Science.gov

Sample records for deep core-level photoexcitation

  1. State-selective enhanced production of positive ions and excited neutral fragments of gaseous CH2Cl2 following Cl 2p core-level photoexcitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, K. T.; Chen, J. M.; Lee, J. M.; Haw, S. C.; Chen, S. A.; Liang, Y. C.; Chen, S. W.

    2010-09-01

    Following photoexcitation of Cl2p electrons to various resonances, the dissociation dynamics of ionic and excited neutral fragments of gaseous CH2Cl2 was investigated by combined measurements of photon-induced ionic dissociation, x-ray absorption, and uv-visible dispersed fluorescence. The Cl2p core-to-Rydberg excitations near the ionization threshold produce a notable enhancement of excited neutral fragments (C* and CH*), which is attributed to the contribution from a shake-modified resonant Auger decay and postcollision interaction. The excitation Cl2p→10a1* induces an enhanced yield of CH2+, possibly originating from fast dissociation via a strongly repulsive surface. The experimental results provide insight into the dissociation dynamics of ionic and excited neutral fragment production following core-level excitation.

  2. Deep localized distortion of alternating bonds and reduced transport of charged carriers in conjugated polymers under photoexcitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cong; Jiang, De-Yao; Chen, Ren-Ai; Li, Sheng; George, Thomas F.

    2014-12-01

    In a real bulk heterojunction polymer solar cell, after exciton separation in the heterojunction, the resulting negatively-charged carrier, a polaron, moves along the polymer chain of the acceptor, which is believed to be of significance for the charged carrier transport properties in a polymer solar cell. During the negative polaron transport, due to the external light field, the polaron, which is re-excited and induces deep localization, also forms a new local distortion of the alternating bonds. It is revealed that the excited polaron moves more slowly than the ground-state polaron. Furthermore, the velocity of the polaron moving along the polymer chain is crucially dependent on the photoexcitation. With an increase in the intensity of the optical field, the localization of the excited polaron will be deepened, with a decrease of the polaron's velocity. It is discovered that, for a charged carrier, photoexcitation is a significant factor in reducing the efficiency during the charged carrier transport in polymer solar cells. Mostly, the deep trapping effect of charged carrier in composite conjugated polymer solar cell presents an opportunity for the future application in nanoscale memory and imaging devices.

  3. Surface Carrier Dynamics on Semiconductor Studied with Femtosecond Core-Level Photoelectron Spectroscopy Using Extreme Ultraviolet High-Order Harmonic Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oguri, K.; Tsunoi, T.; Kato, K.; Nakano, H.; Nishikawa, T.; Gotoh, H.; Tateno, K.; Sogawa, T.

    2013-03-01

    We have used a femtosecond time-resolved core-level surface PES system based on the 92-eV harmonic source to study the surface carrier dynamics that induces the transient SPV on semiconductor surfaces. We clarified the temporal evolution of the transient SPV characterized by the time of the photo-generated carrier separation and recombination. This result demonstrates the potential of this technique for clarifying the initial stage of the surface carrier dynamics after photoexcitation.

  4. Physics of the Be(0001) surface core-level spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Feibelman, P.J.; Stumpf, R. )

    1994-12-15

    First-principles calculations for slabs as many as 13 layers thick show that the three surface core-level features observed on Be(0001) correspond to core-electron ionizations in its three outermost atomic layers. The calculations also imply that the experimental peak identified with core ionization in the bulk is a composite; theoretical core-ionization potentials for the fourth and deeper layers differ by as much as 90 meV. The sign and surprisingly large magnitudes of the Be(0001) surface core-level shifts (SCLS's) are attributed to unusually large surface-state contributions to the three outer layers' local densities of states. Both initial- and final-state effects are substantial in the SCLS's, and their contributions are additive.

  5. Core level binding energies of functionalized and defective graphene.

    PubMed

    Susi, Toma; Kaukonen, Markus; Havu, Paula; Ljungberg, Mathias P; Ayala, Paola; Kauppinen, Esko I

    2014-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is a widely used tool for studying the chemical composition of materials and it is a standard technique in surface science and technology. XPS is particularly useful for characterizing nanostructures such as carbon nanomaterials due to their reduced dimensionality. In order to assign the measured binding energies to specific bonding environments, reference energy values need to be known. Experimental measurements of the core level signals of the elements present in novel materials such as graphene have often been compared to values measured for molecules, or calculated for finite clusters. Here we have calculated core level binding energies for variously functionalized or defected graphene by delta Kohn-Sham total energy differences in the real-space grid-based projector-augmented wave density functional theory code (GPAW). To accurately model extended systems, we applied periodic boundary conditions in large unit cells to avoid computational artifacts. In select cases, we compared the results to all-electron calculations using an ab initio molecular simulations (FHI-aims) code. We calculated the carbon and oxygen 1s core level binding energies for oxygen and hydrogen functionalities such as graphane-like hydrogenation, and epoxide, hydroxide and carboxylic functional groups. In all cases, we considered binding energy contributions arising from carbon atoms up to the third nearest neighbor from the functional group, and plotted C 1s line shapes by using experimentally realistic broadenings. Furthermore, we simulated the simplest atomic defects, namely single and double vacancies and the Stone-Thrower-Wales defect. Finally, we studied modifications of a reactive single vacancy with O and H functionalities, and compared the calculated values to data found in the literature. PMID:24605278

  6. Core level binding energies of functionalized and defective graphene

    PubMed Central

    Kaukonen, Markus; Havu, Paula; Ljungberg, Mathias P; Ayala, Paola; Kauppinen, Esko I

    2014-01-01

    Summary X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is a widely used tool for studying the chemical composition of materials and it is a standard technique in surface science and technology. XPS is particularly useful for characterizing nanostructures such as carbon nanomaterials due to their reduced dimensionality. In order to assign the measured binding energies to specific bonding environments, reference energy values need to be known. Experimental measurements of the core level signals of the elements present in novel materials such as graphene have often been compared to values measured for molecules, or calculated for finite clusters. Here we have calculated core level binding energies for variously functionalized or defected graphene by delta Kohn–Sham total energy differences in the real-space grid-based projector-augmented wave density functional theory code (GPAW). To accurately model extended systems, we applied periodic boundary conditions in large unit cells to avoid computational artifacts. In select cases, we compared the results to all-electron calculations using an ab initio molecular simulations (FHI-aims) code. We calculated the carbon and oxygen 1s core level binding energies for oxygen and hydrogen functionalities such as graphane-like hydrogenation, and epoxide, hydroxide and carboxylic functional groups. In all cases, we considered binding energy contributions arising from carbon atoms up to the third nearest neighbor from the functional group, and plotted C 1s line shapes by using experimentally realistic broadenings. Furthermore, we simulated the simplest atomic defects, namely single and double vacancies and the Stone–Thrower–Wales defect. Finally, we studied modifications of a reactive single vacancy with O and H functionalities, and compared the calculated values to data found in the literature. PMID:24605278

  7. Core-level binding-energy shifts for the metallic elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Börje; Mårtensson, Nils

    1980-05-01

    chromium relative to the dns2 configuration in vanadium and manganese. When the core-level shift is referred to, the dns2 (or dn+1s) atomic configuration for all the elements in a transition series, a quite regular behavior of the shift is found. However, some structure can still be observed originating from a change of screening within the d band from a bonding to an antibonding type as one proceeds through the series. For elements beyond the coin metals the screening of a core hole is performed by p electrons, which provide a less effective screening mechanism than the d electrons for the transition metals. The coin metals are intermediate cases, partly due to a dominating s-electron screening and partly due to d-electron bonding in the initial state. The effect of the electron-density redistribution between the free atom and the solid on the core-level shift is particularly striking in the case of the rare-earth elements Pr-Sm and Tb-Tm. Here the remarkable situation is that a deep core electron is less bound in the atom than in the solid. Also for the actinides the electronic redistribution upon condensation gives rise to pronounced effects on the core-level shifts. Further, it is shown that the measured 6p32 binding energy in metallic uranium provides a clear demonstration of the occupation of the 5f level in this metal. The present treatment of the core-level shift for bulk metallic atoms can easily be generalized to surface atoms. From an empirical relation for the surface energy a simple expression for the shift of the surface core-level relative to the bulk can be derived. For the earlier transition metals, it is found that the core electrons are more bound at the surface than in the bulk, while for the heavier ones the opposite situation exists. This change of sign of the surface shift depends on the bonding-antibonding division of the d band. To illustrate how the present approach can be applied to alloy systems, a treatment of core-level shifts for rare

  8. Lattice charge models and core level shifts in disordered alloys.

    PubMed

    Underwood, T L; Cole, R J

    2013-10-30

    Differences in core level binding energies between atoms belonging to the same chemical species can be related to differences in their intra- and extra-atomic charge distributions, and differences in how their core holes are screened. With this in mind, we consider the charge-excess functional model (CEFM) for net atomic charges in alloys (Bruno et al 2003 Phys. Rev. Lett. 91 166401). We begin by deriving the CEFM energy function in order to elucidate the approximations which underpin this model. We thereafter consider the particular case of the CEFM in which the strengths of the 'local interactions' within all atoms are the same. We show that for binary alloys the ground state charges of this model can be expressed in terms of charge transfer between all pairs of unlike atoms analogously to the linear charge model (Magri et al 1990 Phys. Rev. B 42 11388). Hence, the model considered is a generalization of the linear charge model for alloys containing more than two chemical species. We then determine the model's unknown 'geometric factors' over a wide range of parameter space. These quantities are linked to the nature of charge screening in the model, and we illustrate that the screening becomes increasingly universal as the strength of the local interactions is increased. We then use the model to derive analytical expressions for various physical quantities, including the Madelung energy and the disorder broadening in the core level binding energies. These expressions are applied to ternary random alloys, for which it is shown that the Madelung energy and magnitude of disorder broadening are maximized at the composition at which the two species with the largest 'electronegativity difference' are equal, while the remaining species have a vanishing concentration. This result is somewhat counterintuitive with regards to the disorder broadening since it does not correspond to the composition with the highest entropy. Finally, the model is applied to CuPd and Cu

  9. Lattice charge models and core level shifts in disordered alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underwood, T. L.; Cole, R. J.

    2013-10-01

    Differences in core level binding energies between atoms belonging to the same chemical species can be related to differences in their intra- and extra-atomic charge distributions, and differences in how their core holes are screened. With this in mind, we consider the charge-excess functional model (CEFM) for net atomic charges in alloys (Bruno et al 2003 Phys. Rev. Lett. 91 166401). We begin by deriving the CEFM energy function in order to elucidate the approximations which underpin this model. We thereafter consider the particular case of the CEFM in which the strengths of the ‘local interactions’ within all atoms are the same. We show that for binary alloys the ground state charges of this model can be expressed in terms of charge transfer between all pairs of unlike atoms analogously to the linear charge model (Magri et al 1990 Phys. Rev. B 42 11388). Hence, the model considered is a generalization of the linear charge model for alloys containing more than two chemical species. We then determine the model’s unknown ‘geometric factors’ over a wide range of parameter space. These quantities are linked to the nature of charge screening in the model, and we illustrate that the screening becomes increasingly universal as the strength of the local interactions is increased. We then use the model to derive analytical expressions for various physical quantities, including the Madelung energy and the disorder broadening in the core level binding energies. These expressions are applied to ternary random alloys, for which it is shown that the Madelung energy and magnitude of disorder broadening are maximized at the composition at which the two species with the largest ‘electronegativity difference’ are equal, while the remaining species have a vanishing concentration. This result is somewhat counterintuitive with regards to the disorder broadening since it does not correspond to the composition with the highest entropy. Finally, the model is applied to Cu

  10. Photoexcitation dynamics of coupled semiconducting carbon nanotube thin films.

    PubMed

    Mehlenbacher, Randy D; Wu, Meng-Yin; Grechko, Maksim; Laaser, Jennifer E; Arnold, Michael S; Zanni, Martin T

    2013-04-10

    Carbon nanotubes are a promising means of capturing photons for use in solar cell devices. We time-resolved the photoexcitation dynamics of coupled, bandgap-selected, semiconducting carbon nanotubes in thin films tailored for photovoltaics. Using transient absorption spectroscopy and anisotropy measurements, we found that the photoexcitation evolves by two mechanisms with a fast and long-range component followed by a slow and short-range component. Within 300 fs of optical excitation, 20% of nanotubes transfer their photoexcitation over 5-10 nm into nearby nanotube fibers. After 3 ps, 70% of the photoexcitation resides on the smallest bandgap nanotubes. After this ultrafast process, the photoexcitation continues to transfer on a ~10 ps time scale but to predominantly aligned tubes. Ultimately the photoexcitation hops twice on average between fibers. These results are important for understanding the flow of energy and charge in coupled nanotube materials and light-harvesting devices. PMID:23464618

  11. Alkaline Earth Core Level Photoemission Spectroscopy of High-Temperature Superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, R.

    1993-01-01

    This paper examines photoemission measurements of the alkaline Earth core levels of high-temperature superconductors and related materials, models that seek to explain the large negative shifts observed relative to the corresponding alkaline Earth metals, and the effect of lattice site disorder on the core level spectra and the presence or absence of intrinsic surface peaks.

  12. Core-level spectroscopy of the Ni/W(110) interface: Correlation of W interfacial core-level shifts with first-layer Ni phases

    SciTech Connect

    Riffe,D.; Franckowiak, R.; Shinn, N.; Kim, B.; Kim, K.; Kang, T.

    2008-01-01

    We have measured W 4f7/2 core-level photoemission spectra from W(1 1 0) in the presence of Ni overlayers, from {approx}0.2 to {approx}3 monolayers. Interfacial core-level shifts associated with first-layer Ni phases have been identified: -230 {+-} 15 meV for the 1 x 1 pseudomorphic phase and -70 {+-} 7 meV for the 7 x 1 close-packed commensurate phase. At higher Ni coverages the interfacial core-level shift is -100 {+-} 10 meV. These shifts are analyzed using the partial-shift model of Nilsson et al.; the analysis indicates that the difference in binding energies between the 1 x 1 and 7 x 1 phases has a large contribution from structural differences between the two phases.

  13. A first-principles core-level XPS study on the boron impurities in germanium crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Yamauchi, Jun; Yoshimoto, Yoshihide; Suwa, Yuji

    2013-12-04

    We systematically investigated the x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) core-level shifts and formation energies of boron defects in germanium crystals and compared the results to those in silicon crystals. Both for XPS core-level shifts and formation energies, relationship between defects in Si and Ge is roughly linear. From the similarity in the formation energy, it is expected that the exotic clusters like icosahedral B12 exist in Ge as well as in Si.

  14. A first-principles core-level XPS study on the boron impurities in germanium crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, Jun; Yoshimoto, Yoshihide; Suwa, Yuji

    2013-12-01

    We systematically investigated the x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) core-level shifts and formation energies of boron defects in germanium crystals and compared the results to those in silicon crystals. Both for XPS core-level shifts and formation energies, relationship between defects in Si and Ge is roughly linear. From the similarity in the formation energy, it is expected that the exotic clusters like icosahedral B12 exist in Ge as well as in Si.

  15. Dynamics of photoexcited carrier relaxation and recombination in CdTe/CdS thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Levi, D.H.; Fluegel, B.D.; Ahrenkiel, R.K.

    1996-05-01

    Efficiency-limiting defects in photovoltaic devices are readily probed by time-resolved spectroscopy. This paper presents the first direct optical measurements of the relaxation and recombination pathways of photoexcited carriers in the CdS window layer of CdTe/CdS polycrystalline thin films. Femtosecond time-resolved pump/probe measurements indicate the possible existence of a two-phase CdS/CdSTe layer, rather than a continuously graded alloy layer at the CdTe/CdS interface. Complementary time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) measurements show that the photoexcited carriers are rapidly captured by deep-level defects. The temporal and density-dependent properties of the photoluminescence prove that the large Stokes shift of the PL relative to the band edge is due to strong phonon coupling to deep-level defects in CdS. The authors suggest that modifications in the CdS processing may enhance carrier collection efficiency in the blue spectral region.

  16. An easy-to-implement filter for separating photo-excited signals from topography in scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Kangkang; Rosenmann, Daniel; Holt, Martin; Winarski, Robert; Hla, Saw-Wai; Rose, Volker

    2013-06-15

    In order to achieve elemental and chemical sensitivity in scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), synchrotron x-rays have been applied to excite core-level electrons during tunneling. The x-ray photo-excitations result in tip currents that are superimposed onto conventional tunneling currents. While carrying important physical information, the varying x-ray induced currents can destabilize the feedback loop causing it to be unable to maintain a constant tunneling current, sometimes even causing the tip to retract fully or crash. In this paper, we report on an easy-to-implement filter circuit that can separate the x-ray induced currents from conventional tunneling currents, thereby allowing simultaneous measurements of topography and chemical contrasts. The filter and the schematic presented here can also be applied to other variants of light-assisted STM such as laser STM.

  17. Primary Conformation Change in Bacteriorhodopsin on Photoexcitation

    PubMed Central

    Yabushita, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Takayoshi

    2009-01-01

    Ultrafast dynamics of bacteriorhodopsin (bR) has been extensively studied experimentally and theoretically. However, there are several contradictory results reported, indicating that its detailed dynamics and initial process have not yet been fully clarified. In this work, changes in the amplitude and phase of molecular vibration in the isomerization process of bR were real-time probed simultaneously at 128 different wavelengths through intensity modulation of the electronic transition. Systematic information on the transient change in continuous spectrum extending from 505 nm (2.45 eV) to 675 nm (1.84 eV) showed different dynamics in each spectral region reflecting the difference in the excited states and intermediates dominating the dynamics during the photoisomerization. Careful analysis of the transient spectral changes and spectrograms calculated from the vibrational real-time traces elucidated that the primary event just after photoexcitation is the deformation of the retinal configuration, which decays within 30 fs near the C=N bond in the protonated Schiff base. The intensity of C=N stretching mode starts to decrease before the initiation of the frequency modulation of the C=C stretching mode. The C=C stretching mode frequency was modulated by a coupled torsion around the C13=C14 bond, leading to the photoisomerization around the bond. This study clarified the dynamics of the C=N and C=C stretching modes working as key vibration modes in the photoisomerization of bR. Furthermore, we have elucidated the modulation and decay dynamics of the C=C stretching mode in the photoreaction starting from H (Franck-Condon excited state) followed by I (twisted excited), and J (first intermediate) states. PMID:19217861

  18. Extrinsic photoresponse enhancement under additional intrinsic photoexcitation in organic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kounavis, P.

    2016-06-01

    Dual light beam photoresponse experiments are employed to explore the photoresponse under simultaneous extrinsic and intrinsic photoexcitation of organic semiconductors. The photoresponse of a red modulated light extrinsic photoexcitation is found that can be significantly enhanced under an additional blue bias-light intrinsic photoexcitation in two terminal pentacene films on glass substrates. From the frequency resolved photoresponse, it is deduced that the phenomenon of photoresponse enhancement can be attributed to an increase in the extrinsic photogeneration rate of the red modulated light and/or an improvement of the drift velocity of carriers under an additional blue light intrinsic photoexcitation. The possible predominant extrinsic photogeneration mechanism, which can be compatible with the observed dependence of the photoresponse enhancement on the frequency and on the light intensities of the red and blue light excitation, is the singlet exciton dissociation through electron transfer to acceptor-like traps. Moreover, an improvement in the drift velocity of carriers traversing grain boundaries with potential energy barriers, which may be reduced by trapping of minority carriers created from the intrinsic photoexcitation, may partly contribute to the photoresponse enhancement.

  19. Femtomagnetism in graphene induced by core level excitation of organic adsorbates.

    PubMed

    Ravikumar, Abhilash; Baby, Anu; Lin, He; Brivio, Gian Paolo; Fratesi, Guido

    2016-01-01

    We predict the induction or suppression of magnetism in the valence shell of physisorbed and chemisorbed organic molecules on graphene occurring on the femtosecond time scale as a result of core level excitations. For physisorbed molecules, where the interaction with graphene is dominated by van der Waals forces and the system is non-magnetic in the ground state, numerical simulations based on density functional theory show that the valence electrons relax towards a spin polarized configuration upon excitation of a core-level electron. The magnetism depends on efficient electron transfer from graphene on the femtosecond time scale. On the other hand, when graphene is covalently functionalized, the system is magnetic in the ground state showing two spin dependent mid gap states localized around the adsorption site. At variance with the physisorbed case upon core-level excitation, the LUMO of the molecule and the mid gap states of graphene hybridize and the relaxed valence shell is not magnetic anymore. PMID:27089847

  20. High resolution core level spectroscopy of hydrogen-terminated (1 0 0) diamond.

    PubMed

    Schenk, A K; Rietwyk, K J; Tadich, A; Stacey, A; Ley, L; Pakes, C I

    2016-08-01

    Synchrotron-based photoelectron spectroscopy experiments are presented that address a long standing inconsistency in the treatment of the C1s core level of hydrogen terminated (1 0 0) diamond. Through a comparison of surface and bulk sensitive measurements we show that there is a surface related core level component to lower binding energy of the bulk diamond component; this component has a chemical shift of [Formula: see text] eV which has been attributed to carbon atoms which are part of the hydrogen termination. Additionally, our results indicate that the asymmetry of the hydrogen terminated (1 0 0) diamond C1s core level is an intrinsic aspect of the bulk diamond peak which we have attributed to sub-surface carbon layers. PMID:27299369

  1. Femtomagnetism in graphene induced by core level excitation of organic adsorbates

    PubMed Central

    Ravikumar, Abhilash; Baby, Anu; Lin, He; Brivio, Gian Paolo; Fratesi, Guido

    2016-01-01

    We predict the induction or suppression of magnetism in the valence shell of physisorbed and chemisorbed organic molecules on graphene occurring on the femtosecond time scale as a result of core level excitations. For physisorbed molecules, where the interaction with graphene is dominated by van der Waals forces and the system is non-magnetic in the ground state, numerical simulations based on density functional theory show that the valence electrons relax towards a spin polarized configuration upon excitation of a core-level electron. The magnetism depends on efficient electron transfer from graphene on the femtosecond time scale. On the other hand, when graphene is covalently functionalized, the system is magnetic in the ground state showing two spin dependent mid gap states localized around the adsorption site. At variance with the physisorbed case upon core-level excitation, the LUMO of the molecule and the mid gap states of graphene hybridize and the relaxed valence shell is not magnetic anymore. PMID:27089847

  2. High resolution core level spectroscopy of hydrogen-terminated (1 0 0) diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenk, A. K.; Rietwyk, K. J.; Tadich, A.; Stacey, A.; Ley, L.; Pakes, C. I.

    2016-08-01

    Synchrotron-based photoelectron spectroscopy experiments are presented that address a long standing inconsistency in the treatment of the C1s core level of hydrogen terminated (1 0 0) diamond. Through a comparison of surface and bulk sensitive measurements we show that there is a surface related core level component to lower binding energy of the bulk diamond component; this component has a chemical shift of -0.16+/- 0.05 eV which has been attributed to carbon atoms which are part of the hydrogen termination. Additionally, our results indicate that the asymmetry of the hydrogen terminated (1 0 0) diamond C1s core level is an intrinsic aspect of the bulk diamond peak which we have attributed to sub-surface carbon layers.

  3. Spin polarization and magnetic dichroism in core-level photoemission from ferromagnets

    SciTech Connect

    Menchero, J G

    1997-05-01

    In this thesis we present a theoretical investigation of angle- and spin-resolved core-level photoemission from ferromagnetic Fe and Ni. We also consider magneto-dichroic effects due to reversal of the photon helicity or reversal of the sample magnetization direction. In chapter 1, we provide a brief outline of the history of photoemission, and show how it has played an important role in the development of modern physics. We then review the basic elements of the theory of core-level photoemission, and discuss the validity of the some of the commonly-used approximations. In chapter 2, we present a one-electron theory to calculate spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectra for an arbitrary photon polarization. The Hamiltonian includes both spin-orbit and exchange interactions. As test cases for the theory, we calculate the spin polarization and magnetic dichroism for the Fe 2p core level, and find that agreement with experiment is very good.

  4. Femtomagnetism in graphene induced by core level excitation of organic adsorbates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravikumar, Abhilash; Baby, Anu; Lin, He; Brivio, Gian Paolo; Fratesi, Guido

    2016-04-01

    We predict the induction or suppression of magnetism in the valence shell of physisorbed and chemisorbed organic molecules on graphene occurring on the femtosecond time scale as a result of core level excitations. For physisorbed molecules, where the interaction with graphene is dominated by van der Waals forces and the system is non-magnetic in the ground state, numerical simulations based on density functional theory show that the valence electrons relax towards a spin polarized configuration upon excitation of a core-level electron. The magnetism depends on efficient electron transfer from graphene on the femtosecond time scale. On the other hand, when graphene is covalently functionalized, the system is magnetic in the ground state showing two spin dependent mid gap states localized around the adsorption site. At variance with the physisorbed case upon core-level excitation, the LUMO of the molecule and the mid gap states of graphene hybridize and the relaxed valence shell is not magnetic anymore.

  5. Local-field corrections to surface and interface core-level shifts in insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Rotenberg, E. ); Olmstead, M.A. )

    1992-11-15

    We present a model for the extra-atomic contributions to core-level shifts in insulating thin films on polarizable substrates. The final-state shift is calculated from the screening-dependent local fields at a photoemitting atom and shown to be comparable to the initial-state Madelung potential shift in polar crystals. For Xe(111) films, our model completely accounts for experimental results. For NaCl(100) and CaF{sub 2}(111) surfaces, we present predictions of surface core-level shifts for simple bulk terminations. We discuss corrections which can be incorporated into our model.

  6. Potassium-induced charge redistribution on Si(111) surfaces studied by core-level photoemission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Y. ); Chen, C.T.; Meigs, G.; Sette, F. ); Illing, G. ); Shigakawa, H. )

    1992-03-15

    High-resolution core-level photoemission spectra of the K/Si(111)(7{times}7) surface system are presented. The Si 2{ital p} results show that potassium adsorption induces a Si 2{ital p} core level to shift to o/Ihighero/P binding energy, i.e., to the opposite direction than that expected from the Si-K electronegativity differences. This result is compared with that of the K/Si(111)({radical}3 {times} {radical}3 ){ital R}30{degree}-B system and is interpreted in terms of the K-induced charge redistribution between the Si-adatom--rest-atom pair.

  7. Phase coherence and pairing amplitude in photo-excited superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perfetti, Luca; Piovera, Christian; Zhang, Zailan

    2016-05-01

    New data on Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ (Bi2212) reveal interesting aspects of photoexcited superconductors. The electrons dynamics show that inelastic scattering by nodal quasiparticles decreases when the temperature is lowered below the critical value of the superconducting phase transition. This drop of electronic dissipation is astonishingly robust and survives to photoexcitation densities much larger than the value sustained by long-range superconductivity. The unconventional behavior of quasiparticle scattering is ascribed to superconducting correlations extending on a length scale comparable to the inelastic mean-free path. Our measurements indicate that strongly driven superconductors enter in a regime without phase coherence but finite pairing amplitude.

  8. Enhancement of Paramagnetic Relaxation by Photoexcited Gold Nanorods

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Tao; Wamer, Wayne G.; Subczynski, Witold K.; Hou, Shuai; Wu, Xiaochun; Yin, Jun-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy was used to investigate the switchable, light-dependent effects of gold nanorods (GNRs) on paramagnetic properties of nitroxide spin probes. The photoexcited GNRs enhanced the spin-spin and spin-lattice relaxations of nitroxide spin probes. It was shown that molecular oxygen plays the key role in this process. Our results demonstrate that ESR is a powerful tool for investigating the events following photoexcitation of GNRs. The novel light-controlled effects observed for GNRs on paramagnetic properties and activities of surrounding molecules have a number of significant applications where oxygen sensing and oxygen activity is important. PMID:27071507

  9. Detection of subsurface core-level shifts in Si 2p core-level photoemission from Si(111)-(1x1):As

    SciTech Connect

    Paggel, J.J.; Hasselblatt, M.; Horn, K.

    1997-04-01

    The (7 x 7) reconstruction of the Si(111) surface arises from a lowering energy through the reduction of the number of dangling bonds. This reconstruction can be removed by the adsorption of atoms such as hydrogen which saturate the dangling bonds, or by the incorporation of atoms, such as arsenic which, because of the additional electron it possesses, can form three bonds and a nonreactive lone pair orbital from the remaining two electrons. Core and valence level photoemission and ion scattering data have shown that the As atoms replace the top silicon atoms. Previous core level spectra were interpreted in terms of a bulk and a single surface doublet. The authors present results demonstrate that the core level spectrum contains two more lines. The authors assign these to subsurface silicon layers which also experience changes in the charge distribution when a silicon atom is replaced by an arsenic atom. Subsurface core level shifts are not unexpected since the modifications of the electronic structure and/or of photohole screening are likely to decay into the bulk and not just to affect the top-most substrate atoms. The detection of subsurface components suggests that the adsorption of arsenic leads to charge flow also in the second double layer of the Si(111) surface. In view of the difference in atomic radius between As and Si, it was suggested that the (1 x 1): As surface is strained. The presence of charge rearrangement up to the second double layer implies that the atomic coordinates also exhibit deviations from their ideal Si(111) counterparts, which might be detected through a LEED I/V or photoelectron diffraction analysis.

  10. Core level shifts in Cu-Pd alloys as a function of bulk composition and structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boes, Jacob R.; Kondratyuk, Peter; Yin, Chunrong; Miller, James B.; Gellman, Andrew J.; Kitchin, John R.

    2015-10-01

    CuPd alloys are important materials in hydrogen purification, where they are used as dense Pd-based separation membranes. Cu is added to impart sulfur tolerance and improved mechanical properties. At intermediate compositions and T < 873 K, a BCC alloy (B2) phase occurs, which has superior separation characteristics to those of the FCC phases that form at high Cu and high Pd compositions. Identifying the composition and temperature window where the B2 phase forms is a critical need to enable the design of improved alloys. A composition spread alloy film of Cu and Pd was synthesized. The film was characterized by electron back scatter diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, providing the core level shifts as a function of bulk composition and bulk structure. An anomalous deviation in the Cu core level shift was observed in the composition range 0.33 < xPd < 0.55 over which the B2 phase occurs. Density functional theory calculations were used to simulate core level shifts in the FCC and B2 alloy structures. They suggest that the anomalous deviation in core level shift is due to formation of the ordered B2 phase in this composition range.

  11. Modeling Shallow Core-Level Transitions in the Reflectance Spectra of Gallium-Containing Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoute, Nicholas; Aspnes, David

    2012-02-01

    The electronic structure of covalent materials is typically approached by band theory. However, shallow core level transitions may be better modeled by an atomic-scale approach. We investigate shallow d-core level reflectance spectra in terms of a local atomic-multiplet theory, a novel application of a theory typically used for higher-energy transitions on more ionic type material systems. We examine specifically structure in reflectance spectra of GaP, GaAs, GaSb, GaSe, and GaAs1-xPx due to transitions that originate from Ga3d core levels and occur in the 20 to 25 eV range. We model these spectra as a Ga^+3 closed-shell ion whose transitions are influenced by perturbations on 3d hole-4p electron final states. These are specifically spin-orbit effects on the hole and electron, and a crystal-field effect on the hole, attributed to surrounding bond charges and positive ligand anions. Empirical radial-strength parameters were obtained by least-squares fitting. General trends with respect to anion electronegativity are consistent with expectations. In addition to the spin-orbit interaction, crystal-field effects play a significant role in breaking the degeneracy of the d levels, and consequently are necessary to understand shallow 3d core level spectra.

  12. Surface core-level shifts and atomic coordination at a stepped W(110) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Riffe, D.M.; Kim, B.; Erskine, J.L. ); Shinn, N.D. )

    1994-11-15

    Core-level 4[ital f][sub 7/2] photoemission spectra have been measured from a single, bifacial W crystal, which has both a flat W(110) and a vicinal, stepped W(110) [W(320)] surface. This procedure reduces uncertainties in the quantitative description of peaks in the spectra from W(320). Various analyses, including nonlinear least-squares curve fitting, show that the average surface core-level shift (SCS) for W(320) is only [similar to][minus]140 meV, compared to [minus]310 meV for W(110) and that, at a maximum, only two of five terrace rows are isoelectronic to W(110) surface atoms. The absence of a large SCS for the step-edge atoms contradicts earlier interpretations of W(320) core-level spectra and departs significantly from expectations based on atomic-coordination models or tight-binding calculations of a bulk truncated surface. We suggest that systematic errors are responsible for the differences in reported core-level shifts for W(320). Implications of possible step-edge-driven atomic rearrangements are discussed.

  13. Two-Color Ultrafast Photoexcited Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Camillone, N.; Dolocan, A.; Acharya, D.P.; Zahl, P.; Sutter, P.

    2011-05-26

    We report on two-color two-photon photoexcitation of a metal surface driven by ultrafast laser pulses and detected with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) tip as a proximate anode. Results are presented for two cases: (i) where the tip is retracted from the surface far enough to prohibit tunneling, and (ii) where the tip is within tunneling range of the surface. A delay-modulation technique is implemented to isolate the two-color photoemission from concurrent one-color two-photon photoemission and provide subpicosecond time-resolved detection. When applied with the tip in tunneling range, this approach effectively isolates the two-photon photoexcited current signal from the conventional tunneling current and enables subpicosecond time-resolved detection of the photoexcited surface electrons. The advantage of the two-color approach is highlighted by comparison with the one-color case where optical interference causes thermal modulation of the STM tip length, resulting in tunneling current modulations that are orders of magnitude larger than the current due to photoexcitation of surface electrons. By completely eliminating this interference, and thereby avoiding thermal modulation of the STM tip length, the two-color approach represents an important step toward the ultimate goal of simultaneous subnanometer and subpicosecond measurements of surface electron dynamics by ultrafast-laser-excited STM.

  14. Understanding photoexcitation dynamics in a three-step photoionization of atomic uranium and measurement of photoexcitation and photoionization cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, P. K.; Sahoo, A. C.; Das, R. C.; Shah, M. L.; Pulhani, A. K.; Manohar, K. G.; Dev, Vas

    2015-09-01

    Photoexcitation dynamics in a three-step photoionization of atomic uranium has been investigated using time-resolved two-color three-photon and delayed three-color three-photon photoionization signals. Investigations are carried out in an atomic beam of uranium coupled to a high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer using three tunable pulsed dye lasers. Dependence of both the signals on the second-step laser photon fluence is studied. Excited-level-to-excited-level photoexcitation cross section and photoionization cross section from the second excited level are simultaneously determined by analyzing the two-color three-photon and three-color three-photon photoionization signals using population rate equation model. Using this methodology, photoexcitation and photoionization cross sections at seven values of the second-step laser wavelength have been measured. From the measured values of the photoexcitation cross sections, we have obtained excited-level-to-excited-level transition probabilities and compared these with the values reported in the literature.

  15. Core-level binding-energy shifts due to ionic adsorbates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagus, Paul S.; Pacchioni, Gianfranco

    1993-11-01

    The mechanisms responsible for the core-level binding-energy (BE) shifts due to alkali-metal and halogen adsorption on metal surfaces are identified and characterized through theoretical analyses of the surface electronic structure. By means of cluster model calculations of the adsorption of K and F atoms on the Cu(100) surface, we show that ionic adsorbates, both cationic and anionic, lead to small BE shifts, typically <200 meV, of the substrate metal atoms. These small shifts arise from the cancellation of two large initial-state effects, the electric field created by the ions at the surface and the consequent polarization of the metal conduction-band electrons. These two mechanisms induce rather large shifts of opposite sign and similar magnitude in the substrate core-level BE's, with resulting small final shifts. This is true for all electronic states, clusters, adsorption sites, and substrate-adsorbate distances. Thus, substrate BE shifts do not provide information about the bonding nature and the adsorption site. On the other hand, ionic and covalent bonding between the substrate and the adsorbate lead to significantly different shifts in the core-level BE's of the adsorbate. The BE shifts of alkali-metal atoms adsorbed on metal surfaces as functions of the coverage provide an indication of the transition from an ionic bond at low coverage to a covalent bond at high coverage.

  16. First-principles interpretation of core-level spectroscopy of photoelectrochemical materials and processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pemmaraju, Sri Chaitanya Das; Prendergast, David

    2014-03-01

    We present two case studies of first-principles theoretical methods applied in conjunction with experimental core-level spectroscopy measurements to investigate the electronic structure and dynamical processes in molecular and interfacial systems relevant to photoelectrochemical (PEC) technologies. In the first, we study the core-level and valence spectroscopies of two zinc(II)-porphyrin based Donor-pi-Acceptor (D-p-A) dyes using the occupancy-constrained excited electron and core-hole (XCH) approach and time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) simulations. In the second, we use constrained DFT and TDDFT to interpret measured transient core-level shifts in time-resolved femtosecond x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, investigating the dynamics of the electron injection process from a N3 dye molecule chemisorbed onto a ZnO substrate. These studies illustrate the utility of first-principles methods in guiding the design of better PEC materials. This work was performed at the Molecular Foundry, LBNL, supported by the Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  17. Surface core-level shifts of GaAs(100)(2×4) from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punkkinen, M. P. J.; Laukkanen, P.; Kokko, K.; Ropo, M.; Ahola-Tuomi, M.; Väyrynen, I. J.; Komsa, H.-P.; Rantala, T. T.; Pessa, M.; Kuzmin, M.; Vitos, L.; Kollár, J.; Johansson, B.

    2007-09-01

    First-principles calculations show that measured surface core-level shifts (SCLSs) of the GaAs(100)(2×4) surfaces can be described within the initial state effects. The calculated As3d and Ga3d SCLSs for the β2 and α2 reconstructions of the GaAs(100)(2×4) surfaces are in reasonable agreement with recent measurements. In particular, the results confirm that both the lower and the higher binding energy SCLSs, relative to the bulk emission in the As3d photoelectron spectra, are intrinsic properties of the GaAs(100)(2×4) surfaces. The most positive and most negative As shifts are attributed to the third layer As atoms, which differs from the previous intuitive suggestions. In general, calculations show that significant SCLSs arise from deep layers, and that there are more than two SCLSs. Our previously measured As3d spectra are fitted afresh using the calculated SCLSs. The intensity ratios of the SCLSs, obtained from the fits, show that as the heating temperature of the GaAs(100)(2×4) surface is increased gradually, the area of the α2 reconstruction increases on the surface, but the β2 phase remains within the whole temperature range, in agreement with previous experimental findings. Our results show that the combination of the experimental and theoretical results is a prerequisite for the accurate analysis of the SCLSs of the complex reconstructed surfaces.

  18. Electron collisional excitation and resonant photoexcitation of solar S XI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kastner, S. O.; Bhatia, A. K.

    1986-01-01

    The line emission of carbon-like S XI is predicted using a comprehensive 46-level model including the configurations 2p2, 2s2p3, 2p3s, 2p4, 2p3p, 2p3d. Relative intensities of allowed, intercombination, and forbidden lines are computed for quiet and active solar conditions. The process of photoexcitation by the Fe XIII 191.26 A line is included to study its effect on EUV lines and the infrared forbidden lines at 1.92 and 1.39 microns. It is concluded that an observation of the 1.92-micron line by Olsen, Anderson, and Stewart (1971) is consistent with quiet solar conditions in the absence of photoexcitation.

  19. Photo-excited broadband tunable terahertz metamaterial absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianna; Wang, Guocui; Zhang, Bo; He, Ting; He, Yanan; Shen, Jingling

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate a photo-excited broadband tunable metamaterial absorber for use in the terahertz region. The metamaterial absorber consists of a hybrid metal-semiconductor square split ring and a metallic ground plane that are separated by a dielectric resonator spacer. The conductivity of the silicon used to fill the gap in the metallic resonator is tuned actively as a function of the incident pump power, which results in frequency modulation of the resonance absorption peak. Broadband tunable metamaterial absorbers are produced by suitable placement of the photoconductive silicon in different critical regions of the metallic resonator. In addition, the proposed method is applicable to a concentric rings-based metallic resonator. The proposed photo-excited broadband tunable metamaterial absorber has numerous potential applications, including uses as terahertz modulators and switches.

  20. Microscopic view on the ultrafast photoluminescence from photoexcited graphene.

    PubMed

    Winzer, Torben; Ciesielski, Richard; Handloser, Matthias; Comin, Alberto; Hartschuh, Achim; Malic, Ermin

    2015-02-11

    We present a joint theory-experiment study on ultrafast photoluminescence from photoexcited graphene. On the basis of a microscopic theory, we reveal two distinct mechanisms behind the occurring photoluminescence: besides the well-known incoherent contribution driven by nonequilibrium carrier occupations, we found a coherent part that spectrally shifts with the excitation energy. In our experiments, we demonstrate for the first time the predicted appearance and spectral shift of the coherent photoluminescence. PMID:25616043

  1. Dimensionality and doping effect on the Core-level X-ray photoemission satellites in layered ruthenates.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Haizhong; Li, Yi; Hu, Biao; Jin, Rongying; Plummer, E. W.; Zhang, Jiandi; Urbina, D.; Liu, Tijiang; Fobes, David; Mao, Zhiqiang

    2009-03-01

    Core-level photoelectron spectra of the layered perovskite crystal Srn+1RunO3n+1 (n = 1, 2, and 3) and Mn-doped Sr3Ru2O7 are investigated by x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) techniques. The Sr 3d and Ru 3d core-level spectra exhibit a two-peak structure, screened and unscreened peaks, indicating strong correlation effects among Ru 4d electrons. However, there are little changes of the core-level satellite features with n, suggesting the electron-electron correlation is mainly confined in the RuO2 plane. On the other hand, doping of Mn will drastically affect the core-level spectral weight, reflecting the doping-induced metal-to-insulator transition in the doped system. The position of Ru-core levels remain the same, thus, indicating no doping-induced change of Ru valence.

  2. Single-electron transport through the vortex core levels in clean superconductors.

    SciTech Connect

    Kopnin, N. B.; Mel'nikov, A. S.; Vinokur, V. M.; Materials Science Division; Helsinki Univ. of Technical Physics; L. D. Landau Inst. for Theoretical Physics; Russian Aacademy of Sciences

    2003-08-01

    We develop a microscopic theory of single-electron low-energy transport in normal-metal-superconductor-normal-metal hybrid structures in the presence of applied magnetic field introducing vortex lines in a superconductor layer. We show that vortex cores in a thick and clean superconducting layer are similar to mesoscopic conducting channels where the bound core states play the role of transverse modes. The transport through not very thick layers is governed by another mechanism, namely by tunneling via vortex core levels. We apply our method to calculation of the thermal conductance along the magnetic field.

  3. Effects of vibrational motion on core-level spectra of prototype organic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Uejio, Janel S.; Schwartz, Craig P.; Saykally, Richard J.; Prendergast, David

    2008-08-21

    A computational approach is presented for prediction and interpretation of core-level spectra of complex molecules. Applications are presented for several isolated organic molecules, sampling a range of chemical bonding and structural motifs. Comparison with gas phase measurements indicate that spectral lineshapes are accurately reproduced both above and below the ionization potential, without resort to ad hoc broadening. Agreement with experiment is significantly improved upon inclusion of vibrations via molecular dynamics sampling. We isolate and characterize spectral features due to particular electronic transitions enabled by vibrations, noting that even zero-point motion is sufficient in some cases.

  4. Orbitally modulated photoexcited Si I emission in the eclipsing composite-spectrum binary ζ Aurigae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, G. M.; Griffin, R. E. M.; Bennett, P. D.; O'Riain, N.

    2016-02-01

    We examine the little-known phenomenon of orbitally modulated Si I emission at λ 3905.523 Å and λ 4102.936 Å in composite-spectrum binaries, with specific reference to ζ Aurigae (K4 Ib + B5 V). The emission is detected in the isolated spectrum of the B-type dwarf secondary, and while λ 4102 Å is heavily blended with Hδ, λ 3905 Å falls in the B-star's featureless continuum. The narrowness of the emission (vturb ≃ 6 km s-1) demonstrates that it originates in the upper photosphere or deep chromosphere of the K star primary. We propose that photoexcitation by the hot star's UV continuum, followed by recombination and cascades, leads to resonant scattering and subsequent pumping of lower opacity transitions in the singlet and triplet systems of Si I. This process channels the UV continuum into select narrow emission lines. We have also identified weaker photoexcited emission of Fe II at λ 3938.289 Å. The strengths, positions, and widths of the λ 3905 Å emission line vary with orbital phase owing to changes in the dilution of the irradiating flux and in the geometrical aspect of the irradiated hemisphere. Utilizing the inherent spatial resolution provided by the illuminated patch, and assuming that the K star is spherical with isotropic emission, yields vsin i ˜ 5.7 km s-1. Evidence of tidal distortion was deduced from the timing of the rapidly rising phase of the emission just after periastron. Increasing the diagnostic potential requires radiative transfer modelling of the formation and centre-to-limb variation of the emission.

  5. Core-level shifts in fcc random alloys: A first-principles approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olovsson, W.; Göransson, C.; Pourovskii, L. V.; Johansson, B.; Abrikosov, I. A.

    2005-08-01

    First-principles theoretical calculations of the core-level binding-energy shift (CLS) for eight binary face-centered-cubic (fcc) disordered alloys, CuPd, AgPd, CuNi, NiPd, CuAu, PdAu, CuPt, and NiPt, are carried out within density-functional theory (DFT) using the coherent potential approximation. The shifts of the Cu and Ni 2p3/2 , Ag and Pd 3d5/2 , and Pt and Au 4f7/2 core levels are calculated according to the complete screening picture, which includes both initial-state (core-electron energy eigenvalue) and final-state (core-hole screening) effects in the same scheme. The results are compared with available experimental data, and the agreement is shown to be good. The CLSs are analyzed in terms of initial- and final-state effects. We also compare the complete screening picture with the CLS obtained by the transition-state method, and find very good agreement between these two alternative approaches for the calculations within the DFT. In addition the sensitivity of the CLS to relativistic and magnetic effects is studied.

  6. Strongly correlated valence electrons and core-level chemical bonding of Lithium at terapascal pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Anguang; Zhang, Fan

    2015-03-01

    As the simplest pure metal, lithium exhibits some novel properties on electrical conductivity and crystal structures under high pressure. All-electron density functional theory simulations, recently developed by using the linear combination of localized Slater atomic orbitals, revealed that the bandwidth of its valence bands remains almost unchanged within about 3.5 eV even up to a terapascal pressure range. This indicates that the development from delocalized to strongly correlated electronic systems takes place under compression, resulting in metal-semiconductor and superconductivity transitions together with a sequence of new high-pressure crystal phases, discovered experimentally. In contrast to the valence bands, the core-level bands become broadening up to about 10 eV at terapascal pressures. It means the transformation from chemical non-bonding to bonding for core electrons. Thus, dense lithium under compression can be characterized as core-level chemical bonding and a completely new class of strongly correlated materials with narrow bands filled in s-electron shells only.

  7. Quanty for core level spectroscopy - excitons, resonances and band excitations in time and frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haverkort, Maurits W.

    2016-05-01

    Depending on the material and edge under consideration, core level spectra manifest themselves as local excitons with multiplets, edge singularities, resonances, or the local projected density of states. Both extremes, i.e., local excitons and non-interacting delocalized excitations are theoretically well under control. Describing the intermediate regime, where local many body interactions and band-formation are equally important is a challenge. Here we discuss how Quanty, a versatile quantum many body script language, can be used to calculate a variety of different core level spectroscopy types on solids and molecules, both in the frequency as well as the time domain. The flexible nature of Quanty allows one to choose different approximations for different edges and materials. For example, using a newly developed method merging ideas from density renormalization group and quantum chemistry [1-3], Quanty can calculate excitons, resonances and band-excitations in x-ray absorption, photoemission, x-ray emission, fluorescence yield, non-resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, resonant inelastic x-ray scattering and many more spectroscopy types. Quanty can be obtained from: http://www.quanty.org.

  8. Angle and temperature dependence of magnetic circular dichroism in core-level photoemission from Gd(0001)

    SciTech Connect

    Denecke, R.; Morais, J.; Ynzunza, R. X.; Menchero, J. G.; Liesegang, J.; Rice, M.; Kortright, J.; Hussain, Z.; Fadley, C. S.

    1997-04-01

    Magnetic dichroism in core-level photoelectron emission from solids represents a promising new element-specific probe of surface and interface atomic structure and magnetic order. One way of measuring such effects is by using photoelectrons excited by circular polarized radiation, thus leading to magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) if the intensity with right-circular polarized (RCP) light is not equal to that with left-circular polarized (LCP) light. The spin-integrated photoelectron intensity in a certain emission direction also in general depends on the direction of the magnetization in a magnetic material. In fact, if the magnetization lies in a surface mirror plane, then inverting its direction can provide a second way of measuring MCD. Purely atomic theoretical models have been successful in explaining many aspects of such data. By varying the emission direction one also probes the geometric structure of the sample. But such MCD in photoelectron angular distributions (MCDAD) then has to be interpreted also in terms of photoelectron diffraction. Measuring the temperature dependence of such MCD effects also provides a useful tool for studying magnetic transition temperatures. The authors have here studied such effects in core-level emission from Gd(0001).

  9. Core-level photoemission and work-function investigation of Na on Cu(110)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, C.; Shi, X.; Tang, D.; Heskett, D.; Tsuei, K.-D.

    1993-10-01

    Core-level photoemission, low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), and work-function change measurements have been carried out to study the coverage dependence of Na/Cu(110) at room temperature. The results of LEED and work-function measurements are qualitatively similar to most other investigations of alkali-metal adsorption on fcc(110) metal surfaces. With LEED, we observed an alkali-metal-induced (1×2) reconstruction at intermediate coverage. We have performed a simple calculation to account for the work-function differences between Na/fcc(110) and Na/fcc(111) metal surfaces. The comparison of coverage-dependent core-level binding-energy shifts between Na/Cu(110) and Na/Cu(111) reveals that a low-coverage plateau in the curve of binding energy vs Na coverage for Na/Cu(110) is associated with the Na-induced reconstruction, and can be accounted for within a localized picture of the reconstruction.

  10. Core level excitations—A fingerprint of structural and electronic properties of epitaxial silicene

    SciTech Connect

    Friedlein, R. Fleurence, A.; Aoyagi, K.; Yamada-Takamura, Y.; Jong, M. P. de; Van Bui, H.; Wiggers, F. B.; Yoshimoto, S.; Koitaya, T.; Shimizu, S.; Noritake, H.; Mukai, K.; Yoshinobu, J.

    2014-05-14

    From the analysis of high-resolution Si 2p photoelectron and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra, we show that core level excitations of epitaxial silicene on ZrB{sub 2}(0001) thin films are characteristically different from those of sp{sup 3}-hybridized silicon. In particular, it is revealed that the lower Si 2p binding energies and the low onset in the NEXAFS spectra as well as the occurrence of satellite features in the core level spectra are attributed to the screening by low-energy valence electrons and interband transitions between π bands, respectively. The analysis of observed Si 2p intensities related to chemically distinct Si atoms indicates the presence of at least one previously unidentified component. The presence of this component suggests that the observation of stress-related stripe domains in scanning tunnelling microscopy images is intrinsically linked to the relaxation of Si atoms away from energetically unfavourable positions.

  11. Shape resonance phenomena in CO following K-shell photoexcitation

    SciTech Connect

    Truesdale, C.M.; Southworth, S.H.; Kobrin, P.H.; Becker, U.; Lindle, D.W.; Kerkhoff, H.G.; Shirley, D.A.

    1983-04-25

    Electron cross sections and asymmetries following photoexcitation of the CO K shells were measured directly. Energy analysis of ejected electrons yielded cross sections exhibiting sigma shape resonances in the C(1s), C(KVV), and O(1s) channels, and a ..pi.. resonance in the C(KVV) channel, confirming earlier indirect measurements. Asymmetry measurements showed a sigma shape resonance in the C(1s) channel, in good agreement with the predictions of Dehmer and Dill. The C(KVV) ..pi.. resonance showed nearly isotropic behavior.

  12. Near-surface transport of semiconductor nanoclusters upon cyclic photoexcitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekhtyar', M. L.; Rozenbaum, V. M.; Trakhtenberg, L. I.

    2016-07-01

    A mechanism for the directed motion of a semiconductor nanocluster along a polar substrate upon cyclic photoexcitation that alters the electron density distribution inside the particle is studied. A model that allows us to estimate the average velocity and optimize the system parameters (particle size, distance between the particle and the substrate, the average cycle duration, and charge distribution in the substrate) so as to ensure the maximum velocity is proposed. At the optimum parameters, the average velocity of directed motion can be quite high (~3 mm/s).

  13. Photoexcitation dynamics in thin films of insulated molecular wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, M. H.; Frampton, M. J.; Anderson, H. L.; Herz, L. M.

    2006-12-01

    A study is presented on how encapsulation of conjugated polymer chains affects the motion of photoexcitations and the formation of interchain aggregates in solid films. It is shown that threading of a poly(diphenylene vinylene) backbone inside insulating cyclodextrins (rotaxination) and/or complexation of the chains with poly(ethylene oxide) are effective means of preventing the diffusion of excitons to nonradiative defect sites. Ultrafast time-resolved photoluminescence data reveal that excitation transfer between encapsulated chains is still possible and, for the case of rotaxination, is likely to be facilitated through close packing of end groups belonging to adjacent chains.

  14. Exciton and core-level electron confinement effects in transparent ZnO thin films

    PubMed Central

    Mosquera, Adolfo A.; Horwat, David; Rashkovskiy, Alexandr; Kovalev, Anatoly; Miska, Patrice; Wainstein, Dmitry; Albella, Jose M.; Endrino, Jose L.

    2013-01-01

    The excitonic light emission of ZnO films have been investigated by means of photoluminescence measurements in ultraviolet-visible region. Exciton confinement effects have been observed in thin ZnO coatings with thickness below 20 nm. This is enhanced by a rise of the intensity and a blue shift of the photoluminescence peak after extraction of the adsorbed species upon annealing in air. It is found experimentally that the free exciton energy (determined by the photoluminescence peak) is inversely proportional to the square of the thickness while core-level binding energy is inversely proportional to the thickness. These findings correlate very well with the theory of kinetic and potential confinements.

  15. Physics of the Be(10{bar 1} 0) Surface Core Level Spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Lizzit, S.; Pohl, K. |; Baraldi, A.; Comelli, G.; Fritzsche, V.; Plummer, E.W. |; Stumpf, R.; Hofmann, P. ||

    1998-10-01

    Photoelectron diffraction has been utilized to confirm the theoretical prediction that the surface core level shifts observed for Be(10{bar 1}0) have been improperly assigned. The original assignment based upon the relative intensity of the shifted components was intuitively obvious: the peak with the largest shift of {minus}0.7 eV with respect to the bulk was associated with the surface plane, the next peak shifted by {minus}0.5 eV stems from the second layer, and the third peak at {minus}0.22 eV from the third and fourth layers. First-principles theory and our experimental data show that the largest shift is associated with the second plane, not the first plane. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society }

  16. An experimental and theoretical core-level study of tautomerism in guanine.

    PubMed

    Plekan, Oksana; Feyer, Vitaliy; Richter, Robert; Coreno, Marcello; Vall-Llosera, Gemma; Prince, Kevin C; Trofimov, Alexander B; Zaytseva, Irina L; Moskovskaya, Tatyana E; Gromov, Evgeniy V; Schirmer, Jochen

    2009-08-20

    The core level photoemission and near edge X-ray photoabsorption spectra of guanine in the gas phase have been measured and the results interpreted with the aid of high level ab initio calculations. Tautomers are clearly identified spectroscopically, and their relative free energies and Boltzmann populations at the temperature of the experiment (600 K) have been calculated and compared with the experimental results and with previous calculations. We obtain good agreement between experiment and the Boltzmann weighted theoretical photoemission spectra, which allows a quantitative determination of the ratio of oxo to hydroxy tautomer populations. For the photoabsorption spectra, good agreement is found for the C 1s and O 1s spectra but only fair agreement for the N 1s edge. PMID:19634878

  17. Communication: Application of state-specific multireference coupled cluster methods to core-level excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Brabec, Jiri; Bhaskaran-Nair, Kiran; Govind, Niranjan; Pittner, Jiri; Kowalski, Karol

    2012-11-07

    The concept of the model space underlying multireference coupled-cluster (MRCC) formulations is a powerful tool to deal with complex correlation effects for various electronic states. Here, we demonstrate that iterative state-specific MRCC methods (SS-MRCC) based on properly defined model spaces can be used to describe core-level excited states even when canonical Hartree-Fock orbitals are utilized. We show that the SS-MRCC models with single and double excitations (SSMRCCSD) are comparable in accuracy to high-level single reference equation-of-motion coupled cluster (EOMCC) formalism. We also demonstrate that the SS-MRCC methods are capable of providing high accuracy results without experiencing numerical problems of the EOMCC methods.

  18. Exploring the core level shift origin of sulfur and thiolates on Pd(111) surfaces.

    PubMed

    Salvarezza, Roberto Carlos; Carro, Pilar

    2015-10-01

    Thiol molecules on planar metal surfaces are widely used for building sensing and electronic devices and also as capping agents to protect and to control the size and shape of nanoparticles. In the case of Pd the thiol molecules exhibit a complex behavior because C-S bond scission is possible, resulting in a significant amount of co-adsorbed S. Therefore identification of these species on Pd is a key point for many applications, a task that is usually achieved by XPS. Here we show, from DFT calculations, that the core level shift (CLS) of the S 2p binding energy (BE) of thiol and sulfur on different thiol-Pd(111) surface models strongly depends on the adsorbed or subsurface state of sulfur atoms. Our results reflect the complexity of S 2p BE behavior and contribute to understanding and reanalyzing the experimental data of thiolated Pd surfaces. PMID:26325179

  19. Surface core-level binding energy shifts for MgO(100).

    PubMed

    Nelin, Connie J; Uhl, Felix; Staemmler, Volker; Bagus, Paul S; Fujimori, Yuichi; Sterrer, Martin; Kuhlenbeck, Helmut; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2014-10-28

    Theoretical and experimental results for the surface core-level binding energy, BE, shifts, SCLS, for MgO(100) are presented and the anomalous O(1s) SCLS is interpreted in terms of the surface electronic structure. While the Mg(2p) surface BE shifts to a higher value than bulk by ≈1 eV as expected from the different surface and bulk Madelung potentials, the O(1s) SCLS is almost 0 rather than ≈-1 eV, expected from the Madelung potentials. The distortion of the surface atoms from the spherical symmetry of the bulk Mg and O atoms is examined by a novel theoretical procedure. The anomalous O SCLS is shown to arise from the increase of the effective size of surface O anions. PMID:25212984

  20. Production of excited neutral and ionic photofragments following core-level excitation in molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, R. A.; Wen, C.-R.; Tan, K.; Chen, J.-M.

    1990-05-01

    We have performed the first experiments to examine the neutral fragmentation paths following direct core-level excitation in a molecule. Using monochromatized synchrotron radiation in the range 100-140 eV, we have monitored the dispersed UV/optical fluorescence resulting from excitation of a Si 2p electron in SiF4. The main features in the fluorescence spectrum have been identified as emission from the SiF+4 D state and from excited SiF, Si, F, and Si+. Features in the fluorescence excitation spectra are assigned to excitation of a Si 2p electron to unoccupied valence orbitals, Rydberg orbitals, and shape resonances. There is a large enhancement in the yield of excited-state fragments following core-to-Rydberg excitation, which is due to the greater probability of the core-excited Rydberg state decaying, via a resonant Auger process, to highly excited, unbound states of SiF+4.

  1. Alkyl-terminated Si(111) surfaces: A high-resolution, core level photoelectron spectroscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, J.; Linford, M.R.; Wigren, C.; Cao, R.; Pianetta, P.; Chidsey, C.E.

    1999-01-01

    The bonding of alkyl monolayers to Si(111) surfaces has been studied with high-resolution core level photoelectron spectroscopy (PES). Two very different wet-chemical methods have been used to prepare the alkyl monolayers: (i) Olefin insertion into the H{endash}Si bond of the H{endash}Si(111) surface, and (ii) replacement of Cl on the Cl{endash}Si(111) surface by an alkyl group from an alkyllithium reagent. In both cases, PES has revealed a C 1s component shifted to lower binding energy and a Si 2p component shifted to higher binding energy. Both components are attributed to the presence of a C{endash}Si bond at the interface. Along with photoelectron diffraction data [Appl. Phys. Lett. {bold 71}, 1056, (1997)], these data are used to show that these two synthetic methods can be used to functionalize the Si(111) surface. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Quantum confinement, core level shifts, and dopant segregation in P-doped Si⟨110⟩ nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jiaxin; Chan, Tzu-Liang; Chelikowsky, James R.

    2010-10-01

    We examine P-doped Si⟨110⟩ nanowires by employing a real-space pseudopotential method. We find the defect wave function becomes more localized along the nanowire axis and the donor ionization energy increases, owing to quantum confinement. It is more difficult to dope a P atom into a Si⟨110⟩ nanowire than to dope Si bulk because the formation energy increases with decreasing size. By comparing the formation energy for different P positions within a nanowire, we find that if a P atom at the nanowire surface can overcome the energy barrier close to the surface, there is a tendency for the dopant to reside within the nanowire core. We calculate P core levels shift as P changes position within the nanowire and provide a means for x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy experiments to determine the location of P atoms within a Si nanowire.

  3. Plasmon response of a quantum-confined electron gas probed by core-level photoemission

    SciTech Connect

    Ozer, Mustafa M; Moon, Eun Ju; Eguiluz, Adolfo G; Weitering, Harm H

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate the existence of quantized 'bulk' plasmons in ultrathin magnesium films on Si(111) by analyzing plasmon-loss satellites in core-level photoemission spectra, recorded as a function of the film thickness d. Remarkably, the plasmon energy is shown to vary as 1/d{sup 2} all the way down to three atomic layers. The loss spectra are dominated by the n=1 and n=2 normal modes, consistent with the excitation of plasmons involving quantized electronic subbands. With decreasing film thickness, spectral weight is gradually transferred from the plasmon modes to the low-energy single-particle excitations. These results represent striking manifestations of the role of quantum confinement on plasmon resonances in precisely controlled nanostructures.

  4. Characterization of combustion chamber products by core-level photoabsorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kellar, S. A.; Huff, W. R.A.; Moler, E J; Yeah, S.; Hussain, Z.

    1997-04-01

    The lubricating performance of motor oil is adversely affected by the carbon soot contamination that is a natural by-product of the combustion process. Particularly in diesel engines, {open_quote}blow-by{close_quote} is a problem that greatly decreases the longevity of the engine-lubricating oil. Motor oil manufacturers spend considerable resources developing new oil formulations that counteract the adverse affects of this combustion soot. At present, the only effective way to test new formulations is in a working engine. This process is obviously expensive and not especially efficient. In this ongoing work in collaboration with Chevron Research and Technology, the authors goal is to find a form of carbon that chemically resembles the soot created by the {open_quote}blow-by{close_quote} in a diesel engine. The chemically correct soot substitute can be used in bench tests to replace the expensive full motor testing for new formulations. The final testing would still be done in the test motors but only with promising candidates. To these ends, Near Edge X-ray Adsorption spectroscopy Extended Fine Structure (NEXAFS) is an attractive technique in that it has chemical specificity through the core-level binding energy and because it probes the chemically important unoccupied molecular orbitals of the material. Core-level photoabsorption has been used to characterize the empty electronic states of a wide variety of materials. Specifically, the near-edge region of the photoabsorption process has been used to determine the relative quantity of sp{sup 2} and sp{sup 3}bonding in carbon films. The samples were fine grained powders pressed into pellets. The C(1s) absorption spectra were collected from each sample by measuring the total electron yield from the sample as a function of photon energy. The absorption intensity was normalized to the incoming photon flux by measuring the photoyield from a fine gold mesh.

  5. Separation of distinct photoexcitation species in femtosecond transient absorption microscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xiao, Kai; Ma, Ying -Zhong; Simpson, Mary Jane; Doughty, Benjamin; Yang, Bing

    2016-02-03

    Femtosecond transient absorption microscopy is a novel chemical imaging capability with simultaneous high spatial and temporal resolution. Although several powerful data analysis approaches have been developed and successfully applied to separate distinct chemical species in such images, the application of such analysis to distinguish different photoexcited species is rare. In this paper, we demonstrate a combined approach based on phasor and linear decomposition analysis on a microscopic level that allows us to separate the contributions of both the excitons and free charge carriers in the observed transient absorption response of a composite organometallic lead halide perovskite film. We found spatialmore » regions where the transient absorption response was predominately a result of excitons and others where it was predominately due to charge carriers, and regions consisting of signals from both contributors. Lastly, quantitative decomposition of the transient absorption response curves further enabled us to reveal the relative contribution of each photoexcitation to the measured response at spatially resolved locations in the film.« less

  6. Photoexcited quantum dots for killing multidrug-resistant bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtney, Colleen M.; Goodman, Samuel M.; McDaniel, Jessica A.; Madinger, Nancy E.; Chatterjee, Anushree; Nagpal, Prashant

    2016-05-01

    Multidrug-resistant bacterial infections are an ever-growing threat because of the shrinking arsenal of efficacious antibiotics. Metal nanoparticles can induce cell death, yet the toxicity effect is typically nonspecific. Here, we show that photoexcited quantum dots (QDs) can kill a wide range of multidrug-resistant bacterial clinical isolates, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli, and extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae and Salmonella typhimurium. The killing effect is independent of material and controlled by the redox potentials of the photogenerated charge carriers, which selectively alter the cellular redox state. We also show that the QDs can be tailored to kill 92% of bacterial cells in a monoculture, and in a co-culture of E. coli and HEK 293T cells, while leaving the mammalian cells intact, or to increase bacterial proliferation. Photoexcited QDs could be used in the study of the effect of redox states on living systems, and lead to clinical phototherapy for the treatment of infections.

  7. Photoexcited ZnO nanoparticles with controlled defects as a highly sensitive oxygen sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Taku; Shimizu, Yoshiki; Yasuda, Hidehiro; Ito, Tsuyohito

    2016-07-01

    Conductance of photoexcited ZnO nanoparticles with various defects has been investigated in oxygen. ZnO nanoparticles, which show strong photoluminescence peaks originating from interstitial zinc atom (Zni) and singly charged oxygen vacancy (VO+), show oxygen-pressure-dependent conductance changes caused by photoexcitation. Herein, a model is proposed to simulate the conductance changes.

  8. Low-temperature galvanomagnetic studies of nominally undoped germanium subjected to intrinsic photoexcitation

    SciTech Connect

    Bannaya, V. F.

    2015-09-15

    The results of studying the heating of charge carriers by an electric field in nominally undoped Ge (with impurity concentrations of (N{sub a} + N{sub g}) ≤ 5 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup –3}) subjected to interband illumination are reported. It is necessary in this situation to take into account two types of free charge carriers. In the case of such generation, the relation between the concentrations of electrons and holes depends to a large extent on the value of the electric field since this field differently affects the recombination coefficients of charge carriers and gives rise to new effects. The results of experimental studies of the conductivity σ and the Hall constant R{sub H} in n-Ge and p-Ge at T = 4.2 K and at different intensities of intrinsic photoexcitation are reported. A model of interband recombination, which takes into account deep-level impurity centers, is suggested for explanation of the results.

  9. Theory of Primary Photoexcitations in Donor-Acceptor Copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryanpour, Karan; Dutta, Tirthankar; Huynh, Uyen N. V.; Vardeny, Zeev Valy; Mazumdar, Sumit

    2015-12-01

    We present a generic theory of primary photoexcitations in low band gap donor-acceptor conjugated copolymers. Because of the combined effects of strong electron correlations and broken symmetry, there is considerable mixing between a charge-transfer exciton and an energetically proximate triplet-triplet state with an overall spin singlet. The triplet-triplet state, optically forbidden in homopolymers, is allowed in donor-acceptor copolymers. For an intermediate difference in electron affinities of the donor and the acceptor, the triplet-triplet state can have a stronger oscillator strength than the charge-transfer exciton. We discuss the possibility of intramolecular singlet fission from the triplet-triplet state, and how such fission can be detected experimentally.

  10. Theory of Primary Photoexcitations in Donor-Acceptor Copolymers.

    PubMed

    Aryanpour, Karan; Dutta, Tirthankar; Huynh, Uyen N V; Vardeny, Zeev Valy; Mazumdar, Sumit

    2015-12-31

    We present a generic theory of primary photoexcitations in low band gap donor-acceptor conjugated copolymers. Because of the combined effects of strong electron correlations and broken symmetry, there is considerable mixing between a charge-transfer exciton and an energetically proximate triplet-triplet state with an overall spin singlet. The triplet-triplet state, optically forbidden in homopolymers, is allowed in donor-acceptor copolymers. For an intermediate difference in electron affinities of the donor and the acceptor, the triplet-triplet state can have a stronger oscillator strength than the charge-transfer exciton. We discuss the possibility of intramolecular singlet fission from the triplet-triplet state, and how such fission can be detected experimentally. PMID:26765027

  11. Photo-excited terahertz switch based on composite metamaterial structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guocui; Zhang, Jianna; Zhang, Bo; He, Ting; He, Yanan; Shen, Jingling

    2016-09-01

    A photo-excited terahertz switch based on a composite metamaterial structure was designed by integration of photoconductive silicon into the gaps of split-ring resonators. The conductivity of the silicon that was used to fill the gaps in the split-ring resonators was tuned dynamically as a function of the incident pump power using laser excitation, leading to a change in the composite metamaterial structure's properties. We studied the transmission characteristics of the composite metamaterial structure for various silicon conductivities, and the results indicated that this type of composite metamaterial structure could be used as a resonance frequency tunable terahertz metamaterial switch. We also designed other structures by filling different gaps with silicon, and proved that these structures could be used as terahertz metamaterial switches can change the working mode from a single frequency to multiple frequencies.

  12. Pressure-induced crossing of the core levels in 5 d metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tal, Alexey A.; Katsnelson, Mikhail I.; Ekholm, Marcus; Jönsson, H. Johan M.; Dubrovinsky, Leonid; Dubrovinskaia, Natalia; Abrikosov, Igor A.

    2016-05-01

    A pressure-induced interaction between core electrons, the core-level crossing (CLC) transition, has been observed in hcp Os at P ≈400 GPa [L. Dubrovinsky et al., Nature (London) 525, 226 (2015)], 10.1038/nature14681. By carrying out a systematic theoretical study for all metals of the 5 d series (Hf, Ta, W, Re, Os, Ir, Pt, Au) we have found that the CLC transition is a general effect for this series of metals. While in Pt it occurs at ≈1500 GPa , at a pressure substantially higher than in Os, in Ir it occurs already at 80 GPa. Moreover, we predict that in Re the CLC transition may take place already at ambient pressure. We explain the effect of the CLC and analyze the shift of the transition pressure across the series within the Thomas-Fermi model. In particular, we show that the effect has many common features with the atomic collapse in rare-earth elements.

  13. Core-level anionic photofragmentation of gaseous CCl4 and solid-state analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, K. T.; Chen, J. M.; Lee, J. M.; Haw, S. C.; Chou, T. L.; Chen, S. A.; Chen, T. H.

    2009-09-01

    The dissociation dynamics of anionic and excited neutral fragments of gaseous CCl4 and CCl4 adsorbed on Si(100) ˜90K following Cl2p core-level excitations were investigated on combining measurements of photon-induced anionic dissociation, x-ray absorption, and uv-visible dispersed fluorescence. The transitions of core electrons to high Rydberg states or doubly excited states near Cl2p ionization thresholds of gaseous CCl4 remarkably enhance the production of excited neutral fragments ( C∗ and CCl∗ ); this enhancement is attributed to the contribution from the shake-modified resonant Auger decay and/or postcollision interaction (PCI). The Cl- anion is significantly reinforced in the vicinity of the Cl2p1/2,3/2 ionization threshold of gaseous CCl4 , originating from PCI-mediated photoelectron recapture. The Cl2p→7a1∗ excitation for CCl4/Si(100) at ˜90K enhances the Cl- desorption yield at a submonolayer level. This resonant enhancement of Cl- yield at the 7a1∗ resonance in the Cl2p edge at a submonolayer level occurs through the formation of high-lying molecular-ion states of CCl4 adsorbed on a Si surface.

  14. High-resolution core-level photoemission study of dense Pb overlayers on Si(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Won Hoon; Kim, Keun Su; Yeom, Han Woong

    2008-11-01

    Structure and bonding configuration of dense Pb overlayers on the Si(111) surface have been studied by low-energy-electron diffraction and high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation. Several representative phases in its devil’s staircase phase diagram have been systematically investigated by varying the Pb coverage at 200-300 K. Pb5d photoelectron spectra indicate that there exist two distinct bonding configurations of Pb, which are interpreted as the hollow and on-top (T1) sites of the structure models proposed earlier. In case of surface Si atoms, mainly two different bonding environments are revealed by surface Si2p components for the low-density 7×3 phase. These can be assigned to T1 and modified on-top (T1') sites surrounding hollow-site adatoms. As the coverage increases, the minority site T1 converts to T1' making the topmost Si layer have a unique bonding configuration. This behavior is also consistent with the structure models. The temperature-dependent study reveals that the 7×3 phase undergoes a reversible phase transition into a 1×1 phase. This phase transition induces no significant change in Pb core levels but a marginal increase in the Si2p component for the T1' sites. We suggest a plausible scenario of the phase transition based on the structure model with 1.2 monolayer Pb and the active diffusion of hollow-site adatoms.

  15. Core-level x-ray photoemission: Deviations from threshold behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, D. L.; Frota, H. O.; Oliveira, L. N.; Wilkins, J. W.

    1985-07-01

    We present a systematic numerical study of core-level x-ray photoemission intensity in metals, with emphasis upon studying the deviations from behavior asymptotically close to threshold. For a model with a contact potential and linear conduction-electron dispersion, we have evaluated the photoemission intensity for core-hole phase shifts δ(0) between 0.05π and 0.5π. We find the following results. (i) The asymptotic regime extends out to 0.01 to 0.1 times the conduction bandwidth (D) from threshold. The range of the asymptotic regime decreases with increasing (absolute) phase shift. (ii) The linear relation between the integrated photoemission intensity and the asymptotic form holds for all phase shifts above ~0.1D. Due to our normalization procedure we cannot say whether it holds below this value. (iii) Discrepancies exist between numerical estimates of the deviations from asymptotic behavior and approximate analytic estimates. (iv) A definition of the frequency-dependent threshold singularity exponent α(ω) in terms of a moment of the photoemission intensity is stable out to the conduction-band edge and may prove useful to experimentalists attempting to extract exponents from their data.

  16. Proton-coupled electron transfer with photoexcited metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Wenger, Oliver S

    2013-07-16

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) plays a crucial role in many enzymatic reactions and is relevant for a variety of processes including water oxidation, nitrogen fixation, and carbon dioxide reduction. Much of the research on PCET has focused on transfers between molecules in their electronic ground states, but increasingly researchers are investigating PCET between photoexcited reactants. This Account describes recent studies of excited-state PCET with d(6) metal complexes emphasizing work performed in my laboratory. Upon photoexcitation, some complexes release an electron and a proton to benzoquinone reaction partners. Others act as combined electron-proton acceptors in the presence of phenols. As a result, we can investigate photoinduced PCET involving electron and proton transfer in a given direction, a process that resembles hydrogen-atom transfer (HAT). In other studies, the photoexcited metal complexes merely serve as electron donors or electron acceptors because the proton donating and accepting sites are located on other parts of the molecular PCET ensemble. We and others have used this multisite design to explore so-called bidirectional PCET which occurs in many enzymes. A central question in all of these studies is whether concerted proton-electron transfer (CPET) can compete kinetically with sequential electron and proton transfer steps. Short laser pulses can trigger excited-state PCET, making it possible to investigate rapid reactions. Luminescence spectroscopy is a convenient tool for monitoring PCET, but unambiguous identification of reaction products can require a combination of luminescence spectroscopy and transient absorption spectroscopy. Nevertheless, in some cases, distinguishing between PCET photoproducts and reaction products formed by simple photoinduced electron transfer (ET) (reactions that don't include proton transfer) is tricky. Some of the studies presented here deal directly with this important problem. In one case study we

  17. Gamma Spectra Resulting From the Annihilation of Positrons with Electrons in Single, Selected Core Levels of Cu, Ag and Au

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S; Eshed, A; Goktepeli, S; Sterne, P A; Koymen, A R; Chen, W C; Weiss, A H

    2005-07-25

    The {gamma}-ray energy spectra due to positron annihilation with the 3p core-level of Cu, the 4p core-level of Ag, and 5p core level of Au were obtained separately from the total annihilation spectrum by measuring the energies of {gamma}-rays time coincident with Auger electrons emitted as a result of filling the core-hole left by annihilation. The results of these measurements are compared to the total annihilation spectra and with LDA based theoretical calculations. A comparison of area normalized momentum distributions with the individual cores extracted from the Doppler measurements shows good qualitative agreement, however, in all three spectra, the calculated values of the momentum density appears to fall below the measured values as the momentum increases. The discrepancies between theory and experiment are well outside the statistical uncertainties of the experiment and become more pronounced with increasing Z going down the column from Cu to Ag to Au. The comparison with the experimental results clearly indicates that the calculations are not predicting the correct ratio of high momentum to low momentum spectral weight and suggest the need to improve the treatment of many body electron-positron correlation effects in annihilation as they pertain to core levels.

  18. Pronounced Surface Band Bending of Thin-Film Silicon Revealed by Modeling Core Levels Probed with Hard X-rays.

    PubMed

    Wippler, David; Wilks, Regan G; Pieters, Bart E; van Albada, Sacha J; Gerlach, Dominic; Hüpkes, Jürgen; Bär, Marcus; Rau, Uwe

    2016-07-13

    Enhancing the probing depth of photoemission studies by using hard X-rays allows the investigation of buried interfaces of real-world device structures. However, it also requires the consideration of photoelectron-signal attenuation when evaluating surface effects. Here, we employ a computational model incorporating surface band bending and exponential photoelectron-signal attenuation to model depth-dependent spectral changes of Si 1s and Si 2s core level lines. The data were acquired from hydrogenated boron-doped microcrystalline thin-film silicon, which is applied in silicon-based solar cells. The core level spectra, measured by hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy using different excitation energies, reveal the presence of a 0.29 nm thick surface oxide layer. In the silicon film a downward surface band bending of eVbb = -0.65 eV over ∼6 nm obtained via inverse modeling explains the observed core level shifts and line broadening. Moreover, the computational model allows the extraction of the "real" Si 1s and Si 2s bulk core level binding energies as 1839.13 and 150.39 eV, and their natural Lorentzian line widths as 496 and 859 meV, respectively. These values significantly differ from those directly extracted from the measured spectra. Because band bending usually occurs at material surfaces we highly recommend the detailed consideration of signal integration over depth for quantitative statements from depth-dependent measurements. PMID:27294978

  19. Thermalization after photoexcitation from the perspective of optical spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogoj, Jan; Vidmar, Lev; Mierzejewski, Marcin; Trugman, Stuart A.; Bonča, Janez

    2016-07-01

    We analyze the thermalization of a photoexcited charge carrier coupled to a single branch of quantum phonons within the Holstein model. To this end, we calculate the far-from-equilibrium time evolution of a pure many-body state and compare it with predictions of the thermal Gibbs ensemble. We show that at strong enough carrier excitation, the nonequilibrium system evolves towards a thermal steady state. Our analysis is based on two classes of observables. First, the occupations of fermionic momenta, which are the eigenvalues of the one-particle density matrix, match in the steady state the values in the corresponding Gibbs ensemble. This indicates thermalization of static fermionic correlations on the entire lattice. Second, the dynamic current-current correlations, including the time-resolved optical conductivity, also take the form of their thermal counterparts. Remarkably, both static and dynamic fermionic correlations thermalize with identical temperatures. Our results suggest that the subsequent relaxation processes, observed in time-resolved ultrafast spectroscopy, may be efficiently described by applying quasithermal approaches, e.g., multitemperature models.

  20. Charge relaxation and recombination in photo-excited Mott insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prelovšek, P.; Lenarčič, Z.

    2016-04-01

    Recent femtosecond pump-probe experiments on Mott insulators reveal charge recombination, which is in picosecond range, i.e., much faster than in clean bandgap semiconductors although excitation gaps in Mott insulators are even larger. The charge response in photo-excited insulators can be generally divided in femtosecond transient relaxation of charge excitations, which are holons and doublons, and a second slower, but still very fast, holon-doublon (HD) recombination. We present a theory of the recombination rate of the excited HD pairs, based on the two-dimensional (2D) model relevant for cuprates, which shows that such fast processes can be explained even quantitatively with the multi-magnon emission. We show that the condition for the exponential decay as observed in the experiment is the existence of the exciton, i.e., the bound HD pair. Its recombination rate is exponentially dependent on the charge gap and on the magnon energy, while the ultrafast process can be traced back to strong charge-spin coupling. We comment also fast recombination times in the one-dimensional (1D) Mott insulators, as e.g., organic salts. The recombination rate in the latter cases can be explained with the stronger coupling with phonon excitations.

  1. Ultrafast electron injection into photo-excited organic molecules.

    PubMed

    Cvetko, Dean; Fratesi, Guido; Kladnik, Gregor; Cossaro, Albano; Brivio, Gian Paolo; Venkataraman, Latha; Morgante, Alberto

    2016-08-10

    Charge transfer rates at metal/organic interfaces affect the efficiencies of devices for organic based electronics and photovoltaics. A quantitative study of electron transfer rates, which take place on the femtosecond timescale, is often difficult, especially since in most systems the molecular adsorption geometry is unknown. Here, we use X-ray resonant photoemission spectroscopy to measure ultrafast charge transfer rates across pyridine/Au(111) interfaces while also controlling the molecular orientation on the metal. We demonstrate that a bi-directional charge transfer across the molecule/metal interface is enabled upon creation of a core-exciton on the molecule with a rate that has a strong dependence on the molecular adsorption angle. Through density functional theory calculations, we show that the alignment of molecular levels relative to the metal Fermi level is dramatically altered when a core-hole is created on the molecule, allowing the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital to fall partially below the metal Fermi level. We also calculate charge transfer rates as a function of molecular adsorption geometry and find a trend that agrees with the experiment. These findings thus give insight into the charge transfer dynamics of a photo-excited molecule on a metal surface. PMID:27444572

  2. Photoexcited energy transfer in a weakly coupled dimer

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hernandez, Laura Alfonso; Nelson, Tammie; Tretiak, Sergei; Fernandez-Alberti, Sebastian

    2015-01-08

    Nonadiabatic excited-state molecular dynamics (NA-ESMD) simulations have been performed in order to study the time-dependent exciton localization during energy transfer between two chromophore units of the weakly coupled anthracene dimer dithia-anthracenophane (DTA). Simulations are done at both low temperature (10 K) and room temperature (300 K). The initial photoexcitation creates an exciton which is primarily localized on a single monomer unit. Subsequently, the exciton experiences an ultrafast energy transfer becoming localized on either one monomer unit or the other, whereas delocalization between both monomers never occurs. In half of the trajectories, the electronic transition density becomes completely localized on themore » same monomer as the initial excitation, while in the other half, it becomes completely localized on the opposite monomer. In this article, we present an analysis of the energy transfer dynamics and the effect of thermally induced geometry distortions on the exciton localization. Finally, simulated fluorescence anisotropy decay curves for both DTA and the monomer unit dimethyl anthracene (DMA) are compared. As a result, our analysis reveals that changes in the transition density localization caused by energy transfer between two monomers in DTA is not the only source of depolarization and exciton relaxation within a single DTA monomer unit can also cause reorientation of the transition dipole.« less

  3. Photoexcited energy transfer in a weakly coupled dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, Laura Alfonso; Nelson, Tammie; Tretiak, Sergei; Fernandez-Alberti, Sebastian

    2015-01-08

    Nonadiabatic excited-state molecular dynamics (NA-ESMD) simulations have been performed in order to study the time-dependent exciton localization during energy transfer between two chromophore units of the weakly coupled anthracene dimer dithia-anthracenophane (DTA). Simulations are done at both low temperature (10 K) and room temperature (300 K). The initial photoexcitation creates an exciton which is primarily localized on a single monomer unit. Subsequently, the exciton experiences an ultrafast energy transfer becoming localized on either one monomer unit or the other, whereas delocalization between both monomers never occurs. In half of the trajectories, the electronic transition density becomes completely localized on the same monomer as the initial excitation, while in the other half, it becomes completely localized on the opposite monomer. In this article, we present an analysis of the energy transfer dynamics and the effect of thermally induced geometry distortions on the exciton localization. Finally, simulated fluorescence anisotropy decay curves for both DTA and the monomer unit dimethyl anthracene (DMA) are compared. As a result, our analysis reveals that changes in the transition density localization caused by energy transfer between two monomers in DTA is not the only source of depolarization and exciton relaxation within a single DTA monomer unit can also cause reorientation of the transition dipole.

  4. Theoretical predictions of the impact of nuclear dynamics and environment on core-level spectra of organic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prendergast, David; Schwartz, Craig; Uejio, Janel; Saykally, Richard

    2009-03-01

    Core-level spectroscopy provides an element-specific probe of local electronic structure and bonding, but linking details of atomic structure to measured spectra relies heavily on accurate theoretical interpretation. We present first principles simulations of the x-ray absorption of a range of organic molecules both in isolation and aqueous solvation, highlighting the spectral impact of internal nuclear motion as well as solvent interactions. Our approach uses density functional theory with explicit inclusion of the core-level excited state within a plane-wave supercell framework. Nuclear degrees of freedom are sampled using various molecular dynamics techniques. We indicate specific cases for molecules in their vibrational ground state at experimental conditions, where nuclear quantum effects must be included. Prepared by LBNL under Contract DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  5. Effects of non-local exchange on core level shifts for gas-phase and adsorbed molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Van den Bossche, M.; Grönbeck, H.; Martin, N. M.; Gustafson, J.; Lundgren, E.; Hakanoglu, C.; Weaver, J. F.

    2014-07-21

    Density functional theory calculations are often used to interpret experimental shifts in core level binding energies. Calculations based on gradient-corrected (GC) exchange-correlation functionals are known to reproduce measured core level shifts (CLS) of isolated molecules and metal surfaces with reasonable accuracy. In the present study, we discuss a series of examples where the shifts calculated within a GC-functional significantly deviate from the experimental values, namely the CLS of C 1s in ethyl trifluoroacetate, Pd 3d in PdO and the O 1s shift for CO adsorbed on PdO(101). The deviations are traced to effects of the electronic self-interaction error with GC-functionals and substantially better agreements between calculated and measured CLS are obtained when a fraction of exact exchange is used in the exchange-correlation functional.

  6. Trap density probing on top-gate MoS2 nanosheet field-effect transistors by photo-excited charge collection spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Kyunghee; Raza, Syed Raza Ali; Lee, Hee Sung; Jeon, Pyo Jin; Pezeshki, Atiye; Min, Sung-Wook; Kim, Jin Sung; Yoon, Woojin; Ju, Sang-Yong; Lee, Kimoon; Im, Seongil

    2015-03-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) field-effect transistors (FETs) have been extensively studied, but most of the FETs with gate insulators have displayed negative threshold voltage values, which indicates the presence of interfacial traps both shallow and deep in energy level. Despite such interface trap issues, reports on trap densities in MoS2 are quite limited. Here, we probed top-gate MoS2 FETs with two- (2L), three- (3L), and four-layer (4L) MoS2/dielectric interfaces to quantify deep-level interface trap densities by photo-excited charge collection spectroscopy (PECCS), and reported the result that deep-level trap densities over 1012 cm-2 may exist in the interface and bulk MoS2 near the interface. Transfer curve hysteresis and PECCS measurements show that shallow traps and deep traps are not that different in density order from each other. We conclude that our PECCS analysis distinguishably provides valuable information on deep level interface/bulk trap densities in 2D-based FETs.Two-dimensional (2D) molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) field-effect transistors (FETs) have been extensively studied, but most of the FETs with gate insulators have displayed negative threshold voltage values, which indicates the presence of interfacial traps both shallow and deep in energy level. Despite such interface trap issues, reports on trap densities in MoS2 are quite limited. Here, we probed top-gate MoS2 FETs with two- (2L), three- (3L), and four-layer (4L) MoS2/dielectric interfaces to quantify deep-level interface trap densities by photo-excited charge collection spectroscopy (PECCS), and reported the result that deep-level trap densities over 1012 cm-2 may exist in the interface and bulk MoS2 near the interface. Transfer curve hysteresis and PECCS measurements show that shallow traps and deep traps are not that different in density order from each other. We conclude that our PECCS analysis distinguishably provides valuable information on deep level interface

  7. Photoexcitation dynamics in SWCNT from sub-10 fs to ms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzani, Guglielmo

    2006-03-01

    Photophisics in Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes, SWCNT-PEG, prepared by HiPco embedded PMMA is investigated with cw and pulse photo-excitation. Using ultra-short pulses in the visible and near infrared, with time duration of 7 fs and 20 fs respectively, pump-probe spectroscopy is carried out in SWCNT-PEG films in air at room temperature. Photo-bleaching recovery and photoinduced absorption build-up, upon excitation into the second absorption band, are time resolved providing a time constant of 40 plus/minus 5 fs. This is associated to exciton relaxation within semiconducting NTs, due to Fano-type resonances between localized excitonic levels and the underlying continuum density. Pumping in different regions of the absorption spectrum and probing a broad range of wavelengths, gives a complete description of the phenomenon. After relaxation, the decay of the equilibrated exciton occurs with a broad distribution of time constants, which is consistent with the inhomogeneous broadening of the sample. When using the shortest pulses (sub-10 fs) coherent phonons are clearly detected in the transmission difference traces. A radial breathing mode (RBM) at 250 wavenumber is observed, with dephasing of 1.2 ps. Anharmonic coupling between the RBM mode and the G-mode is detected for the first time in the time domain. Using cw excitation at 2.3 and 1.3 eV we observed photorefractivity in SWCNT-PEG samples, kept in vacuum at low temperature, in close analogy with conjugated polymers. Charges, which are photogenerated in the films, can separate giving rise to local electric fields which in turn induce Stark shift of the excitonic resonance.

  8. Photo-excitation of carotenoids causes cytotoxicity via singlet oxygen production

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshii, Hiroshi; Yoshii, Yukie; Asai, Tatsuya; Furukawa, Takako; Takaichi, Shinichi; Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Some photo-excited carotenoids have photosensitizing ability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer They are able to produce ROS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Photo-excited fucoxanthin can produce singlet oxygen through energy transfer. -- Abstract: Carotenoids, natural pigments widely distributed in algae and plants, have a conjugated double bond system. Their excitation energies are correlated with conjugation length. We hypothesized that carotenoids whose energy states are above the singlet excited state of oxygen (singlet oxygen) would possess photosensitizing properties. Here, we demonstrated that human skin melanoma (A375) cells are damaged through the photo-excitation of several carotenoids (neoxanthin, fucoxanthin and siphonaxanthin). In contrast, photo-excitation of carotenoids that possess energy states below that of singlet oxygen, such as {beta}-carotene, lutein, loroxanthin and violaxanthin, did not enhance cell death. Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by photo-excited fucoxanthin or neoxanthin was confirmed using a reporter assay for ROS production with HeLa Hyper cells, which express a fluorescent indicator protein for intracellular ROS. Fucoxanthin and neoxanthin also showed high cellular penetration and retention. Electron spin resonance spectra using 2,2,6,6-tetramethil-4-piperidone as a singlet oxygen trapping agent demonstrated that singlet oxygen was produced via energy transfer from photo-excited fucoxanthin to oxygen molecules. These results suggest that carotenoids such as fucoxanthin, which are capable of singlet oxygen production through photo-excitation and show good penetration and retention in target cells, are useful as photosensitizers in photodynamic therapy for skin disease.

  9. On the selective photoexcitation of molecules within the homogeneous width of optical lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izmailov, Azad Ch.; Mahmoudi, Mohammad; Tajalli, Habib

    2000-03-01

    We investigate the photoexcitation of molecules of a gas, caused by the change of the state of the coherent population trapping of the open Λ-system of quantum levels at the sharp change of phase and amplitude parameters of the two-frequency laser pumping. Analysis is carried out both on the basis of the Schrödinger equation and in the formalism of the density matrix of molecules in the case of homogeneously broadened spectral lines. The maximum photoexcitation takes place at the two-quantum resonance between lower long-lived states of the Λ-system. It is shown, that the narrow, high-contrast peak of the photoexcitation appears on the comparatively low and wide background, caused by collisions of molecules. Conditions are determined, when the influence of this background is minimum and the spectral width of the photoexcitation peak is much less than the homogeneous widths of the optical lines of resonance transitions in the Λ-system. Such photoexcitation may be used in the technology of isotope (isomer) separation, selective photochemistry and photobiology even at essential overlap of optical spectra of different molecules.

  10. Photo-excitation of carotenoids causes cytotoxicity via singlet oxygen production.

    PubMed

    Yoshii, Hiroshi; Yoshii, Yukie; Asai, Tatsuya; Furukawa, Takako; Takaichi, Shinichi; Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa

    2012-01-01

    Carotenoids, natural pigments widely distributed in algae and plants, have a conjugated double bond system. Their excitation energies are correlated with conjugation length. We hypothesized that carotenoids whose energy states are above the singlet excited state of oxygen (singlet oxygen) would possess photosensitizing properties. Here, we demonstrated that human skin melanoma (A375) cells are damaged through the photo-excitation of several carotenoids (neoxanthin, fucoxanthin and siphonaxanthin). In contrast, photo-excitation of carotenoids that possess energy states below that of singlet oxygen, such as β-carotene, lutein, loroxanthin and violaxanthin, did not enhance cell death. Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by photo-excited fucoxanthin or neoxanthin was confirmed using a reporter assay for ROS production with HeLa Hyper cells, which express a fluorescent indicator protein for intracellular ROS. Fucoxanthin and neoxanthin also showed high cellular penetration and retention. Electron spin resonance spectra using 2,2,6,6-tetramethil-4-piperidone as a singlet oxygen trapping agent demonstrated that singlet oxygen was produced via energy transfer from photo-excited fucoxanthin to oxygen molecules. These results suggest that carotenoids such as fucoxanthin, which are capable of singlet oxygen production through photo-excitation and show good penetration and retention in target cells, are useful as photosensitizers in photodynamic therapy for skin disease. PMID:22185691

  11. The decay dynamics of photoexcited argon cluster ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. A.; Gotts, N. G.; Winkel, J. F.; Hallett, R.; Woodward, C. A.; Stace, A. J.; Whitaker, B. J.

    1992-07-01

    Following the photoexcitation of argon cluster ions, Ar+n for n in the range 4-25, kinetic energy release measurements have been undertaken on the fragments using two quite separate techniques. For Ar+4-Ar+6, fragment ion kinetic energy spectra were recorded at 532 nm in a crossed beam apparatus as a function of the angle of polarization of the laser radiation with respect to the incident ion beam. Only Ar+ from Ar+4 was observed to exhibit a polarization dependence together with a comparatively high kinetic energy release. The principal fragment ion Ar+2 was found both to emerge with a low kinetic energy release and to display no dependence on the angle of polarization of the radiation. In a second series of experiments, mass and kinetic energy resolved cluster ions were photodissociated in the entrance to a time-of-flight (TOF) device of variable length. The subsequent deflection of all ions allowed for time resolved measurements to be undertaken on the neutral photofragments. Following the absorption of a photon, all cluster ions up to Ar+25 were found to eject one/two neutral atoms with comparatively high kinetic energies. Any remaining internal energy appears to be dissipated through the loss of further neutral atoms with low kinetic energies. An analysis of the laser polarization dependence of these events, shows that those atoms identified as having high kinetic energies are ejected on a time scale which is short compared with the rotation period of a cluster (≂10 ps). These experimental observations are consistent with the results of recent molecular dynamics simulations of excited states in rare gas clusters by Landman, Jortner, and co-workers [J. Phys. Chem. 91, 4890 (1987); J. Chem. Phys. 88, 4273 (1988)]. Kinetic energy releases calculated from the TOF spectra exhibit marked fluctuations as a function of cluster size, with Ar+15 showing a minimum and Ar+19 a maximum. It is suggested that such behavior is part of a dynamic response to changes in

  12. Ultrafast terahertz response in photoexcited, vertically grown few-layer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Maixia; Quan, Baogang; He, Jingwen; Yao, Zehan; Gu, Changzhi; Li, Junjie; Zhang, Yan

    2016-03-01

    The terahertz (THz) response from vertically aligned few-layer graphene samples with and without femtosecond optical excitation was investigated. The frequency-dependent optical conductivity of the photoexcited vertically aligned few-layer graphene had a strong free carrier response. Upon photoexcitation, a transient decrease in THz transmission on the subpicosecond timescale was observed. A modulation depth of nearly 16% was demonstrated in the range of the photoexcitation power used. The photoinduced ultrafast response presented here is distinct from previous studies on horizontally grown graphene. The mechanism underlying this photoconductive ultrafast response was investigated by measuring the transmission properties and by calculating the carrier density. The results of these studies are promising for the development of high-performance THz modulators and ultrafast switchable THz photoelectric devices.

  13. Investigating photoexcitation-induced mitochondrial damage by chemotherapeutic corroles using multimode optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jae Youn; Lubow, David J.; Sims, Jessica D.; Gray, Harry B.; Mahammed, Atif; Gross, Zeev; Medina-Kauwe, Lali K.; Farkas, Daniel L.

    2012-01-01

    We recently reported that a targeted, brightly fluorescent gallium corrole (HerGa) is highly effective for breast tumor detection and treatment. Unlike structurally similar porphryins, HerGa exhibits tumor-targeted toxicity without the need for photoexcitation. We have now examined whether photoexcitation further modulates HerGa toxicity, using multimode optical imaging of live cells, including two-photon excited fluorescence, differential interference contrast (DIC), spectral, and lifetime imaging. Using two-photon excited fluorescence imaging, we observed that light at specific wavelengths augments the HerGa-mediated mitochondrial membrane potential disruption of breast cancer cells in situ. In addition, DIC, spectral, and fluorescence lifetime imaging enabled us to both validate cell damage by HerGa photoexcitation and investigate HerGa internalization, thus allowing optimization of light dose and timing. Our demonstration of HerGa phototoxicity opens the way for development of new methods of cancer intervention using tumor-targeted corroles.

  14. Analysis of photoexcitation energy dependence in the photoluminescence of firefly luciferin.

    PubMed

    Hiyama, Miyabi; Akiyama, Hidefumi; Mochizuki, Toshimitsu; Yamada, Kenta; Koga, Nobuaki

    2014-01-01

    The whole pathways for photoluminescence, which include absorption, relaxation and emission, of firefly luciferin in aqueous solutions of different pH values with different photoexcitation energies were theoretically investigated by considering protonation/deprotonation. It is experimentally known that the color of fluorescence changes from green to red with a decrease in the photoexcitation energy. We confirmed with the theoretical analysis that the peak energy shift in the fluorescence spectra with varying photoenergies is due to a change in photoluminescence pathway. When the photoexcitation energy is decreased, the red emission from a monoanion form of firefly luciferin with carboxylate and phenolate groups and N-protonated thiazoline ring occurs irrespective of the pH values. However, because the species abundant in the solution and those excited by the photon depend on the solution pH, the pathway leading to the monoanion form changes with the solution pH. PMID:24446724

  15. Probing core-electron orbitals by scanning transmission electron microscopy and measuring the delocalization of core-level excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Jong Seok; Odlyzko, Michael L.; Xu, Peng; Jalan, Bharat; Mkhoyan, K. Andre

    2016-04-01

    By recording low-noise energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy maps from crystalline specimens using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, it is possible to probe core-level electron orbitals in real space. Both the 1 s and 2 p orbitals of Sr and Ti atoms in SrTi O3 are probed, and their projected excitation potentials are determined. This paper also demonstrates experimental measurement of the electronic excitation impact parameter and the delocalization of an excitation due to Coulombic beam-orbital interaction.

  16. Graphene on Au-coated SiOx substrate: Its visibility and intrinsic core-level photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chung-Lin; Chen, Jhih-Wei; Wang, Chiang-Lun; Chen, Chia-Hao; Chen, Yi-Chun

    2012-02-01

    With the motivation of precisely and intrinsically characterizing a exfoliate graphene using photoelectron spectroscopy, a conducting substrate having high optical contrast is greatly desired. Here, we demonstrate that exfoliated graphene can be optically visible on a thin 9-nm Au-coated SiOx substrate, and can be easily conducted into scanning photoelectron microscopy/spectroscopy (SPEM/S) studies. Because of the elimination of charging effect, precisely core-level characterization of exfoliated graphene is presented with different numbers of layers. Consequently, the usage of Au-coated SiOx substrate serves a simple but effective method to study pristine graphene by photoelectron spectroscopy and other electron-detection techniques.

  17. Electronic noise in high electron-mobility transistors under photo-excitation conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Marinchio, H.; Sabatini, G.; Varani, L.; Palermo, C.; Shiktorov, P.; Starikov, E.; Gruzinskis, V.; Ziade, P.; Kallassy, Z.

    2009-04-23

    The hydrodynamic approach based on the carrier concentration and velocity conservation equations is used to investigate the influence of photo-excitation of plasma waves at the beating frequency of two lasers on the intrinsic extra noise in InGaAs HEMTs caused by thermally-induced plasma oscillations. It is found that, by increasing the amplitude of the photo-excitation, a significant supression of the intrinsic excess noise is observed at the beating frequency as well as at all the frequencies where plasma waves can be excited.

  18. Effects of carrier-carrier scattering on population inversion in graphene under pulse photoexcitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satou, Akira; Ryzhii, Victor; Otsuji, Taiichi

    2015-01-01

    We study the carrier relaxation dynamics in intrinsic graphene after pulse photoexcitation and reveal effects of intraband carrier-carrier scattering on population inversion in the terahertz region, by conducting simulation based on the quasi-classical Boltzmann equation. It is demonstrated that by changing the dielectric constant of the surrounding materials the rate of carrier-carrier scattering can be controlled and the relaxation dynamics differs for cases with low and high dielectric constants. It is also found that the Pauli blocking of photogeneration in case of the pulse photoexcitation causes decrease in the photocarrier concentration and thus weakening of population inversion with higher dielectric constant.

  19. Electron-deformation mechanism of photoexcitation of hypersound in semiconductors in a dc electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Chigarev, N V

    2002-09-30

    The effect of a dc electric field on photoexcitation of a hypersonic pulse in a semiconductor via an electron-deformation mechanism is studied. The profiles of acoustic pulses are simulated for different directions of the electric field. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  20. Suppression of self-interstitials in silicon during ion implantation via in-situ photoexcitation

    SciTech Connect

    Ravi, J.; Erokhin, Yu.; Christensen, K.; Rozgonyi, G.A.; Patnaik, B.K.; White, C.W.

    1995-02-01

    The influence of in-situ photoexcitation during low temperature implantation on self-interstitial agglomeration following annealing has been investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A reduction in the level of as-implanted damage determined by RBS and TEM occurs athermally during 150 keV self-ion implantation. The damage reduction following a 300 C anneal suggests that it is mostly divacancy related. Subsequent thermal annealing at 800 C resulted in the formation of (311) rod like defects or dislocation loops for samples with and without in-situ photoexcitation, respectively. Estimation of the number of self-interstitials bound by these defects in the sample without in-situ photoexcitation corresponds to the implanted dose; whereas for the in-situ photoexcitation sample a suppression of {approx}2 orders in magnitude is found. The kinetics of the athermal annealing process are discussed within the framework of either a recombination enhanced defect reaction mechanism, or a charge state enhanced defect migration and Coulomb interaction.

  1. Photoexcited breathers in conjugated polyenes: An excited-state molecular dynamics study

    PubMed Central

    Tretiak, S.; Saxena, A.; Martin, R. L.; Bishop, A. R.

    2003-01-01

    π-conjugated polymers have become an important class of materials for electronic devices. Design of these devices requires understanding such processes as photochemical reactions, spatial dynamics of photoexcitations, and energy and charge transport, which in turn involve complex coupled electron-vibrational dynamics. Here we study nonlinear photoexcitation dynamics in the polyene oligomers by using a quantum-chemical method suitable for the simulation of excited-state molecular dynamics in extended molecular systems with sizes up to hundreds of atoms. The method is based on the adiabatic propagation of the ground-state and transition single-electron density matrices along the trajectory. The simulations reveal formation of a self-localized vibronic excitation (“breather” or multiquanta bound state) with a typical period of 34 fs and allows us to identify specific slow and fast nuclear motions strongly coupled to the electronic degrees of freedom. The effect of chain imperfections and chemical defects on the dynamics is also investigated. A complementary two-dimensional analysis of corresponding transition density matrices provides an efficient way to monitor time-dependent real-space localization of the photoexcitation by identifying the underlying changes in charge densities and bond orders. Possible correlated electronic and vibrational spectroscopic signatures of photoexcited breathers are predicted, and generalizations to energy localization in complex macromolecules are discussed. PMID:12594339

  2. Core-level spectroscopy investigation of the Mo{sub 0.75}Re{sub 0.25}(100) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Lyman, P.F.; Zehner, D.M.

    1993-10-01

    Preferential surface segregation in the Mo{sub 0.75}(100) surface region was investigated using high-resolution core-level spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation. The magnitude and direction of the surface core-level shifts observed in this study can be qualitatively understood by comparison to W and Mo core-level shifts. Measured core-level intensities are found to be consistent with the segregation of Mo to the surface of the alloy, with an enrichment of Re in the second layer (as found in previous investigations). It is inferred that both Tc and Os will segregate to the Mo{sub 0.75}Re{sub 0.25}(100) surface.

  3. Effect of iodine impurity on relaxation of photoexcited silver chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Vostrikova, Yu. V. Klyuev, V. G.

    2008-03-15

    The time and temperature dependences of relaxation of excited AgCl and AgCl:I crystals is studied by the method of photostimulated flash of luminescence. The presence of iodine impurity in silver chloride gives rise to hole recombination (luminescence) centers and hole traps in the band gap. It is shown that the main contribution to the decrease in the concentration of electrons localized at deep traps is made by the recombination of electrons with holes released thermally from shallow localization levels (iodine-related centers). Estimation of activation energy for the relaxation process showed that these energies for the AgCl and AgCl:I samples under study are the same within the experimental error and are equal to E{sub rel1} = 0.01 {+-} 0.0005 eV for the initial stage of relaxation and E{sub rel2} = 0.09 {+-} 0.005 eV for the final state. This fact indicates that the majority of hole traps involved in the relaxation process in AgCl are related to iodine impurity. In the course of thermal relaxation in AgCl, relocalization of nonequilibrium charge carriers from shallow levels to deep levels is observed. The depth of the corresponding trap is E{sub arl} = 0.174 {+-} 0.03 eV.

  4. Ab initio study of 3s core-level x-ray photoemission spectra in transition metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Manabu; Igarashi, Jun-Ichi

    2010-01-01

    We calculate the 3s - and 4s -core-level x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) spectra in the ferromagnetic and nonmagnetic transition metals by developing an ab initio method. We obtain the spectra exhibiting the characteristic shapes as a function of binding energy in good agreement with experimental observations. The spectral shapes are strikingly different between the majority spin channel and the minority spin channel for ferromagnetic metals Ni, Co, and Fe, that is, large intensities appear in the higher binding-energy side of the main peak (satellite) in the majority spin channel. Such satellite or shoulder intensities are also obtained for nonmagnetic metals V and Ru. These behaviors are elucidated in terms of the change of the one-electron states induced by the core-hole potential.

  5. Evidence of the nature of core-level photoemission satellites using angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Moler, E.J.; Kellar, S.A.; Huff, W.R.A.

    1997-04-01

    The authors present a unique method of experimentally determining the angular momentum and intrinsic/extrinsic origin of core-level photoemission satellites by examining the satellite diffraction pattern in the Angle Resolved Photoemission Extended Fine Structure (ARPEFS) mode. They show for the first time that satellite peaks not associated with chemically differentiated atomic species display an ARPEFS intensity oscillation. They present ARPEFS data for the carbon 1s from ({radical}3x{radical}3)R30 CO/Cu(111) and p2mg(2xl)CO/Ni(110), nitrogen 1s from c(2x2) N{sub 2}/Ni(100), cobalt 1s from p(1x1)Co/Cu(100), and nickel 3p from clean nickel (111). The satellite peaks and tails of the Doniach-Sunjic line shapes in all cases exhibit ARPEFS curves which indicate an angular momentum identical to the main peak and are of an intrinsic nature.

  6. Real-time TDDFT simulations of time-resolved core-level spectroscopies in solid state systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pemmaraju, Sri Chaitanya Das; Prendergast, David; Theory of Nanostructured Materials Facility Team

    The advent of sub-femtosecond time-resolved core-level spectroscopies based on high harmonic generated XUV pulses has enabled the study of electron dyanamics on characteristic femtosecond time-scales. Unambiguous interpretation of these powerful yet complex spectroscopies however requires the development of theoretical algorithms capable of modeling light-matter interaction across a wide energy range spanning both valence and core orbitals. In this context we present a recent implementation of the velocity-gauge formalism of real-time TDDFT within a linear combination of atomic orbital (LCAO) framework, which facilitates efficient numerical treatment of localized semi-core orbitals. Dynamics and spectra obtained from LCAO based simulations are compared to those from a real-space grid implementation. Potential applications are also illustrated by applying the method towards interpreting recent atto-second time-resolved IR-pump XUV-probe spectroscopies investigating sub-cycle excitation dynamics in bulk silicon.

  7. On sulfur core level binding energies in thiol self-assembly and alternative adsorption sites: An experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Jia, Juanjuan; Kara, Abdelkader; Pasquali, Luca; Bendounan, Azzedine; Sirotti, Fausto; Esaulov, Vladimir A

    2015-09-14

    Characteristic core level binding energies (CLBEs) are regularly used to infer the modes of molecular adsorption: orientation, organization, and dissociation processes. Here, we focus on a largely debated situation regarding CLBEs in the case of chalcogen atom bearing molecules. For a thiol, this concerns the case when the CLBE of a thiolate sulfur at an adsorption site can be interpreted alternatively as due to atomic adsorption of a S atom, resulting from dissociation. Results of an investigation of the characteristics of thiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) obtained by vacuum evaporative adsorption are presented along with core level binding energy calculations. Thiol ended SAMs of 1,4-benzenedimethanethiol (BDMT) obtained by evaporation on Au display an unconventional CLBE structure at about 161.25 eV, which is close to a known CLBE of a S atom on Au. Adsorption and CLBE calculations for sulfur atoms and BDMT molecules are reported and allow delineating trends as a function of chemisorption on hollow, bridge, and atop sites and including the presence of adatoms. These calculations suggest that the 161.25 eV peak is due to an alternative adsorption site, which could be associated to an atop configuration. Therefore, this may be an alternative interpretation, different from the one involving the adsorption of atomic sulfur resulting from the dissociation process of the S-C bond. Calculated differences in S(2p) CLBEs for free BDMT molecules, SH group sulfur on top of the SAM, and disulfide are also reported to clarify possible errors in assignments. PMID:26374051

  8. On sulfur core level binding energies in thiol self-assembly and alternative adsorption sites: An experimental and theoretical study

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Juanjuan; Kara, Abdelkader E-mail: vladimir.esaulov@u-psud.fr; Pasquali, Luca; Bendounan, Azzedine; Sirotti, Fausto; Esaulov, Vladimir A. E-mail: vladimir.esaulov@u-psud.fr

    2015-09-14

    Characteristic core level binding energies (CLBEs) are regularly used to infer the modes of molecular adsorption: orientation, organization, and dissociation processes. Here, we focus on a largely debated situation regarding CLBEs in the case of chalcogen atom bearing molecules. For a thiol, this concerns the case when the CLBE of a thiolate sulfur at an adsorption site can be interpreted alternatively as due to atomic adsorption of a S atom, resulting from dissociation. Results of an investigation of the characteristics of thiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) obtained by vacuum evaporative adsorption are presented along with core level binding energy calculations. Thiol ended SAMs of 1,4-benzenedimethanethiol (BDMT) obtained by evaporation on Au display an unconventional CLBE structure at about 161.25 eV, which is close to a known CLBE of a S atom on Au. Adsorption and CLBE calculations for sulfur atoms and BDMT molecules are reported and allow delineating trends as a function of chemisorption on hollow, bridge, and atop sites and including the presence of adatoms. These calculations suggest that the 161.25 eV peak is due to an alternative adsorption site, which could be associated to an atop configuration. Therefore, this may be an alternative interpretation, different from the one involving the adsorption of atomic sulfur resulting from the dissociation process of the S–C bond. Calculated differences in S(2p) CLBEs for free BDMT molecules, SH group sulfur on top of the SAM, and disulfide are also reported to clarify possible errors in assignments.

  9. On sulfur core level binding energies in thiol self-assembly and alternative adsorption sites: An experimental and theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Juanjuan; Kara, Abdelkader; Pasquali, Luca; Bendounan, Azzedine; Sirotti, Fausto; Esaulov, Vladimir A.

    2015-09-01

    Characteristic core level binding energies (CLBEs) are regularly used to infer the modes of molecular adsorption: orientation, organization, and dissociation processes. Here, we focus on a largely debated situation regarding CLBEs in the case of chalcogen atom bearing molecules. For a thiol, this concerns the case when the CLBE of a thiolate sulfur at an adsorption site can be interpreted alternatively as due to atomic adsorption of a S atom, resulting from dissociation. Results of an investigation of the characteristics of thiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) obtained by vacuum evaporative adsorption are presented along with core level binding energy calculations. Thiol ended SAMs of 1,4-benzenedimethanethiol (BDMT) obtained by evaporation on Au display an unconventional CLBE structure at about 161.25 eV, which is close to a known CLBE of a S atom on Au. Adsorption and CLBE calculations for sulfur atoms and BDMT molecules are reported and allow delineating trends as a function of chemisorption on hollow, bridge, and atop sites and including the presence of adatoms. These calculations suggest that the 161.25 eV peak is due to an alternative adsorption site, which could be associated to an atop configuration. Therefore, this may be an alternative interpretation, different from the one involving the adsorption of atomic sulfur resulting from the dissociation process of the S-C bond. Calculated differences in S(2p) CLBEs for free BDMT molecules, SH group sulfur on top of the SAM, and disulfide are also reported to clarify possible errors in assignments.

  10. Model of Ultrafast Intersystem Crossing in Photoexcited Transition-Metal Organic Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    van Veenendaal, Michel; Chang, Jun; Fedro, A.J.

    2010-07-01

    The mechanism behind fast intersystem crossing in transition-metal complexes is shown to be a result of the dephasing of the photoexcited state to the phonon continuum of a different state with a significantly different transition metal-ligand distance. The coupling is a result of the spin-orbit interaction causing a change in the local moment. A recurrence to the initial state is prevented by the damping of the phonon oscillation. The decay time is faster than the oscillation frequency of the transition metal-ligand stretch mode, in agreement with experiment. For energies above the region where the strongest coupling occurs, a slower 'leakage-type' decay is observed. If the photoexcited state is lower in energy than the state it couples to, then there is no decay.

  11. Spin filtering neutrons with a proton target dynamically polarized using photo-excited triplet states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haag, M.; van den Brandt, B.; Eichhorn, T. R.; Hautle, P.; Wenckebach, W. Th.

    2012-06-01

    In a test of principle a neutron spin filter has been built, which is based on dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) using photo-excited triplet states. This DNP method has advantages over classical concepts as the requirements for cryogenic equipment and magnets are much relaxed: the spin filter is operated in a field of 0.3 T at a temperature of about 100 K and has performed reliably over periods of several weeks. The neutron beam was also used to analyze the polarization of the target employed as a spin filter. We obtained an independent measurement of the proton spin polarization of ˜0.13 in good agreement with the value determined with NMR. Moreover, the neutron beam was used to measure the proton spin polarization as a function of position in the naphthalene sample. The polarization was found to be homogeneous, even at low laser power, in contradiction to existing models describing the photo-excitation process.

  12. High-resolution core-level spectroscopy of Si(100)c(4 × 2) and some metal-induced Si(111)√3 × √3 surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhrberg, R. I. G.

    2001-12-01

    High-resolution core-level spectroscopy has been applied to the Si(100)c(4 × 2) surface. A correct decomposition of the Si 2p spectrum of the clean surface is important for studies of adsorption of different species and the formation of various surface reconstructions. A very well-resolved Si 2p spectrum is presented for the Si(100)c(4 × 2) surface. The decomposition of this spectrum verifies the original decomposition scheme introduced by Landemark et al (Landemark E, Karlsson C J, Chao Y-C and Uhrberg R I G 1992 Phys. Rev. Lett. 69 1588). Core-level spectra of some metal-induced Si(111)√3 × √3 surfaces are also presented. A comparison is made between the √3 × √3 reconstructions formed on Si(111) by In, a group III atom, and by Sn, a group IV atom. Both the 4d core levels of the adatoms and the Si 2p core-level spectra are discussed. Different kinds of deviation from an ideal surface may introduce a significant broadening of the core-level spectra. The effect of additional Ag atoms is discussed in the case of the Ag/Si(111)√3 × √3 surface. By reducing the surplus of Ag atoms on this surface, a Si 2p spectrum with extremely narrow components has been obtained.

  13. Fluxes of nonequilibrium photo-excited phonons along surfaces of crystals without an inversion center

    SciTech Connect

    Blokh, M.D.

    1988-01-01

    The flux of nonequilibrium phonons excited by light in the near-surface domain of a crystal or a thin plate is investigated. An exact expression is obtained for the phonon energy flux for a crystal with a polar direction and its polarization dependence is analyzed. The magnitude of the energy flux can reach the incident light intensity. The temperature difference produced by the flux of nonequilibrium photo-excited phonons is found.

  14. Ultrafast Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Using a Photoexcited Low-Temperature-Grown GaAs Tip

    SciTech Connect

    Donati, G.P.; Rodriguez, G.; Taylor, A.J.

    1999-05-21

    The authors report ultrafast scanning tunneling microscopy using a low-temperature-grown GaAs tip photoexcited by 100-fs, 800-nm pulses. They use this tip to detect picosecond transients on a coplanar stripline and demonstrate a temporal resolution of 1.7 ps. A dependence of the transient signal upon spatial position of the tip is revealed, indicating that the signal arises from areas on the sample smaller than {approximately}20nm.

  15. Electrochemical immobilization of Fluorescent labelled probe molecules on a FTO surface for affinity detection based on photo-excited current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haruyama, Tetsuya; Wakabayashi, Ryo; Cho, Takeshi; Matsuyama, Sho-taro

    2011-10-01

    Photo-excited current can be generated at a molecular interface between a photo-excited molecules and a semi-conductive material in appropriate condition. The system has been recognized for promoting photo-energy devices such as an organic dye sensitized solar-cell. The photo-current generated reactions are totally dependent on the interfacial energy reactions, which are in a highly fluctuated interfacial environment. The authors investigated the photo-excited current reaction to develop a smart affinity detection method. However, in order to perform both an affinity reaction and a photo-excited current reaction at a molecular interface, ordered fabrications of the functional (affinity, photo-excitation, etc.) molecules layer on a semi-conductive surface is required. In the present research, we would like to present the fabrication and functional performance of photo-excited current-based affinity assay device and its application for detection of endocrine disrupting chemicals. On the FTO surface, fluorescent pigment labelled affinity peptide was immobilized through the EC tag (electrochemical-tag) method. The modified FTO produced a current when it was irradiated with diode laser light. However, the photo current decreased drastically when estrogen (ES) coexisted in the reaction solution. In this case, immobilized affinity probe molecules formed a complex with ES and estrogen receptor (ER). The result strongly suggests that the photo-excited current transduction between probe molecule-labelled cyanine pigment and the FTO surface was partly inhibited by a complex that formed at the affinity oligo-peptide region in a probe molecule on the FTO electrode. The bound bulky complex may act as an impediment to perform smooth transduction of photo-excited current in the molecular interface. The present system is new type of photo-reaction-based analysis. This system can be used to perform simple high-sensitive homogeneous assays.

  16. Bandgap modulation in photoexcited topological insulator Bi2Te3 via atomic displacements.

    PubMed

    Hada, Masaki; Norimatsu, Katsura; Tanaka, Sei Ichi; Keskin, Sercan; Tsuruta, Tetsuya; Igarashi, Kyushiro; Ishikawa, Tadahiko; Kayanuma, Yosuke; Miller, R J Dwayne; Onda, Ken; Sasagawa, Takao; Koshihara, Shin-Ya; Nakamura, Kazutaka G

    2016-07-14

    The atomic and electronic dynamics in the topological insulator (TI) Bi2Te3 under strong photoexcitation were characterized with time-resolved electron diffraction and time-resolved mid-infrared spectroscopy. Three-dimensional TIs characterized as bulk insulators with an electronic conduction surface band have shown a variety of exotic responses in terms of electronic transport when observed under conditions of applied pressure, magnetic field, or circularly polarized light. However, the atomic motions and their correlation between electronic systems in TIs under strong photoexcitation have not been explored. The artificial and transient modification of the electronic structures in TIs via photoinduced atomic motions represents a novel mechanism for providing a comparable level of bandgap control. The results of time-domain crystallography indicate that photoexcitation induces two-step atomic motions: first bismuth and then tellurium center-symmetric displacements. These atomic motions in Bi2Te3 trigger 10% bulk bandgap narrowing, which is consistent with the time-resolved mid-infrared spectroscopy results. PMID:27421417

  17. Bandgap modulation in photoexcited topological insulator Bi2Te3 via atomic displacements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hada, Masaki; Norimatsu, Katsura; Tanaka, Sei'ichi; Keskin, Sercan; Tsuruta, Tetsuya; Igarashi, Kyushiro; Ishikawa, Tadahiko; Kayanuma, Yosuke; Miller, R. J. Dwayne; Onda, Ken; Sasagawa, Takao; Koshihara, Shin-ya; Nakamura, Kazutaka G.

    2016-07-01

    The atomic and electronic dynamics in the topological insulator (TI) Bi2Te3 under strong photoexcitation were characterized with time-resolved electron diffraction and time-resolved mid-infrared spectroscopy. Three-dimensional TIs characterized as bulk insulators with an electronic conduction surface band have shown a variety of exotic responses in terms of electronic transport when observed under conditions of applied pressure, magnetic field, or circularly polarized light. However, the atomic motions and their correlation between electronic systems in TIs under strong photoexcitation have not been explored. The artificial and transient modification of the electronic structures in TIs via photoinduced atomic motions represents a novel mechanism for providing a comparable level of bandgap control. The results of time-domain crystallography indicate that photoexcitation induces two-step atomic motions: first bismuth and then tellurium center-symmetric displacements. These atomic motions in Bi2Te3 trigger 10% bulk bandgap narrowing, which is consistent with the time-resolved mid-infrared spectroscopy results.

  18. Photoexcitation of adsorbates on metal surfaces: One-step or three-step

    SciTech Connect

    Petek, Hrvoje

    2012-09-07

    In this essay we discuss the light-matter interactions at molecule-covered metal surfaces that initiate surface photochemistry. The hot-electron mechanism for surface photochemistry, whereby the absorption of light by a metal surface creates an electron-hole pair, and the hot electron scatters through an unoccupied resonance of adsorbate to initiate nuclear dynamics leading to photochemistry, has become widely accepted. Yet, ultrafast spectroscopic measurements of molecule-surface electronic structure and photoexcitation dynamics provide scant support for the hot electron mechanism. Instead, in most cases the adsorbate resonances are excited through photoinduced substrate-to-adsorbate charge transfer. Based on recent studies of the role of coherence in adsorbate photoexcitation, as measured by the optical phase and momentum resolved two-photon photoemission measurements, we examine critically the hot electron mechanism, and propose an alternative description based on direct charge transfer of electrons from the substrate to adsorbate. The advantage of this more quantum mechanically rigorous description is that it informs how material properties of the substrate and adsorbate, as well as their interaction, influence the frequency dependent probability of photoexcitation and ultimately how light can be used to probe and control surface femtochemistry.

  19. Skin-depth lattice strain, core-level trap depression and valence charge polarization of Al surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan; Bo, Maolin; Liu, Yonghui; Guo, Yongling; Wang, Haibin; Yue, Jian; Huang, Yongli

    2016-01-01

    Clarifying the origin for surface core-level shift (SCLS) and gaining quantitative information regarding the coordination-resolved local strain, binding energy (BE) shift and cohesive energy change have been a challenge. Here, we show that a combination of the bond order-length-strength (BOLS) premise, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and the ab initio density functional theory (DFT) calculations of aluminum (Al) 2p3/2 energy shift of Al surfaces has enabled us to derive such information, namely, (i) the 2p3/2 energy of an isolated Al atom (72.146 ± 0.003eV) and its bulk shift (0.499 eV); (ii) the skin lattice contracts by up to 12.5% and the BE density increases by 70%; and (iii) the cohesive energy drops up to 38%. It is affirmed that the shorter and stronger bonds between under-coordinated atoms provide a perturbation to the Hamiltonian and hence lead to the local strain, quantum entrapment and valence charge polarization. Findings should help in understanding the phenomena of surface pre-melting and skin-high elasticity, in general.

  20. Core-level Photoemission Study for Cuprates with a Dynamical Mean-Field Approach Considering Realistic Crystal Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariki, Atsushi; Uozumi, Takayuki

    2013-03-01

    Recently, remarkable experimental progress reveals some characteristic spectral features in the 2p3/2main line of Cu 2p core-level X-ray photoemission spectra (XPS). The structures show strong material dependence and drastic changes for electron or hole doping. Van Veenendaal et al., pointed out that the main line shape is strongly affected by the so-called nonlocal screening which is accompanied by a formation of a Zhang-Rice singlet (ZRS) in the XPS final state. On the other hand, Taguchi et al., shows these features are reproduced by introducing an phenomenological extended impurity model. We consider that this topic on 2pXPS of cuprates still remain controversial. In this study, we propose another approach based on the dynamical mean field theory(DMFT) considering the realistic crystal structure. Many-particle effects including the ZRS is appropriately embedded in the hybridization function of a single impurity Anderson model through the DMFT self-consistent cycle. Our approach reproduces experimental results and shows that the Cu 2p3/2 main line is closely related with the quasi-particle structure near the Fermi energy.

  1. Impacts of electronically photo-excited NO2 on air pollution in the South Coast Air Basin of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ensberg, J. J.; Carreras-Sospedra, M.; Dabdub, D.

    2010-02-01

    A new path for hydroxyl radical formation via photo-excitation of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and the reaction of photo-excited NO2 with water is evaluated using the UCI-CIT model for the South Coast Air Basin of California (SoCAB). Two separate studies predict different reaction rates, which differ by nearly an order of magnitude, for the reaction of photo-excited NO2 with water. Impacts of this new chemical mechanism on ozone and particulate matter formation, while utilizing both reaction rates, are quantified by simulating two summer episodes. First, sensitivity simulations are conducted to evaluate the uncertainty in the rate of reaction of photo-excited NO2 with water reported in the literature. Results indicate that the addition of photo-excited NO2 chemistry increases peak 8-h average ozone and particulate matter concentrations. The importance of this new chemistry is then evaluated in the context of pollution control strategies. A series of simulations are conducted to generate isopleths for ozone and particulate matter concentrations, varying baseline nitrogen oxides (NOx) and volatile organic compounds (VOC) emissions. Isopleths are obtained using 1987 emissions, to represent past conditions, and 2005, to represent current conditions in the SoCAB. Results show that the sensitivity of modeled pollutant control strategies due to photoexcitation decreases with the decrease in baseline emissions from 1987 to 2005. Results show that including NO2 photo-excitation, increases the sensitivity of ozone concentration with respect to changes in NOx emissions for both years. In particular, decreasing NOx emissions in 2005 when NO2 photo-excitation is included, while utilizing the higher reaction rate, leads to ozone relative reduction factors that are 15% lower than in a case without photo-excited NO2. This implies that photoexcitation increases the effectiveness in reducing ozone through NOx emissions reductions alone, which has implications for the assessment of future

  2. Optimization of Extreme Ultraviolet Light Source from High Harmonic Generation for Condensed-Phase Core-Level Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ming-Fu; Verkamp, Max A.; Ryland, Elizabeth S.; Benke, Kristin; Zhang, Kaili; Carlson, Michaela; Vura-Weis, Josh

    2015-06-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (XUV) light source from high-order harmonic generation has been shown to be a powerful tool for core-level spectroscopy. In addition, this light source provides very high temporal resolution (10-18 s to 10-15 s) for time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy. Most applications of the light source have been limited to the studies of atomic and molecular systems, with technique development focused on optimizing for shorter pulses (i.e. tens of attoseconds) or higher XUV energy (i.e. ~keV range). For the application to general molecular systems in solid and liquid forms, however, the XUV photon flux and stability are highly demanded due to the strong absorption by substrates and solvents. In this case, the main limitation is due to the stability of the high order generation process and the limited bandwidth of the XUV source that gives only discrete even/odd order peaks. Consequently, this results in harmonic artifact noise that overlaps with the resonant signal. In our current study, we utilize a semi-infinite cell for high harmonic generation from two quantum trajectories (i.e. short and long) at over-driven NIR power. This condition, produces broad XUV spectrum without using complicated optics (e.g. hollow-core fibers and double optical gating). This light source allows us to measure the static absorption spectrum of the iron M-edge from a Fe(acac)3 molecular solid film, which shows a resonant feature of 0.01 OD (~2.3% absorption). Moreover, we also investigate how sample roughness affects the static absorption spectrum. We are able to make smooth solar cell precursor materials (i.e. PbI2 and PbBr2) by spin casting and observe iodine (50 eV) and bromine (70 eV) absorption edges in the order of 0.05 OD with minimal harmonic artifact noise.

  3. Sugar radicals formed by photo-excitation of guanine cation radical in oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Adhikary, Amitava; Collins, Sean; Khanduri, Deepti; Sevilla, Michael D.

    2008-01-01

    This work presents evidence that photo-excitation of guanine cation radical (G•+) in dGpdG and DNA-oligonucleotides: TGT, TGGT, TGGGT, TTGTT, TTGGTT, TTGGTTGGTT, AGA and AGGGA in frozen glassy aqueous solutions at low temperatures leads to hole transfer to the sugar phosphate backbone and results in high yields of deoxyribose radicals. In this series of oligonucleotides we find that, G•+ on photo-excitation, at 143 K leads to the formation of predominantly C5′• and C1′• with small amounts of C3′•. Photo-conversion yields of G•+ to sugar radicals in oligonucleotides decreased as the overall chain length increased. However, for high molecular weight dsDNA (salmon testes) in frozen aqueous solutions substantial conversion of G•+ to C1′• (only) sugar radical is still found (ca. 50%). Within the cohort of sugar radicals formed we find a relative increase in the formation of C1′• with length of the oligonucleotide along with decreases in C3′• and C5′• For dsDNA in frozen solutions, only the formation of C1′• is found via photo-excitation of G•+ without a significant temperature dependence (77 K to 180 K). Long wavelength visible light (>540 nm) is observed to be about as effective as light under 540 nm for photoconversion of G•+ to sugar radicals for short oligonucleotides but gradually loses effectiveness with chain length. This wavelength dependence is attributed to base-to-base hole transfer for wavelengths >540 nm. Base-to-sugar hole transfer is suggested to dominate under 540 nm. These results may have implications for a number of investigations of hole transfer through DNA in which DNA-holes are subjected to continuous visible illumination. PMID:17547448

  4. Method And Apparatus For Examining A Tissue Using The Spectral Wing Emission Therefrom Induced By Visible To Infrared Photoexcitation.

    DOEpatents

    Alfano, Robert R.; Demos, Stavros G.; Zhang, Gang

    2003-12-16

    Method and an apparatus for examining a tissue using the spectral wing emission therefrom induced by visible to infrared photoexcitation. In one aspect, the method is used to characterize the condition of a tissue sample and comprises the steps of (a) photoexciting the tissue sample with substantially monochromatic light having a wavelength of at least 600 nm; and (b) using the resultant far red and near infrared spectral wing emission (SW) emitted from the tissue sample to characterize the condition of the tissue sample. In one embodiment, the substantially monochromatic photoexciting light is a continuous beam of light, and the resultant steady-state far red and near infrared SW emission from the tissue sample is used to characterize the condition of the tissue sample. In another embodiment, the substantially monochromatic photoexciting light is a light pulse, and the resultant time-resolved far red and near infrared SW emission emitted from the tissue sample is used to characterize the condition of the tissue sample. In still another embodiment, the substantially monochromatic photoexciting light is a polarized light pulse, and the parallel and perpendicular components of the resultant polarized time-resolved SW emission emitted from the tissue sample are used to characterize the condition of the tissue sample.

  5. [Photoexcitation mechanism of photoconductive device by organic/inorganic thin-film heteropairing].

    PubMed

    Jin, Hui; Teng, Feng; Liu, Jun-Feng; Meng, Xian-Guo; Xu, Zheng; Hou, Yan-Bing; Xu, Xu-Rong

    2004-08-01

    Photoconductive devices with organic (polyvinylcarbazole-PVK)/inorganic (zinc-sulfide--ZnS) thin-film heteropairing were fabricated. In external field, the excitation profile of the steady-state photoconductivity and the primary photoexcitation process of hybrid devices were presented and discussed. Comparison of photoconductivity of the devices and absorption spectra of PVK and ZnS implied that both layers absorption contributes to the photocurrent, but the effective part is at the interface of PVK and ZnS. The dependence of maximum photocurrent on the applied voltage and the dark and illuminated current spectra indicates the ultrafast charge transfer at the interface. PMID:15766107

  6. Neutral dissociation of hydrogen following photoexcitation of HCl at the chlorine K edge

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, D.L.; Arrasate, M.E.; Martin, R.; Vanderford, B.; Lindle, D.W.; Cotter, J.; Neill, P.; Fisher, G.R.; Perera, R.C.; Leung, K.T.; Levin, J.C.; Sellin, I.A.; Simon, M.; Simon, M.; Uehara, Y.; Whitfield, S.B.

    1998-04-01

    Time-of-flight mass spectroscopy was used to study the relaxation dynamics of HCl following photoexcitation in the vicinity of the Cl K edge ({approximately}2.8keV) using monochromatic synchrotron radiation. At the lowest resonant excitation to the 6{sigma}{sup {asterisk}} antibonding orbital, almost half of the excited molecules decay by emission of a neutral H atom, mostly in coincidence with a highly charged Cl{sup n+} ion. The present work demonstrates that neutral-atom emission can be a significant decay channel for excited states with very short lifetimes (1 fs). {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  7. X-ray resonant photoexcitation: linewidths and energies of Kα transitions in highly charged Fe ions.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, J K; Bernitt, S; Epp, S W; Steinbrügge, R; Beilmann, C; Brown, G V; Eberle, S; Graf, A; Harman, Z; Hell, N; Leutenegger, M; Müller, A; Schlage, K; Wille, H-C; Yavaş, H; Ullrich, J; Crespo López-Urrutia, J R

    2013-09-01

    Photoabsorption by and fluorescence of the Kα transitions in highly charged iron ions are essential mechanisms for x-ray radiation transfer in astrophysical environments. We study photoabsorption due to the main Kα transitions in highly charged iron ions from heliumlike to fluorinelike (Fe24+ to Fe17+) using monochromatic x rays around 6.6 keV at the PETRA III synchrotron photon source. Natural linewidths were determined with hitherto unattained accuracy. The observed transitions are of particular interest for the understanding of photoexcited plasmas found in x-ray binary stars and active galactic nuclei. PMID:25166661

  8. Ultrafast Enhancement of Ferromagnetism via Photoexcited Holes inGaMnAs

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.; Cotoros, I.; Dani, K.M.; Liu, X.; Furdyna, J.K.; Chemla, D.S.

    2007-02-17

    We report on the observation of ultrafast photo-enhanced ferromagnetism in GaMnAs. It is manifested as a transient magnetization increase on a 100-ps time scale, after an initial sub-ps demagnetization. The dynamic magnetization enhancement exhibits a maximum below the Curie temperature {Tc} and dominates the demagnetization component when approaching {Tc}. We attribute the observed ultrafast collective ordering to the p-d exchange interaction between photoexcited holes and Mn spins, leading to a correlation-induced peak around 20K and a transient increase in {Tc}.

  9. Nonequilibrium plasmon emission drives ultrafast carrier relaxation dynamics in photoexcited graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamm, J. M.; Page, A. F.; Bravo-Abad, J.; Garcia-Vidal, F. J.; Hess, O.

    2016-01-01

    The fast decay of carrier inversion in photoexcited graphene has been attributed to optical phonon emission and Auger recombination. Plasmon emission provides another pathway that, as we show here, drives the carrier relaxation dynamics on ultrafast time scales. In studying the nonequilibrium relaxation dynamics we find that plasmon emission effectively converts inversion into hot carriers, whose energy is then extracted by optical phonon emission. This mechanism not only explains the observed femtosecond lifetime of inversion but also offers the prospect for atomically thin ultrafast plasmon emitters.

  10. Hydration shell effects in the relaxation dynamics of photoexcited Fe-II complexes in water

    SciTech Connect

    Nalbach, P.; Achner, A. J. A.; Frey, M.; Grosser, M.; Thorwart, M.; Bressler, C.

    2014-07-28

    We study the relaxation dynamics of photoexcited Fe-II complexes dissolved in water and identify the relaxation pathway which the molecular complex follows in presence of a hydration shell of bound water at the interface between the complex and the solvent. Starting from a low-spin state, the photoexcited complex can reach the high-spin state via a cascade of different possible transitions involving electronic as well as vibrational relaxation processes. By numerically exact path integral calculations for the relaxational dynamics of a continuous solvent model, we find that the vibrational life times of the intermittent states are of the order of a few ps. Since the electronic rearrangement in the complex occurs on the time scale of about 100 fs, we find that the complex first rearranges itself in a high-spin and highly excited vibrational state, before it relaxes its energy to the solvent via vibrational relaxation transitions. By this, the relaxation pathway can be clearly identified. We find that the life time of the vibrational states increases with the size of the complex (within a spherical model), but decreases with the thickness of the hydration shell, indicating that the hydration shell acts as an additional source of fluctuations.

  11. Theoretical and experimental study of dynamics of photoexcited carriers in GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Shishehchi, Sara; Bellotti, Enrico; Rudin, Sergey; Garrett, Gregory A.; Wraback, Michael

    2013-12-21

    We present a theoretical and experimental study of the sub-picosecond dynamics of photo-excited carriers in GaN. In the theoretical model, interaction with an external ultrafast laser pulse is treated coherently and to account for the scattering mechanisms and dephasing processes, a generalized Monte-Carlo simulation is used. The scattering mechanisms included are carrier interactions with polar optical phonons and acoustic phonons, and carrier-carrier Coulomb interactions. We study the effect of different scattering mechanisms on the carrier densities. In the case that the excitation energy satisfies the threshold for polar optical scattering, phonon contribution is the dominant process in relaxing the system, otherwise, carrier-carrier mechanism is dominant. Furthermore, we present the temperature and pulse power dependent normalized luminescence intensity. The results are presented over a range of temperatures, electric field, and excitation energy of the laser pulse. For comparison, we also report the experimental time-resolved photoluminescence studies on GaN samples. There is a good agreement between the simulation and experiment in normalized luminescence intensity results. Therefore, we show that we can explain the dynamics of the photo-excited carriers in GaN by including only carrier-carrier and carrier-phonon interactions and a relatively simple two-band electronic structure model.

  12. Interactions between photoexcited NIR emitting CdHgTe quantum dots and graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagtap, Amardeep M.; Varade, Vaibhav; Konkena, Bharathi; Ramesh, K. P.; Chatterjee, Abhijit; Banerjee, Arup; Pendyala, Naresh Babu; Koteswara Rao, K. S. R.

    2016-02-01

    Hydrothermally grown mercury cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdHgTe QDs) are decorated on graphene oxide (GO) sheets through physisorption. The structural change of GO through partial reduction of oxygen functional groups is observed with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in GO-QDs composites. Raman spectroscopy provides relatively a small change (˜1.1 times) in D/G ratio of band intensity and red shift in G band from 1606 cm-1 to 1594 cm-1 in GO-CdHgTe QDs (2.6 nm) composites, which indicates structural modification of GO network. Steady state and time resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy shows the electronic interactions between photoexcited near infrared emitting CdHgTe QDs and GO. Another interesting observation is PL quenching in the presence of GO, and it is quite effective in the case of smaller size QDs (2.6 nm) compared to the larger size QDs (4.2 nm). Thus, the observed PL quenching is attributed to the photogenerated electron transfer from QDs to GO. The photoexcited electron transfer rate decreases from 2.2 × 109 to 1.5 × 108 s-1 with increasing particle size from 2.6 to 4.2 nm. Photoconductivity measurements on QDs-GO composite devices show nearly 3 fold increase in the current density under photo-illumination, which is a promising aspect for solar energy conversion and other optoelectronic applications.

  13. Spin-Orbit Effects in Spin-Resolved L2,3 Core Level Photoemission of 3d Ferromagnetic Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Komesu, T; Waddill, G D; Yu, S W; Butterfield, M; Tobin, J G

    2007-10-02

    We present spin-resolved 2p core level photoemission for the 3d transition metal films of Fe and Co grown on Cu(100). We observe clear spin asymmetry in the main 2p core level photoemission peaks of Fe and Co films consistent with trends in the bulk magnetic moments. The spin polarization can be strongly enhanced, by variation of the experimental geometry, when the photoemission is undertaken with circularly polarized light, indicating that spin-orbit interaction can have a profound in spin polarized photoemission. Further spin polarized photoemission studies using variable circularly polarized light at high photon energies, high flux are indicated, underscoring the value of synchrotron measurements at facilities with increased beam stability.

  14. Experimental verification of the surface termination in the topological insulator TlBiSe2 using core-level photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, Kenta; Ye, Mao; Schwier, Eike F.; Nurmamat, Munisa; Shirai, Kaito; Nakatake, Masashi; Ueda, Shigenori; Miyamoto, Koji; Okuda, Taichi; Namatame, Hirofumi; Taniguchi, Masaki; Ueda, Yoshifumi; Kimura, Akio

    2013-12-01

    The surface termination of the promising topological insulator TlBiSe2 has been studied by surface- and bulk-sensitive probes. Our scanning tunneling microscopy has unmasked for the first time the unusual surface morphology of TlBiSe2 obtained by cleaving, where islands are formed by residual atoms on the cleaved plane. The chemical condition of these islands was identified using core-level spectroscopy. We observed thallium core-level spectra that are strongly deformed by a surface component in sharp contrast to the other elements. We propose a simple explanation for this behavior by assuming that the sample cleaving breaks the bonding between thallium and selenium atoms, leaving the thallium layer partially covering the selenium layer. These findings will assist the interpretation of future experimental and theoretical studies of this surface.

  15. Electronic Charges and Electric Potential at LaAlO3/SrTiO3 Interfaces Studied by Core-Level Photoemission Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Harold

    2011-08-19

    We studied LaAlO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3} interfaces for varying LaAlO{sub 3} thickness by core-level photoemission spectroscopy. In Ti 2p spectra for conducting 'n-type' interfaces, Ti{sup 3+} signals appeared, which were absent for insulating 'p-type' interfaces. The Ti{sup 3+} signals increased with LaAlO{sub 3} thickness, but started well below the critical thickness of 4 unit cells for metallic transport. Core-level shifts with LaAlO{sub 3} thickness were much smaller than predicted by the polar catastrophe model. We attribute these observations to surface defects/adsorbates providing charges to the interface even below the critical thickness.

  16. Observation of core-level binding energy shifts between (100) surface and bulk atoms of epitaxial CuInSe{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, A.J.; Berry, G.; Rockett, A.

    1997-04-01

    Core-level and valence band photoemission from semiconductors has been shown to exhibit binding energy differences between surface atoms and bulk atoms, thus allowing one to unambiguously distinguish between the two atomic positions. Quite clearly, surface atoms experience a potential different from the bulk due to the lower coordination number - a characteristic feature of any surface is the incomplete atomic coordination. Theoretical accounts of this phenomena are well documented in the literature for III-V and II-VI semiconductors. However, surface state energies corresponding to the equilibrium geometry of (100) and (111) surfaces of Cu-based ternary chalcopyrite semiconductors have not been calculated or experimental determined. These compounds are generating great interest for optoelectronic and photovoltaic applications, and are an isoelectronic analog of the II-VI binary compound semiconductors. Surface core-level binding energy shifts depend on the surface cohesive energies, and surface cohesive energies are related to surface structure. For ternary compound semiconductor surfaces, such as CuInSe{sub 2}, one has the possibility of variations in surface stoichiometry. Applying standard thermodynamical calculations which consider the number of individual surface atoms and their respective chemical potentials should allow one to qualitatively determine the magnitude of surface core-level shifts and, consequently, surface state energies.

  17. Study on dynamics of photoexcited charge injection and trapping in CdS quantum dots sensitized TiO2 nanowire array film electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Shan; Cheng, Ke; Yuan, Zhanqiang; Xu, Suyun; Cheng, Gang; Du, Zuliang

    2014-05-01

    The photoexcited electrons transfer dynamics of the CdS quantum dots (QDs) deposited in TiO2 nanowire array films are studied using surface photovoltage (SPV) and transient photovoltage (TPV) techniques. By comparing the SPV results with different thicknesses of QDs layers, we can separate the dynamic characteristics of photoexcited electrons injection and trapping. It is found that the TPV signals of photoexcited electrons trapped in the CdS QDs occur at timescales of about 2 × 10-8 s, which is faster than that of the photoexcited electrons injected from CdS into TiO2. More than 90 nm of the thickness of the CdS QDs layer will seriously affect the photoexcited electrons transfer and injection.

  18. Study on dynamics of photoexcited charge injection and trapping in CdS quantum dots sensitized TiO{sub 2} nanowire array film electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, Shan; Cheng, Ke; Yuan, Zhanqiang; Xu, Suyun; Cheng, Gang; Du, Zuliang

    2014-05-19

    The photoexcited electrons transfer dynamics of the CdS quantum dots (QDs) deposited in TiO{sub 2} nanowire array films are studied using surface photovoltage (SPV) and transient photovoltage (TPV) techniques. By comparing the SPV results with different thicknesses of QDs layers, we can separate the dynamic characteristics of photoexcited electrons injection and trapping. It is found that the TPV signals of photoexcited electrons trapped in the CdS QDs occur at timescales of about 2 × 10{sup −8} s, which is faster than that of the photoexcited electrons injected from CdS into TiO{sub 2}. More than 90 nm of the thickness of the CdS QDs layer will seriously affect the photoexcited electrons transfer and injection.

  19. Role of photoexcited nitrogen dioxide chemistry on ozone formation and emission control strategy over the Pearl River Delta, China

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new hydroxyl radical formation pathway via photo-excited nitrogen dioxide chemistry is incorporated into a chemistry-only box model as well as a 3D air quality model to examine its potential role on ozone formation and emission control strategy over the Pearl River Delta region...

  20. Two-color photoexcitation of Rydberg states via an electric quadrupole transition

    SciTech Connect

    Li Leping; Gu Quanli; Knee, J. L.; Wright, J. D.; DiSciacca, J. M.; Morgan, T. J.

    2008-03-15

    We report the observation of an electric quadrupole transition between the 4s{sup '}[1/2]{sub 0}{sup o} and 3d[3/2]{sub 2}{sup o} states in the spectrum of argon and use it in the first step of a scheme to excite Rydberg states. The initial identification of the transition is based on one-color, two-photon photoionization. A different experiment utilizing two-color, two-photon photoexcitation to Rydberg states confirms the identification. Despite the unavoidable background of one-color, two-photon photoionization, the latter experimental technique makes possible two-photon spectroscopy of Rydberg states using a resonant intermediate state populated by an electric quadrupole transition.

  1. Highly efficient terahertz wave modulators by photo-excitation of organics/silicon bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Hyung Keun; Kang, Chul; Hwang, In-Wook; Yoon, Youngwoon; Lee, Kiejin; Kee, Chul-Sik; Lee, Joong Wook

    2014-07-07

    Using hybrid bilayer systems comprising a molecular organic semiconductor and silicon, we achieve optically controllable active terahertz (THz) modulators that exhibit extremely high modulation efficiencies. A modulation efficiency of 98% is achieved from thermally annealed C{sub 60}/silicon bilayers, due to the rapid photo-induced electron transfer from the excited states of the silicon onto the C{sub 60} layer. Furthermore, we demonstrate the broadband modulation of THz waves. The cut-off condition of the system that is determined by the formation of efficient charge separation by the photo-excitation is highly variable, changing the system from insulating to metallic. The phenomenon enables an extremely high modulation bandwidth and rates of electromagnetic waves of interest. The realization of near-perfect modulation efficiency in THz frequencies opens up the possibilities of utilizing active modulators for THz spectroscopy and communications.

  2. Ultrafast Relaxation Dynamics of Photoexcited Zinc-Porphyrin: Electronic-Vibrational Coupling.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Baxter; Nieto-Pescador, Jesus; Gundlach, Lars

    2016-08-18

    Cyclic tetrapyrroles are the active core of compounds with crucial roles in living systems, such as hemoglobin and chlorophyll, and in technology as photocatalysts and light absorbers for solar energy conversion. Zinc-tetraphenylporphyrin (Zn-TPP) is a prototypical cyclic tetrapyrrole that has been intensely studied in past decades. Because of its importance for photochemical processes the optical properties are of particular interest, and, accordingly, numerous studies have focused on light absorption and excited-state dynamics of Zn-TPP. Relaxation after photoexcitation in the Soret band involves internal conversion that is preceded by an ultrafast process. This relaxation process has been observed by several groups. Hitherto, it has not been established if it involves a higher lying "dark" state or vibrational relaxation in the excited S2 state. Here we combine high time resolution electronic and vibrational spectroscopy to show that this process constitutes vibrational relaxation in the anharmonic S2 potential. PMID:27482847

  3. Dynamics and photoexcitation in MX and MXX[prime] chain solids

    SciTech Connect

    Gammel, J.T. ); Saxena, A.; Bishop, A.R. )

    1992-01-01

    Nonlinear adiabatic dynamics associated with nonlinear excitations in MX and MXX' chain materials are numerically studied within a discrete, 3/4-filled, two-band, tight-binding extended Peierls-Hubbard model. Both Hartree-Fock (HF) adiabatic molecular relaxation and molecular dynamics techniques are employed to investigate the time evolution of solitons, polarons, bipolarons in charge-density-wave (CDW), bond-order-wave (BOW) and spin-density-wave (SDW) ground state materials. Photoexcitations are performed between (i) continuum levels, (ii) localized levels, (iii) continuum and localized levels. The subsequent formation and time evolution of excitons, defect pairs, breathers, and, for the MXX' solids, charge separation are studied in terms of energy levels and distortion patterns. These results are compared with the dynamics of previously studied 1/2-filled, one-band, SSH-type electron-phonon models, used for studying polyenes and polyynes, and experimental data.

  4. Dynamics and photoexcitation in MX and MXX{prime} chain solids

    SciTech Connect

    Gammel, J.T.; Saxena, A.; Bishop, A.R.

    1992-12-01

    Nonlinear adiabatic dynamics associated with nonlinear excitations in MX and MXX` chain materials are numerically studied within a discrete, 3/4-filled, two-band, tight-binding extended Peierls-Hubbard model. Both Hartree-Fock (HF) adiabatic molecular relaxation and molecular dynamics techniques are employed to investigate the time evolution of solitons, polarons, bipolarons in charge-density-wave (CDW), bond-order-wave (BOW) and spin-density-wave (SDW) ground state materials. Photoexcitations are performed between (i) continuum levels, (ii) localized levels, (iii) continuum and localized levels. The subsequent formation and time evolution of excitons, defect pairs, breathers, and, for the MXX` solids, charge separation are studied in terms of energy levels and distortion patterns. These results are compared with the dynamics of previously studied 1/2-filled, one-band, SSH-type electron-phonon models, used for studying polyenes and polyynes, and experimental data.

  5. Transient reflectance of photoexcited Cd{sub 3}As{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, C. P. Berggren, Bryan S.; Arushanov, Ernest; Nateprov, Alex; Hosseini, Tahereh; Kouklin, Nikolai

    2015-06-08

    We report ultrafast transient-grating measurements of crystals of the three-dimensional Dirac semimetal cadmium arsenide, Cd{sub 3}As{sub 2}, at both room temperature and 80 K. After photoexcitation with 1.5-eV photons, charge-carriers relax by two processes, one of duration 500 fs and the other of duration 3.1 ps. By measuring the complex phase of the change in reflectance, we determine that the faster signal corresponds to a decrease in absorption, and the slower signal to a decrease in the light's phase velocity, at the probe energy. We attribute these signals to electrons' filling of phase space, first near the photon energy and later at lower energy. We attribute their decay to cooling by rapid emission of optical phonons, then slower emission of acoustic phonons. We also present evidence that both the electrons and the lattice are strongly heated.

  6. Non-Band-Gap Photoexcitation of Hydroxylated TiO2

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The photochemistry of TiO2 has been studied intensively since it was discovered that TiO2 can act as a photocatalyst. Nevertheless, it has proven difficult to establish the detailed charge-transfer processes involved, partly because the excited states involved are difficult to study. Here we present evidence of the existence of hydroxyl-induced excited states in the conduction band region. Using two-photon photoemission, we show that stepwise photoexcitation from filled band gap states lying 0.8 eV below the Fermi level of rutile TiO2(110) excites hydroxyl-induced states 2.73 eV above the Fermi level that has an onset energy of ∼3.1 eV. The onset is shifted to lower energy by the coadsorption of molecular water, which suggests a means of tuning the energy of the excited state. PMID:26267712

  7. Photo-ionization and photo-excitation of curcumin investigated by laser flash photolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Tingting; Kun, Li; Gao, Bo; Zhu, Rongrong; Wu, Xianzheng; Wang, ShiLong

    2013-12-01

    Curcumin (Cur) has putative antitumor properties. In the current study, we examined photophysical and photochemical properties of Cur using laser flash photolysis. The results demonstrated that Cur could be photo-ionized at 355 nm laser pulse to produce radical cation (Currad +) and solvated electron esol- in 7:3 ethanol-water mixtures. The quantum yield of Cur photo-ionization and the ratio of photo-ionization to photo-excitation were also determined. Currad + could be transferred into neutral radical of Cur (Currad ) via deprotonation with the pKa 4.13. The excited singlet of Cur (1Cur*) could be transferred into excited triplet (3Cur*), which could be quenched by oxygen to produce singlet oxygen 1O2∗. Reaction of 3Cur* with tryptophan was confirmed. The results encourage developing curcumin as a photosensitive antitumor agent.

  8. Photoexcited escape probability, optical gain, and noise in quantum well infrared photodetectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, B. F.; Zussman, A.; Gunapala, S. D.; Asom, M. T.; Kuo, J. M.; Hobson, W. S.

    1992-01-01

    We present a detailed and thorough study of a wide variety of quantum well infrared photodetectors (QWIPs), which were chosen to have large differences in their optical and transport properties. Both n- and p-doped QWIPs, as well as intersubband transitions based on photoexcitation from bound-to-bound, bound-to-quasi-continuum, and bound-to-continuum quantum well states were investigated. The measurements and theoretical analysis included optical absorption, responsivity, dark current, current noise, optical gain, hot carrier mean free path; net quantum efficiency, quantum well escape probability, quantum well escape time, as well as detectivity. These results allow a better understanding of the optical and transport physics and thus a better optimization of the QWIP performance.

  9. Broadband transient absorption study of photoexcitations in lead halide perovskites: Towards a multiband picture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, Benoy; Sampat, Siddharth; Danilov, Evgeny O.; Peng, Weina; Rupich, Sara M.; Chabal, Yves J.; Gartstein, Yuri N.; Malko, Anton V.

    2016-04-01

    Ultrafast transient pump-probe measurements of thin CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite films over a wide spectral range from 350 to 800 nm reveal a family of photoinduced bleach (PB) and absorption (PA) features unequivocally pointing to the fundamentally multiband character of the underlying electronic structure. Excitation pump-energy dependent kinetics of three long-lived PB peaks at 1.65, 2.55, and 3.15 eV along with a broad PA band shows the involvement of band-edge thermalized carriers in all transitions and at least four, possibly more, electronic bands. The evolution of the transient signatures is described in terms of the redistribution of the conserved oscillator strength of the whole system. The multiband perspective opens up different directions for understanding and controlling photoexcitations in hybrid perovskites.

  10. Wavepacket splitting and two-pathway deactivation in the photoexcited visual pigment isorhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Polli, Dario; Weingart, Oliver; Brida, Daniele; Poli, Emiliano; Maiuri, Margherita; Spillane, Katelyn M; Bottoni, Andrea; Kukura, Philipp; Mathies, Richard A; Cerullo, Giulio; Garavelli, Marco

    2014-02-24

    Isorhodopsin is the visual pigment analogue of rhodopsin. It shares the same opsin environment but it embeds 9-cis retinal instead of 11-cis. Its photoisomerization is three times slower and less effective. The mechanistic rationale behind this observation is revealed by combining high-level quantum-mechanical/molecular-mechanical simulations with ultrafast optical spectroscopy with sub-20 fs time resolution and spectral coverage extended to the near-infrared. Whereas in rhodopsin the photoexcited wavepacket has ballistic motion through a single conical intersection seam region between the ground and excited states, in isorhodopsin it branches into two competitive deactivation pathways involving distinct conical intersection funnels. One is rapidly accessed but unreactive. The other is slower, as it features extended steric interactions with the environment, but it is productive as it follows forward bicycle pedal motion. PMID:24481600

  11. Non-equilibrium photoexcited carrier effects in a graphene-based Josephson junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsumura, Kohei; Furukawa, Naoki; Ito, Hironori; Watanabe, Eiichiro; Tsuya, Daiju; Takayanagi, Hideaki

    2016-01-01

    We studied the superconducting proximity effect under photoexcitation by illuminating a superconductor/monolayer graphene/superconductor (SGS) Josephson junction with monochromatic light at a wavelength of 1.31 μm. Although the critical current Ic can be controlled by the irradiation power P, its variation cannot be explained by modification of the carrier density, which has been reported for semiconductor-based Josephson junctions. The estimated electron temperature of graphene is proportional to P δ , where δ ≃ 1 / 3 . This relation clearly indicates that photogenerated non-equilibrium carrier dynamics are responsible for the variation of Ic with P. We suggest that the SGS junction can directly mediate interactions between the optical field and the superconducting state.

  12. Ultrafast lattice response of photoexcited thin films studied by X-ray diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Herzog, Marc; Bojahr, André; Leitenberger, Wolfram; Hertwig, Andreas; Bargheer, Matias

    2014-01-01

    Using ultrafast X-ray diffraction, we study the coherent picosecond lattice dynamics of photoexcited thin films in the two limiting cases, where the photoinduced stress profile decays on a length scale larger and smaller than the film thickness. We solve a unifying analytical model of the strain propagation for acoustic impedance-matched opaque films on a semi-infinite transparent substrate, showing that the lattice dynamics essentially depend on two parameters: One for the spatial profile and one for the amplitude of the strain. We illustrate the results by comparison with high-quality ultrafast X-ray diffraction data of SrRuO3 films on SrTiO3 substrates. PMID:26798784

  13. Hyperpolarization of Thin Films with Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Using Photoexcited Triplet Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tateishi, Kenichiro; Negoro, Makoto; Kagawa, Akinori; Uesaka, Tomohiro; Kitagawa, Masahiro

    2013-08-01

    With dynamic nuclear polarization using the photoexcited triplet electron spin (triplet-DNP) of pentacene, nuclear spins can be hyperpolarized even in a low magnetic field at room temperature. Several demonstrations have been performed using bulk crystals. Hyperpolarization in a thin film with triplet-DNP enables new applications, such as general NMR spectroscopy and the polarized target of unstable nuclei. In this work, we succeeded in polarizing 1H spins in a thin film fabricated by the cell method. We obtained a 1H spin polarization of 12.9% using a 7-μm-thick film of p-terphenyl doped with pentacene in 0.4 T at room temperature. We also obtained a 1H spin polarization of 3.9% in 0.4 T at 150 K using a 60-μm-thick film of trans-stilbene doped with pentacene, whose single crystal cannot be made easily by conventional methods.

  14. Spatiotemporal dynamics of photoexcited quasiparticles in two-dimensional crystals studied by ultrafast laser techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Nardeep

    Layered materials in which atomic sheets are stacked together by weak van der Waals forces can be used to fabricate two-dimensional systems. They represent a diverse and rich, but largely unexplored, source of materials. Atomically-thin structures derived from these materials possess a number of interesting electrical, optical, and mechanical properties, and are attractive for new nanodevices. For their applications in semiconductor industry, it is necessary to understand the dynamics of photoexcited quasiparticles that occur on ultrafast time scales of less than one nanosecond. In this dissertation, I discuss ultrafast optical experimental techniques and results from various two-dimensional materials, which provide information about electronic dynamics. First, a second harmonic generation technique that can be used to find the crystalline orientation, thickness uniformity, layer stacking, and single-crystal domain size is discussed, with results presented on exfoliated and chemical vapor deposition MoS2 samples. Second, a third harmonic generation technique is discussed, which can be used to explore nonlinear optical properties of materials, and results are presented on graphene and few-layer graphite films. Third, a spatially resolved femtosecond pump-probe is described, which can be used to study hot carrier and photoexcited phonon dynamics and results are presented on Bi2 Se3 sample. Then, exciton dynamics in MoS2 and MoSe2 are explored by using transient absorption microscopy with a high spatiotemporal resolution. Finally, a polarization-resolved femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy that can be used to study valley and spin dynamics is discussed, with results presented on monolayer, few-layer, and bulk MoSe2 samples.

  15. Photoexcitation of Yb-doped aluminosilicate fibers at 250 nm: evidence for excitation transfer from oxygen deficiency centers to Yb{sup 3+}

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, C. G.; Keister, K. E.; Dragic, P. D.; Eden, J. G.; Croteau, A.

    2010-10-15

    Emission spectra in the {approx}240-1100 nm wavelength region as well as the temporally resolved decay of Yb{sup 3+} and point defect spontaneous emission have been recorded when aluminosilicate optical fibers doped with Yb are irradiated with {approx}160 fs laser pulses having a central wavelength of {approx}250 nm (({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){omega}=5 eV). Photoexcitation of the fibers in this region of the deep ultraviolet (UV) provides access simultaneously to the Type II Si oxygen deficiency center (ODC), the non-bridging oxygen hole center (NBOHC: an oxygen-excess defect), and the Ge ODC. Emission from all of these defects in the ultraviolet and/or visible is observed, as is intense fluorescence at 976 nm from Yb{sup 3+}. Absorption measurements conducted in the {approx}230-265 nm region with a sequence of UV light-emitting diodes reveal a continuum peaking at {approx}248 nm and having a spectral width of {approx}18 nm (FWHM), confirming that the 250 nm laser pump is photoexciting predominantly the ODC. The temporal histories of the optically active defect and rare earth ion emission waveforms, in combination with time-integrated spectra, suggest that the Si ODC(II) triplet state directly excites Yb{sup 3+} as well as at least one other intrinsic defect in the silica network. Prolonged exposure of the Yb-doped fibers to 250 nm radiation yields increased Yb{sup 3+}, NBOHC, and Si ODC(II) singlet emission which is accompanied by a decline in Si ODC(II) triplet fluorescence, thus reinforcing the conclusion--drawn on the basis of luminescence decay constants--that the triplet state of Si ODC(II) is the immediate precursor to the NBOHC and is partially responsible for Yb ion emission at 976 nm. This conclusion is consistent with the observation that exposure of fiber to 5 eV radiation slightly suppresses ODC absorption in the {approx}240-255 nm region while simultaneously introducing an absorption continuum extending from 260 nm to below 235 nm (({Dirac_h}/2{pi

  16. Density Functional Theory Study of the Energetics, Electronic Structure, and Core-Level Shifts of NO Adsorption on the Pt(111) Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Z. H.; Da Silva, J. L. F.; Deng, H. Q.; Li, W. X.

    2009-01-01

    In this work, we report a first-principles investigation of the energetics, structures, electronic properties, and core-level shifts of NO adsorption on the Pt(111) surface. Our calculations are based on density functional theory within the framework of the ultrasoft pseudopotential plane-wave and the all-electron projected augmented-wave methods. We found that at 0.25, 0.50, and 0.75 monolayer, NO adsorbs preferentially in the fcc, fcc+top, and fcc+top+hcp sites, respectively. The geometric parameters, adsorption energies, vibrational frequencies, and work-function changes are in good agreement with the experimental data. The interaction between NO and Pt(111) was found to follow a donation-back-donation process, in which the NO {sigma} states donate electrons to the substrate Pt d states, while the substrate Pt d states back donate to the NO {pi} states. Though there is an overall net charge transfer from the substrate to the NO adsorbate regardless of the adsorption sites and coverages, the spatial redistribution of the transferred electron is site dependent. The charge accumulation for NO in the top sites occurs closer to the surface than NO in the hollow sites, which results in the reduction of the Pt(111) surface work function for the top NO but an increase for the hollow NO. The core-level shifts of the topmost surface Pt atoms coordinated with top and hollow NO molecules at different coverages are in excellent agreement with experiments. In contrast, the N 1s core-level shifts between top and hollow NO ({approx}0.7 eV) deviated significantly from the zero shift found in experiments. Our analysis indicates that the difference may come from the thermal vibration and rotation of adsorbed NO on the Pt(111) surface.

  17. Thermal stability of the Rh(110) missing-row reconstruction: Combination of real-time core-level spectroscopy and ab initio modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Baraldi, A.; Comelli, G.; Rosei, R.; Lizzit, S.; Bondino, F.; Sbraccia, C.; Bonini, N.; Baroni, S.; Mikkelsen, A.; Andersen, J.N.

    2005-08-15

    The thermal stability of the (1x2) missing-row phase of Rh(110), whose first layer is an ordered array of one-dimensional atomic chains, is investigated using high-resolution core-level spectroscopy and density functional calculations. The time evolution of the spectra indicates that this phase is metastable towards deconstruction into a (1x1) phase. Our calculations unveil the mechanism of this process, which is shown to be ignited by surface defects, and provide a value for the activation energy in good agreement with experimental findings.

  18. Deep Earthquakes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frohlich, Cliff

    1989-01-01

    Summarizes research to find the nature of deep earthquakes occurring hundreds of kilometers down in the earth's mantle. Describes further research problems in this area. Presents several illustrations and four references. (YP)

  19. Layer-dependent Debye temperature and thermal expansion of Ru(0001) by means of high-energy resolution core-level photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrari, Eugenio; Galli, Lorenzo; Miniussi, Elisa; Morri, Maurizio; Panighel, Mirko; Ricci, Maria; Lacovig, Paolo; Lizzit, Silvano; Baraldi, Alessandro

    2010-11-15

    The layer-dependent Debye temperature of Ru(0001) is determined by means of high-energy resolution core-level photoelectron spectroscopy measurements. The possibility to disentangle three different components in the Ru 3d{sub 5/2} spectrum of Ru(0001), originating from bulk, first-, and second-layer atoms, allowed us to follow the temperature evolution of their photoemission line shapes and binding energies. Temperature effects were detected, namely, a lattice thermal expansion and a layer-dependent phonon broadening, which was interpreted within the framework of the Hedin-Rosengren formalism based on the Debye theory. The resulting Debye temperature of the top-layer atoms is 295{+-}10 K, lower than that of the bulk (T=668{+-}5 K) and second-layer (T=445{+-}10 K) atoms. While these results are in agreement with the expected phonon softening at the surface, we show that a purely harmonic description of the motion of the surface atoms is not valid, since anharmonic effects contribute significantly to the position and line shape of the different core-level components.

  20. Structural origin of Si-2p core-level shifts from Si(100)-c[4x2] surface: A spectral x-ray photoelectron diffraction study

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X.; Tonner, B.P.; Denlinger, J.

    1997-04-01

    The authors have performed angle-resolved x-ray photoelectron diffraction (XPD) from a Si(100)-c(4x2) surface to study the structural origin of Si-2p core-level shifts. In the experiment, the highly resolved surface Si-2p core-level spectra were measured as a fine grid of hemisphere and photon energies, using the SpectroMicroscopy Facility {open_quotes}ultraESCA{close_quotes} instrument. By carefully decomposing the spectra into several surface peaks, the authors are able to obtain surface-atom resolved XPD patterns. Using a multiple scattering analysis, they derived a detailed atomic model for the Si(100)-c(4x2) surface. In this model, the asymmetric dimers were found tilted by 11.5 plus/minus 2.0 degrees with bond length of 2.32 plus/minus 0.05{angstrom}. By matching model XPD patterns to experiment, the authors can identify which atoms in the reconstructed surface are responsible for specific photoemission lines in the 2p spectrum.

  1. Angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure of the Ni 3p, Cu 3s, and Cu 3p core levels of the respective clean (111) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Huff, W.R. |; Chen, Y.; Kellar, S.A.; Moler, E.J. |; Hussain, Z.; Huang, Z.Q.; Zheng, Y.; Shirley, D.A.

    1997-07-01

    We report a non-s initial-state angle-resolved photoemission extended fine-structure (ARPEFS) study of clean surfaces for the purpose of further understanding the technique. The surface structure sensitivity of ARPEFS applied to clean surfaces and to arbitrary initial states is studied using normal photoemission data taken from the Ni 3p core levels of a Ni(111) single crystal and the Cu 3s and the Cu 3p core levels of a Cu(111) single crystal. The Fourier transforms of these clean surface data are dominated by backscattering. Unlike the s initial-state data, the p initial-state data show a peak in the Fourier transform corresponding to in-plane scattering from the six nearest neighbors to the emitter. Evidence was seen for single-scattering events from the same plane as the emitters and double-scattering events. Using a recently developed, multiple-scattering calculation program, ARPEFS data from clean surfaces and from p initial states can be modeled to high precision. Although there are many layers of emitters when measuring photoemission from a clean surface, test calculations show that the ARPEFS signal is dominated by photoemission from atoms in the first two crystal layers. Thus ARPEFS applied to clean surfaces is sensitive to surface reconstruction. The best-fit calculation for clean Ni(111) indicates an expansion of the first two layers. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  2. Electron heating due to microwave photoexcitation in the high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs two dimensional electron system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanayaka, A. N.; Mani, R. G.; Wegscheider, W.

    2013-12-01

    We extract the electron temperature in the microwave photo-excited high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs two dimensional electron system (2DES) by studying the influence of microwave radiation on the amplitude of Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations (SdHOs) in a regime where the cyclotron frequency, ωc, and the microwave angular frequency, ω, satisfy 2ω ≤ ωc ≤ 3.5ω The results indicate that increasing the incident microwave power has a weak effect on the amplitude of the SdHOs and therefore the electron temperature, in comparison to the influence of modest temperature changes on the dark-specimen SdH effect. The results indicate negligible electron heating under modest microwave photo-excitation, in good agreement with theoretical predictions.

  3. Picosecond time evolution of photoexcitations at 2.33 eV in α-sexithyenil thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzani, G.; Danieli, R.; Muccini, M.; Taliani, C.

    1993-11-01

    Picosecond time dynamics of the isotropic as well as the anisotropic transient absorption saturation have been measured in an α-sexithyenil (T6) thin film at room temperature by photoinduced absorption and resonant Kerr-gate experiments. Strongly damped photoacoustical oscillations have been detected superimposed on the photobleaching signal, providing a way to evaluate the sound speed in T6 films along the normal to the substrate; VS~=16 Å/ps. A stretched exponential function has been used to describe the time recovery of the total photoexcited population yielding a time constant τ=3.5 ns with an exponent α=0.5. This is indicative of dispersive diffusion towards recombination centers via intermolecular hopping; the Kerr-gate transmission decay provides an estimate of the photoexcitation diffusion constant, namely, D=6×10-3 cm2/s.

  4. Quenching of photoexcited states of the proteins chromophores and introduced into the protein macromolecules fluorescent probes by heavy metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnikov, A. G.; Dyachuk, O. A.; Melnikov, G. V.

    2015-03-01

    We have studied the processes of quenching of photoexcited states of fluorescent probes and quenching of the fluorescence of the chromophores of human serum albumin (HSA) by heavy metal ions (HM): cations Tl+, Pb2+, Cu2+, Cd2+, and the anion of iodine (I-). We used the dye from xanthene series - eosin as a fluorescent probe. By quenching of the fluorescence of protein chromophores we found an influence of HM on the structure of proteins, resulting in a shift of the peak of the fluorescence of HSA tryptophanyl. This can be explained by proteins denaturation under the influence of heavy metals and penetration of water into the inner environment of HSA tryptophan. It was established that the constant of the quenching of the probe phosphorescence is much higher than the fluorescence, which is explained by significantly longer lifetime of the photoexcited states of fluorescent probes in the triplet state than in the singlet.

  5. EXAFS studies on the structure of photoexcited cyclopentadienylnickelnitrosyl(C{sub 5}H{sub 5}NiNO)

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L.X.; Bowman, M.K.; Montano, A.; Norris, J.R. |

    1993-05-01

    The structures of C{sub 5}H{sub 5}NiNO in a reversible photochemical reaction were studied via EXAFS, FTIR, and optical absorption spectroscopies. A photoexcited intermediate with distinctively different EXAFS, IR, and optical absorption spectra from those of the ground state molecules was generated upon irradiation using 365 mn light at 20K in a 3-methylpentane solution. The reverse reaction was induced by irradiation with 310 mn light. The EXAFS data analysis has shown a 0.12 {Angstrom} elongation of the Ni-N bond and the bending, of Ni-N-0 in the photoexcited intermediate. Several ZINDO calculations were conducted based on the structures obtained from the EXAFS spectroscopy. These calculations reproduced the changes in the optical spectra and the intramolecular electron transfer in C{sub 5}H{sub 5}NiNO.

  6. EXAFS studies on the structure of photoexcited cyclopentadienylnickelnitrosyl(C[sub 5]H[sub 5]NiNO)

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L.X.; Bowman, M.K.; Montano, A. ); Norris, J.R. Chicago Univ., IL . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1993-01-01

    The structures of C[sub 5]H[sub 5]NiNO in a reversible photochemical reaction were studied via EXAFS, FTIR, and optical absorption spectroscopies. A photoexcited intermediate with distinctively different EXAFS, IR, and optical absorption spectra from those of the ground state molecules was generated upon irradiation using 365 mn light at 20K in a 3-methylpentane solution. The reverse reaction was induced by irradiation with 310 mn light. The EXAFS data analysis has shown a 0.12 [Angstrom] elongation of the Ni-N bond and the bending, of Ni-N-0 in the photoexcited intermediate. Several ZINDO calculations were conducted based on the structures obtained from the EXAFS spectroscopy. These calculations reproduced the changes in the optical spectra and the intramolecular electron transfer in C[sub 5]H[sub 5]NiNO.

  7. Visualization of Photoexcited Carrier Responses in a Solar Cell Using Optical Pump—Terahertz Emission Probe Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanishi, Hidetoshi; Ito, Akira; Takayama, Kazuhisa; Kawayama, Iwao; Murakami, Hironaru; Tonouchi, Masayoshi

    2016-05-01

    We observed photoexcited carrier responses in solar cells excited by femtosecond laser pulses with spatial and temporal resolution using an optical pump-terahertz emission probe technique. We visualized the ultrafast local variation of the intensity of terahertz emission from a polycrystalline silicon solar cell using this technique and clearly observed the change in signals between a grain boundary and the inside of a grain in the solar cell. Further, the time evolution of the pump-probe signals of the polycrystalline and monocrystalline silicon solar cells was observed, and the relaxation times of photoexcited carriers in the emitter layers of crystalline silicon solar cells were estimated using this technique. The estimated relaxation time was consistent with the lifetime of the Auger recombination process that was dominant in heavily doped silicon used as an emitter layer for the silicon solar cells, which is difficult to obtain with photoluminescence method commonly used for the evaluation of solar cells.

  8. Electron heating due to microwave photoexcitation in the high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs two dimensional electron system

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanayaka, A. N.; Mani, R. G.; Wegscheider, W.

    2013-12-04

    We extract the electron temperature in the microwave photo-excited high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs two dimensional electron system (2DES) by studying the influence of microwave radiation on the amplitude of Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations (SdHOs) in a regime where the cyclotron frequency, ω{sub c}, and the microwave angular frequency, ω, satisfy 2ω ≤ ω{sub c} ≤ 3.5ω The results indicate that increasing the incident microwave power has a weak effect on the amplitude of the SdHOs and therefore the electron temperature, in comparison to the influence of modest temperature changes on the dark-specimen SdH effect. The results indicate negligible electron heating under modest microwave photo-excitation, in good agreement with theoretical predictions.

  9. Deep learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecun, Yann; Bengio, Yoshua; Hinton, Geoffrey

    2015-05-01

    Deep learning allows computational models that are composed of multiple processing layers to learn representations of data with multiple levels of abstraction. These methods have dramatically improved the state-of-the-art in speech recognition, visual object recognition, object detection and many other domains such as drug discovery and genomics. Deep learning discovers intricate structure in large data sets by using the backpropagation algorithm to indicate how a machine should change its internal parameters that are used to compute the representation in each layer from the representation in the previous layer. Deep convolutional nets have brought about breakthroughs in processing images, video, speech and audio, whereas recurrent nets have shone light on sequential data such as text and speech.

  10. Deep learning.

    PubMed

    LeCun, Yann; Bengio, Yoshua; Hinton, Geoffrey

    2015-05-28

    Deep learning allows computational models that are composed of multiple processing layers to learn representations of data with multiple levels of abstraction. These methods have dramatically improved the state-of-the-art in speech recognition, visual object recognition, object detection and many other domains such as drug discovery and genomics. Deep learning discovers intricate structure in large data sets by using the backpropagation algorithm to indicate how a machine should change its internal parameters that are used to compute the representation in each layer from the representation in the previous layer. Deep convolutional nets have brought about breakthroughs in processing images, video, speech and audio, whereas recurrent nets have shone light on sequential data such as text and speech. PMID:26017442

  11. Delayed fluorescence spectra of intact leaves photoexcited by sunlight measured with a multichannel Fourier-transform chemiluminescence spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akita, Saeka; Yano, Ayako; Ishii, Hiroshi; Satoh, Chikahiro; Akai, Nobuyuki; Nakata, Munetaka

    2013-06-01

    Delayed fluorescence spectra of intact leaves of Green pak choi (Brassica rapa var. chinensis) were measured with a multichannel Fourier-transform chemiluminescence spectrometer, which we developed recently. The intact samples, photoexcited by sunlight without artificial light sources, showed delayed fluorescence around 740 nm with a lifetime of ˜6 s. The observed spectra were deconvoluted into two Gaussian bands: the delayed fluorescence from photosystem II and photosystem I complexes. Their relative intensities depended on the chlorophyll concentration, but their wavelengths were unchanged.

  12. Photoexcited carriers in organic light emitting materials and blended films observed by surface photovoltage spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jihua; Gordon, Keith C.; McQuillan, A. James; Zidon, Yigal; Shapira, Yoram

    2005-04-01

    The electronic structure of the widely-used light emitting materials, 2,5-bis(5-tert-butyl-2-benzoxazolyl) thiophene (BBOT), poly( N -vinylcarbazole) (PVK) thin films have been characterized using surface photovoltage spectroscopy. The photo-induced charge separation and transfer processes in both blend films of PVK:BBOT and PVK:TPD:BBOT, where TPD is N,N' -diphenyl- N,N' -bis(3-methylphenyl)-[ 1,1' -biphenyl]- 4,4' -diamine have also been investigated. The results of the photo-induced contact potential difference (CPD) change show that BBOT film is an electron-transporting material while PVK film is a hole-transporting one. The photoluminescence and electroluminescence results of the blend films suggest an exciplex interaction between BBOT and PVK or TPD. A positive CPD change due to photo-excitation of the BBOT in PVK:BBOT blend film is attributed to electron trapping at the localized state induced by dispersed BBOT species. In the PVK:TPD:BBOT blend films, a positive CPD change, which starts at the same transition energy as in the former blend film but is significantly enhanced, is observed and explained in terms of charge transfer between the involved energy structures of the blend components. The dependence of the observed effects on the blend composition and ensuing electronic structure is discussed.

  13. Nonequilibrium versus equilibrium molecular dynamics studies of solvation dynamics after photoexcitation of OClO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunnerson, Kim N.; Brooksby, Craig; Prezhdo, Oleg V.; Reid, Philip J.

    2007-10-01

    The results of our earlier work [C. Brooksby, O. V. Prezhdo, and P. J. Reid, J. Chem. Phys. 119, 9111 (2003)] rationalizing the surprisingly weak solvent dependence of the dynamics following photoexcitation of chlorine dioxide in water, chloroform, and cyclohexane are thoroughly tested. Comparisons are made between equilibrium and nonequilibrium solvent response, equilibrium response in the ground and excited electronic states, as well as the cumulant and direct evaluation of the optical response function. In general, the linear response and cumulant approximations are found to hold, although minor deviations are found with all solvents. The ground state, linear response, and cumulant data show best agreement with experiment, most likely due to the better tested ground-state force field and the robust behavior of the linear response and cumulant approximations. The main conclusion of our earlier work explaining the weak solvent dependence by the domination of the van der Waals interaction component remains intact within the more advanced treatments. However, the molecular origin of this surprising experimental observation is different in water and chloroform compared to cyclohexane.

  14. External electric field effects on state energy and photoexcitation dynamics of diphenylpolyenes.

    PubMed

    Nakabayashi, Takakazu; Wahadoszamen, Md; Ohta, Nobuhiro

    2005-05-18

    External electric field effects on state energy and photoexcitation dynamics have been examined for para-substituted and unsubstituted all-trans-diphenylpolyenes doped in a film, based on the steady-state and picosecond time-resolved measurements of the field effects on absorption and fluorescence. The substitution dependence of the electroabsorption spectra shows that the dipole moment of the substituted stilbene in the Franck-Condon excited state becomes larger with increasing difference between the Hammet constants of the substituents. Fluorescence quantum yields of 4-(dimethylamino)-4'-nitrostilbene and 4-(dimethylamino)-4'-nitrodiphenylbutadiene are markedly reduced by an electric field, suggesting that the rates of the intramolecular charge transfer (CT) from the fluorescent state to the nonradiative CT state are accelerated by an external electric field. The magnitude of the field-induced decrease in fluorescence lifetime has been evaluated. The isomerization of the unsubstituted all-trans-diphenylpolyenes to the cis forms is shown to be a significant nonradiative pathway even in a film. Field-induced quenching of their fluorescence as well as field-induced decrease in fluorescence lifetime suggests that the trans to cis photoisomerization is enhanced by an electric field. PMID:15884948

  15. Enhanced dipole moments in photo-excited TTF-TCNQ dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Mina; Miyamoto, Yoshiyuki; Scheffler, Matthias

    2011-07-01

    We have studied the dynamics of electron transfer between the molecules of an organic donor-acceptor pair upon absorption of light. Specifically, we considered the tetrathiafulvalene (TTF)-7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) donor-acceptor pair using time-dependent density functional theory with local-density approximation. The molecular planes of the two components are parallel to each other, and the optical transition probability is found to be highest when the optical electric field is parallel to these planes. Under these conditions, absorption induces additional electron transfer from TTF to TCNQ in the π-orbitals perpendicular to the molecular plane and, consequently, we found that the dimer's dipole moment perpendicular to the molecular axes is enhanced with the increase rate of 1% in 15 fs. This enhancement reflects the fact that photo-excited electron-hole pairs tend to dissociate, i.e. electrons and holes move away from each other. We thus suggest potential photovoltaic devices employing these molecules as building blocks.

  16. Kinetic Parameters of Photo-Excited Triplet State of Pentacene Determined by Dynamic Nuclear Polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawahara, Tomomi; Sakaguchi, Satoshi; Tateishi, Kenichiro; Tang, Tsz Leung; Uesaka, Tomohiro

    2015-04-01

    The lifetimes and spin-lattice relaxation time of photo-excited triplet electron of pentacene doped in p-terphenyl at room temperature have been investigated. Values of spin-lattice relaxation time previously reported in ESR studies are inconsistent with each other. In this paper, we determined these time constants based on proton signals enhanced by dynamic nuclear polarization using the electrons (Triplet-DNP). The combined analysis of dependences of proton signal intensities on the delay time of polarization transfer and laser pulse structure allows us to disentangle contributions of the lifetimes and spin-lattice relaxation time. The lifetimes of triplet sublevels with ms = 0 and ±1 were determined to be 22.3 and 88 µs, respectively. The spin-lattice relaxation time was found to be longer than 300 µs, hence the time evolution of the electron population in the triplet state is governed by the lifetimes. It was also found that the proton signal enhancement is limited at a high repetition rate by the partial cancellation of the electron spin polarization by the remaining population produced by the preceding laser pulses.

  17. Transient Spectroscopy of Photoexcitations and Morphology Control of Organometal Trihalide Perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Yaxin; Lafalce, Evan; Sheng, Chuan-Xiang; Zhang, Chuang; Sun, Dali; Vardeny, Zeev Valy

    We studied the photoexcitation dynamics in various hybrid perovskites by using broadband ps transient photomodulation (PM) spectroscopy and variable stripe length (VSL) technique. We observed both excitonic and free carriers spectral features in MAPbI3 but mainly excitonic transition in MAPbI1.1Br1.9 and MAPbI3-xClx films. We also fabricated MAPbBr3 films with nano-crystal pinning (NCP) treatment, which allows for smaller crystalline grain size. The transient spectra show a narrower and longer-lived photobleaching band in NCP treated films consistent with the increase in the photoluminescence efficiency. In addition the net optical gain measured by VSL is markedly increased up to 300 cm-1, and the lasing threshold is concurrently reduced. Measurement of the waveguide losses in the NCP films shows that the improvement in lasing properties can partly be attributed to the reduced optical scattering. Work supported by the AFOSR through a MURI Grant RA 9550-14-1-0037.

  18. Distinguishing between plasmon-induced and photoexcited carriers in a device geometry

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Bob Y.; Zhao, Hangqi; Manjavacas, Alejandro; McClain, Michael; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J.

    2015-01-01

    The use of surface plasmons, charge density oscillations of conduction electrons of metallic nanostructures, to boost the efficiency of light-harvesting devices through increased light-matter interactions could drastically alter how sunlight is converted into electricity or fuels. These excitations can decay directly into energetic electron–hole pairs, useful for photocurrent generation or photocatalysis. However, the mechanisms behind plasmonic carrier generation remain poorly understood. Here we use nanowire-based hot-carrier devices on a wide-bandgap semiconductor to show that plasmonic carrier generation is proportional to internal field-intensity enhancement and occurs independently of bulk absorption. We also show that plasmon-induced hot electrons have higher energies than carriers generated by direct excitation and that reducing the barrier height allows for the collection of carriers from plasmons and direct photoexcitation. Our results provide a route to increasing the efficiency of plasmonic hot-carrier devices, which could lead to more efficient devices for converting sunlight into usable energy. PMID:26165521

  19. X-ray absorption structural study of a reversible, photoexcited charge-transfer state

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L.X.; Bowman, M.K.; Norris, J.R. Univ. of Chicago, IL ); Montano, P.A. )

    1993-05-19

    Electron-transfer reactions can be accompanied by significant nuclear movements. Nuclear motion appears to be especially vital to the reversible, photoinduced charge-transfer chemistry of cyclopentadienylnickel nitrosyl (C[sub 5]H[sub 5]NiNO). Although extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy has recorded photoinduced changes in the ligation of myoglobins, similar X-ray studies of electron-transfer chemistry have not been reported. Here we examine reversible, photoinduced structural changes in C[sub 5]H[sub 5]NiNO by EXAFS and propose a mechanism for the electron-transfer chemistry. This work demonstrates that EXAFS can measure distance changes accompanying photoinduced electron transfer to provide new details of the geometry of photoexcited state and suggests that electron transfer occurs in the transient, optically excited states of C[sub 5]H[sub 5]NiNO and C[sub 5]H[sub 5]NiNO[sup CT] as dictated by NO movement that produces either C[sub 5]H[sub 5]NiNO[sup CT] or C[sub 5]H[sub 5]NiNO[sup GS]. 14 refs., 2 figs.

  20. Photoexcited carrier trapping and recombination at Fe centers in GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uždavinys, T. K.; Marcinkevičius, S.; Leach, J. H.; Evans, K. R.; Look, D. C.

    2016-06-01

    Fe doped GaN was studied by time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The shape of PL transients at different temperatures and excitation powers allowed discrimination between electron and hole capture to Fe3+ and Fe2+ centers, respectively. Analysis of the internal structure of Fe ions and intra-ion relaxation rates suggests that for high repetition rates of photoexciting laser pulses the electron and hole trapping takes place in the excited state rather than the ground state of Fe ions. Hence, the estimated electron and hole capture coefficients of 5.5 × 10-8 cm3/s and 1.8 × 10-8 cm3/s should be attributed to excited Fe3+ and Fe2+ states. The difference in electron capture rates determined for high (MHz) and low (Hz) (Fang et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 107, 051901 (2015)) pulse repetition rates may be assigned to the different Fe states participating in the carrier capture. A weak temperature dependence of the electron trapping rate shows that the potential barrier for the multiphonon electron capture is small. A spectral feature observed at ˜420 nm is assigned to the radiative recombination of an electron in the ground Fe2+ state and a bound hole.

  1. Nonequilibrium dynamics of photoexcited electrons in graphene: Collinear scattering, Auger processes, and the impact of screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomadin, Andrea; Brida, Daniele; Cerullo, Giulio; Ferrari, Andrea C.; Polini, Marco

    2013-07-01

    We present a combined analytical and numerical study of the early stages (sub-100-fs) of the nonequilibrium dynamics of photoexcited electrons in graphene. We employ the semiclassical Boltzmann equation with a collision integral that includes contributions from electron-electron (e-e) and electron-optical phonon interactions. Taking advantage of circular symmetry and employing the massless Dirac fermion (MDF) Hamiltonian, we are able to perform an essentially analytical study of the e-e contribution to the collision integral. This allows us to take particular care of subtle collinear scattering processes—processes in which incoming and outgoing momenta of the scattering particles lie on the same line—including carrier multiplication (CM) and Auger recombination (AR). These processes have a vanishing phase space for two-dimensional MDF bare bands. However, we argue that electron-lifetime effects, seen in experiments based on angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, provide a natural pathway to regularize this pathology, yielding a finite contribution due to CM and AR to the Coulomb collision integral. Finally, we discuss in detail the role of physics beyond the Fermi golden rule by including screening in the matrix element of the Coulomb interaction at the level of the random phase approximation (RPA), focusing in particular on the consequences of various approximations including static RPA screening, which maximizes the impact of CM and AR processes, and dynamical RPA screening, which completely suppresses them.

  2. Spatially Resolved Photoexcited Charge-Carrier Dynamics in Phase-Engineered Monolayer MoS2

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yamaguchi, Hisato; Blancon, Jean-Christophe; Kappera, Rajesh; Lei, Sidong; Najmaei, Sina; Mangum, Benjamin D.; Gupta, Gautam; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Lou, Jun; Chhowalla, Manish; et al

    2014-12-18

    A fundamental understanding of the intrinsic optoelectronic properties of atomically thin transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) is crucial for its integration into high performance semiconductor devices. We investigate the transport properties of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) grown monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) under photo-excitation using correlated scanning photocurrent microscopy and photoluminescence imaging. We examined the effect of local phase transformation underneath the metal electrodes on the generation of photocurrent across the channel length with diffraction-limited spatial resolution. While maximum photocurrent generation occurs at the Schottky contacts of semiconducting (2H-phase) MoS2, after the metallic phase transformation (1T-phase), the photocurrent peak is observed towardsmore » the center of the device channel, suggesting a strong reduction of native Schottky barriers. Analysis using the bias and position dependence of the photocurrent indicates that the Schottky barrier heights are few meV for 1T- and ~200 meV for 2H-contacted devices. We also demonstrate that a reduction of native Schottky barriers in a 1T device enhances the photo responsivity by more than one order of magnitude, a crucial parameter in achieving high performance optoelectronic devices. The obtained results pave a pathway for the fundamental understanding of intrinsic optoelectronic properties of atomically thin TMDs where Ohmic contacts are necessary for achieving high efficiency devices with low power consumption.« less

  3. Photoexcited-induced sensitivity of InGaAs surface QDs to environment.

    PubMed

    Milla, M J; Ulloa, J M; Guzmán, A

    2014-11-01

    A detailed analysis of the impact of illumination on the electrical response of In0.5Ga0.5As surface nanostructures is carried out as a function of different relative humidity conditions. The importance of the surface-to-volume ratio for sensing applications is once more highlighted. From dark-to-photo conditions, the sheet resistance (SR) of a three-dimensional In0.5Ga0.5As nanostructure decays two orders of magnitude compared with that of a two-dimensional nanostructure. The electrical response is found to be vulnerable to the energy of the incident light and the external conditions. Illuminating with high energy light translates into an SR reduction of one order of magnitude under humid atmospheres, whereas it remains nearly unchanged under dry environments. Conversely, lighting with energy below the bulk energy bandgap, shows a negligible effect on the electrical properties regardless the local moisture. Both illumination and humidity are therefore needed for sensing. Photoexcited carriers can only contribute to conductivity if surface states are inactive due to water physisorption. The strong dependence of the electrical response on the environment makes these nanostructures very suitable for the development of highly sensitive and efficient sensing devices. PMID:25325146

  4. Kh a 1,2 hyperesatellites of 3d transition metals and their photoexcitation energy dependence.

    SciTech Connect

    Diamant, R.; Kao, C.; Huotari, S; Hamalainen, K; Sharon, R; Deutsch, M.

    2009-06-25

    Hollow atoms in which the K shell is empty while the outer shells are populated allow studying a variety of important and unusual properties of atoms. The diagram x-ray emission lines of such atoms, the K{sup h} {alpha}{sub 1,2} hypersatellites (HSs), were measured for the 3d transition metals, Z = 23-30, with a high energy resolution using photoexcitation by monochromatized synchrotron radiation. Good agreement with ab initio relativistic multiconfigurational Dirac-Fock calculations was found. The measured HS intensity variation with the excitation energy yields accurate values for the excitation thresholds, excludes contributions from shake-up processes, and indicates domination near threshold of a nonshake process. The Z variation of the HS shifts from the diagram line K{alpha}{sub 1,2}, the K{sup h}{alpha}{sub 1}-K{sup h}{alpha}{sub 2} splitting, and the K{sup h}{alpha}{sub 1}/K{sup h}{alpha}{sub 2} intensity ratio, derived from the measurements, are also discussed with a particular emphasis on the QED corrections and Breit interaction.

  5. Amoeba-inspired nanoarchitectonic computing: solving intractable computational problems using nanoscale photoexcitation transfer dynamics.

    PubMed

    Aono, Masashi; Naruse, Makoto; Kim, Song-Ju; Wakabayashi, Masamitsu; Hori, Hirokazu; Ohtsu, Motoichi; Hara, Masahiko

    2013-06-18

    Biologically inspired computing devices and architectures are expected to overcome the limitations of conventional technologies in terms of solving computationally demanding problems, adapting to complex environments, reducing energy consumption, and so on. We previously demonstrated that a primitive single-celled amoeba (a plasmodial slime mold), which exhibits complex spatiotemporal oscillatory dynamics and sophisticated computing capabilities, can be used to search for a solution to a very hard combinatorial optimization problem. We successfully extracted the essential spatiotemporal dynamics by which the amoeba solves the problem. This amoeba-inspired computing paradigm can be implemented by various physical systems that exhibit suitable spatiotemporal dynamics resembling the amoeba's problem-solving process. In this Article, we demonstrate that photoexcitation transfer phenomena in certain quantum nanostructures mediated by optical near-field interactions generate the amoebalike spatiotemporal dynamics and can be used to solve the satisfiability problem (SAT), which is the problem of judging whether a given logical proposition (a Boolean formula) is self-consistent. SAT is related to diverse application problems in artificial intelligence, information security, and bioinformatics and is a crucially important nondeterministic polynomial time (NP)-complete problem, which is believed to become intractable for conventional digital computers when the problem size increases. We show that our amoeba-inspired computing paradigm dramatically outperforms a conventional stochastic search method. These results indicate the potential for developing highly versatile nanoarchitectonic computers that realize powerful solution searching with low energy consumption. PMID:23565603

  6. Importance of quantum correction for the quantitative simulation of photoexcited scanning tunneling spectra of semiconductor surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnedler, M.; Dunin-Borkowski, R. E.; Ebert, Ph.

    2016-05-01

    Photoexcited scanning tunneling spectroscopy is a promising technique for the determination of carrier concentrations, surface photovoltages, and potentials of semiconductors with atomic spatial resolution. However, extraction of the desired quantities requires computation of the electrostatic potential induced by the proximity of the tip and the tunnel current. This calculation is based on an accurate solution of the Poisson as well as the continuity equations for the tip-vacuum-semiconductor system. For this purpose, the carrier current densities are modeled by classical drift and diffusion equations. However, for small tip radii and highly doped materials, the drift and diffusion transport model significantly overestimates a semiconductor's carrier concentration near the surface, making the quantification of physical properties impossible. In this paper, we apply quantum correction to the drift and diffusion model, in order to account for the so-called quantum compressibility, i.e., reduced compressibility of the carrier gas due to the Pauli principle, in the region of the tip-induced band bending. We compare carrier concentrations, potentials, and tunnel currents derived with and without quantum correction for GaN (10 1 ¯0 ) and GaAs(110) surfaces to demonstrate its necessity.

  7. Diffusion-assisted photoexcitation transfer in coupled semiconducting carbon nanotube thin films.

    PubMed

    Grechko, Maksim; Ye, Yumin; Mehlenbacher, Randy D; McDonough, Thomas J; Wu, Meng-Yin; Jacobberger, Robert M; Arnold, Michael S; Zanni, Martin T

    2014-06-24

    We utilize femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy to study dynamics of photoexcitation migration in films of semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes. Films of nanotubes in close contact enable energy migration such as needed in photovoltaic and electroluminescent devices. Two types of films composed of nanotube fibers are utilized in this study: densely packed and very porous. By comparing exciton kinetics in these films, we characterize excitation transfer between carbon nanotubes inside fibers versus between fibers. We find that intrafiber transfer takes place in both types of films, whereas interfiber transfer is greatly suppressed in the porous one. Using films with different nanotube composition, we are able to test several models of exciton transfer. The data are inconsistent with models that rely on through-space interfiber energy transfer. A model that fits the experimental results postulates that interfiber transfer occurs only at intersections between fibers, and the excitons reach the intersections by diffusing along the long-axis of the tubes. We find that time constants for the inter- and intrafiber transfers are 0.2-0.4 and 7 ps, respectively. In total, hopping between fibers accounts for about 60% of all exciton downhill transfer prior to 4 ps in the dense film. The results are discussed with regards to transmission electron micrographs of the films. This study provides a rigorous analysis of the photophysics in this new class of promising materials for photovoltaics and other technologies. PMID:24806792

  8. Correlation between N 1s core level x-ray photoelectron and x-ray absorption spectra of amorphous carbon nitride films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quirós, C.; Gómez-García, J.; Palomares, F. J.; Soriano, L.; Elizalde, E.; Sanz, J. M.

    2000-08-01

    This work presents a comparative analysis of the N 1s core level spectra, as measured by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), of amorphous CNx films which gives evidence of the existing correlation between the different components that constitute the respective spectra. After annealing, the contribution of XPS at 399.3 eV and the components of XAS at 399.6 and 400.8 eV are clearly enhanced. They are assigned to sp2 with two neighbors and to sp states of nitrogen. In addition, the XPS component at 401.3 eV is related to the XAS feature at 402.0 eV and has been assigned to sp2 nitrogen bonded to three carbon neighbors.

  9. Deep Lysimeter

    DOEpatents

    Hubbell, Joel M.; Sisson, James B.

    2004-06-01

    A deep lysimeter including a hollow vessel having a chamber, a fill conduit extending into the chamber through apertures, a semi-permeable member mounted on the vessel and in fluid communication with the fill conduit, and a line connection for retrieving the lysimeter.

  10. High-resolution core-level photoemission study of Eu-induced (3x2)/(3x4) reconstruction on Ge(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzmin, M.; Peraelae, R. E.; Laukkanen, P.; Ahola-Tuomi, M.; Vaeyrynen, I. J.

    2006-09-15

    We have investigated Eu-induced Ge(111)-(3x2)/(3x4) reconstruction by high-resolution core-level photoelectron spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation and low-energy electron diffraction. Recent scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) observations [Phys. Rev. B 73, 125332 (2006)] revealed that the Ge arrangement of this reconstruction can be well described in terms of the honeycomb chain-channel (HCC) geometry proposed earlier for metal/Si(111)-(3x1) and -(3x2) surfaces; the Eu atoms, however, were found to reside at two different adsorption sites in the Eu/Ge(111)-(3x2)/(3x4) reconstruction, in contrast to the equivalent adsorption sites (e.g., T4) occupied in the case of Si. The present photoemission results provide further information about the atomic arrangement of Eu/Ge(111)-(3x2)/(3x4). In particular, we show that the Ge 3d core-level data cannot be interpreted by the HCC structure with the Eu atoms adsorbed only on T4 sites, giving a spectroscopic support for the suggestions based on the earlier STM data. We consider here a modified HCC-based configuration for the Eu/Ge(111)-(3x2)/(3x4) surface where the Eu atoms occupy two different sites in the empty channel between the neighboring Ge honeycomb chains. The atomic models are discussed in the context of the Ge 3d and Eu 4f data as well as the previous results available in the literature. Finally, we propose a structural model that allows us to account for the present photoemission and earlier STM findings.

  11. Li induced effects in the core level and π-band electronic structure of graphene grown on C-face SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Johansson, Leif I. Xia, Chao; Virojanadara, Chariya

    2015-11-15

    Studies of the effects induced in the electronic structure after Li deposition, and subsequent heating, on graphene samples prepared on C-face SiC are reported. The as prepared graphene samples are essentially undoped, but after Li deposition, the Dirac point shifts down to 1.2 eV below the Fermi level due to electron doping. The shape of the C 1s level also indicates a doping concentration of around 10{sup 14 }cm{sup −2} after Li deposition, when compared with recent calculated results of core level spectra of graphene. The C 1s, Si 2p, and Li 1s core level results show little intercalation directly after deposition but that most of the Li has intercalated after heating at 280 °C. Heating at higher temperatures leads to desorption of Li from the sample, and at 1030 °C, Li can no longer be detected on the sample. The single π-band observable from multilayer C-face graphene samples in conventional angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy is reasonably sharp both on the initially prepared sample and after Li deposition. After heating at 280 °C, the π-band appears more diffuse and possibly split. The Dirac point becomes located at 0.4 eV below the Fermi level, which indicates occurrence of a significant reduction in the electron doping concentration. Constant energy photoelectron distribution patterns extracted from the as prepared graphene C-face sample and also after Li deposition and heating at 280 °C look very similar to earlier calculated distribution patterns for monolayer graphene.

  12. Photo-excited states in germanium at liquid-helium temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Culbertson, J.C.

    1982-12-01

    A wide variety of experimental work dealing with the basic properties of photoexcited states in Ge at liquid helium temperatures is presented. The primary emphasis is on the electron-hole liquid (EHL) and the free exciton (FE). The EHL is composed of two interpenetrating Fermi liquids, one of electrons and one of holes, each with its own Fermi level. The FE dealt with here is a mobile, loosely bound state of an electron and a hole. We report the first absolute measurement of the density dependence of the enhancement factor g/sub eh/(0) for the EHL in Ge. This factor g/sub eh/(0) is a measure of the electron-hole spatial correlation function, and provides a valuable and sensitive test for the predictions of various many-body-theory approximations. An EHL droplet - FE gas system confined to a strain induced potential well was used. The measurement approach relied on only a few simple and verifiable assumptions. A byproduct of this work was the measurement as a function of stress of: the electron and hole Fermi levels E/sub F//sup e/ and E/sub F//sup h/, the EHL density n/sub l/, the condensation energy phi of a FE relative to the EHL, and the binding energy of a FE (E/sub x/) relative to free carriers (FC). The decay of a FE-FC system confined to a strain induced potential well is studied. The first direct measurement of the FE diffusivity D/sub x/ is reported. The evolution in time of spatial profiles of FE luminescence were measured. From these FE density profiles, D/sub x/(4.2K) approx. = to 300 cm/sup 2/ s/sup -1/, the surface recombination velocity S approx. = 3000 cm s/sup -1/, and the FE lifetime tau/sub x/ = 27 ..mu..s with surface effects excluded were determined. (WHK)

  13. Photoexcited Surface Frustrated Lewis Pairs for Heterogeneous Photocatalytic CO2 Reduction.

    PubMed

    Ghuman, Kulbir Kaur; Hoch, Laura B; Szymanski, Paul; Loh, Joel Y Y; Kherani, Nazir P; El-Sayed, Mostafa A; Ozin, Geoffrey A; Singh, Chandra Veer

    2016-02-01

    In this study we investigated, theoretically and experimentally, the unique photoactive behavior of pristine and defected indium oxide surfaces providing fundamental insights into their excited state properties as well as an explanation for the experimentally observed enhanced activity of defected indium oxide surfaces for the gas-phase reverse water gas shift reaction, CO2 + H2 + hν→ CO + H2O in the light compared to the dark. To this end, a detailed excited-state study of pristine and defected forms of indium oxide (In2O3, In2O3-x, In2O3(OH)y and In2O3-x(OH)y) surfaces was performed using time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations, the results of which were supported experimentally by transient absorption spectroscopy and photoconductivity measurements. It was found that the surface frustrated Lewis pairs (FLPs) created by a Lewis acidic coordinately unsaturated surface indium site proximal to an oxygen vacancy and a Lewis basic surface hydroxide site in In2O3-x(OH)y become more acidic and basic and hence more active in the ES compared to the GS. This provides a theoretical mechanism responsible for the enhanced activity and reduced activation energy of the photochemical reverse water gas shift reaction observed experimentally for In2O3-x(OH)y compared to the thermochemical reaction. This fundamental insight into the role of photoexcited surface FLPs for catalytic CO2 reduction could lead to improved photocatalysts for solar fuel production. PMID:26759919

  14. Ballistic phonon production in photoexcited Ge, GaAs, and Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Msall, M. E.; Wolfe, J. P.

    2002-05-01

    Phonon imaging and photoluminescence measurements are used to determine the frequency and spatial distribution of optically generated nonequilibrium phonons in Si, Ge, and GaAs at 1.7 K. At low excitation levels the thermalization of photoexcited carriers and the subsequent phonon down-conversion produce a broad frequency distribution of acoustic phonons that ``quasidiffuse'' in the crystal. These phonons produce a temporally broad heat pulse when detected at a distance from the excitation point. At moderate excitation levels (typically a 10-nS pulse with a power density of ~20 W/mm2), the laser pulse produces a dense electron-hole plasma that can radically change the frequency distribution of nonequilibrium phonons. The plasma is a potentially rich source of low-frequency acoustic phonons, characterized by a temporally sharp heat pulse at a remote detector. The fraction of low-frequency phonons in the heat pulses is smallest in the direct-gap semiconductor GaAs, where rapid recombination depletes the populations of electrons and holes in just a few nanoseconds. More noticeable low frequency phonon components are seen in heat pulses in the indirect-gap semiconductors Ge and Si. At sufficiently high excitation densities (~60 W/mm2) in Ge, there is a suppression of the low-frequency phonon signal, which may result from phonon absorption within a cloud of electron hole droplets. An interesting alternative hypothesis is that the acoustic phonons created in the plasma are sufficiently dense to initiate phonon coalescence, whereby phonons are localized by phonon-phonon scattering over a relatively long period (500 ns). This localized ``hot spot'' could provide the phonon wind that drives the initial rapid expansion of the electron-hole plasma into the crystal.

  15. Light to Electrons to Bonds: Imaging Water Splitting and Collecting Photoexcited Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leenheer, Andrew Jay

    Photoelectrochemical devices can store solar energy as chemical bonds in fuels, but more control over the materials involved is needed for economic feasibility. Both efficient capture of photon energy into electron energy and subsequent electron transfer and bond formation are necessary, and this thesis explores various steps of the process. To look at the electrochemical fuel formation step, the spatially-resolved reaction rate on a water-splitting electrode was imaged during operation at a few-micron scale using optical microscopy. One method involved localized excitation of a semiconductor photoanode and recording the growth rate of bubbles to determine the local reaction rate. A second method imaged the reactant profile with a pH-sensitive fluorophore in the electrolyte to determine the local three-dimensional pH profile at patterned electrocatalysts in a confocal microscope. These methods provide insight on surface features optimal for efficient electron transfer into fuel products. A second set of studies examined the initial process of photoexcited electron transport and collection. An independent method to measure the minority carrier diffusion length in semiconductor photoelectrodes was developed, in which a wedge geometry is back illuminated with a small scanned spot. The diffusion length can be determined from the exponential decrease of photocurrent with thickness, and the method was demonstrated on solid-state silicon wedge diodes, as well as tungsten oxide thin-film wedge photoanodes. Finally, the possibility of absorbing and collecting sub-bandgap illumination via plasmon-enhanced hot carrier internal photoemission was modeled to predict the energy conversion efficiency. The effect of photon polarization on emission yield was experimentally tested using gold nanoantennas buried in silicon, and the correlation was found to be small.

  16. Deep smarts.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Dorothy; Swap, Walter

    2004-09-01

    When a person sizes up a complex situation and rapidly comes to a decision that proves to be not just good but brilliant, you think, "That was smart." After you watch him do this a few times, you realize you're in the presence of something special. It's not raw brainpower, though that helps. It's not emotional intelligence, either, though that, too, is often involved. It's deep smarts. Deep smarts are not philosophical--they're not"wisdom" in that sense, but they're as close to wisdom as business gets. You see them in the manager who understands when and how to move into a new international market, in the executive who knows just what kind of talk to give when her organization is in crisis, in the technician who can track a product failure back to an interaction between independently produced elements. These are people whose knowledge would be hard to purchase on the open market. Their insight is based on know-how more than on know-what; it comprises a system view as well as expertise in individual areas. Because deep smarts are experienced based and often context specific, they can't be produced overnight or readily imported into an organization. It takes years for an individual to develop them--and no time at all for an organization to lose them when a valued veteran walks out the door. They can be taught, however, with the right techniques. Drawing on their forthcoming book Deep Smarts, Dorothy Leonard and Walter Swap say the best way to transfer such expertise to novices--and, on a larger scale, to make individual knowledge institutional--isn't through PowerPoint slides, a Web site of best practices, online training, project reports, or lectures. Rather, the sage needs to teach the neophyte individually how to draw wisdom from experience. Companies have to be willing to dedicate time and effort to such extensive training, but the investment more than pays for itself. PMID:15449858

  17. SO2 photoexcitation mechanism links mass-independent sulfur isotopic fractionation in cryospheric sulfate to climate impacting volcanism

    PubMed Central

    Hattori, Shohei; Schmidt, Johan A.; Johnson, Matthew S.; Danielache, Sebastian O.; Yamada, Akinori; Ueno, Yuichiro; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2013-01-01

    Natural climate variation, such as that caused by volcanoes, is the basis for identifying anthropogenic climate change. However, knowledge of the history of volcanic activity is inadequate, particularly concerning the explosivity of specific events. Some material is deposited in ice cores, but the concentration of glacial sulfate does not distinguish between tropospheric and stratospheric eruptions. Stable sulfur isotope abundances contain additional information, and recent studies show a correlation between volcanic plumes that reach the stratosphere and mass-independent anomalies in sulfur isotopes in glacial sulfate. We describe a mechanism, photoexcitation of SO2, that links the two, yielding a useful metric of the explosivity of historic volcanic events. A plume model of S(IV) to S(VI) conversion was constructed including photochemistry, entrainment of background air, and sulfate deposition. Isotopologue-specific photoexcitation rates were calculated based on the UV absorption cross-sections of 32SO2, 33SO2, 34SO2, and 36SO2 from 250 to 320 nm. The model shows that UV photoexcitation is enhanced with altitude, whereas mass-dependent oxidation, such as SO2 + OH, is suppressed by in situ plume chemistry, allowing the production and preservation of a mass-independent sulfur isotope anomaly in the sulfate product. The model accounts for the amplitude, phases, and time development of Δ33S/δ34S and Δ36S/Δ33S found in glacial samples. We are able to identify the process controlling mass-independent sulfur isotope anomalies in the modern atmosphere. This mechanism is the basis of identifying the magnitude of historic volcanic events. PMID:23417298

  18. SO2 photoexcitation mechanism links mass-independent sulfur isotopic fractionation in cryospheric sulfate to climate impacting volcanism.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Shohei; Schmidt, Johan A; Johnson, Matthew S; Danielache, Sebastian O; Yamada, Akinori; Ueno, Yuichiro; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2013-10-29

    Natural climate variation, such as that caused by volcanoes, is the basis for identifying anthropogenic climate change. However, knowledge of the history of volcanic activity is inadequate, particularly concerning the explosivity of specific events. Some material is deposited in ice cores, but the concentration of glacial sulfate does not distinguish between tropospheric and stratospheric eruptions. Stable sulfur isotope abundances contain additional information, and recent studies show a correlation between volcanic plumes that reach the stratosphere and mass-independent anomalies in sulfur isotopes in glacial sulfate. We describe a mechanism, photoexcitation of SO2, that links the two, yielding a useful metric of the explosivity of historic volcanic events. A plume model of S(IV) to S(VI) conversion was constructed including photochemistry, entrainment of background air, and sulfate deposition. Isotopologue-specific photoexcitation rates were calculated based on the UV absorption cross-sections of (32)SO2, (33)SO2, (34)SO2, and (36)SO2 from 250 to 320 nm. The model shows that UV photoexcitation is enhanced with altitude, whereas mass-dependent oxidation, such as SO2 + OH, is suppressed by in situ plume chemistry, allowing the production and preservation of a mass-independent sulfur isotope anomaly in the sulfate product. The model accounts for the amplitude, phases, and time development of Δ(33)S/δ(34)S and Δ(36)S/Δ(33)S found in glacial samples. We are able to identify the process controlling mass-independent sulfur isotope anomalies in the modern atmosphere. This mechanism is the basis of identifying the magnitude of historic volcanic events. PMID:23417298

  19. Pi topology and spin alignment in unique photoexcited triplet and quintet states arising from four unpaired electrons of an organic spin system.

    PubMed

    Teki, Yoshio; Toichi, Tetuya; Nakajima, Satoru

    2006-03-01

    Syntheses, electronic structures in the ground state, unique photoexcited states, and spin alignment are reported for novel biradical 1, which was designed as an ideal model compound to investigate photoinduced spin alignment in the excited state. Electron spin resonance (ESR), time-resolved ESR (TRESR), and laser-excitation pulsed ESR experiments were carried out. The magnetic properties were examined with a SQUID magnetometer. In the electronic ground state, two radical moieties interact very weakly (almost no interaction) with each other through the closed-shell diphenylanthracene spin coupler. On photoirradiation, a novel lowest photoexcited state with the intermediate spin (S = 1) arising from four unpaired electrons with low-lying quintet (S = 2) photoexcited state was detected. The unique triplet state has an interesting electronic structure, the D value of which is reduced by antiferromagnetic spin alignment between two radical spins through the excited triplet spin coupler. The general theoretical predictions of the spin alignment and the reduction of the fine-structure splitting of the triplet bis(radical) systems are presented. The fine-structure splitting of the unique photoexcited triplet state of 1, as well as the existence of the low-lying quintet state, is interpreted well on the basis of theoretical predictions. Details of the spin alignment in the photoexcited states are discussed. PMID:16372362

  20. Photoexcited carrier relaxation dynamics in pentacene probed by ultrafast optical spectroscopy: Influence of morphology on relaxation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorsmølle, V. K.; Averitt, R. D.; Demsar, J.; Smith, D. L.; Tretiak, S.; Martin, R. L.; Chi, X.; Crone, B. K.; Ramirez, A. P.; Taylor, A. J.

    2009-10-01

    We present a comparative study of ultrafast photoexcited state relaxation in pentacene single crystals and in pure and C60-doped pentacene films using optical pump-probe spectroscopy. The photoinduced absorption spectra in pentacene crystals is consistent with a dominant singlet-triplet fission decay channel for above-gap excitation. This decay channel is suppressed in thin films and even further suppressed by electron trapping in C60-doped films. Thus we show that suppression of triplet state production, which is necessary for free carrier formation and thus photovoltaic and photodiode performance, is controllable via sample morphology.

  1. The evolution of Ga and As core levels in the formation of Fe/GaAs (001): A high resolution soft x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic study

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Jamie D. W.; Neal, James R.; Shen, Tiehan H.; Morton, Simon A.; Tobin, James G.; Dan Waddill, G.; Matthew, Jim A. D.; Greig, Denis; Hopkinson, Mark

    2008-07-15

    A high resolution soft x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic study of Ga and As 3d core levels has been conducted for Fe/GaAs (001) as a function of Fe thickness. This work has provided unambiguous evidence of substrate disrupting chemical reactions induced by the Fe overlayer--a quantitative analysis of the acquired spectra indicates significantly differing behavior of Ga and As during Fe growth, and our observations have been compared with existing theoretical models. Our results demonstrate that the outdiffusing Ga and As remain largely confined to the interface region, forming a thin intermixed layer. Whereas at low coverages Fe has little influence on the underlying GaAs substrate, the onset of substrate disruption when the Fe thickness reaches 3.5 A results in major changes in the energy distribution curves (EDCs) of both As and Ga 3d cores. Our quantitative analysis suggests the presence of two additional As environments of metallic character: one bound to the interfacial region and another which, as confirmed by in situ oxidation experiments, surface segregates and persists over a wide range of overlayer thickness. Analysis of the corresponding Ga 3d EDCs found not two, but three additional environments--also metallic in nature. Two of the three are interface resident whereas the third undergoes outdiffusion at low Fe coverages. Based on the variations of the integrated intensities of each component, we present a schematic of the proposed chemical makeup of the Fe/GaAs (001) system.

  2. The influence of oxygen adsorption on the NEXAFS and core-level XPS spectra of the C{sub 60} derivative PCBM

    SciTech Connect

    Brumboiu, Iulia Emilia Eriksson, Olle; Brena, Barbara; Ericsson, Leif; Hansson, Rickard; Moons, Ellen

    2015-02-07

    Fullerenes have been a main focus of scientific research since their discovery due to the interesting possible applications in various fields like organic photovoltaics (OPVs). In particular, the derivative [6,6]-phenyl-C{sub 60}-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) is currently one of the most popular choices due to its higher solubility in organic solvents compared to unsubstituted C{sub 60}. One of the central issues in the field of OPVs is device stability, since modules undergo deterioration (losses in efficiency, open circuit voltage, and short circuit current) during operation. In the case of fullerenes, several possibilities have been proposed, including dimerization, oxidation, and impurity related deterioration. We have studied by means of density functional theory the possibility of oxygen adsorption on the C{sub 60} molecular moiety of PCBM. The aim is to provide guidelines for near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements which can probe the presence of atomic or molecular oxygen on the fullerene cage. By analysing several configurations of PCBM with one or more adsorbed oxygen atoms, we show that a joint core level XPS and O1s NEXAFS investigation could be effectively used not only to confirm oxygen adsorption but also to pinpoint the bonding configuration and the nature of the adsorbate.

  3. Understanding surface core-level shifts using the Auger parameter: A study of Pd atoms adsorbed on ultrathin SiO2 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaden, William E.; Büchner, Christin; Lichtenstein, Leonid; Stuckenholz, Stefanie; Ringleb, Franziska; Heyde, Markus; Sterrer, Martin; Freund, Hans-Joachim; Giordano, Livia; Pacchioni, Gianfranco; Nelin, Connie J.; Bagus, Paul S.

    2014-03-01

    Auger parameter (Δα) measurements have been employed to determine the extent to which initial- and final-state effects govern surface core-level shifts in x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements of Pd atoms confined between a bilayer SiO2 film and its Ru(0001) support. For atoms bound in this manner, we note negative binding energy shifts (ΔBEs) of ˜0.3 eV, relative to the Pd 3d peak position in the bulk, and attribute these shifts to large variations in the initial-state orbital energies of the supported atoms (˜1.1 eV towards EF), coupled with decreased final-state relaxation contributions (˜0.8 eV). Theoretical calculations reveal that, despite small partial positive charges and decreased final-state screening, the decreased 4d-5sp hybridization of the undercoordinated Pd atoms results in large enough upward 3d orbital-energy shifts to yield the net-negative ΔBE noted by XPS.

  4. Layer-by-layer resolved core-level shifts in CaF[sub 2] and SrF[sub 2] on Si(111): Theory and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Rotenberg, E. ); Denlinger, J.D. ); Leskovar, M.; Hessinger, U.; Olmstead, M.A. )

    1994-10-15

    Using x-ray-photoelectron spectroscopy and Auger-electron spectroscopy, we have resolved surface, bulk, and interface Ca and F core-level emission in thin films (3--8 triple layers) of CaF[sub 2] and SrF[sub 2] on Si(111). We confirmed these assignments using x-ray-photoelectron diffraction (XPD) and surface modification. XPD was also used to identify the growth modes of the films as being either laminar or layer plus islands; in the latter case we have resolved buried and uncovered interface F and Ca/Sr emission. We compare the observed energy differences between surface, bulk, and interface emission to theoretical estimates of the extra-atomic contributions to emission energies. We find excellent agreement considering only the Madelung (electrostatic) potentials for the initial-state contribution and polarization response for the final-state contribution, including the effect of tetragonal strain. Small discrepancies for emission from metal atoms bonded to the Si substrate are interpreted in terms of chemical shifts.

  5. Synthesis Dependent Core Level Binding Energy Shift in the Oxidation State of Platinum Coated on Ceria–Titania and its Effect on Catalytic Decomposition of Methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Karakoti, A. S.; King, Jessica; Vincent, Abhilash; Seal, Sudipta

    2010-11-20

    Synergistic interaction of catalyst and support has attracted the interest of the catalytic community for several decades. The decomposition/oxidation of alcohols for the production of hydrogen as a source of fuel requires such support catalyst interaction. Recent studies have suggested the active role of oxide based supports on the catalytic ability of noble metals such as gold, platinum and palladium. Herein, we report the effect of synthesis technique on the catalytic activity of platinum coated on mixed ceria-titania support system. Wet impregnation technique followed by calcination was compared with the chemical reduction of platinum during the coating over oxide support. Methanol decomposition studied using an in-house built catalytic reactor coupled to a mass spectrometer showed that catalyst prepared by thermal reduction of platinum demonstrated better catalytic ability than the catalyst prepared by chemical reduction of platinum. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the size of both platinum and ceria-titania particles remained unchanged, while the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed that the oxidation state of platinum was modified by different coating procedures. A shift in the core level binding energy of the Pt 4f towards lower binding energy was observed with chemical reduction. Based on the XPS data it was found that platinum (on ceria-titania supports) in mixed oxidation state outperformed the Pt in reduced metallic state. Results from catalysis and in situ Fourier transform infra red spectroscopy are presented and discussed.

  6. The evolution of Ga and As core levels in the formation of Fe/GaAs (001):A high resolution soft x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic study

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Jamie; Neal, James; Shen, Tiehan; Morton, Simon; Tobin, James; Waddill, George Dan; Matthew, Jim; Greig, Denis; Hopkinson, Mark

    2008-07-14

    A high resolution soft x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic study of Ga and As 3d core levels has been conducted for Fe/GaAs (001) as a function of Fe thickness. This work has provided unambiguous evidence of substrate disrupting chemical reactions induced by the Fe overlayer--a quantitative analysis of the acquired spectra indicates significantly differing behavior of Ga and As during Fe growth, and our observations have been compared with existing theoretical models. Our results demonstrate that the outdiffusing Ga and As remain largely confined to the interface region, forming a thin intermixed layer. Whereas at low coverages Fe has little influence on the underlying GaAs substrate, the onset of substrate disruption when the Fe thickness reaches 3.5 Angstrom results in major changes in the energy distribution curves (EDCs) of both As and Ga 3d cores. Our quantitative analysis suggests the presence of two additional As environments of metallic character: one bound to the interfacial region and another which, as confirmed by in situ oxidation experiments, surface segregates and persists over a wide range of overlayer thickness. Analysis of the corresponding Ga 3d EDCs found not two, but three additional environments--also metallic in nature. Two of the three are interface resident whereas the third undergoes outdiffusion at low Fe coverages. Based on the variations of the integrated intensities of each component, we present a schematic of the proposed chemical makeup of the Fe/GaAs (001) system.

  7. The Evolution of Ga and As Core Levels in the Formation of Fe/GaAs(001): A High Resolution Soft X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopic Study

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J W; Neal, J R; Shen, T H; Morton, S A; Tobin, J G; Waddill, G D; Matthew, J D; Greig, D; Hopkinson, M

    2006-12-08

    A high resolution soft x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic study of Ga and As 3d core levels has been conducted for Fe/GaAs (001) as a function of Fe thickness. This work has provided unambiguous evidence of substrate disrupting chemical reactions induced by the Fe overlayer--a quantitative analysis of the acquired spectra indicates significantly differing behavior of Ga and As during Fe growth, and our observations have been compared with existing theoretical models. Our results demonstrate that the outdiffusing Ga and As remain largely confined to the interface region, forming a thin intermixed layer. Whereas at low coverages Fe has little influence on the underlying GaAs substrate, the onset of substrate disruption when the Fe thickness reaches 3.5 {angstrom} results in major changes in the energy distribution curves (EDCs) of both As and Ga 3d cores. Our quantitative analysis suggests the presence of two new As environments of metallic character; one bound to the interfacial region and another which, as confirmed by in-situ oxidation experiments, surface segregates and persists over a wide range of overlayer thickness. Analysis of the corresponding Ga 3d EDCs found not two, but three new environments--also metallic in nature. Two of the three are interface-resident whereas the third undergoes outdiffusion at low Fe coverages. Based on the variations of the integrated intensities of each component, we present a schematic of the proposed chemical make-up of the Fe/GaAs (001) system.

  8. Ultrafast Control of Magnetism in Ferromagnetic Semiconductors via Photoexcited Transient Carriers

    SciTech Connect

    Cotoros, Ingrid A.

    2008-12-01

    The field of spintronics offers perspectives for seamless integration of coupled and inter-tunable electrical and magnetic properties in a single device. For integration of the spin degree of freedom with current electronic technology, new semiconductors are needed that show electrically-tunable magnetic properties at room temperature and above. Dilute magnetic semiconductors derived from III-V compounds, like GaMnAs and InMnAs, show coupled and tunable magnetic, transport, and optical properties, due to the fact that their ferromagnetism is hole-mediated. These unconventional materials are ideal systems for manipulating the magnetic order by changing the carrier polarization, population density, and energy band distribution of the complementary subsystem of holes. This is the main theme we cover in this thesis. In particular, we develop a unique setup by use of ultraviolet pump, near-infrared probe femtosecond laser pulses, that allows for magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE) spectroscopy experiments. We photo-excite transient carriers in our samples, and measure the induced transient magnetization dynamics. One set of experiments performed allowed us to observe for the first time enhancement of the ferromagnetic order in GaMnAs, on an ultrafast time scale of hundreds of picoseconds. The corresponding transient increase of Curie temperature (Tc, the temperature above which a ferromagnetic material loses its permanent magnetism) of about 1 K for our experimental conditions is a very promising result for potential spintronics applications, especially since it is seconded by observation of an ultrafast ferromagnetic to paramagnetic phase transition above Tc. In a different set of experiments, we "write" the magnetization in a particular orientation in the sample plane. Using an ultrafast scheme, we alter the distribution of holes in the system and detect signatures of the particular memory state in the subsequent magnetization dynamics, with unprecedented hundreds of

  9. Ionic pathways following UV photoexcitation of the (HI)2 van der Waals dimer.

    PubMed

    Vidma, Konstantin V; Parker, David H; Bogdanchikov, Georgii A; Baklanov, Alexey V; Kochubei, Sergei A

    2010-03-11

    Photodissociation of the (HI)(2) van der Waals dimers at 248 nm and nearby wavelengths has been studied using time-of-flight mass spectrometry and velocity map imaging. I(2)(+) product ions with a translational temperature of 130 K and "translationally hot" I(+) ions with an average kinetic energy of E(t) = 1.24 +/- 0.03 eV and angular anisotropy beta = 1.92 +/- 0.11 were detected as dimer-specific ionic photofragments. Velocity map images of the I(2)(+) and I(+) species were found to be qualitatively similar to those observed in the case of photoexcitation of the (CH(3)I)(2) dimer (J. Chem. Phys. 2005, 122, 204301). As in the case of the (CH(3)I)(2) dimer, the absence of neutral I(2)-specific features in the ionic species images from (HI)(2) allows us to eliminate neutral molecular I(2) as a precursor of I(+) and I(2)(+). Similar to the case of (CH(3)I)(2), we deduce that the observed I(2)(+) ions are produced in their (2)Pi(3/2,g) ground electronic state as a result of photodissociation of the ionized dimer (HI)(2)(+) + h nu --> I(2)(+) + .... The formation of "translationally hot" I(+) ions is attributed to photodissociation of nascent vibrationally excited I(2)(+) with an average vibrational energy of 1.05 +/- 0.10 eV. This vibrational excitation is explained by the nonequilibrium initial I-I distance in I(2)(+) arising in photodissociation of (HI)(2)(+) after prompt release of the light H atoms. On the basis of our ab initio calculated value for the I-I distance of (3.17 A) in the (HI)(2)(+) precursor dimer, the vibrational excitation of I(2)(+) is expected to be 1.02 eV, which is in quantitative agreement with our experimentally deduced value. The interpretation of our results was supported by ab initio calculations of the structure and energy of neutral and ionized dimers of HI at the MP4(SDTQ)//MP2 level. PMID:19827807

  10. Observation of photoexcitation of Fe-oxide grown on TiO2(100) by visible light irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawauchi, Taizo; Nagatsuka, Naoki; Fukutani, Katsuyuki

    2016-12-01

    Electronic excitation of materials is of fundamental and technological importance and interest in terms of photoinduced phase transition, photovoltaics, and photocatalysis. In the present study, photoexcitation of Fe2 O 3 epitaxially grown on rutile TiO2(100) was investigated with conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy (CEMS) under dominantly visible-light irradiation. 57Fe was deposited on the substrate at a substrate temperature of 973 K, and the resulting film was characterized by RHEED and XPS. After deposition of Fe on TiO2(100), it was found that Fe was oxidized to Fe 3+, and the structure was analyzed to be the rhombohedral phase of Fe2 O 3. While the CEMS spectrum without light irradiation showed a quadrupole splitting of 0.80 mm/s with an isomer shift of +0.25 mm/s, an additional component with a quadrupole splitting of 0.85 and an isomer shift of +0.67 mm/s was observed under light irradiation. The latter component corresponds to a reduced state of Fe at the octahedral site surrounded by oxygen atoms. The lifetime of this photoexcited state is discussed.

  11. UVA-visible photo-excitation of guanine radical cations produces sugar radicals in DNA and model structures

    PubMed Central

    Adhikary, Amitava; Malkhasian, Aramice Y. S.; Collins, Sean; Koppen, Jessica; Becker, David; Sevilla, Michael D.

    2005-01-01

    This work presents evidence that photo-excitation of guanine radical cations results in high yields of deoxyribose sugar radicals in DNA, guanine deoxyribonucleosides and deoxyribonucleotides. In dsDNA at low temperatures, formation of C1′• is observed from photo-excitation of G•+ in the 310–480 nm range with no C1′• formation observed ≥520 nm. Illumination of guanine radical cations in 2′dG, 3′-dGMP and 5′-dGMP in aqueous LiCl glasses at 143 K is found to result in remarkably high yields (∼85–95%) of sugar radicals, namely C1′•, C3′• and C5′•. The amount of each of the sugar radicals formed varies dramatically with compound structure and temperature of illumination. Radical assignments were confirmed using selective deuteration at C5′ or C3′ in 2′-dG and at C8 in all the guanine nucleosides/tides. Studies of the effect of temperature, pH, and wavelength of excitation provide important information about the mechanism of formation of these sugar radicals. Time-dependent density functional theory calculations verify that specific excited states in G•+ show considerable hole delocalization into the sugar structure, in accord with our proposed mechanism of action, namely deprotonation from the sugar moiety of the excited molecular radical cation. PMID:16204456

  12. Femtosecond transient infrared and stimulated Raman spectroscopy shed light on the relaxation mechanisms of photo-excited peridinin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Donato, Mariangela; Ragnoni, Elena; Lapini, Andrea; Foggi, Paolo; Hiller, Roger G.; Righini, Roberto

    2015-06-01

    By means of one- and two-dimensional transient infrared spectroscopy and femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy, we investigated the excited state dynamics of peridinin, a carbonyl carotenoid occurring in natural light harvesting complexes. The presence of singly and doubly excited states, as well as of an intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) state, makes the behavior of carbonyl carotenoids in the excited state very complex. In this work, we investigated by time resolved spectroscopy the relaxation of photo-excited peridinin in solvents of different polarities and as a function of the excitation wavelength. Our experimental results show that a characteristic pattern of one- and two-dimensional infrared bands in the C=C stretching region allows monitoring the relaxation pathway. In polar solvents, moderate distortions of the molecular geometry cause a variation of the single/double carbon bond character, so that the partially ionic ICT state is largely stabilized by the solvent reorganization. After vertical photoexcitation at 400 nm of the S2 state, the off-equilibrium population moves to the S1 state with ca. 175 fs time constant; from there, in less than 5 ps, the non-Franck Condon ICT state is reached, and finally, the ground state is recovered in 70 ps. That the relevant excited state dynamics takes place far from the Franck Condon region is demonstrated by its noticeable dependence on the excitation wavelength.

  13. Magneto-transport characteristics of a 2D electron system driven to negative magneto-conductivity by microwave photoexcitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mani, Ramesh; Kriisa, A.

    2015-03-01

    Negative diagonal magneto-conductivity/resistivity is a spectacular- and thought provoking- property of driven, far-from-equilibrium, low dimensional electronic systems. The physical response of this exotic electronic state is not yet fully understood since it is rarely encountered in experiment. The microwave-radiation-induced zero-resistance state in the high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs 2D electron system is believed to be an example where negative magneto-conductivity/resistivity is responsible for the observed phenomena. Here, we examine the magneto-transport characteristics of this negative conductivity/resistivity state in the microwave photo-excited two-dimensional electron system (2DES) through a numerical solution of the associated boundary value problem. The results suggest, surprisingly, that a bare negative diagonal conductivity/resistivity state in the 2DES under photo-excitation should yield a positive diagonal resistance with a concomitant sign reversal in the Hall voltage. Transport measurements are supported by the DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Material Sciences and Engineering Division under DE-SC0001762. Additional support by the ARO under W911NF-07-01-015.

  14. Surface Recombination Limited Lifetimes of Photoexcited Carriers in Few-Layer Transition Metal Dichalcogenide MoS₂.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haining; Zhang, Changjian; Rana, Farhan

    2015-12-01

    We present results on photoexcited carrier lifetimes in few-layer transition metal dichalcogenide MoS2 using nondegenerate ultrafast optical pump-probe technique. Our results show a sharp increase of the carrier lifetimes with the number of layers in the sample. Carrier lifetimes increase from few tens of picoseconds in monolayer samples to more than a nanosecond in 10-layer samples. The inverse carrier lifetime was found to scale according to the probability of the carriers being present at the surface layers, as given by the carrier wave function in few layer samples, which can be treated as quantum wells. The carrier lifetimes were found to be largely independent of the temperature, and the inverse carrier lifetimes scaled linearly with the photoexcited carrier density. These observations are consistent with defect-assisted carrier recombination, in which the capture of electrons and holes by defects occurs via Auger scatterings. Our results suggest that carrier lifetimes in few-layer samples are surface recombination limited due to the much larger defect densities at surface layers compared with the inner layers. PMID:26535607

  15. Enhanced Photoexcited Carrier Separation in Oxygen-Doped ZnIn2 S4 Nanosheets for Hydrogen Evolution.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenlong; Zhang, Lei; Xie, Junfeng; Zhang, Xiaodong; Liu, Qinghua; Yao, Tao; Wei, Shiqiang; Zhang, Qun; Xie, Yi

    2016-06-01

    Limited by the relatively sluggish charge-carrier separation in semiconductors, the photocatalytic performance is still far below what is expected. Herein, a model of ZnIn2 S4 (ZIS) nanosheets with oxygen doping is put forward to obtain in-depth understanding of the role that doping atoms play in photocatalysis. It shows enhanced photocatalytic activity compared with pristine ZIS. The electron dynamics analyzed by ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy reveals that the average recovery lifetime of photoexcited electrons is increased by 1.53 times upon oxygen incorporation into the ZIS crystals, indicating enhanced separation of photoexcited carriers in oxygen-doped ZIS nanosheets. As expected, the oxygen-doped ZIS nanosheets show a remarkably improved photocatalytic activity with a hydrogen evolution rate of up to 2120 μmol h(-1)  g(-1) under visible-light irradiation, which is 4.5 times higher than that of the pristine ZIS nanosheets. PMID:27100950

  16. Continuous-time core-level photon-stimulated desorption spectroscopy for monitoring soft x-ray-induced reactions of molecules adsorbed on a single-crystal surface

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, L.-C.; Wen, C.-R.

    2006-05-15

    Continuous-time core-level photon-stimulated desorption (PSD) spectroscopy was proposed for monitoring the soft x-ray-induced reactions of molecules adsorbed on a single-crystal surface. Monochromatic synchrotron radiation was used as a soft x-ray light source in the photon-induced reactions of CF{sub 3}Cl adsorbed on a Si(111)-7x7 surface at 30 K and also as a probe for studying the produced fluorination states of the bonding surface Si atom in the positive-ion PSD spectroscopy. The F{sup +} PSD spectrum was obtained by monitoring the F{sup +} signal as a function of incident photon energy near the Si(2p) edge (98-110 eV). Sequential F{sup +} PSD spectra were measured as a function of photon exposure at four adsorbate coverages (the first dose=0.3x10{sup 15} molecules/cm{sup 2}, the second dose=0.8x10{sup 15} molecules/cm{sup 2}, the third dose=2.2x10{sup 15} molecules/cm{sup 2}, and the fourth dose=3.2x10{sup 15} molecules/cm{sup 2}). For the first and second CF{sub 3}Cl-dosed surfaces, the sequential F{sup +} PSD spectra show the variation of their shapes with photon exposure and indicate the formation of surface SiF species. The sequential F{sup +} PSD spectra for the third and fourth CF{sub 3}Cl-dosed surfaces also show the variation of their shapes with photon exposure and depict the production of surface SiF and SiF{sub 3} species.

  17. Deep pockets for deep seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    Peter Auster, a fisheries ecologist with the National Undersea Research Center in Connecticut, plans to assess degradation of the deep-shelf seafloor from bottom trawling. Magnus Ngoile, an official with Tanzania's National Environmental Management Council, will work on building capacity of poor villagers to protect their coastline. And Alison Rieser, a lawyer with the University of Maine School of Law, will produce a textbook to educate scientists on how to apply the law for marine conservation.These individuals are among 11 recipients of the Pew Charitable Trust's 10th annual marine conservation fellowships, announced on July 12. With each recipient receiving an award of $150,000, the program is the world's largest award for marine conservationists. Other 1999 recipients will be involved with areas including investigating marine pollution in the Arctic region, examining economic incentives for conservation in Baja, Mexico, and establishing a marine conservation biology training program for minority students.

  18. The requisite electronic structure theory to describe photoexcited nonadiabatic dynamics: nonadiabatic derivative couplings and diabatic electronic couplings.

    PubMed

    Subotnik, Joseph E; Alguire, Ethan C; Ou, Qi; Landry, Brian R; Fatehi, Shervin

    2015-05-19

    Electronically photoexcited dynamics are complicated because there are so many different relaxation pathways: fluorescence, phosphorescence, radiationless decay, electon transfer, etc. In practice, to model photoexcited systems is a very difficult enterprise, requiring accurate and very efficient tools in both electronic structure theory and nonadiabatic chemical dynamics. Moreover, these theoretical tools are not traditional tools. On the one hand, the electronic structure tools involve couplings between electonic states (rather than typical single state energies and gradients). On the other hand, the dynamics tools involve propagating nuclei on multiple potential energy surfaces (rather than the usual ground state dynamics). In this Account, we review recent developments in electronic structure theory as directly applicable for modeling photoexcited systems. In particular, we focus on how one may evaluate the couplings between two different electronic states. These couplings come in two flavors. If we order states energetically, the resulting adiabatic states are coupled via derivative couplings. Derivative couplings capture how electronic wave functions change as a function of nuclear geometry and can usually be calculated with straightforward tools from analytic gradient theory. One nuance arises, however, in the context of time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT): how do we evaluate derivative couplings between TD-DFT excited states (which are tricky, because no wave function is available)? This conundrum was recently solved, and we review the solution below. We also discuss the solution to a second, pesky problem of origin dependence, whereby the derivative couplings do not (strictly) satisfy translation variance, which can lead to a lack of momentum conservation. Apart from adiabatic states, if we order states according to their electronic character, the resulting diabatic states are coupled via electronic or diabatic couplings. The couplings

  19. Photoexcitation and ionization in carbon dioxide - Theoretical studies in the separated-channel static-exchange approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padial, N.; Csanak, G.; Mckoy, B. V.; Langhoff, P. W.

    1981-01-01

    Vertical-electronic static-exchange photoexcitation and ionization cross sections are reported which provide a first approximation to the complete dipole spectrum of CO2. Separated-channel static-exchange calculations of vertical-electronic transition energies and oscillator strengths, and Stieltjes-Chebyshev moment methods were used in the development. Detailed comparisons were made of the static-exchange excitation and ionization spectra with photoabsorption, electron-impact excitation, and quantum-defect estimates of discrete transition energies and intensities, and with partial-channel photoionization cross sections obtained from fluorescence measurements and from tunable-source and (e, 2e) photoelectron spectroscopy. Results show that the separate-channel static-exchange approximation is generally satisfactory in CO2.

  20. Investigation of the generation of singlet oxygen in ensembles of photoexcited silicon nanocrystals by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantinova, E. A. Demin, V. A.; Timoshenko, V. Yu.

    2008-09-15

    The generation of singlet oxygen is investigated and its concentration upon photoexcitation of silicon nanocrystals in porous silicon layers is determined using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. The relaxation times of spin centers, i.e., silicon dangling bonds, in vacuum and in an oxygen atmosphere in the dark and under illumination of the samples are measured for the first time. It is revealed that the spin-lattice relaxation in porous silicon is retarded as compared to that in a single-crystal substrate. From analyzing experimental data, a microscopic model is proposed for interaction of oxygen molecules in the triplet state and spin centers at the surface of silicon nanocrystals. The results obtained have demonstrated that porous silicon holds promise for the use as a photosensitizer of molecular oxygen in biomedical applications.

  1. Influence of mesoscopic ordering on the photoexcitation transfer dynamics in supramolecular assemblies of oligo- p-phenylenevinylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, M. H.; Hoeben, F. J. M.; Jonkheijm, P.; Schenning, A. P. H. J.; Meijer, E. W.; Silva, C.; Herz, L. M.

    2006-01-01

    We have investigated the influence of molecular arrangement on the transfer rates of photoexcitations along supramolecular assemblies of hydrogen-bonded oligo- p-phenylenevinylene (OPV) molecules for two different packing geometries. For well-defined, helical stacks of monofunctional OPVs fast (≈50 ps) photoluminescence depolarization and excitation transfer to dopants was observed, in agreement with semi-coherent exciton diffusion. For disordered assemblies of bifunctional OPVs incorporating a spacer to link adjacent molecules, depolarization and energy transfer dynamics occur on a longer time scale (≈nanosecond). This strongly suggests that such spacers need to be tuned carefully as they may otherwise interfere with the π-stacking thereby reducing the intermolecular electronic coupling.

  2. The first photoexcitation step of ruthenium-based models for artificial photosynthesis highlighted by resonance Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Carmen; Neugebauer, Johannes; Presselt, Martin; Uhlemann, Ute; Schmitt, Michael; Rau, Sven; Popp, Jürgen; Reiher, Markus

    2007-05-31

    Ruthenium-polypyridine and related complexes play an important role as models for light-harvesting antenna systems to be employed in artificial photosynthesis. In this theoretical and experimental work, the first photoexcitation step of a tetranuclear [Ru2Pd2] complex composed of two ruthenium-bipyridyl subunits and two palladium-based fragments, {[(tbbpy)2Ru(tmbi)]2[Pd(allyl)]2}2+ (tbbpy = 4,4'-di-tert-butyl-2,2'-bipyridine, tmbi = 5,6,5',6'-tetramethyl-2,2'-bibenzimidazolate), is investigated by means of experimental and theoretical resonance Raman spectroscopy. The calculated spectra, which were obtained within the short-time approximation combined with time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT), reproduce the experimental spectrum with excellent agreement. We also compared calculations on off-resonance Raman spectra, for which a completely different theoretical approach has to be used, to experimental ones and again found very good agreement. The [Ru2Pd2] complex represents the probably largest system for which a quantum chemical frequency analysis and a calculation of conventional Raman as well as resonance Raman spectra with reasonable basis sets have been performed. A comparison between the resonance Raman spectra of the [Ru2Pd2] complex and its mononuclear [Ru] building block [(tbbpy)2Ru(tmbi)]2+ and a normal-mode analysis reveal that the [Ru2Pd2] resonance Raman spectrum is composed uniquely from peaks arising from the [Ru] fragment. This observation and an analysis of the Kohn-Sham orbitals mainly involved in the initial electronic excitation in the TDDFT description of the [Ru2Pd2] system support the hypothesis that the initial photoexcitation step of [Ru2Pd2] is a charge-transfer excitation from the ruthenium atoms to the adjacent butyl-2,2'-bipyridine ligands. PMID:17489631

  3. Efficient generation of charges via below-gap photoexcitation of polymer-fullerene blend films investigated by terahertz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkinson, P.; Lloyd-Hughes, J.; Johnston, M. B.; Herz, L. M.

    2008-09-01

    Using optical-pump terahertz-probe spectroscopy, we have investigated the time-resolved conductivity dynamics of photoexcited polymer-fullerene bulk heterojunction blends for two model polymers: poly[3-hexylthiophene] (P3HT) and poly[2-methoxy-5-( 3,7 -dimethyloctyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene] (MDMO-PPV) blended with [6,6]-phenyl- C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM). The observed terahertz-frequency conductivity is characteristic of dispersive charge transport for photoexcitation both at the π-π∗ absorption peak (560 nm for P3HT) and significantly below it (800 nm). The photoconductivity at 800 nm is unexpectedly high, which we attribute to the presence of a charge-transfer complex. We report the excitation-fluence dependence of the photoconductivity over more than four orders of magnitude, obtained by utilizing a terahertz spectrometer based upon on either a laser oscillator or an amplifier source. The time-averaged photoconductivity of the P3HT:PCBM blend is over 20 times larger than that of P3HT, indicating that long-lived hole polarons are responsible for the high photovoltaic efficiency of polymer:fullerene blends. At early times (˜ps) the linear dependence of photoconductivity upon fluence indicates that interfacial charge transfer dominates as an exciton decay pathway, generating charges with mobility of at least ˜0.1cm2V-1s-1 . At later times, a sublinear relationship shows that carrier-carrier recombination effects influence the conductivity on a longer time scale (>1μs) with a bimolecular charge annihilation constant for the blends that is approximately two to three orders of magnitude smaller than that typical for neat polymer films.

  4. Ligand field splittings in core level transitions for transition metal (TM) oxides: Tanabe-Sugano diagrams and (TM) dangling bonds in vacated O-atom defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucovsky, Gerry; Wu, Kun; Pappas, Brian; Whitten, Jerry

    2013-04-01

    Defect states in the forbidden band-gap below the conduction band edge are active as electron traps in nano-grain high-) transition metal (TM) oxides with thickness >0.3 nm, e.g., ZrO2 and HfO2. These oxides have received considerable attention as gate-dielectrics in complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) devices, and more recently are emerging as candidates for charge storage and memory devices. To provide a theoretical basis for device functionality, ab-initio many-electron theory is combined with X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to study O K edge and TM core level transitions. These studies identify ligand field splittings (ΔLF) for defect state features,. When compared with those obtained from O-atom and TM-atom core spectroscopic transitions, this provides direct information about defect state sun-nm bonding arrangements. comparisons are made for (i) elemental TiO2 and Ti2O3 with different formal ionic charges, Ti4+ and Ti3+ and for (ii) Magneli Phase alloys, TinO2n-1, n is an integer 9>=n>3, and (TiO2)x(HfO2)1-x alloys. The alloys display multi-valent behavior from (i) different ionic-charge states, (ii} local bond-strain, and (iii) metallic hopping transport. The intrinsic bonding defects in TM oxides are identified as pairs of singly occupied dangling bonds. For 6-fold coordinated Ti-oxides defect excited states in 2nd derivative O K pre-edge spectra are essentially the same as single Ti-atom d2 transitions in Tanabe-Sugano (T-S) diagrams. O-vacated site defects in 8-fold coordinated ZrO2 and HfO2 are described by d8 T-S diagrams. T-S defect state ordering and splittings are functions of the coordination and symmetry of vacated site bordering TM atoms. ΔLF values from the analysis of T-S diagrams indicate medium range order (MRO) extending to 3rd and 4th nearest-neighbor (NN) TM-atoms. Values are different for 6-fold Ti, and 8-fold ZrO2 and HfO2, and scale inversely with differences in respective formal ionic radii. O-vacated site bonding

  5. Deep Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Deep Vein Thrombosis Overview What is deep vein thrombosis? Deep vein thrombosis (also called DVT) is a blood clot in a vein deep inside your body. These clots usually occur in your leg veins. While DVT is a fairly common condition, it is ...

  6. Deep Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    Deep vein thrombosis, or DVT, is a blood clot that forms in a vein deep in the body. Most deep vein clots occur in the ... vein swells, the condition is called thrombophlebitis. A deep vein thrombosis can break loose and cause a serious problem ...

  7. Deep Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    Deep vein thrombosis, or DVT, is a blood clot that forms in a vein deep in the body. Most deep vein clots occur in the lower leg or ... vein swells, the condition is called thrombophlebitis. A deep vein thrombosis can break loose and cause a ...

  8. H elimination and metastable lifetimes in the UV photoexcitation of diacetylene

    PubMed Central

    Silva, R.; Gichuhi, W. K.; Huang, C.; Doyle, M. B.; Kislov, V. V.; Mebel, A. M.; Suits, A. G.

    2008-01-01

    We present an experimental investigation of the UV photochemistry of diacetylene under collisionless conditions. The H loss channel is studied using DC slice ion imaging with two-color reduced-Doppler detection at 243 nm and 212 nm. The photochemistry is further studied deep in the vacuum UV, that is, at Lyman-alpha (121.6 nm). Translational energy distributions for the H + C4H product arising from dissociation of C4H2 after excitation at 243, 212, and 121.6 nm show an isotropic angular distribution and characteristic translational energy profile suggesting statistical dissociation from the ground state or possibly from a low-lying triplet state. From these distributions, a two-photon dissociation process is inferred at 243 nm and 212 nm, whereas at 121.6 nm, a one-photon dissociation process prevails. The results are interpreted with the aid of ab initio calculations on the reaction pathways and statistical calculations of the dissociation rates and product branching. In a second series of experiments, nanosecond time-resolved phototionization measurements yield a direct determination of the lifetime of metastable triplet diacetylene under collisionless conditions, as well as its dependence on excitation energy. The observed submicrosecond lifetimes suggest that reactions of metastable diacetylene are likely to be less important in Titan's atmosphere than previously believed. PMID:18697925

  9. Terahertz dielectric response of photoexcited carriers in Si revealed via single-shot optical-pump and terahertz-probe spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Minami, Yasuo; Horiuchi, Kohei; Masuda, Kaisei; Takeda, Jun; Katayama, Ikufumi

    2015-10-26

    We have demonstrated accurate observations of terahertz (THz) dielectric response due to photoexcited carriers in a Si plate via single-shot optical-pump and THz-probe spectroscopy. In contrast to conventional THz time-domain spectroscopy, this spectroscopic technique allows single-shot detection of the THz response of materials at a given delay time between the pump and THz pulses, thereby sufficiently extending the time interval between the pump pulses. As a result, we can accurately measure the dielectric properties of materials, while avoiding artifacts in the response caused by the accumulation of long-lived photoexcited carriers. Using our single-shot scheme, the transmittance of a Si plate was measured in the range of 0.5–2.5 THz with different pump fluences. Based on a Drude model analysis, the optically induced complex dielectric constant, plasma frequency, and damping rate in the THz region were quantitatively evaluated.

  10. Characterizing the Solvated Structure of Photoexcited [Os(terpy)₂](2+) with X-ray Transient Absorption Spectroscopy and DFT Calculations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoyi; Pápai, Mátyás; Møller, Klaus B; Zhang, Jianxin; Canton, Sophie E

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing the geometric and electronic structures of individual photoexcited dye molecules in solution is an important step towards understanding the interfacial properties of photo-active electrodes. The broad family of "red sensitizers" based on osmium(II) polypyridyl compounds often undergoes small photo-induced structural changes which are challenging to characterize. In this work, X-ray transient absorption spectroscopy with picosecond temporal resolution is employed to determine the geometric and electronic structures of the photoexcited triplet state of [Os(terpy)₂](2+) (terpy: 2,2':6',2″-terpyridine) solvated in methanol. From the EXAFS analysis, the structural changes can be characterized by a slight overall expansion of the first coordination shell [OsN₆]. DFT calculations supports the XTA results. They also provide additional information about the nature of the molecular orbitals that contribute to the optical spectrum (with TD-DFT) and the near-edge region of the X-ray spectra. PMID:26907233

  11. Taoism and Deep Ecology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sylvan, Richard; Bennett, David

    1988-01-01

    Contrasted are the philosophies of Deep Ecology and ancient Chinese. Discusses the cosmology, morality, lifestyle, views of power, politics, and environmental philosophies of each. Concludes that Deep Ecology could gain much from Taoism. (CW)

  12. Deep Ecology and Subjectivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foley, Grover

    1988-01-01

    Describes Deep Ecology and criticizes its limitations. Discusses mysticism, the bomb, freedom, subjectivity and power as they are addressed by Deep Ecology. Stresses the need to teach ecological balance. (CW)

  13. Deep vein thrombosis - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    You were treated for deep venous thrombosis (DVT). This is a condition in which a blood clot forms in a vein that is not on ... especially if it gets worse upon taking a deep breath in You cough up blood

  14. Deep venous thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    Deep venous thrombosis is a condition that occurs when a blood clot forms in a vein deep inside a part ... M, et al. Executive Summary: Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis. 9th ed. American College of Chest ...

  15. Preventing Deep Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Education FAQs Preventing Deep Vein Thrombosis Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Preventing Deep Vein Thrombosis FAQ174, August 2011 PDF ... Your Practice Patient Safety & Quality Payment Reform (MACRA) Education & Events Annual ... Pamphlets Teen Health About ACOG About Us Leadership & ...

  16. Heating of the magnetic-ion spin system in modulation doped ZnMnSe/ZnBeSe quantum wells by means of photoexcitation.

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, D.; Astakhov, G. V.; Yakovlev, D. R.; Barrick, T.; Crooker, S. A.; Hansen, L.; Ossau, W.; Molenkamp, L. W.

    2002-01-01

    Heating of the spin system of magnetic ions by means of photoexcited carriers has been studied in modulation-doped (Zn,Mn)Se/(Zn,Be)Se quantum well structures with different electron densities varying from about 10{sup 9} to 5.5 x 10{sup 11} cm{sup -2}. The elevated temperature of the magnetic ions manifests in a reduced Zeeman splitting of the carriers already for low excitation densities. The efficiency of the heating decreases with increasing electron concentration.

  17. Moving solvated electrons with light: Nonadiabatic mixed quantum/classical molecular dynamics simulations of the relocalization of photoexcited solvated electrons in tetrahydrofuran (THF)

    SciTech Connect

    Bedard-Hearn, Michael J.; Larsen, Ross E.; Schwartz, Benjamin J.

    2006-11-21

    Motivated by recent ultrafast spectroscopic experiments [Martini et al., Science 293, 462 (2001)], which suggest that photoexcited solvated electrons in tetrahydrofuran (THF) can relocalize (that is, return to equilibrium in solvent cavities far from where they started), we performed a series of nonequilibrium, nonadiabatic, mixed quantum/classical molecular dynamics simulations that mimic one-photon excitation of the THF-solvated electron. We find that as photoexcited THF-solvated electrons relax to their ground states either by continuous mixing from the excited state or via nonadiabatic transitions, {approx}30% of them relocalize into cavities that can be over 1 nm away from where they originated, in close agreement with the experiments. A detailed investigation shows that the ability of excited THF-solvated electrons to undergo photoinduced relocalization stems from the existence of preexisting cavity traps that are an intrinsic part of the structure of liquid THF. This explains why solvated electrons can undergo photoinduced relocalization in solvents like THF but not in solvents like water, which lack the preexisting traps necessary to stabilize the excited electron in other places in the fluid. We also find that even when they do not ultimately relocalize, photoexcited solvated electrons in THF temporarily visit other sites in the fluid, explaining why the photoexcitation of THF-solvated electrons is so efficient at promoting recombination with nearby scavengers. Overall, our study shows that the defining characteristic of a liquid that permits the photoassisted relocalization of solvated electrons is the existence of nascent cavities that are attractive to an excess electron; we propose that other such liquids can be found from classical computer simulations or neutron diffraction experiments.

  18. Photoexcited Nuclear Dynamics with Ab Initio Electronic Structure Theory: Is TD-DFT Ready For the Challenge?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subotnik, Joseph

    In this talk, I will give a broad overview of our work in nonadiabatic dynamics, i.e. the dynamics of strongly coupled nuclear-electronic motion whereby the relaxation of a photo-excited electron leads to the heating up of phonons. I will briefly discuss how to model such nuclear motion beyond mean field theory. Armed with the proper framework, I will then focus on how to calculate one flavor of electron-phonon couplings, known as derivative couplings in the chemical literature. Derivative couplings are the matrix elements that couple adiabatic electronic states within the Born-Oppenheimer treatment, and I will show that these matrix elements show spurious poles using formal (frequency-independent) time-dependent density functional theory. To correct this TD-DFT failure, a simple approximation will be proposed and evaluated. Finally, time permitting, I will show some ab initio calculations whereby one can use TD-DFT derivative couplings to study electronic relaxation through a conical intersection.

  19. Mesoscopic structural phase progression in photo-excited VO2 revealed by time-resolved x-ray diffraction microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yi; Cai, Zhonghou; Chen, Pice; Zhang, Qingteng; Highland, Matthew J.; Jung, Il Woong; Walko, Donald A.; Dufresne, Eric M.; Jeong, Jaewoo; Samant, Mahesh G.; Parkin, Stuart S. P.; Freeland, John W.; Evans, Paul G.; Wen, Haidan

    2016-01-01

    Dynamical phase separation during a solid-solid phase transition poses a challenge for understanding the fundamental processes in correlated materials. Critical information underlying a phase transition, such as localized phase competition, is difficult to reveal by measurements that are spatially averaged over many phase separated regions. The ability to simultaneously track the spatial and temporal evolution of such systems is essential to understanding mesoscopic processes during a phase transition. Using state-of-the-art time-resolved hard x-ray diffraction microscopy, we directly visualize the structural phase progression in a VO2 film upon photoexcitation. Following a homogenous in-plane optical excitation, the phase transformation is initiated at discrete sites and completed by the growth of one lattice structure into the other, instead of a simultaneous isotropic lattice symmetry change. The time-dependent x-ray diffraction spatial maps show that the in-plane phase progression in laser-superheated VO2 is via a displacive lattice transformation as a result of relaxation from an excited monoclinic phase into a rutile phase. The speed of the phase front progression is quantitatively measured, and is faster than the process driven by in-plane thermal diffusion but slower than the sound speed in VO2. The direct visualization of localized structural changes in the time domain opens a new avenue to study mesoscopic processes in driven systems. PMID:26915398

  20. Mesoscopic structural phase progression in photo-excited VO2 revealed by time-resolved x-ray diffraction microscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhu, Yi; Cai, Zhonghou; Chen, Pice; Zhang, Qingteng; Highland, Matthew J.; Jung, II Woong; Walko, Donald A.; Dufresne, Eric M.; Jaewoo, Jeong; Samant, Mahesh G.; et al

    2016-02-26

    Dynamical phase separation during a solid-solid phase transition poses a challenge for understanding the fundamental processes in correlated materials. Critical information underlying a phase transition, such as localized phase competition, is difficult to reveal by measurements that are spatially averaged over many phase seperated regions. The ability to simultanousely track the spatial and temporal evolution of such systems is essential to understanding mesoscopic processes during a phase transition. Using state-of- the-art time-resolved hard x-ray diffraction microscopy, we directly visualize the structural phase progression in a VO2 film upon photoexcitation. Following a homogenous in-plane optical excitation, the phase transformation is initiatedmore » at discrete sites and completed by the growth of one lattice structure into the other, instead of a simultaneous isotropic lattice symmetry change. The time-dependent x-ray diffraction spatial maps show that the in-plane phase progression in laser-superheated VO2 is via a displacive lattice transformation as a result of relaxation from an excited monoclinic phase into a rutile phase. The speed of the phase front progression is quantitatively measured, which is faster than the process driven by in-plane thermal diffusion but slower than the sound speed in VO2. Lastly, the direct visualization of localized structural changes in the time domain opens a new avenue to study mesoscopic processes in driven systems.« less

  1. Charge recombination reactions in photoexcited C[sub 60]-amine complexes studied by picosecond pump probe spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, H.N.; Pal, H.; Sapre, A.V.; Mittal, J.P. )

    1993-12-15

    Photoexcitation of complexes between fullerence C[sub 60] and organic amines in benzene solutions is known to result in charge separation (CS) and subsequent charge recombination (CR) reactions, which lead to varying yields of fullerence triplet formation. Picosecond flash photolysis studies are carried out on C[sub 60]-diphenylamine (DPA), C[sub 60]-triethylamine (TEA), C[sub 60]-diazabicyclooctane (DABCO), and C[sub 60]-triphenylamine (TPA) systems to find out mechanistic details of the triplet formation on CR by inducing heavy atom and polarity effects by using suitable solvents. It is found that in the case of C[sub 60]-DPA, C[sub 60]-TEA, and C[sub 60]-DABCO systems proton transfer from the amine cation to the C[sub 60] anion in the ion pair state dominates, leading to poor triplet yields, which improve in heavy atom containing solvents. In TPA, proton transfer is not possible and hence fullerene triplet yields are high. Increase of solvent polarity for this system results in decreased C[sub 60] triplet yields with a consequent increase in the ion dissociation yield. A suitable reaction scheme is proposed to explain the results obtained. 34 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Mesoscopic structural phase progression in photo-excited VO2 revealed by time-resolved x-ray diffraction microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yi; Cai, Zhonghou; Chen, Pice; Zhang, Qingteng; Highland, Matthew J.; Jung, Il Woong; Walko, Donald A.; Dufresne, Eric M.; Jeong, Jaewoo; Samant, Mahesh G.; Parkin, Stuart S. P.; Freeland, John W.; Evans, Paul G.; Wen, Haidan

    2016-02-01

    Dynamical phase separation during a solid-solid phase transition poses a challenge for understanding the fundamental processes in correlated materials. Critical information underlying a phase transition, such as localized phase competition, is difficult to reveal by measurements that are spatially averaged over many phase separated regions. The ability to simultaneously track the spatial and temporal evolution of such systems is essential to understanding mesoscopic processes during a phase transition. Using state-of-the-art time-resolved hard x-ray diffraction microscopy, we directly visualize the structural phase progression in a VO2 film upon photoexcitation. Following a homogenous in-plane optical excitation, the phase transformation is initiated at discrete sites and completed by the growth of one lattice structure into the other, instead of a simultaneous isotropic lattice symmetry change. The time-dependent x-ray diffraction spatial maps show that the in-plane phase progression in laser-superheated VO2 is via a displacive lattice transformation as a result of relaxation from an excited monoclinic phase into a rutile phase. The speed of the phase front progression is quantitatively measured, and is faster than the process driven by in-plane thermal diffusion but slower than the sound speed in VO2. The direct visualization of localized structural changes in the time domain opens a new avenue to study mesoscopic processes in driven systems.

  3. Time Evolution of Charge Carriers & Phonons after Photo-Excitation by an Ultra-Short Light Pulse in Bulk Germanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahy, Stephen; Murphy-Armando, Felipe; Trigo, Mariano; Savic, Ivana; Murray, Eamonn; Reis, David

    We have calculated the time-evolution of carriers and generated phonons in Ge after ultrafast photo-excitation above the direct band-gap. The relevant electron-phonon and anharmonic phonon scattering rates are obtained from first-principles electronic structure calculations. Measurements of the x-ray diffuse scattering after excitation near the L point in the Brillouin zone find a relatively slow (5 ps, compared to the typical electron-phonon energy relaxation of the Gamma-L phonon) increase of the phonon population. We find this is due to emission caused by the scattering of electrons between the Delta and L valleys, after the initial depopulation of the Gamma valley. The relative slowness of this process is due to a combination of causes: (i) the finite time for the initial depopulation of the conduction Gamma valley; (ii) the associated electron-phonon coupling is relatively weaker (compared to Gamma-L, Gamma-Delta and Delta-Delta couplings) ; (iii) the TA associated phonon has a long lifetime and (iv) the depopulation of the Delta valley suppresses the phonon emission. Supported by Science Foundation Ireland, Grant 12/1A/1601.

  4. Photoexcitation and charge-transfer-to-solvent relaxation dynamics of the I(-)(CH3CN) complex.

    PubMed

    Mak, Chun C; Timerghazin, Qadir K; Peslherbe, Gilles H

    2013-08-15

    Photoexcitation of iodide-acetonitrile clusters, I(-)(CH3CN)n, to the charge-transfer-to-solvent (CTTS) state and subsequent cluster relaxation could result in the possible formation of cluster analogues of the bulk solvated electron. In this work, the relaxation process of the CTTS excited iodide-acetonitrile binary complex, [I(-)(CH3CN)]*, is investigated using rigorous ab initio quantum chemistry calculations and direct-dynamics simulations to gain insight into the role and motion of iodine and acetonitrile in the relaxation of CTTS excited I(-)(CH3CN)n. Computed potential energy curves and profiles of the excited electron vertical detachment energy for [I(-)(CH3CN)]* along the iodine-acetonitrile distance coordinate reveal for the first time significant dispersion effects between iodine and the excited electron, which can have a significant stabilizing effect on the latter. Results of direct-dynamics simulations demonstrate that [I(-)(CH3CN)]* undergoes dissociation to iodine and acetonitrile fragments, resulting in decreased stability of the excited electron. The present work provides strong evidence of solvent translational motion and iodine ejection as key aspects of the early time relaxation of CTTS excited I(-)(CH3CN)n that can also have a substantial impact on the subsequent electron solvation processes and further demonstrates that intricate details of the relaxation process of CTTS excited iodide-polar solvent molecule clusters make it heavily solvent-dependent. PMID:23819756

  5. Double photoexcitation of He atoms by attosecond xuv pulses in the presence of intense few-cycle infrared lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, X.M.; Lin, C.D.

    2005-03-01

    We studied the photoelectron spectra of He atoms resulting from double photoexcitation to autoionizing states by an attosecond xuv pulse in the presence of intense few-cycle Ti:sapphire lasers using the time-dependent hyperspherical close-coupling method. In its first application we show that the combination of a weak xuv pulse and an intense infrared laser offers an efficient means for probing states that cannot be reached by single photoabsorption experiments alone. The method provides an alternative approach of studying Stark induced states at field strength much higher than that available for a dc electric field. Using parameters from the presently available attosecond pulses and infrared lasers we showed that the four singlet 2l2l{sup '} doubly excited states of He are prominently excited in such experiments. The dependence of the shape of the autoionizing states thus generated has been studied with respect to the intensity and the carrier-envelope phase of the few-cycle laser pulses.

  6. An electron spin polarization study of the interaction of photoexcited triplet molecules with mono- and polynitroxyl stable free radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Turro, N.J.; Khudyakov, I.V.; Bossmann, S.H. ); Dwyer, D.W. )

    1993-02-11

    Time-resolved electron spin resonance (TR ESR) has been used to investigate the chemically induced dynamic electron polarization (CIDEP) generated by the interaction of stable free radicals with the triplet states of benzophenone, benzil, and 2-acetylnaphthalene. The stable radicals were mono-, di-, tri-, and tetranitroxyl free radicals possessing the 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl moiety. All of the stable radical systems investigated were found to be emissively polarized by interaction with the triplet states, and the phase of polarization was independent of the sign of zero-field splitting (D) of the interacting triple molecule. Possible and likely mechanisms of polarization transfer (creation) resulting from the interaction of photoexcited triplet molecules with nitroxyls in the strong electron exchange are discussed. The emissive CIDEP of nitroxyls observed in the interactions with triplet benzil, which has D > 0, provides strong support for the operation of the radical-triplet pair mechanism. Within the time scale of TR ESR experiments ([approximately]10[sup [minus]7]--10[sup [minus]6] s) no significant variation in the shape of the CIDEP spectra of the nitroxyls was observed, either in viscous media or in micelles. It is concluded that intramolecular spin exchange (or conformational change) of polynitroyls occurs much faster than the time resolution of the experiment. 24 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Relationship between the catalytic activity of Pt/alumina and the relaxation process of the photoexcited electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Junji; Hanaki, Yasunari; Shen, Qing; Toyoda, Taro

    2012-12-01

    In order to decrease the consumption of precious metals used in the catalytic converters used in automobiles, we studied the relationship between the catalytic activity of Pt/alumina (Pt/Al2O3) and the relaxation process of photoexcited electrons. Firstly, we studied the relationship between the size of the Pt particles in Pt/Al2O3 and catalytic performance. Secondly, the relationship between the size of the Pt particles in Pt/Al2O3 and the decay time of the excited electrons was studied using an improved transient grating (TG) technique. The results showed that faster decay of the excited electrons leads to greater oxidation rates. The decay time obtained with the improved TG technique gives an indication of the time that the exited electrons take to return to the ground state. According to studies utilizing FT-IR, one of the processes necessary for quickly generating CO2 with Pt is that the electron in the Ptsbnd O bond moves to the Pt side and that the Pt+ becomes Pt metal. Thus, the decay time obtained with the improved TG technique corresponds to the process whereby Pt+ returns to Pt metal. Thus, we found that the consumption of precious metals can be reduced by increasing the speed of the decay of the excited electrons.

  8. Photoexcitation, Reaction Localization and Energy Dissipation in Single beta-HMX Crystals subjected to 20 GPa Shock and PBX Detonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaksin, Igor; Rodrigues, L.; Plaksin, S.; Mendes, R.; Campos, J.; Simoes, P.

    2011-06-01

    We present experimentally revealed highly anisotropic dynamics of the detonation conversion occurring in beta-HMX crystals. Panoramic observation of 1-mm single b-HMX crystal surrounded by different binder materials (HTPB, GAP, water) and by fine-grained PBX (HMX 85/15 GAP as a dirty binder) performed by mean of Multi-Channel Optical Analyzer (96 optical fibers) provided spatially resolved measurements of reaction spots onset/growth and a post-detonation ejecta of reaction products via the radiance registration carried out with 100 μm-spatial and 0.2 ns-temporal accuracy in a spectral range 450-850 nm. Experimental evidences obtained in more than 20 tests with b-HMX crystals subjected to a 20 GPa shock and to the PBX detonation (51 GPa-VN spike at entering to a crystal and 21.5 GPa-CJ pressure), demonstrate that independently on orientation crystal vs. input front, a major reaction spots are localized in crystal vertexes/edges and the emitted reaction radiance induces photoexcitation in the crystal bulk causing a radiation-induced precursor of the major reaction front. Further reaction spots dissipation is attended by origination of the reaction products' longitudinal/transversal ejecta moving behind the leading front with the 20-30 micron/ns speed. This work was funded by the Office of Naval Research under the Grant No 0014-08-1-0096 with Dr. Clifford Bedford as Program Manager.

  9. Manipulation of an Innate Escape Response in Drosophila: Photoexcitation of acj6 Neurons Induces the Escape Response

    PubMed Central

    Manoli, Devanand S.; Zhang, Feng; Deisseroth, Karl; Baker, Bruce S.; Scott, Matthew P.

    2009-01-01

    Background The genetic analysis of behavior in Drosophila melanogaster has linked genes controlling neuronal connectivity and physiology to specific neuronal circuits underlying a variety of innate behaviors. We investigated the circuitry underlying the adult startle response, using photoexcitation of neurons that produce the abnormal chemosensory jump 6 (acj6) transcription factor. This transcription factor has previously been shown to play a role in neuronal pathfinding and neurotransmitter modality, but the role of acj6 neurons in the adult startle response was largely unknown. Principal Findings We show that the activity of these neurons is necessary for a wild-type startle response and that excitation is sufficient to generate a synthetic escape response. Further, we show that this synthetic response is still sensitive to the dose of acj6 suggesting that that acj6 mutation alters neuronal activity as well as connectivity and neurotransmitter production. Results/Significance These results extend the understanding of the role of acj6 and of the adult startle response in general. They also demonstrate the usefulness of activity-dependent characterization of neuronal circuits underlying innate behaviors in Drosophila, and the utility of integrating genetic analysis into modern circuit analysis techniques. PMID:19340304

  10. Features of the electrical conductivity of TlInSe{sub 2} under photoexcitation and X-ray excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Madatov, R. S. Najafov, A. I.; Mustafayev, Yu. M.; Gazanfarov, M. R.; Movsumova, I. M.

    2015-09-15

    The current–voltage characteristics of TlInSe{sub 2} crystals under photoexcitation and X-ray excitation are studied. The parameters of the trap, which are equal to N{sub t} = 5 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup –3}, n{sub t} = 4.5 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup –3}, and ΔE{sub t} = 0.42 eV, are calculated. The calculated values of N{sub t} and n{sub t} before and after X-ray excitation are equal to 3 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup –3} and 3.2 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup –3}, respectively. The dependences of the X-ray conductances on the radiation intensity are studied for TlInSe{sub 2} crystals at various accelerating voltages V{sub a} and it is determined that the X-ray conductance K{sub σ} decreases exponentially as the accelerating voltage V{sub a} and radiation dose increase.

  11. Spatially Resolved Photoexcited Charge-Carrier Dynamics in Phase-Engineered Monolayer MoS2

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, Hisato; Blancon, Jean-Christophe; Kappera, Rajesh; Lei, Sidong; Najmaei, Sina; Mangum, Benjamin D.; Gupta, Gautam; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Lou, Jun; Chhowalla, Manish; Crochet, Jared J.; Mohite, Aditya D.

    2014-12-18

    A fundamental understanding of the intrinsic optoelectronic properties of atomically thin transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) is crucial for its integration into high performance semiconductor devices. We investigate the transport properties of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) grown monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) under photo-excitation using correlated scanning photocurrent microscopy and photoluminescence imaging. We examined the effect of local phase transformation underneath the metal electrodes on the generation of photocurrent across the channel length with diffraction-limited spatial resolution. While maximum photocurrent generation occurs at the Schottky contacts of semiconducting (2H-phase) MoS2, after the metallic phase transformation (1T-phase), the photocurrent peak is observed towards the center of the device channel, suggesting a strong reduction of native Schottky barriers. Analysis using the bias and position dependence of the photocurrent indicates that the Schottky barrier heights are few meV for 1T- and ~200 meV for 2H-contacted devices. We also demonstrate that a reduction of native Schottky barriers in a 1T device enhances the photo responsivity by more than one order of magnitude, a crucial parameter in achieving high performance optoelectronic devices. The obtained results pave a pathway for the fundamental understanding of intrinsic optoelectronic properties of atomically thin TMDs where Ohmic contacts are necessary for achieving high efficiency devices with low power consumption.

  12. Deep Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Deep Vein Thrombosis? Español Deep vein thrombosis (throm-BO-sis), or DVT, is a blood clot that forms in a vein deep in the body. Blood clots occur when blood ...

  13. Deep Web video

    SciTech Connect

    None Available

    2009-06-01

    To make the web work better for science, OSTI has developed state-of-the-art technologies and services including a deep web search capability. The deep web includes content in searchable databases available to web users but not accessible by popular search engines, such as Google. This video provides an introduction to the deep web search engine.

  14. Deep Web video

    ScienceCinema

    None Available

    2012-03-28

    To make the web work better for science, OSTI has developed state-of-the-art technologies and services including a deep web search capability. The deep web includes content in searchable databases available to web users but not accessible by popular search engines, such as Google. This video provides an introduction to the deep web search engine.

  15. Deep Space Telecommunications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuiper, T. B. H.; Resch, G. M.

    2000-01-01

    The increasing load on NASA's deep Space Network, the new capabilities for deep space missions inherent in a next-generation radio telescope, and the potential of new telescope technology for reducing construction and operation costs suggest a natural marriage between radio astronomy and deep space telecommunications in developing advanced radio telescope concepts.

  16. Observation of Doubly-Excited States in CALCIUM(17+) and Inner Shell-Photoexcitations in Argon, Potassium and Rubidium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suleiman, Jamal A.

    High resolution X-ray spectroscopy is used to study (A) simultaneous electron-excitation and electron capture in the collision of calcium ions with argon atoms; these studies are important because of the close relationship to dielectronic recombination (DR) which plays an important role in energy-transfer processes in astrophysical and laboratory plasmas; (B) single and double inner-shell photoexcitations of potassium, rubidium and argon; these measurements can lead to very precise tests of electron correlation effects, such as Breit interaction, and QED effects in many electron systems. In the first case, Ca^{18+ } and Ca^{19+} ions from the ATLAS accelerator at Argonne National Laboratory, at energies near 100 MeV, were directed to an argon gas target. X-ray spectra near 3.9 KeV were collected using a high-resolution X-ray spectrometer. We have resolved transitions from doubly-excited 1s2lnl^ ' states to singly-excited 1s ^2nl^' states in lithium -like calcium. Comparison of the experimental wavelengths and intensities with relativistic Hartree-Fock calculations shows very good agreement. In the second case, we have obtained high spectral resolution absorption spectra of potassium near K-, KN -, and KM-edges, rubidium near K- and KO edges, and argon near K-, KM-, and KL-edges. The measurements were made at the X-24A and X-23A2 beamlines at the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Preliminary identifications of most the peaks are made using Dirac Hartree-Fock calculations. Comparisons of the experimental wavelengths and intensities with relativistic Hartree-Fock calculations show very good agreement.

  17. Strongly correlated mechanisms of a photoexcited radical reaction from the anti-Hermitian contracted Schrödinger equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, Jonathan J.; Rothman, Adam E.; Mazziotti, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Photoexcited radical reactions are critical to processes in both nature and materials, and yet they can be challenging for electronic structure methods due to the presence of strong electron correlation. Reduced-density-matrix (RDM) methods, based on solving the anti-Hermitian contracted Schrödinger equation (ACSE) for the two-electron RDM (2-RDM), are examined for studying the strongly correlated mechanisms of these reactions with application to the electrocyclic interconversion of allyl and cyclopropyl radicals. We combine recent extensions of the ACSE to excited states [G. Gidofalvi and D. A. Mazziotti, Phys. Rev. A 80, 022507 (2009)] and arbitrary spin states [A. E. Rothman, J. J. Foley IV, and D. A. Mazziotti, Phys. Rev. A 80, 052508 (2009)]. The ACSE predicts that the ground-state ring closure of the allyl radical has a high 52.5 kcal/mol activation energy that is consistent with experimental data, while the closure of an excited allyl radical can occur by disrotatory and conrotatory pathways whose transition states are essentially barrierless. Comparisons are made with multireference second- and third-order perturbation theories and multireference configuration interaction. While predicted energy differences do not vary greatly between methods, the ACSE appears to improve these differences when they involve a strongly and a weakly correlated radical by capturing a greater share of single-reference correlation that increases the stability of the weakly correlated radicals. For example, the ACSE predicts a -39.6 kcal/mol conversion of the excited allyl radical to the ground-state cyclopropyl radical in comparison to the -32.6 to -37.3 kcal/mol conversions predicted by multireference methods. In addition, the ACSE reduces the computational scaling with the number of strongly correlated orbitals from exponential (traditional multireference methods) to quadratic. Computed ground- and excited-state 2-RDMs are nearly N-representable.

  18. Mechanism of photoexcited precession of magnetization in (Ga,Mn)As on the basis of time-resolved spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, T.; Munekata, H.

    2016-02-01

    In order to investigate the mechanism of photoexcited precession of magnetization in ferromagnetic G a1 -xM nxAs , magneto-optical (MO) and differential reflectivity (Δ R /R ; DR) temporal profiles are studied at relatively long (picosecond to nanosecond) and ultrashort (1 ps or less) time scales for samples with different Mn content (x =0.01 -0.11 ) . As to the oscillatory MO profiles observed in the long time scale, simulation based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation combined with two different MO effects confirms photoinducement of the perpendicular anisotropy component Δ Heff ,⊥ . As for the profiles observed in the ultrashort time scale, they are consistently explained in terms of the dynamics of photogenerated carriers, but not by the sudden reduction in magnetization (the ultrafast demagnetization). In light of these experimental results and analyses, a mechanism that accounts for the photoinduced Δ Heff ,⊥ is addressed: namely, photoionizationlike excitation of M n2 + , M n2 ++h ν →M n2 +,*=M n3++e- . That such excitation tips magnetic anisotropy toward the out-of-plane direction through the inducement of orbital angular momentum and the gradient ∂ (M n2 +,* )/∂ z is discussed. The validity of the proposed mechanism is examined by estimating the efficiency of excitation on the basis of the Lambert-Beer law and the experimental Δ Heff ,⊥ values, through which an efficiency of 1-10 ppm with a nominal optical cross section of around 5 ×10-12m2 is obtained.

  19. The deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Presented is Deep Space Network (DSN) progress in flight project support, tracking and data acquisition (TDA) research and technology, network engineering, hardware and software implementation, and operations.

  20. The deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Summaries are given of Deep Space Network progress in flight project support, tracking and data acquisition research and technology, network engineering, hardware and software implementation, and operations.

  1. Deep space antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    Three 26-m tracking antennas operated by the NASA Deep Space Network at Goldstone, Calif.; Madrid, Spain; and near Canberra, Australia, will cease operations on Dec. 1, 1981. The stations will continue to operate 64-m and 34-m deep space tracking antennas. Ending operation of the 26-m antennas will cause a reduction of about 30%; of the Deep Space Network tracking and data acquisition capability. This means less support for NASA planetary spacecraft. Currently, the Deep Space Network is supporting Voyagers 1 and 2, Helios 1, the Mars Viking 1 Lander and Pioneers 6 through 12.

  2. A deep reef in deep trouble

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Menza, Charles; Kendall, M.; Rogers, C.; Miller, J.

    2007-01-01

    The well-documented degradation of shallower reefs which are often closer to land and more vulnerable to pollution, sewage and other human-related stressors has led to the suggestion that deeper, more remote offshore reefs could possibly serve as sources of coral and fish larvae to replenish the shallower reefs. Yet, the distribution, status, and ecological roles of deep (>30 m) Caribbean reefs are not well known. In this report, an observation of a deep reef which has undergone a recent extensive loss of coral cover is presented. In stark contrast to the typical pattern of coral loss in shallow reefs, the deeper corals were most affected. This report is the first description of such a pattern of coral loss on a deep reef.

  3. Probing the Electronic Structure of a Photoexcited Solar Cell Dye with Transient X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kuiken, Benjamin E. Van; Huse, Nils; Cho, Hana; Strader, Matthew L.; Lynch, Michael S.; Schoenlein, Robert W.; Khalil, Munira

    2012-05-01

    This study uses transient X-ray absorption (XA) spectroscopy and timedependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) to directly visualize the charge density around the metal atom and the surrounding ligands following an ultrafast metal-to-ligand charge-transfer (MLCT) process in the widely used RuII solar cell dye, Ru(dcbpy)2(NCS)2 (termed N3). We measure the Ru L-edge XA spectra of the singlet ground (1A1) and the transient triplet (3MLCT) excited state of N34 and perform TD-DFT calculations of 2p core-level excitations, which identify a unique spectral signature of the electron density on the NCS ligands. We find that the Ru 2p, Ru eg, and NCS orbitals are stabilized by 2.0, 1.0, and 0.6 eV, respectively, in the transient 3MLCT state of the dye. These results highlight the role of the NCS ligands in governing the oxidation state of the Ru center.

  4. The photoexcitation of crystalline ice and amorphous solid water: A molecular dynamics study of outcomes at 11 K and 125 K

    SciTech Connect

    Crouse, J.; Loock, H.-P. Cann, N. M.

    2015-07-21

    Photoexcitation of crystalline ice Ih and amorphous solid water at 7-9 eV is examined using molecular dynamics simulations and a fully flexible water model. The probabilities of photofragment desorption, trapping, and recombination are examined for crystalline ice at 11 K and at 125 K and for amorphous solid water at 11 K. For 11 K crystalline ice, a fully rigid water model is also employed for comparison. The kinetic energy of desorbed H atoms and the distance travelled by trapped fragments are correlated to the location and the local environment of the photoexcited water molecule. In all cases, H atom desorption is found to be the most likely outcome in the top bilayer while trapping of all photofragments is most probable deeper in the solid where the likelihood for recombination of the fragments into H{sub 2}O molecules also rises. Trajectory analysis indicates that the local hydrogen bonding network in amorphous solid water is more easily distorted by a photodissociation event compared to crystalline ice. Also, simulations indicate that desorption of OH radicals and H{sub 2}O molecules are more probable in amorphous solid water. The kinetic energy distributions for desorbed H atoms show a peak at high energy in crystalline ice, arising from photoexcited water molecules in the top monolayer. This peak is less pronounced in amorphous solid water. H atoms that are trapped may be displaced by up to ∼10 water cages, but migrate on average 3 water cages. Trapped OH fragments tend to stay near the original solvent cage.

  5. Deep-diving dinosaurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayman, John

    2012-08-01

    Dysbaric bone necrosis demonstrated in ichthyosaurs may be the result of prolonged deep diving rather than rapid ascent to escape predators. The bone lesions show structural and anatomical similarity to those that may occur in human divers and in the deep diving sperm whale, Physeter macrocephalus.

  6. The Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Deep Space Network progress in flight project support, tracking and data acquisition, research and technology, network engineering, hardware and software implementation, and operations is cited. Topics covered include: tracking and ground based navigation; spacecraft/ground communication; station control and operations technology; ground communications; and deep space stations.

  7. The deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The progress is reported of Deep Space Network (DSN) research in the following areas: (1) flight project support, (2) spacecraft/ground communications, (3) station control and operations technology, (4) network control and processing, and (5) deep space stations. A description of the DSN functions and facilities is included.

  8. Deep-diving dinosaurs.

    PubMed

    Hayman, John

    2012-08-01

    Dysbaric bone necrosis demonstrated in ichthyosaurs may be the result of prolonged deep diving rather than rapid ascent to escape predators. The bone lesions show structural and anatomical similarity to those that may occur in human divers and in the deep diving sperm whale, Physeter macrocephalus. PMID:22824942

  9. [Deep neck infections].

    PubMed

    Nowak, Katarzyna; Szyfter, Witold

    2006-01-01

    Deep neck infection is relatively rare but potentially life threatening complication of common oropharyngeal infections. This retrospective study was aimed at analyzing the occurrence of complications, diagnostic methods and proper management of deep neck infection. A review was conducted in 32 cases who were diagnosed as having deep neck infection from 1995 to 2005. The causes of deep neck infections were tonsillitis (16 cases), tooth diseases (6 cases), paratonsillar abscess (4 cases), parotitis (1 case), pussy lymphonodes after tonsillectomy (2 cases), pussy congenital neck cyst (1 case), chronic otitis media (1 case), parotitis (1 case), foreign body of the esophagus (1 case). All the puss bacterial cultivation were positive. All the patients were treated by different ways of chirurgical drainage and use of large dosage of antibiotics. Deep neck infection should be suspected in patients with long lasting fever and painful swelling of the neck and treatment should begin quick as possible. PMID:17152800

  10. Interfacial electron transfer between the photoexcited porphyrin molecule and TiO2 nanoparticles: effect of catecholate binding.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishna, G; Verma, Sandeep; Jose, D Amilan; Kumar, D Krishna; Das, Amitava; Palit, Dipak K; Ghosh, Hirendra N

    2006-05-11

    Interfacial electron transfer (ET) dynamics of 5,10,15-trisphenyl-20-(3,4-dihydroxybenzene) porphyrin (TPP-cat) adsorbed on TiO2 nanoparticles has been studied by femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy in the visible and near-IR region exciting at 400 and 800 nm. TPP-cat molecule forms a charge transfer (CT) complex with TiO2 nanoparticles through the catechol moiety with the formation of a five-membered ring. Optical absorption measurements have shown that the Q-band of TPP-cat interacts strongly with TiO2 due to chelation; however, the Soret band is affected very little. Optical absorption measurements indicate that the catechol moiety also interacts with TiO2 nanoparticles showing the characteristic band of pure catechol-TiO2 charge transfer (CT) in the visible region. Electron injection has been confirmed by monitoring the cation radical, instant bleach, and injected electron in the conduction band of TiO2 nanoparticles. Electron injection time has been measured to be < 100 fs and recombination kinetics has been best fitted with a multiexponential function, where the majority of the injected electrons come back to the parent cation radical with a time constant of approximately 800 fs for both excitation wavelengths. However, the reaction channel for the electron injection process has been found to be different for both wavelengths. Excitation at 800 nm, found to populate the CT state of the Q-band, and from the photoexcited CT state electron injection into the conduction band, takes place through diffusion. On the other hand, with excitation at 400 nm, a complicated reaction channel takes place. Excitation with 400 nm light excites both the CT band of Cat-TiO2 and also the Soret band of TPP-cat. We have discussed the reaction path in the TPP-cat/TiO2 system after exciting with both 400 and 800 nm laser light. We have also compared ET dynamics by exciting at both wavelengths. PMID:16671709

  11. Photofission and photoexcitation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, T.R.

    1980-01-01

    The high proton beam current available from the Brooklyn College Dynamitron Accelerator have been used to generate beams of gamma-rays of well defined and variable energy from the (p,..gamma..) reaction on various targets. Eleven such gamma-rays in the energy range from 5.8 to 11.5 MeV have been used to induce photofission in the even-even nuclei of /sup 238/U and /sup 232/Th. Spectra of photofission fragments have been measured with a photon energy resolution of several hundred eV. Polycarbonate films have been used as fission track detectors. The absolute efficiency of these films for counting fission fragments from thick uranium and thorium foils has been determined experimentally. Evidence of structure resulting from class II states was observed in /sup 232/Th.

  12. A study of angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure as applied to the Ni 3p, Cu 3s, and Cu 3p core levels of the respective clean (111) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Huff, W.R.A.; Moler, E.J.; Kellar, S.A.

    1997-04-01

    The first non-s initial state angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure (ARPEFS) study of clean surfaces for the purpose of further understanding the technique is reported. The surface structure sensitivity of ARPEFS applied to clean surfaces and to arbitrary initial states is studied using normal photoemission data taken from the Ni 3p core levels of a Ni(111) single crystal and the Cu 3s and the Cu 3p core-levels of a Cu(111) single crystal. The Fourier transforms of these clean surface data are dominated by backscattering. Unlike the s initial state data, the p initial state data show a peak in the Fourier transform corresponding to in-plane scattering from the six nearest-neighbors to the emitter. Evidence was seen for single-scattering events from in the same plane as the emitters and double-scattering events. Using a newly developed, multiple-scattering calculation program, ARPEFS data from clean surfaces and from p initial states can be modeled to high precision. Although there are many layers of emitters when measuring photoemission from a clean surface, test calculations show that the ARPEFS signal is dominated by photoemission from atoms in the first two crystal layers. Thus, ARPEFS applied to clean surfaces is sensitive to surface reconstruction. The known contraction of the first two Cu(111) layers is confirmed. The best-fit calculation for clean Ni(111) indicates an expansion of the first two layers. To better understand the ARPEFS technique, the authors studied s and non-s initial state photoemission from clean metal surfaces.

  13. Deep Moonquakes: Remaining Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Y.

    2004-01-01

    We have recently reexamined more than 9000 United States previously unidentified seismic events catalogued during the Apollo landing missions and positively identified for the first time about 30 deep moonquake nests on the far side of the Moon. Although only a few of them are currently locatable, the relative arrival times among stations for the rest and presence or absence of seismic signals at particular stations suggest that either (a) the region within about $40\\deg$ of the antipode is aseismic or (b) the deep interior of the Moon severely attenuates or deflects seismic waves. Aside from the obvious question of how to distinguish between such hypothetical models, this effort raised several more general questions concerning the use of deep moonquake signals to infer the structure and dynamics of the deep interior of the Moon. Among more important ones are: (1) How reliable are the seismic arrival picks from which to compute the seismic velocity variations in the Moon? (2) How do the possible lateral variations in seismic velocity affect the computed radial variation in seismic velocity at depth? (3) Can we tell more about the distribution and mechanism of deep moonquakes from the newly expanded database of identified deep moonquakes? Questions (1) and (2) are especially important because the inferred deep internal structure of the Moon depends critically on their answers. Answering these questions may demand additional data collected on future lunar missions, but some may be resolved with further examination of the existing data.

  14. Deep subsurface microbial processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Chapelle, F.H.

    1995-01-01

    Information on the microbiology of the deep subsurface is necessary in order to understand the factors controlling the rate and extent of the microbially catalyzed redox reactions that influence the geophysical properties of these environments. Furthermore, there is an increasing threat that deep aquifers, an important drinking water resource, may be contaminated by man's activities, and there is a need to predict the extent to which microbial activity may remediate such contamination. Metabolically active microorganisms can be recovered from a diversity of deep subsurface environments. The available evidence suggests that these microorganisms are responsible for catalyzing the oxidation of organic matter coupled to a variety of electron acceptors just as microorganisms do in surface sediments, but at much slower rates. The technical difficulties in aseptically sampling deep subsurface sediments and the fact that microbial processes in laboratory incubations of deep subsurface material often do not mimic in situ processes frequently necessitate that microbial activity in the deep subsurface be inferred through nonmicrobiological analyses of ground water. These approaches include measurements of dissolved H2, which can predict the predominant microbially catalyzed redox reactions in aquifers, as well as geochemical and groundwater flow modeling, which can be used to estimate the rates of microbial processes. Microorganisms recovered from the deep subsurface have the potential to affect the fate of toxic organics and inorganic contaminants in groundwater. Microbial activity also greatly influences 1 the chemistry of many pristine groundwaters and contributes to such phenomena as porosity development in carbonate aquifers, accumulation of undesirably high concentrations of dissolved iron, and production of methane and hydrogen sulfide. Although the last decade has seen a dramatic increase in interest in deep subsurface microbiology, in comparison with the study of

  15. Deep venous reconstructive surgery.

    PubMed

    Maleti, Oscar; Lugli, Marzia; Tripathi, Ramesh K

    2015-03-01

    Surgical correction of deep venous reflux is a valuable adjunct in treatment of selected patient with lower limb venous ulcer. Deep venous obstruction and superficial reflux is must be corrected first. Sustained venous ulcer healing and reduced ambulatory venous hypertension can be achieved in patients with both primary and secondary deep venous insufficiency. When direct valve repair is possible, valvuloplasty is the best option, but when this is not feasible, other techniques can be used, including femoral vein transposition into the great saphenous vein, vein valve transplant, neovalve construction, or nonautologous artificial venous valve. PMID:26358308

  16. Phosphorescence study of chlorophyll d photophysics. Determination of the energy and lifetime of the photo-excited triplet state. Evidence of singlet oxygen photosensitization.

    PubMed

    Neverov, Konstantin V; Santabarbara, Stefano; Krasnovsky, Alexander A

    2011-09-01

    Chlorophyll d (Chl d) is the major pigment in both photosystems (PSI and II) of the cyanobacterium Acaryochloris marina, whose pigment composition represents an interesting alternative in oxygenic photosynthesis. While abundant information is available relative to photophysical properties of Chl a , the understanding of Chl d photophysics is still incomplete. In this paper, we present for the first time a characterization of Chl d phosphorescence, which accompanies radiative deactivation of the photoexcited triplet state of this pigment. Reliable information was obtained on the energy and lifetime of the Chl d triplet state in frozen solutions at 77 K using diethyl ether and aqueous dispersions of Triton X100 as solvents. It is shown that triplet Chl d is effectively populated upon photoexcitation of pigment molecules and efficiently sensitizes singlet oxygen phosphorescence in aerobic solutions under ambient conditions. The data obtained are compared with the previous results of the phosphorescence studies of Chl a and Pheo a, and their possible biological implications are discussed. PMID:21573948

  17. An ultrafast terahertz probe of the transient evolution of the charged and neutral phase of photo-excited electron-hole gas in a monolayer semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xuefeng; Yu, Hongyi; Ji, Qingqing; Gao, Zhihan; Ge, Shaofeng; Qiu, Jun; Liu, Zhongfan; Zhang, Yanfeng; Sun, Dong

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the dynamical formation of an exciton from photo-excited electron-hole plasma and its subsequent decay dynamics in monolayer MoS2 grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using ultrafast pump and terahertz probe spectroscopy. Different photo-excited electron-hole states are resolved based on their distinct responses to THz photon and decay lifetimes. The observed transient THz transmission can be fitted with two decay components: a fast component with a decay lifetime of 20 ps, which is attributed to the exciton lifetime, including its formation and subsequent intra-exciton relaxation; a slow component with an extremely long decay lifetime of several ns, possibly due to a long-lived dark exciton state. The relaxation dynamics are further supported by temperature and pump-fluence-dependent studies of the decay time constants. The sign of the transient THz observed in this experiment is the opposite of that measured in a recent parallel transient THz work on MoS2 [1]. The observed decay dynamics are also different, and the possible reasons for these discrepancies are discussed.

  18. Probing Photoexcited Carriers in a Few-Layer MoS2 Laminate by Time-Resolved Optical Pump-Terahertz Probe Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kar, Srabani; Su, Y; Nair, R R; Sood, A K

    2015-12-22

    We report the dynamics of photoinduced carriers in a free-standing MoS2 laminate consisting of a few layers (1-6 layers) using time-resolved optical pump-terahertz probe spectroscopy. Upon photoexcitation with the 800 nm pump pulse, the terahertz conductivity increases due to absorption by the photoinduced charge carriers. The relaxation of the non-equilibrium carriers shows fast as well as slow decay channels, analyzed using a rate equation model incorporating defect-assisted Auger scattering of photoexcited electrons, holes, and excitons. The fast relaxation time occurs due to the capture of electrons and holes by defects via Auger processes, resulting in nonradiative recombination. The slower relaxation arises since the excitons are bound to the defects, preventing the defect-assisted Auger recombination of the electrons and the holes. Our results provide a comprehensive understanding of the non-equilibrium carrier kinetics in a system of unscreened Coulomb interactions, where defect-assisted Auger processes dominate and should be applicable to other 2D systems. PMID:26516987

  19. The deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The functions and facilities of the Deep Space Network are considered. Progress in flight project support, tracking and data acquisition research and technology, network engineering, hardware and software implementation, and operations is reported.

  20. The Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Progress on the Deep Space Network (DSN) supporting research and technology, advanced development, engineering and implementation, and DSN operations is presented. The functions and facilities of the DSN are described.

  1. The Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The various systems and subsystems are discussed for the Deep Space Network (DSN). A description of the DSN is presented along with mission support, program planning, facility engineering, implementation and operations.

  2. Nurturing Deep Connections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kessler, Rachael

    2002-01-01

    Argues that the missing ingredient in school reform is soul, that is, deep connections among students, teachers, and administrators. Discusses five principles of leadership with soul: Personalize, pacing, permission, protection, and paradox. (PKP)

  3. The deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A report is given of the Deep Space Networks progress in (1) flight project support, (2) tracking and data acquisition research and technology, (3) network engineering, (4) hardware and software implementation, and (5) operations.

  4. The deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A Deep Space Network progress report is presented dealing with in flight project support, tracking and data acquisition research and technology, network engineering, hardware and software implementation, and operations.

  5. The deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Progress is reported in flight project support, tracking and data acquisition research and technology, network engineering, hardware and software implementation, and operations. The functions and facilities of the Deep Space Network are emphasized.

  6. The deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The facilities, programming system, and monitor and control system for the deep space network are described. Ongoing planetary and interplanetary flight projects are reviewed, along with tracking and ground-based navigation, communications, and network and facility engineering.

  7. Reading Knee-Deep

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jewett, Pamela

    2007-01-01

    Freire told his audience at a seminar at the University of Massachusetts, "You need to read knee-deep in texts, for deeper than surface meanings, and you need to know the words to be able to do it" (quoted in Cleary, 2003). In a children's literature class, fifteen teachers and I traveled along a path that moved us toward reading knee-deep as we…

  8. Exploration for deep coal

    SciTech Connect

    2008-12-15

    The most important factor in safe mining is the quality of the roof. The article explains how the Rosebud Mining Co. conducts drilling and exploration in 11 deep coal mine throughout Pennsylvania and Ohio. Rosebud uses two Atlas Copco CS10 core drilling rigs mounted on 4-wheel drive trucks. The article first appeared in Atlas Copco's in-house magazine, Deep Hole Driller. 3 photos.

  9. The deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The objectives, functions, and organization of the Deep Space Network are summarized along with deep space station, ground communication, and network operations control capabilities. Mission support of ongoing planetary/interplanetary flight projects is discussed with emphasis on Viking orbiter radio frequency compatibility tests, the Pioneer Venus orbiter mission, and Helios-1 mission status and operations. Progress is also reported in tracking and data acquisition research and technology, network engineering, hardware and software implementation, and operations.

  10. The Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The objectives, functions, and organization, of the Deep Space Network are summarized. Deep Space stations, ground communications, and network operations control capabilities are described. The network is designed for two-way communications with unmanned spacecraft traveling approximately 1600 km from earth to the farthest planets in the solar system. It has provided tracking and data acquisition support for the following projects: Ranger, Surveyor, Mariner, Pioneer, Apollo, Helios, Viking, and the Lunar Orbiter.

  11. Deep source gas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-02-01

    Three separate emplacement concepts could explain the occurrence of gas at extreme depths: abiogenesis (a primordial, nonbiologic origin source); subducted, organic-origin gas (involving the deep, tectonic subduction emplacement of hydrocarbon-generating ocean sediments); and deep sedimentary basin gas (the more conventional emplacement of sedimentary rocks by deep downwarping of the Earth's crust). Of these concepts, Deep Source Gas research focuses on the subducted, organic-origin concept. The purpose of Deep Source Gas research is to verify natural gas arising from depths in excess of 30,000 feet, to relate these occurrences to conceptual models, to define the limits of target areas, to quantify the resource, and to determine the significance of the gas to the nation's reserves. The research emphasizes an Earth science study (geology, geochemistry, and geophysics) of the Cordilleran Geologic Province of western North America. This area is considered a prospective source largely because of known and suspected plate tectonic structures and their youthful emplacement, which increase the likelihood of a timely entrapment of deep-source generated hydrocarbons. Detailed geochemical studies indicate that the deep-source-gas generating capacity of the Aleutian Trench area of southern Alaska is high. Furthermore, geophysical studies show that an apparent fossil subduction zone exists in western Washington. This zone appears to have very thick sedimentary rock units, the existence of which will be evaluated through a more detailed seismic study and possibly through drilling activities. Structural observations made in the northern Brooks Range and central Alaskan Range indicate that overthrusting and compressional features may serve as large-scale target areas for deep source gas generation and occurrence. 12 figures, 2 tables.

  12. Photo-excitation of adenine cation radical [A•+] in the near UV-vis region produces sugar radicals in Adenosine and in its nucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Adhikary, Amitava; Khanduri, Deepti; Kumar, Anil; Sevilla, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we report the formation of ribose sugar radicals in high yields (85 – 100%) via photo-excitation of adenine cation radical (A•+) in Ado and its ribonucleotides. Photo-excitation of A•+ at low temperatures in homogenous aqueous glassy samples of Ado, 2′-AMP, 3′-AMP and 5′-AMP forms sugar radicals predominantly at C5′- and also at C3′-sites. The C5′• and C3′• sugar radicals were identified employing Ado deuterated at specific carbon sites: C1′, C2′, and at C5′. Phosphate substitution is found to deactivate sugar radical formation at the site of substitution. Thus, in 5′-AMP, C3′• is observed to be the main radical formed via photo-excitation at ca. 143 K whereas in 3′-AMP, C5′• is the only species found. These results were supported by results obtained employing 5′-AMP with specific deuteration at C5′-site (i.e., 5′,5′-D,D-5′-AMP). Moreover, contrary to the C5′• observed in 3′-dAMP, we find that C5′• in 3′-AMP shows a clear pH dependent conformational change as evidenced by a large increase in the C4′ β–hyperfine coupling on increasing the pH from 6 to 9. Calculations performed employing DFT (B3LYP/6-31G*) for C5′• in 3′-AMP show that the two conformations of C5′• result from strong hydrogen bond formation between the O5′-H and the 3′-phosphate dianion at higher pHs. Employing time-dependent density functional theory [TD-DFT, B3LYP/6-31G(d)] we show that in the excited state, the hole transfers to the sugar moiety and has significant hole localization at the C5′-site in a number of allowed transitions. This hole localization is proposed to lead to the formation of the neutral C5′-radical (C5′•) via deprotonation. PMID:19367991

  13. The deep oval window.

    PubMed

    Kapur, T R

    1991-09-01

    This article presents the results of an analysis of the variable and surgically important relationship between the oval window, the fossular walls and the related posterior tympanic recesses in 50 temporal bones. The visual impressions of superficial and deep oval windows seem to correspond fairly closely to the depth of the inferior wall of the fossula fenestra vestibuli (FFV). The depth of the superior and anterior walls of the FFV by themselves, did not appear to have such a dominating relationship in determining the deep oval window. There does not appear to be a well defined posterior wall in the vast majority of the specimens (86 per cent). In the event of scar tissue forming between the superior, inferior and anterior walls, the gap between the postero-superior part of the promontory and the posterior tympanic wall (posterior communication) could allow aeration of the region of the deep oval window in such an instance. Closure of this gap by a solid shelf of ponticulus or scar tissue could cause a localized malaeration of the fossula in most cases of deep oval windows. This is an entirely new concept of the likely problems of malaeration of a deep oval window which could arise due to anatomical variations and of the possible safety valve mechanism which could prevent such malaeration and its consequences. PMID:1919338

  14. Calculating core-level excitations and X-ray absorption spectra of medium-sized closed-shell molecules with the algebraic-diagrammatic construction scheme for the polarization propagator.

    PubMed

    Wenzel, Jan; Wormit, Michael; Dreuw, Andreas

    2014-10-01

    Core-level excitations are generated by absorption of high-energy radiation such as X-rays. To describe these energetically high-lying excited states theoretically, we have implemented a variant of the algebraic-diagrammatic construction scheme of second-order ADC(2) by applying the core-valence separation (CVS) approximation to the ADC(2) working equations. Besides excitation energies, the CVS-ADC(2) method also provides access to properties of core-excited states, thereby allowing for the calculation of X-ray absorption spectra. To demonstrate the potential of our implementation of CVS-ADC(2), we have chosen medium-sized molecules as examples that have either biological importance or find application in organic electronics. The calculated results of CVS-ADC(2) are compared with standard TD-DFT/B3LYP values and experimental data. In particular, the extended variant, CVS-ADC(2)-x, provides the most accurate results, and the agreement between the calculated values and experiment is remarkable. PMID:25130619

  15. Pressure-dependent relaxation in the photoexcited mott insulator ET-F2TCNQ: influence of hopping and correlations on quasiparticle recombination rates.

    PubMed

    Mitrano, M; Cotugno, G; Clark, S R; Singla, R; Kaiser, S; Stähler, J; Beyer, R; Dressel, M; Baldassarre, L; Nicoletti, D; Perucchi, A; Hasegawa, T; Okamoto, H; Jaksch, D; Cavalleri, A

    2014-03-21

    We measure the ultrafast recombination of photoexcited quasiparticles (holon-doublon pairs) in the one dimensional Mott insulator ET-F(2)TCNQ as a function of external pressure, which is used to tune the electronic structure. At each pressure value, we first fit the static optical properties and extract the electronic bandwidth t and the intersite correlation energy V. We then measure the recombination times as a function of pressure, and we correlate them with the corresponding microscopic parameters. We find that the recombination times scale differently than for metals and semiconductors. A fit to our data based on the time-dependent extended Hubbard Hamiltonian suggests that the competition between local recombination and delocalization of the Mott-Hubbard exciton dictates the efficiency of the recombination. PMID:24702420

  16. Ultrafast terahertz probe of photoexcited free charge carriers in organometal CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Huijie; An, Baoli; Fan, Zhengfu; Zhu, Xiaoya; Lin, Xian; Jin, Zuanming; Ma, Guohong

    2016-04-01

    By using optical pump-terahertz probe (OPTP) experiments, we study the free charge carrier dynamics in photoexcited drop-cast CH3NH3PbI3-based perovskite thin film at room temperature. Compared with the pump photon energy at 1.55 eV, the measured OPTP signal following excitation of 3.1 eV shows an additional fast decay channel of the photoconductivity. Our experimental results demonstrate that effective carrier lifetime can be strongly modulated by surface recombination. In addition, the Drude-Smith-like transient terahertz photoconductivity spectra suggest that photogenerated free carriers experience backscattering at grain boundaries in our solution-processed perovskite films studied here.

  17. Deep space laser communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Abhijit; Kovalik, Joseph M.; Srinivasan, Meera; Shaw, Matthew; Piazzolla, Sabino; Wright, Malcolm W.; Farr, William H.

    2016-03-01

    A number of laser communication link demonstrations from near Earth distances extending out to lunar ranges have been remarkably successful, demonstrating the augmented channel capacity that is accessible with the use of lasers for communications. The next hurdle on the path to extending laser communication and its benefits throughout the solar system and beyond is to demonstrate deep-space laser communication links. In this paper, concepts and technology development being advanced at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in order to enable deep-space link demonstrations to ranges of approximately 3 AU in the next decade, will be discussed.

  18. Teaching for Deep Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Tracy Wilson; Colby, Susan A.

    2007-01-01

    The authors have been engaged in research focused on students' depth of learning as well as teachers' efforts to foster deep learning. Findings from a study examining the teaching practices and student learning outcomes of sixty-four teachers in seventeen different states (Smith et al. 2005) indicated that most of the learning in these classrooms…

  19. The Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The Deep Space Network (DSN) is the largest and most sensitive scientific telecommunications and radio navigation network in the world. Its principal responsibilities are to support unmanned interplanetary spacecraft missions and to support radio and radar astronomy observations in the exploration of the solar system and the universe. The DSN facilities and capabilities as of January 1988 are described.

  20. The Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Work accomplished on the Deep Space Network (DSN) was described, including the following topics: supporting research and technology, advanced development and engineering, system implementation, and DSN operations pertaining to mission-independent or multiple-mission development as well as to support of flight projects.

  1. Functional patterned multiphoton excitation deep inside scattering tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papagiakoumou, Eirini; Bègue, Aurélien; Leshem, Ben; Schwartz, Osip; Stell, Brandon M.; Bradley, Jonathan; Oron, Dan; Emiliani, Valentina

    2013-04-01

    Stochastic distortion of light beams in scattering samples makes in-depth photoexcitation in brain tissue a major challenge. A common solution for overcoming scattering involves adaptive pre-compensation of the unknown distortion. However, this requires long iterative searches for sample-specific optimized corrections, which is a problem when applied to optical neurostimulation where typical timescales in the system are in the millisecond range. Thus, photoexcitation in scattering media that is independent of the properties of a specific sample would be an ideal solution. Here, we show that temporally focused two-photon excitation with generalized phase contrast enables photoexcitation of arbitrary spatial patterns within turbid tissues with remarkable robustness to scattering. We demonstrate three-dimensional confinement of tailored photoexcitation patterns >200 µm in depth, both in numerical simulations and through brain slices combined with patch-clamp recording of photoactivated channelrhodopsin-2.

  2. Deduction of the chemical state and the electronic structure of Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B compound from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy core-level and valence-band spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jing; Liang, Le; Zhang, Lanting E-mail: lmsun@sjtu.edu.cn; Sun, Limin E-mail: lmsun@sjtu.edu.cn; Hirano, Shinichi

    2014-10-28

    Characterization of chemical state and electronic structure of the technologically important Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B compound is attractive for understanding the physical nature of its excellent magnetic properties. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) study of such rare-earth compound is important and also challenging due to the easy oxidation of surface and small photoelectron cross-sections of rare-earth 4f electrons and B 2p electrons, etc. Here, we reported an investigation based on XPS spectra of Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B compound as a function of Ar ion sputtering time. The chemical state of Fe and that of B in Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B compound can be clearly determined to be 0 and −3, respectively. The Nd in Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B compound is found to have the chemical state of close to +3 instead of +3 as compared with the Nd in Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3}. In addition, by comparing the valence-band spectrum of Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B compound to that of the pure Fe, the contributions from Nd, Fe, and B to the valence-band structure of Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B compound is made more clear. The B 2p states and B 2s states are identified to be at ∼11.2 eV and ∼24.6 eV, respectively, which is reported for the first time. The contribution from Nd 4f states can be identified both in XPS core-level spectrum and XPS valence-band spectrum. Although Nd 4f states partially hybridize with Fe 3d states, Nd 4f states are mainly localized in Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B compound.

  3. Hidden relationship between the electrical conductivity and the Mn 2p core-level photoemission spectra in La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}MnO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Hishida, T.; Ohbayashi, K.; Saitoh, T.

    2013-01-28

    Core-level electronic structure of La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}MnO{sub 3} has been studied by x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). We first report, by the conventional XPS, the well-screened shoulder structure in Mn 2p{sub 3/2} peak, which had been observed only by hard x-ray photoemission spectroscopy so far. Multiple-peak analysis revealed that the Mn{sup 4+} spectral weight was not proportional to the nominal hole concentration x, indicating that a simple Mn{sup 3+}/Mn{sup 4+} intensity ratio analysis may result in a wrong quantitative elemental analysis. Considerable weight of the shoulder at x = 0.0 and the fact that the shoulder weight was even slightly going down from x = 0.2 to 0.4 were not compatible with the idea that this weight simply represents the metallic behavior. Further analysis found that the whole Mn 2p{sub 3/2} peak can be decomposed into four portions, the Mn{sup 4+}, the (nominal) Mn{sup 3+}, the shoulder, and the other spectral weight located almost at the Mn{sup 3+} location. We concluded that this weight represents the well-screened final state at Mn{sup 4+} sites, whereas the shoulder is known as that of the Mn{sup 3+} states. We found that the sum of these two spectral weight has an empirical relationship to the conductivity evolution with x.

  4. Living with Deep Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Deep Vein Thrombosis NHLBI Resources Pulmonary Embolism (Health Topics) Non-NHLBI Resources Deep Vein Thrombosis (MedlinePlus) Pulmonary Embolism (MedlinePlus) Clinical Trials ...

  5. Project DEEP STEAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aeschliman, D. P.; Clay, R. G.; Donaldson, A. B.; Eisenhawer, S. W.; Fox, R. L.; Johnson, D. R.; Mulac, A. J.

    1982-01-01

    The objective of Project DEEP STEAM is to develop the technology to economically produce heavy oils from deep reservoirs. The tasks included in this project are the development of thermally efficient delivery systems and downhole steam generation systems. During the period January 1-March 31, 1981, effort has continued on a low pressure combustion downhole generator (Rocketdyne), and on two high pressure designs (Foster-Miller Associates, Sandia National Laboratories). The Sandia design was prepared for deployment in the Wilmington Field at Long Beach, California. Progress continued on the Min-Stress II packer concept at L'Garde, Inc., and on the extruded metal packer at Foster-Miller. Initial bare string field data are reported on the insulated tubular test at Lloydminster, Saskatchewan, Canada.

  6. Deep gluteal syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Hal David; Reddy, Manoj; Gómez-Hoyos, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Deep gluteal syndrome describes the presence of pain in the buttock caused from non-discogenic and extrapelvic entrapment of the sciatic nerve. Several structures can be involved in sciatic nerve entrapment within the gluteal space. A comprehensive history and physical examination can orientate the specific site where the sciatic nerve is entrapped, as well as several radiological signs that support the suspected diagnosis. Failure to identify the cause of pain in a timely manner can increase pain perception, and affect mental control, patient hope and consequently quality of life. This review presents a comprehensive approach to the patient with deep gluteal syndrome in order to improve the understanding of posterior hip anatomy, nerve kinematics, clinical manifestations, imaging findings, differential diagnosis and treatment considerations. PMID:27011826

  7. Deep depth undex simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Higginbotham, R. R.; Malakhoff, A.

    1985-01-29

    A deep depth underwater simulator is illustrated for determining the dual effects of nuclear type underwater explosion shockwaves and hydrostatic pressures on a test vessel while simulating, hydrostatically, that the test vessel is located at deep depths. The test vessel is positioned within a specially designed pressure vessel followed by pressurizing a fluid contained between the test and pressure vessels. The pressure vessel, with the test vessel suspended therein, is then placed in a body of water at a relatively shallow depth, and an explosive charge is detonated at a predetermined distance from the pressure vessel. The resulting shockwave is transmitted through the pressure vessel wall so that the shockwave impinging on the test vessel is representative of nuclear type explosive shockwaves transmitted to an underwater structure at great depths.

  8. Canberra Deep Dish Communications Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    View of Canberra 70m (230 ft.) antenna with flags from the three Deep Space Network sites. The Canberra Deep Space Communications Complex, located outside Canberra, Australia, is one of the three complexes which comprise NASA's Deep Space Network. The other complexes are located in Goldstone, California, and Madrid, Spain.

  9. Deep-Sarsa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrecut, M.; Ali, M. K.

    In this paper we discuss the application of reinforcement learning algorithms to the problem of autonomous robot navigation. We show that the autonomous navigation using the standard delayed reinforcement learning algorithms is an ill posed problem and we present a more efficient algorithm for which the convergence speed is greatly improved. The proposed algorithm (Deep-Sarsa) is based on a combination between the Depth-First Search (a graph searching algorithm) and Sarsa (a delayed reinforcement learning algorithm).

  10. Understanding deep convolutional networks.

    PubMed

    Mallat, Stéphane

    2016-04-13

    Deep convolutional networks provide state-of-the-art classifications and regressions results over many high-dimensional problems. We review their architecture, which scatters data with a cascade of linear filter weights and nonlinearities. A mathematical framework is introduced to analyse their properties. Computations of invariants involve multiscale contractions with wavelets, the linearization of hierarchical symmetries and sparse separations. Applications are discussed. PMID:26953183

  11. Project DEEP STEAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, B. W.

    Development of technology for thermally efficient downhole delivery of surface generated steam and for downhole steam generators are the major elements of Project DEEP STEAM. Specific activities include development of advanced concept thermal packers, evaluation of the thermal performance of insulated tubing designs in a test tower and in a field environment, and development of downhole steam generator concepts. Field tests were performed in both technology areas and the results and status are presented.

  12. Project DEEP STEAM

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, B.W.

    1982-01-01

    Development of technology for thermally efficient downhole delivery of surface-generated steam and for downhole steam generators are the major elements of Project DEEP STEAM. Specific activities include development of advanced concept thermal packers, evaluation of the thermal performance of insulated tubing designs in a test tower and in a field environment, and development of downhole steam generator concepts. Field tests have been performed in both technology areas and the results and status are presented.

  13. Imagining Deep Time (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talasek, J.

    2013-12-01

    Imagining Deep Time '...the mind seemed to grow giddy by looking so far into the abyss of time.' John Playfair (1748 -1819), scientist and mathematician "Man cannot afford to conceive of nature and exclude himself." Emmit Gowin, photographer 'A person would have to take themselves out of the human context to begin to think in terms of geologic time. They would have to think like a rock.' Terry Falke, photographer The term Deep Time refers to the vastness of the geological time scale. First conceived in the 18th century, the development of this perspective on time has been pieced together like a jigsaw puzzle of information and observations drawn from the study of the earth's structure and discovered fossilized flora and fauna. Deep time may possibly be the greatest contribution made by the discipline of geology forever impacting our perception of earth and our relationship to it. How do we grasp such vast concepts as deep time which relates to the origins of the earth or cosmic time which relates to the origins of the universe - concepts that exist far beyond the realm of human experience? Further more how do we communicate this? The ability to visualize is a powerful tool of discovery and communication for the scientist and it is part and parcel of the work of visual artists. The scientific process provides evidence yet it is imagination on the part of the scientists and artists alike that is needed to interpret that information. This exhibition represents an area where both rational and intuitive thinking come together to explore this question of how we relate to the vastness of time. The answer suggested by the combination of art work assembled here suggests that we do so through a combination of visual metaphors (cycles, circles, arrows, trajectories) and visual evidence (rock formations, strata, fossils of fauna and flora) while being mediated through various technologies. One provides factual and empirical evidence while the other provides a way of grasping

  14. Dissociation of deep-core-excited CH{sub 3}Cl

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, D.L.; Martin, R.; Vanderford, B.

    1997-04-01

    Using x-rays from B.L. 9.3.1, a space-focused time-of-flight (TOF) was used to study photofragmentation of CH{sub 3}Cl following excitation in the neighborhood of the Cl K-shell threshold ({approximately} 2.8 keV). Multi-ion coincidence measurements were used to search for selective dissociation of specific bonds in the molecule. Such selectivity has been observed for excitation near outer-core-level thresholds (e.g., Cl 2p), but this is the first study in deep core levels, where very-short core-hole lifetimes and Auger cascade effects may influence fragmentation. Both high-resolution time-of-flight spectroscopy and multi-coincidence photoelectron-photoion-photoion (PE-PIPICO), as well as photoelectron-photoion-photoion-photoion (PE3PICO) measurements were performed. Dramatic changes in the line shapes for different fragment ions are observed as a function of the excitation energy, and are attributed to selective dissociation of the CH{sub 3}Cl molecule along the C-Cl bond. In addition, pronounced angular distributions of the ejected ions are observed on resonance.

  15. Dynamical mechanism of charge separation by photoexcited generation of proton-electron pairs in organic molecular systems. A nonadiabatic electron wavepacket dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Kentaro; Takatsuka, Kazuo

    2016-08-01

    In this perspective article, we review, along with presenting new results, a series of our theoretical analyses on the excited-state mechanism of charge separation (proton-electron pair creation) relevant to the photoinduced water-splitting reaction (2H2O → 4H+ + 4e- + O2) in organic and biological systems, which quite often includes Mn clusters in various molecular configurations. The present mechanism is conceived to be universal in the triggering process of the photoexcited water splitting dynamics. In other words, any Mn-based catalytic charge separation is quite likely to be initiated according to this mechanism. As computationally tractable yet realistic models, we examine a series of systems generally expressed as X-Mn-OH2⋯A, where X = (OH, Ca(OH)3) and A = (N-methylformamidine, guanidine, imidazole or ammonia cluster) in terms of the theory of nonadiabatic electron wavepacket dynamics. We first find both an electron and a proton are simultaneously transferred to the acceptors through conical intersections upon photoexcitation. In this mechanism, the electron takes different pathways from that of the proton and reaches the densely lying Rydberg-like states of the acceptors in the end, thereby inducing charge separation. Therefore the presence of the Rydberg-like diffused unoccupied states as an electron acceptor is critical for this reaction to proceed. We also have found another crucial nonadiabatic process that deteriorates the efficiency of charge separation by rendering the created pair of proton and electron back to the originally donor site through the states of d-d band originated from Mn atom. Repetition of this process gradually annihilates the created pair of proton and electron in a way different from the usual charge recombination process. We address this dynamics by means of our proposed path-branching representation. The dynamical roles of a doped Ca atom are also uncovered, which are relevant to controlling the pathways of electron

  16. Deep Space Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, Andrew T. (Inventor); Riedel, Joseph E. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A single, compact, lower power deep space positioning system (DPS) configured to determine a location of a spacecraft anywhere in the solar system, and provide state information relative to Earth, Sun, or any remote object. For example, the DPS includes a first camera and, possibly, a second camera configured to capture a plurality of navigation images to determine a state of a spacecraft in a solar system. The second camera is located behind, or adjacent to, a secondary reflector of a first camera in a body of a telescope.

  17. Deep shadow occulter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cash, Webster (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Methods and apparatus are disclosed for occulting light. The occulter shape suppresses diffraction at any given size or angle and is practical to build because it can be made binary to avoid scatter. Binary structures may be fully opaque or fully transmitting at specific points. The diffraction suppression is spectrally broad so that it may be used with incoherent white light. An occulter may also include substantially opaque inner portion and an at least partially transparent outer portion. Such occulters may be used on the ground to create a deep shadow in a short distance, or may be used in space to suppress starlight and reveal exoplanets.

  18. Glass-like recovery of antiferromagnetic spin ordering in a photo-excited manganite Pr0.7Ca0.3MnO3

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, S.Y.; Langner, M.C.; Zhu, Y.; Chuang, Y.-D.; Rini, M.; Glover, T.E.; Hertlein, M.P.; Gonzalez, A.G. Cruz; Tahir, N.; Tomioka, Y.; Tokura, Y.; Hussain, Z.; Schoenlein, R.W.

    2014-01-16

    Electronic orderings of charges, orbitals and spins are observed in many strongly correlated electron materials, and revealing their dynamics is a critical step toward understanding the underlying physics of important emergent phenomena. Here we use time-resolved resonant soft x-ray scattering spectroscopy to probe the dynamics of antiferromagnetic spin ordering in the manganite Pr0:7Ca0:3MnO3 following ultrafast photo-exitation. Our studies reveal a glass-like recovery of the spin ordering and a crossover in the dimensionality of the restoring interaction from quasi-1D at low pump fluence to 3D at high pump fluence. This behavior arises from the metastable state created by photo-excitation, a state characterized by spin disordered metallic droplets within the larger charge- and spin-ordered insulating domains. Comparison with time-resolved resistivity measurements suggests that the collapse of spin ordering is correlated with the insulator-to-metal transition, but the recovery of the insulating phase does not depend on the re-establishment of the spin ordering.

  19. Inversion of the relative probabilities of the f- f and f- d transitions in the Ln3+ lanthanide ions at their radio- and sonoexcitation as compared to photoexcitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharipov, G. L.

    2007-07-01

    The results of measuring the efficiencies of the formation of electronically excited states of the Ln3+ lanthanide ions in aqueous solutions in the processes of radioluminescence and multibubble sonoluminescence are analyzed. In both cases, electronic excitation occurs due to inelastic collisions of Ln3+ ions with (for radioluminescence) charged ionizing particles in liquid and (for multibubble sonoluminescence) high-energy particles, primarily electrons, in the gas phase of cavitation bubbles. In both processes, the efficiencies of exciting ions whose luminescence states appear in the 4 f-5 d transitions (Ce3+ and Pr3+) are significantly lower (by an order of magnitude or larger) than the efficiencies of exciting ions whose luminescence states appear in the 4 f-4 f transitions (Gd3+ and Tb3+). Therefore, the probability of the f- d transitions is lower than the probability of the f- f transitions in lanthanide ions excited by collisions with the charged particles and the relative probabilities of these transitions are inverted in these processes as compared to photoexcitation.

  20. Deep learning for image classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoppin, Ryan; Rizki, Mateen

    2014-06-01

    This paper provides an overview of deep learning and introduces the several subfields of deep learning including a specific tutorial of convolutional neural networks. Traditional methods for learning image features are compared to deep learning techniques. In addition, we present our preliminary classification results, our basic implementation of a convolutional restricted Boltzmann machine on the Mixed National Institute of Standards and Technology database (MNIST), and we explain how to use deep learning networks to assist in our development of a robust gender classification system.

  1. Deep drawing of uranium metal

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, R J; Lundberg, M R

    1987-01-19

    A procedure was developed to fabricate uranium forming blanks with high ''draw-ability'' so that cup shapes could be easily and uniformly deep drawn. The overall procedure involved a posttreatment to develop optimum mechanical and structural properties in the deep-drawn cups. The fabrication sequence is casting high-purity logs, pucking cast logs, cross-rolling pucks to forming blanks, annealing and outgassing forming blanks, cold deep drawing to hemispherical shapes, and stress relieving, outgassing, and annealing deep-drawn parts to restore ductility and impart dimensional stability. The fabrication development and the resulting fabrication procedure are discussed in detail. The mechanical properties and microstructural properties are discussed.

  2. Neurological effects of deep diving.

    PubMed

    Grønning, Marit; Aarli, Johan A

    2011-05-15

    Deep diving is defined as diving to depths more than 50 m of seawater (msw), and is mainly used for occupational and military purposes. A deep dive is characterized by the compression phase, the bottom time and the decompression phase. Neurological and neurophysiologic effects are demonstrated in divers during the compression phase and the bottom time. Immediate and transient neurological effects after deep dives have been shown in some divers. However, the results from the epidemiological studies regarding long term neurological effects from deep diving are conflicting and still not conclusive. Prospective clinical studies with sufficient power and sensitivity are needed to solve this very important issue. PMID:21377169

  3. Deep frequency modulation interferometry.

    PubMed

    Gerberding, Oliver

    2015-06-01

    Laser interferometry with pm/Hz precision and multi-fringe dynamic range at low frequencies is a core technology to measure the motion of various objects (test masses) in space and ground based experiments for gravitational wave detection and geodesy. Even though available interferometer schemes are well understood, their construction remains complex, often involving, for example, the need to build quasi-monolithic optical benches with dozens of components. In recent years techniques have been investigated that aim to reduce this complexity by combining phase modulation techniques with sophisticated digital readout algorithms. This article presents a new scheme that uses strong laser frequency modulations in combination with the deep phase modulation readout algorithm to construct simpler and easily scalable interferometers. PMID:26072834

  4. Groth Deep Locations Image

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer photographed this ultraviolet color blowup of the Groth Deep Image on June 22 and June 23, 2003. Hundreds of galaxies are detected in this portion of the image, and the faint red galaxies are believed to be 6 billion light years away. The white boxes show the location of these distant galaxies, of which more than a 100 can be detected in this image. NASA astronomers expect to detect 10,000 such galaxies after extrapolating to the full image at a deeper exposure level.

    The Galaxy Evolution Explorer mission is led by the California Institute of Technology, which is also responsible for the science operations and data analysis. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., a division of Caltech, manages the mission and built the science instrument. The mission was developed under NASA's Explorers Program, managed by the Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. The mission's international partners include South Korea and France.

  5. Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Perlmutter, Joel S.; Mink, Jonathan W.

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has provided remarkable benefits for people with a variety of neurologic conditions. Stimulation of the ventral intermediate nucleus of the thalamus can dramatically relieve tremor associated with essential tremor or Parkinson disease (PD). Similarly, stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus or the internal segment of the globus pallidus can substantially reduce bradykinesia, rigidity, tremor, and gait difficulties in people with PD. Multiple groups are attempting to extend this mode of treatment to other conditions. Yet, the precise mechanism of action of DBS remains uncertain. Such studies have importance that extends beyond clinical therapeutics. Investigations of the mechanisms of action of DBS have the potential to clarify fundamental issues such as the functional anatomy of selected brain circuits and the relationship between activity in those circuits and behavior. Although we review relevant clinical issues, we emphasize the importance of current and future investigations on these topics. PMID:16776585

  6. Method of deep drilling

    DOEpatents

    Colgate, Stirling A.

    1984-01-01

    Deep drilling is facilitated by the following steps practiced separately or in any combination: (1) Periodically and sequentially fracturing zones adjacent the bottom of the bore hole with a thixotropic fastsetting fluid that is accepted into the fracture to overstress the zone, such fracturing and injection being periodic as a function of the progression of the drill. (2) Casing the bore hole with ductile, pre-annealed casing sections, each of which is run down through the previously set casing and swaged in situ to a diameter large enough to allow the next section to run down through it. (3) Drilling the bore hole using a drill string of a low density alloy and a high density drilling mud so that the drill string is partially floated.

  7. Neptune's deep atmosphere revealed

    SciTech Connect

    de Pater, I. ); Atreya, S.K. ); Romani, P.N.

    1989-08-01

    The brightness temperature of Uranus at 20 cm is 260 {plus minus} 10K, while for Neptune it is 318 {plus minus} 16K. Since NH{sub 3} is the dominant absorber at this wavelength the authors have modeled the microwave spectra of Neptune based upon an assumed deep gaseous mixing ratio of NH{sub 3} and subsequent loss into clouds. The difference between the two brightness temperatures implies that the NH{sub 3} mixing ratio below the level of cloud formation on Neptune compared to Uranus is lower by nearly 2 order of magnitude. An alternative explanation is that the 20 cm radiation from Neptune is a combination of thermal plus synchrotron emission as proposed by de Pater and Goertz (1989).

  8. Modeling ocean deep convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canuto, V. M.; Howard, A.; Hogan, P.; Cheng, Y.; Dubovikov, M. S.; Montenegro, L. M.

    The goal of this study is to assess models for Deep Convection with special emphasis on their use in coarse resolution ocean general circulation models. A model for deep convection must contain both vertical transport and lateral advection by mesoscale eddies generated by baroclinic instabilities. The first process operates mostly in the initial phases while the second dominates the final stages. Here, the emphasis is on models for vertical mixing. When mesoscales are not resolved, they are treated with the Gent and McWilliams parameterization. The model results are tested against the measurements of Lavender, Davis and Owens, 2002 (LDO) in the Labrador Sea. Specifically, we shall inquire whether the models are able to reproduce the region of " deepest convection," which we shall refer to as DC (mixed layer depths 800-1300 m). The region where it was measured by Lavender et al. (2002) will be referred to as the LDO region. The main results of this study can be summarized as follows. 3° × 3° resolution. A GFDL-type OGCM with the GISS vertical mixing model predicts DC in the LDO region where the vertical heat diffusivity is found to be 10 m 2 s -1, a value that is quite close to the one suggested by heuristic studies. No parameter was changed from the original GISS model. However, the GISS model also predicts some DC in a region to the east of the LDO region. 3° × 3° resolution. A GFDL-type OGCM with the KPP model (everything else being the same) does not predict DC in the LDO region where the vertical heat diffusivity is found to be 0.5 × 10 -4 m 2 s -1 which is the background value. The KPP model yields DC only to the east of the LDO region. 1° × 1° resolution. In this case, a MY2.5 mixing scheme predicts DC in the LDO region. However, it also predicts DC to the west, north and south of it, where it is not observed. The behavior of the KPP and MY models are somewhat anti-symmetric. The MY models yield too low a mixing in stably stratified flows since they

  9. Modeling ocean deep convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canuto, V. M.; Howard, A.; Hogan, P.; Cheng, Y.; Dubovikov, M. S.; Montenegro, L. M.

    The goal of this study is to assess models for Deep Convection with special emphasis on their use in coarse resolution ocean general circulation models. A model for deep convection must contain both vertical transport and lateral advection by mesoscale eddies generated by baroclinic instabilities. The first process operates mostly in the initial phases while the second dominates the final stages. Here, the emphasis is on models for vertical mixing. When mesoscales are not resolved, they are treated with the Gent and McWilliams parameterization. The model results are tested against the measurements of Lavender, Davis and Owens, 2002 (LDO) in the Labrador Sea. Specifically, we shall inquire whether the models are able to reproduce the region of " deepest convection," which we shall refer to as DC (mixed layer depths 800-1300 m). The region where it was measured by Lavender et al. (2002) will be referred to as the LDO region. The main results of this study can be summarized as follows. 3° × 3° resolution. A GFDL-type OGCM with the GISS vertical mixing model predicts DC in the LDO region where the vertical heat diffusivity is found to be 10 m 2 s -1, a value that is quite close to the one suggested by heuristic studies. No parameter was changed from the original GISS model. However, the GISS model also predicts some DC in a region to the east of the LDO region. 3° × 3° resolution. A GFDL-type OGCM with the KPP model (everything else being the same) does not predict DC in the LDO region where the vertical heat diffusivity is found to be 0.5 × 10 -4 m 2 s -1 which is the background value. The KPP model yields DC only to the east of the LDO region. 1° × 1° resolution. In this case, a MY2.5 mixing scheme predicts DC in the LDO region. However, it also predicts DC to the west, north and south of it, where it is not observed. The behavior of the KPP and MY models are somewhat anti-symmetric. The MY models yield too low a mixing in stably stratified flows since they

  10. Deep Ecology: Beyond Mere Environmentalism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Suzanne

    1994-01-01

    Outlines the principles of deep ecology, a movement that questions the societal values that have resulted in damage to the earth's life-supporting biosphere. In contrast to shallow reform, deep ecology encourages individuals to examine their values and relationship to nature to address the environmental crisis. (LP)

  11. Context and Deep Learning Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyle, Tom; Ravenscroft, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Conceptual clarification is essential if we are to establish a stable and deep discipline of technology enhanced learning. The technology is alluring; this can distract from deep design in a surface rush to exploit the affordances of the new technology. We need a basis for design, and a conceptual unit of organization, that are applicable across…

  12. Deep space network energy program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friesema, S. E.

    1980-01-01

    If the Deep Space Network is to exist in a cost effective and reliable manner in the next decade, the problems presented by international energy cost increases and energy availability must be addressed. The Deep Space Network Energy Program was established to implement solutions compatible with the ongoing development of the total network.

  13. Deep sulfur cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, N.; Mandeville, C. W.

    2009-12-01

    Geochemical cycle of sulfur in near-surface reservoirs has been a subject of intense studies for decades. It has been shown that sulfur isotopic compositions of sedimentary sulfides and sulfates record interactions of the atmosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere and lithosphere, with δ34S of sedimentary sulfides continuously decreasing from 0‰ toward present-day values of ~-30 to -40‰ over the Phanerozoic (e.g., Canfield, 2004). It has also been shown that microbial reduction of the present-day seawater sulfate (δ34S=+21‰) results in large shifts in isotopic compositions of secondary pyrites in altered oceanic crust (to δ34S=-70‰: Rouxel et al., 2009). How much of these near surface isotopic variations survive during deep geochemical cycle of sulfur interacting with the mantle infinite reservoir with δ34S=0‰? Could extent of their survival be used as a tracer of processes and dynamics involved in deep geochemical cycle? As a first step toward answering these questions, δ34S was determined in-situ using a Cameca IMS 1280 ion microprobe at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in materials representing various domains of deep geochemical cycle. They include pyrites in altered MORB as potential subducting materials and pyrites in UHP eclogites as samples that have experienced subduction zone processes, and mantle-derived melts are represented by olivine-hosted melt inclusions in MORB and those in IAB, and undegassed submarine OIB glasses. Salient features of the results include: (1) pyrites in altered MORB (with O. Rouxel; from ODP site 801 and ODP Hole 1301B) range from -70 to +19‰, (2) pyrites in UHP eclogites from the Western Gneiss Region, Norway (with B. Hacker and A. Kylander-Clark) show a limited overall range from -3.4 to + 2.8‰ among five samples, with one of them covering almost the entire range, indicating limited scale lengths of isotopic equilibration during subduction, (3) olivine-hosted melt inclusions in arc basalts from Galunggung (-2

  14. Electronic coupling between photo-excited stacked bases in DNA and RNA strands with emphasis on the bright states initially populated.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Lisbeth Munksgaard; Hoffmann, Søren Vrønning; Nielsen, Steen Brøndsted

    2013-08-01

    In biology the interplay between multiple light-absorbers gives rise to complex quantum effects such as superposition states that are of extreme importance for life, both for harvesting solar energy and likely protecting nucleic acids from radiation damage. Still the characteristics of these states and their quantum dynamics are a much debated issue. While the electronic properties of single bases are fairly well understood, the situation for strands is complicated by the fact that stacked bases electronically couple when photoexcited. These newly arising states are denoted as exciton states and are simply linear combinations of localised wavefunctions that involve N - 1 ground-state bases and one base in its excited state (cf. the Frenkel exciton model). There is disagreement over the number of bases, N, that coherently couple, i.e., the spatial extent of the exciton, and how electronic deexcitation back to the ground state occurs. The importance of dark charge-transfer states has been inferred both from time-resolved fluorescence and transient absorption experiments. These states were suggested to be responsible for long deexcitation times but it is unclear whether 'long' is tens of picoseconds or nanoseconds. In this review paper, we focus on the bright states initially populated and discuss their nature based on information obtained from systematic absorption and circular dichroism experiments on single strands of different lengths. Our results from the last five years are compared with those from other groups, and are discussed in the context of successive deexcitation schemes. Pieces to the puzzle have come from different experiments and theory but a complete description has yet to emerge. As such the story about DNA/RNA photophysical decay mechanisms resembles the tale about the blind men and the elephant where all see the beast in different, correct but incomplete ways. PMID:23545881

  15. Dynamics of multidissociation paths of acetaldehyde photoexcited at 157 nm: Branching ratios, distributions of kinetic energy, and angular anisotropies of products

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Shih-Huang

    2009-11-07

    After the photolysis of acetaldehyde (CH{sub 3}CHO) at 157.6 nm in a molecular-beam apparatus using photofragment translational spectroscopy and vacuum-ultraviolet photoionization to detect products, we observed 13 photofragments associated with six primary dissociation channels and secondary dissociation of products CH{sub 3}CO and HCO. We measured time-of-flight spectra and spatial angular anisotropies of products and evaluated the branching ratios of products. All photoproducts have nearly isotropic angular distributions with an average |{beta}| value less than 0.05. Primary dissociations to CH{sub 3}CO+H and CH{sub 3}+HCO are two major paths; most CH{sub 3}CO subsequently decomposes spontaneously to CH{sub 3}+CO and CH{sub 2}CO+H and most HCO decomposes to H+CO. The ternary dissociation to CH{sub 3}+CO+H thus accounts for approximately half of the total branching. Dissociations to CH{sub 2}CO+H{sub 2} and CH{sub 2}+CH{sub 2}O are observable, but the production of CH{sub 4}+CO is ambiguous. The productions of C{sub 2}H{sub 3}+OH and C{sub 2}H{sub 2}+H{sub 2}O indicate that isomerization from acetaldehyde to ethenol occurs before fragmentation. After photoexcitation to the n-3p state, most acetaldehyde converts into states T{sub 1} and S{sub 0} but a little isomerizes to ethenol followed by multichannel decomposition.

  16. Deep inelastic phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Prescott, C.Y.

    1980-10-01

    Nucleon structure as seen in the context of deep inelastic scattering is discussed. The lectures begin with consideration of the quark-parton model. The model forms the basis of understanding lepton-nucleon inelastic scattering. As improved data in lepton-nucleon scattering at high energies became available, the quark-parton model failed to explain some crucial features of these data. At approximately the same time a candidate theory of strong interactions based on a SU(3) gauge theory of color was being discussed in the literature, and new ideas on the explanation of inelastic scattering data became popular. A new theory of strong interactions, now called quantum chromodynamics provides a new framework for understanding the data, with a much stronger theoretical foundation, and seems to explain well the features of the data. The lectures conclude with a look at some recent experiments which provide new data at very high energies. These lectures are concerned primarily with charged lepton inelastic scattering and to a lesser extent with neutrino results. Furthermore, due to time and space limitations, topics such as final state hadron studies, and multi-muon production are omitted here. The lectures concentrate on the more central issues: the quark-parton model and concepts of scaling, scale breaking and the ideas of quantum chromodynamics, the Q/sup 2/ dependence of structure function, moments, and the important parameter R.

  17. Deep mine cooling system

    SciTech Connect

    Conan, J.

    1984-11-06

    A deep mine cooling system comprising a compressor supplied with air and rotatively driven by a motor and an expansion turbine supplied with compressed air from said compressor and driving an actuating unit, wherein the compressed air, after leaving the compressor but prior to reaching the expansion turbine, passes through a steam generator whose output provides the energy required to operate an absorption refrigeration machine used to cool utility water for mining, said compressed air on leaving the steam generator going to a first heat exchanger in which it yields calories to a water circuit comprising a second heat exchanger, said second heat exchanger giving off the calories absorbed by the water in the first heat exchanger to the air fed by the second heat exchanger to a drying cell that is regenerated by said air from the second heat exchanger, said drying cell being part of a set of two cells working in alternation, the other cell in the set receiving the compressed air from the first heat exchanger, such that the compressed air is fed to said expansion turbine after leaving said drying unit, and wherein the air exhausted from said expansion turbine is sent to a third heat exchanger after which it is distributed according to the needs of the mine, said third exchanger being traversed by the water collected in the mine, cooled in said exchanger and circulated upon leaving said exchanger to meet the cool water requirements of the mine.

  18. Deep atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, H.; Drake, B.; Randall, C.; Hansma, P. K.

    2013-12-15

    The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) possesses several desirable imaging features including the ability to produce height profiles as well as two-dimensional images, in fluid or air, at high resolution. AFM has been used to study a vast selection of samples on the scale of angstroms to micrometers. However, current AFMs cannot access samples with vertical topography of the order of 100 μm or greater. Research efforts have produced AFM scanners capable of vertical motion greater than 100 μm, but commercially available probe tip lengths are still typically less than 10 μm high. Even the longest probe tips are below 100 μm and even at this range are problematic. In this paper, we present a method to hand-fabricate “Deep AFM” probes with tips of the order of 100 μm and longer so that AFM can be used to image samples with large scale vertical topography, such as fractured bone samples.

  19. Microbial Life in the Deep Subsurface: Deep, Hot and Radioactive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeStefano, Andrea L.; Ford, Jill C.; Winsor, Seana K.; Allen, Carlton C.; Miller, Judith; McNamara, Karen M.; Gibson, Everett K., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Recent studies, motivated in part by the search for extraterrestrial life, continue to expand the recognized limits of Earth's biosphere. This work explored evidence for life a high-temperature, radioactive environment in the deep subsurface.

  20. Deep Learning in Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Gawehn, Erik; Hiss, Jan A; Schneider, Gisbert

    2016-01-01

    Artificial neural networks had their first heyday in molecular informatics and drug discovery approximately two decades ago. Currently, we are witnessing renewed interest in adapting advanced neural network architectures for pharmaceutical research by borrowing from the field of "deep learning". Compared with some of the other life sciences, their application in drug discovery is still limited. Here, we provide an overview of this emerging field of molecular informatics, present the basic concepts of prominent deep learning methods and offer motivation to explore these techniques for their usefulness in computer-assisted drug discovery and design. We specifically emphasize deep neural networks, restricted Boltzmann machine networks and convolutional networks. PMID:27491648

  1. Jack Dymond's Deep Insights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, R. E.; Delaney, J. R.

    2004-12-01

    Most people do not know that Jack Dymond was a major influence on several aspects of current deep-sea research. Along with Margaret Leinen and Jack, we were part of the first Alvin dive program on the Endeavour hydrothermal field in 1984. Jack was working with Rick, on a sediment-trap study of the overall carbon fluxes in the vicinity of the Endeavour hydrothermal systems in an effort to address a question that Cindy Lee had posed about the overall carbon production from hydrothermal vents. At the time we were recognizing and naming many of the 20- to 40-meter-high sulfide structures in the Endeavour field (Hulk, Grotto, Dante, Dudley, Bastille), Jack commented that it was a shame that the world could not see these magnificent edifices or watch endlessly awesome black smokers. His feeling was that some vent sites should be converted to National Parks to preserve them from invasion by enthusiastic scientists, yet he clearly had the vision that the public should be given a sense of the grandeur involved locally, as well as the vastness of the 70,000-km ridge-crest system running through every ocean. Within a year we started talking about the RIDGE Program, and Jack was an early and enthusiastic participant in the design and development of RIDGE. Jack was among the first to encourage multi-disciplinary research at the hydrothermal vent sites. Recognizing that deep currents are important to vent processes, he urged physical oceanographers to work with the chemists, biologists, and geologists and was personally responsible for Rick becoming interested in studying vents. We, the co-authors of this abstract, became close friends as a result of having been introduced to each other by Jack. Several years ago, we co-authored the first paper ever written on the possible influence of hydrothermal activity on the circulation of the Europan Ocean, a paper that we here dedicate to the memory of Jack. Finally, it was in part because of Jack's conviction that the world should know

  2. Deep UV LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jung; Amano, Hiroshi; Schowalter, Leo

    2014-06-01

    Deep ultraviolet (DUV) photons interact strongly with a broad range of chemical and biological molecules; compact DUV light sources could enable a wide range of applications in chemi/bio-sensing, sterilization, agriculture, and industrial curing. The much shorter wavelength also results in useful characteristics related to optical diffraction (for lithography) and scattering (non-line-of-sight communication). The family of III-N (AlGaInN) compound semiconductors offers a tunable energy gap from infrared to DUV. While InGaN-based blue light emitters have been the primary focus for the obvious application of solid state lighting, there is a growing interest in the development of efficient UV and DUV light-emitting devices. In the past few years we have witnessed an increasing investment from both government and industry sectors to further the state of DUV light-emitting devices. The contributions in Semiconductor Science and Technology 's special issue on DUV devices provide an up-to-date snapshot covering many relevant topics in this field. Given the expected importance of bulk AlN substrate in DUV technology, we are pleased to include a review article by Hartmann et al on the growth of AlN bulk crystal by physical vapour transport. The issue of polarization field within the deep ultraviolet LEDs is examined in the article by Braut et al. Several commercial companies provide useful updates in their development of DUV emitters, including Nichia (Fujioka et al ), Nitride Semiconductors (Muramoto et al ) and Sensor Electronic Technology (Shatalov et al ). We believe these articles will provide an excellent overview of the state of technology. The growth of AlGaN heterostructures by molecular beam epitaxy, in contrast to the common organo-metallic vapour phase epitaxy, is discussed by Ivanov et al. Since hexagonal boron nitride (BN) has received much attention as both a UV and a two-dimensional electronic material, we believe it serves readers well to include the

  3. Lunar deep drill apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Proposed as a baseline configuration, this rotary drill apparatus is designed to produce 100-mm diameter holes in the lunar surface at depths up to 50 meters. The drill is intended to acquire samples for scientific analysis, mineral resource location, calibration of electronic exploration devices, and foundation analysis at construction sites. It is also intended to prepare holes for emplacement of scientific instruments, the setting of structural anchors, and explosive methods in excavation and mining activities. Defined as a deep drill because of the modular drill string, it incorporates an automatic rod changer. The apparatus is teleoperated from a remote location, such as earth, utilizing supervisory control techniques. It is thus suitable for unmanned and man-tended operation. Proven terrestrial drilling technology is used to the extent it is compatible with the lunar environment. Augers and drive tubes form holes in the regolith and may be used to acquire loose samples. An inertial cutting removal system operates intermittently while rock core drilling is in progress. The apparatus is carried to the work site by a three-legged mobile platform which also provides a 2-meter feed along the hole centerline, an off-hole movement of approximately .5 meters, an angular alignment of up to 20 deg. from gravity vertical, and other dexterity required in handling rods and samples. The technology can also be applied using other carriers which incorporate similar motion capabilities. The apparatus also includes storage racks for augers, rods, and ancillary devices such as the foot-plate that holds the down-hole tooling during rod changing operations.

  4. The Deep Space Network, volume 17

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The objectives, functions, and organization of the Deep Space Network are summarized. The Deep Space Instrumentation Facility, the Ground Communications Facility, and the Network Control System are described.

  5. Deep Space 1 (fact sheet)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, D. K.

    1998-01-01

    Exerting less force than does a single sheet of paper resting in your hand, Deep Space 1's ion propulsion system will slowly, yet continuously accelerate the spacecraft well beyond speeds attainable by conventional chemical propulsion.

  6. Deep Space Telecommunications Systems Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuen, J. H. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    Descriptive and analytical information useful for the optimal design, specification, and performance evaluation of deep space telecommunications systems is presented. Telemetry, tracking, and command systems, receiver design, spacecraft antennas, frequency selection, interference, and modulation techniques are addressed.

  7. Goldstone Deep Space Communication Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Three 34m (110 ft.) diameter Beam Waveguide antennas located at the Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex, situated in the Mojave Desert in California. This is one of three complexes which comprise NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN). The DSN provides radio communications for all of NASA's interplanetary spacecraft and is also utilized for radio astronomy and radar observations of the solar system and the universe.

  8. Deep Percolation in Devegetated Hillslopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebel, B. A.; Hinckley, E. S.

    2011-12-01

    Deep percolation has recently been recognized as a critical component in hillslope hydrology studies. In devegetated hillslopes where vegetation is killed and, in some cases, removed, deep percolation may be substantially enhanced beyond pre-disturbance magnitudes. We discuss two examples of devegetated hillslopes where water balance partitioning shifted to favor increased deep percolation fluxes for some hydrologic conditions. The first is the Coos Bay Experimental Catchment in Oregon, USA, where commercial forestry resulted in the complete removal of trees. An intensive field campaign in the 1990's resulted in a long term record of precipitation, discharge, piezometric response, and groundwater levels. Hydrologic response modeling confirms hypotheses from the field-data analysis and points to unresolved questions regarding feedbacks between deep percolation and near-surface hydrologic processes. The second example is the area burned by the Fourmile Canyon Fire in Colorado, USA, where a severe wildland fire removed all vegetation from a north-aspect hillslope in 2010. Precipitation, atmospheric conditions, soil-water content, matric potential, and runoff have been measured since the fire devegetated the site. Subsurface sampling of the vadose zone is accomplished using suction lysimeters to capture total nitrate, ammonium, and dissolved organic carbon concentrations. Darcian flux calculations of net infiltration from the shallow soil into fractured granodiorite bedrock are used to estimate solute fluxes to a deeper groundwater system. Virtual experiments using numerical models of unsaturated fluid flow and solute transport further elucidate the temporal dynamics of deep percolation and associated solute fluxes during spring snowmelt and frontal rainstorms, which are the major hydrologic drivers of deep percolation in this fire-impacted system. Together, these examples serve to illustrate the critical importance of deep percolation in disturbed landscapes. The

  9. Etude experimentale de la photoexcitation des colorants de type anthracene, azobenzene et thioindigo dans des matrices de cristaux liquides nematiques et smectiques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad, Bendaoud

    Nous avons étudié le comportement de différents colorants (tétracène et azobenzènes AZD3, DR1 et D2) dans des matrices de cristaux liquides (E7 et 5CB). Les résultats obtenus ont montré que la réorientation optique des molécules de cristaux liquides se produit à des intensités extrêmement faibles (~1 μW/cm 2). Nous avons attribué cet effet à l'interaction entre les molécules des colorants photoexcitées et celles des cristaux liquides hôtes. Ces interactions se produisent lorsque les molécules dichroïques exçitées transitent entre des états triplets intermédiaires tout en conduisant à la génération d'un nouveau moment optique géant, responsable de la réorientation des molécules. Le changement de la forme de la molécule du colorant, dû à l'isomérisation Trans-Cis , est à l'origine de la création de ce moment. Ce qui distingue notre réorientation moléculaire de celle obtenue sur d'autres systèmes hôtes-dopants est que les molécules sont repoussées du champ électrique de la lumière. Par ailleurs, cette réorientation est accompagnée d'une diffusion anisotrope des molécules excitées. Nous avons aussi étudié le cristal liquide PhBz rendu ferroélectrique en le dopant par des molécules thioindigos. En exploitant l'augmentation de la polarisation spontanée due à la photoisomérisation du colorant, nous avons pu réaliser un hologramme dynamique contrôlable par un champ optique assisté par une tension statique.

  10. Photoexcitation and cooling of positronium

    SciTech Connect

    Dermer, C.D.; Howell, R.H.; Jones, K.M.; Liang, E.P.; Magnotta, F.; Ziock, K.P.

    1988-08-01

    Our demonstration of multiple-photon resonant cycling between the 1/sup 3/S and 2/sup 3/P states of ortho-Positronium (oPs) makes possible the production of cold positronium (Ps) through the technique of laser cooling. A simplified analysis of magnetic mixing in excited-state Ps is given. This effect is important both as a diagnostic of resonant cycling and Ps cooling. The significance of cold Ps in fine structure measurements and the formation of a Bose-Einstein condensate is discussed. 13 refs., 3 figs.

  11. FORT UNION DEEP

    SciTech Connect

    Lyle A. Johnson Jr.

    2002-09-01

    Coalbed methane (CBM) is currently the hottest area of energy development in the Rocky Mountain area. The Powder River Basin (PRB) is the largest CBM area in Wyoming and has attracted the majority of the attention because of its high permeability and relatively shallow depth. Other Wyoming coal regions are also being targeted for development, but most of these areas have lower permeability and deeper coal seams. This project consists of the development of a CBM stimulation system for deep coal resources and involves three work areas: (1) Well Placement, (2) Well Stimulation, and (3) Production Monitoring and Evaluation. The focus of this project is the Washakie Basin. Timberline Energy, Inc., the cosponsor, has a project area in southern Carbon County, Wyoming, and northern Moffat County, Colorado. The target coal is found near the top of the lower Fort Union formation. The well for this project, Evans No.1, was drilled to a depth of 2,700 ft. Three coal seams were encountered with sandstone and some interbedded shale between seams. Well logs indicated that the coal seams and the sandstone contained gas. For the testing, the upper seam at 2,000 ft was selected. The well, drilled and completed for this project, produced very little water and only occasional burps of methane. To enhance the well, a mild severity fracture was conducted to fracture the coal seam and not the adjacent sandstone. Fracturing data indicated a fracture half-length of 34 ft, a coal permeability of 0.2226 md, and permeability of 15.3 md. Following fracturing, the gas production rate stabilized at 10 Mscf/day within water production of 18 bpd. The Western Research Institute (WRI) CBM model was used to design a 14-day stimulation cycle followed by a 30-day production period. A maximum injection pressure of 1,200 psig to remain well below the fracture pressure was selected. Model predictions were 20 Mscf/day of air injection for 14 days, a one-day shut-in, then flowback. The predicted flowback

  12. FORT UNION DEEP

    SciTech Connect

    Lyle A. Johnson Jr.

    2002-03-01

    Coalbed methane (CBM) is currently the hottest area of energy development in the Rocky Mountain area. The Powder River Basin (PRB) is the largest CBM area in Wyoming and has attracted the majority of the attention because of its high permeability and relatively shallow depth. Other Wyoming coal regions are also being targeted for development, but most of these areas have lower permeability and deeper coal seams. This project consists of the development of a CBM stimulation system for deep coal resources and involves three work areas: (1) Well Placement, (2) Well Stimulation, and (3) Production Monitoring and Evaluation. The focus of this project is the Washakie Basin. Timberline Energy, Inc., the cosponsor, has a project area in southern Carbon County, Wyoming, and northern Moffat County, Colorado. The target coal is found near the top of the lower Fort Union formation. The well for this project, Evans No.1, was drilled to a depth of 2,700 ft. Three coal seams were encountered with sandstone and some interbedded shale between seams. Well logs indicated that the coal seams and the sandstone contained gas. For the testing, the upper seam at 2,000 ft was selected. The well, drilled and completed for this project, produced very little water and only occasional burps of methane. To enhance the well, a mild severity fracture was conducted to fracture the coal seam and not the adjacent sandstone. Fracturing data indicated a fracture half-length of 34 ft, a coal permeability of 0.2226 md, and permeability of 15.3 md. Following fracturing, the gas production rate stabilized at 10 Mscf/day within water production of 18 bpd. The Western Research Institute (WRI) CBM model was used to design a 14-day stimulation cycle followed by a 30-day production period. A maximum injection pressure of 1,200 psig to remain well below the fracture pressure was selected. Model predictions were 20 Mscf/day of air injection for 14 days, a one-day shut-in, then flowback. The predicted flowback

  13. Making sense of deep sequencing.

    PubMed

    Goldman, D; Domschke, K

    2014-10-01

    This review, the first of an occasional series, tries to make sense of the concepts and uses of deep sequencing of polynucleic acids (DNA and RNA). Deep sequencing, synonymous with next-generation sequencing, high-throughput sequencing and massively parallel sequencing, includes whole genome sequencing but is more often and diversely applied to specific parts of the genome captured in different ways, for example the highly expressed portion of the genome known as the exome and portions of the genome that are epigenetically marked either by DNA methylation, the binding of proteins including histones, or that are in different configurations and thus more or less accessible to enzymes that cleave DNA. Deep sequencing of RNA (RNASeq) reverse-transcribed to complementary DNA is invaluable for measuring RNA expression and detecting changes in RNA structure. Important concepts in deep sequencing include the length and depth of sequence reads, mapping and assembly of reads, sequencing error, haplotypes, and the propensity of deep sequencing, as with other types of 'big data', to generate large numbers of errors, requiring monitoring for methodologic biases and strategies for replication and validation. Deep sequencing yields a unique genetic fingerprint that can be used to identify a person, and a trove of predictors of genetic medical diseases. Deep sequencing to identify epigenetic events including changes in DNA methylation and RNA expression can reveal the history and impact of environmental exposures. Because of the power of sequencing to identify and deliver biomedically significant information about a person and their blood relatives, it creates ethical dilemmas and practical challenges in research and clinical care, for example the decision and procedures to report incidental findings that will increasingly and frequently be discovered. PMID:24925306

  14. Deep space optical communications experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinman, P.; Katz, J.; Gagliardi, R.

    1983-01-01

    An optical communications experiment between a deep space vehicle and an earth terminal is under consideration for later in this decade. The experimental link would be incoherent (direct detection) and would employ two-way cooperative pointing. The deep space optical transceiver would ride piggyback on a spacecraft with an independent scientific objective. Thus, this optical transceiver is being designed for minimum spacecraft impact - specifically, low mass and low power. The choices of laser transmitter, coding/modulation scheme, and pointing mechanization are discussed. A representative telemetry link budget is presented.

  15. Stimulation Technologies for Deep Well Completions

    SciTech Connect

    2003-09-30

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring the Deep Trek Program targeted at improving the economics of drilling and completing deep gas wells. Under the DOE program, Pinnacle Technologies is conducting a study to evaluate the stimulation of deep wells. The objective of the project is to assess U.S. deep well drilling & stimulation activity, review rock mechanics & fracture growth in deep, high pressure/temperature wells and evaluate stimulation technology in several key deep plays. An assessment of historical deep gas well drilling activity and forecast of future trends was completed during the first six months of the project; this segment of the project was covered in Technical Project Report No. 1. The second progress report covers the next six months of the project during which efforts were primarily split between summarizing rock mechanics and fracture growth in deep reservoirs and contacting operators about case studies of deep gas well stimulation.

  16. STIMULATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR DEEP WELL COMPLETIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen Wolhart

    2003-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring a Deep Trek Program targeted at improving the economics of drilling and completing deep gas wells. Under the DOE program, Pinnacle Technologies is conducting a project to evaluate the stimulation of deep wells. The objective of the project is to assess U.S. deep well drilling & stimulation activity, review rock mechanics & fracture growth in deep, high pressure/temperature wells and evaluate stimulation technology in several key deep plays. Phase 1 was recently completed and consisted of assessing deep gas well drilling activity (1995-2007) and an industry survey on deep gas well stimulation practices by region. Of the 29,000 oil, gas and dry holes drilled in 2002, about 300 were drilled in the deep well; 25% were dry, 50% were high temperature/high pressure completions and 25% were simply deep completions. South Texas has about 30% of these wells, Oklahoma 20%, Gulf of Mexico Shelf 15% and the Gulf Coast about 15%. The Rockies represent only 2% of deep drilling. Of the 60 operators who drill deep and HTHP wells, the top 20 drill almost 80% of the wells. Six operators drill half the U.S. deep wells. Deep drilling peaked at 425 wells in 1998 and fell to 250 in 1999. Drilling is expected to rise through 2004 after which drilling should cycle down as overall drilling declines.

  17. Lessons from Earth's Deep Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soreghan, G. S.

    2005-01-01

    Earth is a repository of data on climatic changes from its deep-time history. Article discusses the collection and study of these data to predict future climatic changes, the need to create national study centers for the purpose, and the necessary cooperation between different branches of science in climatic research.

  18. Electrochemical Machining Removes Deep Obstructions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catania, Mark J.

    1987-01-01

    Electrochemical machining (ECM) is effective way of removing obstructing material between two deep holes supposed to intersect but do not because of misalignment of drilling tools. ECM makes it possible to rework costly castings otherwise scrapped. Method fast even for tough or hard alloys and complicated three-dimensional shapes.

  19. Ploughing the deep sea floor.

    PubMed

    Puig, Pere; Canals, Miquel; Company, Joan B; Martín, Jacobo; Amblas, David; Lastras, Galderic; Palanques, Albert

    2012-09-13

    Bottom trawling is a non-selective commercial fishing technique whereby heavy nets and gear are pulled along the sea floor. The direct impact of this technique on fish populations and benthic communities has received much attention, but trawling can also modify the physical properties of seafloor sediments, water–sediment chemical exchanges and sediment fluxes. Most of the studies addressing the physical disturbances of trawl gear on the seabed have been undertaken in coastal and shelf environments, however, where the capacity of trawling to modify the seafloor morphology coexists with high-energy natural processes driving sediment erosion, transport and deposition. Here we show that on upper continental slopes, the reworking of the deep sea floor by trawling gradually modifies the shape of the submarine landscape over large spatial scales. We found that trawling-induced sediment displacement and removal from fishing grounds causes the morphology of the deep sea floor to become smoother over time, reducing its original complexity as shown by high-resolution seafloor relief maps. Our results suggest that in recent decades, following the industrialization of fishing fleets, bottom trawling has become an important driver of deep seascape evolution. Given the global dimension of this type of fishery, we anticipate that the morphology of the upper continental slope in many parts of the world’s oceans could be altered by intensive bottom trawling, producing comparable effects on the deep sea floor to those generated by agricultural ploughing on land. PMID:22951970

  20. A Deep-Sea Simulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montes, Georgia E.

    1997-01-01

    Describes an activity that simulates exploration techniques used in deep-sea explorations and teaches students how this technology can be used to take a closer look inside volcanoes, inspect hazardous waste sites such as nuclear reactors, and explore other environments dangerous to humans. (DDR)

  1. Creating food for deep space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendel, JoAnna

    2014-07-01

    Explorers and scientists have to eat, whether they're on top of a mountain, deep in the sea, or in space. NASA scientists are working to develop a viable food program by 2030 that could feed six crew members for a 3-year mission to Mars.

  2. Deep Impact on Launch Pad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Deep Impact awaits launch from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. on Jan. 12, 2005.

    The spacecraft will travel to comet Tempel 1 and release an impactor, creating a crater on the surface of the comet. Scientists believe the exposed materials may give clues to the formation of our solar system.

  3. Diagnosis of deep vein thrombosis.

    PubMed Central

    Douketis, J. D.; Ginsberg, J. S.

    1996-01-01

    Deep vein thrombosis (DVT), a common disease, can be difficult to diagnose because its clinical features are nonspecific. Venography is the standard test, but other less expensive, easily performed, noninvasive tests are available. At present, duplex ultrasonography is the noninvasive test of choice. PMID:8616289

  4. Digging Deeper: The Deep Web.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Laura

    2001-01-01

    Focuses on the Deep Web, defined as Web content in searchable databases of the type that can be found only by direct query. Discusses the problems of indexing; inability to find information not indexed in the search engine's database; and metasearch engines. Describes 10 sites created to access online databases or directly search them. Lists ways…

  5. Stimulation Technologies for Deep Well Completions

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen Wolhart

    2005-06-30

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring the Deep Trek Program targeted at improving the economics of drilling and completing deep gas wells. Under the DOE program, Pinnacle Technologies conducted a study to evaluate the stimulation of deep wells. The objective of the project was to review U.S. deep well drilling and stimulation activity, review rock mechanics and fracture growth in deep, high-pressure/temperature wells and evaluate stimulation technology in several key deep plays. This report documents results from this project.

  6. DeepSurveyCam--A Deep Ocean Optical Mapping System.

    PubMed

    Kwasnitschka, Tom; Köser, Kevin; Sticklus, Jan; Rothenbeck, Marcel; Weiß, Tim; Wenzlaff, Emanuel; Schoening, Timm; Triebe, Lars; Steinführer, Anja; Devey, Colin; Greinert, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Underwater photogrammetry and in particular systematic visual surveys of the deep sea are by far less developed than similar techniques on land or in space. The main challenges are the rough conditions with extremely high pressure, the accessibility of target areas (container and ship deployment of robust sensors, then diving for hours to the ocean floor), and the limitations of localization technologies (no GPS). The absence of natural light complicates energy budget considerations for deep diving flash-equipped drones. Refraction effects influence geometric image formation considerations with respect to field of view and focus, while attenuation and scattering degrade the radiometric image quality and limit the effective visibility. As an improvement on the stated issues, we present an AUV-based optical system intended for autonomous visual mapping of large areas of the seafloor (square kilometers) in up to 6000 m water depth. We compare it to existing systems and discuss tradeoffs such as resolution vs. mapped area and show results from a recent deployment with 90,000 mapped square meters of deep ocean floor. PMID:26828495

  7. DeepSurveyCam—A Deep Ocean Optical Mapping System

    PubMed Central

    Kwasnitschka, Tom; Köser, Kevin; Sticklus, Jan; Rothenbeck, Marcel; Weiß, Tim; Wenzlaff, Emanuel; Schoening, Timm; Triebe, Lars; Steinführer, Anja; Devey, Colin; Greinert, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Underwater photogrammetry and in particular systematic visual surveys of the deep sea are by far less developed than similar techniques on land or in space. The main challenges are the rough conditions with extremely high pressure, the accessibility of target areas (container and ship deployment of robust sensors, then diving for hours to the ocean floor), and the limitations of localization technologies (no GPS). The absence of natural light complicates energy budget considerations for deep diving flash-equipped drones. Refraction effects influence geometric image formation considerations with respect to field of view and focus, while attenuation and scattering degrade the radiometric image quality and limit the effective visibility. As an improvement on the stated issues, we present an AUV-based optical system intended for autonomous visual mapping of large areas of the seafloor (square kilometers) in up to 6000 m water depth. We compare it to existing systems and discuss tradeoffs such as resolution vs. mapped area and show results from a recent deployment with 90,000 mapped square meters of deep ocean floor. PMID:26828495

  8. Deep Space 1 in Cleanroom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Deep Space 1 was launched in October 1998 as part of NASA's New Millennium Program, which is managed by JPL for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. The California Institute of Technology in Pasadena manages JPL for NASA. Deep Space 1 used a unique ion drive propulsion system. Unlike the fireworks of most chemical rockets using solid or liquid fuels, the ion drive emits only an eerie blue glow as ionized (electrically charged) atoms of xenon are pushed out of the engine. Xenon is the same gas found in photo flash tubes and many lighthouse bulbs. The almost imperceptible thrust from the system is equivalent to the pressure exerted by a sheet of paper held in the palm of your hand. The ion engine is very slow to pick up speed, but over the long haul it can deliver 10 times as much thrust per pound of fuel as more traditional rockets. Previous ion propulsion systems, like those found on some communications satellites, were not used as the main engines, but only to keep the satellites on track. Deep Space 1 is the first spacecraft to use this important technology as its primary means of propulsion. The importance of ion propulsion is its great efficiency,' says Dr. Marc Rayman, project manager for Deep Space 1. 'It uses very little propellant, and that means it weighs less so it can use a less expensive launch vehicle and ultimately go much faster than other spacecraft. This opens the solar system to many future exciting missions which otherwise would have been unaffordable or even impossible,' added Dr. Rayman. The ion particles travel out at about 68,000 miles per hour. However, Deep Space 1 doesn't move that fast in the other direction, because it is much heavier than the ion particles. By the end of the mission, the ion engine will have changed the spacecraft's speed by about 6,800 mph (over 11,000 kph). The technology is so efficient that it only consumes about 3.5 ounces (100 g) of xenon per day, taking about four days to expend just one pound (0.4 kg

  9. Eco-Philosophy and Deep Ecology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skolimowski, Henryk

    1988-01-01

    Criticizes the Deep Ecology Movement as a new ecological world view. Discusses the limits of this philosophy including its views of destiny, evolution and cosmology. Concludes that although its intentions are admirable, Deep Ecology leaves too much unanswered. (CW)

  10. Deep Brain Stimulation Tested for Early Alzheimer's

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160137.html Deep Brain Stimulation Tested for Early Alzheimer's Although treatment seems ... 2016 THURSDAY, July 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Deep brain stimulation appears safe for people with early Alzheimer's ...

  11. Deep learning for computational biology.

    PubMed

    Angermueller, Christof; Pärnamaa, Tanel; Parts, Leopold; Stegle, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Technological advances in genomics and imaging have led to an explosion of molecular and cellular profiling data from large numbers of samples. This rapid increase in biological data dimension and acquisition rate is challenging conventional analysis strategies. Modern machine learning methods, such as deep learning, promise to leverage very large data sets for finding hidden structure within them, and for making accurate predictions. In this review, we discuss applications of this new breed of analysis approaches in regulatory genomics and cellular imaging. We provide background of what deep learning is, and the settings in which it can be successfully applied to derive biological insights. In addition to presenting specific applications and providing tips for practical use, we also highlight possible pitfalls and limitations to guide computational biologists when and how to make the most use of this new technology. PMID:27474269

  12. The LSST Deep Drilling Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, R. L.; Brandt, W. N.; Cook, K. H.; Lacy, M.; Dhital, S.; LSST Deep Drilling Interest Group

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 10% of LSST's survey time will be dedicated to mini-surveys designed to enhance science beyond the Wide, Fast Deep (WFD) mode of typical LSST operations. One planned type of mini-survey is the Deep Drilling (DD) program, which proposes to survey a limited number of fields to deeper limiting magnitudes and with higher cadence than the WFD baseline. By observing more frequently and using many filters during each sequence, the DD program will provide rich data sets for discovering and characterizing supernovae and other transient objects. By observing to much deeper limiting magnitudes, the DD program delivers higher SNR for galaxy shape and photometric redshift measurements, providing a clean calibration sample to correct for biases within the WFD, and will also detect objects to much higher redshifts. Deep drilling fields will be targeted towards a wide range of science goals, including discovering faint (r=27) solar system objects to explore planetesimal size distributions, characterizing L and T dwarfs by adding deeper i band exposures, and obtaining dense light curves for variable stars and transients within our Local Group. A DD Interest Group, drawn from the LSST Science Collaborations, has been tasked with exploring deep drilling program implementations. Members of this group have written a series of white papers, available on the web, detailing their various science goals and observational requirements. The LSST Operations Simulation group has completed a first set of runs to investigate how these requirements mesh with the overall survey; preliminary analysis of these runs is presented here. The first four DD pointings have been announced by the LSST Science Council to provide opportunities for precovery or multiwavelength surveys, and are discussed here. Further refinement of the DD program to optimize science return of both DD and WFD fields will continue until shortly before the start of LSST operations.

  13. Deep Imaging of Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauvin, G.

    2010-10-01

    With the development of high contrast imaging instruments and techniques, vast efforts have been devoted during the past decade to detect and characterize lighter, cooler and closer companions to nearby stars, and ultimately image new planetary systems. Complementary to other observing techniques (radial velocity, transit, micro-lensing, pulsar-timing and astrometry), this approach has opened a new astrophysical window to study the physical properties and the formation and evolution mechanisms of giant planets at orbits larger than a few AUs. In this review, I will briefly present the main motivations to use deep imaging to search for exoplanets and review the constant progress achieved thanks to improved performances of advanced instrumentation and data analysis techniques. I will describe the main classes of stars identified and observed so far to increase the chances of detection. I will also detail the classical strategy adopted to identify false alarms and characterize true companions. I will review the current status of the different deep imaging surveys as well as the main results that recently led to the discovery of giant planets probably formed like the ones of our solar system. Finally, I will rise the questions and uncertainties related to the formation mechanisms, the physical properties and the frequency of these planetary mass companions to conclude with the exciting and attractive perspectives offered with the future generation of deep imaging instruments.

  14. EHR Big Data Deep Phenotyping

    PubMed Central

    Lenert, L.; Lopez-Campos, G.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objectives Given the quickening speed of discovery of variant disease drivers from combined patient genotype and phenotype data, the objective is to provide methodology using big data technology to support the definition of deep phenotypes in medical records. Methods As the vast stores of genomic information increase with next generation sequencing, the importance of deep phenotyping increases. The growth of genomic data and adoption of Electronic Health Records (EHR) in medicine provides a unique opportunity to integrate phenotype and genotype data into medical records. The method by which collections of clinical findings and other health related data are leveraged to form meaningful phenotypes is an active area of research. Longitudinal data stored in EHRs provide a wealth of information that can be used to construct phenotypes of patients. We focus on a practical problem around data integration for deep phenotype identification within EHR data. The use of big data approaches are described that enable scalable markup of EHR events that can be used for semantic and temporal similarity analysis to support the identification of phenotype and genotype relationships. Conclusions Stead and colleagues’ 2005 concept of using light standards to increase the productivity of software systems by riding on the wave of hardware/processing power is described as a harbinger for designing future healthcare systems. The big data solution, using flexible markup, provides a route to improved utilization of processing power for organizing patient records in genotype and phenotype research. PMID:25123744

  15. Angle-resolved electron-energy-loss study of core-level electron excitation in molecules: Determination of the generalized oscillator strength for the carbon 1 s (2. sigma. sub g r arrow 2. pi. sub u ) excitation in CO sub 2

    SciTech Connect

    Boechat Roberty, H.M.; Bielschowsky, C.E.; de Souza, G.G.B. )

    1991-08-01

    As part of a systematic, quantitative study of the angle dependence of core-level-electron excitation by electron impact, we have determined the generalized oscillator strength (GOS) for the carbon 1{ital s}(2{sigma}{sub {ital g}}{r arrow}2{pi}{sub {ital u}}) transition in CO{sub 2}. The experimental results were obtained at an impact energy of 1290 eV, in the angular range of 2{degree}--14{degree}, with an energy resolution of 0.9 eV. Theoretical values for the GOS were also obtained, using {ital ab} {ital initio} Hartree-Fock molecular wave functions and allowing for the relaxation of all the molecular orbitals in the determination of the excited-state wave function.

  16. The deep Canary poleward undercurrent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velez-Belchi, P. J.; Hernandez-Guerra, A.; González-Pola, C.; Fraile, E.; Collins, C. A.; Machín, F.

    2012-12-01

    Poleward undercurrents are well known features in Eastern Boundary systems. In the California upwelling system (CalCEBS), the deep poleward flow has been observed along the entire outer continental shelf and upper-slope, using indirect methods based on geostrophic estimates and also using direct current measurements. The importance of the poleward undercurrents in the CalCEBS, among others, is to maintain its high productivity by means of the transport of equatorial Pacific waters all the way northward to Vancouver Island and the subpolar gyre but there is also concern about the low oxygen concentration of these waters. However, in the case of the Canary Current Eastern Boundary upwelling system (CanCEBS), there are very few observations of the poleward undercurrent. Most of these observations are short-term mooring records, or drifter trajectories of the upper-slope flow. Hence, the importance of the subsurface poleward flow in the CanCEBS has been only hypothesized. Moreover, due to the large differences between the shape of the coastline and topography between the California and the Canary Current system, the results obtained for the CalCEBS are not completely applicable to the CanCEBS. In this study we report the first direct observations of the continuity of the deep poleward flow of the Canary Deep Poleward undercurrent (CdPU) in the North-Africa sector of the CanCEBS, and one of the few direct observations in the North-Africa sector of the Canary Current eastern boundary. The results indicate that the Canary Island archipelago disrupts the deep poleward undercurrent even at depths where the flow is not blocked by the bathymetry. The deep poleward undercurrent flows west around the eastern-most islands and north east of the Conception Bank to rejoin the intermittent branch that follows the African slope in the Lanzarote Passage. This hypothesis is consistent with the AAIW found west of Lanzarote, as far as 17 W. But also, this hypothesis would be coherent

  17. Deep water recycling through time

    PubMed Central

    Magni, Valentina; Bouilhol, Pierre; van Hunen, Jeroen

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the dehydration processes in subduction zones and their implications for the water cycle throughout Earth's history. We use a numerical tool that combines thermo-mechanical models with a thermodynamic database to examine slab dehydration for present-day and early Earth settings and its consequences for the deep water recycling. We investigate the reactions responsible for releasing water from the crust and the hydrated lithospheric mantle and how they change with subduction velocity (vs), slab age (a) and mantle temperature (Tm). Our results show that faster slabs dehydrate over a wide area: they start dehydrating shallower and they carry water deeper into the mantle. We parameterize the amount of water that can be carried deep into the mantle, W (×105 kg/m2), as a function of vs (cm/yr), a (Myrs), and Tm (°C):. We generally observe that a 1) 100°C increase in the mantle temperature, or 2) ∼15 Myr decrease of plate age, or 3) decrease in subduction velocity of ∼2 cm/yr all have the same effect on the amount of water retained in the slab at depth, corresponding to a decrease of ∼2.2×105 kg/m2 of H2O. We estimate that for present-day conditions ∼26% of the global influx water, or 7×108 Tg/Myr of H2O, is recycled into the mantle. Using a realistic distribution of subduction parameters, we illustrate that deep water recycling might still be possible in early Earth conditions, although its efficiency would generally decrease. Indeed, 0.5–3.7 × 108 Tg/Myr of H2O could still be recycled in the mantle at 2.8 Ga. Key Points Deep water recycling might be possible even in early Earth conditions We provide a scaling law to estimate the amount of H2O flux deep into the mantle Subduction velocity has a a major control on the crustal dehydration pattern PMID:26321881

  18. Single site double core level ionisation of OCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedin, L.; Tashiro, M.; Linusson, P.; Eland, J. H. D.; Ehara, M.; Ueda, K.; Zhaunerchyk, V.; Karlsson, L.; Feifel, R.

    2014-08-01

    Single site O1s, C1s and S2p double ionisation of the OCS molecule has been investigated using a magnetic bottle multi-electron coincidence time-of-flight spectrometer. Photon energies of 1300, 750 and 520 eV, respectively, were used for the ionisation, and spectra were obtained from which the double core ionisation energies could be determined. The energies measured for 1s double ionisation are 1172 eV (O1s-2) and 659 eV (C1s-2). For the S2p double ionisation three dicationic states are expected, 3P, 1D and 1S. The ionisation energies obtained for these states are 373 eV (3P), 380 eV (1D) and 388 eV (1S). The ratio between the double and single core ionisation energies are in all cases equal or close to 2.20. Auger spectra of OCS, associated with the O1s-2, C1s-2 and S2p-2 dicationic states, were also recorded incorporating both electrons emitted as a result of the filling of the two core vacancies. As for other small molecules, the spectra show an atomic-like character with Auger bands located in the range 480-560 eV for oxygen, 235-295 eV for carbon and 100-160 eV for sulphur. The interpretation of the spectra is supported by CASSCF and CASCI calculations. The cross section ratio between double and single core hole creation was estimated as 3.7 × 10-4 for oxygen at 1300 eV, 3.7 × 10-4 for carbon at 750 eV and as 2.2 × 10-3 for sulphur at 520 eV.

  19. Core-level shifts from density-functional computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedocchi, Luca; Russo, Nino; Salahub, Dennis R.

    1993-05-01

    The C 1s x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy binding energies of a series of organic (CO, CH4, C2H2, HCHO, CH3CCH, C6H6) and inorganic [Ni(CO)4, Mo(CO)6] molecules have been calculated by using the linear-combination of Gaussian-type orbitals local- and nonlocal-spin-density (LCGTO-LSD and LCGTO-NLSD) methods. The calculated C 1s chemical shifts are in very good agreement with experiment. The differences between experimental and theoretical shifts are found to be less than 0.5 eV. It is shown that the addition of nonlocal corrections improves the agreement with the experimental data.

  20. Unifying principles of the deep terrestrial and deep marine biospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colwell, Frederick S.; Smith, Richard P.

    Recent estimates of the amount of microbial biomass in the combined marine and terrestrial subsurface boost this portion of the biosphere to a level which needs to be considered when integrating where life exists on our planet. Additionally, the subsurface serves practical needs associated with groundwater, waste disposal, and resource recovery. Although our view of this isolated ecosystem is restricted by technologies used to access samples, we are learning more about places where life thrives in the subsurface and where life is severely repressed. Until studies of hyperthermophiles provide different information, a thermal boundary to life exists at the 120°C isotherm. Other locations in the subsurface are barren where they are impoverished by low fluid flux to supply electron donors and acceptors or by limited pore space in which microorganisms can reside. Examples of such locations include deep vadose zones and igneous rock masses with limited fractures. In contrast, subsurface locations that show evidence of gaseous or liquid flux are the most likely to yield higher numbers of microorganisms. Locations that have marine and terrestrial hydrothermal convection cells, active methane venting, solid-liquid-gas phase changes, as well as zones of salinity and porosity contrasts are all examples of demonstrated or potential subsurface oases. Our ability to conceptualize and quantify the subsurface biosphere will be accelerated by new sampling tools and molecular characterization methods for microbes. The merging of disparate disciplines such as microbiology, geophysics, and tectonic research will extend our ability to fully comprehend the deep biosphere.

  1. The deep Ionian Basin revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tugend, Julie; Chamot-Rooke, Nicolas; Arsenikos, Stavros; Frizon de Lamotte, Dominique; Blanpied, Christian

    2016-04-01

    The deep Eastern Mediterranean Basins (Ionian and Herodotus) are characterized by thick sedimentary sequences overlying an extremely thinned basement evidenced from different geophysical methods. Yet, the nature of the crust (continental or oceanic) and the timing of the extreme crustal and lithosphere thinning in the different sub-basins remain highly controversial, casting doubts on the tectonic setting related to the formation of this segment of the North Gondwana paleo-margin. We focus on the Ionian Basin located at the western termination of the Eastern Mediterranean with the aim of identifying, characterizing and mapping the deepest sedimentary sequences. We present tentative age correlations relying on calibrations and observations from the surrounding margins and basins (Malta shelf and Escarpment, Cyrenaica margin, Sirte Basin, Apulian Platform). Two-ship deep refraction seismic data (Expanding Spread Profiles from the PASIPHAE cruise) combined with reprocessed reflection data (from the ARCHIMEDE survey) enabled us to present a homogeneous seismic stratigraphy across the basin and to investigate the velocity structure of its basement. Based on our results, and on a review of geological and geophysical observations, we suggest an Upper Triassic-Early Dogger age for the formation of the deep Ionian Basin. The nature of the underlying basement remains uncertain, both highly-thinned continental and slow-spreading type oceanic crust being compatible with the available constraints. The narrow size and relatively short-lived evolution of the Ionian Basin lead us to suggest that it is more likely the remnant of an immature oceanic basin than of a stable oceanic domain. Eventually, upscaling these results at the scale of the Eastern Mediterranean Basins highlights the complex interaction observed between two propagating oceans: The Central Atlantic and Neo-Tethys.

  2. Advanced deep sea diving equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danesi, W. A.

    1972-01-01

    Design requirements are generated for a deep sea heavy duty diving system to equip salvage divers with equipment and tools that permit work of the same quality and in times approaching that done on the surface. The system consists of a helmet, a recirculator for removing carbon dioxide, and the diver's dress. The diver controls the inlet flow by the recirculatory control valve and is able to change closed cycle operation to open cycle if malfunction occurs. Proper function of the scrubber in the recirculator minimizes temperature and humidity effects as it filters the returning air.

  3. Delving into the Deep Biosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grim, S. L.; Sogin, M. L.; Boetius, A.; Briggs, B. R.; Brazelton, W. J.; D'Hondt, S. L.; Edwards, K. J.; Fisk, M. R.; Gaidos, E.; Gralnick, J.; Hinrichs, K.; Lazar, C.; Lavalleur, H.; Lever, M. A.; Marteinsson, V.; Moser, D. P.; Orcutt, B.; Pedersen, K.; Popa, R.; Ramette, A.; Schrenk, M. O.; Sylvan, J. B.; Smith, A. R.; Teske, A.; Walsh, E. A.; Colwell, F. S.

    2013-12-01

    The Census of Deep Life organized an international survey of microbial community diversity in terrestrial and marine deep subsurface environments. Habitats included subsurface continental fractured rock aquifers, volcanic and metamorphic subseafloor sedimentary units from the open ocean, subsurface oxic and anoxic sediments and underlying basaltic oceanic crust, and their overlying water columns. Our survey employed high-throughput pyrosequencing of the hypervariable V4-V6 16S rRNA gene of bacteria and archaea. We detected 1292 bacterial genera representing 40 phyla, and 99 archaeal genera from 30 phyla. Of these, a core group of thirteen bacterial genera occurred in every environment. A genus of the South African Goldmine Group (Euryarchaeota) was always present whenever archaea were detected. Members of the rare biosphere in one system often represented highly abundant taxa in other environments. Dispersal could account for this observation but mechanisms of transport remain elusive. Ralstonia (Betaproteobacteria) represented highly abundant taxa in marine communities and terrestrial rock, but generally low abundance organisms in groundwater. Some of these taxa could represent sample contamination, and their extensive distribution in several systems requires further assessment. An unknown Sphingobacteriales (Bacteroidetes) genus, Stenotrophomonas (Gammaproteobacteria), Acidovorax and Aquabacterium (both Betaproteobacteria), a Chlorobiales genus, and a TM7 genus were in the core group as well but more prevalent in terrestrial environments. Similarly, Bacillus (Firmicutes), a new cyanobacterial genus, Bradyrhizobium and Sphingomonas (both Alphaproteobacteria), a novel Acidobacteriaceae genus, and Variovorax (Betaproteobacteria) frequently occurred in marine systems but represented low abundance taxa in other environments. Communities tended to cluster by biome and material, and many genera were unique to systems. For example, certain Rhizobiales

  4. Science and Deep Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon-Miller, Amy

    2011-01-01

    Have you ever wondered about the science goals of various deep space missions? Or why scientists want such seemingly complicated spacecraft and operations scenarios? With a focus on outer planets) this talk will cover the scientific goals and results of several recent and future missions) how scientists approach a requirements flow down) and how the disparate needs of mission engineers and scientists can come together for mission success. It will also touch on several up and coming technologies and how they will change mission architectures in the future.

  5. Exploring life's limits: Deep geobiochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, A. D.

    2014-12-01

    N-dimensional chemical space on Earth and beyond produces diverse habitats for microbial activity. Hydrothermal environments cover a wide range of habitable space up to and including life's known limits and provide a window into deep geological, geochemical, and biological processes. Hydrothermal water compositions, as sampled from and measured in terrestrial hot springs on Earth's surface, vary in chemical constituent speciation and concentrations over orders of magnitude in a plethora of geochemical parameters with biological significance, including hydronium ion, sulfide, iron, zinc, magnesium, manganese, and molybdenum. Proteins provide a link between geochemistry and microbial activity by catalyzing chemical reactions. Proteins extracted and identified by tandem mass spectrometry from 13 hot spring sediments and biofilms - covering pH values from 2-9 and diverse geochemical compositions - function as efflux transporters, permeases, electron transporters, and others, suggesting that these processes were present in the environment and occurring at the time of sampling. Metalloenzymes have been identified, including the iron protein rubrerythrin, thought to be involved in oxidative stress protection in anaerobic bacteria and archaea, as well as proteins involved in macronutrient processing (carbon, phosphorus, nitrogen, and sulfur). The melding of biochemistry with geochemistry shows potential for quantifying microbial activity in deep environments by demonstrating the presence - and as techniques improve, relative abundances - of reaction-catalyzing enzymes. Moreover, using hot spring sources and their outflow channels as chemical and biological models of geologic time helps decipher the origin and co-evolution of life and geochemistry.

  6. Deep Space 1 Technology Demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The completely assembled Deep Space 1 (DS-1) technology demonstrator spacecraft. The DS-1 spacecraft incorporates a number of advanced technology concepts in its mission, but none so 'high profile' as its Ion propulsion system. The name itself evokes visions of Star Trek and science fiction fantasy, although the idea actually dates from the 1950s. However, unlike the 'Warp Drive' propulsion system that zings the fictional starship Enterprise across the cosmos in minutes, the almost imperceptible thrust from the ion propulsion system is equivalent to the pressure exerted by a sheet of paper held in the palm of your hand. The ion engine is very slow to pick up speed, but over the long haul it can deliver 10 times as much thrust per pound of fuel as more traditional rockets. Unlike the fireworks of most chemical rockets using solid or liquid fuels, the ion drive emits only an eerie blue glow as ionized (electrically charged) atoms of xenon are pushed out of the engine. Xenon is the same gas found in photo flash tubes and many lighthouse bulbs. Deep Space 1 was launched in October 1998 as part of NASA's New Millennium Program, which is managed by JPL for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. The California Institute of Technology in Pasadena manages JPL for NASA.

  7. Density functionals from deep learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahon, Jeffrey

    Density-functional theory is a formally exact description of a many-body quantum system in terms of its density; in practice, however, approximations to the universal density functional (DF) are necessary. Machine learning has recently been proposed as a novel approach to discover such a DF (or components of it). Conventional machine learning algorithms, however, are limited in their ability to process data in their raw form, leading to invariance and/or sensitivity issues. In this presentation, an alternative approach based on deep learning will be demonstrated. Deep learning allows computational models that are capable of discovering intricate structure in large and/or high-dimensional data sets with multiple levels of abstraction, and do not suffer from the aforementioned issues. Results from the application of this approach to the prediction of the kinetic-energy DF of noninteracting electrons will be presented. Using theoretical results from computer science, a connection between the underlying model and the theorems of Hohenberg and Kohn will also be suggested.

  8. Geologic studies of deep natural gas resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dyman, T. S., (Edited By); Kuuskraa, V.A.

    2001-01-01

    In 1995, the USGS estimated a mean resource of 114 trillion cubic feet of undiscovered technically recoverable natural gas in plays deeper than 15,000 feet/4,572 meters in onshore regions of the United States. This volume summarizes major conclusions of ongoing work. Chapters A and B address the areal extent of drilling and distribution of deep basins in the U.S. Chapter C summarizes distribution of deep sedimentary basins and potential for deep gas in the former Soviet Union. Chapters D and E are geochemical papers addressing source-rock issues and deep gas generation. Chapter F develops a probabilistic method for subdividing gas resources into depth slices, and chapter G analyzes the relative uncertainty of estimates of deep gas in plays in the Gulf Coast Region. Chapter H evaluates the mechanism of hydrogenation of deep, high-rank spent kerogen by water, with subsequent generation of methane-rich HC gas.

  9. The deep space network, volume 13

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The objectives, functions, and organization of the Deep Space Network are summarized. The deep space instrumentation facility, the ground communications facility, and the network control system are described. Other areas reported include: Helios Mission support, DSN support of the Mariner Mars 1971 extended mission, Mariner Venus/Mercury 1973 mission support, Viking mission support, radio science, tracking and ground-based navigation, network control and data processing, and deep space stations.

  10. Deep CCD/G750M Wavecals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitherer, Claus

    2000-07-01

    Deep wavecals are needed for the long wavelength setting of G750M. Dr. T Gull has noticed wavelength dispersion errors on the order of 1 pixel in the overlap regions of the long wavelength settings of G750M for his GTO and GO Eta Carina long slit spectra. No deep post-launch wavecals exist for these wavelengths. The standard GO wavecals are not deep enough to accurately determine the dispersion relation.

  11. Deep cleaning--valid or publicity stunt?

    PubMed

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2008-03-01

    While deep cleaning is not new--hospitals have undertaken deep cleans ward-by-ward for some time, often following a "superbug" outbreak, Health Secretary Alan Johnson and Prime Minister Gordon Brown both emphasised on announcing the mandate that this was the first time all English NHS hospitals had been asked to deep clean their entire site, "restoring surfaces and fabrics to as close as possible as their original condition". PMID:18411818

  12. Deep Ultrasound Enhancements Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Quarry, M; Thomas, G; Ward, W; Gardner, D

    2006-05-01

    This study involves collaboration between Los Alamos National Laboratory and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to enhance and optimize LANL's ultrasonic inspection capabilities for production. Deep-penetrating ultrasonic testing enhancement studies will extend the current capabilities, which only look for disbonds. Current ultrasonic methods in production use 15-20 MHz to inspect for disbonds. The enhanced capabilities use 5 MHz to penetrate to the back surface and image the back surface for any flaws. The enhanced capabilities for back surface inspection use transducers and squirter modifications that can be incorporated into the existing production system. In a production setup the current 15-20 MHz transducer and squirter would perform a bond inspection, followed by a deep inspection that would be performed by simply swapping out the 5 MHz transducer and squirter. Surrogate samples were manufactured of beryllium and bismuth to perform the ultrasonic enhancement studies. The samples were used to simulate flaws on the back surface and study ultrasound's ability to image them. The ultrasonic technique was optimized by performing experiments with these samples and analyzing transducer performance in detecting flaws in the surrogate. Beam patterns were also studied experimentally using a steel ball reflector to measure beam patterns, focal points, and sensitivities to better understand the relationship between design and performance. Many transducers were evaluated including transducers from LANL's production system, LLNL, and other commercially available transducers. Squirter design was also analyzed while performing experiments Flat-bottom holes and ball-mill defects of various sizes were introduced into the samples for experimentation. Flaws depths were varied from .020'' to 0.060'', and diameters varied from 0.0625'' to 0.187''. The smallest defect, .020'' depth and 0.0625'', was detected. Ultrasonic amplitude features produced better images than time

  13. Deep learning in neural networks: an overview.

    PubMed

    Schmidhuber, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, deep artificial neural networks (including recurrent ones) have won numerous contests in pattern recognition and machine learning. This historical survey compactly summarizes relevant work, much of it from the previous millennium. Shallow and Deep Learners are distinguished by the depth of their credit assignment paths, which are chains of possibly learnable, causal links between actions and effects. I review deep supervised learning (also recapitulating the history of backpropagation), unsupervised learning, reinforcement learning & evolutionary computation, and indirect search for short programs encoding deep and large networks. PMID:25462637

  14. The deep ocean under climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Lisa A.; Le Bris, Nadine

    2015-11-01

    The deep ocean absorbs vast amounts of heat and carbon dioxide, providing a critical buffer to climate change but exposing vulnerable ecosystems to combined stresses of warming, ocean acidification, deoxygenation, and altered food inputs. Resulting changes may threaten biodiversity and compromise key ocean services that maintain a healthy planet and human livelihoods. There exist large gaps in understanding of the physical and ecological feedbacks that will occur. Explicit recognition of deep-ocean climate mitigation and inclusion in adaptation planning by the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) could help to expand deep-ocean research and observation and to protect the integrity and functions of deep-ocean ecosystems.

  15. Stimulation Technologies for Deep Well Completions

    SciTech Connect

    2004-03-31

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring the Deep Trek Program targeted at improving the economics of drilling and completing deep gas wells. Under the DOE program, Pinnacle Technologies is conducting a study to evaluate the stimulation of deep wells. The objective of the project is to assess U.S. deep well drilling and stimulation activity, review rock mechanics and fracture growth in deep, high-pressure/temperature wells and evaluate stimulation technology in several key deep plays. An assessment of historical deep gas well drilling activity and forecast of future trends was completed during the first six months of the project; this segment of the project was covered in Technical Progress Report No. 1. During the next six months, efforts were primarily split between summarizing rock mechanics and fracture growth in deep reservoirs and contacting operators about case studies of deep gas well stimulation as documented in Technical Progress Report No. 2. This report details work done with Anadarko and ChevronTexaco in the Table Rock Field in Wyoming.

  16. Photophysical studies of chromium sensitizers designed for excited state hole transfer to semiconductors and sequential hole/electron transfers from photoexcited cadmium sulfide nanorods to mononuclear ruthenium water-oxidation catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Huan-Wei

    a photoexcited cadmium sulfide nanorod and [Ru(diethyl 2,2'-bipyridine-4,4'-dicarboxylate)(2,2':6',2"-terpyridine)Cl] +, a mononuclear water-oxidation catalyst. Upon photoexcitation, hole transfer from the cadmium sulfide nanorod oxidizes the catalyst (Ru 2+ → Ru3+) on a 100 ps to 1 ns timescale. This is followed by electron transfer (10-100 ns) from the nanorod to reduce the Ru3+ center. The relatively slow electron transfer dynamics may provide opportunities for the accumulation of multiple holes at the catalyst, which is required for water oxidation.

  17. Wireless magnetothermal deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ritchie; Romero, Gabriela; Christiansen, Michael G; Mohr, Alan; Anikeeva, Polina

    2015-03-27

    Wireless deep brain stimulation of well-defined neuronal populations could facilitate the study of intact brain circuits and the treatment of neurological disorders. Here, we demonstrate minimally invasive and remote neural excitation through the activation of the heat-sensitive capsaicin receptor TRPV1 by magnetic nanoparticles. When exposed to alternating magnetic fields, the nanoparticles dissipate heat generated by hysteresis, triggering widespread and reversible firing of TRPV1(+) neurons. Wireless magnetothermal stimulation in the ventral tegmental area of mice evoked excitation in subpopulations of neurons in the targeted brain region and in structures receiving excitatory projections. The nanoparticles persisted in the brain for over a month, allowing for chronic stimulation without the need for implants and connectors. PMID:25765068

  18. RFI receiver. [deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lay, R.

    1980-01-01

    An S-band radio frequency interference (RFI) receiver to analyze and identify sources of RFI problems in the Deep Space Network DSN tracking stations is described. The RFI receiver is a constant gain, double conversion, open loop receiver with dual sine/cosine channel outputs, providing a total of 20 MHZ monitoring capability. This receiver is computer controlled using a MODCOMP II miniprocessor. The RFI receiver has been designed to operate at a 150 Kelvin system noise temperature accomplished by cascading two low noise field effect transistor (FET) amplifiers for the receiver front-end. The first stage low noise FET amplifier is mounted at the feed horn to minimize any cable losses to achieve a lower system noise temperature. The receiver is tunable over the frequency range of 2150 to 2450 MHz in both sine/cosine output channels with a resolution of 100 kHz.

  19. Oceanic crust deep seismic survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBride, J. H.; White, R. S.

    In September 1991, the British Institutions Reflection Profiling Syndicate (BIRPS) collected 578 km of deep seismic reflection profiles over the oceanic crust beneath the Cape Verde abssyal plain in approximately 4900 m of water (Fig. 1). The survey, under the direction of J. H. McBride, was undertaken in response to a proposal made by R. S. White at the 1990 BIRPS open syndicate meeting in Birmingham, England, and was acquired using GECO-PRAKLA'S M/V Bin Hai 511. The survey consisted of two strike lines parallel to magnetic sea-floor lineations and nine orthogonal crossing lines oriented parallel to the spreading direction (Fig. 2). Adjacent lines are spaced at 4 km. For the first time, this provides the ability to map oceanic crust in “3D,” since the line spacing is less than or equal to the Fresnel-zone diameter for the lower crust.

  20. Deep epistasis in human metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imielinski, Marcin; Belta, Calin

    2010-06-01

    We extend and apply a method that we have developed for deriving high-order epistatic relationships in large biochemical networks to a published genome-scale model of human metabolism. In our analysis we compute 33 328 reaction sets whose knockout synergistically disables one or more of 43 important metabolic functions. We also design minimal knockouts that remove flux through fumarase, an enzyme that has previously been shown to play an important role in human cancer. Most of these knockout sets employ more than eight mutually buffering reactions, spanning multiple cellular compartments and metabolic subsystems. These reaction sets suggest that human metabolic pathways possess a striking degree of parallelism, inducing "deep" epistasis between diversely annotated genes. Our results prompt specific chemical and genetic perturbation follow-up experiments that could be used to query in vivo pathway redundancy. They also suggest directions for future statistical studies of epistasis in genetic variation data sets.

  1. Study of Earth's deep interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cain, Joseph; Loper, David

    More than a decade has passed since the very successful 1971 meeting on the coremantle interface that was organized by Allan Cox at the Florida Institute of Technology in Melbourne [Cox and Cain, 1972]. The rationale of that meeting was to bring together workers in several different disciplines that normally do not interact at scientific gatherings. In recognition of the facts that significant advances in our understanding of Earth's deep interior have taken place since that time but that there is yet the problem of combining data and theories from disparate geophysical disciplines, a group met during the Prague meeting of the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics (IUGG) and formed an ad hoc consortium named “ISECALM” (International Study of the Earth's Core and Lower Mantle). One of the principal instigators of this initiative was Ray Hide (U.K. Meteorological Office, Bracknell), who was also instrumental in organizing the 1971 core-mantle meeting.

  2. Deep Brain Stimulation: Expanding Applications

    PubMed Central

    TEKRIWAL, Anand; BALTUCH, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    For over two decades, deep brain stimulation (DBS) has shown significant efficacy in treatment for refractory cases of dyskinesia, specifically in cases of Parkinson's disease and dystonia. DBS offers potential alleviation from symptoms through a well-tolerated procedure that allows personalized modulation of targeted neuroanatomical regions and related circuitries. For clinicians contending with how to provide patients with meaningful alleviation from often debilitating intractable disorders, DBSs titratability and reversibility make it an attractive treatment option for indications ranging from traumatic brain injury to progressive epileptic supra-synchrony. The expansion of our collective knowledge of pathologic brain circuitries, as well as advances in imaging capabilities, electrophysiology techniques, and material sciences have contributed to the expanding application of DBS. This review will examine the potential efficacy of DBS for neurologic and psychiatric disorders currently under clinical investigation and will summarize findings from recent animal models. PMID:26466888

  3. Treatment of deep vein thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Douketis, James D.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To identify patients with deep vein thrombosis (DVT) for whom in-hospital treatment should be considered. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE The literature was searched for studies on outpatient treatment of DVT. Seventeen studies were assessed: seven were randomized controlled trials (level I evidence), and 10 were non-randomized trials (level II evidence). MAIN MESSAGE Four criteria can be used to identify patients with DVT for whom outpatient treatment might not be appropriate: presence of massive DVT, presence of symptomatic pulmonary embolism, high risk of bleeding with anticoagulant therapy, and presence of comorbid conditions or other factors that warrant in-hospital care. CONCLUSION Four criteria can be used to identify patients with DVT for whom in-hospital treatment should be considered. PMID:15751565

  4. The Deep Space Network Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatti, Mark S.

    2006-01-01

    This document is a viewgraph presentation that reviews the costs, and technological processing required to replace the current network of Deep Space Antennas. The concept of using an array for space communications is much less of a concern than the cost of implementing and operating such an array. Within the cost question, the cost uncertainty of the front-end components (repeated n-times) is of most importance. The activities at JPL have focused on both these aspects of the cost. A breadboard array of three antennas at JPL has been the vehicle to perform many investigations into the development of the new DSN. Several pictures of the antennas at JPL are shown.

  5. The NTT SUSI deep field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnouts, S.; D'Odorico, S.; Cristiani, S.; Zaggia, S.; Fontana, A.; Giallongo, E.

    1999-01-01

    We present a deep BVrI multicolor catalog of galaxies in a 5.62 sq.arcmin field 80 arcsec south of the high redshift (z=4.7) quasar BR 1202-0725, derived from observations with the direct CCD camera SUSI at the ESO NTT. The formal 5sigma magnitude limits (in 2x FWHM apertures) are 26.9, 26.5, 25.9 and 25.3 in B, V, r and I respectively. Counts, colors for the star and galaxy samples are discussed and a comparison with a deep HST image in the I band is presented. The percentage of merged or blended galaxies in the SUSI data to this magnitude limit is estimated to be not higher than 1%. At the same galactic latitude of the HDF but pointing toward the galactic center, the star density in this field is found to be ~ 3 times higher, with ~ 20% of the objects with V-I>3.0. Reliable colors have been measured for galaxies selected down to r=26. The choice of the optical filters has been optimized to define a robust multicolor selection of galaxies at 3.8<= z<= 4.4. Within this interval the surface density of galaxy candidates with r < 26 in this field is 2.7+/- 0.4 arcmin(-2) corresponding to a comoving density of Star Formation Rate at 3.8<= z<= 4.4 of 10(-2.00) - 10(-1.82) h(3) Msun * yr(-1) * Mpc(-3) . Based on observations collected at the NTT 3.5m of ESO, Chile The catalog is available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/Abstract.letml

  6. Observed deep energetic eddies by seamount wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gengxin; Wang, Dongxiao; Dong, Changming; Zu, Tingting; Xue, Huijie; Shu, Yeqiang; Chu, Xiaoqing; Qi, Yiquan; Chen, Hui

    2015-11-01

    Despite numerous surface eddies are observed in the ocean, deep eddies (a type of eddies which have no footprints at the sea surface) are much less reported in the literature due to the scarcity of their observation. In this letter, from recently collected current and temperature data by mooring arrays, a deep energetic and baroclinic eddy is detected in the northwestern South China Sea (SCS) with its intensity, size, polarity and structure being characterized. It remarkably deepens isotherm at deep layers by the amplitude of ~120 m and induces a maximal velocity amplitude about 0.18 m/s, which is far larger than the median velocity (0.02 m/s). The deep eddy is generated in a wake when a steering flow in the upper layer passes a seamount, induced by a surface cyclonic eddy. More observations suggest that the deep eddy should not be an episode in the area. Deep eddies significantly increase the velocity intensity and enhance the mixing in the deep ocean, also have potential implication for deep-sea sediments transport.

  7. Pharmacodynamic Considerations for Moderate and Deep Sedation

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Daniel E.

    2012-01-01

    Moderate and deep sedation can be provided using various classes of drugs, each having unique mechanisms of action. While drugs within a given classification share similar mechanisms and effects, certain classes demonstrate superior efficacy but added concern regarding safety. This continuing education article will highlight essential principles of pharmacodynamics and apply these to drugs commonly used to produce moderate and deep sedation. PMID:22428972

  8. Temperature impacts on deep-sea biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Yasuhara, Moriaki; Danovaro, Roberto

    2016-05-01

    Temperature is considered to be a fundamental factor controlling biodiversity in marine ecosystems, but precisely what role temperature plays in modulating diversity is still not clear. The deep ocean, lacking light and in situ photosynthetic primary production, is an ideal model system to test the effects of temperature changes on biodiversity. Here we synthesize current knowledge on temperature-diversity relationships in the deep sea. Our results from both present and past deep-sea assemblages suggest that, when a wide range of deep-sea bottom-water temperatures is considered, a unimodal relationship exists between temperature and diversity (that may be right skewed). It is possible that temperature is important only when at relatively high and low levels but does not play a major role in the intermediate temperature range. Possible mechanisms explaining the temperature-biodiversity relationship include the physiological-tolerance hypothesis, the metabolic hypothesis, island biogeography theory, or some combination of these. The possible unimodal relationship discussed here may allow us to identify tipping points at which on-going global change and deep-water warming may increase or decrease deep-sea biodiversity. Predicted changes in deep-sea temperatures due to human-induced climate change may have more adverse consequences than expected considering the sensitivity of deep-sea ecosystems to temperature changes. PMID:25523624

  9. [MRI compatibility of deep brain stimulator].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yujing

    2013-07-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) therapy develops rapidly in clinical application. The structures of deep brain stimulator and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) equipment are introduced, the interactions are analyzed, and the two compatible problems of radio frequency (RF) heating and imaging artifact are summarized in this paper. PMID:24195387

  10. Observed deep energetic eddies by seamount wake.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gengxin; Wang, Dongxiao; Dong, Changming; Zu, Tingting; Xue, Huijie; Shu, Yeqiang; Chu, Xiaoqing; Qi, Yiquan; Chen, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Despite numerous surface eddies are observed in the ocean, deep eddies (a type of eddies which have no footprints at the sea surface) are much less reported in the literature due to the scarcity of their observation. In this letter, from recently collected current and temperature data by mooring arrays, a deep energetic and baroclinic eddy is detected in the northwestern South China Sea (SCS) with its intensity, size, polarity and structure being characterized. It remarkably deepens isotherm at deep layers by the amplitude of ~120 m and induces a maximal velocity amplitude about 0.18 m/s, which is far larger than the median velocity (0.02 m/s). The deep eddy is generated in a wake when a steering flow in the upper layer passes a seamount, induced by a surface cyclonic eddy. More observations suggest that the deep eddy should not be an episode in the area. Deep eddies significantly increase the velocity intensity and enhance the mixing in the deep ocean, also have potential implication for deep-sea sediments transport. PMID:26617343

  11. Observed deep energetic eddies by seamount wake

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gengxin; Wang, Dongxiao; Dong, Changming; Zu, Tingting; Xue, Huijie; Shu, Yeqiang; Chu, Xiaoqing; Qi, Yiquan; Chen, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Despite numerous surface eddies are observed in the ocean, deep eddies (a type of eddies which have no footprints at the sea surface) are much less reported in the literature due to the scarcity of their observation. In this letter, from recently collected current and temperature data by mooring arrays, a deep energetic and baroclinic eddy is detected in the northwestern South China Sea (SCS) with its intensity, size, polarity and structure being characterized. It remarkably deepens isotherm at deep layers by the amplitude of ~120 m and induces a maximal velocity amplitude about 0.18 m/s, which is far larger than the median velocity (0.02 m/s). The deep eddy is generated in a wake when a steering flow in the upper layer passes a seamount, induced by a surface cyclonic eddy. More observations suggest that the deep eddy should not be an episode in the area. Deep eddies significantly increase the velocity intensity and enhance the mixing in the deep ocean, also have potential implication for deep-sea sediments transport. PMID:26617343

  12. Relating to Nature: Deep Ecology or Ecofeminism?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathews, Freya

    1994-01-01

    This essay begins with an examination of the metaphysical axioms of deep ecology. It is argued that the axioms generate a fundamental dilemma for deep ecologists and that in attempting to resolve this dilemma, it is necessary to draw on an ethical perspective more akin to that found in ecofeminist literature. (LZ)

  13. Deep Space Network turbo decoder implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berner, Jeff B.; Andrews, Kenneth S.; Bryant, Scott H.

    2001-01-01

    A new decoder is being developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for NASA's Deep Space Network. This unit will decode the new turbo codes, which have recently been approved by the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS). Turbo codes provide up to 0.8 dB improvement in Eb/No over the current best codes used by deep space missions.

  14. [Search for life in deep biospheres].

    PubMed

    Naganuma, Takeshi

    2003-12-01

    The life in deep biospheres bridges conventional biology and future exobiology. This review focuses the microbiological studies from the selected deep biospheres, i.e., deep-sea hydrothermal vents, sub-hydrothermal vents, terrestrial subsurface and a sub-glacier lake. The dark biospheres facilitate the emergence of organisms and communities dependent on chemolithoautotrophy, which are overwhelmed by photoautotrophy (photosynthesis) in the surface biospheres. The life at deep-sea hydrothermal vents owes much to chemolithoautotrophy based on the oxidation of sulfide emitted from the vents. It is likely that similarly active bodies such as the Jovian satellite Europa may have hydrothermal vents and associated biological communities. Anoxic or anaerobic condition is characteristic of deep subsurface biospheres. Subsurface microorganisms exploit available oxidants, or terminal electron acceptors (TEA), for anaerobic respiration. Sulfate, nitrate, iron (III) and CO2 are the representative TEAs in the deep subsurface. Below the 3000-4000 m-thick glacier on Antarctica, there have been >70 lakes with liquid water located. One of such sub-glacial lakes, Lake Vostok, is about to be drill-penetrated for microbiological studies. These deep biosphere "platforms" provide new knowledge about the diversity and potential of the Earth's life. The expertise obtained from the deep biosphere expeditions will facilitate the capability of exobiologial exploration. PMID:15136755

  15. Deep learning for neuroimaging: a validation study.

    PubMed

    Plis, Sergey M; Hjelm, Devon R; Salakhutdinov, Ruslan; Allen, Elena A; Bockholt, Henry J; Long, Jeffrey D; Johnson, Hans J; Paulsen, Jane S; Turner, Jessica A; Calhoun, Vince D

    2014-01-01

    Deep learning methods have recently made notable advances in the tasks of classification and representation learning. These tasks are important for brain imaging and neuroscience discovery, making the methods attractive for porting to a neuroimager's toolbox. Success of these methods is, in part, explained by the flexibility of deep learning models. However, this flexibility makes the process of porting to new areas a difficult parameter optimization problem. In this work we demonstrate our results (and feasible parameter ranges) in application of deep learning methods to structural and functional brain imaging data. These methods include deep belief networks and their building block the restricted Boltzmann machine. We also describe a novel constraint-based approach to visualizing high dimensional data. We use it to analyze the effect of parameter choices on data transformations. Our results show that deep learning methods are able to learn physiologically important representations and detect latent relations in neuroimaging data. PMID:25191215

  16. Deep learning for neuroimaging: a validation study

    PubMed Central

    Plis, Sergey M.; Hjelm, Devon R.; Salakhutdinov, Ruslan; Allen, Elena A.; Bockholt, Henry J.; Long, Jeffrey D.; Johnson, Hans J.; Paulsen, Jane S.; Turner, Jessica A.; Calhoun, Vince D.

    2014-01-01

    Deep learning methods have recently made notable advances in the tasks of classification and representation learning. These tasks are important for brain imaging and neuroscience discovery, making the methods attractive for porting to a neuroimager's toolbox. Success of these methods is, in part, explained by the flexibility of deep learning models. However, this flexibility makes the process of porting to new areas a difficult parameter optimization problem. In this work we demonstrate our results (and feasible parameter ranges) in application of deep learning methods to structural and functional brain imaging data. These methods include deep belief networks and their building block the restricted Boltzmann machine. We also describe a novel constraint-based approach to visualizing high dimensional data. We use it to analyze the effect of parameter choices on data transformations. Our results show that deep learning methods are able to learn physiologically important representations and detect latent relations in neuroimaging data. PMID:25191215

  17. Dynamics of the Q2Π1u(1 ) state studied from the isotope effect on the cross sections for the formation of the 2 p atom pair in the photoexcitation of H2 and D2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosaka, Kouichi; Shiino, Kennichi; Nakanishi, Yuko; Odagiri, Takeshi; Kitajima, Masashi; Kouchi, Noriyuki

    2016-06-01

    The absolute values of the cross section for formation of a 2 p atom pair in the photoexcitation of H2 and D2 are measured against the incident photon energy in the range of doubly excited states by means of the coincidence detection of two Lyman-α photons. The cross-section curves are explained only by the contribution of the doubly excited Q2Π1u(1 ) state. The isotope effect on the oscillator strengths of 2 p +2 p pair formation for H2 and D2 from the Q2Π1u(1 ) state is almost the same as that on the oscillator strengths of 2 s +2 p pair formation from the Q2Π1u(1 ) state obtained by our group [T. Odagiri et al., Phys. Rev. A 84, 053401 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevA.84.053401]. This channel independence indicates that both isotope effects are dominated by the early dynamics of the Q2Π1u(1 ) state, before reaching the branching point into 2 p +2 p pair formation and 2 s +2 p pair formation.

  18. Deep Carbon Cycling in the Deep Hydrosphere: Abiotic Organic Synthesis and Biogeochemical Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherwood Lollar, B.; Sutcliffe, C. N.; Ballentine, C. J.; Warr, O.; Li, L.; Ono, S.; Wang, D. T.

    2014-12-01

    Research into the deep carbon cycle has expanded our understanding of the depth and extent of abiotic organic synthesis in the deep Earth beyond the hydrothermal vents of the deep ocean floor, and of the role of reduced gases in supporting deep subsurface microbial communities. Most recently, this research has expanded our understanding not only of the deep biosphere but the deep hydrosphere - identifying for the first time the extreme antiquity (millions to billions of years residence time) of deep saline fracture waters in the world's oldest rocks. Energy-rich saline fracture waters in the Precambrian crust that makes up more than 70% of the Earth's continental lithosphereprovide important constraints on our understanding of the extent of the crust that is habitable, on the time scales of hydrogeologic isolation (and conversely mixing) of fluids relevant to the deep carbon cycle, and on the geochemistry of substrates that sustain both abiotic organic synthesis and biogeochemical cycles driven by microbial communities. Ultimately the chemistry and hydrogeology of the deep hydrosphere will help define the limits for life in the subsurface and the boundary between the biotic-abiotic fringe. Using a variety of novel techniques including noble gas analysis, clumped isotopologues of methane, and compound specific isotope analysis of CHNOS, this research is addressing questions about the distribution of deep saline fluids in Precambrian rocks worldwide, the degree of interconnectedness of these potential biomes, the habitability of these fluids, and the biogeographic diversity of this new realm of the deep hydrosphere.

  19. Deep brain stimulation: new techniques.

    PubMed

    Hariz, Marwan

    2014-01-01

    The technology of the hardware used in deep brain stimulation (DBS), and the mode of delivering the stimulation have not significantly evolved since the start of the modern era of DBS 25 years ago. However, new technology is now being developed along several avenues. New features of the implantable pulse generator (IPG) allow fractionation of the electric current into variable proportions between different contacts of the multi-polar lead. Another design consists in leads that allow selective current steering from directionally placed electrode contacts that would deliver the stimulation in a specific direction or even create a directional shaped electric field that would conform to the anatomy of the brain target aimed at, avoiding adjacent structures, and thus avoiding side effects. Closed loop adaptive stimulation technologies are being developed, allowing a tracking of the pathological local field potential of the brain target, and delivering automatically the stimulation to suppress the pathological activity as soon as it is detected and for as long as needed. This feature may contribute to a DBS therapy "on demand", instead of continuously. Finally, advances in imaging technology are providing "new" brain targets, and increasingly allowing DBS to be performed accurately while avoiding the risks of microelectrode recording. PMID:24262179

  20. Deep-sea pleistocene biostratigraphy.

    PubMed

    Lidz, L

    1966-12-16

    The first detailed paleontological analysis of a deep-sea pistoncore from the Caribbean Sea has been completed. The core, P6304-8, was raised from 3927 meters, east of Beata Ridge at 14 degrees 59'N, 69 degrees 20'W. Formerly, stratigraphic works in this area were based on studies of paleotemperature, measured by the oxygen isotope mass spectrometry method, or on micropaleontological analysis by means of rapid or cursory examinations. For core P6304-8, samples for foraminiferal analysis were taken at 10-centimeter intervals and split into smaller samples containing an average of 710 individuals (smallest sample, 517 individuals); all individuals were then identified and counted. By use of data derived from populations of this size, a statistical reliability was insured within a 5 percent limnit. Temperature oscillations, the best method of portraying Pleistocene stratigraphy, were shown by using ratios of the relative abundances of tropical and subtropical planktonic foraminifera to those found in temperate and cooler waters. These ratios correlate well with existing paleotemperature measurements for the same core, obtained by the oxygen isotope mass spectrometry method. PMID:17821563

  1. Deep and shallow inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, Heather

    2015-05-15

    In this session we focused on the higher energy deep and shallow inelastic particle interactions, DIS and SIS. DIS interactions occur when the energy of the incident particle beam is so large that the beam is able to penetrate the nucleons inside of the target nuclei. These interactions occur at the smallest level possible, that of the quark-gluon, or parton, level. SIS interactions occur in an intermediate energy range, just below the energy required for DIS interactions. The DIS cross section formula contains structure functions that describe our understanding of the underlying parton structure of nature. The full description of DIS interactions requires three structure functions: two may be measured in charged lepton or neutrino scattering, but one can only be extracted from neutrino DIS data. There are reasons to expect that the impact of nuclear effects could be different for neutrinos engaging in the DIS interaction, vs those felt by leptons. In fact, fits by the nCTEQ collaboration have found that the neutrino-Fe structure functions appear to differ from those extracted from lepton scattering data [1]. To better understand the global picture of DIS and SIS, we chose a three-pronged attack that examined recent experimental results, data fits, and latest theory predictions. Experimental results from neutrino and lepton scattering, as well as collider experiments, were presented.

  2. Digging Deep in Pandora's Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blakeslee, John P.; Alamo-Martinez, Karla; Toloba, Elisa; Barro, Guillermo; Peng, Eric W.

    2015-01-01

    Abell 2744, the first and nearest (z=0.31) of the Hubble Frontier Fields, is extraordinarily rich in the number and variety of galaxies it contains. Nicknamed "Pandora's Cluster," it exhibits multiple peaks in the dark matter, X-ray, and galaxy density distributions, suggesting an ongoing collision of several massive clusters. The exceptional depth of the Hubble Frontier Field imaging now makes it possible to throw open Pandora's cluster and peer deep inside. To do this, we first model and remove the stellar light of the cluster galaxies; underneath we find not only distant background galaxies, but (like the Hope that lay at the bottom of Pandora's box) a large population of globular star clusters and compact cluster members within Abell 2744 itself. Our earlier work on the massive lensing cluster Abell 1689 (Alamo-Martinez et al. 2013) revealed the largest known population of globular clusters, with a spatial profile intermediate between the galaxy light and the dark matter. Abell 2744 is similarly massive, but far less regular in its density distribution; we examine what implications this has for the copious globular clusters coursing through its multiple cores.

  3. Electrochemistry in deep eutectic solvents.

    PubMed

    Nkuku, Chiemela A; LeSuer, Robert J

    2007-11-22

    We report the cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry, and scanning electrochemical microscopy of ferrocene dissolved in deep eutectic solvents (DES), consisting of choline chloride (ChCl) and either trifluoroacetamide (TFA) or malonic acid as the hydrogen-bond donor. Despite the use of ultramicroelectrodes, which were required due to the modest conductivities of the DES employed, linear diffusion behavior was observed in cyclic voltammetric experiments. The high viscosity of 1:2 ChCl/TFA relative to non-aqueous electrochemical solvents leads to a low diffusion coefficient, 2.7 x 10(-8) cm2 s(-1) for ferrocene in this medium. Because of the difficulties in achieving steady-state conditions, SECM approach curves were tip velocity dependent. Under certain conditions, SECM approach curves to an insulating substrate displayed a positive-feedback response. Satisfactory simulation of this unexpected behavior was obtained by including convection terms into the mass transport equations typically used for SECM theory. The observance of positive-feedback behavior at an insulating substrate can be described in terms of a dimensionless parameter, the Peclet number, which is the ratio of the convective and diffusive timescales. Fitting insulator approach curves of ferrocene in 1:2 ChCl/TFA shows an apparent increase in the diffusion coefficient with increasing tip velocity, which can be explained by DES behaving as a shear thinning non-Newtonian fluid. PMID:17973421

  4. Coring in deep hardrock formations

    SciTech Connect

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1988-08-01

    The United States Department of Energy is involved in a variety of scientific and engineering feasibility studies requiring extensive drilling in hard crystalline rock. In many cases well depths extend from 6000 to 20,000 feet in high-temperature, granitic formations. Examples of such projects are the Hot Dry Rock well system at Fenton Hill, New Mexico and the planned exploratory magma well near Mammoth Lakes, California. In addition to these programs, there is also continuing interest in supporting programs to reduce drilling costs associated with the production of geothermal energy from underground sources such as the Geysers area near San Francisco, California. The overall progression in these efforts is to drill deeper holes in higher temperature, harder formations. In conjunction with this trend is a desire to improve the capability to recover geological information. Spot coring and continuous coring are important elements in this effort. It is the purpose of this report to examine the current methods used to obtain core from deep wells and to suggest projects which will improve existing capabilities. 28 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Deep Brain Stimulation for Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Sussman, Eric S; Zhang, Michael; Pendharkar, Arjun V; Azagury, Dan E; Bohon, Cara; Halpern, Casey H

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is now the third leading cause of preventable death in the US, accounting for 216,000 deaths annually and nearly 100 billion dollars in health care costs. Despite advancements in bariatric surgery, substantial weight regain and recurrence of the associated metabolic syndrome still occurs in almost 20-35% of patients over the long-term, necessitating the development of novel therapies. Our continually expanding knowledge of the neuroanatomic and neuropsychiatric underpinnings of obesity has led to increased interest in neuromodulation as a new treatment for obesity refractory to current medical, behavioral, and surgical therapies. Recent clinical trials of deep brain stimulation (DBS) in chronic cluster headache, Alzheimer’s disease, and depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder have demonstrated the safety and efficacy of targeting the hypothalamus and reward circuitry of the brain with electrical stimulation, and thus provide the basis for a neuromodulatory approach to treatment-refractory obesity. In this study, we review the literature implicating these targets for DBS in the neural circuitry of obesity. We will also briefly review ethical considerations for such an intervention, and discuss genetic secondary-obesity syndromes that may also benefit from DBS. In short, we hope to provide the scientific foundation to justify trials of DBS for the treatment of obesity targeting these specific regions of the brain. PMID:26180683

  6. Ice Nucleation in Deep Convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Eric; Ackerman, Andrew; Stevens, David; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The processes controlling production of ice crystals in deep, rapidly ascending convective columns are poorly understood due to the difficulties involved with either modeling or in situ sampling of these violent clouds. A large number of ice crystals are no doubt generated when droplets freeze at about -40 C. However, at higher levels, these crystals are likely depleted due to precipitation and detrainment. As the ice surface area decreases, the relative humidity can increase well above ice saturation, resulting in bursts of ice nucleation. We will present simulations of these processes using a large-eddy simulation model with detailed microphysics. Size bins are included for aerosols, liquid droplets, ice crystals, and mixed-phase (ice/liquid) hydrometers. Microphysical processes simulated include droplet activation, freezing, melting, homogeneous freezing of sulfate aerosols, and heterogeneous ice nucleation. We are focusing on the importance of ice nucleation events in the upper part of the cloud at temperatures below -40 C. We will show that the ultimate evolution of the cloud in this region (and the anvil produced by the convection) is sensitive to these ice nucleation events, and hence to the composition of upper tropospheric aerosols that get entrained into the convective column.

  7. Geodynamic models of deep subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Ulrich

    2001-12-01

    Numerical and laboratory models that highlight the mechanisms leading to a complex morphology of subducted lithospheric slabs in the mantle transition zone are reviewed. An increase of intrinsic density with depth, an increase of viscosity, or phase transitions with negative Clapeyron slope have an inhibiting influence on deep subduction. The impingement of slabs on a viscosity and density interface has been studied in laboratory tanks using corn syrup. Slab interaction with equilibrium and non-equilibrium phase transitions has been modelled numerically in two dimensions. Both the laboratory and the numerical experiments can reproduce the variety of slab behaviour that is found in tomographic images of subduction zones, including cases of straight penetration into the lower mantle, flattening at the 660-km discontinuity, folding and thickening of slabs, and sinking of slabs into the lower mantle at the endpoint of a flat-lying segment. Aside from the material and phase transition properties, the tectonic conditions play an important role. In particular, the retrograde motion of the point of subduction (trench-rollback) has an influence on slab penetration into the lower mantle. A question that still needs to be clarified is the mutual interaction between plate kinematics and the subduction process through the transition zone.

  8. Jupiter's deep magnetotail boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolaou, G.; McComas, D. J.; Bagenal, F.; Elliott, H. A.; Ebert, R. W.

    2015-06-01

    In 2007 the New Horizons (NH) spacecraft flew by Jupiter for a gravity assist en route to Pluto. After closest approach on day of year (DOY) 58, 2007, NH followed a tailward trajectory that provided a unique opportunity to explore the deep jovian magnetotail and the surrounding magnetosheath. After DOY 132, 16 magnetopause crossings were observed between 1654 and 2429 Jupiter radii (Rj) along the dusk flank tailward of the planet. In some cases the crossings were identified as rapid transitions from the magnetotail to the magnetosheath and vice versa. In other cases a boundary layer was observed just inside the magnetopause. Solar Wind Around Pluto (SWAP) is an instrument on board NH that obtained spectra of low energy ions during the flyby period. We use a forward model including the SWAP instrument response to derive plasma parameters (density, temperature and velocity) which best reproduce the observations. We also vary the plasma parameters in our model in order to fit the observations more accurately on occasions where the measurements exhibit significant variability. We compare the properties of the plasma in the boundary layer with those of the magnetosheath plasma derived in our earlier work. We attempt to estimate the magnetic field in the boundary layer assuming pressure balance between it and the magnetosheath. Finally, we investigate several possible scenarios to assess if magnetopause movement and structure could cause the variations seen in the data.

  9. Biodiversity Science In The Deep Sea: The ESF EuroDEEP Programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonckheere, I. G.

    2007-12-01

    What little we know of deep-sea ecosystems indicates that they host one of the highest biodiversities on the planet as well as important mineral and biological resources, which are increasingly being exploited. Understanding deep-sea biodiversity and ecosystem functioning, from viruses to megafauna, is essential to assess the impact of natural and anthropogenic factors and provide management options. The aim of the multidisciplinary ESF EUROCORES Programme EuroDEEP, Ecosystem Functioning and Biodiversity in Deep Sea, is to further explore and identify the different deep-sea habitats, assessing both the abiotic and biotic processes that sustain and maintain deep-sea communities. The scope is to interpret variations of biodiversity within and between deep-sea habitats, and the interactions of the biota with the ecosystems in which they live. The resulting scientific data are a prerequisite for the sustainable use and the development of management and conservation options aiming at the sustainable use of marine resources that will benefit society as a whole. The Programme aims at providing the necessary framework and funding for the development of top-quality deep- sea research at the European level in a global context (Census of Marine Life and SCOR/IGBP). In particular, it builds on sharing of national large-scale resources, which are essential for deep-sea research (i.e. ships, ROVs, submersibles, AUVs, deep-towed vehicles, deep-sea sampling equipment, new sensors, etc.) as well as the coordination of efforts amongst scientists and laboratories from the countries involved and links with ongoing projects. EuroDEEP will participate in the development of new technologies as well as data management, analysis and modelling. Most of all, EuroDEEP will catalyse excellent research on what biodiversity exists in the deep sea, how it is generated and maintained by abiotic and biotic processes, and what the role of the deep-sea is in the biogeochemical processes affecting the

  10. Deep Seismic Reflection Profiling in Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attoh, K.; Brown, L. D.

    2006-05-01

    Africa represents one of the true frontiers for systematic deep seismic reflection profiling of the type pioneered by COCORP, LITHOPROBE, BIRPS, DEKORP, and ECORS in the northern hemisphere. However, there have been a number of notable individual surveys that have sampled key components of the African lithosphere, and several systematic regional geophysical initiatives which suggest African is fertile ground for future efforts. Among the latter are the KRISP refraction/wide-angle program to probe the East African Rift system in the 1990's, the Kaapvaal Experiment to image the deep lithosphere with passive techniques and most recently the EAGLE active/passive experiments in the Afar. Examples of true multichannel deep reflection surveys to delineate crustal structure include the transects of the Limpopo Belt, a Neoarchean mobile zone that sutures the Kaapval and Zimbabwe cratons, deep oil prospecting surveys in the Nosop basin of southern Botswana that reveal dramatic basement reflectors off the NW margin of the Kaapvaal craton, and most recently deep vibroseis surveys within the Kaapvaal craton that indicate a crustal stack of tectonic slivers as well as tectonic shingling of the upper mantle. The passive margin of western Africa, with its strategic oil resources, has been a target of several deep studies using marine seismic surveys, including the PROBE initiative of the late 1980's and more recent deep surveys offshore Angola. Reprocessing of lines from oil exploration grids reveal Proterozoic mid-lower crustal features offshore of Ghana. Among the potentially rich targets for future surveys in Africa are the West African and Congo cratons and their suturing Pan-African (Neoproterozoic) mobile belts. This suite of cratonic lithosphere elements is largely largely untouched by modern high resolution seismic methodologies. New initiatives such as LEGENDS ( targeting the East African Orogen) and exploitation of existing oil industry seismic data for deep information

  11. 1. Deep Creek Road, picnic pavilion Great Smoky Mountains ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Deep Creek Road, picnic pavilion - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Deep Creek Road, Between Park Boundary near Bryson City & Deep Creek Campground, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  12. 2. Deep Creek Road, old bridge at campground entrance. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Deep Creek Road, old bridge at campground entrance. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Deep Creek Road, Between Park Boundary near Bryson City & Deep Creek Campground, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  13. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Deep Vein Thrombosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Deep Vein Thrombosis? The signs and symptoms of deep vein thrombosis ( ... serious, possibly life-threatening problems if not treated. Deep Vein Thrombosis Only about half of the people who have ...

  14. Earthquakes induced by deep penetrating bombing?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balassanian, Serguei Y.

    2005-11-01

    The data of M≥5 earthquakes occurred in one year before and after 4 deep penetrating bombs in the region within 500 km and 1 000 km from the shooting site are presented. The 4 bombs are those happened in 1999 Kosovo of Yugoslavia, the 1991 Baghdad of Iraq, the 2001 Tora Bora of Afghanistan, and the 2003 Kirkuk of Iraq, respectively. The data indicate that the deep penetrating bombs may have remotely triggered some earthquakes. The deep penetrating bombs in seismically active regions should be forbidden.

  15. The JPL roadmap for Deep Space navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin-Mur, Tomas J.; Abraham, Douglas S.; Berry, David; Bhaskaran, Shyam; Cesarone, Robert J.; Wood, Lincoln

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews the tentative set of deep space missions that will be supported by NASA's Deep Space Mission System in the next twenty-five years, and extracts the driving set of navigation capabilities that these missions will require. There will be many challenges including the support of new mission navigation approaches such as formation flying and rendezvous in deep space, low-energy and low-thrust orbit transfers, precise landing and ascent vehicles, and autonomous navigation. Innovative strategies and approaches will be needed to develop and field advanced navigation capabilities.

  16. Comet Dust After Deep Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wooden, Diane H.; Harker, David E.; Woodward, Charles E.

    2006-01-01

    When the Deep Impact Mission hit Jupiter Family comet 9P/Tempel 1, an ejecta crater was formed and an pocket of volatile gases and ices from 10-30 m below the surface was exposed (A Hearn et aI. 2005). This resulted in a gas geyser that persisted for a few hours (Sugita et al, 2005). The gas geyser pushed dust grains into the coma (Sugita et a1. 2005), as well as ice grains (Schulz et al. 2006). The smaller of the dust grains were submicron in radii (0-25.3 micron), and were primarily composed of highly refractory minerals including amorphous (non-graphitic) carbon, and silicate minerals including amorphous (disordered) olivine (Fe,Mg)2SiO4 and pyroxene (Fe,Mg)SiO3 and crystalline Mg-rich olivine. The smaller grains moved faster, as expected from the size-dependent velocity law produced by gas-drag on grains. The mineralogy evolved with time: progressively larger grains persisted in the near nuclear region, having been imparted with slower velocities, and the mineralogies of these larger grains appeared simpler and without crystals. The smaller 0.2-0.3 micron grains reached the coma in about 1.5 hours (1 arc sec = 740 km), were more diverse in mineralogy than the larger grains and contained crystals, and appeared to travel through the coma together. No smaller grains appeared at larger coma distances later (with slower velocities), implying that if grain fragmentation occurred, it happened within the gas acceleration zone. These results of the high spatial resolution spectroscopy (GEMINI+Michelle: Harker et 4. 2005, 2006; Subaru+COMICS: Sugita et al. 2005) revealed that the grains released from the interior were different from the nominally active areas of this comet by their: (a) crystalline content, (b) smaller size, (c) more diverse mineralogy. The temporal changes in the spectra, recorded by GEMIM+Michelle every 7 minutes, indicated that the dust mineralogy is inhomogeneous and, unexpectedly, the portion of the size distribution dominated by smaller grains has

  17. Deep brain stimulation: new directions.

    PubMed

    Ostergard, T; Miller, J P

    2014-12-01

    The role of deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the treatment of movement disorders is well established, but there has recently been a proliferation of additional indications that have been shown to be amenable to this technology. The combination of innovative approaches to neural interface technology with novel target identification based on previously discovered clinical effects of lesioning procedures has led to a fundamental paradigm for new directions in the application of DBS. The historical use of neurosurgical lesioning procedures in the treatment of psychiatric diseases such as obsessive compulsive disorder provided an initial opportunity to expand the use of DBS. The list is rapidly expanding and now includes major depressive disorder, Tourette's syndrome, addiction disorders, and eating disorders. Keen observations by neurosurgeons using these devices have lead to the incidental discovery of treatments for diseases without previous neurosurgical treatments. These discoveries are breaking new ground in the treatment of disorders of cognition, headache syndromes, disorders of consciousness, and epilepsy. Two features of DBS make it well-suited for treatment of disorders of nervous system function. First, the reversible, non-lesional nature of DBS allows for investigation of new targets without the morbidity of permanent side effects. Second, the programmable nature of DBS allows practitioners to alter stimulation patterns to minimize side effects and potentially improve efficacy through reprogramming. More importantly, proper scientific evaluation of new targets is aided by the ability to turn stimulation on and off with evaluators blinded to the stimulation status. Knowledge of these emerging therapies is important for practitioners, as there are many situations where a single target can effectively treat the symptoms of more than one disease. The intersection of advances in neuromodulation, neurophysiology, neuroimaging, and functional neuroanatomy has

  18. NATURAL GAS RESOURCES IN DEEP SEDIMENTARY BASINS

    SciTech Connect

    Thaddeus S. Dyman; Troy Cook; Robert A. Crovelli; Allison A. Henry; Timothy C. Hester; Ronald C. Johnson; Michael D. Lewan; Vito F. Nuccio; James W. Schmoker; Dennis B. Riggin; Christopher J. Schenk

    2002-02-05

    From a geological perspective, deep natural gas resources are generally defined as resources occurring in reservoirs at or below 15,000 feet, whereas ultra-deep gas occurs below 25,000 feet. From an operational point of view, ''deep'' is often thought of in a relative sense based on the geologic and engineering knowledge of gas (and oil) resources in a particular area. Deep gas can be found in either conventionally-trapped or unconventional basin-center accumulations that are essentially large single fields having spatial dimensions often exceeding those of conventional fields. Exploration for deep conventional and unconventional basin-center natural gas resources deserves special attention because these resources are widespread and occur in diverse geologic environments. In 1995, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated that 939 TCF of technically recoverable natural gas remained to be discovered or was part of reserve appreciation from known fields in the onshore areas and State waters of the United. Of this USGS resource, nearly 114 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of technically-recoverable gas remains to be discovered from deep sedimentary basins. Worldwide estimates of deep gas are also high. The U.S. Geological Survey World Petroleum Assessment 2000 Project recently estimated a world mean undiscovered conventional gas resource outside the U.S. of 844 Tcf below 4.5 km (about 15,000 feet). Less is known about the origins of deep gas than about the origins of gas at shallower depths because fewer wells have been drilled into the deeper portions of many basins. Some of the many factors contributing to the origin of deep gas include the thermal stability of methane, the role of water and non-hydrocarbon gases in natural gas generation, porosity loss with increasing thermal maturity, the kinetics of deep gas generation, thermal cracking of oil to gas, and source rock potential based on thermal maturity and kerogen type. Recent experimental simulations using laboratory

  19. The Deep Space Network. [tracking and communication functions and facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The objectives, functions, and organization of the Deep Space Network are summarized. The Deep Space Instrumentation Facility, the Ground Communications Facility, and the Network Control System are described.

  20. Deep brain stimulation, ethics, and society.

    PubMed

    Bell, Emily; Racine, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Discussion surrounding ethical and social issues in deep brain stimulation (DBS) has increased. This article introduces a special section on the ethics of DBS in The Journal of Clinical Ethics. PMID:20866015

  1. Deep Space Atomic Clock Ticks Toward Success

    NASA Video Gallery

    Dr. Todd Ely, principal investigator for NASA's Deep Space Atomic Clock at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., spotlights the paradigm-busting innovations now in development to revol...

  2. The deep ocean under climate change.

    PubMed

    Levin, Lisa A; Le Bris, Nadine

    2015-11-13

    The deep ocean absorbs vast amounts of heat and carbon dioxide, providing a critical buffer to climate change but exposing vulnerable ecosystems to combined stresses of warming, ocean acidification, deoxygenation, and altered food inputs. Resulting changes may threaten biodiversity and compromise key ocean services that maintain a healthy planet and human livelihoods. There exist large gaps in understanding of the physical and ecological feedbacks that will occur. Explicit recognition of deep-ocean climate mitigation and inclusion in adaptation planning by the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) could help to expand deep-ocean research and observation and to protect the integrity and functions of deep-ocean ecosystems. PMID:26564845

  3. MWD tool for deep, small diameter boreholes

    SciTech Connect

    Buytaert, J.P.R.; Duckworth, A.

    1992-03-17

    This patent describes an apparatus for measuring a drilling parameters while drilling a borehole in an earth formation, wherein the borehole includes a small diameter deep borehole portion and a large diameter upper borehole portion. It includes small diameter drillstring means for drilling the deep borehole portion; sensor means, disposed within the small diameter drillstring means, for measuring a drilling parameter characteristic of the deep portion of the borehole while drilling the deep portion of the borehole and for providing sensor output signals indicative of the measured parameter; an upper drillstring portion extending between the surface of the formation and the small diameter drillstring means, the upper drillstring portion including a large diameter drillstring portion; data transmission means disposed within the large diameter drillstring portion and responsive to the sensor output.

  4. Deep drilling pushes technology to the limit

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-07-01

    Deep drilling has tapered off in recent years - particularly in the last 6 months, as the result of lower oil and gas prices. The number of well drilled to depths greater than 15,000 ft dropped from a record high of 1,205 wells in 1982 to 566 wells last year. Early estimates show the pace to slow further in 1986. Eventually, as oil and gas prices rebound, deep drilling should make a comeback, as well. With this return in deep drilling activity, engineers will be faced once again with technical problems the industry was learning to overcome. When bottomhole temperatures exceed 400/sup 0/F and bottomhole pressures rise above 15,000 psi, corrosion problems are magnified. These high temperatures and pressures complicate decisions about the drilling fluid system and drill string program. Further, the pressure integrity of the deep liner and casing strings and the associated cementing jobs become more critical.

  5. USGS assesses deep undiscovered gas resource

    SciTech Connect

    Dyman, T.S.; Schmoker, J.W.; Root, D.H.

    1998-04-20

    The US Geological Survey (USGS) estimated in 1995 that 1,412 tcf of technically recoverable natural gas remained to be discovered or developed in US onshore areas. A significant part of that resource base, 114 tcf, is undiscovered gas in deep sedimentary basins assessed by the USGS in onshore areas and state waters. This article contains: (1) descriptions of the deep gas plays supplied by USGS province geologists; (2) estimates of undiscovered technically-recoverable gas from these plays; and, (3) comparisons of the USGS estimates with other recent deep gas assessments. For detailed discussions of the deep gas plays and maps illustrating the play outlines, refer to the 1995 USGS National Petroleum Assessment CD-ROM.

  6. Applications of Deep Learning in Biomedicine.

    PubMed

    Mamoshina, Polina; Vieira, Armando; Putin, Evgeny; Zhavoronkov, Alex

    2016-05-01

    Increases in throughput and installed base of biomedical research equipment led to a massive accumulation of -omics data known to be highly variable, high-dimensional, and sourced from multiple often incompatible data platforms. While this data may be useful for biomarker identification and drug discovery, the bulk of it remains underutilized. Deep neural networks (DNNs) are efficient algorithms based on the use of compositional layers of neurons, with advantages well matched to the challenges -omics data presents. While achieving state-of-the-art results and even surpassing human accuracy in many challenging tasks, the adoption of deep learning in biomedicine has been comparatively slow. Here, we discuss key features of deep learning that may give this approach an edge over other machine learning methods. We then consider limitations and review a number of applications of deep learning in biomedical studies demonstrating proof of concept and practical utility. PMID:27007977

  7. Deep Extragalactic X-Ray Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, W. N.; Hasinger, G.

    2005-09-01

    Deep surveys of the cosmic X-ray background are reviewed in the context of observational progress enabled by the Chandra X-Ray Observatory and the X-Ray Multi-Mirror Mission-Newton. The sources found by deep surveys are described along with their redshift and luminosity distributions, and the effectiveness of such surveys at selecting active galactic nuclei (AGN) is assessed. Some key results from deep surveys are highlighted, including (a) measurements of AGN evolution and the growth of supermassive black holes, (b) constraints on the demography and physics of high-redshift AGN, (c) the X-ray AGN content of infrared and submillimeter galaxies, and (d) X-ray emission from distant starburst and normal galaxies. We also describe some outstanding problems and future prospects for deep extragalactic X-ray surveys.

  8. Habitat Demonstration Unit - Deep Space Habitat Configuration

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animated video shows the process of transporting, assembling and testing the Habitat Demonstration Unit - Deep Space Habitat (HDU DSH) configuration, which will be deployed during the 2011 Des...

  9. Semantic Antinomies and Deep Structure Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuber, Ryszard

    1975-01-01

    This article discusses constructions known as semantic antinomies, that is, the paradoxical results of false presuppositions, and how they can be dealt with by means of deep structure analysis. See FL 508 186 for availability. (CLK)

  10. Deep Space Network turbo decoder implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berner, J. B.; Andrews, K. S.

    2000-01-01

    A new decoder is being developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for NASA's Deep Space Network. This unit will decode the new turbo codes, which have recently been approved by the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS).

  11. Future Plans for NASA's Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deutsch, Leslie J.; Preston, Robert A.; Geldzahler, Barry J.

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the importance of NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) to space exploration, and future planned improvements to the communication capabilities that the network allows, in terms of precision, and communication power.

  12. Energetics of life on the deep seafloor

    PubMed Central

    McClain, Craig R.; Allen, Andrew P.; Tittensor, Derek P.; Rex, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    With frigid temperatures and virtually no in situ productivity, the deep oceans, Earth’s largest ecosystem, are especially energy-deprived systems. Our knowledge of the effects of this energy limitation on all levels of biological organization is very incomplete. Here, we use the Metabolic Theory of Ecology to examine the relative roles of carbon flux and temperature in influencing metabolic rate, growth rate, lifespan, body size, abundance, biomass, and biodiversity for life on the deep seafloor. We show that the relative impacts of thermal and chemical energy change across organizational scales. Results suggest that individual metabolic rates, growth, and turnover proceed as quickly as temperature-influenced biochemical kinetics allow but that chemical energy limits higher-order community structure and function. Understanding deep-sea energetics is a pressing problem because of accelerating climate change and the general lack of environmental regulatory policy for the deep oceans. PMID:22949638

  13. The Deep Space Atomic Clock Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ely, Todd A.; Koch, Timothy; Kuang, Da; Lee, Karen; Murphy, David; Prestage, John; Tjoelker, Robert; Seubert, Jill

    2012-01-01

    The Deep Space Atomic Clock (DSAC) mission will demonstrate the space flight performance of a small, low-mass, high-stability mercury-ion atomic clock with long term stability and accuracy on par with that of the Deep Space Network. The timing stability introduced by DSAC allows for a 1-Way radiometric tracking paradigm for deep space navigation, with benefits including increased tracking via utilization of the DSN's Multiple Spacecraft Per Aperture (MSPA) capability and full ground station-spacecraft view periods, more accurate radio occultation signals, decreased single-frequency measurement noise, and the possibility for fully autonomous on-board navigation. Specific examples of navigation and radio science benefits to deep space missions are highlighted through simulations of Mars orbiter and Europa flyby missions. Additionally, this paper provides an overview of the mercury-ion trap technology behind DSAC, details of and options for the upcoming 2015/2016 space demonstration, and expected on-orbit clock performance.

  14. Deep water ventilation traced by Synechococcus cyanobacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilibić, Ivica; Šantić, Danijela

    2008-07-01

    The paper describes a finding of photoautotroph cyanobacteria Synechococcus in deep Adriatic waters during the spring of 2006. The maximum abundance in early May was positioned at 800 m, being of order of the values referred for the surface waters in the Adriatic Sea. The deep abundance maximum has been associated to the fast ventilation of deep Adriatic waters, usually occurring during wintertime strong cooling events. Two processes were detected: (1) deep convection in the South Adriatic Pit (SAP) and (2) density current going downslope. The first process was responsible for bringing the cyanobacteria down to 600-m depth in the area of convection, and the second one triggered the downslope transport of the cyanobacteria to the SAP very bottom. The depletion rate of Synechoccocus cyanobacteria in an extremely hostile environment has been computed to equal about 1 month.

  15. High detectivity solar-blind high-temperature deep-ultraviolet photodetector based on multi-layered (l00) facet-oriented β-Ga₂O₃ nanobelts.

    PubMed

    Zou, Rujia; Zhang, Zhenyu; Liu, Qian; Hu, Junqing; Sang, Liwen; Liao, Meiyong; Zhang, Wenjun

    2014-05-14

    Fabrication of a high-temperature deep-ultraviolet photodetector working in the solar-blind spectrum range (190-280 nm) is a challenge due to the degradation in the dark current and photoresponse properties. Herein, β-Ga2O3 multi-layered nanobelts with (l00) facet-oriented were synthesized, and were demonstrated for the first time to possess excellent mechanical, electrical properties and stability at a high temperature inside a TEM studies. As-fabricated DUV solar-blind photodetectors using (l00) facet-oriented β-Ga2O3 multi-layered nanobelts demonstrated enhanced photodetective performances, that is, high sensitivity, high signal-to-noise ratio, high spectral selectivity, high speed, and high stability, importantly, at a temperature as high as 433 K, which are comparable to other reported semiconducting nanomaterial photodetectors. In particular, the characteristics of the photoresponsivity of the β-Ga2O3 nanobelt devices include a high photoexcited current (>21 nA), an ultralow dark current (below the detection limit of 10(-14) A), a fast time response (<0.3 s), a high R(λ) (≈851 A/W), and a high EQE (~4.2 × 10(3)). The present fabricated facet-oriented β-Ga2O3 multi-layered nanobelt based devices will find practical applications in photodetectors or optical switches for high-temperature environment. PMID:24520013

  16. Colonization of the deep sea by fishes

    PubMed Central

    Priede, I G; Froese, R

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of maximum depth of occurrence of 11 952 marine fish species shows a global decrease in species number (N) with depth (x; m): log10N = −0·000422x + 3·610000 (r2 = 0·948). The rate of decrease is close to global estimates for change in pelagic and benthic biomass with depth (−0·000430), indicating that species richness of fishes may be limited by food energy availability in the deep sea. The slopes for the Classes Myxini (−0·000488) and Actinopterygii (−0·000413) follow this trend but Chondrichthyes decrease more rapidly (−0·000731) implying deficiency in ability to colonize the deep sea. Maximum depths attained are 2743, 4156 and 8370 m for Myxini, Chondrichthyes and Actinopterygii, respectively. Endemic species occur in abundance at 7–7800 m depth in hadal trenches but appear to be absent from the deepest parts of the oceans, >9000 m deep. There have been six global oceanic anoxic events (OAE) since the origin of the major fish taxa in the Devonian c. 400 million years ago (mya). Colonization of the deep sea has taken place largely since the most recent OAE in the Cretaceous 94 mya when the Atlantic Ocean opened up. Patterns of global oceanic circulation oxygenating the deep ocean basins became established coinciding with a period of teleost diversification and appearance of the Acanthopterygii. Within the Actinopterygii, there is a trend for greater invasion of the deep sea by the lower taxa in accordance with the Andriashev paradigm. Here, 31 deep-sea families of Actinopterygii were identified with mean maximum depth >1000 m and with >10 species. Those with most of their constituent species living shallower than 1000 m are proposed as invasive, with extinctions in the deep being continuously balanced by export of species from shallow seas. Specialized families with most species deeper than 1000 m are termed deep-sea endemics in this study; these appear to persist in the deep by virtue of global distribution enabling

  17. Colonization of the deep sea by fishes.

    PubMed

    Priede, I G; Froese, R

    2013-12-01

    Analysis of maximum depth of occurrence of 11 952 marine fish species shows a global decrease in species number (N) with depth (x; m): log10 N = -0·000422x + 3·610000 (r(2)  = 0·948). The rate of decrease is close to global estimates for change in pelagic and benthic biomass with depth (-0·000430), indicating that species richness of fishes may be limited by food energy availability in the deep sea. The slopes for the Classes Myxini (-0·000488) and Actinopterygii (-0·000413) follow this trend but Chondrichthyes decrease more rapidly (-0·000731) implying deficiency in ability to colonize the deep sea. Maximum depths attained are 2743, 4156 and 8370 m for Myxini, Chondrichthyes and Actinopterygii, respectively. Endemic species occur in abundance at 7-7800 m depth in hadal trenches but appear to be absent from the deepest parts of the oceans, >9000 m deep. There have been six global oceanic anoxic events (OAE) since the origin of the major fish taxa in the Devonian c. 400 million years ago (mya). Colonization of the deep sea has taken place largely since the most recent OAE in the Cretaceous 94 mya when the Atlantic Ocean opened up. Patterns of global oceanic circulation oxygenating the deep ocean basins became established coinciding with a period of teleost diversification and appearance of the Acanthopterygii. Within the Actinopterygii, there is a trend for greater invasion of the deep sea by the lower taxa in accordance with the Andriashev paradigm. Here, 31 deep-sea families of Actinopterygii were identified with mean maximum depth >1000 m and with >10 species. Those with most of their constituent species living shallower than 1000 m are proposed as invasive, with extinctions in the deep being continuously balanced by export of species from shallow seas. Specialized families with most species deeper than 1000 m are termed deep-sea endemics in this study; these appear to persist in the deep by virtue of global distribution enabling recovery

  18. DEEP VADOSE ZONE TREATABILITY TEST PLAN

    SciTech Connect

    GB CHRONISTER; MJ TRUEX

    2009-07-02

    {sm_bullet} Treatability test plan published in 2008 {sm_bullet} Outlines technology treatability activities for evaluating application of in situ technologies and surface barriers to deep vadose zone contamination (technetium and uranium) {sm_bullet} Key elements - Desiccation testing - Testing of gas-delivered reactants for in situ treatment of uranium - Evaluating surface barrier application to deep vadose zone - Evaluating in situ grouting and soil flushing

  19. Usuda Deep Space Center support for ICE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, J. P.

    1986-01-01

    The planning, implementation and operations that took place to enable the Usuda, Japan, Deep Space Center to support the International Cometary Explorer (ICE) mission are summarized. The results show that even on very short notification our two countries can provide mutual support to help ensure mission success. The data recovery at the Usuda Deep Space Center contributed significantly to providing the required continuity of the experimental data stream at the encounter of the Comet Giacobini-Zinner.

  20. Low Gravity Issues of Deep Space Refueling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, David J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses the technologies required to develop deep space refueling of cryogenic propellants and low cost flight experiments to develop them. Key technologies include long term storage, pressure control, mass gauging, liquid acquisition, and fluid transfer. Prior flight experiments used to mature technologies are discussed. A plan is presented to systematically study the deep space refueling problem and devise low-cost experiments to further mature technologies and prepare for full scale flight demonstrations.

  1. Life Support for Deep Space and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harry W.; Hodgson, Edward W.; Kliss, Mark H.

    2014-01-01

    How should life support for deep space be developed? The International Space Station (ISS) life support system is the operational result of many decades of research and development. Long duration deep space missions such as Mars have been expected to use matured and upgraded versions of ISS life support. Deep space life support must use the knowledge base incorporated in ISS but it must also meet much more difficult requirements. The primary new requirement is that life support in deep space must be considerably more reliable than on ISS or anywhere in the Earth-Moon system, where emergency resupply and a quick return are possible. Due to the great distance from Earth and the long duration of deep space missions, if life support systems fail, the traditional approaches for emergency supply of oxygen and water, emergency supply of parts, and crew return to Earth or escape to a safe haven are likely infeasible. The Orbital Replacement Unit (ORU) maintenance approach used by ISS is unsuitable for deep space with ORU's as large and complex as those originally provided in ISS designs because it minimizes opportunities for commonality of spares, requires replacement of many functional parts with each failure, and results in substantial launch mass and volume penalties. It has become impractical even for ISS after the shuttle era, resulting in the need for ad hoc repair activity at lower assembly levels with consequent crew time penalties and extended repair timelines. Less complex, more robust technical approaches may be needed to meet the difficult deep space requirements for reliability, maintainability, and reparability. Developing an entirely new life support system would neglect what has been achieved. The suggested approach is use the ISS life support technologies as a platform to build on and to continue to improve ISS subsystems while also developing new subsystems where needed to meet deep space requirements.

  2. Microbial life in the deep terrestrial subsurface

    SciTech Connect

    Fliermans, C.B.; Balkwill, D.L.; Beeman, R.E.

    1988-12-31

    The distribution and function of microorganisms is a vital issue in microbial ecology. The US Department of Energy`s Program, ``Microbiology of the Deep Subsurface,`` concentrates on establishing fundamental scientific information about organisms at depth, and the use of these organisms for remediation of contaminants in deep vadose zone and groundwater environments. This investigation effectively extends the Biosphere hundreds of meters into the Geosphere and has implications to a variety of subsurface activities.

  3. The deep space network, volume 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Progress on Deep Space Network (DSN) supporting research and technology is presented, together with advanced development and engineering, implementation, and DSN operations of flight projects. The DSN is described. Interplanetary and planetary flight projects and radio science experiments are discussed. Tracking and navigational accuracy analysis, communications systems and elements research, and supporting research are considered. Development of the ground communications and deep space instrumentation facilities is also presented. Network allocation schedules and angle tracking and test development are included.

  4. Helios mission support. [Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, P. S.; Rockwell, G. M.

    1978-01-01

    Activities of the Deep Space Network Operations organization in support of the Helios Project from 15 October 1977 through 15 December 1977 are described. Topics covered include: (1) Mark 3 data subsystem testing at the conjoint Deep Space Stations (DSS) 42/43 (Canberra, Australia); (2) MDS implementation at DSS 61/63 (Madrid, Spain); (3) Radio Science update, and (4) other mission-related activities.

  5. A Deep Dish for Discovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    On the 66th martian day, or sol, of its mission, the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit finished a drive and sent back this navigation camera image mosaic revealing 'Bonneville' crater in its entirety.

    Spirit has spent more than 60 sols, two thirds of the nominal mission, en route to the rim of the large crater dubbed 'Bonneville.' The rover stopped on occasion to examine rocks along the way, many of which probably found their resting places after being ejected from the nearly 200-meter-diameter (656-foot) crater.

    The science team sent the rover to 'Bonneville' to find out more about where the rocks they have examined so far originated. Reaching the rim of this deep dish has been a major priority since day one.

    According to science team member Dr. John Grant of Washington D.C.'s National Air and Space Museum, the 'Bonneville' crater could be a giant window into the ancient past of the Gusev landing site. He said, 'The rocks that we see scattered around our landing site may be ejecta from inside 'Bonneville,' but we won't know that for sure until we actually investigate the crater. We can look at the rocks' form and chemistry, but we don't know how they fit into the big picture. If we can find their occurrence within the walls of 'Bonneville' crater, we'll be one step closer to understanding the processes that shaped the entire Gusev area over time.'

    Most scientists agree that a fitting prize for this long drive would be to find an outcrop of bedrock material that was not transported, but formed in the crater. When a meteorite slams into the ground and creates a crater, it throws surface debris out to the sides, revealing the older, mostly buried material, a sort of natural 'road cut.' The real gem would be to find exposed layers of the ancient rock within the 'cut' walls of the crater, which would give scientists a peek into how the area formed. 'The Gusev landing site is at least partially covered in a layer of ejecta material,' said Grant. 'As Mars

  6. Rheological Limitations on Deep Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidner, D. J.; Raterron, P.; Chen, J.; Li, L.

    2002-05-01

    The occurrence of earthquakes deeper than 50 km requires processes that differ from the friction-mitigated phenomena that control fault slip of shallow events. These earthquakes that extend to depths of about 700 km have been useful in delineating plate tectonic processes and stresses, but remain elusive as to why the stress is released as earthquakes and not dissipated by slow plastic flow. Indeed, our understanding of plate tectonic and fracture processes would not be challenged if these events did not occur at all. While the source of deviatoric stress for these earthquakes results from the dynamics of plate tectonics, the ability to store the stress and catastrophically release the stress in an earthquake is controlled by the properties of the minerals that constitute the subducting slab. Guided by our recent experimental results, we propose that the deep earthquake process is largely controlled by the rheology of the subducted material. The core of the slab for depths shallower than 400 km, at temperatures less than 500,aC, is capable of supporting high levels of shear stress with a mildly temperature dependent strength. This region is not seismogenic as it does not have access to stress instabilities. Above 600,aC, olivine becomes too weak to be seismogenic. Between 500 and 600,aC, olivine strength is highly temperature dependent and the region is ripe for runaway plastic instabilities which give rise to earthquakes. This can account for double seismic zones owing to the distorted temperature profile. If the tectonic stress is insufficient in one of these zones, then there will be only a single seismic plane. Deeper than 400 km even though temperature continues to increase, the properties of the high pressure phases of olivine, wadsleyite and ringwoodite, control the seismicity. Higher temperatures are required of these phases to access the plastic instability process, thus allowing seismicity to increase in this region. Our data for perovskite indicate that

  7. Deep basin gas - fact or fiction

    SciTech Connect

    Sandmeyer, D.J.

    1980-01-01

    The geology of the Deep basin is complex. Prior to 1976 the region had been explored sporadically primarily to investigate the potential in the deeper rocks with little expectation that the shallower zones would be productive. These shallower zones of relatively low quality reservoir rocks are the source of the current interest in the Deep basin. Today, estimates of natural gas resource potential of the Deep basin range up to 440 TCF. Prior to the discovery of gas in the Deep basin, proved accumulations of gas in place in Alberta and6 British Columbia were 145 tcf and 18 tcf, respectively. The potential of the Deep basin must be viewed as significant in Canada's future energy planning. However, estimating resource potential and proving the existence of recoverable gas which can be marketed, are distinctly different problems. It is a fact that a large gas resource potential has been discovered in the Deep basin, but there is some risk that any currently discussed estimate of recoverable gas volumes will be viewed as fiction in the future.

  8. Deep plane facelifting for facial rejuvenation.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Neil; Adam, Stewart

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide the facial plastic surgeon with anatomical and embryologic evidence to support the use of the deep plane technique for optimal treatment of facial aging. A detailed description of the procedure is provided to allow safe and consistent performance. Insights into anatomical landmarks, technical nuances, and alternative approaches for facial variations are presented. The following points will be further elucidated in the article. The platysma muscle/submuscular aponeurotic system/galea are the continuous superficial cervical fascia encompassing the majority of facial fat, and this superficial soft tissue envelope is poorly anchored to the face. The deep cervical fascia binds the structural aspects of the face and covers the facial nerve and buccal fat pad. Facial aging is mainly due to gravity's long-term effects on the superficial soft tissue envelope, with more subtle effects on the deeper structural compartments. The deep plane is the embryologic cleavage plane between these fascial layers, and is the logical place for facial dissection. The deep plane allows access to the buccal fat pad for treatment of jowling. Soft tissue mobilization is maximized in deep plane dissections and requires careful hairline planning. Flap advancement creates tension only at the fascia level allowing natural, tension-free skin closure, and long-lasting outcomes. The deep plane advancement flap is well vascularized and resistant to complications. PMID:25076447

  9. The deep space network, volume 18. [Deep Space Instrumentation Facility, Ground Communication Facility, and Network Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The objectives, functions, and organization of the Deep Space Network are summarized. The Deep Space Instrumentation Facility, the Ground Communications Facility, and the Network Control System are described.

  10. Effect of number of stack on the thermal escape and non-radiative and radiative recombinations of photoexcited carriers in strain-balanced InGaAs/GaAsP multiple quantum-well-inserted solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aihara, Taketo; Fukuyama, Atsuhiko; Suzuki, Hidetoshi; Fujii, Hiromasa; Sugiyama, Masakazu; Nakano, Yoshiaki; Ikari, Tetsuo

    2015-02-01

    Three non-destructive methodologies, namely, surface photovoltage (SPV), photoluminescence, and piezoelectric photothermal (PPT) spectroscopies, were adopted to detect the thermal carrier escape from quantum well (QW) and radiative and non-radiative carrier recombinations, respectively, in strain-balanced InGaAs/GaAsP multiple-quantum-well (MQW)-inserted GaAs p-i-n solar cell structure samples. Although the optical absorbance signal intensity was proportional to the number of QW stack, the signal intensities of the SPV and PPT methods decreased at high number of stack. To explain the temperature dependency of these signal intensities, we proposed a model that considers the three carrier dynamics: the thermal escape from the QW, and the non-radiative and radiative carrier recombinations within the QW. From the fitting procedures, it was estimated that the activation energies of the thermal escape ΔEb a r r and non-radiative recombination ΔEN R were 68 and 29 meV, respectively, for a 30-stacked MQW sample. The estimated ΔEb a r r value agreed well with the difference between the first electron subband and the top of the potential barrier in the conduction band. We found that ΔEb a r r remained constant at approximately 70 meV even with increasing QW stack number. However, the ΔENR value monotonically increased with the increase in the number of stack. Since this implies that non-radiative recombination becomes improbable as the number of stack increases, we found that the radiative recombination probability for electrons photoexcited within the QW increased at a large number of QW stack. Additional processes of escaping and recapturing of carriers at neighboring QW were discussed. As a result, the combination of the three non-destructive methodologies provided us new insights for optimizing the MQW components to further improve the cell performance.

  11. Effect of number of stack on the thermal escape and non-radiative and radiative recombinations of photoexcited carriers in strain-balanced InGaAs/GaAsP multiple quantum-well-inserted solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Aihara, Taketo; Fukuyama, Atsuhiko; Ikari, Tetsuo; Suzuki, Hidetoshi; Fujii, Hiromasa; Nakano, Yoshiaki; Sugiyama, Masakazu

    2015-02-28

    Three non-destructive methodologies, namely, surface photovoltage (SPV), photoluminescence, and piezoelectric photothermal (PPT) spectroscopies, were adopted to detect the thermal carrier escape from quantum well (QW) and radiative and non-radiative carrier recombinations, respectively, in strain-balanced InGaAs/GaAsP multiple-quantum-well (MQW)-inserted GaAs p-i-n solar cell structure samples. Although the optical absorbance signal intensity was proportional to the number of QW stack, the signal intensities of the SPV and PPT methods decreased at high number of stack. To explain the temperature dependency of these signal intensities, we proposed a model that considers the three carrier dynamics: the thermal escape from the QW, and the non-radiative and radiative carrier recombinations within the QW. From the fitting procedures, it was estimated that the activation energies of the thermal escape ΔE{sub barr} and non-radiative recombination ΔE{sub NR} were 68 and 29 meV, respectively, for a 30-stacked MQW sample. The estimated ΔE{sub barr} value agreed well with the difference between the first electron subband and the top of the potential barrier in the conduction band. We found that ΔE{sub barr} remained constant at approximately 70 meV even with increasing QW stack number. However, the ΔE{sub NR} value monotonically increased with the increase in the number of stack. Since this implies that non-radiative recombination becomes improbable as the number of stack increases, we found that the radiative recombination probability for electrons photoexcited within the QW increased at a large number of QW stack. Additional processes of escaping and recapturing of carriers at neighboring QW were discussed. As a result, the combination of the three non-destructive methodologies provided us new insights for optimizing the MQW components to further improve the cell performance.

  12. A comparison of bacterial communities in deep terrestrial and deep sub-seafloor biospheres (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toner, B. M.; Lesniewski, R.; Alexander, E. C.; Gralnick, J.; Orcutt, B.

    2009-12-01

    The distribution and community structure of microorganisms within the Earth’s crust are thought to be influenced - even controlled - by environmental factors. However, significant uncertainty remains in our understanding of microbial species distributions generally, and especially in the deep biosphere where 325 - 518 Pg of microbial biomass is estimated to reside globally. The potential magnitude and global significance of deep biosphere microbial communities has prompted active research focused on sub-seafloor biogeochemistry. Taxonomic analyses based on bacterial 16S rRNA gene libraries from over 200 deep terrestrial and marine microbial communities, suggests that the deep terrestrial biosphere is distinct from the deep-sea biosphere in terms of microbial community composition. Therefore, our rapidly expanding understanding of the distribution, ecology, and biogeochemical significance of microorganisms in the deep sub-seafloor may not be transferable to deep terrestrial systems representing up to 70 % of the deep subsurface biomass globally. The long-term goal of this research is an integration of local and regional microbial community and geochemistry data into a global perspective on the biogeography of deep biosphere systems.

  13. Mass extinctions in the deep sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, E.

    1988-01-01

    The character of mass extinctions can be assessed by studying extinction patterns of organisms, the fabric of the extinction, and assessing the environmental niche and mode of life of survivors. Deep-sea benthic foraminifera have been listed as little affected by the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) mass extinction, but very few quantitative data are available. New data on deep-sea Late Maestrichtian-Eocene benthic foraminifera from Maud Rise (Antractica) indicate that about 10 percent of the species living at depths of 2000 to 2500 m had last appearances within 1 my of the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) boundary, versus about 25 percent of species at 1000 to 1500 m. Many survivors from the Cretaceous became extinct in a period of global deep-sea benthic foraminiferal extinction at the end of the Paleocene, a time otherwise marked by very few extinctions. Preliminary conclusions suggest that the deep oceanic environment is essentially decoupled from the shallow marine and terrestrial environment, and that even major disturbances of one of these will not greatly affect the other. This gives deep-sea benthic faunas a good opportunity to recolonize shallow environments from greater depths and vice versa after massive extinctions. The decoupling means that data on deep-sea benthic boundary was caused by the environmental effects of asteriod impact or excessive volcanism. The benthic foraminiferal data strongly suggest, however, that the environmental results were strongest at the Earth's surface, and that there was no major disturbance of the deep ocean; this pattern might result both from excessive volcanism and from an impact on land.

  14. Ultra Deep Wave Equation Imaging and Illumination

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander M. Popovici; Sergey Fomel; Paul Sava; Sean Crawley; Yining Li; Cristian Lupascu

    2006-09-30

    In this project we developed and tested a novel technology, designed to enhance seismic resolution and imaging of ultra-deep complex geologic structures by using state-of-the-art wave-equation depth migration and wave-equation velocity model building technology for deeper data penetration and recovery, steeper dip and ultra-deep structure imaging, accurate velocity estimation for imaging and pore pressure prediction and accurate illumination and amplitude processing for extending the AVO prediction window. Ultra-deep wave-equation imaging provides greater resolution and accuracy under complex geologic structures where energy multipathing occurs, than what can be accomplished today with standard imaging technology. The objective of the research effort was to examine the feasibility of imaging ultra-deep structures onshore and offshore, by using (1) wave-equation migration, (2) angle-gathers velocity model building, and (3) wave-equation illumination and amplitude compensation. The effort consisted of answering critical technical questions that determine the feasibility of the proposed methodology, testing the theory on synthetic data, and finally applying the technology for imaging ultra-deep real data. Some of the questions answered by this research addressed: (1) the handling of true amplitudes in the downward continuation and imaging algorithm and the preservation of the amplitude with offset or amplitude with angle information required for AVO studies, (2) the effect of several imaging conditions on amplitudes, (3) non-elastic attenuation and approaches for recovering the amplitude and frequency, (4) the effect of aperture and illumination on imaging steep dips and on discriminating the velocities in the ultra-deep structures. All these effects were incorporated in the final imaging step of a real data set acquired specifically to address ultra-deep imaging issues, with large offsets (12,500 m) and long recording time (20 s).

  15. Positive and negative ion formation in deep-core excited molecules: S 1s excitation in dimethyl sulfoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Coutinho, L. H.; Gardenghi, D. J.; Schlachter, A. S.; Souza, G. G. B. de; Stolte, W. C.

    2014-01-14

    The photo-fragmentation of the dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) molecule was studied using synchrotron radiation and a magnetic mass spectrometer. The total cationic yield spectrum was recorded in the photon energy region around the sulfur K edge. The sulfur composition of the highest occupied molecular orbital's and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital's in the DMSO molecule has been obtained using both ab initio and density functional theory methods. Partial cation and anion-yield measurements were obtained in the same energy range. An intense resonance is observed at 2475.4 eV. Sulfur atomic ions present a richer structure around this resonant feature, as compared to other fragment ions. The yield curves are similar for most of the other ionic species, which we interpret as due to cascade Auger processes leading to multiply charged species which then undergo Coulomb explosion. The anions S{sup −}, C{sup −}, and O{sup −} are observed for the first time in deep-core-level excitation of DMSO.

  16. Global sampling of the photochemical reaction paths of bromoform by ultrafast deep-UV through near-IR transient absorption and ab initio multiconfigurational calculations.

    PubMed

    Pal, S K; Mereshchenko, A S; Butaeva, E V; El-Khoury, P Z; Tarnovsky, A N

    2013-03-28

    Ultrafast deep-ultraviolet through near infrared (210-950 nm) transient absorption spectroscopy complemented by ab initio multiconfigurational calculations offers a global description of the photochemical reaction pathways of bromoform following 255-nm excitation in methylcyclohexane and acetonitrile solutions. Photoexcitation of CHBr3 leads to the ground-state iso-CHBr3 product in a large quantum yield (∼35%), formed through two different mechanisms: concerted excited-state isomerization and cage-induced isomerization through the recombination of the nascent radical pair. These two processes take place on different time scales of tens of femtoseconds and several picoseconds, respectively. The novel ultrafast direct isomerization pathway proposed herein is consistent with the occurrence of a conical intersection between the first excited singlet state of CHBr3 and the ground electronic state of iso-CHBr3. Complete active space self-consistent field calculations characterize this singularity in the vicinity of a second order saddle point on the ground state which connects the two isomer forms. For cage-induced isomerization, both the formation of the nascent radical pair and its subsequent collapse into ground-state iso-CHBr3 are directly monitored through the deep-ultraviolet absorption signatures of the radical species. In both mechanisms, the optically active (i.e., those with largest Franck-Condon factors) C-Br-Br bending and Br-Br stretching modes of ground-state iso-CHBr3 have the largest projection on the reaction coordinate, enabling us to trace the structural changes accompanying vibrational relaxation of the non-equilibrated isomers through transient absorption dynamics. The iso-CHBr3 photoproduct is stable in methylcyclohexane, but undergoes either facile thermal isomerization to the parent CHBr3 structure through a cyclic transition state stabilized by the polar acetonitrile medium (∼300-ps lifetime), and hydrolysis in the presence of water. PMID

  17. The Deep Space Network. An instrument for radio navigation of deep space probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renzetti, N. A.; Jordan, J. F.; Berman, A. L.; Wackley, J. A.; Yunck, T. P.

    1982-01-01

    The Deep Space Network (DSN) network configurations used to generate the navigation observables and the basic process of deep space spacecraft navigation, from data generation through flight path determination and correction are described. Special emphasis is placed on the DSN Systems which generate the navigation data: the DSN Tracking and VLBI Systems. In addition, auxiliary navigational support functions are described.

  18. The Deep Space Network: A Radio Communications Instrument for Deep Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renzetti, N. A.; Stelzried, C. T.; Noreen, G. K.; Slobin, S. D.; Petty, S. M.; Trowbridge, D. L.; Donnelly, H.; Kinman, P. W.; Armstrong, J. W.; Burow, N. A.

    1983-01-01

    The primary purpose of the Deep Space Network (DSN) is to serve as a communications instrument for deep space exploration, providing communications between the spacecraft and the ground facilities. The uplink communications channel provides instructions or commands to the spacecraft. The downlink communications channel provides command verification and spacecraft engineering and science instrument payload data.

  19. Climate Influence on Deep Sea Populations

    PubMed Central

    Company, Joan B.; Puig, Pere; Sardà, Francesc; Palanques, Albert; Latasa, Mikel; Scharek, Renate

    2008-01-01

    Dynamics of biological processes on the deep-sea floor are traditionally thought to be controlled by vertical sinking of particles from the euphotic zone at a seasonal scale. However, little is known about the influence of lateral particle transport from continental margins to deep-sea ecosystems. To address this question, we report here how the formation of dense shelf waters and their subsequent downslope cascade, a climate induced phenomenon, affects the population of the deep-sea shrimp Aristeus antennatus. We found evidence that strong currents associated with intense cascading events correlates with the disappearance of this species from its fishing grounds, producing a temporary fishery collapse. Despite this initial negative effect, landings increase between 3 and 5 years after these major events, preceded by an increase of juveniles. The transport of particulate organic matter associated with cascading appears to enhance the recruitment of this deep-sea living resource, apparently mitigating the general trend of overexploitation. Because cascade of dense water from continental shelves is a global phenomenon, we anticipate that its influence on deep-sea ecosystems and fisheries worldwide should be larger than previously thought. PMID:18197243

  20. Molecular analysis of deep subsurface bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez Baez, L.E.

    1989-09-01

    Deep sediments samples from site C10a, in Appleton, and sites, P24, P28, and P29, at the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, South Carolina were studied to determine their microbial community composition, DNA homology and mol %G+C. Different geological formations with great variability in hydrogeological parameters were found across the depth profile. Phenotypic identification of deep subsurface bacteria underestimated the bacterial diversity at the three SRS sites, since bacteria with the same phenotype have different DNA composition and less than 70% DNA homology. Total DNA hybridization and mol %G+C analysis of deep sediment bacterial isolates suggested that each formation is comprised of different microbial communities. Depositional environment was more important than site and geological formation on the DNA relatedness between deep subsurface bacteria, since more 70% of bacteria with 20% or more of DNA homology came from the same depositional environments. Based on phenotypic and genotypic tests Pseudomonas spp. and Acinetobacter spp.-like bacteria were identified in 85 million years old sediments. This suggests that these microbial communities might have been adapted during a long period of time to the environmental conditions of the deep subsurface.

  1. Molecular analysis of deep-subsurface bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez, L. )

    1990-07-01

    Bacterial isolates from deep-sediment samples from three sites at the Savannah River site, near Aiken, S.C., were studied to determine their microbial community composition and DNA structure by using total DNA hybridization and moles percent G+C. Standard phenotypic identification underestimated the bacterial diversity at the three sites, since isolates with the same phenotype had different DNA structures in terms of moles percent G+C and DNA homology. The G+C content of deep-subsurface bacteria ranged from 20 to 77 mol%. More than 60% of the isolates tested had G+C values similar to those of Pseudomonas spp., and 12% had values similar to those of Acinetobacter spp. No isolates from deeper formations showed the same DNA composition as isolates from upper formations. Total-DNA hybridization and DNA base composition analysis provided a better resolution than phenotypic tests for the understanding of the diversity and structure of deep-subsurface bacterial communities. On the basis of the moles percent G+C values, deep-subsurface isolates tested seemed to belong to the families Pseudomonadaceae and Neisseriaceae, which might reflect a long period of adaptation to the environmental conditions of the deep subsurface.

  2. Edge systems in the deep ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coon, Andrew; Earp, Samuel L.

    2010-04-01

    DARPA has initiated a program to explore persistent presence in the deep ocean. The deep ocean is difficult to access and presents a hostile environment. Persistent operations in the deep ocean will require new technology for energy, communications and autonomous operations. Several fundamental characteristics of the deep ocean shape any potential system architecture. The deep sea presents acoustic sensing opportunities that may provide significantly enhanced sensing footprints relative to sensors deployed at traditional depths. Communication limitations drive solutions towards autonomous operation of the platforms and automation of data collection and processing. Access to the seabed presents an opportunity for fixed infrastructure with no important limitations on size and weight. Difficult access and persistence impose requirements for long-life energy sources and potentially energy harvesting. The ocean is immense, so there is a need to scale the system footprint for presence over tens of thousands and perhaps hundreds of thousands of square nautical miles. This paper focuses on the aspect of distributed sensing, and the engineering of networks of sensors to cover the required footprint.

  3. Preface: Deep Slab and Mantle Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suetsugu, Daisuke; Bina, Craig R.; Inoue, Toru; Wiens, Douglas A.

    2010-11-01

    We are pleased to publish this special issue of the journal Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors entitled "Deep Slab and Mantle Dynamics". This issue is an outgrowth of the international symposium "Deep Slab and Mantle Dynamics", which was held on February 25-27, 2009, in Kyoto, Japan. This symposium was organized by the "Stagnant Slab Project" (SSP) research group to present the results of the 5-year project and to facilitate intensive discussion with well-known international researchers in related fields. The SSP and the symposium were supported by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (16075101) from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of the Japanese Government. In the symposium, key issues discussed by participants included: transportation of water into the deep mantle and its role in slab-related dynamics; observational and experimental constraints on deep slab properties and the slab environment; modeling of slab stagnation to constrain its mechanisms in comparison with observational and experimental data; observational, experimental and modeling constraints on the fate of stagnant slabs; eventual accumulation of stagnant slabs on the core-mantle boundary and its geodynamic implications. This special issue is a collection of papers presented in the symposium and other papers related to the subject of the symposium. The collected papers provide an overview of the wide range of multidisciplinary studies of mantle dynamics, particularly in the context of subduction, stagnation, and the fate of deep slabs.

  4. Deep-Plane Lipoabdominoplasty in East Asians

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jun-Young; Hong, Yoon Gi; Sim, Hyung Bo; Sun, Sang Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to develop a new surgical technique by combining traditional abdominoplasty with liposuction. This combination of operations permits simpler and more accurate management of various abdominal deformities. In lipoabdominoplasty, the combination of techniques is of paramount concern. Herein, we introduce a new combination of liposuction and abdominoplasty using deep-plane flap sliding to maximize the benefits of both techniques. Methods Deep-plane lipoabdominoplasty was performed in 143 patients between January 2007 and May 2014. We applied extensive liposuction on the entire abdomen followed by a sliding flap through the deep plane after repairing the diastasis recti. The abdominal wound closure was completed with repair of Scarpa's fascia. Results The average amount of liposuction aspirate was 1,400 mL (700–3,100 mL), and the size of the average excised skin ellipse was 21.78×12.81 cm (from 15×10 to 25×15 cm). There were no major complications such as deep-vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism. We encountered 22 cases of minor complications: one wound infection, one case of skin necrosis, two cases of undercorrection, nine hypertrophic scars, and nine seromas. These complications were solved by conservative management or simple revision. Conclusions The use of deep-plane lipoabdominoplasty can correct abdominal deformities more effectively and with fewer complications than traditional abdominoplasty. PMID:27462568

  5. Biology of deep-water chondrichthyans: Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotton, C. F.; Grubbs, R. D.

    2015-05-01

    Approximately half of the known chondrichthyans (sharks, skates, rays, and chimaeras), 575 of 1207 species (47.6%, Table 1), live in the deep ocean (below 200 m), yet little is known of the biology or life histories of most of these fishes (Kyne and Simpfendorfer, 2007). The limited information available for deep-water chondrichthyans is compounded by their rarity, as well as the prevalent uncertainty in the alpha taxonomy of deep-water species. Many species are known only from the type materials, which are generally limited to nondestructive sampling, e.g., morphometrics, imaging (X-ray, MRI, CT scanning). Thus, research has been hindered by a lack of specimens available for investigation that requires destructive sampling or live specimens (e.g., life history, diet, telemetry). The need for more research and dissemination of information about deep-water chondrichthyans has become imperative as fisheries worldwide continue to expand into deeper waters and exploit deep-water stocks, usually in the absence of data required for appropriate management (Morato et al., 2006; Kyne and Simpfendorfer, 2010).

  6. 76 FR 66078 - Notice of Industry Workshop on Technical and Regulatory Challenges in Deep and Ultra-Deep Outer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-25

    ... Challenges in Deep and Ultra-Deep Outer Continental Shelf Waters AGENCY: Bureau of Safety and Environmental... environmentally sound offshore oil and gas exploration and production in deep and ultra-deep OCS waters. Through... will offer a structured venue for consultation among offshore deepwater oil and gas industry...

  7. Deep South Atlantic carbonate chemistry and increased interocean deep water exchange during last deglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jimin; Anderson, Robert F.; Jin, Zhangdong; Menviel, Laurie; Zhang, Fei; Ryerson, Fredrick J.; Rohling, Eelco J.

    2014-04-01

    Carbon release from the deep ocean at glacial terminations is a critical component of past climate change, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. We present a 28,000-year high-resolution record of carbonate ion concentration, a key parameter of the global carbon cycle, at 5-km water depth in the South Atlantic. We observe similar carbonate ion concentrations between the Last Glacial Maximum and the late Holocene, despite elevated concentrations in the glacial surface ocean. This strongly supports the importance of respiratory carbon accumulation in a stratified deep ocean for atmospheric CO2 reduction during the last ice age. After ˜9 μmol/kg decline during Heinrich Stadial 1, deep South Atlantic carbonate ion concentration rose by ˜24 μmol/kg from the onset of Bølling to Pre-boreal, likely caused by strengthening North Atlantic Deep Water formation (Bølling) or increased ventilation in the Southern Ocean (Younger Drays) or both (Pre-boreal). The ˜15 μmol/kg decline in deep water carbonate ion since ˜10 ka is consistent with extraction of alkalinity from seawater by deep-sea CaCO3 compensation and coral reef growth on continental shelves during the Holocene. Between 16,600 and 15,000 years ago, deep South Atlantic carbonate ion values converged with those at 3.4-km water depth in the western equatorial Pacific, as did carbon isotope and radiocarbon values. These observations suggest a period of enhanced lateral exchange of carbon between the deep South Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, probably due to an increased transfer of momentum from southern westerlies to the Southern Ocean. By spreading carbon-rich deep Pacific waters around Antarctica for upwelling, invigorated interocean deep water exchange would lead to more efficient CO2 degassing from the Southern Ocean, and thus to an atmospheric CO2 rise, during the early deglaciation.

  8. Deep boundary current disintegration in Drake Passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brearley, J. Alexander; Sheen, Katy L.; Naveira Garabato, Alberto C.; Smeed, David A.; Speer, Kevin G.; Thurnherr, Andreas M.; Meredith, Michael P.; Waterman, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    The fate of a deep boundary current that originates in the Southeast Pacific and flows southward along the continental slope of South America is elucidated. The current transports poorly ventilated water of low salinity (a type of Pacific Deep Water, PDW), into Drake Passage. East of Drake Passage, the boundary current breaks into fresh anticyclonic eddies, nine examples of which were observed in mooring data from December 2009 to March 2012. The observed eddies appear to originate mainly from a topographic separation point close to 60°W, have typical diameters of 20-60 km and accompanying Rossby numbers of 0.1-0.3. These features are likely to be responsible for transporting PDW meridionally across the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, explaining the near homogenization of Circumpolar Deep Water properties downstream of Drake Passage. This mechanism of boundary current breakdown may constitute an important process in the Southern Ocean overturning circulation.

  9. In Brief: Deep-sea observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2008-11-01

    The first deep-sea ocean observatory offshore of the continental United States has begun operating in the waters off central California. The remotely operated Monterey Accelerated Research System (MARS) will allow scientists to monitor the deep sea continuously. Among the first devices to be hooked up to the observatory are instruments to monitor earthquakes, videotape deep-sea animals, and study the effects of acidification on seafloor animals. ``Some day we may look back at the first packets of data streaming in from the MARS observatory as the equivalent of those first words spoken by Alexander Graham Bell: `Watson, come here, I need you!','' commented Marcia McNutt, president and CEO of the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, which coordinated construction of the observatory. For more information, see http://www.mbari.org/news/news_releases/2008/mars-live/mars-live.html.

  10. Microbial survival in deep space environment.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverman, G. J.

    1971-01-01

    Review of the knowledge available on the extent to which microorganisms (mainly microbial spores, vegetative cells, and fungi) are capable of surviving the environment of deep space, based on recent simulation experiments of deep space. A description of the experimental procedures used is followed by a discussion of deep space ecology, the behavior of microorganisms in ultrahigh vacuum, and factors influencing microbial survival. It is concluded that, so far, simulation experiments have proved far less lethal to microorganisms than to other forms of life. There are, however, wide gaps in the knowledge available, and no accurate predictions can as yet be made on the degree of lethality that might be incurred by a microbial population on a given mission. Therefore, sterilization of spacecraft surfaces is deemed necessary if induced panspermia (i.e., interplanetary life propagation) is to be avoided.

  11. Strategic Technologies for Deep Space Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ronald J.

    2016-01-01

    Deep space transportation capability for science and exploration is fundamentally limited by available propulsion technologies. Traditional chemical systems are performance plateaued and require enormous Initial Mass in Low Earth Orbit (IMLEO) whereas solar electric propulsion systems are power limited and unable to execute rapid transits. Nuclear based propulsion and alternative energetic methods, on the other hand, represent potential avenues, perhaps the only viable avenues, to high specific power space transport evincing reduced trip time, reduced IMLEO, and expanded deep space reach. Here, key deep space transport mission capability objectives are reviewed in relation to STMD technology portfolio needs, and the advanced propulsion technology solution landscape is examined including open questions, technical challenges, and developmental prospects. Options for potential future investment across the full compliment of STMD programs are presented based on an informed awareness of complimentary activities in industry, academia, OGAs, and NASA mission directorates.

  12. NASA Deep Space Network Operations Scheduling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Enari, D. M.

    1982-01-01

    The functioning of the Deep Space Network Operations Scheduling, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, CA is reviewed. The primary objectives of the Operations Scheduling are: to schedule the worldwide global allocation of ground communications, tracking facilities, and equipment; and to provide deep space telecommunications for command, tracking, telemetry, and control in support of flight mission operations and tests. Elements of the earth set are Deep Space Stations (DSS) which provide the telecommunications link between the earth and spacecraft; NASA Communications Network; Network Data Processing Area; Network Operations Control Area which provides operational direction to the DSS; Mission Control and Computing systems; and Mission Support areas which provide flight control of the spacecraft. Elements of the space set include mission priorities and requirements which determine the spacecraft queue for allocating network resources. Scheduling is discussed in terms of long-range (3 years), mid-range (8 weeks), and short-range (2 weeks).

  13. Compact Deep-Space Optical Communications Transceiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, W. Thomas; Charles, Jeffrey R.

    2009-01-01

    Deep space optical communication transceivers must be very efficient receivers and transmitters of optical communication signals. For deep space missions, communication systems require high performance well beyond the scope of mere power efficiency, demanding maximum performance in relation to the precious and limited mass, volume, and power allocated. This paper describes the opto-mechanical design of a compact, efficient, functional brassboard deep space transceiver that is capable of achieving megabyte-per-second rates at Mars ranges. The special features embodied to enhance the system operability and functionality, and to reduce the mass and volume of the system are detailed. System tests and performance characteristics are described in detail. Finally, lessons learned in the implementation of the brassboard design and suggestions for improvements appropriate for a flight prototype are covered.

  14. Spaceport operations for deep space missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, Alan C.

    1990-01-01

    Space Station Freedom is designed with the capability to cost-effectively evolve into a transportation node which can support manned lunar and Mars missions. To extend a permanent human presence to the outer planets (moon outposts) and to nearby star systems, additional orbiting space infrastructure and great advances in propulsion system and other technologies will be required. To identify primary operations and management requirements for these deep space missions, an interstellar design concept was developed and analyzed. The assembly, test, servicing, logistics resupply, and increment management techniques anticipated for lunar and Mars missions appear to provide a pattern which can be extended in an analogous manner to deep space missions. A long range, space infrastructure development plan (encompassing deep space missions) coupled with energetic, breakthrough level propulsion research should be initiated now to assist in making the best budget and schedule decisions.

  15. Measurement of light scattering in deep sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maragos, N.; Balasi, K.; Domvoglou, T.; Kiskiras, I.; Lenis, D.; Maniatis, M.; Stavropoulos, G.

    2016-04-01

    The deep-sea neutrino telescope in the Mediterranean Sea, being prepared by the KM3NET collaboration, will contain thousands of optical sensors to readout. The accurate knowledge of the optical properties of deep-sea water is of great importance for the neutrino event reconstruction process. In this study we describe our progress in designing an experimental setup and studying a method to measure the parameters describing the absorption and scattering characteristics of deep-sea water. Three PMTs will be used to measure in situ the scattered light emitted from six laser diodes in three different wavelengths covering the Cherenkov radiation spectrum. The technique for the evaluation of the parameters is based on Monte Carlo simulations and our results show that we are able to determine these parameters with satisfying precision.

  16. Deep-Ocean Measurements of Tsunami Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinovich, Alexander B.; Eblé, Marie C.

    2015-12-01

    Deep-ocean tsunami measurements play a major role in understanding the physics of tsunami wave generation and propagation, and in improving the effectiveness of tsunami warning systems. This paper provides an overview of the history of tsunami recording in the open ocean from the earliest days, approximately 50 years ago, to the present day. Modern tsunami monitoring systems such as the self-contained Deep-ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunamis and innovative cabled sensing networks, including, but not limited to, the Japanese bottom cable projects and the NEPTUNE-Canada geophysical bottom observatory, are highlighted. The specific peculiarities of seafloor longwave observations in the deep ocean are discussed and compared with observations recorded in coastal regions. Tsunami detection in bottom pressure observations is exemplified through analysis of distant (22,000 km from the source) records of the 2004 Sumatra tsunami in the northeastern Pacific.

  17. Excess plutonium disposition: The deep borehole option

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, K.L.

    1994-08-09

    This report reviews the current status of technologies required for the disposition of plutonium in Very Deep Holes (VDH). It is in response to a recent National Academy of Sciences (NAS) report which addressed the management of excess weapons plutonium and recommended three approaches to the ultimate disposition of excess plutonium: (1) fabrication and use as a fuel in existing or modified reactors in a once-through cycle, (2) vitrification with high-level radioactive waste for repository disposition, (3) burial in deep boreholes. As indicated in the NAS report, substantial effort would be required to address the broad range of issues related to deep bore-hole emplacement. Subjects reviewed in this report include geology and hydrology, design and engineering, safety and licensing, policy decisions that can impact the viability of the concept, and applicable international programs. Key technical areas that would require attention should decisions be made to further develop the borehole emplacement option are identified.

  18. Nerve Bundles and Deep Dyspareunia in Endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Williams, Christina; Hoang, Lien; Yosef, Ali; Alotaibi, Fahad; Allaire, Catherine; Brotto, Lori; Fraser, Ian S; Bedaiwy, Mohamed A; Ng, Tony L; Lee, Anna F; Yong, Paul J

    2016-07-01

    The etiology of deep dyspareunia in endometriosis is unclear. Our objective was to determine whether nerve bundle density in the cul-de-sac/uterosacrals (zone II) is associated with deep dyspareunia in women with endometriosis. We conducted a blinded retrospective immunohistochemistry study (n = 58) at a tertiary referral center (2011-2013). Patients were stringently phenotyped into a study group and 2 control groups. The study group (tender endometriosis, n = 29) consisted of patients with deep dyspareunia, a tender zone II on examination, and an endometriosis lesion in zone II excised at surgery. Control group 1 (nontender endometriosis, n = 17) consisted of patients without deep dyspareunia, a nontender zone II on examination, and an endometriosis lesion in zone II excised at surgery. Control group 2 (tender nonendometriosis, n = 12) consisted of patients with deep dyspareunia, a tender zone II on examination, and a nonendometriosis lesion (eg, normal histology) in zone II excised at surgery. Protein gene product 9.5 (PGP9.5) immunohistochemistry was performed to identify nerve bundles (nerve fibers surrounded by perineurium) in the excised zone II lesion. PGP9.5 nerve bundle density (bundles/high powered field [HPF]) was then scored by a pathologist blinded to the group. We found a significant difference in PGP9.5 nerve bundle density between the 3 groups (analysis of variance, F2,55 = 6.39, P = .003). Mean PGP9.5 nerve bundle density was significantly higher in the study group (1.16 ± 0.56 bundles/HPF [±standard deviation]) compared to control group 1 (0.65 ± 0.36, Tukey test, P = .005) and control group 2 (0.72 ± 0.56, Tukey test, P = .044). This study provides evidence that neurogenesis in the cul-de-sac/uterosacrals may be an etiological factor for deep dyspareunia in endometriosis. PMID:26711313

  19. The study of deep-sea cephalopods.

    PubMed

    Hoving, Henk-Jan T; Perez, Jose Angel A; Bolstad, Kathrin S R; Braid, Heather E; Evans, Aaron B; Fuchs, Dirk; Judkins, Heather; Kelly, Jesse T; Marian, José E A R; Nakajima, Ryuta; Piatkowski, Uwe; Reid, Amanda; Vecchione, Michael; Xavier, José C C

    2014-01-01

    "Deep-sea" cephalopods are here defined as cephalopods that spend a significant part of their life cycles outside the euphotic zone. In this chapter, the state of knowledge in several aspects of deep-sea cephalopod research are summarized, including information sources for these animals, diversity and general biogeography and life cycles, including reproduction. Recommendations are made for addressing some of the remaining knowledge deficiencies using a variety of traditional and more recently developed methods. The types of oceanic gear that are suitable for collecting cephalopod specimens and images are reviewed. Many groups of deep-sea cephalopods require taxonomic reviews, ideally based on both morphological and molecular characters. Museum collections play a vital role in these revisions, and novel (molecular) techniques may facilitate new use of old museum specimens. Fundamental life-cycle parameters remain unknown for many species; techniques developed for neritic species that could potentially be applied to deep-sea cephalopods are discussed. Reproductive tactics and strategies in deep-sea cephalopods are very diverse and call for comparative evolutionary and experimental studies, but even in the twenty-first century, mature individuals are still unknown for many species. New insights into diet and trophic position have begun to reveal a more diverse range of feeding strategies than the typically voracious predatory lifestyle known for many cephalopods. Regular standardized deep-sea cephalopod surveys are necessary to provide insight into temporal changes in oceanic cephalopod populations and to forecast, verify and monitor the impacts of global marine changes and human impacts on these populations. PMID:24880796

  20. Autonomous, Retrievable, Deep Sea Microbial Fuel Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, K.

    2014-12-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) work by providing bacteria in anaerobic sediments with an electron acceptor (anode) that stimulates metabolism of organic matter. The buried anode is connected via control circuitry to a cathode exposed to oxygen in the overlying water. During metabolism, bacteria release hydrogen ions into the sediment and transfer electrons extra-cellularly to the anode, which eventually reduce dissolved oxygen at the cathode, forming water. The open circuit voltage is approximately 0.8 v. The voltage between electrodes is operationally kept at 0.4 v with a potentiastat. The current is chiefly limited by the rate of microbial metabolism at the anode. The Office of Naval Research has encouraged development of microbial fuel cells in the marine environment at a number of academic and naval institutions. Earlier work in shallow sediments of San Diego Bay showed that the most important environmental parameters that control fuel cell power output in San Diego Bay were total organic carbon in the sediment and seasonal water temperature. Current MFC work at SPAWAR includes extension of microbial fuel cell tests to the deep sea environment (>1000 m) and, in parallel, testing microbial fuel cells in the laboratory under deep sea conditions. One question we are asking is whether MFC power output from deep water sediments repressurized and chilled in the laboratory comparable to those measured in situ. If yes, mapping the power potential of deep sea sediments may be made much easier, requiring sediment grabs and lab tests rather than deployment and retrieval of fuel cells. Another question we are asking is whether in situ temperature and total organic carbon in the deep sea sediment can predict MFC power. If yes, then we can make use of the large collection of publicly available, deep sea oceanographic measurements to make these predictions, foregoing expensive work at sea. These regressions will be compared to those derived from shallow water measurements.