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Sample records for decreased renal 11beta-hsd-2

  1. Corticotropin-releasing hormone stimulates expression of leptin, 11beta-HSD2 and syncytin-1 in primary human trophoblasts

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The placental syncytiotrophoblast is the major source of maternal plasma corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) in the second half of pregnancy. Placental CRH exerts multiple functions in the maternal organism: It induces the adrenal secretion of cortisol via the stimulation of adrenocorticotropic hormone, regulates the timing of birth via its actions in the myometrium and inhibits the invasion of extravillous trophoblast cells in vitro. However, the auto- and paracrine actions of CRH on the syncytiotrophoblast itself are unknown. Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is accompanied by an increase in placental CRH, which could be of pathophysiological relevance for the dysregulation in syncytialisation seen in IUGR placentas. Methods We aimed to determine the effect of CRH on isolated primary trophoblastic cells in vitro. After CRH stimulation the trophoblast syncytialisation rate was monitored via syncytin-1 gene expression and beta-hCG (beta-human chorionic gonadotropine) ELISA in culture supernatant. The expression of the IUGR marker genes leptin and 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 (11beta-HSD2) was measured continuously over a period of 72 h. We hypothesized that CRH might attenuate syncytialisation, induce leptin, and reduce 11beta-HSD2 expression in primary villous trophoblasts, which are known features of IUGR. Results CRH did not influence the differentiation of isolated trophoblasts into functional syncytium as determined by beta-hCG secretion, albeit inducing syncytin-1 expression. Following syncytialisation, CRH treatment significantly increased leptin and 11beta-HSD2 expression, as well as leptin secretion into culture supernatant after 48 h. Conclusion The relevance of CRH for placental physiology is underlined by the present in vitro study. The induction of leptin and 11beta-HSD2 in the syncytiotrophoblast by CRH might promote fetal nutrient supply and placental corticosteroid metabolism in the phase before labour induction. PMID

  2. Uteroplacental insufficiency alters nephrogenesis and downregulates cyclooxygenase-2 expression in a model of IUGR with adult-onset hypertension.

    PubMed

    Baserga, Mariana; Hale, Merica A; Wang, Zheng Ming; Yu, Xing; Callaway, Christopher W; McKnight, Robert A; Lane, Robert H

    2007-05-01

    Clinical and animal studies indicate that intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) following uteroplacental insufficiency (UPI) reduces nephron number and predisposes toward renal insufficiency early in life and increased risk of adult-onset hypertension. In this study, we hypothesized that the inducible enzyme cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), a pivotal protein in nephrogenesis, constitutes a mechanism through which UPI and subsequent glucocorticoid overexposure can decrease nephron number. We further hypothesized that UPI downregulates the key enzyme 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (11beta-HSD2), which converts corticosterone to inert 11-dehydrocorticosterone, thereby protecting both the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) from the actions of corticosterone. Following bilateral uterine ligation on the pregnant rat, UPI significantly decreased renal COX-2, 11beta-HSD2, and GR mRNA and protein levels, but upregulated expression of MR at birth. At day 21 of life, 11beta-HSD2, GR, and also MR mRNA and protein levels were downregulated. UPI did not affect blood pressures (BP) at day 21 of life but significantly increased systolic BP in both genders at day 140. We conclude that in our animal model, UPI decreases fetal COX-2 expression during a period of active nephrogenesis in the IUGR rat, which is also characterized by decreased nephron number and adult-onset hypertension. PMID:17272666

  3. Decrease rate of the renal diameter in chronic hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Aoyagi, Teiichiro; Tachibana, Masaaki; Naganuma, Shinji

    2013-01-01

    We here present the results of ultrasonographic (US) evaluations on the alteration of renal diameter of chronic HD patients. Of 109 outpatient HD patients who had neither severe acquired cystic disease of the kidney nor hereditary polycystic kidney disease, we performed US two or three times to measure their maximum renal diameter (mean of both kidneys), and the yearly alteration rate was calculated. The average interval of the two measurements was 35.9 months, and the average HD duration from the HD induction to the first measurement was 29.5 months. The average decrease rate of renal diameter was 4.34 ± 0.4 (SE) mm/year. No statistical difference was seen on the decrease rate in relation to gender, age and original disease (among three groups, glomerulonephritis and IgA nephropathy, diabetes, and others including hypertension). However, the decrease rate was large when the first measurement was close to the induction of hemodialysis, suggesting that the alteration rate reduced according to the hemodialysis vintage (5.3 ± 0.8 mm/year, first measurement not more than 10 months after induction of HD and 1.5 ± 1.6 mm/year, first measurement more than 80 months after induction of HD). Renal diameter decreased approximately 4.3 mm each year, and the decrease rate slowed as the length of time on dialysis increased. PMID:24967236

  4. Diabetes-Induced Decrease in Renal Oxygen Tension: Effects of an Altered Metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palm, Fredrik; Carlsson, Per-Ola; Fasching, Angelica; Hansell, Peter; Liss, Per

    During conditions with experimental diabetes mellitus, it is evident that several alterations in renal oxygen metabolism occur, including increased mitochondrial respiration and increased lactate accumulation in the renal tissue. Consequently, these alterations will contribute to decrease the interstitial pO2, preferentially in the renal medulla of animals with sustained long-term hyperglycemia.

  5. [Medical therapy of osteoporosis in patients with mildly to moderate decreased renal function].

    PubMed

    Eiken, Pia A; Vestergaard, Peter

    2012-11-19

    Both chronic kidney disease and osteoporosis are frequent conditions in the general population. Most drugs for treating osteoporosis seem safe in terms of affecting renal function for patients with mildly to moderate decreased renal function. There are very few data on the efficacy (reduction in fracture risk) or safety in patients with severely decreased renal function (glomerular filtration rate < 30 ml/min) or on dialysis. PMID:23171789

  6. Is decreased diameter of renal pelvis in prone position an indicator of successful pyeloplasty?

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Gyanendra; Sharma, Anshu; Leung, Vivian Yee-Fong; Chu, Winnie Chiu-Wing

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate patients who had undergone pyeloplasty for pelviureteric junction obstruction, by measuring the anteroposterior diameter (APD) of the renal pelvis in supine and prone positions, and determine whether a decrease in APD in prone position can exclude obstruction in dilated renal system. Materials and Methods: From January 2012 to December 2013, patients who had undergone pyeloplasty were evaluated by ultrasound in two centers. The difference of APD of the renal pelvis in supine and prone positions was obtained. Correlation was made with the pre- and post-pyeloplasty renal function by radionuclide renogram. Results: There were 42 patients (31 males, 11 females; age range 5 months to 18 years). Residual hydronephrosis was detected in 41 patients of whom 35 patients (85%) showed decrease in APD by >10% in prone position. These patients and the one without hydronephrosis showed either no deterioration or improvement in renal function. Six patients (15%) showed either no change or increase in APD in prone position. Three patients (7.5%) were confirmed to have decrease in renal function indicating obstruction. Three patients (7.5%) showed no deterioration of renal function, but sluggish drainage on radionuclide renogram. Conclusion: Demonstration of decreased APD of renal pelvis in prone position by ultrasound is useful to differentiate obstructed from non-obstructed dilated renal system, and it correctly identified 85% candidates with successful pyeloplasty. In patients with no decrease or increase in APD at prone position, further follow-up is recommended to rule out obstruction. PMID:27081219

  7. Restored expression levels of TET1 decrease the proliferation and migration of renal carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    FAN, MIN; HE, XIAOZHOU; XU, XIANLIN

    2015-01-01

    Renal carcinoma is the most common type of kidney cancer in adults and is responsible for ~90–95% of the cases of kidney cancer. Ten-eleven translocation methylcytosine dioxygenase 1 (TET1) is a member of the TET family of enzymes, and is expressed at low levels in multiple malignancies. In the present study, a series of experiments were designed and performed to investigate whether the expression of TET1 is clinically correlated with clinical outcomes in renal carcinoma, and to examine the associations between TET1 expression level and the proliferation and migration in renal carcinoma cells. As a result, TET1 was observed to exhibit markedly low expression levels in 54 tumor tissue samples from 54 patients with renal carcinoma. Furthermore, statistical analysis revealed a clinical correlation between low expression levels of TET1 and the prognosis of patients with renal carcinoma. When TET1 was overexpressed in renal carcinoma cells, the viability and invasive abilities of the cells were decreased, and the rate of apoptosis was increased. In conclusion, the results demonstrated that TET1 is involved in tumor inhibition in renal carcinoma by promoting cell apoptosis and inhibiting cell proliferation and invasion, which may be exploited as a novel therapeutic target in the treatment of renal carcinoma. PMID:26165803

  8. EGCG decreases binding of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals onto renal tubular cells via decreased surface expression of alpha-enolase.

    PubMed

    Kanlaya, Rattiyaporn; Singhto, Nilubon; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2016-06-01

    Crystal retention on tubular cell surface inside renal tubules is considered as the earliest and crucial step for kidney stone formation. Therapeutics targeting this step would cease the development of kidney stone. This study thus aimed to investigate the potential role of epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a major antioxidant found in green tea leaves, in the reduction of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystal binding onto renal tubular cells. Pretreatment of the cells with EGCG for up to 6 h significantly diminished crystal-binding capability in a dose-dependent manner. Indirect immunofluorescence assay without and with cell permeabilization followed by laser-scanning confocal microscopy revealed that EGCG significantly reduced surface expression of alpha-enolase, whereas its intracellular level was increased. Western blot analysis confirmed such contradictory changes in membrane and cytosolic fractions of EGCG-treated cells, whereas the total level in whole cell lysate remained unchanged. Moreover, overexpression of surface alpha-enolase and enhancement of cell-crystal adhesion induced by 10 mM sodium oxalate were completely abolished by EGCG. Taken together, these data indicate that EGCG decreases binding of COM crystals onto renal tubular cells by decreasing the surface expression of alpha-enolase via re-localization or inhibition of alpha-enolase shuttling from the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane. These findings may also explain the effects of EGCG in reducing COM crystal deposition in previous animal models of kidney stone disease. Thus, EGCG may be useful for the prevention of new or recurrent stone formation. PMID:26898643

  9. Hyperaldosteronism after decreased renal K+ excretion in KCNMB2 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Casper K; Jensen, Iben S; Sorensen, Mads V; de Bruijn, Pauline I; Bleich, Markus; Praetorius, Helle A; Leipziger, Jens

    2016-05-15

    The kidney is the primary organ ensuring K(+) homeostasis. K(+) is secreted into the urine in the distal tubule by two mechanisms: by the renal outer medullary K(+) channel (Kir1.1) and by the Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel (KCa1.1). Here, we report a novel knockout mouse of the β2-subunit of the KCa1.1 channel (KCNMB2), which displays hyperaldosteronism after decreased renal K(+) excretion. KCNMB2(-/-) mice displayed hyperaldosteronism, normal plasma K(+) concentration, and produced dilute urine with decreased K(+) concentration. The normokalemia indicated that hyperaldosteronism did not result from primary aldosteronism. Activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system was also ruled out as renal renin mRNA expression was reduced in KCNMB2(-/-) mice. Renal K(+) excretion rates were similar in the two genotypes; however, KCNMB2(-/-) mice required elevated plasma aldosterone to achieve K(+) balance. Blockade of the mineralocorticoid receptor with eplerenone triggered mild hyperkalemia and unmasked reduced renal K(+) excretion in KCNMB2(-/-) mice. Knockout mice for the α-subunit of the KCa1.1 channel (KCNMA1(-/-) mice) have hyperaldosteronism, are hypertensive, and lack flow-induced K(+) secretion. KCNMB2(-/-) mice share the phenotypic traits of normokalemia and hyperaldosteronism with KCNMA1(-/-) mice but were normotensive and displayed intact flow-induced K(+) secretion. Despite elevated plasma aldosterone, KNCMB2(-/-) mice did not display salt-sensitive hypertension and were able to decrease plasma aldosterone on a high-Na(+) diet, although plasma aldosterone remained elevated in KCNMB2(-/-) mice. In summary, KCNMB2(-/-) mice have a reduced ability to excrete K(+) into the urine but achieve K(+) balance through an aldosterone-mediated, β2-independent mechanism. The phenotype of KCNMB2 mice was similar but milder than the phenotype of KCNMA1(-/-) mice. PMID:26962098

  10. Decreased expression of receptor tyrosine kinase of EphB1 protein in renal cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shuigen; Wang, Longxin; Li, Guimei; Zhang, Zhengyu; Wang, Jiandong

    2014-01-01

    Receptors tyrosine kinase of Eph superfamily plays an important role in human cancers. We previously found that EphB1 subtype is down-regulated in gastric cancer, colorectal cancer and ovary serous carcinoma. Fore the more, the decreased expression of EphB1 is related to invasion and metastasis in cancers. Although EphB1 has been revealed as an important receptor in cancers, our understanding of its roles in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is limited. In the present study, using specific anit-EphB1 polyclonal antibody and immunohistochemistry, we evaluated EphB1 protein expression levels in RCC specimens surgically resected from 82 patients (including 62 conventional clear-cell RCC, 10 papillary, and 10 chromophobic RCC cases). We found EphB1 protein is positively expressed in the epithelium of renal tubules. Decreased expression of EphB1 was found in all RCC carcinomas compared with expression in the normal epithelium of renal tubules. EphB1 protein moderately expressed in chromophobic RCC, weakly expressed in clear-cell RCC and negatively expressed in papillary RCC. Our results indicate that EphB1 may be involved in carcinogenesis of RCC, the molecular mechanisms of down-regulation of EphB1 including genetic and epigenetic alterations and the dedicated roles of EphB1 in occurrence and progress of RCC need to be explicated in next step. PMID:25120806

  11. Decreased Polycystin 2 Levels Result in Non-Renal Cardiac Dysfunction with Aging

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Ivana Y.; Duong, Sophie L.; Nguyen, Lily; Ehrlich, Barbara E.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the gene for polycystin 2 (Pkd2) lead to polycystic kidney disease, however the main cause of mortality in humans is cardiac related. We previously showed that 5 month old Pkd2+/- mice have altered calcium-contractile activity in cardiomyocytes, but have preserved cardiac function. Here, we examined 1 and 9 month old Pkd2+/- mice to determine if decreased amounts of functional polycystin 2 leads to impaired cardiac function with aging. We observed changes in calcium handling proteins in 1 month old Pkd2+/- mice, and these changes were exacerbated in 9 month old Pkd2+/- mice. Anatomically, the 9 month old Pkd2+/- mice had thinner left ventricular walls, consistent with dilated cardiomyopathy, and the left ventricular ejection fraction was decreased. Intriguingly, in response to acute isoproterenol stimulation to examine β-adrenergic responses, the 9 month old Pkd2+/- mice exhibited a stronger contractile response, which also coincided with preserved localization of the β2 adrenergic receptor. Importantly, the Pkd2+/- mice did not have any renal impairment. We conclude that the cardiac-related impact of decreased polycystin 2 progresses over time towards cardiac dysfunction and altered adrenergic signaling. These results provide further evidence that polycystin 2 provides a critical function in the heart, independent of renal involvement. PMID:27081851

  12. [Either calcium carbonate or sevelamer decreases urinary oxalate excretion in chronic renal failure patients].

    PubMed

    Caravaca, F; Ruiz, A B; Escola, J M; Hernández Gallego, R; Cerezo, I; Fernández, N; Barroso, S; Martín, M V

    2007-01-01

    The rate of oxalate absorbed from intestine is highly influenced by calcium intake in healthy subjects. It is unknown whether commonly used phosphate binders modify intestinal absorption and renal excretion of oxalate in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. This study aims to determine if calcium carbonate or sevelamer influences on urinary oxalate excretion. Twenty patients with CKD (stage 4 and 5 pre-dialysis) were included. Two treatment (1500 mg of calcium carbonate or 2400 mg of sevelamer), two-period (21 days each), crossover study with balanced assignment of the order of administration, and two washout periods were the main characteristics of this study design. Laboratory analyses in each phase included: serum creatinine, calcium, phosphorus, bicarbonate, total cholesterol, and 24 h urinary excretion of oxalate, creatinine, and urea. Creatinine clearance, protein catabolic rate (PNNA), total urinary oxalate excretion, and urinary oxalate / creatinine ratio were determined. Seventeen patients completed both treatment sequences. Total urinary oxalate excretion and urinary oxalate / creatinine ratios decreased significantly with respect to washout periods either after sevelamer or calcium carbonate treatment. The decrease in urinary oxalate excretion was greater after calcium carbonate (41.2+/-17.4%) than after sevelamer treatment (30.4+/-23.8%). There were not significant changes in renal function or PNNA values throughout the study periods. In conclusion, either calcium carbonate or sevelamer significantly reduces urinary oxalate excretion in CKD patients. Further studies will be needed to ascertain whether the type of phosphate binder influences on the accumulation of oxalate in CKD patients. PMID:17944584

  13. Renal

    MedlinePlus

    ... term "renal" refers to the kidney. For example, renal failure means kidney failure. Related topics: Kidney disease Kidney disease - diet Kidney failure Kidney function tests Renal scan Kidney transplant

  14. Risks of Decreased Renal Function and Increased Albuminuria for Glycemic Status and Metabolic Syndrome Components: Taichung Community Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Cheng-Chieh; Li, Chia-Ing; Liu, Chiu-Shong; Lin, Wen-Yuan; Lin, Chih-Hsueh; Lai, Ming-May; Lee, Yih-Dar; Yang, Chuan-Wei; Li, Tsai-Chung

    2014-01-01

    Background. The objective of this study was to assess the association of glycemic status and decreased renal function as determined by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and albuminuria in an adult Taiwanese metropolitan population. Methods. We did a cross-sectional survey in a representative sample of 2,350 Taiwanese adults aged 40 years and over living in a metropolitan city in Taiwan from 2004 to 2005. Glycemic status was classified as normal glycemia, hyperglycemia, and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Renal function was assessed with eGFR using modified Modification of Diet in Renal Disease Study equation for Chinese. Albuminuria was determined by the urinary albumin-creatinine ratio. Decreased renal function was defined as eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73 m2 and albuminuria as the albumin-creatinine ratio >30 mg g−1 creatinine. Results. 593 (25.23%) had hyperglycemia and 287 (12.21%) had T2D. As glycemia level increased, the prevalence of albuminuria and decreased eGFR increased. After adjustment, T2D was associated with an OR of 2.93 (95% CI: 2.11–4.07) for albuminuria, and an OR of 2.05 (95% CI: 1.18–3.58) for decreased eGFR. Conclusions. In a representative sample from a metropolitan city in Taiwan, T2D was associated with albuminuria and decreased eGFR. PMID:24900991

  15. Decreased expression of mucin 18 is associated with unfavorable postoperative prognosis in patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Qi; Liu, Li; Long, Qilai; Xia, Yu; Wang, Jiajun; Xu, Jiejie; Guo, Jianming

    2015-01-01

    Background: MUC18 is correlated with tumor progression and metastasis in types of malignancy. But the role of MUC18 in clear cell renal cell carcinoma remains unclear. In this study, we aimed to investigate the expression of MUC18 and its correlation with clinical outcomes in clear cell renal cell carcinoma. Patients and Methods: Immunohistochemical staining was performed in samples from 288 patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma. We used Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazard models to value the association between MUC18 expression and clinical outcome. Nomogram was constructed to predict overall survival at 5 and 8 years after nephrectomy. Results: MUC18 expression was significantly decreased in tumor compared to non-tumor tissue (P<0.001). Lower MUC18 expression in tumor predicted a shorter survival time (P=0.007). By multivariate cox analysis, MUC18 was defined as an independent prognostic factor (P=0.006). The nomogram performed better in predicting 5- and 8-year overall survival than the TNM stage alone in clear cell renal cell carcinoma. Conclusion: MUC18 is an independent prognostic factor for clear cell renal cell carcinoma and could be incorporated with the other parameters to predict 5- and 8-year overall survival for clear cell renal cell carcinoma patients. PMID:26617818

  16. WNT AGONIST DECREASES TISSUE DAMAGE AND IMPROVES RENAL FUNCTION AFTER ISCHEMIA-REPERFUSION

    PubMed Central

    Kuncewitch, Michael; Yang, Weng-Lang; Corbo, Lana; Khader, Adam; Nicastro, Jeffrey; Coppa, Gene F.; Wang, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Renal ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury (IRI) following shock states or transplantation causes tissue damage and delayed graft function, respectively. The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway plays a critical role in nephrogenesis. We therefore hypothesized that pharmacological activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling by Wnt agonist, a synthetic pyrimidine, could protect kidneys from IRI. Adult male rats were subjected to bilateral clamping of the renal pedicles with microvascular clips for 60 min, followed by reperfusion. Wnt agonist (5 mg/kg BW) or vehicle (20% DMSO in saline) was administered intravenously 1 h prior to ischemia. Blood and renal tissues were collected 24 h after IR for evaluation. Renal IR caused a significant reduction of β-catenin and its downstream target gene cyclin D1 by 65% and 39%, respectively, compared to the sham, while Wnt agonist restored them to the sham levels. The number and intensity of cells staining with the proliferation marker Ki67 in ischematized kidneys were enhanced by Wnt agonist. The integrity of the renal histological architecture in the Wnt agonist group was better preserved than the vehicle group. Wnt agonist significantly lowered serum levels of creatinine, AST, and LDH, inhibited the production of IL-6 and IL-1β, and MPO activities. Lastly, Wnt agonist reduced iNOS, nitrotyrosine proteins and 4-hydroxynonenal in the kidneys by 60%, 47% and 21%, respectively, compared to the vehicle. These results indicate that Wnt agonist improves renal regeneration and function while attenuating inflammation and oxidative stress in the kidneys after IR. Thus, pharmacologic stimulation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling provides a beneficial effect on the prevention of renal IRI. PMID:25514428

  17. Decreased retinol-binding protein 4 in the sera of patients with end-stage renal disease after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W X; Zhou, W; Zhang, Z M; Zhang, Z Q; He, J F; Shi, B Y

    2014-01-01

    Retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) is a novel adipokine that has been associated with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) have very high serum RBP4 levels. However, whether successful kidney transplantation alleviates these elevated serum RBP4 levels is unclear. The serum RBP4 levels of 24 ESRD patients were determined before transplantation and at 1 day, 1 week, and 1 month after kidney transplantation. The control group included 22 healthy subjects. Serum RBP4 concentrations were measured using a commercial kit via the immunologic turbidimetric method, and were related to biomarkers for renal and liver function. The serum RBP4 level of ESRD patients before kidney transplantation (160.8 ± 29.1 mg/L) was approximately 7-fold higher than that of normal controls (22.6 ± 11.0 mg/L; P = 0.000). The serum RBP4 level before transplantation was significantly higher than that at 1 day (65.3 ± 28.4 mg/L), 1 week (48.3 ± 22.9 mg/L), and 1 month after transplantation (53.1 ± 25.5 mg/L; P = 0.000). However, these values were still higher than those of controls (P = 0.000). Univariate regression analysis showed that the percent changes in serum RBP4 concentration before and after kidney transplantation were positively correlated with serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, phosphate, and pre-albumin concentrations and negatively correlated with the estimated glomerular filtration rate. The serum RBP4 concentration of patients with ESRD decreased significantly after kidney transplantation; therefore, we found that serum RBP4 concentration was related to renal function. PMID:25299197

  18. Toradol, an NSAID used for renal colic, decreases renal perfusion and ureteral pressure in a canine model of unilateral ureteral obstruction.

    PubMed

    Perlmutter, A; Miller, L; Trimble, L A; Marion, D N; Vaughan, E D; Felsen, D

    1993-04-01

    Toradol is a new parenteral, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug which is efficacious in treating renal coli. In the present experiments, Toradol was administered to both control dogs and dogs with unilateral ureteral obstruction. In control dogs, Toradol had no effect on RBF or GFR, despite inhibition of renal prostaglandin synthesis (measured as urinary prostaglandin release). In contrast, RBF fell acutely by 35% (p < 0.001) within 15 minutes of Toradol administration in the setting of ureteral obstruction; contralateral RBF was unaffected. Ipsilateral ureteral pressure also fell. Changes in RBF and ureteral pressure, together with the known effects of NSAIDs on pain pathways, may contribute to the pain relief observed clinically with Toradol. However, the abrupt changes in renal hemodynamics brought on by Toradol to the obstructed kidney may compromise renal reserve, and Toradol should be used cautiously in treating renal colic. PMID:8455277

  19. Decrease in transient receptor potential melastatin 6 mRNA stability caused by rapamycin in renal tubular epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ikari, Akira; Sanada, Ayumi; Sawada, Hayato; Okude, Chiaki; Tonegawa, Chie; Sugatani, Junko

    2011-06-01

    Rapamycin, an inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), is used in treatments for transplantation and cancer. Rapamycin causes hypomagnesemia, although precisely how has not been examined. Here, we investigated the effect of rapamycin on the expression of transient receptor potential melastatin 6 (TRPM6), a Mg2+ channel. Rapamycin and LY-294002, an inhibitor of phosphatidilinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) located upstream of mTOR, inhibited epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced expression of the TRPM6 protein without affecting TRPM7 expression in rat renal NRK-52E epithelial cells. Both rapamycin and LY-294002 decreased EGF-induced Mg2+ influx. U0126, a MEK inhibitor, inhibited EGF-induced increases in c-Fos, p-ERK, and TRPM6 levels. In contrast, neither rapamycin nor LY-294002 inhibited EGF-induced increases in p-ERK and c-Fos levels. EGF increased p-Akt level, an effect inhibited by LY-294002 and 1L-6-hydroxymethyl-chiro-inositol2-[(R)-2-O-methyl-3-O-octadecylcarbonate] (Akt inhibitor). Akt inhibitor decreased TRPM6 level similar to rapamycin and LY-294002. These results suggest that a PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway is involved in the regulation of TRPM6 expression. Rapamycin inhibited the EGF-induced increase in TRPM6 mRNA but did not inhibit human TRPM6 promoter activity. In the presence of actinomycin D, a transcriptional inhibitor, rapamycin accelerated the decrease in TRPM6 mRNA. Rapamycin decreased the expression and activity of a luciferase linked with the 3'-untranslated region of human TRPM6 mRNA. These results suggest that TRPM6 expression is up-regulated by a PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway and rapamycin reduces TRPM6 mRNA stability, resulting in a decrease in the reabsorption of Mg2+. PMID:21073857

  20. Hypothermic Machine Perfusion Decreases Renal Cell Apoptosis During Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury via the Ezrin/AKT Pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Fu, Zhen; Zhong, Zibiao; Wang, Ren; Hu, Long; Xiong, Yan; Wang, Yanfeng; Ye, Qifa

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to explore the potential mechanisms of hypothermic machine perfusion (HMP)-a more efficient way to preserve kidneys from donors after cardiac death than static cold storage (CS), then to provide the basis for further improving donor quality. Twelve healthy male New Zealand rabbits (12 weeks old, weighing 3.0 ± 0.3 kg) were randomly divided into two groups: the HMP group and CS group (n = 6). Rabbits' left kidney was subjected to 35 min of warm ischemic time by clamping the left renal pedicle and 1 h of reperfusion. The kidneys were then hypothermically (4-8°C) preserved in vivo for 4 h with HCA-II solution using HMP or CS methods. Then rabbits underwent a right nephrectomy and the kidney tissues were collected after 24 h of reperfusion. TUNEL staining was performed on paraffin sections to detect apoptosis, and the expressions of cleaved caspase-3, ezrin, AKT, and p-AKT in frozen kidney tissues were detected by Western blotting. The ezrin expression was further confirmed by immunohistochemistry analysis. The apoptosis rate and expression of cleaved caspase-3 in the HMP group were significantly lower than the CS group (P < 0.001 and P = 0.002), meanwhile the expression of cleaved caspase-3 in the HMP and CS groups was significantly increased compared with the normal group (P = 0.035 and P < 0.001), and the expression of ezrin and p-AKT in the HMP group was significantly higher than the CS group (P = 0.005, 0.014). HMP decreased the renal cell apoptosis rate during ischemia/reperfusion injury via the ezrin/AKT pathway. PMID:26263023

  1. Nrdp1-mediated degradation of BRUCE decreases cell viability and induces apoptosis in human 786-O renal cell carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shao-Jun; Lin, Jian-Hai; Yao, Xu-Dong; Peng, Bo; Xu, Yun-Fei; Liu, Min; Zheng, Jun-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Neuregulin receptor degradation protein-1 (Nrdp1) is involved in a plethora of cellular processes and plays an essential role in the development and progression of human cancers. However, its role in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) remains unclear. Therefore, the present study aimed to explore the biological significance of Nrdp1 in RCC. Western blot analyses of tissue samples from 24 patients with primary RCC revealed lower Nrdp1 and higher baculovirus inhibitor of apoptosis repeat-containing ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (BRUCE) protein levels in RCC tissues compared with adjacent normal tissues. In addition, MTT and apoptosis assays demonstrated that Nrdp1 overexpression resulted in decreased cell viability and enhanced apoptosis in RCC 786-O cells; conversely, Nrdp1 knockdown increased 786-O cell viability and inhibited apoptosis. Further analysis showed that BRUCE downregulation partially attenuated the effects of Nrdp1 knockdown on RCC cell viability and apoptosis. Moreover, an inverse association was obtained between BRUCE and Nrdp1 protein levels. These findings suggest that Nrdp1-mediated degradation of BRUCE decreases cell viability and induces apoptosis in RCC cells, highlighting Nrdp1 as a potential target for RCC treatment.

  2. The nature of the atrial receptors responsible for a reflex decrease in activity in renal nerves in the dog

    PubMed Central

    Linden, R. J.; Mary, D. A. S. G.; Weatherill, D.

    1980-01-01

    1. In dogs anaesthetized with chloralose, distension of small balloons in the pulmonary vein—atrial junctions and left atrial appendage, to stimulate left atrial receptors, caused a reduction in activity in efferent renal nerves. This response was maintained during distension of the balloons for 30 min periods. 2. In a second group of dogs, cooling the cervical vagi in steps reduced the magnitude of the response in renal nerves. In seven dogs, the response in fourteen preparations of renal nerves was slightly reduced with the vagi at 18 °C and markedly reduced or abolished at 12 °C. The effect of cooling the vagi was the same as the previously shown effect of cooling on the increase in activity in myelinated afferent vagal fibres during similar stimulation of atrial receptors. 3. In a third group of dogs, the cervical vagi were cooled to 9 °C. In six dogs, fifty-four preparations of renal nerves showed no significant response to distension of the balloons. 4. In a fourth group of dogs, both vagi were sectioned in the neck. In three dogs, twenty-four preparations of renal nerves then showed no response to distension of the balloons. 5. It is concluded that the reduction in activity in efferent renal nerves during distension of small balloons in the pulmonary vein—atrial junctions and left atrial appendage involves only atrial receptors discharging into myelinated vagal fibres. PMID:7381789

  3. Acute renal failure induced by markedly decreased appetite secondary to a depressive episode after discontinuation of long-term lithium therapy in an elderly patient with bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Some elderly patients on chronic lithium therapy for bipolar disorder and their doctors may be faced with a therapeutic dilemma over whether or not to continue prescribing/taking lithium given their increased risk of reduced renal function. We present the case of a 78-year-old woman with bipolar disorder who discontinued lithium therapy due to increased risk factors for renal injury. After discontinuation, she experienced markedly decreased appetite secondary to a depressive episode, and developed acute renal failure, which subsequently progressed to a more advanced stage of chronic kidney disease. This case suggests that extreme care must be taken to prevent the recurrence of depression in elderly patients with bipolar disorder who discontinue lithium therapy, even when they had been emotionally stable for a long time while receiving lithium. Medications other than lithium for bipolar disorder may be needed at the time lithium therapy is discontinued. PMID:24835805

  4. Does Nucleos(t)ide Analogues Treatment Affect Renal Function in Chronic Hepatitis B Patients Who Have Already Decreased eGFR? A Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Ming-Chao; Chen, Chien-Hung; Tseng, Po-Lin; Hung, Chao-Hung; Chiu, King-Wah; Chang, Kuo-Chin; Yen, Yi-Hao; Lin, Ming-Tsung; Hu, Tsung-Hui

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the renal function in chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients who received nucleos(t)ide analogues (NAs) therapy using estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) titer. We performed a longitudinal observational study of 37 tenofovir-, 42 telbivudine-, and 62 entecavir-naïve CHB patients, who had impaired renal function (eGFR, 90–30 ml/min/1.73m2) without history of diabetes, hypertension, and chemotherapy. Calculation and evaluation of eGFR was performed with the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease, Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration, and Cockcroft-Gault formula at pretreatment, at baseline, and after the 1st and 2nd year of treatment. The eGFR was significantly increased in patients given telbivudine or entecavir (p = 0.003 and p = 0.012, respectively), but the eGFR was decreased in patients given tenofovir (p = 0.001) after 2 years of treatment. Of all patients, eGFR was stable one year prior to treatment. If we analyzed the renal function by change of chronic kidney disease (CKD) category with a change of 25% of eGFR, the proportion of uncertain drop (drop in CKD category with <25% decrease in eGFR) and certain drop (drop in CKD category with ≧25% decrease in eGFR) in tenofovir group was smaller (5.4%) than those of telbivudine (12.9%) or entecavir (6.5%). Furthermore, telbivudine had the lowest stable rate (76.2%), the highest certain rise rate (9.5%), and certain drop rate (7.1%) compared to the other groups (p = 0.049). In conclusion, in NAs-naïve CHB patients with impaired renal function, telbivudine and entecavir resulted in a significant increase in eGFR while tenofovir resulted in a significant decrease after a 2-year treatment. Interestingly, TDF had the lowest proportion of patients reclassified to certain and uncertain drop groups; in contrast, LdT had a higher proportion in both raise and drop groups. The outcomes of this renal effect remain to be determined. PMID:26964034

  5. Site-Specific Radioiodination of HER2-Targeting Affibody Molecules using 4-Iodophenethylmaleimide Decreases Renal Uptake of Radioactivity

    PubMed Central

    Strand, Joanna; Nordeman, Patrik; Honarvar, Hadis; Altai, Mohamed; Orlova, Anna; Larhed, Mats; Tolmachev, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Affibody molecules are small scaffold-based affinity proteins with promising properties as probes for radionuclide-based molecular imaging. However, a high reabsorption of radiolabeled Affibody molecules in kidneys is an issue. We have shown that the use of 125I-3-iodo-((4-hydroxyphenyl)ethyl)maleimide (IHPEM) for site-specific labeling of cysteine-containing Affibody molecules provides high tumor uptake but low radioactivity retention in kidneys. We hypothesized that the use of 4-iodophenethylmaleimide (IPEM) would further reduce renal retention of radioactivity because of higher lipophilicity of radiometabolites. An anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2) Affibody molecule (ZHER2:2395) was labeled using 125I-IPEM with an overall yield of 45±3 %. 125I-IPEM-ZHER2:2395 bound specifically to HER2-expressing human ovarian carcinoma cells (SKOV-3 cell line). In NMRI mice, the renal uptake of 125I-IPEM-ZHER2:2395 (24±2 and 5.7±0.3 % IA g−1at 1 and 4 h after injection, respectively) was significantly lower than uptake of 125I-IHPEM-ZHER2:2395 (50±8 and 12±2 % IA g−1at 1 and 4 h after injection, respectively). In conclusion, the use of a more lipophilic linker for the radioiodination of Affibody molecules reduces renal radioactivity. PMID:25969816

  6. Increased expression of SET domain-containing proteins and decreased expression of Rad51 in different classes of renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Si; Li, Yiyang; Xu, Hongmei; Wang, Kaichen; Li, Nan; Li, Jia; Sun, Tao; Xu, Ying

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, we aimed to examine whether SET domain-containing methyltransferases are up-regulated in different classes of renal cell carcinoma. We immunoblotted against SET domain and quantified the expression of these modular domains. Furthermore, we examined the expression of Rad51, the key protein that confers genomic stability. There was enhanced expression of SET domain-containing histone methyltransferases in whole lysates of all classes of renal carcinoma. In metastatic high grade clear cell carcinoma, this expression was more pronounced. Though we could not demonstrate direct correlation, we showed that epigenetic modification by methylation is associated with decreased genomic translation of Rad51. PMID:27170370

  7. Increased Nek1 expression in Renal Cell Carcinoma cells is associated with decreased sensitivity to DNA-damaging treatment

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yumay; Chen, Chi-Fen; Polci, Rosaria; Wei, Randy; Riley, Daniel J.; Chen, Phang-Lang

    2014-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a heterogeneous disease with resistance to systemic chemotherapy. Elevated expression of multiple drug resistance (MDR) has been suggested to be one of the mechanisms for this resistance. Here, we provide an alternative mechanism to explain RCC's resistance to chemotherapy-induced apoptosis. Never-in mitosis A-related protein kinase 1 (Nek1) plays an important role in DNA damage response and proper checkpoint activation. The association of Nek1 with the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC1) is a critical determinant of cell survival following DNA-damaging treatment. We report here that Nek1 is highly expressed in RCC tumor and cultured RCC cells compared to that of normal renal tubular epithelial cells (RTE). The association between Nek1 and VDAC1 is genotoxic dependent: prolonged Nek1/VDAC1 dissociation will lead to VDAC1 dephosphorylation and initiate apoptosis. Down-regulation of Nek1 expression in RCC cells enhanced their sensitivity to DNA-damaging treatment. Collectively, these results suggest that the increased Nek1 expression in RCC cells maintain persistent VDAC1 phosphorylation, closing its channel and preventing the onset of apoptosis under genotoxic insults. Based on these results, we believe that Nek1 can serve as a potential therapeutic target for drug development in the treatment of RCC. PMID:24970796

  8. Angiotensin II Type 2 Receptor Decreases Transforming Growth Factor-β Type II Receptor Expression and Function in Human Renal Proximal Tubule Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hui-Lin; Liao, Xiao-Hui; Liu, Qi; Zhang, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), via its receptors, induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and plays an important role in the development of renal tubulointersitial fibrosis. Angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2R), which mediates beneficial renal physiological functions, has received attention as a prospective therapeutic target for renoprotection. In this study, we investigated the effect and underlying mechanism of AT2R on the TGF-β receptor II (TGF-βRII) expression and function in human proximal tubular cells (HK-2). Here, we show that the AT2R agonist CGP42112A decreased TGF-βRII protein expression in a concentration- and time-dependent manner in HK-2 cells. The inhibitory effect of the AT2R on TGF-βRII expression was blocked by the AT2R antagonists PD123319 or PD123177. Stimulation with TGF-β1 enhanced EMT in HK-2 cells, which was prevented by pre-treatment with CGP42112A. One of mechanisms in this regulation is associated with the increased TGF-βRII degradation after activation of AT2R. Furthermore, laser confocal immunofluorescence microscopy showed that AT2R and TGF-βRII colocalized in HK-2 cells. AT2R and TGF-βRII coimmunoprecipitated and this interaction was increased after AT2R agonist stimulation for 30 min. The inhibitory effect of the AT2R on TGF-βRII expression was also blocked by the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME, indicating that nitric oxide is involved in the signaling pathway. Taken together, our study indicates that the renal AT2R regulates TGF-βRII expression and function via the nitric oxide pathway, which may be important in the control of renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis. PMID:26867007

  9. Decreased SATB2 expression is associated with metastasis and poor prognosis in human clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Changcheng; Xiong, Dabo; Yao, Xudong; Gu, Wenyu; Zhang, Haimin; Yang, Bin; Peng, Bo; Liu, Min; Zheng, Junhua

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the expression and role of special AT-rich sequence-binding protein-2 (SATB2) in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) tissue, and to evaluate the clinical and prognostic significance of SATB2 protein in patients with ccRCC. The expression of SATB2 and SATB1 was examined in ccRCC tissue by Western blotting, real-time PCR and immunohistochemical staining. The association between clinicopathological features and SATB2 level was investigated. The correlation of SATB2 expression with overall survival was also analyzed. The expression of SATB2 protein in tumor tissues was much lower than that in paired normal tissues. The overall survival of the patients with high SATB2 expression was significantly higher than that of the low SATB2 expression group. Low or negative SATB2 expression was significantly correlated with AJCC staging and Furman grade in ccRCC. In contrast, the expression of SATB1 was significantly higher in adjacent tumor tissue than that in normal and tumor tissues. This study provides the first evidence of the expression and clinical significance of SATB2 in ccRCC. Our data suggest that SATB2 functions as a tumor suppressor in the development and progression of ccRCC, and is thereby implicated as a valuable prognostic marker for ccRCC patients. PMID:26097552

  10. Real-time ultrasound-guided percutaneous renal biopsy with needle guide by nephrologists decreases post-biopsy complications

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Narayan; Kumar, Shashi; Manjunath, Revanasiddappa; Bhadauria, Dharmendra; Kaul, Anupama; Sharma, Raj K; Gupta, Amit; Lal, Hira; Jain, Manoj; Agrawal, Vinita

    2015-01-01

    Background Percutaneous renal biopsy (PRB) can result in serious complications. The study is aimed to compare the biopsy yield and complications rate of the real-time ultrasonagram (USG)-guided PRB and needle tracking with and without needle guide in two different study periods. Methods We compared the yield and complications of 2138 kidney biopsies performed in two different periods, 1510 biopsies during the first period from April 2004–December 2010 and 628 biopsies during second period from January 2011–March 2013. All biopsies in both periods were performed by nephrologists. Radiologists provided the real-time image without needle guide during the first period while nephrologists performed both imaging and biopsy with needle guide during the second period. Results Of all the 2138 patients, 226 (10.5%) patients developed 118 minor and 108 major complications. Only 13 (2.1%) major complications occurred in the second period and 95 (6.7%) in the first period (P < 0.001). The relative risk of developing a major complication without guide was 3.04 times greater than that of the biopsies performed with use of the guide. The mean number of glomeruli per biopsy obtained during the second period (17.98 ± 6.75) was significantly greater than that of the first period (14.14 ± 6.01) (P = 0.004). The number of passes to acquire adequate tissue (P = 0.001) and percentage of cortex on biopsy (P = 0.001) were also significantly better in the second period. The optimal observation period post biopsy is 24 h. Conclusions Real-time USG imaging supported by needle guide device is associated with better biopsy yield and fewer complications. PMID:25815170

  11. Type 2 Diabetes, Diabetes Genetic Score and Risk of Decreased Renal Function and Albuminuria: A Mendelian Randomization Study

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Min; Bi, Yufang; Huang, Ya; Xie, Lan; Hao, Mingli; Zhao, Zhiyun; Xu, Yu; Lu, Jieli; Chen, Yuhong; Sun, Yimin; Qi, Lu; Wang, Weiqing; Ning, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Background Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a risk factor for dysregulation of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and albuminuria. However, whether the association is causal remains unestablished. Research Design and Methods We performed a Mendelian Randomization (MR) analysis in 11,502 participants aged 40 and above, from a well-defined community in Shanghai during 2011–2013, to explore the causal association between T2D and decreased estimated GFR (eGFR) and increased urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (uACR). We genotyped 34 established T2D common variants in East Asians, and created a T2D-genetic risk score (GRS). We defined decreased eGFR as eGFR < 90 ml/min/1.73 m2 and increased uACR as uACR ≥ 30 mg/g. We used the T2D_GRS as the instrumental variable (IV) to quantify the causal effect of T2D on decreased eGFR and increased uACR. Results Each 1-standard deviation (SD, 3.90 points) increment in T2D_GRS was associated with decreased eGFR: odds ratio (OR) = 1.18 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.01, 1.30). In the MR analysis, we demonstrated a causal relationship between genetically determined T2D and decreased eGFR (OR = 1.47, 95% CI: 1.15, 1.88, P = 0.0003). When grouping the genetic loci according to their relations with either insulin secretion (IS) or insulin resistance (IR), we found both IS_GRS and IR_GRS were significantly related to decreased eGFR (both P < 0.02). In addition, T2D_GRS and IS_GRS were significantly associated with Log-uACR (both P = 0.04). Conclusion Our results provide novel evidence for a causal association between T2D and decreased eGFR by using MR approach in a Chinese population. PMID:27211558

  12. Diphenyl diselenide, a simple organoselenium compound, decreases methylmercury-induced cerebral, hepatic and renal oxidative stress and mercury deposition in adult mice.

    PubMed

    de Freitas, Andressa Sausen; Funck, Vinícius Rafael; Rotta, Mariana dos Santos; Bohrer, Denise; Mörschbächer, Vanessa; Puntel, Robson Luís; Nogueira, Cristina Wayne; Farina, Marcelo; Aschner, Michael; Rocha, João Batista Teixeira

    2009-04-01

    Oxidative stress has been pointed out as an important molecular mechanism in methylmercury (MeHg) intoxication. At low doses, diphenyl diselenide ((PhSe)2), a structurally simple organoselenium compound, has been shown to possess antioxidant and neuroprotective properties. Here we have examined the possible in vivo protective effect of diphenyl diselenide against the potential pro-oxidative effects of MeHg in mouse liver, kidney, cerebrum and cerebellum. The effects of MeHg exposure (2 mg/(kg day) of methylmercury chloride 10 ml/kg, p.o.), as well as the possible antagonist effect of diphenyl diselenide (1 and 0.4 mg/(kg day); s.c.) on body weight gain and on hepatic, cerebellar, cerebral and renal levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), non-protein thiols (NPSH), ascorbic acid content, mercury concentrations and activities of antioxidant enzymes (glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD)) were evaluated after 35 days of treatment. MeHg caused an increase in TBARS and decreased NPSH levels in all tissues. MeHg also induced a decrease in hepatic ascorbic acid content and in renal GPx and CAT activities. Diphenyl diselenide (1 mg/kg) conferred protection against MeHg-induced hepatic and renal lipid peroxidation and at both doses prevented the reduction in hepatic NPSH levels. Diphenyl diselenide also conferred a partial protection against MeHg-induced oxidative stress (TBARS and NPSH) in liver and cerebellum. Of particular importance, diphenyl diselenide decreased the deposition of Hg in cerebrum, cerebellum, kidney and liver. The present results indicate that diphenyl diselenide can protect against some toxic effects of MeHg in mice. This protection may be related to its antioxidant properties and its ability to reduce Hg body burden. We posit that formation of a selenol intermediate, which possesses high nucleophilicity and high affinity for MeHg, accounts for the ability of diphenyl diselenide to ameliorate Me

  13. Decreased expression of a novel lncRNA CADM1-AS1 is associated with poor prognosis in patients with clear cell renal cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jie; Chen, Yang; Wang, Yongcheng; Liu, Shouying; Yuan, Xueling; Pan, Fei; Geng, Peiliang

    2014-01-01

    The clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is the most common subtype in renal cell carcinomas. Rapidly accumulating studies show that the long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) may play essential roles in cancers. In this study, we investigated the expression pattern of a novel lncRNA CADM1-AS1 in ccRCC by quantitative real time PCR. The results showed that CADM1-AS1 expression was down-regulated in tumor tissues in 64 patients with ccRCC compared with adjacent non-tumor tissues. Furthermore, the expression of CADM1-AS1 was positively correlated with the expression of mRNA CADM1 in ccRCC specimens (R = 0.611, P <0.0001). Decreased CADM1-AS1 expression was correlated with the progression of AJCC stage (P = 0.039) and worse survival of ccRCC patients (P <0.05). Also, multivariate analysis identified low CADM1-AS1 expression as an independent prognostic factor for ccRCC (P <0.001, HR = 0.211, 95% CI = 0.088-0.504). In addition, we used small interfering RNA (siRNA) to evaluate the biological function of CADM1-AS1 in vitro. The results showed that CADM1-AS1 expression was positively associated with CADM1 mRNA expression in 786-O cells and ACHN cells. Functional experiments demonstrated markedly enhanced ability of growth and migration, and reduced apoptotic rate in CADM1-AS1 knocking down in 786-O cells. Conversely, overexpression of CADM1-AS1 showed a significant decrease in growth and migration, along with an increase in apoptotic rate in ACHN cells. In conclusion, our data demonstrated CADM1-AS1 is a new tumor suppressor in ccRCC which regulates cell proliferation, apoptosis and migration via the expression pattern of "CADM1-AS1/CADM1 mRNA gene pairs". CADM1-AS1 may be a potential biomarker and therapeutic target in patients with ccRCC. PMID:25031695

  14. MDSC-decreasing chemotherapy increases the efficacy of cytokine-induced killer cell immunotherapy in metastatic renal cell carcinoma and pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Shang, Yiman; Gao, Quanli

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy using cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells is a promising cancer treatment, but its efficacy is restricted by various factors, including the accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). In this study, we determine whether chemotherapeutic drugs that reduce MDSC levels enhance the efficacy of CIK cell therapy in the treatment of solid tumors. Fifty-three patients were included in this study; 17 were diagnosed with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (MRCC), 10 with advanced pancreatic cancer (PC), and 26 with metastatic melanoma (MM). These patients were divided into two groups: CIK cell therapy alone and CIK cell therapy combined with chemotherapy. Combining CIK cell therapy and chemotherapy increased 1-year survival rates and median survival times in MRCC and PC patients, but not in MM patients. The disease control rate did not differ between treatment groups for MRCC or MM patients, but was higher in PC patients receiving combined treatment than CIK cell treatment alone. These data suggest that addition of MDSC-decreasing chemotherapy to CIK cell therapy improves survival in MRCC and PC patients. PMID:26716894

  15. SIRT1 overexpression decreases cisplatin-induced acetylation of NF-{kappa}B p65 subunit and cytotoxicity in renal proximal tubule cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Yu Jin; Lee, Jung Eun; Lee, Ae Sin; Kang, Kyung Pyo; Lee, Sik; Park, Sung Kwang; Lee, Sang Yong; Han, Myung Kwan; Kim, Duk Hoon; Kim, Won

    2012-03-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cisplatin increases acetylation of NF-{kappa}B p65 subunit in HK2 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 overexpression decreases cisplatin-induced p65 acetylation and -cytotoxicity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Resveratrol decreased cisplatin-induced cell viability through deacetylation of p65. -- Abstract: As the increased acetylation of p65 is linked to nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) activation, the regulation of p65 acetylation can be a potential target for the treatment of inflammatory injury. Cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity is an important issue in chemotherapy of cancer patients. SIRT1, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD{sup +})-dependent protein deacetylase, has been implicated in a variety of cellular processes such as inflammatory injury and the control of multidrug resistance in cancer. However, there is no report on the effect of SIRT1 overexpression on cisplatin-induced acetylation of p65 subunit of NF-{kappa}B and cell injury. To investigate the effect of SIRT1 in on cisplatin-induced acetylation of p65 subunit of NF-{kappa}B and cell injury, HK2 cells were exposed with SIRT1 overexpression, LacZ adenovirus or dominant negative adenovirus after treatment with cisplatin. While protein expression of SIRT1 was decreased by cisplatin treatment compared with control buffer treatment, acetylation of NF-{kappa}B p65 subunit was significantly increased after treatment with cisplatin. Overexpression of SIRT1 ameliorated the increased acetylation of p65 of NF-{kappa}B during cisplatin treatment and cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity. Further, treatment of cisplatin-treated HK2 cells with resveratrol, a SIRT1 activator, also decreased acetylation of NF-{kappa}B p65 subunit and cisplatin-induced increase of the cell viability in HK2 cells. Our findings suggests that the regulation of acetylation of p65 of NF-{kappa}B through SIRT1 can be a possible target to attenuate cisplatin-induced renal cell damage.

  16. Decreased expression of CHIP leads to increased angiogenesis via VEGF-VEGFR2 pathway and poor prognosis in human renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chao; Li, Hai-long; Chen, Hai-rong; Shi, Mei-lin; Liu, Qing-hua; Pan, Zhen-qiang; Bai, Jin; Zheng, Jun-nian

    2015-01-01

    CHIP (c-terminal Hsp70-interacting protein) is an E3 ligase which may play different roles in different cancers. The elucidation of the VHL-HIF-1α (hypoxia inducible factor-1α)-VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) pathway has led to the development of targeted therapy in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). However, little is known about the role of CHIP and the relationship between CHIP and VEGF-VEGFR2 (VEGF receptor 2) pathway in RCC. In this study, we found that the expression of CHIP was downregulated and significantly correlated with pT status (P = 0.022) and TNM stage (P = 0.022) in 304 RCC and 35 normal renal tissues using tissue microarray. Moreover, low expression of CHIP is a strong and independent negative prognostic value for RCC. In vitro, CHIP negatively regulated RCC cell migration, invasion and angiogenesis. In addition, ELISA tests showed that restoration of CHIP inhibited, while knockdown promoted, the secreted level of VEGF. Furthermore, western blot indicated that the VEGFR2 protein level was reduced after CHIP overexpression. Our findings demonstrate for the first time that CHIP may be involved in RCC angiogenesis through regulating VEGF secretion and expression of VEGFR2. CHIP may serve as promising prognostic biomarker of angiogenesis and may constitute a potential therapeutic target in RCC. PMID:26021863

  17. Triptolide inhibits B7-H1 expression on proinflammatory factor activated renal tubular epithelial cells by decreasing NF-kappaB transcription.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongwen; Zhang, Jingbo; Li, Jingyi; Zhao, Tingting; Zou, Liyun; Tang, Yan; Zhang, Xiaoping; Wu, Yuzhang

    2006-03-01

    Triptolide has been used extensively in China for the treatment of autoimmune diseases and tumor for many centuries. Nevertheless, little is known about its exact immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory properties. Increasing recognition of the importance of renal tubular epithelial cells (TECs) in renal diseases raises the question whether triptolide can regulate TEC activity. In this study, various cultured human and murine TECs were exposed to tumor necrotic factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and triptolide, followed to examine the expression of B7-H1 and B7-DC. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that B7-H1 but not B7-DC constitutively expresses on TECs, and the B7-H1 protein expression was profoundly up-regulated by the stimulation of TNF-alpha with a dose-dependent manner. However, triptolide under non-cytotoxic concentration could down-regulate B7-H1 expression on activated TECs at both mRNA and protein level. This effect was transcription factor NF-kappaB dependent. Interestingly, the significant damping effect of triptolide on B7-H1 signal could promote interleukin-2 production by T cell hybridoma (C10) after antigen presentation and enhance cytokine (IFN-gamma and IL-2) secretion by anti-CD3 activated T cells. Our results indicated that triptolide could regulate TEC activity via B7-H1, in addition to previously reported it directly affects the production of some inflammatory factors by T cells, tumor cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. PMID:16129490

  18. Gastrin decreases Na+,K+-ATPase activity via a PI 3-kinase- and PKC-dependent pathway in human renal proximal tubule cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tianbing; Konkalmatt, Prasad R; Yang, Yu; Jose, Pedro A

    2016-04-01

    The natriuretic effect of gastrin suggests a role in the coordinated regulation of sodium balance by the gastrointestinal tract and the kidney. The renal molecular targets and signal transduction pathways for such an effect of gastrin are largely unknown. Recently, we reported that gastrin induces NHE3 phosphorylation and internalization via phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase and PKCα. In this study, we show that gastrin induced the phosphorylation of human Na(+),K(+)-ATPase at serine 16, resulting in its endocytosis via Rab5 and Rab7 endosomes. The gastrin-stimulated phosphorylation of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase was dependent on PI 3-kinase because the phosphorylation was blocked by the PI 3-kinase inhibitor wortmannin. The phosphorylation of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase was also blocked by chelerythrine, a pan-PKC inhibitor, Gö-6976, a conventional PKC (cPKC) inhibitor, and BAPTA-AM, an intracellular calcium chelator, suggesting the importance of cPKC and intracellular calcium in the gastrin signaling pathway. The gastrin-mediated phosphorylation of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase was also inhibited by U-73122, a phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor. These results suggest that gastrin regulates sodium hydrogen exchanger and pump in renal proximal tubule cells at the apical and basolateral membranes. PMID:26786777

  19. Mitochondrial Modulation by Epigallocatechin 3-Gallate Ameliorates Cisplatin Induced Renal Injury through Decreasing Oxidative/Nitrative Stress, Inflammation and NF-kB in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xueping; Wang, Ping; Fu, Guanghou; Meng, Hongzhou; Wang, Yimin; Jin, Baiye

    2015-01-01

    Cancer chemotherapy drug cisplatin is known for its nephrotoxicity. The aim of this study is to investigate whether Epigallocatechin 3-Gallate (EGCG) can reduce cisplatin mediated side effect in kidney and to understand its mechanism of protection against tissue injury. We used a well-established 3-day cisplatin induced nephrotoxicity mice model where EGCG were administered. EGCG is a major active compound in Green Tea and have strong anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. EGCG protected against cisplatin induced renal dysfunction as measured by serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen (BUN). EGCG improved cisplatin induced kidney structural damages such as tubular dilatation, cast formation, granulovaculoar degeneration and tubular cell necrosis as evident by PAS staining. Cisplatin induced kidney specific mitochondrial oxidative stress, impaired activities of mitochondrial electron transport chain enzyme complexes, impaired anti-oxidant defense enzyme activities such as glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) in mitochondria, inflammation (tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin 1β), increased accumulation of NF-κB in nuclear fraction, p53 induction, and apoptotic cell death (caspase 3 activity and DNA fragmentation). Treatment of mice with EGCG markedly attenuated cisplatin induced mitochondrial oxidative/nitrative stress, mitochondrial damages to electron transport chain activities and antioxidant defense enzyme activities in mitochondria. These mitochondrial modulations by EGCG led to protection mechanism against cisplatin induced inflammation and apoptotic cell death in mice kidney. As a result, EGCG improved renal function in cisplatin mediated kidney damage. In addition to that, EGCG attenuated cisplatin induced apoptotic cell death and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in human kidney tubular cell line HK-2. Thus, our data suggest that EGCG may represent new promising adjunct candidate for

  20. Mitochondrial modulation by Epigallocatechin 3-Gallate ameliorates cisplatin induced renal injury through decreasing oxidative/nitrative stress, inflammation and NF-kB in mice.

    PubMed

    Pan, Hao; Chen, Jun; Shen, Kezhen; Wang, Xueping; Wang, Ping; Fu, Guanghou; Meng, Hongzhou; Wang, Yimin; Jin, Baiye

    2015-01-01

    Cancer chemotherapy drug cisplatin is known for its nephrotoxicity. The aim of this study is to investigate whether Epigallocatechin 3-Gallate (EGCG) can reduce cisplatin mediated side effect in kidney and to understand its mechanism of protection against tissue injury. We used a well-established 3-day cisplatin induced nephrotoxicity mice model where EGCG were administered. EGCG is a major active compound in Green Tea and have strong anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. EGCG protected against cisplatin induced renal dysfunction as measured by serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen (BUN). EGCG improved cisplatin induced kidney structural damages such as tubular dilatation, cast formation, granulovaculoar degeneration and tubular cell necrosis as evident by PAS staining. Cisplatin induced kidney specific mitochondrial oxidative stress, impaired activities of mitochondrial electron transport chain enzyme complexes, impaired anti-oxidant defense enzyme activities such as glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) in mitochondria, inflammation (tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin 1β), increased accumulation of NF-κB in nuclear fraction, p53 induction, and apoptotic cell death (caspase 3 activity and DNA fragmentation). Treatment of mice with EGCG markedly attenuated cisplatin induced mitochondrial oxidative/nitrative stress, mitochondrial damages to electron transport chain activities and antioxidant defense enzyme activities in mitochondria. These mitochondrial modulations by EGCG led to protection mechanism against cisplatin induced inflammation and apoptotic cell death in mice kidney. As a result, EGCG improved renal function in cisplatin mediated kidney damage. In addition to that, EGCG attenuated cisplatin induced apoptotic cell death and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in human kidney tubular cell line HK-2. Thus, our data suggest that EGCG may represent new promising adjunct candidate for

  1. Renal Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Zeisberg, Michael; Maeshima, Yohei; Mosterman, Barbara; Kalluri, Raghu

    2002-01-01

    During progression of chronic renal disease, qualitative and quantitative changes in the composition of tubular basement membranes (TBMs) and interstitial matrix occur. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1-mediated activation of tubular epithelial cells (TECs) is speculated to be a key contributor to the progression of tubulointerstitial fibrosis. To further understand the pathogenesis associated with renal fibrosis, we developed an in vitro Boyden chamber system using renal basement membranes that partially mimics in vivo conditions of TECs during health and disease. Direct stimulation of TECs with TGF-β1/epithelial growth factor results in an increased migratory capacity across bovine TBM preparations. This is associated with increased matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) production, namely MMP-2 and MMP-9. Indirect chemotactic stimulation by TGF-β1/EGF or collagen type I was insufficient in inducing migration of untreated TECs across bovine TBM preparation, suggesting that basement membrane integrity and composition play an important role in protecting TECs from interstitial fibrotic stimuli. Additionally, neutralization of MMPs by COL-3 inhibitor dramatically decreases the capacity of TGF-β1-stimulated TECs to migrate through bovine TBM preparation. Collectively, these results demonstrate that basement membrane structure, integrity, and composition play an important role in determining interstitial influences on TECs and subsequent impact on potential aberrant cell-matrix interactions. PMID:12057905

  2. Renal arteriography

    MedlinePlus

    ... Read More Acute arterial occlusion - kidney Acute kidney failure Aneurysm Atheroembolic renal disease Blood clots Renal cell carcinoma Renal venogram X-ray Update Date 4/7/2014 Updated by: Jason ... Failure Kidney Tests X-Rays Browse the Encyclopedia A. ...

  3. Renal venogram

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2008:chap 6. Rankin S. Renal parenchymal disease, including renal failure, renovascular disease and transportation. In: Grainger RC, Allison D, Adam, Dixon AK, eds. Diagnostic Radiology: A Textbook of Medical Imaging . 5th ed. New York, NY: Churchill Livingstone; 2008:chap 39. Read ... arteriography Renal vein thrombosis Tumor Venogram Wilms ...

  4. Percutaneous renal cryoablation: current status.

    PubMed

    Mazaris, Evangelos M; Varkarakis, Ioannis M; Solomon, Stephen B

    2008-04-01

    Over the last 13 years, renal cryoablation has emerged as a promising technique for the treatment of solid renal tumors. The improvement in imaging modalities such as ultrasound, computed tomography and MRI, as well as the introduction of thinner probes, has led to the spread of the minimally invasive percutaneous approach. We review the historical background of percutaneous renal cryoablation (PRC), present its basic principles, mention the contemporary clinical data and outcomes of this technique and suggest future directions for its wider application in renal tumors. Early results have demonstrated that it may offer an alternative for the treatment of small renal masses with the advantages of minimal complications, spared renal function, decreased overall costs and equivalent oncologic efficacy. Long-term results are required in order to apply this minimally invasive technique to a broader spectrum of patients. PMID:18407738

  5. Renal Infarction Caused by Isolated Spontaneous Renal Artery Intramural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sihyung; Lee, Ga Hee; Jin, Kyubok; Park, Kang Min; Kim, Yang Wook; Park, Bong Soo

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 46 Final Diagnosis: Renal infarction Symptoms: Flank pain Medication: — Clinical Procedure: CT Specialty: Nephrology Objective: Rare disease Background: Acute renal infarction is an uncommon condition resulting from an obstruction or a decrease in renal arterial blood flow. Isolated spontaneous renal artery intramural hematoma is a rare cause of renal infarction. Case Report: A 46-year-old healthy man presented to our emergency room because of sudden onset of severe right flank pain. An enhanced abdominal computed tomography scan showed a low-attenuated lesion in the lateral portion of the right kidney but no visible thromboembolisms in the main vessels. Computed tomography angiography revealed acute infarction resulting from intramural hematoma of the anterior segmental artery of the right kidney, with distal occlusion. Conclusions: The rarity and non-specific clinical presentation of renal infarction often lead to a delayed diagnosis that may result in impaired renal function. Clinical suspicion is important in the early diagnosis, and intramural hematoma of the renal artery should be considered the cause of renal infarction even in healthy patients without pre-disposing factors. PMID:26596500

  6. [Renal elastography].

    PubMed

    Correas, Jean-Michel; Anglicheau, Dany; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael

    2016-04-01

    Renal elastography has become available with the development of noninvasive quantitative techniques (including shear-wave elastography), following the rapidly growing field of diagnosis and quantification of liver fibrosis, which has a demonstrated major clinical impact. Ultrasound or even magnetic resonance techniques are leaving the pure research area to reach the routine clinical use. With the increased incidence of chronic kidney disease and its specific morbidity and mortality, the noninvasive diagnosis of renal fibrosis can be of critical value. However, it is difficult to simply extend the application from one organ to the other due to a large number of anatomical and technical issues. Indeed, the kidney exhibits various features that make stiffness assessment more complex, such as the presence of various tissue types (cortex, medulla), high spatial orientation (anisotropy), local blood flow, fatty sinus with variable volume and echotexture, perirenal space with variable fatty content, and the variable depth of the organ. Furthermore, the stiffness changes of the renal parenchyma are not exclusively related to fibrosis, as renal perfusion or hydronephrosis will impact the local elasticity. Renal elastography might be able to diagnose acute or chronic obstruction, or to renal tumor or pseudotumor characterization. Today, renal elastography appears as a promising application that still requires optimization and validation, which is the contrary for liver stiffness assessment. PMID:26976058

  7. Renal rescue of dopamine D2 receptor function reverses renal injury and high blood pressure

    PubMed Central

    Konkalmatt, Prasad R.; Asico, Laureano D.; Zhang, Yanrong; Yang, Yu; Drachenberg, Cinthia; Zheng, Xiaoxu; Han, Fei; Jose, Pedro A.; Armando, Ines

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) deficiency increases renal inflammation and blood pressure in mice. We show here that long-term renal-selective silencing of Drd2 using siRNA increases renal expression of proinflammatory and profibrotic factors and blood pressure in mice. To determine the effects of renal-selective rescue of Drd2 expression in mice, the renal expression of DRD2 was first silenced using siRNA and 14 days later rescued by retrograde renal infusion of adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector with DRD2. Renal Drd2 siRNA treatment decreased the renal expression of DRD2 protein by 55%, and DRD2 AAV treatment increased the renal expression of DRD2 protein by 7.5- to 10-fold. Renal-selective DRD2 rescue reduced the expression of proinflammatory factors and kidney injury, preserved renal function, and normalized systolic and diastolic blood pressure. These results demonstrate that the deleterious effects of renal-selective Drd2 silencing on renal function and blood pressure were rescued by renal-selective overexpression of DRD2. Moreover, the deleterious effects of 45-minute bilateral ischemia/reperfusion on renal function and blood pressure in mice were ameliorated by a renal-selective increase in DRD2 expression by the retrograde ureteral infusion of DRD2 AAV immediately after the induction of ischemia/reperfusion injury. Thus, 14 days after ischemia/reperfusion injury, the renal expression of profibrotic factors, serum creatinine, and blood pressure were lower in mice infused with DRD2 AAV than in those infused with control AAV. These results indicate an important role of renal DRD2 in limiting renal injury and preserving normal renal function and blood pressure. PMID:27358912

  8. Diagnostic value of routine bone scintigraphy renal imaging in renal cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Chancellor, M.B.; Konnak, J.W.; Grossman, H.B.

    1989-05-01

    Technetium-99m-phosphate compounds used in bone scanning are excreted by the kidney, and excellent renal images can be obtained on routine bone scintigrams. The preoperative bone scans of 49 patients who underwent radical nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma between 1981 and 1985 were reviewed for renal imaging. Ninety-four percent of the patients had abnormal bone scan renal images (82% had focal decreased uptake, and 12% had focal increased uptake). Six percent of the renal images were symmetrical bilaterally. When bone scans are employed in the postoperative follow-up of patients with renal cancer, they can be used to assess the status of the remaining kidney.

  9. Pharmacokinetics in renal disease.

    PubMed

    Levy, G

    1977-04-01

    The physiologic perturbations associated with renal disease can have a pronounced effect on the kinetics of elimination of drugs and their metabolites from the body. Drugs are ordinarily cleared from the body by a number of routes, each of which can be characterized by a clearance value. The sum of these clearances (renal, hepatic, etc.) is the total or body clearance which is inversely proportional to the steady-state plasma concentration produced by a given drug dosage regimen. The quantitative contribution of each route of elimination to the metabolic fate of a drug is proportional to the clearance value of that route relative to the body clearance. As a first approximation, the reduction in the renal clearance of a drug caused by renal disease is proportional to the reduction in the renal clearance of creatinine. The metabolic (biotransformation) clearance of many extensively plasma protein bound drugs is proportional to their free fraction (ratio of concentrations of free to total drug) in plasma. Since severe renal disease causes a reduction in the plasma protein binding of many drugs, the metabolic clearance of such drugs will be increased. The contribution of hemodialysis to the total clearance of a drug depends on the magnitude of the clearance obtained by hemodialysis relative to the magnitude of the body clearance of the drug on a day between dialyses. To compensate for the increased elimination of a drug during hemodialysis, the dosing rate (i.e., the dose per unit of time) must be increased by the factor (hemodialysis clearance and body clearance):body clearance, where body clearance is that during a day between dialyses. Further dosage compensation may be needed if body clearance is increased during hemodialysis due to decreased plasma protein binding of the drug. Under certain conditions, an increased accumulation of pharmacologically active drug metabolites during renal failure becomes a matter of serious concern. PMID:851113

  10. Renal effects of percutaneous stone removal

    SciTech Connect

    Eshghi, M.; Schiff, R.G.; Smith, A.D.

    1989-02-01

    Preoperative and postoperative renography with 99mTechnetium-diethylene-triamine pentaacetic acid was performed on 33 patients who were free of renal scarring, infection, and obstruction and who underwent percutaneous renal stone removal. Although there was a transient decrease in renal function postoperatively in some patients, statistically significant reductions in renal function occurred only in 1 patient with an arteriovenous malformation that was embolized and in 1 patient who had a postoperative ureteropelvic junction stricture. The creation of more than one nephrostomy tract did not affect the results. In the absence of serious complications, percutaneous nephrostomy does not have a significant effect on renal function.

  11. Effects of renal lymphatic occlusion and venous constriction on renal function.

    PubMed Central

    Stolarczyk, J.; Carone, F. A.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of renal lymphatic occlusion or increased lymph flow due to renal vein constriction on renal function were investigated in rats. In each experiment, the renal lymphatics or vein of the left kidney were occluded or constricted and the right kidney served as a control. Occlusion of renal lymphatics caused renal enlargement, no change in glomerular filtration rate, a marked increase in urine flow and solute excretion without any change in urine osmolality, and enhanced urinary loss of urea, potassium, sodium and ammonium. Urea concentrations in medullary and papillary tissues were significantly elevated. Renal vein constriction caused renal enlargement and a marked drop in glomerular filtration rate, urine volume, urine osmolality and solute excretion. tissue concentrations of urea and potassium were decreased in the medulla and papilla and total tissue solute was significantly decreased in the papilla. The data indicate that in the rat, renal lymphatic occlusion traps urea in the medulla and induces a urea diuresis resulting in a large flow of normally concentrated urine. On the other hand, increased lymph flow secondary to renal vein constriction decreases medullary urea and potassium concentrations and papillary osmolality. These changes and the reduced glomerular filtration rate result in a small flow if dilute urine. Thus both renal lymphatic occlusion and enhanced lymph flow have a significant effect on renal function. Images Fig 1 PMID:1122006

  12. [Renal colic].

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, J M

    1999-01-01

    The appropriate approach to renal colic, which should be known by the family doctor, is presented. The incidence of this condition in the emergency department of a large general hospital is described as well as the physiopathology of pain, its clinical aspects and the therapeutic attitudes. Renal colic is frequent, it is often possible to diagnose the clinical aspects and general practitioners have the competence for treatment. The use of analgesic drugs, in the correct dosage, is enough to relieve pain and suffering in most of the patients. PMID:10423866

  13. [Renal disease].

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Cuevas, María de Los Ángeles

    2016-09-01

    Chronic renal failure in its various stages, requires certain nutritional restrictions associated with the accumulation of minerals and waste products that cannot be easily eliminated by the kidneys. Some of these restrictions modify the intake of proteins, sodium, and phosphorus. Milk and dairy products are sources of these nutrients. This article aims to inform the reader about the benefits including milk and dairy products relying on a scientific and critical view according to the clinical conditions and the stage of renal disease in which the patient is. PMID:27603894

  14. Renal organogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of chronic kidney disease in the absence of new treatment modalities has become a strong driver for innovation in nephrology. An increasing understanding of stem cell biology has kindled the prospects of regenerative options for kidney disease. However, the kidney itself is not a regenerative organ, as all the nephrons are formed during embryonic development. Here, we will investigate advances in the molecular genetics of renal organogenesis, including what this can tell us about lineage relationships, and discuss how this may serve to inform us about both the normal processes of renal repair and options for regenerative therapies. PMID:22198432

  15. Metabolomics and Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Eugene P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review This review summarizes recent metabolomics studies of renal disease, outlining some of the limitations of the literature to date. Recent findings The application of metabolomics in nephrology research has expanded from initial analyses of uremia to include both cross-sectional and longitudinal studies of earlier stages of kidney disease. Although these studies have nominated several potential markers of incident CKD and CKD progression, lack of overlap in metabolite coverage has limited the ability to synthesize results across groups. Further, direct examination of renal metabolite handling has underscored the substantial impact kidney function has on these potential markers (and many other circulating metabolites). In experimental studies, metabolomics has been used to identify a signature of decreased mitochondrial function in diabetic nephropathy and a preference for aerobic glucose metabolism in PKD; in each case, these studies have outlined novel therapeutic opportunities. Finally, as a complement to the longstanding interest in renal metabolite clearance, the microbiome has been increasingly recognized as the source of many plasma metabolites, including some with potential functional relevance to CKD and its complications. Summary The high-throughput, high-resolution phenotyping enabled by metabolomics technologies has begun to provide insight on renal disease in clinical, physiologic, and experimental contexts. PMID:26050125

  16. Substitution of the Lys Linker with the β-Ala Linker Dramatically Decreased the Renal Uptake of 99mTc-Labeled Arg-X-Asp-Conjugated and X-Ala-Asp-Conjugated α-Melanocyte Stimulating Hormone Peptides

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether the substitution of the Lys linker with the β-Ala could reduce the renal uptake of 99mTc-labeled Arg-X-Asp-conjugated and X-Ala-Asp-conjugated α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) peptides. RSD-β-Ala-(Arg11)CCMSH (1) {c[Arg-Ser-Asp-dTyr-Asp]-β-Ala-Cys-Cys-Glu-His-dPhe-Arg-Trp-Cys-Arg-Pro-Val-NH2}, RTD-β-Ala-(Arg11)CCMSH (2), RVD-β-Ala-(Arg11)CCMSH (3), RAD-β-Ala-(Arg11)CCMSH (4), NAD-β-Ala-(Arg11)CCMSH (5), and EAD-β-Ala-(Arg11)CCMSH (6) peptides were synthesized and evaluated for their melanocortin 1 (MC1) receptor binding affinities in B16/F1 melanoma cells. The biodistribution of their 99mTc-conjugates were determined in B16/F1 melanoma-bearing C57 mice. The substitution of the Lys linker with β-Ala linker dramatically reduced the renal uptake of all six 99mTc-peptides. 99mTc-4 exhibited the highest melanoma uptake (15.66 ± 6.19% ID/g) and the lowest kidney uptake (20.18 ± 3.86% ID/g) among these 99mTc-peptides at 2 h postinjection. The B16/F1 melanoma lesions could be clearly visualized by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT using 99mTc-4 as an imaging probe. PMID:25290883

  17. Renal opiate receptor mediation of renin secretion to renal nerve stimulation in the dog.

    PubMed

    Koyama, S; Hosomi, H

    1986-06-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate renal opiate receptor mediation of the renin secretion response to electrical stimulation of the renal nerves in the pentobarbital sodium-anesthetized dog by use of the opiate agonist leucine-enkephalin (Leu-enk) and the opiate antagonist naloxone. In all animals studied, left kidneys were pump perfused at a constant renal blood flow. Renal perfusion pressure (RPP) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were unaltered at a stimulation frequency of 1.0 Hz; however, renin secretion rate (RSR) increased significantly in the nontreated group. High-frequency renal nerve stimulation (10 Hz) increased RPP and decreased GFR. RSR at the high-frequency stimulation was significantly augmented in the nontreated group. Renal arterial infusion of either Leu-enk (25 micrograms X kg-1 X min-1) or naloxone (7 micrograms X kg-1 X min-1) did not alter base-line levels of renal hemodynamics and RSR and did not produce significant changes in these variables even when renal nerves were stimulated at the low frequency; however, Leu-enk inhibited RPP and RSR responses to the high-frequency stimulation, and naloxone augmented these responses. Phentolamine (13 micrograms X kg-1 X min-1) prevented renal hemodynamic responses to the renal nerve stimulation, whereas RSR responses to the stimulation were unaffected. Propranolol (8 micrograms X kg-1 X min-1) resulted in decreases in RSR at the renal nerve stimulation despite the presence of changes in renal hemodynamics similar to the other groups. The results indicate that intrarenal opiate receptors may participate in inhibiting renal secretion of renin mediated by the renal nerves when renal vasoconstriction and reduction of GFR occurred at the high-frequency stimulation. PMID:3013030

  18. Renal Calculi

    PubMed Central

    Yendt, E. R.

    1970-01-01

    The pathogenesis of renal calculi is reviewed in general terms followed by the results of investigation of 439 patients with renal calculi studied by the author at Toronto General Hospital over a 13-year period. Abnormalities of probable pathogenetic significance were encountered in 76% of patients. Idiopathic hypercalciuria was encountered in 42% of patients, primary hyperparathyroidism in 11%, urinary infection in 8% and miscellaneous disorders in 8%. The incidence of uric acid stones and cystinuria was 5% and 2% respectively. In the remaining 24% of patients in whom no definite abnormalities were encountered the mean urinary magnesium excretion was less than normal. Of 180 patients with idiopathic hypercalciuria, only 24 were females. In the diagnosis of hyperparathyroidism, the importance of detecting minimal degrees of hypercalcemia is stressed; attention is also drawn to the new observation that the upper limit of normal for serum calcium is slightly lower in females than in males. The efficacy of various measures advocated for the prevention of renal calculi is also reviewed. In the author's experience the administration of thiazides has been particularly effective in the prevention of calcium stones. Thiazides cause a sustained reduction in urinary calcium excretion and increase in urinary magnesium excretion. These agents also appear to affect the skeleton by diminishing bone resorption and slowing down bone turnover. PMID:5438766

  19. Proximal renal tubular acidosis

    MedlinePlus

    Renal tubular acidosis - proximal; Type II RTA; RTA - proximal; Renal tubular acidosis type II ... by alkaline substances, mainly bicarbonate. Proximal renal tubular acidosis (Type II RTA) occurs when bicarbonate is not ...

  20. CD47 regulates renal tubular epithelial cell self-renewal and proliferation following renal ischemia reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Natasha M; Zhang, Zheng J; Wang, Jiao-Jing; Thomson, Angus W; Isenberg, Jeffrey S

    2016-08-01

    Defects in renal tubular epithelial cell repair contribute to renal ischemia reperfusion injury, cause acute kidney damage, and promote chronic renal disease. The matricellular protein thrombospondin-1 and its receptor CD47 are involved in experimental renal ischemia reperfusion injury, although the role of this interaction in renal recovery is unknown. We found upregulation of self-renewal genes (transcription factors Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and cMyc) in the kidney of CD47(-/-) mice after ischemia reperfusion injury. Wild-type animals had minimal self-renewal gene expression, both before and after injury. Suggestive of cell autonomy, CD47(-/-) renal tubular epithelial cells were found to increase expression of the self-renewal genes. This correlated with enhanced proliferative capacity compared with cells from wild-type mice. Exogenous thrombospondin-1 inhibited self-renewal gene expression in renal tubular epithelial cells from wild-type but not CD47(-/-) mice, and this was associated with decreased proliferation. Treatment of renal tubular epithelial cells with a CD47 blocking antibody or CD47-targeting small interfering RNA increased expression of some self-renewal transcription factors and promoted cell proliferation. In a syngeneic kidney transplant model, treatment with a CD47 blocking antibody increased self-renewal transcription factor expression, decreased tissue damage, and improved renal function compared with that in control mice. Thus, thrombospondin-1 via CD47 inhibits renal tubular epithelial cell recovery after ischemia reperfusion injury through inhibition of proliferation/self-renewal. PMID:27259369

  1. Renal mu opioid receptor mechanisms in regulation of renal function in rats.

    PubMed

    Kapusta, D R; Jones, S Y; DiBona, G F

    1991-07-01

    Studies were performed in pentobarbital anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats to determine whether mu opioid receptor agonists produce changes in renal function via intrarenal mechanisms. Left renal artery infusion of isotonic saline vehicle or the selective mu opioid receptor agonist, dermorphin (0.5 nmol/kg/min), did not alter mean arterial pressure or heart rate. In contrast, left renal artery dermorphin administration produced a significant decrease in left kidney urinary flow rate and sodium excretion without altering glomerular filtration rate or effective renal plasma flow; function of the right kidney was unaffected. Pretreatment of the left kidney with the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone, 50 micrograms/kg into left renal artery, prevented changes in urinary flow rate and sodium excretion induced by subsequent left renal artery dermorphin administration. Prior bilateral renal denervation abolished the antidiuretic and antinatriuretic responses to left renal artery dermorphin administration. These results suggest that mu opioid receptor agonists participate in the process of renal tubular sodium and water reabsorption via an intrarenal action that is dependent on an interaction with renal sympathetic nerves. This may occur via an action of mu opioid receptor agonists to facilitate the nerve terminal release and/or the direct tubular action of norepinephrine to affect renal tubular sodium and water reabsorption. PMID:1677034

  2. Renal Denervation

    PubMed Central

    Persu, Alexandre; Renkin, Jean; Thijs, Lutgarde; Staessen, Jan A.

    2013-01-01

    The term “ultima ratio” has multiple, though related, meanings. The motto “ultima ratio regum,” cast on the cannons of the French army of King Louis XIV, meant that war is the last argument of kings, that is, the one to be used after all diplomatic arguments have failed. Along similar lines, we propose that, given the current evidence, renal denervation should be used as a last resort, after state-of-the-art drug treatment optimized at expert centers failed to control blood pressure. PMID:22851728

  3. Primary carcinoma of renal calyx.

    PubMed

    Williams, Phillip A; Mai, Kien T

    2013-10-01

    cases, and with no extension into the collecting ducts. RCXC-UC were all positive for p63, CK5, CK7, and PAX2, with all negative for RCC. PAX8 (70% positive) and GATA3 (50% positive) reactivity was variable. The 10 UC cases shared IHC properties with RCXC-UC but frequent negativity for PAX8 and positivity for GATA3. RCXC is an aggressive neoplasm with high risk of metastases. Similar to CDC, it is located in the renal papilla and rarely with clinically visible renal pelvis tumor or ureteral urine positive for tumor cells. Unlike CDC and non-calyceal UC, RCXC shows predominantly urothelial and squamous differentiation and is associated with an in situ component of adjacent renal calyces. By IHC, RCXC exhibited features intermediate between UC and CDC with decreased or negative immunoreactivity for PAX8 and GATA. PMID:23999038

  4. The internist and the renal resistive index: truths and doubts.

    PubMed

    Boddi, Maria; Natucci, Fabrizia; Ciani, Elisa

    2015-12-01

    The renal resistive index (RRI) is measured by Doppler sonography in an intrarenal artery, and is the difference between the peak systolic and end-diastolic blood velocities divided by the peak systolic velocity. The RRI is used for the study of vascular and renal parenchymal renal abnormalities, but growing evidence indicates that it is also a dynamic marker of systemic vascular properties. Renal vascular resistance is only one of several renal (vascular compliance, interstitial and venous pressure), and extrarenal (heart rate, aortic stiffness, pulse pressure) determinants that combine to determine the RRI values, and not the most important one. RRI cannot always be considered a specific marker of renal disease. To summarize from the literature: (1) hydronephrosis, abdominal hypertension, renal vein thrombosis and acute kidney injury are all associated with an acute increase in interstitial and venous pressure that determine RRI values. In all these conditions, RRI is a reliable marker of the severity of renal damage. (2) The hemodynamic impact of renal artery stenosis can be assayed by the RRI decrease in the homolateral kidney by virtue of decreasing pulse pressure. However, renal diseases that often coexist, increase renal vascular stiffness and hide the hemodynamic effect of renal stenosis. (3) In transplant kidney and in chronic renal disease, high RRI values (>0.80) can independently predict renal and clinical outcomes, but systemic (pulse pressure) rather than renal hemodynamic determinants sustain the predictive role of RRI. (4) Higher RRI detects target renal organ damage in hypertension and diabetes when renal function is still preserved, as a marker of systemic atherosclerotic burden. Is this the fact? We attempt to answer. PMID:26337967

  5. [Renal physiology].

    PubMed

    Gueutin, Victor; Deray, Gilbert; Isnard-Bagnis, Corinne

    2012-03-01

    The kidneys are responsible for the urinary excretion of uremic toxins and the regulation of several body systems such as intra and extracellular volume status, acid-base status, calcium and phosphate metabolism or erythropoiesis. They adapt quantitative and qualitative composition of the urine to keep these systems in balance. The flow of plasma is filtered in the range of 120 mL/min, and depends on the systemic and renal hemodynamics which is subject to self-regulation. The original urine will then be modified in successive segments of the nephron. The proximal nephron is to lead the massive reabsorption of water and essential elements such as sodium, bicarbonates, amino-acids and glucose. The distal nephron includes the distal convoluted tubule, the connector tube and the collecting duct. Its role is to adapt the quality composition of urine to the needs of the body. PMID:22157516

  6. [Update in continuous renal replacement techniques].

    PubMed

    Romero-García, M; de la Cueva-Ariza, L; Delgado-Hito, P

    2013-01-01

    Acute renal failure affects 25% of patients hospitalized in intensive care units. Despite technological advances, the mortality of these patients is still high due to its associated complications. Continuous renal replacement techniques are one of the treatments for acute renal failure because they make it possible to treat the complications and decrease mortality. The nurse's knowledge and skills regarding these techniques will be decisive for the success of the therapy. Consequently, the nurse's experience and training are key components. The objective of this article is to update the knowledge on continuous renal replacement techniques. Keeping this in mind, a review has been made of the physical and chemical principles such as diffusion and convection, among others. A description of the different continuous renal replacement techniques, a presentation of the main vascular access, and a description of the nursing cares and complications related to techniques used have also been provided. PMID:23498371

  7. Nuclear factor erythroid-2 related factor 2 overexpressed mesenchymal stem cells transplantation, improves renal function, decreases injuries markers and increases repair markers in glycerol-induced Acute kidney injury rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhaleh, Fateme; Amiri, Fatemeh; Mohammadzadeh-Vardin, Mohammad; Bahadori, Marzie; Harati, Mitra Dehghan; Roudkenar, Mehryar Habibi; Saki, Sasan

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Recently cell therapy is a promising therapeutic modality for many types of disease including acute kidney injury (AKI). Due to the unique biological properties, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are attractive cells in this regard. This study aims to transplant MSCs equipped with nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) in rat experimental models of acute kidney and evaluate regeneration potential of injured kidney especially expression of injury and repaired biomarkers. Materials and methods: Nrf2 was overexpressed in bone marrow-derived MSCs by pcDNA.3.1 plasmid. AKI was induced using glycerol in rat models. The regenerative potential of Nrf2-overexpressed MSCs was evaluated in AKI-Induced animal models using biochemical and histological methods after transplantation. Expression of repaired genes, AQP1 and CK-18, as well as injury markers, Kim-1 and Cystatin C, was also assayed in engrafted kidney sections. Results: Our results revealed that transplantation of Nrf2-overexpressed MSCs into AKI-induced rats decreased blood urea nitrogen and creatinine and ameliorated kidney regeneration throughout 14 days. Upregulation of repaired markers and downregulation of injury markers were considerable 14 days after transplantation. Conclusions: Overexpression of Nrf2 in MSCs suggests a new strategy to increase efficiency of MSC-based cell therapy in AKI. PMID:27114803

  8. Inherited renal cystic diseases.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bohyun; King, Bernard F; Vrtiska, Terri J; Irazabal, Maria V; Torres, Vicente E; Harris, Peter C

    2016-06-01

    A number of inherited renal diseases present with renal cysts and often lead to end-stage renal disease. With recent advances in genetics, increasing number of genes and mutations have been associated with cystic renal diseases. Although genetic testing can provide a definite diagnosis, it is often reserved for equivocal cases or for ongoing investigational research. Therefore, imaging findings are essential in the routine diagnosis, follow-up, and detection of complications in patients with inherited cystic renal diseases. In this article, the most recent classification, genetic analysis, clinical presentations, and imaging findings of inherited cystic renal diseases will be discussed. PMID:27167233

  9. Role of renal sensory nerves in physiological and pathophysiological conditions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Whether activation of afferent renal nerves contributes to the regulation of arterial pressure and sodium balance has been long overlooked. In normotensive rats, activating renal mechanosensory nerves decrease efferent renal sympathetic nerve activity (ERSNA) and increase urinary sodium excretion, an inhibitory renorenal reflex. There is an interaction between efferent and afferent renal nerves, whereby increases in ERSNA increase afferent renal nerve activity (ARNA), leading to decreases in ERSNA by activation of the renorenal reflexes to maintain low ERSNA to minimize sodium retention. High-sodium diet enhances the responsiveness of the renal sensory nerves, while low dietary sodium reduces the responsiveness of the renal sensory nerves, thus producing physiologically appropriate responses to maintain sodium balance. Increased renal ANG II reduces the responsiveness of the renal sensory nerves in physiological and pathophysiological conditions, including hypertension, congestive heart failure, and ischemia-induced acute renal failure. Impairment of inhibitory renorenal reflexes in these pathological states would contribute to the hypertension and sodium retention. When the inhibitory renorenal reflexes are suppressed, excitatory reflexes may prevail. Renal denervation reduces arterial pressure in experimental hypertension and in treatment-resistant hypertensive patients. The fall in arterial pressure is associated with a fall in muscle sympathetic nerve activity, suggesting that increased ARNA contributes to increased arterial pressure in these patients. Although removal of both renal sympathetic and afferent renal sensory nerves most likely contributes to the arterial pressure reduction initially, additional mechanisms may be involved in long-term arterial pressure reduction since sympathetic and sensory nerves reinnervate renal tissue in a similar time-dependent fashion following renal denervation. PMID:25411364

  10. Renal tubular secretion of pramipexole.

    PubMed

    Knop, Jana; Hoier, Eva; Ebner, Thomas; Fromm, Martin F; Müller, Fabian

    2015-11-15

    The dopamine agonist pramipexole is cleared predominantly by the kidney with a major contribution of active renal secretion. Previously the organic cation transporter 2 (OCT2) was shown to be involved in the uptake of pramipexole by renal tubular cells, while the mechanism underlying efflux into tubular lumen remains unclear. Cimetidine, a potent inhibitor of multidrug and toxin extrusion proteins 1 (MATE1) and 2-K (MATE2-K), decreases renal pramipexole clearance in humans. We hypothesized that, in addition to OCT2, pramipexole may be a substrate of MATE-mediated transport. Pramipexole uptake was investigated using MDCK or HEK cells overexpressing OCT2, MATE1 or MATE2-K and the respective vector controls (Co). Transcellular pramipexole transport was investigated in MDCK cells single- or double-transfected with OCT2 and/or MATE1 and in Co cells, separating a basal from an apical compartment in a model for renal tubular secretion. Pramipexole uptake was 1.6-, 1.1-, or 1.6-folds in cells overexpressing OCT2, MATE1 or MATE2-K, respectively as compared to Co cells (p<0.05). In transcellular transport experiments, intracellular pramipexole accumulation was 1.7-folds in MDCK-OCT2 (p<0.001), and transcellular pramipexole transport was 2.2- and 4.0-folds in MDCK-MATE1 and MDCK-OCT2-MATE1 cells as compared to Co cells (p<0.001). Transcellular pramipexole transport was pH dependent and inhibited by cimetidine with IC50 values of 12μM and 5.5μM in MATE1 and OCT2-MATE1 cells, respectively. Taken together, coordinate activity of OCT2-mediated uptake and MATE-mediated efflux determines pramipexole renal secretion. Reduced OCT2 or MATE transport activity due to genetic variation or drug-drug interactions may affect pramipexole renal secretion. PMID:26360835

  11. Early impact of robot-assisted partial nephrectomy on renal function as assessed by renal scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Luciani, Lorenzo G; Chiodini, Stefano; Donner, Davide; Cai, Tommaso; Vattovani, Valentino; Tiscione, Daniele; Giusti, Guido; Proietti, Silvia; Chierichetti, Franca; Malossini, Gianni

    2016-06-01

    To measure the early impact of robot-assisted partial nephrectomy (RAPN) on renal function as assessed by renal scan (Tc 99m-DTPA), addressing the issue of risk factors for ischemic damage to the kidney. All patients undergoing RAPN for cT1 renal masses between June 2013 and May 2014 were included in this prospective study. Renal function as expressed by glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was assessed by Technetium 99m-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Tc 99m-DTPA) renal scan preoperatively and postoperatively at 1 month in every patient. A multivariable analysis was used for the determination of independent factors predictive of GFR decrease of the operated kidney. Overall, 32 patients underwent RAPN in the time interval. Median tumor size, blood loss, and ischemia time were 4 cm, 200 mL, and 24 min, respectively. Two grade III complications occurred (postoperative bleeding in the renal fossa, urinoma). The GFR of the operated kidney decreased significantly from 51.7 ± 15.1 mL/min per 1.73 m(2) preoperatively to 40, 12 ± 12.4 mL/min per 1.73 m(2) 1 month postoperatively (p = 0.001) with a decrease of 22.4 %. On multivariable analysis, only tumor size (p = 0.05) was a predictor of GFR decrease of the operated kidney. Robotic-assisted partial nephrectomy had a detectable impact on early renal function in a series of relatively large tumors and prevailing intermediate nephrometric risk. A mean decrease of 22 % of GFR as assessed by renal scan in the operated kidney was found at 1 month postoperatively. In multivariable analysis, tumor size only was a significant predictor of renal function loss. PMID:26994776

  12. Renal vein thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the kidneys. Possible Complications Complications may include: Acute renal failure (especially if thrombosis occurs in a dehydrated child) ... Saunders; 2012:chap 34. Read More Acute kidney failure Arteriogram Blood ... embolus Renal Tumor Update Date 5/19/2015 Updated by: ...

  13. Renal papillary necrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... your provider. Alternative Names Necrosis - renal papillae; Renal medullary necrosis Images Kidney anatomy Kidney - blood and urine flow References Ruggenenti P, Cravedi P, Remuzzi G. Microvascular and macrovascular diseases of the kidney. In: Taal MW, Chertow GM, ...

  14. Kidney (Renal) Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... renal function using ureteral stenting, nephrostomy, surgery or dialysis. What is kidney (renal) failure? How is kidney ... as a urinary stent or kidney stone removal. Dialysis , including hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis: These procedures remove ...

  15. Renal papillary necrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... renal papillary necrosis, especially after taking over-the-counter pain medicines ... diabetes or sickle cell anemia may reduce your risk. To prevent renal ... over-the-counter pain relievers. Do not take more than the ...

  16. Cardio-renal syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gnanaraj, Joseph; Radhakrishnan, Jai

    2016-01-01

    Cardio-renal syndrome is a commonly encountered problem in clinical practice. Its pathogenesis is not fully understood. The purpose of this article is to highlight the interaction between the cardiovascular system and the renal system and how their interaction results in the complex syndrome of cardio-renal dysfunction. Additionally, we outline the available therapeutic strategies to manage this complex syndrome.

  17. Mechanisms responsible for decreased glomerular filtration in hibernation and hypothermia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tempel, G. E.; Musacchia, X. J.; Jones, S. B.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements of blood pressure, heart rate, red blood cell and plasma volumes, and relative distribution of cardiac output were made on hibernating and hypothermic adult male and female golden hamsters weighing 120-140 g to study the mechanisms underlying the elimination or marked depression of renal function in hibernation and hypothermia. The results suggest that the elimination or marked depression in renal function reported in hibernation and hypothermia may partly be explained by alterations in cardiovascular system function. Renal perfusion pressure which decreases nearly 60% in both hibernation and hypothermia and a decrease in plasma volume of roughly 35% in the hypothermic animal might both be expected to markedly alter glomerular function.

  18. Renal Denervation

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Tao; Guo, Jin-he; Teng, Gao-jun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a group of metabolic diseases of multiple etiologies. Although great progress has been made, researchers are still working on the pathogenesis of T2DM and how to best use the treatments available. Aside from several novel pharmacological approaches, catheter-based sympathetic renal denervation (RDN) has gained a significant role in resistant hypertension, as well as improvements in glycemic control in T2DM. In this article, we will summarize herein the role sympathetic activation plays in the progression of T2DM and review the recent clinical RDN experience in glucose metabolism. We performed systematic review in online databases, including PubMed, EmBase, and Web of Science, from inception until 2015. Studies were included if a statistical relationship was investigated between RDN and T2DM. The quality of each included study was assessed by Newcastle–Ottawa scale score. To synthesize these studies, a random-effects model or a fixed-effects model was applied as appropriate. Then, we calculated heterogeneity, performed sensitivity analysis, tested publication bias, and did meta-regression analysis. Finally, we identified 4 eligible articles. In most studies, RDN achieved via novel catheter-based approach using radiofrequency energy has gained a significant role in resistant hypertension, as well as improvements in glycemic control in T2DM. But the DREAMS-Study showed that RDN did not change median insulin sensitivity nor systemic sympathetic activity. Firstly, the current published studies lacked a proper control group, along with the sample capacity was small. Also, data obtained in the subgroups of diabetic patients were not separately analyzed and the follow-up period was very short. In addition, a reduction in blood pressure accounts for the improvements in glucose metabolism and insulin resistance cannot be excluded. If the favorable result of better glucose metabolism is confirmed in large-scale, randomized studies

  19. Prevention of renal failure: the Malaysian experience.

    PubMed

    Hooi, Lai Seong; Wong, Hin Seng; Morad, Zaki

    2005-04-01

    Renal replacement therapy in Malaysia has shown exponential growth since 1990. The dialysis acceptance rate for 2003 was 80 per million population, prevalence 391 per million population. There are now more than 10,000 patients on dialysis. This growth is proportional to the growth in gross domestic product (GDP). Improvement in nephrology and urology services with widespread availability of ultrasonography and renal pathology has improved care of renal patients. Proper management of renal stone disease, lupus nephritis, and acute renal failure has decreased these as causes of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in younger age groups. Older patients are being accepted for dialysis, and 51% of new patients on dialysis were diabetic in 2003. The prevalence of diabetes is rising in the country (presently 7%); glycemic control of such patients is suboptimal. Thirty-three percent of adult Malaysians are hypertensive and blood pressure control is poor (6%). There is a national coordinating committee to oversee the control of diabetes and hypertension in the country. Primary care clinics have been provided with kits to detect microalbuminuria, and ACE inhibitors for the treatment of hypertension and diabetic nephropathy. Prevention of renal failure workshops targeted at primary care doctors have been launched, opportunistic screening at health clinics is being carried out, and public education targeting high-risk groups is ongoing. The challenge in Malaysia is to stem the rising tide of diabetic ESRD. PMID:15752245

  20. Should blunt segmental vascular renal injuries be considered an AAST grade 4 renal injury?

    PubMed Central

    Malaeb, Bahaa; Figler, Brad; Wessells, Hunter; Voelzke, Bryan B.

    2013-01-01

    Background Renal segmental vascular injury (SVI) following blunt abdominal trauma is not part of the original AAST renal injury grading system. Recent recommendations support classifying SVI as an AAST grade 4 injury. Our primary aim was to compare outcomes following blunt renal SVI and blunt renal collecting system lacerations (CSL). We hypothesize that renal SVI fare well with conservative management alone and should be relegated a less severe renal AAST grade. Methods We retrospectively identified patients with SVI and G4 CSL admitted to a Level 1 trauma center between 2003–2010. Penetrating trauma was excluded. Need for surgical intervention, length of stay, kidney salvage (>25% renal preservation on renography 6–12 weeks after injury), and delayed complication rates were compared between the SVI and CSL injuries. Statistical analysis utilized chi squared, Fisher exact, and t-test. Results 56 patients with SVI and 88 patients with G4 CSL sustained blunt trauma. Age, injury severity score, and length of stay were similar for the two groups. Five patients in each group died of concomitant, non-renal injuries. In the G4 CSL group, 15 patients underwent major interventions and 32 patients underwent minor interventions. Only one patient in the SVI group underwent a major intervention. The renal salvage rate was 85.7% following SVI versus 62.5% following CSL (p=0.107). Conclusions Overall surgical interventions are significantly lower among the SVI cohort than G4 CSL cohort. Further analysis using a larger cohort of patients is recommended before revising the current renal grading system. Adding SVI as a grade 4 injury could potentially increase the heterogeneity of grade 4 injuries and decrease the ability of the AAST renal injury grading system to predict outcomes, such as nephrectomy rate. Level of Evidence IV (retrospective, cohort study) PMID:24458054

  1. Regulation of renal sympathetic neurotransmission by renal α2A-adrenoceptors is impaired in chronic renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Hoch, Henning; Stegbauer, Johannes; Potthoff, Sebastian A; Hein, Lutz; Quack, Ivo; Rump, Lars Christian; Vonend, Oliver

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The mechanisms underlying increased renal noradrenaline in renal failure are still unclear. In this study, the role of α2A-adrenoceptors in controlling sympathetic neurotransmission in chronic renal failure was evaluated in a subtotal nephrectomy model. Also, the influence of this receptor subtype on angiotensin II (Ang II)-mediated noradrenaline release was evaluated. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH α2A-Adrenoceptor-knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice underwent subtotal (5/6) nephrectomy (SNx) or SHAM-operation (SHAM). Kidneys of WT and KO mice were isolated and perfused. Renal nerves were stimulated with platinum electrodes and noradrenaline release was measured by HPLC. KEY RESULTS Noradrenaline release induced by renal nerve stimulation (RNS) was significantly increased in WT mice after SNx. RNS-induced noradrenaline release was significantly higher in SHAM-KO compared with SHAM-WT, but no further increase in noradrenaline release could be observed in SNx-KO. α-Adrenoceptor antagonists increased RNS-induced noradrenaline release in SHAM-WT but not in SHAM-KO. After SNx, the effect of α2-adrenoceptor blockade on renal noradrenaline release was attenuated in WT mice. The mRNA expression of α2A-adrenoceptors was not altered, but the inhibitory effect of α2-adrenoceptor agonists on cAMP formation was abolished after SNx. Ang II facilitated RNS-induced noradrenaline release in SHAM-WT but not in SHAM-KO and SNx-WT. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS In our model of renal failure autoregulation of renal sympathetic neurotransmission was impaired. Presynaptic inhibition of noradrenaline release was diminished and the facilitatory effect of presynaptic angiotensin AT1 receptors on noradrenaline release was markedly decreased in renal failure and depended on functioning α2A-adrenoceptors. PMID:21244368

  2. Comparison of renal ultrasonography and dimercaptosuccinic acid renal scintigraphy in febrile urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Ayazi, Parviz; Mahyar, Abolfazl; Noroozian, Elham; Esmailzadehha, Neda; Barikani, Ameneh

    2015-12-01

    Accurate and early diagnosis and appropriate treatment of patient with urinary tract infection (UTI) are essential for the prevention or restriction of permanent damage to the kidneys in children. The aim of this study was to compare renal ultrasonography (US) and dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) renal scan in the diagnosis of patients with febrile urinary tract infection. This study involved the medical records of children with febrile urinary tract infection who were admitted to the children's hospital in Qazvin, Iran. Pyelonephritis was diagnosed on the basis of clinical symptoms, laboratory tests and abnormal DMSA renal scans. The criteria for abnormality of renal US were an increase or a decrease in diffuse or focal parenchymal echogenicity, loss of corticomedullary differentiation, kidney position irregularities, parenchymal reduction and increased kidney size. Of the 100 study patients, 23% had an abnormal US and 46% had an abnormal DMSA renal scan. Of the latter patients, 15 had concurrent abnormal US (P value ≤ 0.03, concordance rate: 18%). Renal US had a sensitivity of 32%, specificity of 85%, positive predictive value of 65% and negative predictive value of 60%. Of the 77 patients with normal US, 31 (40.2%) had an abnormal DMSA renal scan. Despite the benefits and accessibility of renal US, its value in the diagnosis of pyelonephritis is limited. PMID:26700082

  3. Effects of Renal Denervation on Renal Artery Function in Humans: Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Doltra, Adelina; Hartmann, Arthur; Stawowy, Philipp; Goubergrits, Leonid; Kuehne, Titus; Wellnhofer, Ernst; Gebker, Rolf; Schneeweis, Christopher; Schnackenburg, Bernhard; Esler, Murray; Fleck, Eckart; Kelle, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Aim To study the effects of RD on renal artery wall function non-invasively using magnetic resonance. Methods and Results 32 patients undergoing RD were included. A 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance of the renal arteries was performed before RD and after 6-month. We quantified the vessel sharpness of both renal arteries using a quantitative analysis tool (Soap-Bubble®). In 17 patients we assessed the maximal and minimal cross-sectional area of both arteries, peak velocity, mean flow, and renal artery distensibility. In a subset of patients wall shear stress was assessed with computational flow dynamics. Neither renal artery sharpness nor renal artery distensibility differed significantly. A significant increase in minimal and maximal areas (by 25.3%, p = 0.008, and 24.6%, p = 0.007, respectively), peak velocity (by 16.9%, p = 0.021), and mean flow (by 22.4%, p = 0.007) was observed after RD. Wall shear stress significantly decreased (by 25%, p = 0.029). These effects were observed in blood pressure responders and non-responders. Conclusions RD is not associated with adverse effects at renal artery level, and leads to an increase in cross-sectional areas, velocity and flow and a decrease in wall shear stress. PMID:27003912

  4. [Immune tolerance after renal transplantation].

    PubMed

    Krajewska, Magdalena; Weyde, Wacław; Klinger, Marian

    2006-01-01

    Progress in immunosuppressive therapy has improved short-term survival of renal allografts by decreasing the frequency of acute rejections. However, the long-term survival of renal grafts has not improved. Transplanted kidneys are lost in the late period after transplantation as a result of vasculopathy and chronic rejection. Immunological tolerance means the lack of immunological activity towards certain antigens while the response towards others remains correct. The induction of immunological tolerance of donor antigens (transplant tolerance) is examined intensively to work out treatment methods which will allow prevention of chronic allograft rejection. The paper includes an overview of current knowledge on allograft tolerance. Immune response to alloantigens is described and the mechanisms of immunological tolerance induction (including clonal deletion, anergy connected with the microchimerism phenomenon, and active suppression caused by regulatory lymphocytes) are characterized. The role of dendritic cells in the process of inducing and maintaining tolerance is highlighted. Tolerance-inducing strategies in renal transplant recipients and clinically applied evaluation methods are presented. At present, optimizing recipient matching is used to decrease the risk of graft rejection. Hopefully, gene therapy will be possible in the near future. However, before introducing such a procedure into clinical studies, optimal therapy conditions and risk evaluation must be defined in tests on animals. PMID:16552396

  5. Renal Glucose Handling

    PubMed Central

    Ferrannini, Ele; Veltkamp, Stephan A.; Smulders, Ronald A.; Kadokura, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Ipragliflozin, a sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitor, stimulates glycosuria and lowers glycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). The objective of this study was to assess the pharmacodynamics of ipragliflozin in T2DM patients with impaired renal function. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Glycosuria was measured before and after a single ipragliflozin dose in 8 nondiabetic subjects and 57 T2DM patients (age 62 ± 9 years, fasting glucose 133 ± 39 mg/dL, mean ± SD) with normal renal function (assessed as the estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR]) (eGFR1 ≥90 mL · min–1 · 1.73 m−2), mild (eGFR2 ≥60 to <90), moderate (eGFR3 ≥30 to <60), or severe reduction in eGFR (eGFR4 ≤15 to <30). RESULTS Ipragliflozin significantly increased urinary glucose excretion in each eGFR class (P < 0.0001). However, ipragliflozin-induced glycosuria declined (median [IQR]) across eGFR class (from 46 mg/min [33] in eGFR1 to 8 mg/min [7] in eGFR4, P < 0.001). Ipragliflozin-induced fractional glucose excretion (excretion/filtration) was 39% [27] in the T2DM patients (pooled data), similar to that of the nondiabetic subjects (37% [17], P = ns). In bivariate analysis of the pooled data, ipragliflozin-induced glycosuria was directly related to eGFR and fasting glucose (P < 0.0001 for both, r2 = 0.55), predicting a decrement in 24-h glycosuria of 15 g for each 20 mL/min decline in eGFR and an increase of 7 g for each 10 mg/dL increase in glucose above fasting normoglycemia. CONCLUSIONS In T2DM patients, ipragliflozin increases glycosuria in direct, linear proportion to GFR and degree of hyperglycemia, such that its amount can be reliably predicted in the individual patient. Although absolute glycosuria decreases with declining GFR, the efficiency of ipragliflozin action (fractional glucose excretion) is maintained in patients with severe renal impairment. PMID:23359360

  6. Recurrent renal giant leiomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Öziş, Salih Erpulat; Gülpınar, Kamil; Şahlı, Zafer; Konak, Baha Burak; Keskin, Mete; Özdemir, Süleyman; Ataoğlu, Ömür

    2016-01-01

    Primary renal leiomyosarcomas are rare, aggressive tumors. They constitute 1–2% of adult malignant renal tumors. Although leiomyosarcomas are the most common histological type (50–60%) of renal sarcomas, information on renal leiomyosarcoma is limited. Local or systemic recurrences are common. The radiological appearance of renal leiomyosarcomas is not specific, therefore renal leiomyosarcoma cannot be distinguished from renal cell carcinoma by imaging methods in all patients. A 74-year-old female patient presented to our clinic complaining of a palpable mass on the right side of her abdomen in November 2012. The abdominal magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass, 25 × 24 × 23 cm in size. Her past medical history revealed that she has undergone right radical nephrectomy in 2007, due to a 11 × 12 × 13 cm renal mass that was then reported as renal cell carcinoma on abdominal magnetic resonance imaging, but the pathological diagnosis was low-grade renal leiomyosarcoma. The most recent follow-up of the patient was in 2011, with no signs of local recurrence or distant metastases within this four-year period. The patient underwent laparotomy on November 2012, and a 35 cm retroperitoneal mass was excised. The pathological examination of the mass was reported as high-grade leiomyosarcoma. The formation of this giant retroperitoneal mass in 1 year can be explained by the transformation of the lesion’s pathology from low-grade to a high-grade tumor.

  7. Effects of opioid peptides on neural control of renal function in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Kapusta, D R; Jones, S Y; DiBona, G F

    1990-06-01

    The aims of the present study were to examine the effects of opioid receptor agonists and antagonists on the renal vascular (renal blood flow) and tubular (urinary sodium excretion) responses to renal nerve stimulation and norepinephrine in anesthetized spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Graded frequency renal nerve stimulation (0.5-4.0 Hz) and doses of norepinephrine (10-80 ng/kg) produced frequency and dose-dependent decreases in renal blood flow. The renal vasoconstrictor responses were not altered by intravenous infusion of the opioid receptor agonists methionine enkephalin (mu and delta, 75 micrograms/kg/min) or U-50488H (kappa, 20 micrograms/kg/min) or administration of the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone (1 mg/kg i.v.). The antinatriuretic response to low frequency (less than 1.0 Hz) electrical renal nerve stimulation was prevented by naloxone but not affected by methionine enkephalin administration without changes in glomerular filtration rate or effective renal plasma flow. These studies suggest that endogenous opioid receptor mechanisms are involved in the increased renal tubular sodium reabsorption response to low frequency renal nerve stimulation but not in the renal vasoconstrictor response to either renal nerve stimulation or norepinephrine. This might occur by facilitation of the renal nerve terminal release, the direct renal tubular action, or both, of norepinephrine to influence renal tubular sodium reabsorption. PMID:2351429

  8. Acute renal failure in the "Comrades Marathon" runners.

    PubMed

    Seedat, Y K; Aboo, N; Naicker, S; Parsoo, I

    This study investigated the clinical and biochemical features of acute renal failure in marathon runners. Over a period of 18 years (1969-1986), 19 patients were admitted to the renal unit. The histories and biochemical data of 4 patients seen in 1986 are described. The pathophysiology of acute renal failure is multifactorial and is the combined effect of rhabdomyolysis, dehydration, hypotension, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and hyperuricaemia. Efforts to correct dehydration have resulted in a decrease in the incidence of acute renal failure. The use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs is to be deprecated and efforts should be made to publicize this harmful effect. PMID:2485484

  9. Renal Artery Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Sauk, Steven; Zuckerman, Darryl A.

    2011-01-01

    Renal artery embolization (RAE) is an effective minimally invasive alternative procedure for the treatment of a variety of conditions. Since the 1970s when RAE was first developed, technical advances and growing experience have expanded the indications to not only include treatment of conditions such as symptomatic hematuria and palliation for metastatic renal cancer, but also preoperative infarction of renal tumors, treatment of angiomyolipomas, vascular malformations, medical renal disease, and complications following renal transplantation. With the drastically improved morbidity associated with this technique in part due to the introduction of more precise embolic agents and smaller delivery catheters, RAE continues to gain popularity for various urologic conditions. The indications and techniques for renal artery embolization are reviewed in the following sections. PMID:23204638

  10. Renal cystic disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, D.S.

    1988-01-01

    The book begins with an overview of renal cystic disease and a presentation of simple renal cysts. Subsequent chapters cover cystic disease in association with renal neoplasms and medullary sponge kidney. The chapters addressing autosomal-dominant and autosomal-recessive polycystic kidney disease discuss and differentiate the infantile and adult forms of the disease. There are also separate discussions of medullary cystic disease, multicystic dysplastic kidney, and cysts of the renarenal sinus.

  11. Calcified renal oncocytoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserman, N.F.; Ewing, S.L.

    1983-10-01

    Renal oncocytoma, a neoplasm thought to derive from cells of the proximal convoluted tubules, exhibits benign clinical features. Its preoperative distinction from typical renal cell carcinoma would enable the surgeon to perform a more limited procedure. In a patient who is a poor operative candidate, surgery might be deferred. However, preoperative diagnosis has been elusive. A rare case of bilateral renal oncocytoma is reported. One of these tumors represents the first reported oncocytoma showing radiologically demonstrable calcification.

  12. Multimarker assessment for the prediction of renal function improvement after percutaneous revascularization for renal artery stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Partovi, Sasan; Zeller, Thomas; Breidthardt, Tobias; Kaech, Max; Boeddinghaus, Jasper; Puelacher, Christian; Nestelberger, Thomas; Aschwanden, Markus; Mueller, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Background Identifying patients likely to have improved renal function after percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty and stenting (PTRA) for renal artery stenosis (RAS) is challenging. The purpose of this study was to use a comprehensive multimarker assessment to identify those patients who would benefit most from correction of RAS. Methods In 127 patients with RAS and decreased renal function and/or hypertension referred for PTRA, quantification of hemodynamic cardiac stress using B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), renal function using estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), parenchymal renal damage using resistance index (RI), and systemic inflammation using C-reactive protein (CRP) were performed before intervention. Results Predefined renal function improvement (increase in eGFR ≥10%) at 6 months occurred in 37% of patients. Prognostic accuracy as quantified by the area under the receiver-operating characteristics curve for the ability of BNP, eGFR, RI and CRP to predict renal function improvement were 0.59 (95% CI, 0.48–0.70), 0.71 (95% CI, 0.61–0.81), 0.52 (95% CI, 0.41–0.65), and 0.56 (95% CI, 0.44–0.68), respectively. None of the possible combinations increased the accuracy provided by eGFR (lower eGFR indicated a higher likelihood for eGFR improvement after PTRA, P=ns for all). In the subgroup of 56 patients with pre-interventional eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73 m2, similar findings were obtained. Conclusions Quantification of renal function, but not any other pathophysiologic signal, provides at least moderate accuracy in the identification of patients with RAS in whom PTRA will improve renal function. PMID:27280085

  13. Increasing or stabilizing renal epoxyeicosatrienoic acid production attenuates abnormal renal function and hypertension in obese rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hui; Morisseau, Christophe; Wang, JingFeng; Yang, Tianxin; Falck, John R; Hammock, Bruce D; Wang, Mong-Heng

    2007-07-01

    Since epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) affect sodium reabsorption in renal tubules and dilate the renal vasculature, we have examined their effects on renal hemodynamics and sodium balance in male rats fed a high-fat (HF) diet by fenofibrate, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPAR-alpha) agonist and an inducer of cytochrome P-450 (CYP) epoxygenases; by N-methanesulfonyl-6-(2-proparyloxyphenyl)hexanamide (MSPPOH), a selective EET biosynthesis inhibitor; and by 12-(3-adamantane-1-yl-ureido)dodecanoic acid (AUDA), a selective inhibitor of soluble epoxide hydrolase. In rats treated with fenofibrate (30 mg.kg(-1).day(-1) ig) or AUDA (50 mg/l in drinking water) for 2 wk, mean arterial pressure, renal vascular resistance, and glomerular filtration rate were lower but renal blood flow was higher than in vehicle-treated control rats. In addition, fenofibrate and AUDA decreased cumulative sodium balance in the HF rats. Treatment with MSPPOH (20 mg.kg(-1).day(-1) iv) + fenofibrate for 2 wk reversed renal hemodynamics and sodium balance to the levels in control HF rats. Moreover, fenofibrate caused a threefold increase in renal cortical CYP epoxygenase activity, whereas the fenofibrate-induced elevation of this activity was attenuated by MSPPOH. Western blot analysis showed that fenofibrate induced the expression of CYP epoxygenases in renal cortex and microvessels and that the induction effect of fenofibrate was blocked by MSPPOH. These results demonstrate that the fenofibrate-induced increase of CYP epoxygenase expression and the AUDA-induced stabilization of EET production in the kidneys cause renal vascular dilation and reduce sodium retention, contributing to the improvement of abnormal renal hemodynamics and hypertension in HF rats. PMID:17442729

  14. Gout secondary to chronic renal disease: studies on urate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Sorensen, L F

    1980-10-01

    A report of 20 cases of gout considered to be secondary to chronic renal disease is presented. Studies of renal function and of uric acid metabolism were carried out in 16 patients. The daily production of urate remained within normal limits in the face of progressive renal dysfunction. Renal excretion of uric acid was decreased to a mean of 35.5% of the turnover. The cumulative urinary recovery of intravenously injected 14C-uric acid averaged 32.0%. In 3 patients 14C was successively retrieved in urinary allantoinand urea, in carbon dioxide of expired air, and in faeces. As in normal man, carbon dioxide and ammonia were the principal uricolytic products. The extrarenal excretion of uric acid assumes a greater role in chronic renal disease and eventually becomes the major route of elimination of uric acid. The possibility that gout may be secondary to intrinsic renal disease should be entertained when azotaemia is present. PMID:7436573

  15. [Hereditary renal cell carcinomas].

    PubMed

    Hartmann, A; Stöhr, C G; Junker, K

    2010-10-01

    Renal cell carcinomas occur in several hereditary tumor syndromes. These renal tumors frequently have a specific histopathological appearance which can be a sign for a hereditary cause of the disease. The genetic alterations responsible for most of these tumor syndromes were identified in recent years. Interestingly, renal cell carcinomas show specific histopathological features in each of the hereditary renal cancer syndromes. Clear cell and often cystic renal cell carcinomas occur in von Hippel-Lindau syndrome (VHL), while oncocytomas and chromophobe renal cell carcinomas are found in the Birt-Hugg-Dube syndrome, often also as hybrid tumors. Well differentiated papillary carcinomas (Type 1 according to the WHO) are found in the hereditary papillary renal cell carcinoma (HPRC). In contrast, poorly diffentiated papillary renal cell carcinomas (Type 2 according to the WHO) occur in combination with leiomyomas and leiomyosarcomas of the skin and uterus in hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell carcinoma syndrome (HLRCC). The various genetic causes for these hereditary tumor syndromes open up new therapeutic possibilities, some of which are already being investigated in clinical studies. PMID:20960197

  16. Evidence of a heterogeneous tissue oxygenation: renal ischemia/reperfusion injury in a large animal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, Nicole J.; Huffman, Scott W.; Alemozaffar, Mehrdad; Gage, Frederick A.; Levin, Ira W.; Elster, Eric A.

    2013-03-01

    Renal ischemia that occurs intraoperatively during procedures requiring clamping of the renal artery (such as renal procurement for transplantation and partial nephrectomy for renal cancer) is known to have a significant impact on the viability of that kidney. To better understand the dynamics of intraoperative renal ischemia and recovery of renal oxygenation during reperfusion, a visible reflectance imaging system (VRIS) was developed to measure renal oxygenation during renal artery clamping in both cooled and warm porcine kidneys. For all kidneys, normothermic and hypothermic, visible reflectance imaging demonstrated a spatially distinct decrease in the relative oxy-hemoglobin concentration (%HbO2) of the superior pole of the kidney compared to the middle or inferior pole. Mean relative oxy-hemoglobin concentrations decrease more significantly during ischemia for normothermic kidneys compared to hypothermic kidneys. VRIS may be broadly applicable to provide an indicator of organ ischemia during open and laparoscopic procedures.

  17. Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Bradley P.; Hulbert, John C.; Bissler, John J.

    2010-01-01

    Although not as common as other genetic renal diseases such as autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, patients with tuberous sclerosis complex frequently have significant renal involvement. Recent revelations in the cell biology of these renal disease manifestations as well as effective therapies for tuberous sclerosis complex-related renal issues have heralded hope of improved renal survival and improved quality of life for the TSC patient. This review specifically addresses some of the major renal manifestations of this disease. PMID:21071977

  18. Renal outcome of children with unilateral renal agenesis.

    PubMed

    Doğan, Çağla Serpil; Torun Bayram, Meral

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate associated urological anomalies and renal outcome in children with unilateral renal agenesis (URA). Medical records of 51 cases of URA followed at Şanlıurfa Children 's Hospital between January 2009 and December 2012 were reviewed retrospectively. In all patients, diagnosis was made by abdominal ultrasound (US) and confirmed by a radionuclide scan. The children were between 3 months and 17 years of age (median age: 5 years). There were 31 males (60.8%) and 20 females (39.2%). In 33 patients (67.3%), the left kidney was absent. Urological anomalies were found in 12/51 patients (23.5%), including ureterovesical junction obstruction in 4 (7.8%), bladder dysfunction in 2 (3.9%), and vesicoureteral reflux (VUR), ureteropelvic junction obstruction, ureterovesical and ureteropelvic junction obstruction, duplicated collecting system plus grade IV VUR, ectopic kidney plus grade V VUR, and ectopic kidney in 1 patient (2%) each. Chronic renal insufficiency (CRI) developed in 5/51 patients (9.8%) (stage III in 3 patients and stage IV in 2), 4 of whom had additional urological anomaly; in the remaining 1 patient, a 17-year-old female, imaging studies were normal except for a small and hyperechogenic solitary kidney determined on US. A total of 3 patients (5.8%) developed hypertension, and all except one had an associated urological anomaly. Proteinuria was seen in 2 patients (3.8%) with stage IV CRI, one of whom was also hypertensive. In conclusion, urological anomalies usually accompany URA and should be followed closely to decrease the risk of renal failure. PMID:24577979

  19. Effect of renal sympathetic nerve on adrenergically and angiotensin II-induced renal vasoconstriction in normal Wistar-Kyoto rats

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background This study examined the effect of renal sympathetic innervation on adrenergically and angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced renal vasoconstriction in Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats. Methods Forty-eight WKY rats were treated with either losartan (10 mg/kg/day p.o.) or carvedilol (5 mg/kg/day p.o.) or a combination of them (10 mg/kg/day + 5 mg/kg/day p.o.) for 7 days. On day 8, the rats were anaesthetized, and renal vasoconstrictor experiments were carried out. A group of rats was subjected to acute unilateral renal denervation during the acute study. Changes in the renal vasoconstrictor responses were determined in terms of reductions in renal blood flow caused by Ang II, noradrenaline (NA), and methoxamine (ME). Results In normal animals, losartan decreased (P < 0.05) the renal vasoconstrictor response to Ang II but not to NA or ME. Carvedilol treatment, however, blunted (P < 0.05) the renal vasoconstrictor responses to Ang II and adrenergic agonists. Combination of losartan and carvedilol blunted (P < 0.05) the renal vasoconstrictor response to Ang II but augmented the responses to NA and ME (all P < 0.05). Interestingly, when denervated rats were treated with the same combination, there was a reduction (P < 0.05) in the renal vasoconstrictor responses to Ang II and adrenergic agonists. Conclusions Data suggest that the renal sympathetic nerve contributes to adrenergic agonist-mediated renal vasoconstrictions in normal rats. The data further indicate an interactive relationship between renin-angiotensin and sympathetic nervous systems in modulating adrenergically and Ang II-induced renal vasoconstriction in WKY rats. PMID:21047287

  20. Renal Function Outcomes for Multifocal Renal Neoplasms Managed by Radiofrequency Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Pushpender Allen, Brian C. Chen, Michael Y. Childs, David D. Kota, Gopi Zagoria, Ronald J.

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: To evaluate renal function changes related to radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for the treatment of multifocal renal neoplasms. Methods: This is an institutional review board-approved, Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act compliant retrospective study of all patients treated with computed tomography guided RFA for multifocal renal neoplasms at one institution. Fifty-seven subjects, mean age 70 (range 37-88) years, underwent RFA of 169 renal neoplasms (average size 2.0 cm). Subjects had between 2 and 8 (mean 2.96) neoplasms ablated. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was measured before and after RFA. Complications related to RFA were recorded. Results: eGFR decreased on average of 4.4 % per tumor treated and 6.7 % per ablation session (average 1.76 tumors treated per session). For subjects with the largest neoplasm measuring >3 cm, eGFR decreased an average of 14.5 % during the course of their treatment. If the largest neoplasm measured 2-3 cm, eGFR decreased an average of 7.7 %, and if the largest neoplasm measured <2 cm, eGFR decreased an average of 3.8 %. Subjects with reduced baseline renal function were more likely to have a greater decline in eGFR after RFA. There was a minor complication rate of 6.3 % (6 of 96 sessions), none of which required treatment, and a major complication rate of 4.2 % (4 of 96 sessions). Conclusion: RFA for the treatment of multifocal renal neoplasms results in mild decline of renal function.

  1. Calbindins decreased after space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sergeev, I. N.; Rhoten, W. B.; Carney, M. D.

    1996-01-01

    Exposure of the body to microgravity during space flight causes a series of well-documented changes in Ca2+ metabolism, yet the cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to these changes are poorly understood. Calbindins, vitamin D-dependent Ca2+ binding proteins, are believed to have a significant role in maintaining cellular Ca2+ homeostasis. In this study, we used biochemical and immunocytochemical approaches to analyze the expression of calbindin-D28k and calbindin-D9k in kidneys, small intestine, and pancreas of rats flown for 9 d aboard the space shuttle. The effects of microgravity on calbindins in rats from space were compared with synchronous Animal Enclosure Module controls, modeled weightlessness animals (tail suspension), and their controls. Exposure to microgravity resulted in a significant and sustained decrease in calbindin-D28k content in the kidney and calbindin-D9k in the small intestine of flight animals, as measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Modeled weightlessness animals exhibited a similar decrease in calbindins by ELISA. Immunocytochemistry (ICC) in combination with quantitative computer image analysis was used to measure in situ the expression of calbindins in the kidney and the small intestine, and the expression of insulin in pancreas. There was a large decrease of immunoreactivity in renal distal tubular cell-associated calbindin-D28k and in intestinal absorptive cell-associated calbindin-D9k of space flight and modeled weightlessness animals compared with matched controls. No consistent difference in pancreatic insulin immunoreactivity between space flight, modeled weightlessness, and controls was observed. Regression analysis of results obtained by quantitative ICC and ELISA for space flight, modeled weightlessness animals, and their controls demonstrated a significant correlation. These findings after a short-term exposure to microgravity or modeled weightlessness suggest that a decreased expression of calbindins

  2. Galacto-oligosaccharides attenuate renal injury with microbiota modification.

    PubMed

    Furuse, Satoshi U; Ohse, Takamoto; Jo-Watanabe, Airi; Shigehisa, Akira; Kawakami, Koji; Matsuki, Takahiro; Chonan, Osamu; Nangaku, Masaomi

    2014-07-01

    Tubulointerstitial injury is central to the progression of end-stage renal disease. Recent studies have revealed that one of the most investigated uremic toxins, indoxyl sulfate (IS), caused tubulointerstitial injury through oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Because indole, the precursor of IS, is synthesized from dietary tryptophan by the gut microbiota, we hypothesized that the intervention targeting the gut microbiota in kidney disease with galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS) would attenuate renal injury. After 2 weeks of GOS administration for 5/6 nephrectomized (Nx) or sham-operated (Sham) rats, cecal indole and serum IS were measured, renal injury was evaluated, and the effects of GOS on the gut microbiota were examined using pyrosequencing methods. Cecal indole and serum IS were significantly decreased and renal injury was improved with decreased infiltrating macrophages in GOS-treated Nx rats. The expression levels of ER stress markers and apoptosis were significantly increased in the Nx rats and decreased with GOS. The microbiota analysis indicated that GOS significantly increased three bacterial families and decreased five families in the Nx rats. In addition, the analysis also revealed that the bacterial family Clostridiaceae was significantly increased in the Nx rats compared with the Sham rats and decreased with GOS. Taken altogether, our data show that GOS decreased cecal indole and serum IS, attenuated renal injury, and modified the gut microbiota in the Nx rats, and that the gut microbiota were altered in kidney disease. GOS could be a novel therapeutic agent to protect against renal injury. PMID:24994892

  3. Late renal dysfunction in adult survivors of bone marrow transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Lawton, C.A.; Cohen, E.P.; Barber-Derus, S.W.; Murray, K.J.; Ash, R.C.; Casper, J.T.; Moulder, J.E. )

    1991-06-01

    Until recently long-term renal toxicity has not been considered a major late complication of bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Late renal dysfunction has been described in a pediatric population status post-BMT which was attributable to the radiation in the preparatory regimen. A thorough review of adults with this type of late renal dysfunction has not previously been described. Fourteen of 103 evaluable adult patients undergoing allogeneic (96) or autologous (7) bone marrow transplantation, predominantly for leukemia and lymphomas, at the Medical College of Wisconsin (Milwaukee, WI) have had a syndrome of renal insufficiency characterized by increased serum creatinine, decreased glomerular filtration rate, anemia, and hypertension. This syndrome developed at a median of 9 months (range, 4.5 to 26 months) posttransplantation in the absence of specific identifiable causes. The cumulative probability of having this renal dysfunction is 20% at 1 year. Renal biopsies performed on seven of these cases showed the endothelium widely separated from the basement membrane, extreme thickening of the glomerular basement membrane, and microthrombi. Previous chemotherapy, antibiotics, and antifungals as well as cyclosporin may add to and possibly potentiate a primary chemoradiation marrow transplant renal injury, but this clinical syndrome is most analogous to clinical and experimental models of radiation nephritis. This late marrow transplant-associated nephritis should be recognized as a potentially limiting factor in the use of some intensive chemoradiation conditioning regimens used for BMT. Some selective attenuation of the radiation to the kidneys may decrease the incidence of this renal dysfunction.

  4. Lumican overexpression exacerbates lipopolysaccharide-induced renal injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiao-Mei; Ma, Ling; Jin, Yu-Nan; Yu, Yan-Qiu

    2015-09-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the role of lumican in mice with endotoxin-induced acute renal failure (ARF). Lumican transgenic mice and wild‑type mice were injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 10 mg/kg) to establish a model of ARF. The mice were sacrificed at 24 h and the blood and renal tissue samples were collected. The value of serum creatinine (SCr) and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) were measured to determine renal function. An ELISA was used to determined the concentrations of renal cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α, interleukin (IL)‑6, IL‑4 and IL‑10. The protein expression levels of Toll-like receptor (TLR4) and nuclear factor (NF)κB in renal tissues were assessed using western blot analysis. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase‑mediated dUTP nick end labeling was performed to monitor apoptosis of renal tissue. Light microscopy and electron microscopy were used to observe structural changes in the renal tissues. Following the administration of LPS, the SCr and BUN values of mice in the lumican transgenic group were higher compared with those in the control group. The expression levels of renal TLR4, NFκB, TNFα, IL‑6, IL‑4 and IL‑10 were upregulated in the lumican transgenic mice compared with those in the wild‑type control group. Apoptosis was detected predominantly on the renal tubule. There was a significant difference in the optical density of apoptotic bodies between the control mice and the lumican transgenic mice. Light and electron microscopy demonstrated more severe renal tissue injury in the lumican transgenic mice compared with that in the control mice. In conclusion, LPS may cause excessive apoptosis in the renal tubular cells via the TLR4 signal transduction pathway, a decrease in the number of renal tubular cells and ARF. Lumican may be important in mice with LPS-induced ARF. PMID:26081832

  5. [Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis].

    PubMed

    Sauguet, A; Honton, B

    2014-12-01

    Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis can cause ischaemic nephropathy and arterial hypertension. Renal artery stenosis (RAS) continues to be a problem for clinicians, with no clear consensus on how to investigate and assess the clinical significance of stenotic lesions and manage the findings. RAS caused by fibromuscular dysplasia is probably commoner than previously appreciated, should be actively looked for in younger hypertensive patients and can be managed successfully with angioplasty. Atheromatous RAS is associated with increased incidence of cardiovascular events and increased cardiovascular mortality, and is likely to be seen with increasing frequency. Many patients with RAS may be managed effectively with medical therapy for several years without endovascular stenting, as demonstrated by randomized, prospective trials including the cardiovascular outcomes in Renal Atherosclerotic Lesions (CORAL) trial, the Angioplasty and Stenting for Renal Artery Lesions (ASTRAL) trial. These trials share the limitation of excluding subsets of patients with high-risk clinical presentations, including episodic pulmonary edema and rapidly progressing renal failure and hypertension. Blood pressure control and medication adjustment may become more difficult with declining renal function and may prevent the use of angiotensin receptor blocker and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. The objective of this review is to evaluate the current management of RAS for cardiologists in the context of recent randomized clinical trials. There is now interest in looking more closely at patient selection for intervention, with focus on intervening only in patients with the highest-risk presentations such as flash pulmonary edema, rapidly declining renal function and severe resistant hypertension. PMID:25450992

  6. Cadmium and renal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Il'yasova, Dora; Schwartz, Gary G. . E-mail: gschwart@wfubmc.edu

    2005-09-01

    Background: Rates of renal cancer have increased steadily during the past two decades, and these increases are not explicable solely by advances in imaging modalities. Cadmium, a widespread environmental pollutant, is a carcinogen that accumulates in the kidney cortex and is a cause of end-stage renal disease. Several observations suggest that cadmium may be a cause of renal cancer. Methods: We performed a systematic review of the literature on cadmium and renal cancer using MEDLINE for the years 1966-2003. We reviewed seven epidemiological and eleven clinical studies. Results: Despite different methodologies, three large epidemiologic studies indicate that occupational exposure to cadmium is associated with increased risk renal cancer, with odds ratios varying from 1.2 to 5.0. Six of seven studies that compared the cadmium content of kidneys from patients with kidney cancer to that of patients without kidney cancer found lower concentrations of cadmium in renal cancer tissues. Conclusions: Exposure to cadmium appears to be associated with renal cancer, although this conclusion is tempered by the inability of studies to assess cumulative cadmium exposure from all sources including smoking and diet. The paradoxical findings of lower cadmium content in kidney tissues from patients with renal cancer may be caused by dilution of cadmium in rapidly dividing cells. This and other methodological problems limit the interpretation of studies of cadmium in clinical samples. Whether cadmium is a cause of renal cancer may be answered more definitively by future studies that employ biomarkers of cadmium exposure, such as cadmium levels in blood and urine.

  7. Multicystic renal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Nagaraj, V P; Ratnakar, K S

    2001-07-01

    Multicystic renal dysplasia, the most common form of cystic renal disease in the newborn period, is a clinically important consequence of abnormal nephrogenesis. It usually presents as an abdominal mass. The dysplasias are usually unilateral, but it can be bilateral, segmental or focal. The clinical presentation usually depends on the extent of the dysplastic involvement and the degree of the associated urinary obstruction. Here, we present a case of histologically multicystic renal dysplasia, which is ?bilateral. The left kidney showed typical radiological, gross and histopathological features of multicystic dysplasia, but the right kidney showed only radiological features of dysplastic cystic kidney. PMID:11479648

  8. Renal Replacement Therapy.

    PubMed

    Villa, Gianluca; Ricci, Zaccaria; Ronco, Claudio

    2015-10-01

    Renal replacement therapy (RRT) is a cornerstone in the clinical management of patients with acute kidney injury. Results from different studies agree that early renal support therapy (aimed to support the residual kidney function during early phases of organ dysfunction) may reduce mortality with respect to late RRT (aimed to substitute the complete loss of function during the advanced kidney insufficiency). Although it seems plausible that a timely initiation of RRT may be associated with improved renal and nonrenal outcomes in these patients, there is scarce evidence in literature to exactly identify the most adequate onset timing for RRT. PMID:26410148

  9. Renal kallikrein in chronic hypoxic rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, C F; Chen, L W; Chien, C T; Wu, M S; Tsai, T J

    1996-09-01

    1. We have studied the role of kallikrein (KK) in the maintenance of renal function in chronic hypoxic rats (high altitude; HA), compared with control rats kept at sea level (SL). Hypoxia was induced by placing female Wistar rats (198-290 g) in an altitude chamber (5500 m) 15 h/day for 4 weeks. Experiments were also conducted to study the interaction of KK with renal nerve activity and endothelin (ET), two parameters previously shown to be altered in this model. 2. It was found that renal cortex tissue KK activity (TKA) was not significantly different in 10 SL and 10 HA rats. However, the urinary KK activity (UKA) was reduced nearly to half (from 35.2 +/- 4.6 to 18.5 +/- 1.7 pkat/min) in HA rats after 4 weeks of chronic hypoxia. 3. Acute renal denervated diuresis was accompanied by a significant increase in UKA (from 9 +/- 2 to 14 +/- 2 pkat/min in HA and denervated HA rats, respectively; P < 0.05) in HA rats. Intrarenal arterial pretreatment of aprotinin reduced the denervated diuresis. 4. Endothelin (600 ng/kg per h) reduced urine flow, sodium and potassium excretion in the ipsilateral kidney in another 10 SL and 10 HA rats. The extent of the drop of these parameters was significantly less in HA rats. Urinary KK activity was correlated significantly with the measured renal functional parameters (r ranging from 0.472 to 0.612) in SL rats, but was insignificant in HA rats (r ranging from 0.032 to 0.192). 5. We have demonstrated that chronic exposure to hypoxia decreases urinary KK excretion and that KK is involved in acute renal denervated diuresis generated in these animals. The present study suggests that KK plays a partial role in the maintenance of renal function in chronic hypoxic rats. PMID:8911720

  10. End-stage renal disease and thrombophilia.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Alexander; Limperger, Verena; Nowak-Göttl, Ulrike

    2016-05-10

    Chronic kidney disease is an established risk factor for arterial and venous thromboembolism (TE). Whereas the overall risk of TE in moderately decreased kidney function is approximately 2.5-fold higher compared to patients with normal renal function, the risk increase is 5.5-fold in patients with severe renal dysfunction. In patients with renal dysfunction and arterial thrombosis (OR: 4.9), malignancy (OR: 5.8) surgery (OR: 14.0) or thrombophilia (OR: 4.3) the risk to suffer from venous TE is higher compared to the risk associated to the baseline renal dysfunction alone. The treatment options for end-stage renal diseases include hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis and kidney transplantation. During all treatment modalities thrombotic complications have been described, namely catheter malfunction and shunt thrombosis in patients undergoing hemodialysis in up to 25% of patients, and TE, pulmonary embolism or graft vessel thrombosis in approximately 8% of patients. The reported incidence of reno-vascular thrombosis following renal transplantation leading to hemorrhagic infarction with organ rejection or organ loss varied between 2-12%. Keeping in mind the multifactorial etiology of TE in patients with kidney dysfunction a general screening for thrombophilia in this patient group is not indicated. Selected screening on an individual patient basis should be discussed if the family history for TE is positive or the patient itself had suffered one thrombosis before the onset of the renal disease or multiple TEs during hemodialysis or post kidney transplantation in patients waiting for living donor kidney transplantation. PMID:25639843

  11. Renal calculi: emergency department diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Carter, Michelle R; Green, Brad R

    2011-07-01

    The acute treatment of kidney stones (urolithiasis) addresses pain management and focuses on the effects of the morbidity associated with an obstructed renal system. Minimal fluid intake, resulting in decreased urine production and a high concentration of stone-forming salts, is a leading factor in renal calculi development. Radio-opaque calcareous stones account for 70% to 75% of renal calculi. Microscopic hematuria in the presence of acute flank pain is suggestive of renal colic, but the absence of red blood cells does not exclude urolithiasis. Furthermore, many inflammatory and infectious conditions cause hematuria, demonstrating the low specificity of urinalysis testing. The diagnostic modality of choice is a noncontrast computed tomography (CT); ultrasonography s preferred in pregnant patients and children. Combining opioids with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is the optimal evidence-based regimen to treat severe symptoms. Rapid intravenous (IV) hydration has not shown a benefit. Potentially life-threatening diagnoses including abdominal aortic aneurysm, ovarian torsion, and appendicitis may mimic renal colic and must be ruled out. PMID:22164398

  12. Renal artery embolization in severe nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Solak, Yalcin; Koc, Osman; Ucar, Ramazan; Ozbek, Orhan; Ergenc, Hasan; Gaipov, Abduzhappar; Turk, Suleyman

    2016-07-01

    Introduction Severe nephrotic syndrome is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Renal artery embolization (RAE) has been used in a number of renal diseases such as renal tumors, arteriovenous fistulas etc. However, data regarding benefits of RAE in patients with symptomatic severe proteinuria is limited. We decided to evaluate role of RAE in the setting of severe symptomatic nephrotic syndrome. Methods Eight patients who had undergone transcatheter renal artery embolization with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) were included. Clinico-demographic characteristics as well as baseline laboratory data including level of proteinuria, serum albumin, C-reactive protein and LDL cholesterol levels were recorded for each patient. After RAE, outpatient clinic control laboratory values were also assessed. Findings All patients except one underwent bilateral RAE (four simultaneous or three sequential). Two patients experienced postembolization syndrome characterized by flank pain, fever, and leukocytosis, which was self-limited and responded to analgesics in all patients. There was no technical complications associated with RAE procedure. All patients became anuric except one. Serum albumin levels increased and serum LDL-cholesterol levels decreased considerably in treated patients. Discussion Renal artery embolization with the purpose of amelioration in nephrotic syndrome complications was effective and free of major technical complications in our patients. PMID:26833695

  13. Ablative therapies in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chan, A A; Ahrar, K; Matin, S F

    2011-09-01

    We reviewed the use of ablative therapies in the management of renal cell carcinoma. We performed a PubMed search of the English language literature using the keywords "ablation" and "renal carcinoma." Pertinent articles specific to the technologic advancement of ablative therapy and clinical outcomes were selected for review. Intermediate-term oncologic outcomes of cryoablation and radiofrequency ablation are acceptable but are not quite as good as for surgical excision based nearly all on retrospective studies. No randomized studies have been performed comparing excisional and ablative therapies. Careful selection of patients and tumor characteristics results in improved outcomes. Diagnostic biopsy for tissue confirmation is mandatory and should even be considered post therapy after 6-12 months in patients with a concern about recurrence. Ablative therapies are associated with decreased morbidity, less severe complication rates, and excellent preservation of renal function in comparison with surgical excision. The majority of recurrences occur early, but long-term surveillance is required as delayed recurrences are also possible and the long-term oncologic efficacy is not yet established. Ablation can be delivered percutaneously or laparoscopically, and the superiority of one over the other remains controversial. The percutaneous approach is more cost effective and causes less perinephric desmoplasia. Nearly all data on ablation are retrospective and, with few exceptions, from single institutions. Ablative therapy is an appealing option for the management of small renal tumors shown to be renal cell carcinoma on biopsy in patients who are unsuitable candidates for surgical extirpation. PMID:21993322

  14. Renal Mitochondrial Cytopathies

    PubMed Central

    Emma, Francesco; Montini, Giovanni; Salviati, Leonardo; Dionisi-Vici, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    Renal diseases in mitochondrial cytopathies are a group of rare diseases that are characterized by frequent multisystemic involvement and extreme variability of phenotype. Most frequently patients present a tubular defect that is consistent with complete De Toni-Debré-Fanconi syndrome in most severe forms. More rarely, patients present with chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis, cystic renal diseases, or primary glomerular involvement. In recent years, two clearly defined entities, namely 3243 A > G tRNALEU mutations and coenzyme Q10 biosynthesis defects, have been described. The latter group is particularly important because it represents the only treatable renal mitochondrial defect. In this paper, the physiopathologic bases of mitochondrial cytopathies, the diagnostic approaches, and main characteristics of related renal diseases are summarized. PMID:21811680

  15. 'Transcollateral' Renal Angioplasty for a Completely Occluded Renal Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, Subash; Chadha, Davinder S. Swamy, Ajay

    2011-02-15

    Percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty with stenting has been effective in the control of hypertension, renal function, and pulmonary edema caused by atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis. However, the role of the procedure has not been fully established in the context of chronic total occlusion of renal artery. We report the successful use of this procedure in 57-year-old male patient who reported for evaluation of a recent episode of accelerated hypertension. A renal angiogram in this patient showed ostial stenosis of the right renal artery, which was filling by way of the collateral artery. Renal angioplasty for chronic total occlusion of right renal artery was successfully performed in a retrograde fashion through a collateral artery, thereby leading to improvement of renal function and blood pressure control.

  16. Renal Primordia Activate Kidney Regenerative Events in a Rat Model of Progressive Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Imberti, Barbara; Corna, Daniela; Rizzo, Paola; Xinaris, Christodoulos; Abbate, Mauro; Longaretti, Lorena; Cassis, Paola; Benedetti, Valentina; Benigni, Ariela; Zoja, Carlamaria; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Morigi, Marina

    2015-01-01

    New intervention tools for severely damaged kidneys are in great demand to provide patients with a valid alternative to whole organ replacement. For repairing or replacing injured tissues, emerging approaches focus on using stem and progenitor cells. Embryonic kidneys represent an interesting option because, when transplanted to sites such as the renal capsule of healthy animals, they originate new renal structures. Here, we studied whether metanephroi possess developmental capacity when transplanted under the kidney capsule of MWF male rats, a model of spontaneous nephropathy. We found that six weeks post-transplantation, renal primordia developed glomeruli and tubuli able to filter blood and to produce urine in cyst-like structures. Newly developed metanephroi were able to initiate a regenerative-like process in host renal tissues adjacent to the graft in MWF male rats as indicated by an increase in cell proliferation and vascular density, accompanied by mRNA and protein upregulation of VEGF, FGF2, HGF, IGF-1 and Pax-2. The expression of SMP30 and NCAM was induced in tubular cells. Oxidative stress and apoptosis markedly decreased. Our study shows that embryonic kidneys generate functional nephrons when transplanted into animals with severe renal disease and at the same time activate events at least partly mimicking those observed in kidney tissues during renal regeneration. PMID:25811887

  17. Renal primordia activate kidney regenerative events in a rat model of progressive renal disease.

    PubMed

    Imberti, Barbara; Corna, Daniela; Rizzo, Paola; Xinaris, Christodoulos; Abbate, Mauro; Longaretti, Lorena; Cassis, Paola; Benedetti, Valentina; Benigni, Ariela; Zoja, Carlamaria; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Morigi, Marina

    2015-01-01

    New intervention tools for severely damaged kidneys are in great demand to provide patients with a valid alternative to whole organ replacement. For repairing or replacing injured tissues, emerging approaches focus on using stem and progenitor cells. Embryonic kidneys represent an interesting option because, when transplanted to sites such as the renal capsule of healthy animals, they originate new renal structures. Here, we studied whether metanephroi possess developmental capacity when transplanted under the kidney capsule of MWF male rats, a model of spontaneous nephropathy. We found that six weeks post-transplantation, renal primordia developed glomeruli and tubuli able to filter blood and to produce urine in cyst-like structures. Newly developed metanephroi were able to initiate a regenerative-like process in host renal tissues adjacent to the graft in MWF male rats as indicated by an increase in cell proliferation and vascular density, accompanied by mRNA and protein upregulation of VEGF, FGF2, HGF, IGF-1 and Pax-2. The expression of SMP30 and NCAM was induced in tubular cells. Oxidative stress and apoptosis markedly decreased. Our study shows that embryonic kidneys generate functional nephrons when transplanted into animals with severe renal disease and at the same time activate events at least partly mimicking those observed in kidney tissues during renal regeneration. PMID:25811887

  18. Detection of renal brush border membrane enzymes for evaluation of renal injury in neonatal scleredema

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Qing; Zhang, Yongjun; Yang, Jinying; Wei, Lixia; Zhao, Lili; Yang, Qiaozhi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate renal brush border membrane enzymes in urine as an indicator for renal injury in neonatal scleredema (NS). Methods: Sixty nine NS patients in our hospital were enrolled and divided into mild group and moderate/severe group. Patients were further randomly divided into therapy and control subgroups for 7 days ligustrazine administration. Urine samples were collected to detect renal brush border membrane enzymes (RBBME) by ELISA and β2-microglobulin (β2-MG) by radioimmunoassay (RIA). The results were compared with those of 30 normal neonates. Data were statistically analyzed using SPSS13.0 software. Results: Both RBBME and β2-MG were found to be higher in urine in NS patients than normal controls (P < 0.01). Level of RBBME increased with the severity of NS (P <0.05), while urinary β2-MG did not (P >0.05). After being treated with ligustrazine, a medicine for renal function recovery, both RBBME and β2-MG were similarly significantly decreased comparing to untreated groups (P < 0.05). 79.7% of NS patients showed abnormal RBBME while only 52.2% had an abnormal urinary β2-MG (χ2=11.65,P < 0.01). Conclusion: RBBME was more sensitive than β2-MG in reflecting the renal injury in NS. Examination of RBBME effectively reflected the recovery of renal injury after treatment with ligustrazine. PMID:25878616

  19. Disappearing renal calculus

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Helen; Thomas, Johanna; Kumar, Sunil

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of a renal calculus treated solely with antibiotics which has not been previously reported in the literature. A man with a 17 mm lower pole renal calculus and concurrent Escherichia coli urine infection was being worked up to undergo percutaneous nephrolithotomy. However, after a course of preoperative antibiotics the stone was no longer seen on retrograde pyelography or CT imaging. PMID:23580676

  20. Hereditary Renal Cancer Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Naomi B.

    2013-01-01

    Inherited susceptibility to kidney cancer is a fascinating and complex topic. Our knowledge about types of genetic syndromes associated with an increased risk of disease is continually expanding. Currently, there are 10 syndromes associated with an increased risk of all types of renal cancer, which are reviewed herein. Clear cell renal cancer is associated with von Hippel Lindau disease, chromosome 3 translocations, PTEN hamartomatous syndrome and mutations in BAP1, as well as several of the genes encoding the proteins comprising the succinate dehydrogenase complex (SDHB/C/D). Type 1 papillary renal cancers arise in conjunction with germline mutations in MET and type 2 as part of Hereditary Leiomyomatosis and Renal Cell Cancer (FH mutations). Chromophone and oncocytic renal cancers are predominantly associated with Birt Hogg Dubé syndrome. Angiomyolipomas are commonly and their malignant counterpart epitheliod angiomyolipomas rarely are found in patients with Tuberous Sclerosis Complex. The targeted therapeutic options for the renal cancer associated with these diseases are just starting to expand, and are an area of active clinical research. PMID:24359990

  1. Medical Grand Rounds: refractory hypertension and renal insufficiency in a patient with renal artery stenosis.

    PubMed Central

    Huot, S. J.; Scoutt, L. M.; Meier, G. H.

    1996-01-01

    Renal artery stenosis has become increasingly common as a cause of refractory hypertension and renal insufficiency. There is a high prevalence of bilateral disease and the lesions tend to progress over time. Newer, less invasive, imaging modalities such as doppler ultrasound, magnetic resonance angiography, and spiral CT scanning are evolving technologies in the diagnosis of renal artery stenosis. Advances in surgical technique, particularly the development of extra-anatomical procedures such as spleno-renal and hepato-renal by pass, have significantly lowered surgical morbidity and mortality and provides revascularization options for patients with complex vascular disease that would previously not have been considered because of their high surgical risk. Improvements in angioplasty technique and the use of stents are broadening the types of lesions that can be successfully approached with these techniques and may be particularly helpful for patients with more severe cardiac or cerebrovascular disease. The benefits of revascularization may be even greater for preservation of renal function than for control of blood pressure in properly selected patients. It is difficult to predict which patients will benefit from surgical revascularization versus medical management of RAS. Knowledge of the progressive nature of RAS, the high prevalence of bilateral disease, and the clinical characteristics that correlate with progression (e.g., decreasing renal size) are helpful in guiding clinical decisions regarding intervention. Additional studies to determine the predictive value of non-invasive tests such as CRS, doppler ultrasound before and after administration of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, and other tests, are needed to assist the clinician in identifying who will benefit most from revascularization both in terms of renal function and blood pressure control. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9381740

  2. The Effects of Catheter-Based Radiofrequency Renal Denervation on Renal Function and Renal Artery Structure in Patients With Resistant Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhi-Hui; Yang, Kan; Jiang, Feng-Lin; Zeng, Li-Xiong; Jiang, Wei-Hong; Wang, Xiao-Yan

    2014-01-01

    There are no clinical studies on the effects of catheter-based radiofrequency renal denervation (RDN) on renal artery structure using 64-detector computed tomography (CT). A total of 39 patients with resistant hypertension received RDN and 38 patients received drug treatment. Mean systolic pressure and diastolic pressure in the RDN group decreased after 1, 3, 6, and 12 months of procedure (P<.05) and urinary protein level significantly decreased after 6 and 12 months (P<.05). The diameter, length, and sectional area of the renal artery; number of cases of atherosclerosis; and plaque burden of 64-detector CT renal arteriography did not change at 12 months of follow-up (P<.05), whereas the plaque burden increased significantly in the control group (P<.05). RDN significantly and persistently reduced blood pressure and decreased urinary protein excretion rate in patients with resistant hypertension and did not exhibit any adverse effect on renal function and renal artery structure. PMID:25039997

  3. A study of the role of renal nerves in the renal responses to 60° head-up tilt in the anaesthetized dog

    PubMed Central

    DiBona, G. F.; Johns, E. J.

    1980-01-01

    1. Renal responses to 10 min of 60° head-up tilt were measured in anaesthetized dogs in which renal perfusion pressure was maintained at a relatively constant value. 2. Tilting was associated with a fall in systemic blood pressure and an increase in heart rate. Renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate remained constant while there was a significant decrease in both absolute and fractional excretion of sodium. 3. Animals which had undergone acute renal denervation were tilted. The cardiovascular responses were similar to intact animals. A fall in renal blood flow was observed but the glomerular filtration rate was maintained at a steady value during tilting. The decreased renal tubular excretion of sodium measured in intact animals was abolished. 4. Alpha-adrenergic blockade of the kidney was achieved by infusion of phentolamine into the renal artery. Tilting of these animals caused cardiovascular changes similar to those observed in control animals but renal blood flow, glomerular filtration rate and sodium handling remained unchanged. 5. Animals in which both carotid sinuses had been acutely denervated were tilted. Systemic blood pressure fell as in intact animals, but the rise in heart rate was significantly less. Renal blood flow, glomerular filtration rate and the rate of sodium excretion were unchanged. 6. A 10 min period of 60° head-up tilt in anaesthetized dogs resulted in an unchanged renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate which was associated with a decrease in both fractional excretion of sodium and sodium excretion. The renal sympathetic nerves were shown to be responsible for these changes in tubular sodium handling which appeared to exert their action via renal tubular α-adrenergic receptors. This activation of the renal nerves appeared to be mediated by the carotid sinus baroreceptor reflex. PMID:7381761

  4. Boldine Prevents Renal Alterations in Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Salinas, Romina; Vielma, Alejandra Z.; Arismendi, Marlene N.; Boric, Mauricio P.; Sáez, Juan C.; Velarde, Victoria

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy alters both structure and function of the kidney. These alterations are associated with increased levels of reactive oxygen species, matrix proteins, and proinflammatory molecules. Inflammation decreases gap junctional communication and increases hemichannel activity leading to increased membrane permeability and altering tissue homeostasis. Since current treatments for diabetic nephropathy do not prevent renal damage, we postulated an alternative treatment with boldine, an alkaloid obtained from boldo with antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and hypoglycemic effects. Streptozotocin-induced diabetic and control rats were treated or not treated with boldine (50 mg/Kg/day) for ten weeks. In addition, mesangial cells were cultured under control conditions or in high glucose concentration plus proinflammatory cytokines, with or without boldine (100 µmol/L). Boldine treatment in diabetic animals prevented the increase in glycemia, blood pressure, renal thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and the urinary protein/creatinine ratio. Boldine also reduced alterations in matrix proteins and markers of renal damage. In mesangial cells, boldine prevented the increase in oxidative stress, the decrease in gap junctional communication, and the increase in cell permeability due to connexin hemichannel activity induced by high glucose and proinflammatory cytokines but did not block gap junction channels. Thus boldine prevented both renal and cellular alterations and could be useful for preventing tissue damage in diabetic subjects. PMID:24416726

  5. [Renal angiomyolipoma: diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Arima, K; Kise, H; Yamashita, A; Yanagawa, M; Tochigi, H; Kawamura, J; Horiuchi, E; Sugimura, Y

    1995-09-01

    In 10 years the diagnosis of renal angiomyolipoma (RAML) was made in 14 patients (male-to female ratio 1:3.7) at our institution; 1 case was associated with tuberous sclerosis (TS) and 1 case had regional lymph node involvement. A statistical study was done on data taken from 739 cases of RAML in the Japanese literature, including our cases. The male to female ratio was 1 to 3. Twenty eight percent of the cases were associated with TS. The ratio of bilateral cases to the unilateral one was 1 to 3. The main clinical signs were flank pain, abdominal mass, hematuria and fever elevation. Recently the ratio of nephrectomy has decreased to 30%. The percentage of detecting the fat component by ultrasonography (US), computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging were 88.1%, 86.5% and 80.8% respectively. The percentages of visualizing hypervascularity, aneurysms, absence of arterio-venous shunt and onion peel appearance by selective renal angiography were 77.3%, 71.4%, 48.1% and 4.9% respectively. Small (less than 3 cm), asymptomatic, simple lesions with adipose component may be observed annually by CT and US until more experiences is gained with surveillance of these patients. Embolization was useful for emergency cases or pre-treatment of nephron sparing surgery, but insufficient by itself. As there still remain problems in the diagnosis of RAML, especially in the case of very small tumors, in the case with almost no adipose component and in the case associated with renal cell carcinoma, the diagnosis of RAML should be made synthetically including angiography. PMID:7484542

  6. [Hereditary renal cancer].

    PubMed

    Sanz-Ortega, Julián; Olivier, Carlos; Pérez Segura, Pedro; Galante Romo, Isabel; San José Mansó, Luis; Saez, Mamen

    2009-02-01

    Kidney cancer is the tenth most common cause of cancer death. There are a growing number of genes known to be associated with an increased risk of specific types of kidney cancer. People with Von Hippel-Lindau syndrome have about a 40% risk of developing multiple bilateral clear cell kidney cancers. They can also develop retinal and brain hemangioblastoma, kidneys or pancreas cysts, pheochromocytoma and endolymphatic sac tumor. Four phenotypes with different renal cancer and pheocromocitoma risk have been described depending on the germline mutation. Hereditary papillary renal cell carcinoma syndrome has type 1 papillary renal cell carcinomas associated with protooncogene c-MET germline mutations. Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome has FLCN gene mutations associated with fibrofolliculomas, lung cysts with a high risk for spontaneous pneumothorax, and a 15% to 30% risk of kidney cancer (most classified as chromophobe carcinoma, oncocytoma or oncocytic hybrid, but clear cell and papillary kidney cancers have also been reported). Histopathological findings such as oncocytosis and oncocytic hybrids are very unusual outside the syndrome. Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer syndrome shows mutations of Fumarate hydratase gene and cutaneous leiomyomata in 76% of affected individuals, uterine leiomyomata in 100% of females, and unilateral, solitary, and aggressive papillary renal cancer in 10 to 16% of patients. A specific histopathological change is eosinophilic prominent nucleoli with a perinucleolar halo. Tuberous sclerosis complex is one of the most prevalent (1/5.800) hereditary syndromes where renal disease is the second leading cause of death, associated with angiomyolipomas (70%), renal cysts, oncocytomas or clear cell cancer. PMID:19418834

  7. Nutrient and nonnutrient renal blood flow

    SciTech Connect

    Young, J.S.; Passmore, J.C.; Hartupee, D.A.; Baker, C.H. )

    1990-06-01

    The role of prostaglandins in the distribution of total renal blood flow (TRBF) between nutrient and nonnutrient compartments was investigated in anesthetized mongrel dogs. Renal blood flow distribution was assessed by the xenon 133 freeze-dissection technique and by rubidium 86 extraction after ibuprofen treatment. Ibuprofen (13 mg/kg) significantly decreased TRBF by 16.3% +/- 1.2% (mean +/- SEM electromagnetic flow probe; p less than 0.005), but did not alter blood flows to the outer cortex (3.7 vs 4.3 ml/min per gram), the inner cortex (2.6 vs 2.7 ml/min per gram), and the other medulla (1.5 vs 1.5 ml/min per gram), which suggests a decrease in nonnutrient flow. In a separate group of animals the effect of reduced blood flow on the nutrient and nonnutrient components was determined by mechanically reducing renal arterial blood flow by 48%. Unlike the ibuprofen group, nutrient blood flows were proportionally reduced with the mechanical decrease in TRBF in the outer cortex (1.9 ml/min per gram, p less than 0.05), the inner cortex (1.4 ml/min per gram, p less than 0.05), and the outer medulla (0.8 ml/min per gram, p less than 0.01). These results indicate no shift between nutrient and nonnutrient compartments. Nutrient and nonnutrient renal blood flows of the left kidney were also determined by 86Rb extraction. After ibuprofen treatment, nonextracted 86Rb decreased to 12.1% from the control value of 15.6% (p less than 0.05). Mechanical reduction of TRBF did not significantly decrease the proportion of unextracted 86Rb (18.7%).

  8. Cigarette smoking: an important renal risk factor – far beyond carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Orth, SR

    2003-01-01

    In recent years, it has become apparent that smoking has a negative impact on renal function, being one of the most important remediable renal risk factors. It has been clearly shown that the risk for high-normal urinary albumin excretion and microalbuminuria is increased in smoking compared to non-smoking subjects of the general population. Data from the Multiple Risk Factor Intervention Trial (MRFIT) indicate that at least in males, smoking increases the risk to reach end-stage renal failure. Smoking is particularly "nephrotoxic" in older subjects, subjects with essential hypertension and patients with preexisting renal disease. Of interest, the magnitude of the adverse renal effect of smoking seems to be independent of the underlying renal disease. Death-censored renal graft survival is decreased in smokers, indicating that smoking also damages the renal transplant. Cessation of smoking has been show to reduce the rate of progression of renal failure both in patients with renal disease or a renal transplant. The mechanisms of smoking-induced renal damage are only partly understood and comprise acute hemodynamic (e.g., increase in blood pressure and presumably intraglomerular pressure) and chronic effects (e.g., endothelial cell dysfunction). Renal failure per se leads to an increased cardiovascular risk. The latter is further aggravated by smoking. Particularly survival of smokers with diabetes mellitus on hemodialysis is abysmal. In the present review article the current state of knowledge about the renal risks of smoking is reviewed. It is the aim of the article to point out that smoking not only increases the risk of renal cell carcinoma or uroepithelial cell carcinoma, but also the risk of a faster decline of renal function. The latter is a relatively new negative aspect which has not been widely recognized. PMID:19570254

  9. Cigarette smoking: an important renal risk factor – far beyond carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Orth, SR

    2003-01-01

    In recent years, it has become apparent that smoking has a negative impact on renal function, being one of the most important remediable renal risk factors. It has been clearly shown that the risk for high-normal urinary albumin excretion and microalbuminuria is increased in smoking compared to non-smoking subjects of the general population. Data from the Multiple Risk Factor Intervention Trial (MRFIT) indicate that at least in males, smoking increases the risk to reach end-stage renal failure. Smoking is particularly "nephrotoxic" in older subjects, subjects with essential hypertension and patients with preexisting renal disease. Of interest, the magnitude of the adverse renal effect of smoking seems to be independent of the underlying renal disease. Death-censored renal graft survival is decreased in smokers, indicating that smoking also damages the renal transplant. Cessation of smoking has been show to reduce the rate of progression of renal failure both in patients with renal disease or a renal transplant. The mechanisms of smoking-induced renal damage are only partly understood and comprise acute hemodynamic (e.g., increase in blood pressure and presumably intraglomerular pressure) and chronic effects (e.g., endothelial cell dysfunction). Renal failure per se leads to an increased cardiovascular risk. The latter is further aggravated by smoking. Particularly survival of smokers with diabetes mellitus on hemodialysis is abysmal. In the present review article the current state of knowledge about the renal risks of smoking is reviewed. It is the aim of the article to point out that smoking not only increases the risk of renal cell carcinoma or uroepithelial cell carcinoma, but also the risk of a faster decline of renal function. The latter is a relatively new negative aspect which has not been widely recognized.

  10. Renal consequences of obesity.

    PubMed

    Naumnik, Beata; Myśliwiec, Michał

    2010-08-01

    The worldwide prevalence of obesity and its associated metabolic and cardiovascular disorders has risen dramatically within the past 2 decades. Our objective is to review the mechanisms that link obesity with altered kidney function. Current evidence suggests that excess weight gain may be responsible for 65-75% of the risk for arterial hypertension. Impaired renal pressure natriuresis, initially due to increased renal tubular sodium reabsorption, is a key factor linking obesity with hypertension. Obesity increases renal sodium reabsorption by activating the renin-angiotensin and sympathetic nervous systems, and by altering intrarenal physical forces. Adipose tissue functions as an endocrine organ, secreting hormones/cytokines (e.g., leptin) which may trigger sodium retention and hypertension. Additionally, excess visceral adipose tissue may physically compress the kidneys, increasing intrarenal pressures and tubular reabsorption. Eventually, sustained obesity via hyperinsulinemia, due to resistance to insulin, causes hyperfiltration, resulting in structural changes in the kidneys--glomerular hyperthrophy and occasionally focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. The consequences of kidney injury are continuous loss of glomerular filtration rate, further increase of arterial pressure and escalation of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. There is a growing awareness of the renal consequences of obesity, and considerable progress is being made in understanding its pathophysiology. Weight reduction results in lowered proteinuria. Aside from low sodium diet and exercises, more widespread use of renoprotective therapy (e.g., ACE inhibitors and statins) in treatment of hypertension in obese subjects should be advocated. Renal protection should result in reducing the cardiovascular complications of obesity. PMID:20671624

  11. Renal disease in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Rafael Alberto

    2006-01-01

    Chronic renal disease represents a problem of public health in Colombia. Its prevalence has increased in last decade, with a prevalence of 44.7 patients per million (ppm) in 1993 to 294.6 ppm in 2004, considering that only 56.2% of the population has access to the health. This increase complies with the implementation of Law 100 of 1993, offering greater coverage of health services to the Colombian population. The cost of these pathologies is equivalent to the 2.49% of the budget for health of the nation. The three most common causes of renal failure are diabetes mellitus (DM; 30%), arterial hypertension (30%), and glomerulonephritis (7.85%). In incident patients, the DM accounts for 32.9%. The rate of global mortality is 15.8%, 17.4% in hemodialysis and 15.1% in peritoneal dialysis. In 2004, 467 renal transplants were made, 381 of deceased donor with an incidence of 10.3 ppm. The excessive cost of these pathologies can cause the nation's health care system to collapse if preventative steps are not taken. In December of 2004, the Colombian Association of Nephrology with the participation of the Latin American Society of Nephrology and Arterial Hypertension wrote the "Declaration of Bogotá," committing the state's scientific societies and promotional health companies to develop a model of attention for renal health that, in addition to implementing national registries, continues to manage renal disease. PMID:17162422

  12. Renal biomarkers in domestic species.

    PubMed

    Hokamp, Jessica A; Nabity, Mary B

    2016-03-01

    Current conventional tests of kidney damage and function in blood (serum creatinine and urea nitrogen) and urine (urine protein creatinine ratio and urine specific gravity) are widely used for diagnosis and monitoring of kidney disease. However, they all have important limitations, and additional markers of glomerular filtration rate and glomerular and tubular damage are desirable, particularly for earlier detection of renal disease when therapy is most effective. Additionally, urinary markers of kidney damage and function may help localize damage to the affected portion of the kidney. In general, the presence of high- and intermediate-molecular weight proteins in the urine are indicative of glomerular damage, while low-molecular weight proteins and enzymes in the urine suggest tubular damage due to decreased reabsorption of proteins, direct tubular damage, or both. This review aims to discuss many of these new blood and urinary biomarkers in domestic veterinary species, focusing primarily on dogs and cats, how they may be used for diagnosis of renal disease, and their limitations. Additionally, a brief discussion of serum creatinine is presented, highlighting its limitations and important considerations for its improved interpretation in domestic species based on past literature and recent studies. PMID:26918420

  13. Renal Tumor Biopsy Technique

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Li, Xue-Song; Zhou, Li-Qun

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To review hot issues and future direction of renal tumor biopsy (RTB) technique. Data Sources: The literature concerning or including RTB technique in English was collected from PubMed published from 1990 to 2015. Study Selection: We included all the relevant articles on RTB technique in English, with no limitation of study design. Results: Computed tomography and ultrasound were usually used for guiding RTB with respective advantages. Core biopsy is more preferred over fine needle aspiration because of superior accuracy. A minimum of two good-quality cores for a single renal tumor is generally accepted. The use of coaxial guide is recommended. For biopsy location, sampling different regions including central and peripheral biopsies are recommended. Conclusion: In spite of some limitations, RTB technique is relatively mature to help optimize the treatment of renal tumors. PMID:27174334

  14. Tofacitinab in Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Zand, Martin S.

    2013-01-01

    Tofacitinib (tositinib, CP-690,550) is a small molecule inhibitor of Janus associated kinases, primarily JAK3 and JAK2, which inhibits cytokine signaling through the IL-2Rγ chain. In this article, we review the mechanism of action of tofacitinib, and pre-clinical and clinical data regarding its use in solid organ transplantation thus far. It is hoped that tofacitinib may form the basis for calcineurin-free immunosuppression, improving renal function while eliminating calcineurin inhibitor renal toxicity. Current studies suggest that tofacitinib is an effective immunosuppressive agent for renal transplantation, but it's use in current protocols carries an increased risk of CMV, BK, and EBV viral infection, anemia and leukopenia, and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder. PMID:23849222

  15. Contemporary Management of Renal Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Shoobridge, Jennifer J; Corcoran, Niall M; Martin, Katherine A; Koukounaras, Jim; Royce, Peter L; Bultitude, Matthew F

    2011-01-01

    In the management of renal trauma, surgical exploration inevitably leads to nephrectomy in all but a few specialized centers. With current management options, the majority of hemodynamically stable patients with renal injuries can be successfully managed nonoperatively. Improved radiographic techniques and the development of a validated renal injury scoring system have led to improved staging of injury severity that is relatively easy to monitor. This article reviews a multidisciplinary approach to facilitate the care of patients with renal injury. PMID:21941463

  16. Role of renal nerves in excretory responses to administration of kappa agonists in conscious spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Kapusta, D R; Jones, S Y; DiBona, G F

    1989-10-01

    The present study examined whether the renal sympathetic nerves contribute to the renal excretory responses produced by kappa opioid receptor agonist administration in conscious spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Intravenous infusion of the kappa opioid receptor agonists, ketocyclazocine (KC) and U-50488H, produced increases in urine flow rate. KC and U-50488H infusion also resulted in a marked and sustained antinatriuresis which was promptly reversed by low-dose naloxone (50 micrograms/kg i.v.), thus suggesting an opioid receptor-mediated action of both agonists. Although these kappa agonists did not produce changes in glomerular filtration rate or renal plasma flow, efferent renal sympathetic nerve activity increased with the same time course as the antinatriuretic response. To investigate whether the decrease in urinary sodium excretion was mediated via the increase in efferent renal sympathetic nerve activity, experiments were repeated in SHR with prior bilateral renal denervation. These studies demonstrated that similar renal excretory responses (diuresis and a naloxone reversible antiinatriuresis occurred during infusion of KC and U-50488H in renal denervated as were seen in intact SHR. These studies indicate that the renal excretory responses to the kappa opioid agonists KC and U-50488H are not mediated through changes in renal hemodynamics or via a pathway requiring intact renal innervation. Because an antinatriuretic response was observed in renal denervated SHR, this suggests that kappa opioid receptor agonists may influence the renal tubular reabsorption of sodium by additional naloxone-sensitive mechanisms independent of intact renal innervation. PMID:2552076

  17. Renal denervation and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Schlaich, Markus P; Krum, Henry; Sobotka, Paul A; Esler, Murray D

    2011-06-01

    Essential hypertension remains one of the biggest challenges in medicine with an enormous impact on both individual and society levels. With the exception of relatively rare monogenetic forms of hypertension, there is now general agreement that the condition is multifactorial in nature and hence requires therapeutic approaches targeting several aspects of the underlying pathophysiology. Accordingly, all major guidelines promote a combination of lifestyle interventions and combination pharmacotherapy to reach target blood pressure (BP) levels in order to reduce overall cardiovascular risk in affected patients. Although this approach works for many, it fails in a considerable number of patients for various reasons including drug-intolerance, noncompliance, physician inertia, and others, leaving them at unacceptably high cardiovascular risk. The quest for additional therapeutic approaches to safely and effectively manage hypertension continues and expands to the reappraisal of older concepts such as renal denervation. Based on the robust preclinical and clinical data surrounding the role of renal sympathetic nerves in various aspects of BP control very recent efforts have led to the development of a novel catheter-based approach using radiofrequency (RF) energy to selectively target and disrupt the renal nerves. The available evidence from the limited number of uncontrolled hypertensive patients in whom renal denervation has been performed are auspicious and indicate that the procedure has a favorable safety profile and is associated with a substantial and presumably sustained BP reduction. Although promising, a myriad of questions are far from being conclusively answered and require our concerted research efforts to explore the full potential and possible risks of this approach. Here we briefly review the science surrounding renal denervation, summarize the current data on safety and efficacy of renal nerve ablation, and discuss some of the open questions that need

  18. Early atherosclerosis aggravates renal microvascular loss and fibrosis in swine renal artery stenosis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dong; Eirin, Alfonso; Ebrahimi, Behzad; Textor, Stephen C; Lerman, Amir; Lerman, Lilach O

    2016-04-01

    Renal function in patients with atherosclerosis and renal artery stenosis (ARAS) deteriorates more frequently than in nonatherosclerotic RAS. We hypothesized that ARAS aggravates stenotic-kidney micro vascular loss compared to RAS. Domestic pigs were randomized to normal, RAS, and ARAS (RAS fed a high-cholesterol diet) groups (n = 7 each). Ten weeks later stenotic-kidney oxygenation, renal blood flow, and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were evaluated in vivo, and micro vascular density by micro-computed tomography. Blood pressure in both RAS and ARAS was elevated; and stenotic-kidney renal blood flow and GFR similarly decreased. RAS decreased the density of small-size cortical microvessels (<200 μm), whereas ARAS extended the decrease to medium-sized microvessels (200-300 μm). Cortical hypoxia and interstitial fibrosis increased in both RAS and ARAS but correlated inversely with micro vascular density only in RAS. Atherosclerosis aggravates loss of stenotic-kidney microvessels, yet additional determinants likely contribute to cortical hypoxia and fibrosis in swine ARAS. PMID:26879682

  19. Colony-Stimulating Factor-1 Signaling Suppresses Renal Crystal Formation

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, Kazumi; Kitamura, Hiroshi; Yasui, Takahiro; Naiki, Taku; Hamamoto, Shuzo; Ando, Ryosuke; Mizuno, Kentaro; Kawai, Noriyasu; Tozawa, Keiichi; Asano, Kenichi; Tanaka, Masato; Miyoshi, Ichiro; Kohri, Kenjiro

    2014-01-01

    We recently reported evidence suggesting that migrating macrophages (Mϕs) eliminate renal crystals in hyperoxaluric mice. Mϕs can be inflammatory (M1) or anti-inflammatory (M2), and colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) mediates polarization to the M2Mϕ phenotype. M2Mϕs promote renal tissue repair and regeneration, but it is not clear whether these cells are involved in suppressing renal crystal formation. We investigated the role of M2Mϕs in renal crystal formation during hyperoxaluria using CSF-1–deficient mice, which lack M2Mϕs. Compared with wild-type mice, CSF-1–deficient mice had significantly higher amounts of renal calcium oxalate crystal deposition. Treatment with recombinant human CSF-1 increased the expression of M2-related genes and markedly decreased the number of renal crystals in both CSF-1–deficient and wild-type mice. Flow cytometry of sorted renal Mϕs showed that CSF-1 deficiency resulted in a smaller population of CD11b+F4/80+CD163+CD206hi cells, which represent M2-like Mϕs. Additionally, transfusion of M2Mϕs into CSF-1–deficient mice suppressed renal crystal deposition. In vitro phagocytosis assays with calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals showed a higher rate of crystal phagocytosis by M2-polarized Mϕs than M1-polarized Mϕs or renal tubular cells. Gene array profiling showed that CSF-1 deficiency resulted in disordered M2- and stone-related gene expressions. Collectively, our results provide compelling evidence for a suppressive role of CSF-1 signaling in renal crystal formation. PMID:24578130

  20. Multi-State Survival Analysis in Renal Transplantation Recipients

    PubMed Central

    MIRZAEE, Moghaddameh; MOHAMMAD, Kazem; MAHMOODI, Mahmood; ZERAATI, Hojjat; EBADZADEH, Mohammad-Reza; ETMINAN, Abbas; FAZELI, Faramarz; DEHGHANI FIROUZABADI, Mohammad Hasan; SATTARY, Hossein; HAGHPARAST, Mahdiyeh; RAHIMI FOROUSHANI, Abbas

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background Renal transplantation is a therapy for end-stage renal disease. During the study of recipients’ survival after renal transplantation, there are some events as intermediate events that not only affect the recipients’ survival but also events which are affected by various factors. The aim of this study was to handle these intermediate events in order to identify factors that affect recipients’ survival by using multi-state models. Methods This retrospective cohort study included 405 renal transplant patients from Afzalipour Hospital, Kerman, Iran, from 2004 to 2010. The survival time of these recipients was determined after transplantation and the effect of various factors on the death hazard with and without renal allograft failure and hazard of renal allograft failure was studied by using multi-state models. Results During 4.06 years (median) of follow-up; 28 (6.9%) recipients died and allograft failure occurred in 51 (12.6%) recipients. Based on the results of multi-state model, receiving a living kidney transplantation decreased the hazard of renal allograft failure (HR=0.38; 95% CI: 0.17- 0.87), pre-transplant hypertension (HR=2.94; 95% CI: 1.54- 5.63) and serum creatinine levels >1.6 upon discharge from the hospital (HR=7.38; 95% CI: 3.87- 7.08) increased the hazard of renal allograft failure. Receiving living kidney transplantation decreased the hazard of death directly (HR=0.18; 95% CI: 0.04- 0.93). Conclusion It was concluded that the effect of donor type, pre-transplant hypertension and having serum creatinine >1.6 upon discharge from the hospital was significant on hazard of renal allograft failure. The only variable that had a direct significant effect on hazard of death was donor type. PMID:25988091

  1. Autophagy in renal diseases.

    PubMed

    De Rechter, Stéphanie; Decuypere, Jean-Paul; Ivanova, Ekaterina; van den Heuvel, Lambertus P; De Smedt, Humbert; Levtchenko, Elena; Mekahli, Djalila

    2016-05-01

    Autophagy is the cell biology process in which cytoplasmic components are degraded in lysosomes to maintain cellular homeostasis and energy production. In the healthy kidney, autophagy plays an important role in the homeostasis and viability of renal cells such as podocytes and tubular epithelial cells and of immune cells. Recently, evidence is mounting that (dys)regulation of autophagy is implicated in the pathogenesis of various renal diseases, and might be an attractive target for new renoprotective therapies. In this review, we provide an overview of the role of autophagy in kidney physiology and kidney diseases. PMID:26141928

  2. Renal adaptation during hibernation

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Sandra L.; Jain, Swati; Keys, Daniel; Edelstein, Charles L.

    2013-01-01

    Hibernators periodically undergo profound physiological changes including dramatic reductions in metabolic, heart, and respiratory rates and core body temperature. This review discusses the effect of hypoperfusion and hypothermia observed during hibernation on glomerular filtration and renal plasma flow, as well as specific adaptations in renal architecture, vasculature, the renin-angiotensin system, and upregulation of possible protective mechanisms during the extreme conditions endured by hibernating mammals. Understanding the mechanisms of protection against organ injury during hibernation may provide insights into potential therapies for organ injury during cold storage and reimplantation during transplantation. PMID:24049148

  3. Effect of increased protein intake on renal acid load and renal hemodynamic responses.

    PubMed

    Teunissen-Beekman, Karianna F M; Dopheide, Janneke; Geleijnse, Johanna M; Bakker, Stephan J L; Brink, Elizabeth J; de Leeuw, Peter W; van Baak, Marleen A

    2016-03-01

    Increased protein intake versus maltodextrin intake for 4 weeks lowers blood pressure. Concerns exist that high-protein diets reduce renal function. Effects of acute and 4-week protein intake versus maltodextrin intake on renal acid load, glomerular filtration rate and related parameters were compared in this study. Seventy-nine overweight individuals with untreated elevated blood pressure and normal kidney function were randomized to consume a mix of protein isolates (60 g/day) or maltodextrin (60 g/day) for 4 weeks in energy balance. Twenty-four-hour urinary potential renal acid load (uPRAL) was compared between groups. A subgroup (maltodextrin N = 27, protein mix N = 25) participated in extra test days investigating fasting levels and postprandial effects of meals supplemented with a moderate protein- or maltodextrin-load on glomerular filtration rate, effective renal plasma flow, plasma renin, aldosterone, pH, and bicarbonate. uPRAL was significantly higher in the protein group after 4 weeks (P ≤ 0.001). Postprandial filtration fraction decreased further after the protein-supplemented breakfast than after the maltodextrin-supplemented breakfast after 4 weeks of supplementation (P ≤ 0.001). Fasting and postprandial levels of glomerular filtration rate, effective renal plasma flow, renin, aldosterone, angiotensin-converting enzyme, pH and bicarbonate did not differ between groups. In conclusion, 4 weeks on an increased protein diet (25% of energy intake) increased renal acid load, but did not affect renal function. Postprandial changes, except for filtration fraction, also did not differ between groups. These data suggest that a moderate increase in protein intake by consumption of a protein mix for 4 weeks causes no (undesirable) effects on kidney function in overweight and obese individuals with normal kidney function. PMID:26997623

  4. Effects of renal failure on drug transport and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hong; Frassetto, Lynda; Benet, Leslie Z

    2006-01-01

    Renal failure not only alters the renal elimination, but also the non-renal disposition of drugs that are extensively metabolized by the liver. Although reduced metabolic enzyme activity in some cases can be responsible for the reduced drug clearance, alterations in the transporter systems may also be involved in the process. With the development of renal failure, the renal secretion of organic ions mediated by organic anion transporters (OATs) and organic cation transporters (OCTs) is decreased. 3-Carboxy-4-methyl-5-propyl-2-furanpropanoic acid (CMPF) and other organic anionic uremic toxins may directly inhibit the renal excretion of various drugs and endogenous organic acids by competitively inhibiting OATs. In addition, the expression of OAT1 and OCT2 was reduced in chronic renal failure (CRF) rats. Renal failure also impairs the liver uptake of drugs and organic anions, such as bromosulphophthalein (BSP), indocyanine green (ICG), and thyroxine, where organic anion transport polypeptides (OATPs) are the major transporters. Most previous studies have been done in animals or cell culture, very often in rat models, but these are presumed to reflect the presentation of advanced renal disease in humans as well. Recent studies demonstrate that the uremic toxins CMPF and indoxyl sulfate (IS) can directly inhibit rOatp2 and hOATP-C in hepatocytes. The protein content of the liver uptake transporters Oatp1, 2, and 4 were significantly decreased in CRF rats. Decreased activity of the intestinal efflux transporter, P-glycoprotein (P-gp), was also observed in CRF rats, with no significant change of protein content, suggesting that uremic toxins may suppress P-gp function. However, increased protein levels of multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) 2 in the kidney and MRP3 in the liver were found in CRF rats, suggesting an adaptive response that may serve as a protective mechanism. Increases in drug areas under the curve (AUCs) in subjects with advanced renal disease

  5. Physiology of the Renal Interstitium

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Long overlooked as the virtual compartment and then strictly characterized through descriptive morphologic analysis, the renal interstitium has finally been associated with function. With identification of interstitial renin- and erythropoietin-producing cells, the most prominent endocrine functions of the kidney have now been attributed to the renal interstitium. This article reviews the functional role of renal interstitium. PMID:25813241

  6. Roles of estrogen and progesterone in modulating renal nerve function in the rat kidney

    PubMed Central

    Graceli, J.B.; Cicilini, M.A.; Bissoli, N.S.; Abreu, G.R.; Moysés, M.R.

    2013-01-01

    The maintenance of extracellular Na+ and Cl- concentrations in mammals depends, at least in part, on renal function. It has been shown that neural and endocrine mechanisms regulate extracellular fluid volume and transport of electrolytes along nephrons. Studies of sex hormones and renal nerves suggested that sex hormones modulate renal function, although this relationship is not well understood in the kidney. To better understand the role of these hormones on the effects that renal nerves have on Na+ and Cl- reabsorption, we studied the effects of renal denervation and oophorectomy in female rats. Oophorectomized (OVX) rats received 17β-estradiol benzoate (OVE, 2.0 mg·kg-1·day-1, sc) and progesterone (OVP, 1.7 mg·kg-1·day-1, sc). We assessed Na+ and Cl- fractional excretion (FENa+ and FECl-, respectively) and renal and plasma catecholamine release concentrations. FENa+, FECl-, water intake, urinary flow, and renal and plasma catecholamine release levels increased in OVX vs control rats. These effects were reversed by 17β-estradiol benzoate but not by progesterone. Renal denervation did not alter FENa+, FECl-, water intake, or urinary flow values vs controls. However, the renal catecholamine release level was decreased in the OVP (236.6±36.1 ng/g) and denervated rat groups (D: 102.1±15.7; ODE: 108.7±23.2; ODP: 101.1±22.1 ng/g). Furthermore, combining OVX + D (OD: 111.9±25.4) decreased renal catecholamine release levels compared to either treatment alone. OVE normalized and OVP reduced renal catecholamine release levels, and the effects on plasma catecholamine release levels were reversed by ODE and ODP replacement in OD. These data suggest that progesterone may influence catecholamine release levels by renal innervation and that there are complex interactions among renal nerves, estrogen, and progesterone in the modulation of renal function. PMID:23828583

  7. [Treatment of acute renal failure--concepts and controversies. 2. Extracorporeal renal replacement and peritoneal dialysis].

    PubMed

    Gabriel, A; Müller, E; Tarnow, J

    2001-04-01

    Therapy of prolonged acute renal failure regularly requires a renal replacement therapy. This can be achieved by different extracorporal renal replacement therapies (ERRT) or by peritoneal dialysis. ERRT are classified according to the physical principle underlying toxin elimination as hemodialysis (diffusion) and hemofiltration (convection). Another classification refers to intermittent or continuous application modes. Biocompatibility of membranes is judged according to their activation of the complement system. Prospective randomized studies did not consolidate the assumptions about the benefit of particular modalities proposed on theoretical foundations. Mortality, duration and complication rates of acute renal failure are not significantly decreased by use of biocompatible membranes. Continuous modalities are not generally preferable but optimize treatment in hemodynamically unstable patients, in whom they endorse fluid balancing and maintenance of sufficient arterial blood pressure. The use of demanding hemofiltration techniques for cytokine removal should be limited to clinical studies. The effects of ERRT-"intensity" and the best timing for initiation of ERRT have not been evaluated sufficiently. The choice of the ERRT modality is subject to clinical judgement (criterion: hemodynamic situation), practical aspects (criteria: availability of equipment and handling experience), and costs. Prior to their general use new and expensive technical modalities and membrane types should be thoroughly evaluated in studies with regard to outcome-related aspects such as patient survival and preservation of renal function. PMID:11386089

  8. Novel SLC5A2 mutation contributes to familial renal glucosuria: Abnormal expression in renal tissues

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lei; Hou, Ping; Liu, Guo-Ping; Zhang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Familial renal glucosuria (FRG) is characterized by persistent glucosuria in the presence of normal serum glucose concentrations, while other impairments of tubular function are absent. Mutations in the sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SLC5A2) gene have been found to be responsible for FRG. However, direct evidence for the presence of SLC5A2 mutant in renal tissues is very rare. In previous studies, a non-sense mutation (c.1320 G>A:p.W440X) that would cause premature termination of the protein was found. However, the effects in the renal tissues were not reported. In the current study, a patient with FRG and a urinary glucose excretion rate of 8.3 g/day is described, for whom a novel missense mutation (c.1319G>A:p.W440X) was revealed by sequencing. Furthermore, in the immunofluorescence examination of a renal biopsy specimen, SLC5A2 was detected in the apical side of the proximal convoluted tubule, discontinuously decreased in comparison with that in normal and disease controls. The results imply that both wild-type SLC5A2 and mutant SLC5A2 with abnormal distribution were expressed in the renal tissues, and that the reduction of SLC5A2 expression and function were due to the c.1319G>A:p.W440X mutation. The current study provides valuable clues regarding the SLC5A2 molecule from genotype to phenotype in families affected by FRG.

  9. Effect of tobacco smoking on renal function.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Ross G

    2006-09-01

    Nicotine is one of many substances that may be acquired through active and passive smoking of tobacco. In man, nicotine is commonly consumed via smoking cigarettes, cigars or pipes. The addictive liability and pharmacological effects of smoking are primarily mediated by the major tobacco alkaloid nicotine. High stress jobs favour repeated smoking and further reinforce addictive behaviours. There are elevated serum cadmium and lead levels in smokers resulting in glomerular dysfunction. Nephropathies are accelerated by nicotine with an increased incidence of microalbuminuria progressing to proteinuria, followed by type-1 diabetes mellitus induced renal failure. Cigarette smoke-induced renal damage is due, at least in part, to activation of the sympathetic nervous system resulting in an elevation in blood pressure. Ethanol, nicotine, or concurrent intake significantly increases lipid peroxidation in liver, and decreased superoxide dismutase activity and increased catalase activity in the kidney. This review describes the effects of nicotine, smoking, smoke extracts and other tobacco constituents on renal and cardiovascular functions, and associated effects on the nervous system. Both active and passive smoking is toxic to renal function. PMID:17085829

  10. Renal Denervation in Moderate to Severe CKD

    PubMed Central

    Hering, Dagmara; Mahfoud, Felix; Walton, Antony S.; Krum, Henry; Lambert, Gavin W.; Lambert, Elisabeth A.; Sobotka, Paul A.; Böhm, Michael; Cremers, Bodo; Esler, Murray D.

    2012-01-01

    Sympathetic activation contributes to the progression of CKD and is associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes. Ablation of renal sympathetic nerves reduces sympathetic nerve activity and BP in patients with resistant hypertension and preserved renal function, but whether this approach is safe and effective in patients with an estimated GFR (eGFR) < 45 ml/min per 1.73 m2 is unknown. We performed bilateral renal denervation in 15 patients with resistant hypertension and stage 3–4 CKD (mean eGFR, 31 ml/min per 1.73 m2). We used CO2 angiography in six patients to minimize exposure to contrast agents. Estimated GFR remained unchanged after the procedure, irrespective of the use of CO2 angiography. Mean baseline BP ± SD was 174±22/91±16 mmHg despite the use of 5.6±1.3 antihypertensive drugs. Mean changes in office systolic and diastolic BP at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months were −34/−14, −25/−11, −32/−15, and −33/−19 mmHg, respectively. Night-time ambulatory BP significantly decreased (P<0.05), restoring a more physiologic dipping pattern. In conclusion, this study suggests a favorable short-term safety profile and beneficial BP effects of catheter-based renal nerve ablation in patients with stage 3–4 CKD and resistant hypertension. PMID:22595301

  11. Renal effects of continuous negative pressure breathing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinney, M. J.

    1975-01-01

    Continuous negative pressure breathing (CNPB) was utilized to simulate the thoracic vascular distension of zero G in 11 anesthetized rats. The animals underwent renal clearance and micropuncture renal nephron studies before, during, and after CNPB. Four rats were pretreated with a high salt diet and I-M desoxycorticosterone (DOCA) in excess. None of these rats diuresed with CNPB. In contrast, five of the seven remaining rats increased the fraction of the filtered sodium excreted and their urinary flow rate. Potassium excretion increased. End proximal tubular fluid specimen's TF/P inulin ratios were unchanged. Whole kidney and single nephron glomerular filtration rates fell 10%. CNPB, a mechanism for atrial distension, appears to cause in the rat a decrease in distal tubular sodium and water reabsorption. Exogenous mineral-corticoid prevents the diuresis, saluresis, and kaluresis. The adequacy of other nonatrial volume control mechanisms in regulating renal salt and water conservation in opposition to the studied atrial-renal (Henry-Gauer) reflex of thoracic vascular distension is confirmed.

  12. Diet and renal stone formation.

    PubMed

    Trinchieri, A

    2013-02-01

    The relationship between diet and the formation of renal stones is demonstrated, but restrictive diets do not take into account the complexity of metabolism and the complex mechanisms that regulate the saturation and crystallization processes in the urine. The restriction of dietary calcium can reduce the urinary excretion of calcium but severe dietary restriction of calcium causes hyperoxaluria and a progressive loss of bone mineral component. Furthermore urinary calcium excretion is influenced by other nutrients than calcium as sodium, potassium, protein and refined carbohydrates. Up to 40% of the daily excretion of oxalate in the urine is from dietary source, but oxalate absorption in the intestine depends linearly on the concomitant dietary intake of calcium and is influenced by the bacterial degradation by several bacterial species of intestinal flora. A more rational approach should be based on the cumulative effects of foods and different dietary patterns on urinary saturation rather than on the effect of single nutrients. A diet based on a adequate intake of calcium (1000-1200 mg per day) and containment of animal protein and salt can decrease significantly urinary supersaturation for calcium oxalate and reduce the relative risk of stone recurrence in hypercalciuric renal stone formers. The DASH-style diet that is high in fruits and vegetables, moderate in low-fat dairy products and low in animal proteins and salt is associated with a lower relative supersaturation for calcium oxalate and a marked decrease in risk of incident stone formation. All the diets above mentioned have as a common characteristic the reduction of the potential acid load of the diet that can be correlated with a higher risk of recurrent nephrolithiasis, because the acid load of diet is inversely related to urinary citrate excretion. The restriction of protein and salt with an adequate calcium intake seem to be advisable but should be implemented with the advice to increase the intake

  13. Ablative therapies for renal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Rajan; Leveillee, Raymond J.

    2010-01-01

    Owing to an increased use of diagnostic imaging for evaluating patients with other abdominal conditions, incidentally discovered kidney masses now account for a majority of renal tumors. Renal ablative therapy is assuming a more important role in patients with borderline renal impairment. Renal ablation uses heat or cold to bring about cell death. Radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation are two such procedures, and 5-year results are now emerging from both modalities. Renal biopsy at the time of ablation is extremely important in order to establish tissue diagnosis. Real-time temperature monitoring at the time of radiofrequency ablation is very useful to ensure adequacy of ablation. PMID:21789083

  14. Renal imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Hierholzer, K; Hierholzer, J

    1997-01-01

    The ancient approach to obtain an image of the kidneys (and other internal organs) was 'section-inspection-imaging' by drawing, painting, sculpturing, and modelling. The present study follows chronologically the development and use of sectioning techniques from ancient (often forbidden) methods to modern microdissection and maceration of silicone-rubber-injected tubules. Inspection evolved from the use of the naked eye to magnifying lenses, microscopes and finally electron microscopy. Pertinent examples such as the description of the kidneys as the site of urine formation, the visualization of loop structures in the renal medulla and the imaging of tight junction strands are discussed. Inspection or visualization of renal structure and function has been revolutionized by modern noninvasive techniques, such as X-ray imaging, imaging by radioisotopes, ultrasound, computer tomography and nuclear magnetic resonance. Pertinent examples are given demonstrating the potency of the various techniques. The contribution of computerized data evaluation is discussed. The development of micropuncture and microperfusion techniques has opened the field for direct imaging not only of renal (sub)structural details but also of functional parameters such as transtubular reabsorption rates, single glomerular capillary filtration and conductance of the paracellular pathway. We focus particularly on techniques specifically designed to visualize renal hemodynamic and transport parameters. PMID:9189257

  15. Malignancy after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Zeier, Martin; Hartschuh, Wolfgang; Wiesel, Manfred; Lehnert, Thomas; Ritz, Eberhard

    2002-01-01

    Malignancy following renal transplantation is an important medical problem during the long-term follow-up. The overall incidence of malignancy at this time is 3 to 5 times higher than in the general population. The most common malignancies are lymphoproliferative disorders (early after transplantation) and skin carcinomas (late after transplantation). The type of malignancy is different in various countries and dependent on genetic and environmental factors. Another important confounder for risk of malignancy after renal transplantation is the type of immunosuppression. Previous use of cytotoxic drugs (eg, cyclophosphamide) or a history of analgesic abuse are additional risk factors. Malignancy may even be transplanted by the graft. Previous cancer treatment in a uremic patient on the transplant waiting list is of great importance in relation to waiting time and postmalignancy screening. Finally, every dialysis patient on the waiting list should undergo a regular screening program before and after renal transplantation to detect a potentially malignant tumor in an early stage. In addition to specific oncological treatment, managing a malignancy after renal transplantation should include modification of immunosuppression. PMID:11774131

  16. Atorvastatin improves renal organic anion transporter 3 and renal function in gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Jaikumkao, Krit; Pongchaidecha, Anchalee; Chattipakorn, Nipon; Chatsudthipong, Varanuj; Promsan, Sasivimon; Arjinajarn, Phatchawan; Lungkaphin, Anusorn

    2016-06-01

    What is the central question of this study? This study was designed to determine the renoprotective effects of atorvastatin treatment in an experimental model of gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity through modulating the Nrf2 pathway by decreasing the oxidative stress. What is the main finding and its importance? Atorvastatin exerts a nephroprotective effect by attenuating oxidative stress, protecting renal function and renal organic anion transporter 3 function from the effects of gentamicin. Atorvastatin might protect the tissues via its antioxidant property and by modulating the antioxidant enzymes through the Nrf2 signalling pathway, which may be the underlying mechanisms of these protective effects. Recent evidence demonstrates that statins, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, exert not only lipid-lowering effects but also antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects. Nephrotoxicity, a serious side-effect of gentamicin, is related to an increase in reactive oxygen species in the kidney. This study was designed to determine the renoprotective effects of atorvastatin treatment in an experimental model of gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were used. Nephrotocixity was induced by i.p. injection of gentamicin, 100 mg kg(-1)  day(-1) , for 15 days. Atorvastatin, 10 mg kg(-1)  day(-1) , was administered by gavage 30 min before gentamicin injection (pretreatment) for 15 days or only on days 10-15 (post-treatment). Renal function and renal organic anion transporter 3 (Oat3) function and expression were examined. Gentamicin-treated rats demonstrated impaired renal function by attenuation of creatinine clearance and increased oxidative stress. Gentamicin treatment also decreased renal Oat3 function and expression as shown by decreased [(3) H]estrone sulfate uptake into renal cortical slices and decreased expression. The protein expressions of protein kinase C, Nrf2, NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1

  17. Serum lipid pattern unifies following renal transplantation in children.

    PubMed

    Müller, Thomas; Koeppe, Silvie; Arbeiter, Klaus; Luckner, Doris; Salzer, Urike; Balzar, Egon; Aufricht, Christoph

    2003-09-01

    Hyperlipidemia is a common problem in solid organ transplant recipients. In this study we evaluated the role of pre-transplant renal replacement therapy on early and late changes of serum lipid levels in children following renal transplantation. In 46 children with chronic renal failure (median age 10.3 years) and 12 children with heart failure (median age 5.0 years), cholesterol and triglycerides were measured before and during follow-up after transplantation. Children with renal failure had significantly higher serum lipids than controls ( n=34, median age 9.2 years) and patients with heart failure. Pre transplantation, cholesterol and triglycerides were significantly lower in the hemodialysis than in the peritoneal dialysis population, whereas conservatively treated children had intermediate levels. After transplantation, serum cholesterol converged towards a mean level of 208 mg/dl and triglyceride levels converged towards a uniform level of 195 mg/dl at 9 months post transplant. The ratio of cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein significantly decreased from 4.7 to 3.8. The pattern of "post-transplant hyperlipidemia" was similar in both renal and cardiac allograft recipients. Hence, the early post-transplant changes of serum lipid pattern are markedly dependent on the mode of pre-transplant renal replacement therapy. Later, serum lipid levels were no longer influenced by prior renal replacement therapy and showed a new pattern of "post-transplant hyperlipidemia" in all children. PMID:12883978

  18. Renal haemodynamic and excretory responses to bradykinin in anaesthetized dogs.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Y; Tadano, K; Yamasaki, T

    1999-08-01

    1. Effects of bradykinin (BK) on renal haemodynamics and urine formation were examined in anaesthetized dogs. 2. Renal arterial infusion of BK at doses of 5 or 50 ng/kg per min produced dose-dependent increases in renal blood flow (RBF), without affecting systemic arterial pressure or glomerular filtration rate. There were also significant and dose-dependent increases in urine flow (UF), urinary excretion of sodium (UNaV) and fractional excretion of sodium (FENa) and decreases in urine osmolality during BK infusion. 3. Renal haemodynamic and excretory responses to the BK infusion were completely abolished by the simultaneous administration of Hoe 140 (icatibant, 100 ng/kg per min intrarenally), a selective BK B2-receptor antagonist. 4. In the presence of NG-nitro-L-arginine (NOARG; 40 micrograms/kg per min intrarenally), a nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor, BK-induced renal vasodilative and natriuretic effects were markedly attenuated, although responses of UF and urine osmolality to BK remained unchanged. The water diuretic effect of BK was abolished in dogs given both NOARG and ibuprofen (12.5 mg/kg bolus injection plus 12.5 mg/kg per h of sustained infusion intravenously), a cyclooxygenase inhibitor. 5. These results clearly indicate that renal haemodynamic and excretory responses to BK were mediated exclusively by the B2-receptor. Renal vasodilative and natriuretic responses are mainly linked to NO generation, while both NO and prostaglandin biosynthesis are involved in the BK-induced water diuresis. PMID:10474781

  19. Renal handling of drugs in renal failure. I: Differential effects of uranyl nitrate- and glycerol-induced acute renal failure on renal excretion of TEAB and PAH in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, J.H.; Lin, T.H.

    1988-09-01

    Two etiologically different models of experimental acute renal failure were induced in rats by administration of either glycerol or uranyl nitrate. Both compounds caused a substantial decrease in the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and the net tubular secretion of tetraethylammonium bromide (TEAB) and para-aminohippuric acid (PAH). The degree of renal impairment induced by uranyl nitrate and glycerol appeared to be dose related. Deprivation of drinking water 24 hr before the administration of glycerol potentiated the renal damage. In uranyl nitrate-induced renal failure, the decline of the net tubular secretion for TEAB and PAH was not proportional to the decrease in GFR; the secretion process deteriorated faster than the GFR. For example, when 0.5 mg/kg uranyl nitrate was administered, GFR fell to approximately 65% of normal, whereas the net tubular secretion was decreased to 30% of normal. These results suggest that the tubular transport was preferentially affected by uranyl nitrate. In contrast, in glycerol-induced renal failure, the decline of TEAB secretion fell in a parallel fashion with the GFR, suggesting that the glomeruli and the proximal tubules were equally damaged by glycerol. However, in this latter model, the decline of PAH secretion did not parallel the decrease in GFR, contradicting the proposal that glycerol affects equally the glomeruli and the proximal tubules. This discrepancy may be due to the selective competitive inhibition of PAH secretion by the accumulation of naturally occurring organic acids.

  20. Renal impairment and worsening of renal function in acute heart failure: can new therapies help? The potential role of serelaxin.

    PubMed

    Schmieder, Roland E; Mitrovic, Veselin; Hengstenberg, Christian

    2015-08-01

    Renal dysfunction is a frequent finding in patients with acute heart failure (AHF) and an important prognostic factor for adverse outcomes. Worsening of renal function occurs in 30-50% of patients hospitalised for AHF, and is associated with increased mortality, prolonged hospital stay and increased risk of readmission. Likely mechanisms involved in the decrease in renal function include impaired haemodynamics and activation of neurohormonal factors, such as the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, the sympathetic nervous system and the arginine-vasopressin system. Additionally, many drugs currently used to treat AHF have a detrimental effect on renal function. Therefore, pharmacotherapy for AHF should carefully take into account any potential complications related to renal function. Serelaxin, currently in clinical development for the treatment of AHF is a recombinant form of human relaxin-2, identical in structure to the naturally occurring human relaxin-2 peptide hormone that mediates cardiac and renal adaptations during pregnancy. Data from both pre-clinical and clinical studies indicate a potentially beneficial effect of serelaxin on kidney function. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms and impact of impairment of renal function in AHF, and the potential benefits of new therapies, such as serelaxin, in this context. PMID:25787721

  1. RENAL INSUFFICIENCY FOLLOWING TRYPSIN INJECTION INTO THE RENAL ARTERIES.

    PubMed

    Friedman, M; Katz, L N

    1938-09-30

    1. The injection of trypsin into both renal arteries of the dog was found to cause an acute necrosis of large sections of the kidney, an immediate excretory insufficiency, and a transient hypertension. 2. Dogs surviving the acute phase of the trypsin injection, developed a chronic renal excretory insufficiency with no hypertension, despite the severity and duration of the renal excretory insufficiency. 3. The application of a Goldblatt clamp to the renal artery of one of the two kidneys, previously injected with trypsin, led to a rise in blood pressure which returned at once to normal when the ischemic kidney was removed, even though the pre-existing renal excretory insufficiency was augmented. This experience demonstrated unequivocally that chronic renal excretory insufficiency and hypertension are not directly related. 4. The application of a Goldblatt clamp to the renal artery of one kidney and the simultaneous injection of trypsin into the other led to a hypertension. The later removal of the ischemic kidney led to a severe renal excretory insufficiency, at the same time the pre-existing hypertension disappeared. This indicated again that renal excretory insufficiency and renal ischemia produced different phenomena and that the former had no direct relation to hypertension. PMID:19870800

  2. Renal systems biology of patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tsalik, Ephraim L.; Willig, Laurel K.; Rice, Brandon J.; van Velkinburgh, Jennifer C.; Mohney, Robert P.; McDunn, Jonathan; Dinwiddie, Darrell L.; Miller, Neil A.; Mayer, Eric; Glickman, Seth W.; Jaehne, Anja K.; Glew, Robert H.; Sopori, Mohan L.; Otero, Ronny M.; Harrod, Kevin S.; Cairns, Charles B.; Fowler, Vance G.; Rivers, Emanuel P.; Woods, Christopher W.; Kingsmore, Stephen F.; Langley, Raymond J.

    2015-01-01

    A systems biology approach was used to comprehensively examine the impact of renal disease and hemodialysis (HD) on patient response during critical illness. To achieve this we examined the metabolome, proteome, and transcriptome of 150 patients with critical illness, stratified by renal function. Quantification of plasma metabolites indicated greater change as renal function declined, with the greatest derangements in patients receiving chronic HD. Specifically, 6 uremic retention molecules, 17 other protein catabolites, 7 modified nucleosides, and 7 pentose phosphate sugars increased as renal function declined, consistent with decreased excretion or increased catabolism of amino acids and ribonucleotides. Similarly, the proteome showed increased levels of low-molecular weight proteins and acute phase reactants. The transcriptome revealed a broad-based decrease in mRNA levels among patients on HD. Systems integration revealed an unrecognized association between plasma RNASE1 and several RNA catabolites and modified nucleosides. Further, allantoin, N1-methyl-4-pyridone-3-carboxamide, and n-acetylaspartate were inversely correlated with the majority of significantly down-regulated genes. Thus, renal function broadly affected the plasma metabolome, proteome, and peripheral blood transcriptome during critical illness; changes not effectively mitigated by hemodialysis. These studies allude to several novel mechanisms whereby renal dysfunction contributes to critical illness. PMID:25993322

  3. Renal systems biology of patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tsalik, Ephraim L; Willig, Laurel K; Rice, Brandon J; van Velkinburgh, Jennifer C; Mohney, Robert P; McDunn, Jonathan E; Dinwiddie, Darrell L; Miller, Neil A; Mayer, Eric S; Glickman, Seth W; Jaehne, Anja K; Glew, Robert H; Sopori, Mohan L; Otero, Ronny M; Harrod, Kevin S; Cairns, Charles B; Fowler, Vance G; Rivers, Emanuel P; Woods, Christopher W; Kingsmore, Stephen F; Langley, Raymond J

    2015-10-01

    A systems biology approach was used to comprehensively examine the impact of renal disease and hemodialysis (HD) on patient response during critical illness. To achieve this, we examined the metabolome, proteome, and transcriptome of 150 patients with critical illness, stratified by renal function. Quantification of plasma metabolites indicated greater change as renal function declined, with the greatest derangements in patients receiving chronic HD. Specifically, 6 uremic retention molecules, 17 other protein catabolites, 7 modified nucleosides, and 7 pentose phosphate sugars increased as renal function declined, consistent with decreased excretion or increased catabolism of amino acids and ribonucleotides. Similarly, the proteome showed increased levels of low-molecular-weight proteins and acute-phase reactants. The transcriptome revealed a broad-based decrease in mRNA levels among patients on HD. Systems integration revealed an unrecognized association between plasma RNASE1 and several RNA catabolites and modified nucleosides. Further, allantoin, N1-methyl-4-pyridone-3-carboxamide, and N-acetylaspartate were inversely correlated with the majority of significantly downregulated genes. Thus, renal function broadly affected the plasma metabolome, proteome, and peripheral blood transcriptome during critical illness; changes were not effectively mitigated by hemodialysis. These studies allude to several novel mechanisms whereby renal dysfunction contributes to critical illness. PMID:25993322

  4. Hydrogen Sulfide Inhibits High-Salt Diet-Induced Renal Oxidative Stress and Kidney Injury in Dahl Rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, Pan; Shen, Zhizhou; Liu, Jia; Huang, Yaqian; Chen, Siyao; Yu, Wen; Wang, Suxia; Ren, Yali; Li, Xiaohui; Tang, Chaoshu; Du, Junbao; Jin, Hongfang

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. The study was designed to investigate if H2S could inhibit high-salt diet-induced renal excessive oxidative stress and kidney injury in Dahl rats. METHODS. Male salt-sensitive Dahl and SD rats were used. Blood pressure (BP), serum creatinine, urea, creatinine clearance rate, and 24-hour urine protein were measured. Renal ultra- and microstructures were observed. Collagen-I and -III contents the oxidants and antioxidants levels in renal tissue were detected. Keap1/Nrf2 association and Keap1 s-sulfhydration were detected. RESULTS. After 8 weeks of high-salt diet, BP was significantly increased, renal function and structure were impaired, and collagen deposition was abundant in renal tissues with increased renal MPO activity, H2O2, MDA, GSSG, and (•)OH contents, reduced renal T-AOC and GSH contents, CAT, GSH-PX and SOD activity, and SOD expressions in Dahl rats. Furthermore, endogenous H2S in renal tissues was decreased in Dahl rats. H2S donor, however, decreased BP, improved renal function and structure, and inhibited collagen excessive deposition in kidney, in association with increased antioxidative activity and reduced oxidative stress in renal tissues. H2S activated Nrf2 by inducing Keap1 s-sulfhydration and subsequent Keap1/Nrf2 disassociation. CONCLUSIONS. H2S protected against high-salt diet-induced renal injury associated with enhanced antioxidant capacity and inhibited renal oxidative stress. PMID:26823949

  5. The effect of ketone bodies on renal ammoniogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lemieux, Guy; Vinay, Patrick; Robitaille, Pierre; Plante, Gérard E.; Lussier, Yolande; Martin, Pierre

    1971-01-01

    Infusion of ketone bodies to ammonium chloride-loaded acidotic dogs was found to induce significant reduction in urinary excretion of ammonia. This effect could not be attributed to urinary pH variations. Total ammonia production by the left kidney was measured in 25 animals infused during 90 min with the sodium salt of D,L-β-hydroxybutyric acid adjusted to pH 6.0 or 4.2. Ketonemia averaged 4.5 mM/liter. In all experiments the ammonia content of both urine and renal venous blood fell markedly so that ammoniogenesis was depressed by 60% or more within 60 min after the onset of infusion. Administration of equimolar quantities of sodium acetoacetate adjusted to pH 6.0 resulted in a 50% decrease in renal ammonia production. Infusion of ketone bodies adjusted to pH 6.0 is usually accompanied by a small increase in extracellular bicarbonate (3.7 mM/liter). However infusion of D,L-sodium lactate or sodium bicarbonate in amounts sufficient to induce a similar rise in plasma bicarbonate resulted in only a slight decrement in ammonia production (15%). The continuous infusion of 5% mannitol alone during 90-150 min failed to influence renal ammoniogenesis. Infusion of pure sodium-free β-hydroxybutyric acid prepared by ion exchange (pH 2.2) resulted in a 50% decrease in renal ammoniogenesis in spite of the fact that both urinary pH and plasma bicarbonate fell significantly. During all experiments where ketones were infused, the renal extraction of glutamine became negligible as the renal glutamine arteriovenous difference was abolished. Renal hemodynamics did not vary significantly. Infusion of β-hydroxybutyrate into the left renal artery resulted in a rapid decrease in ammoniogenesis by the perfused kidney. The present study indicates that ketone bodies exert their inhibitory influence within the renal tubular cell. Since their effect is independent of urinary or systemic acid-base changes, it is suggested that they depress renal ammoniogenesis by preventing the

  6. Renal effect of YM435, a new dopamine D1 receptor agonist, in anesthetized dogs.

    PubMed

    Yatsu, T; Arai, Y; Takizawa, K; Kasai-Nakagawa, C; Takanashi, M; Uchida, W; Inagaki, O; Tanaka, A; Asano, M; Honda, K; Takenaka, T

    1997-03-12

    The renal effects of YM435 ((-)-(S)-4-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-7,8-dihydroxy -1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline hydrochloride hydrate), a dopamine D1 receptor agonist, were investigated in anesthetized dogs. Intravenous infusion of YM435 (0.1-3 micrograms/kg per min) increased renal blood flow and decreased mean blood pressure in a dose-dependent manner with little effect on heart rate. Glomerular filtration rate, urine flow and urinary sodium excretion were concomitantly increased. The renal effect of YM435 by intravenous infusion at 0.3 microgram/kg per min was completely blocked by treatment with the selective dopamine D1 receptor antagonist SCH 23390 (7-chloro-8-hydroxy-3-methyl-1-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-(1H)-3-benzazep ine hydrochloride). Furthermore, intravenous infusion of YM435 (0.3 microgram/kg per min) reversed the angiotensin II-induced decreases in renal blood flow, glomerular filtration rate, urine flow and urinary sodium excretion, and prevented the decrease in renal blood flow, glomerular filtration rate and urine flow induced by renal nerve stimulation and platelet-activating factor (PAF). These results suggest that intravenous administration of YM435 produces renal vasodilating and diuretic/natriuretic effects by stimulation of dopamine D1 receptors, and demonstrate that YM435 can inhibit angiotensin II-, renal nerve stimulation- and PAF-induced renal dysfunction. PMID:9088869

  7. Epidemiologic characteristics and risk factors for renal cell cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lipworth, Loren; Tarone, Robert E; Lund, Lars; McLaughlin, Joseph K

    2009-01-01

    Incidence rates of renal cell cancer, which accounts for 85% of kidney cancers, have been rising in the United States and in most European countries for several decades. Family history is associated with a two- to four-fold increase in risk, but the major forms of inherited predisposition together account for less than 4% of renal cell cancers. Cigarette smoking, obesity, and hypertension are the most consistently established risk factors. Analgesics have not been convincingly linked with renal cell cancer risk. A reduced risk of renal cell cancer among statin users has been hypothesized but has not been adequately studied. A possible protective effect of fruit and vegetable consumption is the only moderately consistently reported dietary finding, and, with the exception of a positive association with parity, evidence for a role of hormonal or reproductive factors in the etiology of renal cell cancer in humans is limited. A recent hypothesis that moderate levels of alcohol consumption may be protective for renal cell cancer is not strongly supported by epidemiologic results, which are inconsistent with respect to the categories of alcohol consumption and the amount of alcohol intake reportedly associated with decreased risk. For occupational factors, the weight of the evidence does not provide consistent support for the hypotheses that renal cell cancer may be caused by asbestos, gasoline, or trichloroethylene exposure. The established determinants of renal cell cancer, cigarette smoking, obesity, and hypertension, account for less than half of these cancers. Novel epidemiologic approaches, including evaluation of gene–environment interactions and epigenetic mechanisms of inherited and acquired increased risk, are needed to explain the increasing incidence of renal cell cancer. PMID:20865085

  8. Analysis of renal function during telaprevir-based triple therapy for chronic hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    KOHJIMA, MOTOYUKI; KUROKAWA, MIHO; ENJOJI, MUNECHIKA; YOSHIMOTO, TSUYOSHI; NAKAMURA, TSUKASA; OHASHI, TOMOKO; FUKUIZUMI, KUNITAKA; HARADA, NAOHIKO; MURATA, YUSUKE; MATSUNAGA, KAZUHISA; KATO, MASAKI; KOTOH, KAZUHIRO; NAKAMUTA, MAKOTO

    2016-01-01

    Telaprevir (TVR) is used for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C in a combination therapy with pegylated-interferon and ribavirin. Although renal dysfunction is one of the critical adverse outcomes of this treatment, little is known regarding the mechanism of its onset. The present study assessed the association of renal function with TVR dose and viral response. Hematological, biochemical, urinary and virological parameters of renal function were examined during the TVR-based triple therapy of patients infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1b. Serum creatinine levels were increased and the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was decreased in every patient during TVR administration, but these values recovered to normal levels following cessation of TVR. Fractional excretion of sodium was <1% at days 3 and 7, appearing similar regardless of baseline renal function. Urinary β2-microglobulin levels were elevated and were significantly higher in patients with renal dysfunction, as compared with those not exhibiting renal dysfunction (P<0.05). The reduction in renal function was milder in patients treated with a reduced TVR dose, and these patients had a significantly lower risk of developing renal dysfunction (P<0.05). Using a multivariate analysis, TVR dose and eGFR at the initiation of treatment were identified as significant contributory factors in the development of renal dysfunction. Reduction in TVR dose did not lead to a significant increase in the viral kinetics of HCV or detrimental effects on the sustained viral response (SVR) rate. It is hypothesized that renal dysfunction during TVR treatment is caused by damage of the renal tubule, in addition to pre-renal dysfunction, and that reduction in TVR dose reduces the rate of renal dysfunction without causing a significant decrease in the SVR rate. PMID:27168803

  9. Does clozapine decrease smoking?

    PubMed

    de Leon, Jose; Diaz, Francisco J; Josiassen, Richard C; Cooper, Thomas B; Simpson, George M

    2005-06-01

    McEvoy et al.'s study in 1999, which used cotinine levels but had limited power, suggested that clozapine treatment may be associated with a mild smoking decrease (particularly when plasma clozapine levels are > 150 ng/ml). Some naturalistic studies also suggest that clozapine treatment may be associated with a mild smoking decrease. The present study included 38 schizophrenic daily smokers from a double-blind clozapine trial. Five analyses were tested for significant decreases in plasma cotinine levels from a haloperidol baseline to: (1) the end of clozapine trials regarding clozapine doses (100, 300 or 600 mg/day), (2) the end of the clozapine trial where the highest plasma clozapine level was achieved, (3) the end of the clozapine trial where a clozapine level in the 150-450 ng/ml range was achieved, (4) the end of the first clozapine trial regardless of clozapine dose, and (5) the end of the last clozapine trial in the study. The first and straightforward analysis by dose showed no clozapine effects on smoking. The second and the third analyses (an attempt to mimic the design by McEvoy et al. [McEvoy, J.P., Freudenreich, O., Wilson, W.H., 1999. Smoking and therapeutic response to clozapine in patients with schizophrenia. Biol. Psychiat. 46, 125-129.]) also indicated that there was not a significant effect of clozapine on smoking. The fourth and five analyses were also negative. None of the five analyses in our clozapine trial demonstrated that clozapine had major effects on smoking. This study cannot rule out that in some subjects, clozapine treatment may be associated with a small decrease in smoking. New prospective longitudinal studies using repeated cotinine and clozapine levels are needed to explore whether clozapine may reduce smoking in some patients. PMID:15951089

  10. Dental management of people with renal disease and renal transplants.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, C A; Whyman, R A

    1998-09-01

    Chronic renal failure is the result of progressive loss of functioning nephrons leading to loss of renal function and accumulation of excretory products. Loss of the regulatory and excretory functions of the kidneys causes oral manifestations and multiple complications which have implications for dental care. Dental management of patients with renal failure and renal transplants involves consideration of specific haematological and cardiovascular effects, and implications for the prescribing and use of pharmaceuticals. It also requires the dentist to appreciate the potential for involvement of multiple organ systems in the disease process and the implications this has for dental care. The orofacial manifestations of chronic renal failure are secondary to systemic manifestations and are not specific to the diagnosis of end-stage renal disease. PMID:9775650

  11. Role of renal nerves in excretory responses to exogenous and endogenous opioid peptides.

    PubMed

    Kapusta, D R; Jones, S Y; Kopp, U C; Dibona, G F

    1989-03-01

    The present study was designed to investigate opioid peptide-mediated changes in renal function in conscious Sprague-Dawley rats after administration of the native opioid agonist methionine enkephalin (ME), its synthetic analog D-Ala2-methionine enkephalinamide (DALA) and the opioid antagonist naloxone. Intravenous infusion of DALA (25 micrograms/kg/min) and ME (75 micrograms/kg/min) produced no changes in mean arterial pressure, heart rate, glomerular filtration rate or effective renal plasma flow in rats with intact or bilaterally denervated kidneys. In contrast, i.v. infusion of these opioid agonists produced differing effects on the renal excretion of water and sodium; DALA produced an increase in urinary flow rate and sodium excretion and ME produced a decrease in these parameters. Changes in renal sympathetic nerve activity were not involved in producing these effects as supported by measurements of renal sympathetic nerve activity and the finding that prior bilateral renal denervation did not alter the renal responses to either agonist. The renal excretory responses to both DALA and ME infusion were prevented by pretreatment with the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone, thus suggesting an opioid receptor-mediated effect of both agonists. Intravenous bolus injections of naloxone alone produced a dose-dependent diuresis and natriuresis without producing changes in systemic or renal hemodynamics or renal sympathetic nerve activity. These studies, therefore, provide evidence that the administration of opioid receptor agonists and antagonists produce changes in the renal excretion of water and sodium via an action on renal tubular reabsorptive mechanisms which are independent of changes in systemic or renal hemodynamics or renal sympathetic nerve activity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2703962

  12. Renal veins and venous extension in clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bonsib, Stephen M

    2007-01-01

    The 2002 TNM formulation defines a pT3b tumor as one that 'extends into the renal vein or its segmental (muscle containing) branches.' This definition elicits uncertainty when veins with little muscle are involved or the relationship to the main renal vein is unknown. The diameter and medial thickness of 10 normal renal venous systems were studied and compared to sinus veins involved in 54 pT3b clear cell renal cell carcinomas (CC). All tumors were grossly examined and sampled for histology by the author. An immunoperoxidase cocktail containing CD 31 and actin, Masson trichrome and elastic stains were employed to aid identification of intravenous tumor. The venous dissections showed variable numbers of primary and secondary divisions with substantial overlap in diameter and medial thickness. The medial thickness decreased with each proximal division and ranged from being nonexistent to being thick. Study of the 54 pT3b CC revealed that the initial phase of extrarenal extension involved large caliber veins draining the primary tumor. With extensive venous involvement, tumor invaded through the vein wall into sinus fat or demonstrated retrograde venous extension into adjacent cortex. Correlation between gross and histology revealed that most nodules of tumor within the sinus fat contained evidence of pre-existing veins. The following observations were made: (1) the diameter of a sinus vein or the quantity of muscle is a poor indicator of vein segment or relationship to the main renal vein; therefore, the wording used to define pT3b should be clarified; (2) extrarenal spread in CC begins with intravenous extension whereas sinus fat invasion is usually secondary; (3) retrograde venous extension occurs in cases with massive renal vein involvement; and (4) nodules within the sinus fat usually represent venous involvement. PMID:17170742

  13. Improvement of renal function after opening occluded atherosclerotic renal arteries.

    PubMed

    Kanamori, Hiroshi; Toma, Masanao; Fukatsu, Atsushi

    2009-09-01

    Percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty (PTRA) with stenting has been effective in the control of hypertension, renal function and pulmonary edema caused by atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (ARAS). However, concerning the viability of renal function, this procedure has not been fully established, especially in the presence of renal atrophy or severe renal parenchymal disease. We report a dramatically improved case of acute renal failure caused by acute worsening ARAS treated by stenting. A 72-year-old female was admitted for accelerated renal dysfunction (serum ceatinine; 1.2-2.3 mg/dl) and hypertension (190/100 mmHg). At 10 days after admission, the patient's serum ceatinine increased to 6.7 mg/dl, her pulmonary edema was exaggerated and hemodialysis was required. Ultrasonography showed bilateral high-echoic kidneys, but no apparent finding of renal artery stenosis (RAS). At day 15, computed tomographic angiography indicated bilateral ostial RAS. Renal angiography demonstrated total occlusion of the right and severe (90%) disease in the left. ARAS was diagnosed by intravascular ultrasonography. The guidewire was inserted in both renal arteries, PTRA with stenting was performed in the right and a stent was directly implanted in the left. Immediately, each kidney enlarged to almost normal size, leading to satisfactory urination. She was released from hemodialysis the next day since her serum creatinine was normal and the pulmonary edema was improved. Although there is still no reliable prognostic factor including resistive index or kidney size, it is important that PTRA with stenting in ARAS should be considered in a case of accelerated renal dysfunction because of the possible improvement. PMID:19726830

  14. Renal effects of continuous negative pressure breathing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinney, M. J.; Discala, V. A.

    1975-01-01

    Continuous negative pressure breathing (CNPB) was utilized to simulate the thoracic vascular distension of zero g or space, in 11 anesthetized rats. The animals underwent renal clearance and micropuncture renal nephron studies before, during, and after CNPB. Rats were pretreated with a high salt diet and I-M desoxycorticosterone (DOCA) in excess. None of these rats diuresed with CNPB. In contrast 5 of the 7 remaining rats increased the fraction of the filtered sodium excreted (C sub Na/GFR, p .05) and their urinary flow rate (V, p .05). Potassium excretion increased (U sub k V, p .05). End proximal tubular fluid specimen's TF/P inulin ratios were unchanged. Whole kidney and single nephron glomerular filtration rates fell 10%. CNPB, a mechanism for atrial distension, appears to cause, in rats, a decrease in distal tubular sodium, water and potassium reabsorption. Exogenous mineral-corticoid prevents the diuresis, saluresis, and kaluresis.

  15. Bilateral renal calculi

    PubMed Central

    Sreenevasan, G

    1974-01-01

    Bilateral renal calculi were present in 114 (10.7%) of 1,070 cases of proved urinary calculus admitted to the Urological Department of the General Hospital, Kuala Lumpur, during the period November 1968—May 1973. The management of bilateral renal calculi is discussed with reference to the first 100 cases in this series. The introduction of renography has greatly facilitated the decision as to which kidney should be operated on first. The management of patients with and without uraemia is discussed and the use of the modified V and V—Y incisions for the removal of staghorn calculi is described. Complications and results are briefly reviewed. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 4Fig. 6Fig. 7 PMID:4845653

  16. Inherited renal carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Akira; Young, Scott W; Takahashi, Naoki; King, Bernard F; Atwell, Thomas D

    2016-06-01

    Hereditary forms of kidney carcinoma account for 5-8% of all malignant kidney neoplasms. The renal tumors are often multiple and bilateral and occur at an earlier age. Each of the hereditary kidney carcinoma syndromes is associated with specific gene mutations as well as a specific histologic type of kidney carcinoma. The presence of associated extrarenal manifestations may suggest a hereditary kidney cancer syndrome. Radiology is most commonly used to screen and manage patients with hereditary kidney cancer syndromes. This manuscript reviews the clinical and imaging findings of well-defined inherited kidney cancer syndromes including von Hippel-Lindau disease, Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome, hereditary papillary renal carcinoma syndrome, hereditary leiomyomatosis and RCC syndrome, tuberous sclerosis complex, and Lynch syndrome. PMID:27108134

  17. Renal injury in sport.

    PubMed

    Holmes, F Clarke; Hunt, Jeremy J; Sevier, Thomas L

    2003-04-01

    Hematuria is the most common presenting sign of renal injury. Its presence in athletes may indicate a benign entity such as exercise-induced hematuria or a more serious injury in the presence of trauma. Exercise-induced hematuria can originate in the kidney, bladder, urethra, or prostate. The type of activity, as well as activity duration and intensity, contributes to its development. A wide differential diagnosis must be considered if hematuria persists longer than 24 to 72 hours. Trauma to the kidney can occur from a direct blow or deceleration; contact and collision sports are most commonly involved. Fortunately, most sports-related renal trauma is mild, and can be managed expectantly. A sporting injury rarely results in nephrectomy. Determining return to play for the athlete with a single kidney remains a controversial issue that requires patient education and an individualized approach. PMID:12831667

  18. Renal stones in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, Norma; DasGupta, Ranan

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosis and treatment of renal stones during pregnancy is a complex problem. Risks to the fetus from ionising radiation and interventional procedures need to be balanced with optimising clinical care for the mother. Management of such patients requires a clear understanding of available options, with a multidisciplinary team approach. In this review, we discuss the role of different diagnostic tests including ultrasound, magnetic resonance urography, and computerized tomography. We also provide an update on recent developments in the treatment of renal stones during pregnancy. Expectant management remains first-line treatment. Where definitive treatment of the stone is required, new evidence suggests that ureteroscopic stone removal may be equally safe, and possibly better than traditional temporising procedures.

  19. Renal Medullary Interstitial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Reena; Hao, Chuan-Ming; Breyer, Matthew D.

    2007-04-01

    Renal medullary interstitial cells (RMICs) are specialized fibroblast-like cells that reside in the renal medulla among the vasa recta, the thin limbs of Henle's loop, and medullary collecting ducts. These cells are characterized by abundant lipid droplets in the cytoplasm. The lipid droplets are composed of triglycerides, cholesterol esters and free long-chain fatty acids, including arachidonic acid. RMICs are also a major site of cyclooxygenase2 (COX-2) expression, and thus a major site of COX-2 derived prostanoid biosynthesis. RMICs are also a potential target of hormones such as angiotensin II and endothelin. The RMIC COX-2 expression and the abundance of lipid droplets change with salt and water intake. These properties of RMICs are consistent with an important role of these cells in modulating physiologic and pathologic processes of the kidney.

  20. Renal Clearance of Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hak Soo; Liu, Wenhao; Misra, Preeti; Tanaka, Eiichi; Zimmer, John P.; Ipe, Binil Itty; Bawendi, Moungi G.; Frangioni, John V.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY The field of nanotechnology holds great promise for the diagnosis and treatment of human disease. However, the size and charge of most nanoparticles preclude their efficient clearance from the body as intact nanoparticles. Without such clearance or their biodegradation into biologically benign components, toxicity is potentially amplified and radiological imaging is hindered. Using quantum dots (QDs) as a model system, we have precisely defined the requirements for renal filtration and urinary excretion of inorganic, metal-containing nanoparticles. Zwitterionic or neutral organic coatings prevented adsorption of serum proteins, which otherwise increased hydrodynamic diameter (HD) by over 15 nm and prevented renal excretion. A final HD smaller than 5.5 nm resulted in rapid and efficient urinary excretion, and elimination of QDs from the body. This study provides a foundation for the design and development of biologically targeted nanoparticles for biomedical applications. PMID:17891134

  1. Central kappa opioid receptor-evoked changes in renal function in conscious rats: participation of renal nerves.

    PubMed

    Kapusta, D R; Obih, J C

    1993-10-01

    The present investigations examined the cardiovascular and renal responses produced by central nervous system stimulation of kappa opioid receptors by the selective kappa opioid receptor agonist, U-50488H, in conscious Sprague-Dawley rats. Administration of U-50488H (1 microgram total) into the lateral cerebroventricle produced a profound diuretic and antinatriuretic response. In addition, concurrent with the decrease in urinary sodium excretion, i.c.v. U-50488H elicited an increase in renal sympathetic nerve activity. The increases in urine flow rate and renal sympathetic nerve activity and the decrease in urinary sodium excretion produced by U-50488H were completely prevented in rats that had undergone pretreatment with the selective kappa opioid receptor antagonist, nor-binaltorphimine. In contrast, in animals that had undergone irreversible mu opioid receptor blockade with the selective mu opioid receptor antagonist, beta-funaltrexamine, central U-50488H administration elicited similar diuretic and antinatriuretic responses as observed in intact naive animals. In further studies, the antinatriuretic response produced by i.c.v. U-50488H was completely abolished in rats that had undergone chronic bilateral renal denervation, a technique used to remove the influence of the renal sympathetic nerves. Glomerular filtration rates and effective renal plasma flows were not altered by i.c.v. administration of U-50488H in intact or renal denervated animals. Together, these studies provide evidence for the role of central kappa opioid receptor mechanisms in the regulation of urinary sodium and water excretion. Moreover, these studies indicate that the changes in renal sodium handling produced by central kappa opioid agonists result from an action of these compounds to modulate sympathetic neural outflow to the kidneys. PMID:8229746

  2. Renal Replacement Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Zaccaria; Romagnoli, Stefano; Ronco, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    During the last few years, due to medical and surgical evolution, patients with increasingly severe diseases causing multiorgan dysfunction are frequently admitted to intensive care units. Therapeutic options, when organ failure occurs, are frequently nonspecific and mostly directed towards supporting vital function. In these scenarios, the kidneys are almost always involved and, therefore, renal replacement therapies have become a common routine practice in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury. Recent technological improvement has led to the production of safe, versatile and efficient dialysis machines. In addition, emerging evidence may allow better individualization of treatment with tailored prescription depending on the patients' clinical picture (e.g. sepsis, fluid overload, pediatric). The aim of the present review is to give a general overview of current practice in renal replacement therapies for critically ill patients. The main clinical aspects, including dose prescription, modality of dialysis delivery, anticoagulation strategies and timing will be addressed. In addition, some technical issues on physical principles governing blood purification, filters characteristics, and vascular access, will be covered. Finally, a section on current standard nomenclature of renal replacement therapy is devoted to clarify the "Tower of Babel" of critical care nephrology. PMID:26918174

  3. Renal Replacement Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ricci, Zaccaria; Romagnoli, Stefano; Ronco, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    During the last few years, due to medical and surgical evolution, patients with increasingly severe diseases causing multiorgan dysfunction are frequently admitted to intensive care units. Therapeutic options, when organ failure occurs, are frequently nonspecific and mostly directed towards supporting vital function. In these scenarios, the kidneys are almost always involved and, therefore, renal replacement therapies have become a common routine practice in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury. Recent technological improvement has led to the production of safe, versatile and efficient dialysis machines. In addition, emerging evidence may allow better individualization of treatment with tailored prescription depending on the patients’ clinical picture (e.g. sepsis, fluid overload, pediatric). The aim of the present review is to give a general overview of current practice in renal replacement therapies for critically ill patients. The main clinical aspects, including dose prescription, modality of dialysis delivery, anticoagulation strategies and timing will be addressed. In addition, some technical issues on physical principles governing blood purification, filters characteristics, and vascular access, will be covered. Finally, a section on current standard nomenclature of renal replacement therapy is devoted to clarify the “Tower of Babel” of critical care nephrology. PMID:26918174

  4. Renal tubular secretion of glutathione (GSH)

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, R.D.; Curthoys, N.P.

    1986-05-01

    The rapid turnover of renal GSH may require its secretion into the tubular lumen. Renal clearance of plasma GSH was measured in rats anesthetized with Inactin and infused with (/sup 3/H)inulin. Renal ..gamma..-glutamyltranspeptidase (..gamma..GT) was then inactivated (> 97%) by infusion of acivicin and samples were collected for 6-7 h. By 4.5 h arterial and urinary GSH increased from 5..mu..M and 1.3 n mol/h to 23 ..mu..M and 2400-7000 nmol/h, respectively. The ratio of urinary GSH to filtered load increased from < 0.01 to 0.7-2.6. When renal GSH was decreased to 30% of normal by pretreating rats with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), the subsequent inactivation of ..gamma..GT caused only a slight increase in arterial GSH and urinary GSH increased to only 400-600 nmol/h (60-70% of filtered load). The amount of GSH filtered by the kidney was reduced by initially treating a rat with acivicin and 3 h later infusing purified ..gamma..GT (0.2 mg/h) to degrade plasma GSH. Just before infusion of ..gamma..GT, arterial GSH was 23 ..mu..M and urinary GSH was equal to 90% of the filtered load. At 1 h after infusion of ..gamma..GT, arterial GSH decreased to 0.3 ..mu..M, whereas urinary GSH remained elevated (1200-1800 nmol/h) and now equalled 10-20 times the filtered load. When similar experiments were carried out in BSO treated rats, maximal urinary GSH was reduced to 200 nmol/h, a value that was still 10 times the filtered load. Therefore, secreted GSH constitutes a significant portion of the GSH that is normally catabolized within the tubular lumen.

  5. Renal Function Assessment During Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy.

    PubMed

    Erbas, Belkis; Tuncel, Murat

    2016-09-01

    measurement of Tc-99m-MAG3 clearance, particularly in patients with preexisting risk factors for long-term nephrotoxicity. Proximal tubular reabsorption and interstitial retention of tracers result in excessive renal irradiation. Coinfusion of positively charged amino acids, such as l-lysine and l-arginine, is recommended to decrease the renal retention of the tracers by inhibiting the proximal tubular reabsorption. Furthermore, nephrotoxicity may be reduced by dose fractionation. Patient-specific dosimetric studies showed that renal biological effective dose of <0Gy was safe for patients without any risk factors. A renal threshold value <28Gy was recommended for patients with risk factors. Despite kidney protection, renal function impairment can occur after PRRT, especially in patients with risk factors and high single or cumulative renal absorbed dose. Therefore, patient-specific dosimetry may be helpful in minimizing the renal absorbed dose while maximizing the tumor dose. In addition, close and accurate renal function monitoring using more precise methods, rather than plasma creatinine levels, is essential to diagnose the early renal functional changes and to follow-up the renal function during the treatment. PMID:27553471

  6. Renal Stone Risk During Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitson, Peggy A.; Pietrzyk, Robert A.; Sams, Clarence F.; Pak, Charles Y. C.; Jones, Jeffrey A.

    1999-01-01

    Space flight produces a number of metabolic and physiological changes in the crewmembers exposed to microgravity. Following launch, body fluid volumes, electrolyte levels, and bone and muscle undergo changes as the human body adapts to the weightless environment. Changes in the urinary chemical composition may lead to the potentially serious consequences of renal stone formation. Previous data collected immediately after space flight indicate changes in the urine chemistry favoring an increased risk of calcium oxalate and uric acid stone formation (n = 323). During short term Shuttle space flights, the changes observed include increased urinary calcium and decreased urine volume, pH and citrate resulting in a greater risk for calcium oxalate and brushite stone formation (n = 6). Results from long duration Shuttle/Mir missions (n = 9) followed a similar trend and demonstrated decreased fluid intake and urine volume and increased urinary calcium resulting in a urinary environment saturated with the calcium stone-forming salts. The increased risk occurs rapidly upon exposure to microgravity, continues throughout the space flight and following landing. Dietary factors, especially fluid intake, or pharmacologic intervention can significantly influence the urinary chemical composition. Increasing fluid intake to produce a daily urine output of 2 liters/day may allow the excess salts in the urine to remain in solution, crystals formation will not occur and a renal stone will not develop. Results from long duration crewmembers (n = 2) who had urine volumes greater than 2.5 L/day minimized their risk of renal stone formation. Also, comparisons of stone-forming risk in short duration crewmembers clearly identified greater risk in those who produced less than 2 liters of urine/day. However, hydration and increased urine output does not correct the underlying calcium excretion due to bone loss and only treats the symptoms and not the cause of the increased urinary salts

  7. Drug-induced renal disorders.

    PubMed

    Ghane Shahrbaf, Fatemeh; Assadi, Farahnak

    2015-01-01

    Drug-induced nephrotoxicity are more common among infants and young children and in certain clinical situations such as underlying renal dysfunction and cardiovascular disease. Drugs can cause acute renal injury, intrarenal obstruction, interstitial nephritis, nephrotic syndrome, and acid-base and fluid electrolytes disorders. Certain drugs can cause alteration in intraglomerular hemodynamics, inflammatory changes in renal tubular cells, leading to acute kidney injury (AKI), tubulointerstitial disease and renal scarring. Drug-induced nephrotoxicity tends to occur more frequently in patients with intravascular volume depletion, diabetes, congestive heart failure, chronic kidney disease, and sepsis. Therefore, early detection of drugs adverse effects is important to prevent progression to end-stage renal disease. Preventive measures requires knowledge of mechanisms of drug-induced nephrotoxicity, understanding patients and drug-related risk factors coupled with therapeutic intervention by correcting risk factors, assessing baseline renal function before initiation of therapy, adjusting the drug dosage and avoiding use of nephrotoxic drug combinations. PMID:26468475

  8. Multiple oncocytomas and renal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Velasquez, G.; Glass, T.A.; D'Souza, V.J.; Formanek, A.G.

    1984-01-01

    Renal oncocytoma, although rare, is being diagnosed more frequently, and criteria to differentiate it from other tumors have been described. Multiple oncocytomas have been reported, but an association between multiple oncocytomas and renal carcinoma in the same kidney has not been described. The authors report a case with two oncocytomas and a renal carcinoma in the right kidney as well as a right adrenal adenoma.

  9. Renal Denervation Findings on Cardiac and Renal Fibrosis in Rats with Isoproterenol Induced Cardiomyopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qian; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Kai; Wang, Shengchan; Lu, Dasheng; Li, Zhenzhen; Geng, Jie; Fang, Ping; Wang, Ying; Shan, Qijun

    2015-12-01

    Cardio-renal fibrosis plays key roles in heart failure and chronic kidney disease. We sought to determine the effects of renal denervation (RDN) on cardiac and renal fibrosis in rats with isoproterenol induced cardiomyopathy. Sixty male Sprague Dawley rats were randomly assigned to Control (n = 10) and isoproterenol (ISO)-induced cardiomyopathy group (n = 50). At week 5, 31 survival ISO-induced cardiomyopathy rats were randomized to RDN (n = 15) and Sham group (n = 16). Compared with Control group, ejection fraction was decreased, diastolic interventricular septal thickness and left atrial dimension were increased in ISO-induced cardiomyopathy group at 5 week. After 10 weeks, cardio-renal pathophysiologic results demonstrated that the collagen volume fraction of left atrio-ventricular and kidney tissues reduced significantly in RDN group compared with Sham group. Moreover the pro-fibrosis factors (TGF-β1, MMP2 and Collagen I), inflammatory cytokines (CRP and TNF-α), and collagen synthesis biomarkers (PICP, PINP and PIIINP) concentration significantly decreased in RDN group. Compared with Sham group, RDN group showed that release of noradrenaline and aldosterone were reduced, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)/angiotensin II (Ang II)/angiotensin II type-1 receptor (AT1R) axis was downregulated. Meanwhile, angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2)/angiotensin-1-7 (Ang-(1-7))/mas receptor (Mas-R) axis was upregulated. RDN inhibits cardio-renal fibrogenesis through multiple pathways, including reducing SNS over-activity, rebalancing RAAS axis.

  10. Renal Denervation Findings on Cardiac and Renal Fibrosis in Rats with Isoproterenol Induced Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qian; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Kai; Wang, Shengchan; Lu, Dasheng; Li, Zhenzhen; Geng, Jie; Fang, Ping; Wang, Ying; Shan, Qijun

    2015-01-01

    Cardio-renal fibrosis plays key roles in heart failure and chronic kidney disease. We sought to determine the effects of renal denervation (RDN) on cardiac and renal fibrosis in rats with isoproterenol induced cardiomyopathy. Sixty male Sprague Dawley rats were randomly assigned to Control (n = 10) and isoproterenol (ISO)-induced cardiomyopathy group (n = 50). At week 5, 31 survival ISO-induced cardiomyopathy rats were randomized to RDN (n = 15) and Sham group (n = 16). Compared with Control group, ejection fraction was decreased, diastolic interventricular septal thickness and left atrial dimension were increased in ISO-induced cardiomyopathy group at 5 week. After 10 weeks, cardio-renal pathophysiologic results demonstrated that the collagen volume fraction of left atrio-ventricular and kidney tissues reduced significantly in RDN group compared with Sham group. Moreover the pro-fibrosis factors (TGF-β1, MMP2 and Collagen I), inflammatory cytokines (CRP and TNF-α), and collagen synthesis biomarkers (PICP, PINP and PIIINP) concentration significantly decreased in RDN group. Compared with Sham group, RDN group showed that release of noradrenaline and aldosterone were reduced, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)/angiotensin II (Ang II)/angiotensin II type-1 receptor (AT1R) axis was downregulated. Meanwhile, angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2)/angiotensin-1-7 (Ang-(1-7))/mas receptor (Mas-R) axis was upregulated. RDN inhibits cardio-renal fibrogenesis through multiple pathways, including reducing SNS over-activity, rebalancing RAAS axis. PMID:26689945

  11. High sodium intake increases blood pressure and alters renal function in intrauterine growth-retarded rats.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Marijke W; Fazzi, Gregorio E; Janssen, Ger M J; Blanco, Carlos E; De Mey, Jo G R

    2005-07-01

    A suboptimal fetal environment increases the risk to develop cardiovascular disease in the adult. We reported previously that intrauterine stress in response to reduced uteroplacental blood flow in the pregnant rat limits fetal growth and compromises renal development, leading to an altered renal function in the adult offspring. Here we tested the hypothesis that high dietary sodium intake in rats with impaired renal development attributable to intrauterine stress, results in increased blood pressure, altered renal function, and organ damage. In rats, intrauterine stress was induced by bilateral ligation of the uterine arteries at day 17 of pregnancy. At the age of 12 weeks, the offspring was given high-sodium drinking water (2% sodium chloride). At the age of 16 weeks, rats were instrumented for monitoring of blood pressure and renal function. After intrauterine stress, litter size and birth weight were reduced, whereas hematocrit at birth was increased. Renal blood flow, glomerular filtration rate, and the glomerular filtration fraction were increased significantly after intrauterine stress. High sodium intake did not change renal function and blood pressure in control animals. However, during high sodium intake in intrauterine stress offspring, renal blood flow, glomerular filtration rate, and the filtration fraction were decreased, and blood pressure was increased. In addition, these animals developed severe albuminuria, an important sign of renal dysfunction. Thus, a suboptimal fetal microenvironment, which impairs renal development, results in sodium-dependent hypertension and albuminuria. PMID:15956110

  12. Effects of dopamine in the renal vascular bed of fetal, newborn, and adult sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, K.T.; Felder, R.A.; Jose, P.A.; Robillard, J.E.

    1987-03-01

    The renal hemodynamic response to renal arterial dopamine infusions was compared in unanesthetized fetal, newborn, and adult sheep. Mean arterial blood pressure and heart rate remained unchanged during intrarenal dopamine infusions. Dopamine produced dose-related decreases in mean renal blood flow velocity in all three groups. When compared with adult sheep fetal sheep were slightly more sensitive to the vasoconstrictive effects of dopamine ED/sub 50/. Increases in mean renal blood flow velocity were not seen at any dose given until dopamine was infused during ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-adrenoceptor blockade. The largest mean increase in renal flow velocity was 13 +/- 3, 16 +/- 3, and 17 +/- 4% in fetal, newborn, and adult sheep, respectively. cis-Flupentixol inhibited the vasodilation. Renal blood flow was measured using the radioactive microspheres techniques. This study demonstrates the presence of renal vasodilation following renal arterial dopamine infusions in fetal, newborn, and adult sheep when renal ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-adrenoceptors are blocked. Vasodilator responses are similar in all three groups, and increases in renal blood flow velocity are small compared with that of other experimental models.

  13. High Incidence of Methotrexate Associated Renal Toxicity in Patients with Lymphoma: A Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    May, Jori; Carson, Kenneth R.; Butler, Sara; Liu, Weijian; Bartlett, Nancy L.; Wagner-Johnston, Nina D.

    2014-01-01

    High dose methotrexate (HDMTX), defined by doses of methotrexate (MTX) ≥ 1g/m2, is a widely used regimen known to cause renal toxicity. The reported incidence of renal toxicity in osteosarcoma patients is 1.8%, but the incidence in hematologic malignancies is not well characterized. In this retrospective study of 649 cycles of HDMTX in 194 patients, renal toxicity occurred in 9.1% of cycles in patients with lymphoma compared to 1.5% in patients with sarcoma. Older age, male sex, decreased baseline CrCl, and increased proton pump inhibitor use among the lymphoma population likely contributed to the observed difference. The incidence of renal toxicity was independent of the incidence of delayed MTX elimination, suggesting that kidney function is only one factor involved in MTX clearance. Renal toxicity prolonged the duration of hospitalization but severe renal insufficiency was uncommon. No significant impact on progression free or overall survival was observed. PMID:24004183

  14. Changes in Renal Function and Blood Pressure in Patients with Stone Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worcester, Elaine M.

    2007-04-01

    Stone disease is a rare cause of renal failure, but a history of kidney stones is associated with an increased risk for chronic kidney disease, particularly in overweight patients. Loss of renal function seems especially notable for patients with stones associated with cystinuria, hyperoxaluria, and renal tubular acidosis, in whom the renal pathology shows deposits of mineral obstructing inner medullary collecting ducts, often diffusely. However, even idiopathic calcium oxalate stone formers have a mild but significant decrease in renal function, compared to age, sex and weight-matched normals, and appear to lose renal function with age at a slightly faster rate than non-stone formers. There is also an increased incidence of hypertension among stone formers, although women are more likely to be affected than men.

  15. Resveratrol ameliorates renal injury in spontaneously hypertensive rats by inhibiting renal micro-inflammation.

    PubMed

    Xue, Hai-Yan; Yuan, Li; Cao, Ying-Jie; Fan, Ya-Ping; Chen, Xiao-Lan; Huang, Xin-Zhong

    2016-07-01

    Micro-inflammation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR). In the present study, we investigated the therapeutic potential of resveratrol (RSV), a polyphenol with anti-fibrosis activity in hypertensive renal damage model. In SHR renal damage model, RSV treatment blunted the increase in urine albumin excretion, urinary β2-microglobulin (β2-MG), attenuated the decrease in creatinine clearance rate (CCR). The glomerular sclerosis index (1.54±0.33 compared with 0.36±0.07) and tubulointerstitial fibrosis (1.57±0.31 compared with 0.19±0.04) were significantly higher in SHRs compared with Wistar Kyoto rats (WKYs), which were significantly lower by RSV treatment. The increases in mesangium accumulation and the expression of renal collagen type I (Col I), fibronectin (Fn), plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) in SHR were also reduced by RSV treatment. Nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) expression was increased in the cytoplasm and nuclei of the SHR kidneys, which was significantly decreased by RSV treatment. Furthermore, the protein level of IκB-α significantly decreased in the kidneys of the SHR when compared with the WKYs. RSV treatment partially restored the decreased IκB-α level. In SHR kidney, increased expression of interleukin-6 (IL-6), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) were observed. These changes were attenuated by RSV treatment. No changes in blood pressure were detected between SHR group and SHR + RSV group. Taken together, the present study demonstrated that RSV treatment may significantly attenuate renal damage in the SHR model of chronic kidney disease (CKD). The renal protective effect is associated with inhibition of IL-6, ICAM-1 and MCP-1 expression via the regulation of the nuclear translocation of NF-κB, which suggesting that micro-inflammation may be a potential therapeutic target of hypertensive

  16. 7 T renal MRI: challenges and promises.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Anneloes; Hoogduin, Johannes M; Blankestijn, Peter J; Li, Xiufeng; Luijten, Peter R; Metzger, Gregory J; Raaijmakers, Alexander J E; Umutlu, Lale; Visser, Fredy; Leiner, Tim

    2016-06-01

    The progression to 7 Tesla (7 T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) yields promises of substantial increase in signal-to-noise (SNR) ratio. This increase can be traded off to increase image spatial resolution or to decrease acquisition time. However, renal 7 T MRI remains challenging due to inhomogeneity of the radiofrequency field and due to specific absorption rate (SAR) constraints. A number of studies has been published in the field of renal 7 T imaging. While the focus initially was on anatomic imaging and renal MR angiography, later studies have explored renal functional imaging. Although anatomic imaging remains somewhat limited by inhomogeneous excitation and SAR constraints, functional imaging results are promising. The increased SNR at 7 T has been particularly advantageous for blood oxygen level-dependent and arterial spin labelling MRI, as well as sodium MR imaging, thanks to changes in field-strength-dependent magnetic properties. Here, we provide an overview of the currently available literature on renal 7 T MRI. In addition, we provide a brief overview of challenges and opportunities in renal 7 T MR imaging. PMID:27008461

  17. LMWH in cancer patients with renal impairment - better than warfarin?

    PubMed

    Bauersachs, Rupert M

    2016-04-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is one of the leading causes of death in cancer patients, which are known to have a 5- to 7-fold increased risk for VTE. The anticoagulant treatment of VTE in cancer patients is less effective with a three-fold increased risk of VTE recurrence compared to non-cancer patients, and it is less safe with more than double rates of major bleeding. Compared to vitamin-K antagonists (VKA), long-term secondary prevention with low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) has been shown to reduce the risk of recurrent VTE in cancer-associated thrombosis (CAT), and therefore, current international guidelines recommend the use of LMWH over VKA. With increasing age, cancer prevalence and VTE incidence increase while renal function decreases. Anti-cancer treatment may impair renal function additionally. Therefore, renal insufficiency is a frequent challenge in CAT patients, which is associated with a higher risk of both bleeding and recurrent VTE. Both VKA and LMWH may be associated with less efficacy and higher bleeding risk in renal insufficiency. Unfortunately, there is a lack of prospective data on renal insufficiency and CAT. A recent sub-analysis from a large randomized controlled trial shows that the bleeding risk in patients with severe renal insufficiency in CAT is not elevated with the use of LMWH compared to VKA while efficacy is maintained. In addition, LMWH treatment has several practical advantages over VKA, particularly in patients with CAT while they are receiving anti-cancer treatment. PMID:27067971

  18. Adrenal medullary regulation of rat renal cortical adrenergic receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Sundaresan, P.R.; Guarnaccia, M.M.; Izzo, J.L. Jr. )

    1987-11-01

    The role of the adrenal medulla in the regulation of renal cortical adrenergic receptors was investigated in renal cortical particular fractions from control rats and rats 6 wk after adrenal demedullation. The specific binding of ({sup 3}H)prazosin, ({sup 3}H)rauwolscine, and ({sup 125}I)iodocyanopindolol were used to quantitate {alpha}{sub 1}-, {alpha}{sub 2}-, and {beta}-adrenergic receptors, respectively. Adrenal demedullation increased the concentration of all three groups of renal adrenergic receptors; maximal number of binding sites (B{sub max}, per milligram membrane protein) for {alpha}{sub 1}-, and {alpha}{sub 2}-, and {beta}-adrenergic receptors were increased by 22, 18.5, and 25%, respectively. No differences were found in the equilibrium dissociation constants (K{sub D}) for any of the radioligands. Plasma corticosterone and plasma and renal norepinephrine levels were unchanged, whereas plasma epinephrine was decreased 72% by adrenal demedullation, renal cortical epinephrine was not detectable in control or demedullated animals. The results suggest that, in the physiological state, the adrenal medulla modulates the number of renal cortical adrenergic receptors, presumably through the actions of a circulating factor such as epinephrine.

  19. Renal vascular perfusion index in a canine model.

    PubMed

    Shau, Yio-Wha; Pao, Sun-Hua; Chou, Nai-Kuan; Chang, King-Jen; Shyu, Jeou-Jong

    2009-01-01

    Decreased renal perfusion plays an important role in the progression toward renal failure. In this study, a novel measure was proposed to quantify renal perfusion using canine model. Serial renal vascular images at different vascular areas including the whole vascular tree, interlobar, arcuate and interlobular vessels were captured. Image processing software was designed to analyze the changes of power Doppler intensity of colored pixels within regions-of-interest (ROI). For a given ROI, the power Doppler vascular index (PDVI) was found to fluctuate with the cardiac cycle. It was also noted that the power Doppler signals generated by arterial vessels have different fluctuating waveforms and different phase compared with the signal derived from venous vessels. A power Doppler correlation-map was developed to differentiate the arteries and veins in the ROI. Using the serial power Doppler images and the derived flow direction information, the interlobular perfusion can be strongly quantified. The renal vascular perfusion index (RVPI) defined as the ratio of PDVI(max) versus PDVI(min) was significantly higher in the interlobular vessel areas than three other areas for seven healthy dogs. The RVPI resembles the systolic/diastolic (S/D) ratio that commonly reflects arterial hemodynamics. RVPI and power Doppler correlation-map reveal more "dynamic" sense of vascular perfusion and provide a novel approach for the examination of renal function in clinical practice. PMID:18805627

  20. Spiral blood flow in aorta-renal bifurcation models.

    PubMed

    Javadzadegan, Ashkan; Simmons, Anne; Barber, Tracie

    2016-07-01

    The presence of a spiral arterial blood flow pattern in humans has been widely accepted. It is believed that this spiral component of the blood flow alters arterial haemodynamics in both positive and negative ways. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of spiral flow on haemodynamic changes in aorta-renal bifurcations. In this regard, a computational fluid dynamics analysis of pulsatile blood flow was performed in two idealised models of aorta-renal bifurcations with and without flow diverter. The results show that the spirality effect causes a substantial variation in blood velocity distribution, while causing only slight changes in fluid shear stress patterns. The dominant observed effect of spiral flow is on turbulent kinetic energy and flow recirculation zones. As spiral flow intensity increases, the rate of turbulent kinetic energy production decreases, reducing the region of potential damage to red blood cells and endothelial cells. Furthermore, the recirculation zones which form on the cranial sides of the aorta and renal artery shrink in size in the presence of spirality effect; this may lower the rate of atherosclerosis development and progression in the aorta-renal bifurcation. These results indicate that the spiral nature of blood flow has atheroprotective effects in renal arteries and should be taken into consideration in analyses of the aorta and renal arteries. PMID:26414530

  1. Mechanisms of renal hyporesponsiveness to BNP in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Egom, Emmanuel E; Feridooni, Tiam; Hotchkiss, Adam; Kruzliak, Peter; Pasumarthi, Kishore B S

    2015-06-01

    The B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), a member of the family of vasoactive peptides, is a potent natriuretic, diuretic, and vasodilatory peptide that contributes to blood pressure and volume homeostasis. These attributes make BNP an ideal drug that could aid in diuresing a fluid-overloaded patient who had poor or worsening renal function. Despite the potential benefits of BNP, accumulating evidence suggests that simply increasing the amount of circulating BNP does not necessarily increase natriuresis in patients with heart failure (HF). Moreover, despite high BNP levels, natriuresis falls when HF progresses from a compensated to a decompensated state, suggesting the emergence of renal resistance to BNP. Although likely multifactorial, several mechanisms have been proposed to explain renal hyporesponsiveness in HF, including, but not limited to, decreased renal BNP availability, down-regulation of natriuretic peptide receptors, and altered BNP intracellular signal transduction pathways. Thus, a better understanding of renal hyporesponsiveness in HF is required to devise strategies to develop novel agents and technologies that directly restore renal BNP efficiency. It is hoped that development of these new therapeutic approaches will serve to limit sodium retention in patients with HF, which may ultimately delay the progression to overt HF. PMID:25881664

  2. The renal scan in pregnant renal transplant patients

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, H.A.; Ziessman, H.A.; Fahey, F.H.; Collea, J.V.; Alijani, M.R.; Helfrich, G.B.

    1985-05-01

    With the greater frequency of renal transplant surgery, more female pts are becoming pregnant and carrying to term. In the renal allograft blood vessels and ureter may be compressed resulting in impaired renal function and/or, hypertension. Toxemia of pregnancy is seen more frequently than normal. Radionuclide renal scan monitoring may be of significant value in this high risk obstetrical pt. After being maintained during the pregnancy, renal function may also deteriorate in the post partum period. 5 pregnant renal transplant pts who delivered live babies had renal studies with Tc-99m DTPA to assess allograft perfusion and function. No transplanted kidney was lost during or after pregnancy as a result of pregnancy. No congenital anomalies were associated with transplant management. 7 studies were performed on these 5 pts. The 7 scans all showed the uterus/placenta. The bladder was always distorted. The transplanted kidney was rotated to a more vertical position in 3 pts. The radiation dose to the fetus is calculated at 0.024 rad/mCi administered. This study demonstrates the anatomic and physiologic alterations expected in the transplanted kidney during pregnancy when evaluated by renal scan and that the radiation burden may be acceptable in management of these pts.

  3. Differential Expression of Specific Dermatan Sulfate Domains in Renal Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Lensen, Joost F. M.; van der Vlag, Johan; Versteeg, Elly M. M.; Wetzels, Jack F. M.; van den Heuvel, Lambert P. W. J.; Berden, Jo H. M.; van Kuppevelt, Toin H.; Rops, Angelique L. W. M. M.

    2015-01-01

    Dermatan sulfate (DS), also known as chondroitin sulfate (CS)-B, is a member of the linear polysaccharides called glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). The expression of CS/DS and DS proteoglycans is increased in several fibrotic renal diseases, including interstitial fibrosis, diabetic nephropathy, mesangial sclerosis and nephrosclerosis. Little, however, is known about structural alterations in DS in renal diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the renal expression of two different DS domains in renal transplant rejection and glomerular pathologies. DS expression was evaluated in normal renal tissue and in kidney biopsies obtained from patients with acute interstitial or vascular renal allograft rejection, patients with interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy (IF/TA), and from patients with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), membranous glomerulopathy (MGP) or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), using our unique specific anti-DS antibodies LKN1 and GD3A12. Expression of the 4/2,4-di-O-sulfated DS domain recognized by antibody LKN1 was decreased in the interstitium of transplant kidneys with IF/TA, which was accompanied by an increased expression of type I collagen, decorin and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β), while its expression was increased in the interstitium in FSGS, MGP and SLE. Importantly, all patients showed glomerular LKN1 staining in contrast to the controls. Expression of the IdoA-Gal-NAc4SDS domain recognized by GD3A12 was similar in controls and patients. Our data suggest a role for the DS domain recognized by antibody LKN1 in renal diseases with early fibrosis. Further research is required to delineate the exact role of different DS domains in renal fibrosis. PMID:26322947

  4. Early diagnosis of renal disease and renal failure.

    PubMed

    Lees, George E

    2004-07-01

    The main goal of early diagnosis of renal disease and renal failure in dogs and cats is to enable timely application of therapeutic interventions that may slow or halt disease progression. Strategies for early diagnosis of renal disease use urine tests that detect proteinuria that is a manifestation of altered glomerular permselectivity or impaired urine-concentrating ability as well blood tests to evaluate plasma creatinine concentration. Animals with progressive renal disease should be carefully investigated and treated appropriately. Animals with mild, possibly nonprogressive, renal disease should be monitored adequately to detect any worsening trends,which should lead to further investigation and treatment even if the increments of change are small. PMID:15223206

  5. Renal osteodystrophy, phosphate homeostasis, and vascular calcification.

    PubMed

    Hruska, Keith A; Saab, Georges; Mathew, Suresh; Lund, Richard

    2007-01-01

    New advances in the pathogenesis of renal osteodystrophy (ROD) change the perspective from which many of its features and treatment are viewed. Calcium, phosphate, parathyroid hormone (PTH), and vitamin D have been shown to be important determinants of survival associated with kidney diseases. Now ROD dependent and independent of these factors is linked to survival more than just skeletal frailty. This review focuses on recent discoveries that renal injury impairs skeletal anabolism decreasing the osteoblast compartment of the skeleton and consequent bone formation. This discovery and the discovery that PTH regulates the hematopoietic stem cell niche alters our view of secondary hyperparathyroidism in chronic kidney disease (CKD) from that of a disease to that of a necessary adaptation to renal injury that goes awry. Furthermore, ROD is shown to be an underappreciated factor in the level of the serum phosphorus in CKD. The discovery and the elucidation of the mechanism of hyperphosphatemia as a cardiovascular risk in CKD change the view of ROD. It is now recognized as more than a skeletal disorder, it is an important component of the mortality of CKD that can be treated. PMID:17635820

  6. Rosuvastatin-induced arrest in progression of renal disease.

    PubMed

    Vidt, Donald G; Cressman, Michael D; Harris, Susan; Pears, John S; Hutchinson, Howard G

    2004-01-01

    Preclinical and limited clinical data suggest that statins decrease the progressive decline in renal function that occurs in patients with renal disease. Pooled analysis of data obtained from a population of hyperlipidemic patients enrolled in the rosuvastatin (Crestor) clinical development program permitted assessment of its effects on renal function both early and later in the course of treatment. Study participants were initially included in controlled clinical trials that evaluated the lipid-lowering efficacy and safety of rosuvastatin when compared with placebo or other lipid-lowering agents (i.e., atorvastatin, simvastatin, pravastatin, cholestyramine, fenofibrate or extended-release niacin). The median duration of treatment with the various doses of statins in these trials was approximately 8 weeks. Following completion of a controlled clinical trial, patients were permitted to enter an open-label extension trial and received rosuvastatin treatment. These data permitted assessment of renal function in a diverse group of over 10,000 patients who received rosuvastatin in its recommended dose range (5-40 mg) for up to 3.8 years. Mean serum creatinine concentrations were lower when compared with baseline both early and later in the course of rosuvastatin treatment. In contrast, no change in mean serum creatinine was observed with placebo. Mean glomerular filtration rates (GFR) predicted from the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) equation were higher when compared with baseline both early and later in the course of rosuvastatin treatment. No change in GFR was observed in the placebo group. Among patients who received long-term rosuvastatin treatment (> or =96 weeks), GFR was unchanged or tended to increase, rather than decrease, when compared with baseline irrespective of age, gender, hypertensive or diabetic status, level of renal function (GFR > or =60 vs. <60 ml/min/1.73 m(2)) at entry or urine dipstick protein status prior to or during the period

  7. The Prognostic Importance of Changes in Renal Function during Treatment for Acute Heart Failure Depends on Admission Renal Function

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Ryan; Ezekowitz, Justin A.; Brown, Paul M.; McAlister, Finlay A.; Rowe, Brian H.; Braam, Branko

    2015-01-01

    Background Worsening and improving renal function during acute heart failure have been associated with adverse outcomes but few studies have considered the admission level of renal function upon which these changes are superimposed. Objectives The objective of this study was to evaluate definitions that incorporate both admission renal function and change in renal function. Methods 696 patients with acute heart failure with calculable eGFR were classified by admission renal function (Reduced [R, eGFR<45 ml/min] or Preserved [P, eGFR≥45 ml/min]) and change over hospital admission (worsening [WRF]: eGFR ≥20% decline; stable [SRF]; and improving [IRF]: eGFR ≥20% increase). The primary outcome was all-cause mortality. The prevalence of Pres and Red renal function was 47.8% and 52.2%. The frequency of R-WRF, R-SRF, and R-IRF was 11.4%, 28.7%, and 12.1%, respectively; the incidence of P-WRF, P-SRF, and P-IRF was 5.7%, 35.3%, and 6.8%, respectively. Survival was shorter for patients with R-WRF compared to R-IRF (median survival times 13.9 months (95%CI 7.7–24.9) and 32.5 months (95%CI 18.8–56.1), respectively), resulting in an acceleration factor of 2.3 (p = 0.016). Thus, an increase compared with a decrease in renal function was associated with greater than two times longer survival among patients with Reduced renal function. PMID:26380982

  8. Contemporary Renal Cell Cancer Epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Wong-Ho; Devesa, Susan S.

    2010-01-01

    We analyzed renal cell cancer incidence patterns in the United States and reviewed recent epidemiologic evidence with regard to environmental and host genetic determinants of renal cell cancer risk. Renal cell cancer incidence rates continued to rise among all racial/ethnic groups in the United States, across all age groups, and for all tumor sizes, with the most rapid increases for localized stage disease and small tumors. Recent cohort studies confirmed the association of smoking, excess body weight, and hypertension with an elevated risk of renal cell cancer, and suggested that these factors can be modified to reduce the risk. There is increasing evidence for an inverse association between renal cell cancer risk and physical activity and moderate intake of alcohol. Occupational exposure to TCE has been positively associated with renal cell cancer risk in several recent studies, but its link with somatic mutations of the VHL gene has not been confirmed. Studies of genetic polymorphisms in relation to renal cell cancer risk have produced mixed results, but genome-wide association studies with larger sample size and a more comprehensive approach are underway. Few epidemiologic studies have evaluated risk factors by subtypes of renal cell cancer defined by somatic mutations and other tumor markers. PMID:18836333

  9. UNITED STATES RENAL DATA SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The United States Renal Data System (USRDS) is a national data system that collects, analyzes, and distributes information about end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in the United States. The USRDS is funded directly by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseas...

  10. Renal Heme Oxygenase-1 Induction with Hemin Augments Renal Hemodynamics, Renal Autoregulation, and Excretory Function

    PubMed Central

    Botros, Fady T.; Dobrowolski, Leszek; Navar, L. Gabriel

    2012-01-01

    Heme oxygenases (HO-1; HO-2) catalyze conversion of heme to free iron, carbon monoxide, and biliverdin/bilirubin. To determine the effects of renal HO-1 induction on blood pressure and renal function, normal control rats (n = 7) and hemin-treated rats (n = 6) were studied. Renal clearance studies were performed on anesthetized rats to assess renal function; renal blood flow (RBF) was measured using a transonic flow probe placed around the left renal artery. Hemin treatment significantly induced renal HO-1. Mean arterial pressure and heart rate were not different (115 ± 5 mmHg versus 112 ± 4 mmHg and 331 ± 16 versus 346 ± 10 bpm). However, RBF was significantly higher (9.1 ± 0.8 versus 7.0 ± 0.5 mL/min/g, P < 0.05), and renal vascular resistance was significantly lower (13.0 ± 0.9 versus 16.6 ± 1.4 [mmHg/(mL/min/g)], P < 0.05). Likewise, glomerular filtration rate was significantly elevated (1.4 ± 0.2 versus 1.0 ± 0.1 mL/min/g, P < 0.05), and urine flow and sodium excretion were also higher (18.9 ± 3.9 versus 8.2 ± 1.0 μL/min/g, P < 0.05 and 1.9 ± 0.6 versus 0.2 ± 0.1 μmol/min/g, P < 0.05, resp.). The plateau of the autoregulation relationship was elevated, and renal vascular responses to acute angiotensin II infusion were attenuated in hemin-treated rats reflecting the vasodilatory effect of HO-1 induction. We conclude that renal HO-1 induction augments renal function which may contribute to the antihypertensive effects of HO-1 induction observed in hypertension models. PMID:22518281

  11. Renal biopsy: methods and interpretation.

    PubMed

    Vaden, Shelly L

    2004-07-01

    Renal biopsy most often is indicated in the management of dogs and cats with glomerular disease or acute renal failure. Renal biopsy can readily be performed in dogs and cats via either percutaneous or surgical methods. Care should be taken to ensure that proper technique is used. When proper technique is employed and patient factors are properly addressed, renal biopsy is a relatively safe procedure that minimally affects renal function. Patients should be monitored during the post biopsy period for severe hemorrhage, the most common complication. Accurate diagnosis of glomerular disease, and therefore, accurate treatment planning,requires that the biopsy specimens not only be evaluated by light microscopy using special stains but by electron and immunofluorescent microscopy. PMID:15223207

  12. Renal failure after ruptured aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Abbott, W M; Abel, R M; Beck, C H; Fischer, J E

    1975-09-01

    The effectiveness of an intravenous nutritional program plus aggressive dialysis was studied in 32 patients with renal failure following ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm. Each patient was managed postoperatively with a renal failure fluid regimen, consisting of the eight essential amino acids plus dextrose in conjunction with peritoneal dialysis and hemodialysis. This regimen induced salutary metabolic effects temporarily improving the patient's condition in most instances. No technical or septic complications associated with the intravenous dietary therapy occurred. However, the incidence of recovery of renal function was low, and the overall patient survival was only 12.5%. The experience indicates that although this program has been shown to be efficacious in some patients with acute renal failure, it seems of little benefit in those whose renal failure follows ruptured aortic aneurysm. PMID:808197

  13. Renal Denervation: Where to Now?

    PubMed

    Wimmer, Neil J; Mauri, Laura

    2015-12-01

    Resistant hypertension remains a growing problem worldwide. Renal sympathetic denervation was thought to be a new method for the treatment for resistant hypertension. Early studies demonstrated a marked benefit in patients who underwent renal denervation procedures, but the pivotal SYMPLICITY 3-HTN trial, the only sham-controlled randomized trial performed, did not show a benefit for patients treated with the procedure compared to sham. There is still much to learn about the physiology and anatomy of renal sympathetic pathways as well as careful attention to medication adherence in order to understand the role of renal sympathetic denervation in treating hypertensive patients. While renal denervation technology remains available in clinical practice outside of the USA, we expect further development of this technology in the upcoming years and the continued evaluation of this technology in patients with hypertension as well as other disease states to fully understand its role. PMID:26482759

  14. Renal allograft rejection: sonography and scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, A.; Cohen, W.N.

    1980-07-01

    A total of 30 renal allograft patients who had sonographic B scanning and radionuclide studies of the transplant was studied as to whether: (1) the allograft rejection was associated with any consistent and reliable sonographic features and (2) the sonograms complemented the radionuclide studies. Focal areas of decreased parenchymal echogenicity were the most striking and consistent sonographic finding in chymal echogenicity were the most striking and consistens sonographic finding in allograft rejection. This was observed in most of the patients exhibiting moderate or severe rejection, but was frequently absent with mild rejection. Areas of decreased parenchymal echogenicity were not seen during episodes of acute tubular necrosis. Therefore, sonography showing zones of decreased parenchymal echogenicity was complementary to radionuclide studies in the diagnosis of allograft rejection versus acute tubular necrosis. Corticomedullary demarcation was difficult to interpret because of technical variables, and was inconsistently related to rejection in this series.

  15. Cutaneous alternariosis in a renal transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Essabbah, Nawel; Gorsane, Imen; Youssef, Monia; Hadhri, Rym; Aloui, Sabra; Gorcii, Mohamed; Ali, Hichem Bel Hadj; Chemli, Zeineb; Babba, Hammouda; El May, Mezri; Zili, Jameleddine; Zakhama, Abdelfatteh; Skhiri, Habib

    2014-05-01

    Alternariosis is a fungal infection that is usually described in immunocompromised patients. We report a case of cutaneous alternariosis in a renal transplant recipient caused by Alternaria tenuissima. The diagnosis was supported by histopathologic (ie, yeastlike cells, filamentous structures) and mycologic findings from a cutaneous biopsy. Cutaneous lesions regressed 1 month following a decrease in the dosage of immunosuppressive therapy. The patient also was treated with intravenous amphotericin B followed by oral fluconazole without improvement. Cryotherapy remarkably accelerated healing of the lesions. PMID:24897135

  16. Renal transplantation in infants.

    PubMed

    Jalanko, Hannu; Mattila, Ilkka; Holmberg, Christer

    2016-05-01

    Renal transplantation (RTx) has become an accepted mode of therapy in infants with severe renal failure. The major indications are structural abnormalities of the urinary tract, congenital nephrotic syndrome, polycystic diseases, and neonatal kidney injury. Assessment of these infants needs expertise and time as well as active treatment before RTx to ensure optimal growth and development, and to avoid complications that could lead to permanent neurological defects. RTx can be performed already in infants weighing around 5 kg, but most operations occur in infants with a weight of 10 kg or more. Perioperative management focuses on adequate perfusion of the allograft and avoidance of thrombotic and other surgical complications. Important long-term issues include rejections, infections, graft function, growth, bone health, metabolic problems, neurocognitive development, adherence to medication, pubertal maturation, and quality of life. The overall outcome of infant RTx has dramatically improved, with long-term patient and graft survivals of over 90 and 80 %, respectively. PMID:26115617

  17. Interleukin-17A Regulates Renal Sodium Transporters and Renal Injury in Angiotensin II-Induced Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Norlander, Allison E; Saleh, Mohamed A; Kamat, Nikhil V; Ko, Benjamin; Gnecco, Juan; Zhu, Linjue; Dale, Bethany L; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Hoover, Robert S; McDonough, Alicia A; Madhur, Meena S

    2016-07-01

    Angiotensin II-induced hypertension is associated with an increase in T-cell production of interleukin-17A (IL-17A). Recently, we reported that IL-17A(-/-) mice exhibit blunted hypertension, preserved natriuresis in response to a saline challenge, and decreased renal sodium hydrogen exchanger 3 expression after 2 weeks of angiotensin II infusion compared with wild-type mice. In the current study, we performed renal transporter profiling in mice deficient in IL-17A or the related isoform, IL-17F, after 4 weeks of Ang II infusion, the time when the blood pressure reduction in IL-17A(-/-) mice is most prominent. Deficiency of IL-17A abolished the activation of distal tubule transporters, specifically the sodium-chloride cotransporter and the epithelial sodium channel and protected mice from glomerular and tubular injury. In human proximal tubule (HK-2) cells, IL-17A increased sodium hydrogen exchanger 3 expression through a serum and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 1-dependent pathway. In mouse distal convoluted tubule cells, IL-17A increased sodium-chloride cotransporter activity in a serum and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 1/Nedd4-2-dependent pathway. In both cell types, acute treatment with IL-17A induced phosphorylation of serum and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 1 at serine 78, and treatment with a serum and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 1 inhibitor blocked the effects of IL-17A on sodium hydrogen exchanger 3 and sodium-chloride cotransporter. Interestingly, both HK-2 and mouse distal convoluted tubule 15 cells produce endogenous IL-17A. IL17F had little or no effect on blood pressure or renal sodium transporter abundance. These studies provide a mechanistic link by which IL-17A modulates renal sodium transport and suggest that IL-17A inhibition may improve renal function in hypertension and other autoimmune disorders. PMID:27141060

  18. Autoantibodies against oxidized LDL in chronic renal failure: role of renal function, diet, and lipids.

    PubMed

    Bergesio, F; Monzani, G; Ciuti, R; Cirami, C; Martinelli, F; Salvadori, M; Tosi, P L

    2001-02-01

    cardiovascular disease reported in uremia. Dialysis does not correct significantly the oxidative state observed in patients with end-stage renal disease. Vegan diet, by reducing LP, TG, and Lp(a), is supposed to decrease the risk of cardiovascular disease and worth being reconsidered as an alternative effective therapeutic tool in patients with advanced CRF. PMID:11244306

  19. Renal disease and chronic renal failure in dental practice.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, J J; Wilson, M H; McArdle, N S; Stassen, L F A

    2008-01-01

    Patients with renal diseases are increasingly common in dental practice. This is due to advances in medicine, and the increasing life expectancy of western populations. Chronic renal failure is a serious condition that general dental practitioners may see in their practice. This article discusses the functions of the kidney, and the causes and medical management of chronic renal failure, as well as considerations in the dental management of these patients. Common complications such as infection and bleeding are discussed. General recommendations are made, based on current evidence with respect to prescribing of medications. PMID:18986093

  20. Smaller caliber renal arteries are a novel feature of uromodulin-associated kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Prejbisz, Aleksander; Sellin, Lorenz; Szwench-Pietrasz, Elżbieta; Woznowski, Magdalena; Michałowska, Ilona; Blondin, Dirk; Sajnaga, Dariusz; Epplen, Jorg T; Litwin, Mieczysław; Dekomien, Gabriele; Januszewicz, Magdalena; Helmchen, Udo; Matuszkiewicz-Rowińska, Joanna; Adamczak, Marcin; Więcek, Andrzej; Januszewicz, Andrzej; Rump, Lars C

    2015-07-01

    Hyperuricemia is very common in industrialized countries and known to promote vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation. Juvenile hyperuricemia is a hallmark of uromodulin-associated kidney disease characterized by progressive interstitial renal fibrosis leading to end-stage renal disease within decades. Here we describe a member of a Polish-German family with a history of familial background of chronic kidney disease, hyperuricemia, and gout. This patient had hypertension because of bilateral small renal arteries, hyperuricemia, and chronic kidney disease. Clinical and molecular studies were subsequently performed in 39 family members, which included a physical examination, Duplex ultrasound of the kidneys, laboratory tests for renal function, and urine analysis. In eight family members contrast-enhanced renal artery imaging by computed tomography-angiography or magnetic resonance imaging was conducted and showed that bilateral non-arteriosclerotic small caliber renal arteries were associated with hyperuricemia and chronic kidney disease. Of the 26 family members who underwent genotyping, 11 possessed the P236R mutation (c.707C>G) of the uromodulin gene. All family members with a small caliber renal artery carried the uromodulin P236R mutation. Statistical analysis showed a strong correlation between reduced renal artery lumen and decreased estimated glomerular filtration rate. Thus, bilateral small caliber renal arteries are a new clinical phenotype associated with an uromodulin mutation. PMID:25671765

  1. Pharmacokinetics, Safety, and Tolerability of Faldaprevir in Patients with Renal Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Moschetti, Viktoria; Lang, Benjamin; Halabi, Atef; Petersen-Sylla, Marc; Yong, Chan-Loi; Elgadi, Mabrouk

    2014-01-01

    Faldaprevir is a potent hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3/4A protease inhibitor with negligible urinary excretion. We assessed the pharmacokinetics and safety of a single oral dose of faldaprevir (480 mg) in 32 HCV-negative subjects with renal impairment or normal renal function. Compared with subjects with normal renal function, the adjusted geometric mean ratios (90% confidence intervals in parentheses) for overall exposure area under the concentration-time curve from zero to infinity (AUC0–∞) were 113.6% (41.6 to 310.2%), 178.3% (85.2 to 373.0%), and 169.2% (73.2 to 391.2%) for subjects with mild, moderate, and severe renal impairment, respectively. Overall, 5/8 (63%) subjects with normal renal function and 20/24 (83%) subjects with renal impairment reported adverse events, with gastrointestinal events being the most common. No severe or serious adverse events or deaths were reported. These results suggest that moderate or severe renal impairment can result in a modest increase in faldaprevir exposure. The increase in exposure may be related to decrease in the activity of the liver uptake transporter OATP1B1 as a result of renal impairment. Given this relatively slight increase in exposure, a dose adjustment in HCV patients with renal impairment is not warranted. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration number NCT01957657.) PMID:25348520

  2. Low renal oximetry correlates with acute kidney injury after infant cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Owens, Gabe E; King, Karen; Gurney, James G; Charpie, John R

    2011-02-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a frequent complication after cardiopulmonary bypass surgery during infancy. Standard methods for evaluating renal function are not particularly sensitive nor are proximate indicators of renal dysfunction that allow intervention in real time. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a newer noninvasive technology that continuously evaluates regional oximetry and may correlate with renal injury and adverse outcomes after cardiac surgery in infants. This prospective observational study enrolled 40 infants (age, <12 months) undergoing biventricular repair. Continuous renal oximetry data were collected for the first 48 postoperative hours and correlated with postoperative course, standard laboratory data, and the occurrence of acute renal injury. Subjects with low renal oximetry (below 50% for >2 h) had significantly higher postoperative peak creatinine levels by 48 h (0.8 ± 0.4 vs. 0.52 ± 0.2; p = 0.003) and a higher incidence of AKI (50 vs. 3.1%; p = 0.003) than those with normal renal oximetry. These subjects also required more ventilator days and greater vasoactive support, and they had elevated lactate levels. Prolonged low renal near-infrared oximetry appears to correlate with renal dysfunction, decreased systemic oxygen delivery, and the overall postoperative course in infants with congenital heart disease undergoing biventricular repair. PMID:21085945

  3. Renal Resistive Index Predicts Postoperative Blood Pressure Outcome in Primary Aldosteronism.

    PubMed

    Iwakura, Yoshitsugu; Ito, Sadayoshi; Morimoto, Ryo; Kudo, Masataka; Ono, Yoshikiyo; Nezu, Masahiro; Takase, Kei; Seiji, Kazumasa; Ishidoya, Shigeto; Arai, Yoichi; Funamizu, Yasuharu; Miki, Takashi; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Sasano, Hironobu; Satoh, Fumitoshi

    2016-03-01

    The renal resistive index (RI) calculated by Doppler ultrasonography has been reported to be correlated with renal structural changes and outcomes in patients with essential hypertension or renal disease. However, little is known about this index in primary aldosteronism. In this prospective study, we examined the utility of this index to predict blood pressure (BP) outcome after adrenalectomy in patients with primary aldosteronism. We studied 94 patients with histopathologically proven aldosteronoma who underwent surgery. Parameters on renal function, including renal flow indices, were examined and followed up for 12 months postoperatively. The renal RI of the main, hilum, and interlobar arteries was significantly higher in patients with aldosteronoma compared with 100 control patients. BP, estimated glomerular filtration rate, and urinary albumin excretion significantly decreased after adrenalectomy. The resistive indices of all compartment arteries were significantly reduced 1 month after adrenalectomy and remained stable for 12 months. Patients whose interlobar RI was in the highest tertile at baseline had higher systolic BP after adrenalectomy than those whose RI was in the lowest tertile. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that the RI of the interlobar and hilum arteries could be an independent predictive marker for intractable hypertension (systolic BP ≥140 mm Hg, increased BP, taking ≥3 antihypertensive agents, or increased number of agents) even after adrenalectomy. Therefore, in patients with aldosteronoma, the renal RI indicates partially reversible renal hemodynamics and renal structural damages that would influence postoperative BP outcome. PMID:26865201

  4. Ameliorative Effect of Recombinant Human Erythropoietin and Ischemic Preconditioning on Renal Ischemia Reperfusion Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Elshiekh, Mohammed; Kadkhodaee, Mehri; Seifi, Behjat; Ranjbaran, Mina; Ahghari, Parisa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury is one of the most common causes of renal dysfunction. There is increasing evidence about the role of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) in these injuries and endogenous antioxidants seem to have an important role in decreasing the renal tissue injury. Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the effect of recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO) and ischemic preconditioning (IPC) on renal IR injury. Materials and Methods: Twenty four male Wistar rats were allocated into four experimental groups: sham-operated, IR, EPO + IR, and IPC + IR. Rats were underwent 50 minutes bilateral ischemia followed by 24 hours reperfusion. Erythropoietin (5000 IU/kg, i.p) was administered 30 minutes before onset of ischemia. Ischemic preconditioning was performed by three cycles of 3 minutes ischemia followed by 3 minutes reperfusion. Plasma concentrations of urea and creatinine were measured. Kidney samples were taken for reactive oxidative species (ROS) measurement including superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, glutathione (GSH) contents, and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels. Results: Compared to the sham group, IR led to renal dysfunction as evidenced by significantly higher plasma urea and creatinine. Treatment with EPO or IPC decreased urea, creatinine, and renal MDA levels and increased SOD activity and GSH contents in the kidney. Conclusions: Pretreatment with EPO and application of IPC significantly ameliorated the renal injury induced by bilateral renal IR. However, both treatments attenuated renal dysfunction and oxidative stress in kidney tissues. There were no significant differences between pretreatment with EPO or application of IPC. PMID:26866008

  5. TLR9 Mediates Remote Liver Injury following Severe Renal Ischemia Reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Bakker, Pieter J.; Scantlebery, Angelique M.; Butter, Loes M.; Claessen, Nike; Teske, Gwendoline J. D.; van der Poll, Tom; Florquin, Sandrine; Leemans, Jaklien C.

    2015-01-01

    Ischemia reperfusion injury is a common cause of acute kidney injury and is characterized by tubular damage. Mitochondrial DNA is released upon severe tissue injury and can act as a damage-associated molecular pattern via the innate immune receptor TLR9. Here, we investigated the role of TLR9 in the context of moderate or severe renal ischemia reperfusion injury using wild-type C57BL/6 mice or TLR9KO mice. Moderate renal ischemia induced renal dysfunction but did not decrease animal well-being and was not regulated by TLR9. In contrast, severe renal ischemia decreased animal well-being and survival in wild-type mice after respectively one or five days of reperfusion. TLR9 deficiency improved animal well-being and survival. TLR9 deficiency did not reduce renal inflammation or tubular necrosis. Rather, severe renal ischemia induced hepatic injury as seen by increased plasma ALAT and ASAT levels and focal hepatic necrosis which was prevented by TLR9 deficiency and correlated with reduced circulating mitochondrial DNA levels and plasma LDH. We conclude that TLR9 does not mediate renal dysfunction following either moderate or severe renal ischemia. In contrast, our data indicates that TLR9 is an important mediator of hepatic injury secondary to ischemic acute kidney injury. PMID:26361210

  6. Renal Oxidative Stress Induced by Long-Term Hyperuricemia Alters Mitochondrial Function and Maintains Systemic Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Cristóbal-García, Magdalena; García-Arroyo, Fernando E.; Arellano-Buendía, Abraham S.; Madero, Magdalena; Rodríguez-Iturbe, Bernardo; Pedraza-Chaverrí, José; Zazueta, Cecilia; Johnson, Richard J.; Sánchez Lozada, Laura-Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    We addressed if oxidative stress in the renal cortex plays a role in the induction of hypertension and mitochondrial alterations in hyperuricemia. A second objective was to evaluate whether the long-term treatment with the antioxidant Tempol prevents renal oxidative stress, mitochondrial alterations, and systemic hypertension in this model. Long-term (11-12 weeks) and short-term (3 weeks) effects of oxonic acid induced hyperuricemia were studied in rats (OA, 750 mg/kg BW), OA+Allopurinol (AP, 150 mg/L drinking water), OA+Tempol (T, 15 mg/kg BW), or vehicle. Systolic blood pressure, renal blood flow, and vascular resistance were measured. Tubular damage (urine N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase) and oxidative stress markers (lipid and protein oxidation) along with ATP levels were determined in kidney tissue. Oxygen consumption, aconitase activity, and uric acid were evaluated in isolated mitochondria from renal cortex. Short-term hyperuricemia resulted in hypertension without demonstrable renal oxidative stress or mitochondrial dysfunction. Long-term hyperuricemia induced hypertension, renal vasoconstriction, tubular damage, renal cortex oxidative stress, and mitochondrial dysfunction and decreased ATP levels. Treatments with Tempol and allopurinol prevented these alterations. Renal oxidative stress induced by hyperuricemia promoted mitochondrial functional disturbances and decreased ATP content, which represent an additional pathogenic mechanism induced by chronic hyperuricemia. Hyperuricemia-related hypertension occurs before these changes are evident. PMID:25918583

  7. Patterning the Renal Vascular Bed

    PubMed Central

    Herzlinger, Doris; Hurtado, Romulo

    2015-01-01

    The renal vascular bed has a stereotypic architecture that is essential for the kidney’s role in excreting metabolic waste and regulating the volume and composition of body fluids. The kidney’s excretory functions are dependent on the delivery of the majority of renal blood flow to the glomerular capillaries, which filter plasma removing from it metabolic waste, as well as vast quantities of solutes and fluids. The renal tubules reabsorb from the glomerular filtrate solutes and fluids required for homeostasis, while the post-glomerular capillary beds return these essential substances back into the systemic circulation. Thus, the kidney’s regulatory functions are dependent on the close proximity or alignment of the post-glomerular capillary beds with the renal tubules. This review will focus on our current knowledge of the mechanisms controlling the embryonic development of the renal vasculature. An understanding of this process is critical for developing novel therapies to prevent vessel rarefaction and will be essential for engineering renal tissues suitable for restoring kidney function to the ever-increasing population of patients with end stage renal disease. PMID:25128732

  8. Late evaluation of the relationship between morphological and functional renal changes and hypertension after non-operative treatment of high-grade renal injuries

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the anatomical and functional renal alterations and the association with post-traumatic arterial hypertension. Methods The studied population included patients who sustained high grades renal injury (grades III to V) successfully non-operative management after staging by computed tomography over a 16-year period. Beyond the review of medical records, these patients were invited to the following protocol: clinical and laboratory evaluation, abdominal computed tomography, magnetic resonance angiography, DMSA renal scintigraphy, and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. The hypertensive patients also were submitted to dynamic renal scintigraphy (99mTc EC), using captopril stimulation to verify renal vascular etiology. Results Of the 31 patients, there were thirteen grade III, sixteen grade IV (nine lacerations, and seven vascular lesions), and two grade V injuries. All the patients were asymptomatic and an average follow up post-injury of 6.4 years. None had abnormal BUN or seric creatinine. The percentage of renal volume reduction correlates with the severity as defined by OIS. There was no evidence of renal artery stenosis in Magnetic Resonance angiography (MRA). DMSA scanning demonstrated a decline in percentage of total renal function corresponding to injury severity (42.2 ± 5.5% for grade III, 35.3 ± 12.8% for grade IV, 13.5 ± 19.1 for grade V). Six patients (19.4%) had severe compromised function (< 30%). There was statistically significant difference in the decrease in renal function between parenchymal and vascular causes for grade IV injuries (p < 0.001). The 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring detected nine patients (29%) with post-traumatic hypertension. All the patients were male, mean 35.6 years, 77.8 % had a familial history of arterial hypertension, 66.7% had grade III renal injury, and average post-injury time was 7.8 years. Seven patients had negative captopril renography. Conclusions Late

  9. Contemporary management of small renal tumors.

    PubMed

    Fracchia, John A; Glickman, Leonard I; Javit, Dan; Westcott, Mark; Armenakas, Noel A

    2014-06-01

    The incidence of kidney cancer in the United States is rising because the increased use of cross-sectional imaging is resulting in more tumors being detected and because the population is aging. In addition, a stage migration in kidney cancer has been observed—again because of improved detection—with an increase in stage T1 tumors and a concomitant decrease in the number of stage T2 to T4 tumors. Recent studies have shown that up to 80% of small renal tumors (SRTs) either have an indolent course or are histologically benign. These fndings raise the question of what the optimal management of SRTs should be. Radical nephrectomy, the traditional, most aggressive, and still most frequently used extirpative surgery, has been shown to increase the risk of chronic kidney disease. Therefore, during the past 2 decades there has been a shift toward nephron-sparing surgery in carefully selected patients as such procedures have demonstrated equivalent oncologic outcomes with a decrease in long-term renal-induced morbidities. More recently, thermal ablative techniques have evolved as a reliable minimally invasive option for SRTs that can provide adequate oncologic control with minimal morbidity. Finally, in patients with limited life expectancies, active surveillance may be a reasonable approach given the slow median growth rate of SRTs. In evaluating patients with SRTs, percutaneous renal biopsies are being used safely and with increasing accuracy, providing valuable histologic information that can be used to guide the management of SRTs. This article will explore the approaches to managing and treating this growing cohort of patients with SRTs, which are usually incidentally identifed. PMID:24999499

  10. [Cystic renal pathology].

    PubMed

    Rosi, P; Cesaroni, M; Bracarda, S; Rociola, W; Virgili, G

    1993-08-01

    Ultrasonography has a great interest in diagnosis of cystic kidney disorders for typical eco-pattern of this pathology. In this work we show the eco-pattern of the most common cystic kidney disorders. Particularly we examine simple cysts (typical, atypical, complicated), multicystic kidney dysplasia, autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (infantile) autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (adult age). The so-called neoplastic cysts (multiloculated cysts, multiloculated cysts nephroma, cystic nephroblastoma), medullar cysts (medullary sponge kidney, medullary cystic disease), parapyelic cysts, acquired cystic kidney disease in renal failure patients, parasitic cysts, epidermoid cysts. About this disorders we present the more typical and expressive ultrasonographic appearance and we define the role and the opportunity of diagnostic setting by echography, moreover ultrasonography allows us to make a differential diagnosis between cystic kidney disorders and other kidney disease. PMID:8353538

  11. Renal Ablation Update

    PubMed Central

    Khiatani, Vishal; Dixon, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Thermal ablative technologies have evolved considerably in the recent past and are now an important component of current clinical guidelines for the treatment of small renal masses. Both radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation have intermediate-term oncologic control that rivals surgical options, with favorable complication profiles. Studies comparing cryoablation and radiofrequency ablation show no significant difference in oncologic control or complication profile between the two modalities. Early data from small series with microwave ablation have shown similar promising results. Newer technologies including irreversible electroporation and high-intensity–focused ultrasound have theoretical advantages, but will require further research before becoming a routine part of the ablation armamentarium. The purpose of this review article is to discuss the current ablative technologies available, briefly review their mechanisms of action, discuss technical aspects of each, and provide current data supporting their use. PMID:25049445

  12. Hyperparathyroidism of Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Noah K; Ananthakrishnan, Shubha; Campbell, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Renal hyperparathyroidism (rHPT) is a common complication of chronic kidney disease characterized by elevated parathyroid hormone levels secondary to derangements in the homeostasis of calcium, phosphate, and vitamin D. Patients with rHPT experience increased rates of cardiovascular problems and bone disease. The Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes guidelines recommend that screening and management of rHPT be initiated for all patients with chronic kidney disease stage 3 (estimated glomerular filtration rate, < 60 mL/min/1.73 m2). Since the 1990s, improving medical management with vitamin D analogs, phosphate binders, and calcimimetic drugs has expanded the treatment options for patients with rHPT, but some patients still require a parathyroidectomy to mitigate the sequelae of this challenging disease. PMID:27479950

  13. [Cilia and renal cysts].

    PubMed

    Paces-Fessy, Mélanie

    2014-11-01

    Advances in genomics, bioinformatics and the creation of model organisms have identified many genes associated with polycystic kidney diseases. Historically, these genes were not necessarily associated with ciliopathies, but it appeared that many connections can be made between the cystic kidney disease and function of the primary cilium. Indeed, the proteins encoded by these genes are localized to the cilium itself, to the basal body or are known to regulate the expression and localization of ciliary proteins. The goal of this article is to describe the multiple cellular processes that may lead to the development of renal cysts if they are deregulated. These include changes in proliferation rate, cell polarity or signaling pathways involved in embryonic kidney development. To highlight the role of the primary cilium in cystogenesis, I will discuss several studies investigating the function of ciliary genes and cilia in the kidneys of different model organisms. PMID:25388585

  14. Renal ablation update.

    PubMed

    Khiatani, Vishal; Dixon, Robert G

    2014-06-01

    Thermal ablative technologies have evolved considerably in the recent past and are now an important component of current clinical guidelines for the treatment of small renal masses. Both radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation have intermediate-term oncologic control that rivals surgical options, with favorable complication profiles. Studies comparing cryoablation and radiofrequency ablation show no significant difference in oncologic control or complication profile between the two modalities. Early data from small series with microwave ablation have shown similar promising results. Newer technologies including irreversible electroporation and high-intensity-focused ultrasound have theoretical advantages, but will require further research before becoming a routine part of the ablation armamentarium. The purpose of this review article is to discuss the current ablative technologies available, briefly review their mechanisms of action, discuss technical aspects of each, and provide current data supporting their use. PMID:25049445

  15. Effect of chronic accumulation of aluminum on renal function, cortical renal oxidative stress and cortical renal organic anion transport in rats.

    PubMed

    Mahieu, Stella T; Gionotti, Marisa; Millen, Néstor; Elías, María Mónica

    2003-11-01

    The aim of the present work was to study the nephrotoxicity of aluminum lactate administered for 3 months (0.57 mg/100 g bodyweight aluminum, i.p., three times per week) to male Wistar rats. Renal function was studied after 6 weeks of treatment (urine was obtained from rats in metabolic cages) and at the end of the treatment using clearance techniques. Another group of rats was used as kidneys donors at the end of treatment. The renal cortex was separated and homogenized to determine glutathione (GSH) level, glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity and lipid peroxidation (LPO) level. Renal cortex slices were also used to study the p-aminohippuric acid (PAH) accumulation during steady-state conditions and the kinetics of uptake process. Clearance results, at the end of the treatment, indicated that renal functions in treated-rats were not different from those measured in control rats, although the renal concentration parameters differ when they were measured in treated rats after 24 h of food and water deprivation. Balances of water and sodium were also modified at both 1.5 and 3 months of treatment. The activity of alkaline phosphatase (AP) relative to inulin excreted in urine was significantly impaired: controls 2.2+/-0.6 IUI/mg, Al-treated 5.1+/-0.5 IU/mg, P<0.05. These data indicated that proximal tubular cells were loosing apical brush border membranes. Data obtained in cortex homogenates indicated that both GSH and GST activity were significantly decreased, and a significant increase of LPO was noted simultaneously in Al-treated rats. Renal accumulation of PAH, estimated as slice-to-medium ratio, decreased significantly in the Al-treated rats: control rats 3.06+/-0.02 ( n=12), Al-treated rats 2.26+/-0.04 ( n=12), P<0.0001. The maximal rate of uptake was also diminished in treated rats, while the apparent affinity remained unchanged. All these results indicate that aluminum accumulation in renal tissue affects cellular metabolism, promotes oxidative stress and

  16. Renal Effects of Prostaglandins and Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Prostaglandins (PGs) with best-defined renal functions are PGE2 and prostacyclin (PGI2). These vasodilatory PGs increase renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate under conditions associated with decreased actual or effective circulating volume, resulting in greater tubular flow and secretion of potassium. Under conditions of decreased renal perfusion, the production of renal PGs serves as an important compensatory mechanism. PGI2 (and possibly PGE2) increases potassium secretion mainly by stimulating secretion of renin and activating the renin-angiotensin system, which leads to increased secretion of aldosterone. In addition, PGE2 is involved in the regulation of sodium and water reabsorption and acts as a counterregulatory factor under conditions of increased sodium reabsorption. PGE2 decreases sodium reabsorption at the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle probably via inhibition of the Na+-K+-2Cl- cotransporter type 2 (NKCC2). Cyclooxygenase inhibitors may enhance urinary concentrating ability in part through effects to upregulate NKCC2 in the thick ascending limb of Henle's loop and aquaporin-2 in the collecting duct. Thus, they may be useful to treat Bartter's syndrome and nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. PMID:24459520

  17. Renal Cancer in the Elderly.

    PubMed

    González León, Tania; Morera Pérez, Maricela

    2016-01-01

    The increase of the aging population corresponds with the rise of renal cancer in elderly patients. The distinction between functional and chronological age, quality of life, and survival estimate are important issues, among others, that should be considered in the management of renal cancer in elderly patients. We made this review with the purpose of synthesizing the most updated criteria regarding indications and outcomes of the different therapeutic options in the management of elderly patients with renal cancer, beginning from the physiologic considerations that characterize them, their capacity to tolerate different therapeutic possibilities, and the prognosis of the patients' risks and comorbidity assessment. PMID:26715222

  18. Unusual renal tumour: multilocular cystic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Palmeiro, Marta Morna; Niza, João Luz; Loureiro, Ana Luisa; Conceição e Silva, João Paulo

    2016-01-01

    Multilocular cystic renal cell carcinoma (MCRCC) is a rare presentation of renal cell carcinoma. Most patients are asymptomatic and frequently MCRCCs are detected incidentally. MCRCCs have good prognosis because of their low malignant potential. We report a case of a 39-year-old woman who presented with mild right flank pain and normal laboratory data. On imaging examinations, a Bosniak III cystic lesion was detected in the lower third of the right kidney. She underwent right partial nephrectomy and histopathology showed a multilocular cystic renal cell carcinoma Fuhrman grade 1. In this article, we also present a review of the literature on MCRCC, highlight the correlation of the pathological and imaging characteristics of these low aggressive renal lesions, and underscore the importance of their recognition to prevent unnecessary radical surgery. PMID:26957035

  19. Hypohyperparathyroidism: a model for renal osteodystrophy?

    PubMed

    Junor, B J; Edward, N

    1981-06-01

    A child who presented with features of renal osteodystrophy but with normal renal function is described. Improvement occurred both on large doses of vitamin D and small doses of 1, alpha-hydroxy-vitamin D3 (1, alpha-OHD3). Investigations suggested that the primary defect was an impaired renal response to parathyroid hormone. The relationship between renal osteodystrophy, abnormalities of vitamin D metabolism and hypohyperparathyroidism is discussed and an alternative hypothesis for the development of renal bone disease suggested. PMID:7301683

  20. Familial renal glycosuria and modifications of glucose renal excretion.

    PubMed

    Prié, D

    2014-12-01

    Under physiological conditions, the kidneys contribute to glucose homoeostasis by producing glucose by gluconeogenesis and preventing glucose loss in urine. The glucose filtered by the glomeruli is completely reabsorbed in the renal proximal tubule. Renal gluconeogenesis produces 25% of the circulating glucose in the postabsorptive state, while the amount of glucose reabsorbed by the kidneys largely exceeds the quantity synthesized by kidney gluconeogenesis. Sodium-glucose cotransporter type 2 (SGLT-2) and glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2) carry out more than 90% of renal glucose uptake. In diabetes, both gluconeogenesis and renal glucose reabsorption are increased. The augmentation of glucose uptake in diabetes is due to the overexpression of renal glucose transporters SGLT-2 and GLUT2 in response to the increase in expression of transcription activator hepatic nuclear factor 1-alpha (HNF1α). The rise in glucose uptake contributes to hyperglycaemia and induces glomerular hyperfiltration by increasing sodium and water reabsorption in the proximal tubule that, in turn, modifies urine flux at the macula densa. SGLT-2 inhibitors improve glycaemic control and prevent renal hyperfiltration in diabetes. Loss of SGLT-2 transporter function is a benign state characterized by glycosuria. In contrast, mutations of other glucose transporters expressed in the kidney are responsible for severe disorders. PMID:25554066

  1. Placental Insufficiency Associated with Loss of Cited1 Causes Renal Medullary Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Sparrow, Duncan B.; Boyle, Scott C.; Sams, Rebecca S.; Mazuruk, Bogdan; Zhang, Li; Moeckel, Gilbert W.; Dunwoodie, Sally L.; de Caestecker, Mark P.

    2009-01-01

    A number of studies have shown that placental insufficiency affects embryonic patterning of the kidney and leads to a decreased number of functioning nephrons in adulthood; however, there is circumstantial evidence that placental insufficiency may also affect renal medullary growth, which could account for cases of unexplained renal medullary dysplasia and for abnormalities in renal function among infants who had experienced intrauterine growth retardation. We observed that mice with late gestational placental insufficiency associated with genetic loss of Cited1 expression in the placenta had renal medullary dysplasia. This was not caused by lower urinary tract obstruction or by defects in branching of the ureteric bud during early nephrogenesis but was associated with decreased tissue oxygenation and increased apoptosis in the expanding renal medulla. Loss of placental Cited1 was required for Cited1 mutants to develop renal dysplasia, and this was not dependent on alterations in embryonic Cited1 expression. Taken together, these findings suggest that renal medullary dysplasia in Cited1 mutant mice is a direct consequence of decreased tissue oxygenation resulting from placental insufficiency. PMID:19297558

  2. The Effects of Renal Denervation on Renal Hemodynamics and Renal Vasculature in a Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Verloop, Willemien L.; Hubens, Lisette E. G.; Spiering, Wilko; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Goldschmeding, Roel; Bleys, Ronald L. A. W.; Voskuil, Michiel

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Recently, the efficacy of renal denervation (RDN) has been debated. It is discussed whether RDN is able to adequately target the renal nerves. Objective We aimed to investigate how effective RDN was by means of functional hemodynamic measurements and nerve damage on histology. Methods and Results We performed hemodynamic measurements in both renal arteries of healthy pigs using a Doppler flow and pressure wire. Subsequently unilateral denervation was performed, followed by repeated bilateral hemodynamic measurements. Pigs were terminated directly after RDN or were followed for 3 weeks or 3 months after the procedure. After termination, both treated and control arteries were prepared for histology to evaluate vascular damage and nerve damage. Directly after RDN, resting renal blood flow tended to increase by 29±67% (P = 0.01). In contrast, renal resistance reserve increased from 1.74 (1.28) to 1.88 (1.17) (P = 0.02) during follow-up. Vascular histopathology showed that most nerves around the treated arteries were located outside the lesion areas (8±7 out of 55±25 (14%) nerves per pig were observed within a lesion area). Subsequently, a correlation was noted between a more impaired adventitia and a reduction in renal resistance reserve (β: -0.33; P = 0.05) at three weeks of follow-up. Conclusion Only a small minority of renal nerves was targeted after RDN. Furthermore, more severe adventitial damage was related to a reduction in renal resistance in the treated arteries at follow-up. These hemodynamic and histological observations may indicate that RDN did not sufficiently target the renal nerves. Potentially, this may explain the significant spread in the response after RDN. PMID:26587981

  3. Heart rate variability and renal organ damage in hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Melillo, Paolo; Izzo, Raffaele; De Luca, Nicola; Pecchia, Leandro

    2012-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV), a noninvasive measure of autonomic dysfunction and a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD), has not been systematically studied in hypertensive patients in relation with renal involvement. A retrospective analysis on a cohort of hypertensive patients was performed to show differences in groups of patients categorized according to renal involvement, assessed by glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Patient with 24-h ECG Holter monitoring and other clinical information registered in the database of the Hypertension Clinic of the University of Naples Federico II were selected. Linear standard HRV measures were computed according to international guidelines on 24-h nominal ECG. A total of 200 patients were included in the present study. Decreased ratio of low to high frequency power (LF/HF) was associated with patient with moderate GFR, the highest grade of renal involvement considered in this study. These results were consistent with the findings of previous studies which concluded that depressed HRV was associated with higher risk of progression to end-stage renal disease and suggested that autonomic dysfunction may lead to kidney damage. Further research is needed to define the role of autonomic dysfunction in the development of renal disease and of HRV as a diagnostic or prognostic maker in hypertensive patients. PMID:23366762

  4. Effect of Renal Function on Prognosis in Chronic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Löffler, Adrián I.; Cappola, Thomas P.; Fang, James; Hetzel, Scott J.; Kadlec, Andrew; Astor, Brad; Sweitzer, Nancy K.

    2014-01-01

    Renal dysfunction (RD) is associated with increased mortality in heart failure (HF). The aim of this study was to identify whether worsened or improved renal function during mid-term follow-up is associated with worsened outcomes in chronic HF patients. 892 participants from a multicenter cohort study of chronic HF were followed over 3.1±1.9 years of enrollment. Worsened and improved renal function were tested with multivariable models as independent predictors of HF hospitalization and mortality. While 12% of subjects experienced a ≥25% decrease in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), 17% experienced a ≥25% increase in eGFR, and there was stability of kidney function observed in the cohort as a whole. The quartile with the worst RD at any point in time had increased risk of HF hospitalization and mortality. Worsened eGFR was associated with HF outcomes in the unadjusted (HR=1.71 (95%CI 1.04-2.81), p=0.035), but not the adjusted analysis. Improvement in eGFR was not associated with outcome (p=0.453). In chronic HF, the severity of RD predicts risk of poor outcome better than changes in renal function during mid-term follow-up. This suggests that in patients with appropriately treated chronic HF, worsening renal function in itself does not yield useful prognostic information and may not reflect poor outcome. PMID:25465925

  5. Expression of laminin and fibronectin in renal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Menon, Santosh; Kakkar, Nandita; Radotra, B D

    2004-01-01

    The pathogenesis of renal dysplasia is a matter of debate. Recent theories have conceptualized the role of extracellular matrix proteins in the genesis of renal dysplasia. During normal nephrogenesis, collagen type I and III and fibronectins are lost and laminin and syndecan appear once proper induction has occurred. Any deviation from the normal pattern is said to lead to dysplasia. In this study, the expressions of adhesive glycoproteins, laminin, and fibronectin were studied immunohistochemically in 25 autopsy cases of renal dysplasia and normal age-matched control cases. These cases of renal dysplasia were categorized into 3 groups based on the period of gestation: 20 to 26 weeks, 27 to 33 weeks, and 34 to 40 weeks. The immunohistochemical findings were graded from 0 to 4+ based on the visual intensity. Chi-square analysis was used to calculate the difference in expressions of laminin and fibronectin in cases and controls as a whole and within and between age groups. Immunostaining for laminin in all age groups showed a significant difference in expression between dysplastic kidneys (less expression) and normal controls (greater expression). In the case of fibronectin expression, all but 1 group showed a significant difference, with dysplastic kidneys showing more and normal controls showing less expression. The inference derived is that laminin expression decreases and fibronectin expression increases in renal dysplasia compared with normal nephrogenesis. PMID:15630524

  6. Methionine restriction improves renal insulin signalling in aged kidneys.

    PubMed

    Grant, Louise; Lees, Emma K; Forney, Laura A; Mody, Nimesh; Gettys, Thomas; Brown, Paul A J; Wilson, Heather M; Delibegovic, Mirela

    2016-07-01

    Dietary methionine restriction (MR) leads to loss of adiposity, improved insulin sensitivity and lifespan extension. The possibility that dietary MR can protect the kidney from age-associated deterioration has not been addressed. Aged (10-month old) male and female mice were placed on a MR (0.172% methionine) or control diet (0.86% methionine) for 8-weeks and blood glucose, renal insulin signalling, and gene expression were assessed. Methionine restriction lead to decreased blood glucose levels compared to control-fed mice, and enhanced insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of PKB/Akt and S6 in kidneys, indicative of improved glucose homeostasis. Increased expression of lipogenic genes and downregulation of PEPCK were observed, suggesting that kidneys from MR-fed animals are more insulin sensitive. Interestingly, renal gene expression of the mitochondrial uncoupling protein UCP1 was upregulated in MR-fed animals, as were the anti-ageing and renoprotective genes Sirt1, FGF21, klotho, and β-klotho. This was associated with alterations in renal histology trending towards reduced frequency of proximal tubule intersections containing vacuoles in mice that had been on dietary MR for 190days compared to control-fed mice, which exhibited a pre-diabetic status. Our results indicate that dietary MR may offer therapeutic potential in ameliorating the renal functional decline related to ageing and other disorders associated with metabolic dysfunction by enhancing renal insulin sensitivity and renoprotective gene expression. PMID:27453066

  7. P311 promotes renal fibrosis via TGFβ1/Smad signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Zhihui; Yang, Sisi; He, Weifeng; Li, Lian; Xu, Rui; Zhang, Xiaorong; Li, Haisheng; Zhan, Rixing; Sun, Wei; Tan, Jianglin; Zhou, Junyi; Luo, Gaoxing; Wu, Jun

    2015-01-01

    P311, a gene that was identified in 1993, has been found to have diverse biological functions in processes such as cell proliferation, migration and differentiation. However, its role in fibrosis is unknown. We previously observed that P311 is highly expressed in skin hypertrophic scars. In this study, P311 over-expression was detected in a subset of tubular epithelial cells in clinical biopsy specimens of renal fibrosis; this over-expression, was found concurrent with α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and transforming growth factor beta1 (TGFβ1) expression. Subsequently, these results were verified in a mouse experimental renal fibrosis model induced by unilateral ureteral obstruction. The interstitial deposition of collagen, α-SMA and TGF-β1 expression, and macrophage infiltration were dramatically decreased when P311 was knocked out. Moreover, TGFβ/Smad signaling had a critical effect on the promotion of renal fibrosis by P311. In conclusion, this study demonstrate that P311 plays a key role in renal fibrosis via TGFβ1/Smad signaling, which could be a novel target for the management of renal fibrosis. PMID:26616407

  8. Inhibition of renal membrane binding and nephrotoxicity of aminoglycosides

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, P.D.; Hottendorf, G.H.; Bennett, D.B.

    1986-06-01

    The initial event in the renal tubular reabsorption of nephrotoxic aminoglycosides involves binding to brush border membranes. This primary event was measured in renal brush border membrane vesicles prepared from rat renal cortex utilizing (3H)gentamicin. In order to gain structure-activity information regarding this interaction the effect of substances having chemical similarities to aminoglycosides (sugars, polyamines and amino acids) on gentamicin binding to brush border membranes was determined. Polyamino acids were found to possess the greatest inhibitory potency. In addition to polymers of cationic amino acids (lysine, ornithine, arginine and histidine), polymers of neutral (asparagine) and acidic (aspartic and glutamic acid) amino acids also exhibited inhibition of the membrane binding of gentamicin. Inasmuch as inhibition of renal membrane binding has the potential to decrease aminoglycoside nephrotoxicity, several polyamino acids that inhibited membrane binding were tested in vivo for potential protective activity vs. gentamicin- and amikacin-induced nephrotoxicity. Polyasparagine90 and polyaspartic acid100 inhibited gentamicin and amikacin nephrotoxicity completely when coadministered to rats with the aminoglycosides. Polylysine20 provided complete and partial inhibition of gentamicin and amikacin nephrotoxicity, respectively. Whereas in vivo distribution studies revealed that cortical levels of (3H)amikacin were elevated slightly by the coadministration of polyaspartic acid, brush border and basolateral membranes contained significantly lower levels of the aminoglycoside (46 and 41% inhibition, respectively). These results question the role of charge per se in the binding of aminoglycosides to renal membranes and further confirm the importance of membrane binding in the pathogenesis of aminoglycoside nephrotoxicity.

  9. Antioxidant resveratrol restores renal sodium transport regulation in SHR

    PubMed Central

    Javkhedkar, Apurva A; Banday, Anees A

    2015-01-01

    Previously we have shown that in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) renal angiotensin (Ang) II receptor (AT1R) upregulation leads to overstimulation of Na/K-ATPase by Ang II. There are reports that antioxidants can reduce oxidative stress and blood pressure (BP) in SHR, however the effect of these compounds on AT1R function remains to be determined. Therefore, we hypothesized that polyphenol antioxidant resveratrol would mitigate oxidative stress, normalize renal AT1R signaling, and reduce BP in SHR. SHR and wistar-kyoto (WKY) rats were treated with resveratrol for 8 weeks. Untreated SHR exhibited oxidative stress and enhanced renal proximal tubular Ang II-induced G-protein activation and Na/K-ATPase stimulation. Treatment of SHR with resveratrol mitigated oxidative stress, reduced BP, and normalized renal AT1R signaling. In SHR, nuclear expression of transcription factor NF-κB was increased while expression of Nrf2 was reduced. SHR also exhibited a significant decrease in renal antioxidant capacity and activities of phase II antioxidant enzymes. Resveratrol treatment of SHR abolished renal NF-κB activation, restored Nrf2-phase II antioxidant signaling and Ang II-mediated Na/K-ATPase regulation. These data show that in SHR, oxidative stress via activation of NF-κB upregulates AT1R–G-protein signaling resulting in overstimulation Na/K-ATPase which contributes to hypertension. Resveratrol, via Nrf2, activates phase II antioxidant enzymes, mitigates oxidative stress, normalizes AT1R–G-protein signaling and Na/K-ATPase regulation, and decreases BP in SHR. PMID:26603454

  10. Renal Atrophy Secondary to Chemoradiotherapy of Abdominal Malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Gary Y.; May, Kilian Salerno; Iyer, Renuka V.; Chandrasekhar, Rameela M.A.; Wilding, Gregory E.; McCloskey, Susan A.; Khushalani, Nikhil I.; Yendamuri, Saikrishna S.; Gibbs, John F.; Fakih, Marwan; Thomas, Charles R.

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: To identify factors predictive of renal atrophy after chemoradiotherapy of gastrointestinal malignancies. Methods and Materials: Patients who received chemotherapy and abdominal radiotherapy (RT) between 2002 and 2008 were identified for this study evaluating change in kidney size and function after RT. Imaging and biochemical data were obtained before and after RT in 6-month intervals. Kidney size was defined by craniocaudal measurement on CT images. The primarily irradiated kidney (PK) was defined as the kidney that received the greater mean kidney dose. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were generated to predict risk for renal atrophy. Results: Of 130 patients, median age was 64 years, and 51.5% were male. Most primary disease sites were pancreas and periampullary tumors (77.7%). Median follow-up was 9.4 months. Creatinine clearance declined 20.89%, and size of the PK decreased 4.67% 1 year after completion of chemoradiation. Compensatory hypertrophy of the non-PK was not seen. Percentage volumes of the PK receiving {>=}10 Gy (V{sub 10}), 15 Gy (V{sub 15}), and 20 Gy (V{sub 20}) were significantly associated with renal atrophy 1 year after RT (p = 0.0030, 0.0029, and 0.0028, respectively). Areas under the ROC curves for V{sub 10}, V{sub 15}, and V{sub 20} to predict >5% decrease in PK size were 0.760, 0.760, and 0.762, respectively. Conclusions: Significant detriments in PK size and renal function were seen after abdominal RT. The V{sub 10}, V{sub 15}, and V{sub 20} were predictive of risk for PK atrophy 1 year after RT. Analyses suggest the association of lower-dose renal irradiation with subsequent development of renal atrophy.