-resolution atmospheric, surface, and subsurface observations. High spatial and temporal resolution datasets better represent the spatiotemporal variability of hydrologica...

  20. Tools for developing a quality management program: proactive tools (process mapping, value stream mapping, fault tree analysis, and failure mode and effects analysis).

    PubMed

    Rath, Frank

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the concepts of quality management (QM) and quality assurance (QA), as well as the current state of QM and QA practices in radiotherapy. A systematic approach incorporating a series of industrial engineering-based tools is proposed, which can be applied in health care organizations proactively to improve process outcomes, reduce risk and/or improve patient safety, improve through-put, and reduce cost. This tool set includes process mapping and process flowcharting, failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA), value stream mapping, and fault tree analysis (FTA). Many health care organizations do not have experience in applying these tools and therefore do not understand how and when to use them. As a result there are many misconceptions about how to use these tools, and they are often incorrectly applied. This article describes these industrial engineering-based tools and also how to use them, when they should be used (and not used), and the intended purposes for their use. In addition the strengths and weaknesses of each of these tools are described, and examples are given to demonstrate the application of these tools in health care settings. PMID:18406925