Science.gov

Sample records for deep core-level photoexcitation

  1. State-selective enhanced production of positive ions and excited neutral fragments of gaseous CH2Cl2 following Cl 2p core-level photoexcitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, K. T.; Chen, J. M.; Lee, J. M.; Haw, S. C.; Chen, S. A.; Liang, Y. C.; Chen, S. W.

    2010-09-01

    Following photoexcitation of Cl2p electrons to various resonances, the dissociation dynamics of ionic and excited neutral fragments of gaseous CH2Cl2 was investigated by combined measurements of photon-induced ionic dissociation, x-ray absorption, and uv-visible dispersed fluorescence. The Cl2p core-to-Rydberg excitations near the ionization threshold produce a notable enhancement of excited neutral fragments (C* and CH*), which is attributed to the contribution from a shake-modified resonant Auger decay and postcollision interaction. The excitation Cl2p→10a1* induces an enhanced yield of CH2+, possibly originating from fast dissociation via a strongly repulsive surface. The experimental results provide insight into the dissociation dynamics of ionic and excited neutral fragment production following core-level excitation.

  2. Deep localized distortion of alternating bonds and reduced transport of charged carriers in conjugated polymers under photoexcitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cong; Jiang, De-Yao; Chen, Ren-Ai; Li, Sheng; George, Thomas F.

    2014-12-01

    In a real bulk heterojunction polymer solar cell, after exciton separation in the heterojunction, the resulting negatively-charged carrier, a polaron, moves along the polymer chain of the acceptor, which is believed to be of significance for the charged carrier transport properties in a polymer solar cell. During the negative polaron transport, due to the external light field, the polaron, which is re-excited and induces deep localization, also forms a new local distortion of the alternating bonds. It is revealed that the excited polaron moves more slowly than the ground-state polaron. Furthermore, the velocity of the polaron moving along the polymer chain is crucially dependent on the photoexcitation. With an increase in the intensity of the optical field, the localization of the excited polaron will be deepened, with a decrease of the polaron's velocity. It is discovered that, for a charged carrier, photoexcitation is a significant factor in reducing the efficiency during the charged carrier transport in polymer solar cells. Mostly, the deep trapping effect of charged carrier in composite conjugated polymer solar cell presents an opportunity for the future application in nanoscale memory and imaging devices.

  3. Surface Carrier Dynamics on Semiconductor Studied with Femtosecond Core-Level Photoelectron Spectroscopy Using Extreme Ultraviolet High-Order Harmonic Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oguri, K.; Tsunoi, T.; Kato, K.; Nakano, H.; Nishikawa, T.; Gotoh, H.; Tateno, K.; Sogawa, T.

    2013-03-01

    We have used a femtosecond time-resolved core-level surface PES system based on the 92-eV harmonic source to study the surface carrier dynamics that induces the transient SPV on semiconductor surfaces. We clarified the temporal evolution of the transient SPV characterized by the time of the photo-generated carrier separation and recombination. This result demonstrates the potential of this technique for clarifying the initial stage of the surface carrier dynamics after photoexcitation.

  4. Physics of the Be(0001) surface core-level spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Feibelman, P.J.; Stumpf, R. )

    1994-12-15

    First-principles calculations for slabs as many as 13 layers thick show that the three surface core-level features observed on Be(0001) correspond to core-electron ionizations in its three outermost atomic layers. The calculations also imply that the experimental peak identified with core ionization in the bulk is a composite; theoretical core-ionization potentials for the fourth and deeper layers differ by as much as 90 meV. The sign and surprisingly large magnitudes of the Be(0001) surface core-level shifts (SCLS's) are attributed to unusually large surface-state contributions to the three outer layers' local densities of states. Both initial- and final-state effects are substantial in the SCLS's, and their contributions are additive.

  5. Core level binding energies of functionalized and defective graphene.

    PubMed

    Susi, Toma; Kaukonen, Markus; Havu, Paula; Ljungberg, Mathias P; Ayala, Paola; Kauppinen, Esko I

    2014-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is a widely used tool for studying the chemical composition of materials and it is a standard technique in surface science and technology. XPS is particularly useful for characterizing nanostructures such as carbon nanomaterials due to their reduced dimensionality. In order to assign the measured binding energies to specific bonding environments, reference energy values need to be known. Experimental measurements of the core level signals of the elements present in novel materials such as graphene have often been compared to values measured for molecules, or calculated for finite clusters. Here we have calculated core level binding energies for variously functionalized or defected graphene by delta Kohn-Sham total energy differences in the real-space grid-based projector-augmented wave density functional theory code (GPAW). To accurately model extended systems, we applied periodic boundary conditions in large unit cells to avoid computational artifacts. In select cases, we compared the results to all-electron calculations using an ab initio molecular simulations (FHI-aims) code. We calculated the carbon and oxygen 1s core level binding energies for oxygen and hydrogen functionalities such as graphane-like hydrogenation, and epoxide, hydroxide and carboxylic functional groups. In all cases, we considered binding energy contributions arising from carbon atoms up to the third nearest neighbor from the functional group, and plotted C 1s line shapes by using experimentally realistic broadenings. Furthermore, we simulated the simplest atomic defects, namely single and double vacancies and the Stone-Thrower-Wales defect. Finally, we studied modifications of a reactive single vacancy with O and H functionalities, and compared the calculated values to data found in the literature. PMID:24605278

  6. Core level binding energies of functionalized and defective graphene

    PubMed Central

    Kaukonen, Markus; Havu, Paula; Ljungberg, Mathias P; Ayala, Paola; Kauppinen, Esko I

    2014-01-01

    Summary X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is a widely used tool for studying the chemical composition of materials and it is a standard technique in surface science and technology. XPS is particularly useful for characterizing nanostructures such as carbon nanomaterials due to their reduced dimensionality. In order to assign the measured binding energies to specific bonding environments, reference energy values need to be known. Experimental measurements of the core level signals of the elements present in novel materials such as graphene have often been compared to values measured for molecules, or calculated for finite clusters. Here we have calculated core level binding energies for variously functionalized or defected graphene by delta Kohn–Sham total energy differences in the real-space grid-based projector-augmented wave density functional theory code (GPAW). To accurately model extended systems, we applied periodic boundary conditions in large unit cells to avoid computational artifacts. In select cases, we compared the results to all-electron calculations using an ab initio molecular simulations (FHI-aims) code. We calculated the carbon and oxygen 1s core level binding energies for oxygen and hydrogen functionalities such as graphane-like hydrogenation, and epoxide, hydroxide and carboxylic functional groups. In all cases, we considered binding energy contributions arising from carbon atoms up to the third nearest neighbor from the functional group, and plotted C 1s line shapes by using experimentally realistic broadenings. Furthermore, we simulated the simplest atomic defects, namely single and double vacancies and the Stone–Thrower–Wales defect. Finally, we studied modifications of a reactive single vacancy with O and H functionalities, and compared the calculated values to data found in the literature. PMID:24605278

  7. Core-level binding-energy shifts for the metallic elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Börje; Mårtensson, Nils

    1980-05-01

    chromium relative to the dns2 configuration in vanadium and manganese. When the core-level shift is referred to, the dns2 (or dn+1s) atomic configuration for all the elements in a transition series, a quite regular behavior of the shift is found. However, some structure can still be observed originating from a change of screening within the d band from a bonding to an antibonding type as one proceeds through the series. For elements beyond the coin metals the screening of a core hole is performed by p electrons, which provide a less effective screening mechanism than the d electrons for the transition metals. The coin metals are intermediate cases, partly due to a dominating s-electron screening and partly due to d-electron bonding in the initial state. The effect of the electron-density redistribution between the free atom and the solid on the core-level shift is particularly striking in the case of the rare-earth elements Pr-Sm and Tb-Tm. Here the remarkable situation is that a deep core electron is less bound in the atom than in the solid. Also for the actinides the electronic redistribution upon condensation gives rise to pronounced effects on the core-level shifts. Further, it is shown that the measured 6p32 binding energy in metallic uranium provides a clear demonstration of the occupation of the 5f level in this metal. The present treatment of the core-level shift for bulk metallic atoms can easily be generalized to surface atoms. From an empirical relation for the surface energy a simple expression for the shift of the surface core-level relative to the bulk can be derived. For the earlier transition metals, it is found that the core electrons are more bound at the surface than in the bulk, while for the heavier ones the opposite situation exists. This change of sign of the surface shift depends on the bonding-antibonding division of the d band. To illustrate how the present approach can be applied to alloy systems, a treatment of core-level shifts for rare

  8. Lattice charge models and core level shifts in disordered alloys.

    PubMed

    Underwood, T L; Cole, R J

    2013-10-30

    Differences in core level binding energies between atoms belonging to the same chemical species can be related to differences in their intra- and extra-atomic charge distributions, and differences in how their core holes are screened. With this in mind, we consider the charge-excess functional model (CEFM) for net atomic charges in alloys (Bruno et al 2003 Phys. Rev. Lett. 91 166401). We begin by deriving the CEFM energy function in order to elucidate the approximations which underpin this model. We thereafter consider the particular case of the CEFM in which the strengths of the 'local interactions' within all atoms are the same. We show that for binary alloys the ground state charges of this model can be expressed in terms of charge transfer between all pairs of unlike atoms analogously to the linear charge model (Magri et al 1990 Phys. Rev. B 42 11388). Hence, the model considered is a generalization of the linear charge model for alloys containing more than two chemical species. We then determine the model's unknown 'geometric factors' over a wide range of parameter space. These quantities are linked to the nature of charge screening in the model, and we illustrate that the screening becomes increasingly universal as the strength of the local interactions is increased. We then use the model to derive analytical expressions for various physical quantities, including the Madelung energy and the disorder broadening in the core level binding energies. These expressions are applied to ternary random alloys, for which it is shown that the Madelung energy and magnitude of disorder broadening are maximized at the composition at which the two species with the largest 'electronegativity difference' are equal, while the remaining species have a vanishing concentration. This result is somewhat counterintuitive with regards to the disorder broadening since it does not correspond to the composition with the highest entropy. Finally, the model is applied to CuPd and Cu

  9. Lattice charge models and core level shifts in disordered alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underwood, T. L.; Cole, R. J.

    2013-10-01

    Differences in core level binding energies between atoms belonging to the same chemical species can be related to differences in their intra- and extra-atomic charge distributions, and differences in how their core holes are screened. With this in mind, we consider the charge-excess functional model (CEFM) for net atomic charges in alloys (Bruno et al 2003 Phys. Rev. Lett. 91 166401). We begin by deriving the CEFM energy function in order to elucidate the approximations which underpin this model. We thereafter consider the particular case of the CEFM in which the strengths of the ‘local interactions’ within all atoms are the same. We show that for binary alloys the ground state charges of this model can be expressed in terms of charge transfer between all pairs of unlike atoms analogously to the linear charge model (Magri et al 1990 Phys. Rev. B 42 11388). Hence, the model considered is a generalization of the linear charge model for alloys containing more than two chemical species. We then determine the model’s unknown ‘geometric factors’ over a wide range of parameter space. These quantities are linked to the nature of charge screening in the model, and we illustrate that the screening becomes increasingly universal as the strength of the local interactions is increased. We then use the model to derive analytical expressions for various physical quantities, including the Madelung energy and the disorder broadening in the core level binding energies. These expressions are applied to ternary random alloys, for which it is shown that the Madelung energy and magnitude of disorder broadening are maximized at the composition at which the two species with the largest ‘electronegativity difference’ are equal, while the remaining species have a vanishing concentration. This result is somewhat counterintuitive with regards to the disorder broadening since it does not correspond to the composition with the highest entropy. Finally, the model is applied to Cu

  10. Photoexcitation dynamics of coupled semiconducting carbon nanotube thin films.

    PubMed

    Mehlenbacher, Randy D; Wu, Meng-Yin; Grechko, Maksim; Laaser, Jennifer E; Arnold, Michael S; Zanni, Martin T

    2013-04-10

    Carbon nanotubes are a promising means of capturing photons for use in solar cell devices. We time-resolved the photoexcitation dynamics of coupled, bandgap-selected, semiconducting carbon nanotubes in thin films tailored for photovoltaics. Using transient absorption spectroscopy and anisotropy measurements, we found that the photoexcitation evolves by two mechanisms with a fast and long-range component followed by a slow and short-range component. Within 300 fs of optical excitation, 20% of nanotubes transfer their photoexcitation over 5-10 nm into nearby nanotube fibers. After 3 ps, 70% of the photoexcitation resides on the smallest bandgap nanotubes. After this ultrafast process, the photoexcitation continues to transfer on a ~10 ps time scale but to predominantly aligned tubes. Ultimately the photoexcitation hops twice on average between fibers. These results are important for understanding the flow of energy and charge in coupled nanotube materials and light-harvesting devices. PMID:23464618

  11. Alkaline Earth Core Level Photoemission Spectroscopy of High-Temperature Superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, R.

    1993-01-01

    This paper examines photoemission measurements of the alkaline Earth core levels of high-temperature superconductors and related materials, models that seek to explain the large negative shifts observed relative to the corresponding alkaline Earth metals, and the effect of lattice site disorder on the core level spectra and the presence or absence of intrinsic surface peaks.

  12. Core-level spectroscopy of the Ni/W(110) interface: Correlation of W interfacial core-level shifts with first-layer Ni phases

    SciTech Connect

    Riffe,D.; Franckowiak, R.; Shinn, N.; Kim, B.; Kim, K.; Kang, T.

    2008-01-01

    We have measured W 4f7/2 core-level photoemission spectra from W(1 1 0) in the presence of Ni overlayers, from {approx}0.2 to {approx}3 monolayers. Interfacial core-level shifts associated with first-layer Ni phases have been identified: -230 {+-} 15 meV for the 1 x 1 pseudomorphic phase and -70 {+-} 7 meV for the 7 x 1 close-packed commensurate phase. At higher Ni coverages the interfacial core-level shift is -100 {+-} 10 meV. These shifts are analyzed using the partial-shift model of Nilsson et al.; the analysis indicates that the difference in binding energies between the 1 x 1 and 7 x 1 phases has a large contribution from structural differences between the two phases.

  13. A first-principles core-level XPS study on the boron impurities in germanium crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, Jun; Yoshimoto, Yoshihide; Suwa, Yuji

    2013-12-01

    We systematically investigated the x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) core-level shifts and formation energies of boron defects in germanium crystals and compared the results to those in silicon crystals. Both for XPS core-level shifts and formation energies, relationship between defects in Si and Ge is roughly linear. From the similarity in the formation energy, it is expected that the exotic clusters like icosahedral B12 exist in Ge as well as in Si.

  14. A first-principles core-level XPS study on the boron impurities in germanium crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Yamauchi, Jun; Yoshimoto, Yoshihide; Suwa, Yuji

    2013-12-04

    We systematically investigated the x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) core-level shifts and formation energies of boron defects in germanium crystals and compared the results to those in silicon crystals. Both for XPS core-level shifts and formation energies, relationship between defects in Si and Ge is roughly linear. From the similarity in the formation energy, it is expected that the exotic clusters like icosahedral B12 exist in Ge as well as in Si.

  15. Dynamics of photoexcited carrier relaxation and recombination in CdTe/CdS thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Levi, D.H.; Fluegel, B.D.; Ahrenkiel, R.K.

    1996-05-01

    Efficiency-limiting defects in photovoltaic devices are readily probed by time-resolved spectroscopy. This paper presents the first direct optical measurements of the relaxation and recombination pathways of photoexcited carriers in the CdS window layer of CdTe/CdS polycrystalline thin films. Femtosecond time-resolved pump/probe measurements indicate the possible existence of a two-phase CdS/CdSTe layer, rather than a continuously graded alloy layer at the CdTe/CdS interface. Complementary time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) measurements show that the photoexcited carriers are rapidly captured by deep-level defects. The temporal and density-dependent properties of the photoluminescence prove that the large Stokes shift of the PL relative to the band edge is due to strong phonon coupling to deep-level defects in CdS. The authors suggest that modifications in the CdS processing may enhance carrier collection efficiency in the blue spectral region.

  16. An easy-to-implement filter for separating photo-excited signals from topography in scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Kangkang; Rosenmann, Daniel; Holt, Martin; Winarski, Robert; Hla, Saw-Wai; Rose, Volker

    2013-06-15

    In order to achieve elemental and chemical sensitivity in scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), synchrotron x-rays have been applied to excite core-level electrons during tunneling. The x-ray photo-excitations result in tip currents that are superimposed onto conventional tunneling currents. While carrying important physical information, the varying x-ray induced currents can destabilize the feedback loop causing it to be unable to maintain a constant tunneling current, sometimes even causing the tip to retract fully or crash. In this paper, we report on an easy-to-implement filter circuit that can separate the x-ray induced currents from conventional tunneling currents, thereby allowing simultaneous measurements of topography and chemical contrasts. The filter and the schematic presented here can also be applied to other variants of light-assisted STM such as laser STM.

  17. Primary Conformation Change in Bacteriorhodopsin on Photoexcitation

    PubMed Central

    Yabushita, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Takayoshi

    2009-01-01

    Ultrafast dynamics of bacteriorhodopsin (bR) has been extensively studied experimentally and theoretically. However, there are several contradictory results reported, indicating that its detailed dynamics and initial process have not yet been fully clarified. In this work, changes in the amplitude and phase of molecular vibration in the isomerization process of bR were real-time probed simultaneously at 128 different wavelengths through intensity modulation of the electronic transition. Systematic information on the transient change in continuous spectrum extending from 505 nm (2.45 eV) to 675 nm (1.84 eV) showed different dynamics in each spectral region reflecting the difference in the excited states and intermediates dominating the dynamics during the photoisomerization. Careful analysis of the transient spectral changes and spectrograms calculated from the vibrational real-time traces elucidated that the primary event just after photoexcitation is the deformation of the retinal configuration, which decays within 30 fs near the C=N bond in the protonated Schiff base. The intensity of C=N stretching mode starts to decrease before the initiation of the frequency modulation of the C=C stretching mode. The C=C stretching mode frequency was modulated by a coupled torsion around the C13=C14 bond, leading to the photoisomerization around the bond. This study clarified the dynamics of the C=N and C=C stretching modes working as key vibration modes in the photoisomerization of bR. Furthermore, we have elucidated the modulation and decay dynamics of the C=C stretching mode in the photoreaction starting from H (Franck-Condon excited state) followed by I (twisted excited), and J (first intermediate) states. PMID:19217861

  18. Extrinsic photoresponse enhancement under additional intrinsic photoexcitation in organic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kounavis, P.

    2016-06-01

    Dual light beam photoresponse experiments are employed to explore the photoresponse under simultaneous extrinsic and intrinsic photoexcitation of organic semiconductors. The photoresponse of a red modulated light extrinsic photoexcitation is found that can be significantly enhanced under an additional blue bias-light intrinsic photoexcitation in two terminal pentacene films on glass substrates. From the frequency resolved photoresponse, it is deduced that the phenomenon of photoresponse enhancement can be attributed to an increase in the extrinsic photogeneration rate of the red modulated light and/or an improvement of the drift velocity of carriers under an additional blue light intrinsic photoexcitation. The possible predominant extrinsic photogeneration mechanism, which can be compatible with the observed dependence of the photoresponse enhancement on the frequency and on the light intensities of the red and blue light excitation, is the singlet exciton dissociation through electron transfer to acceptor-like traps. Moreover, an improvement in the drift velocity of carriers traversing grain boundaries with potential energy barriers, which may be reduced by trapping of minority carriers created from the intrinsic photoexcitation, may partly contribute to the photoresponse enhancement.

  19. High resolution core level spectroscopy of hydrogen-terminated (1 0 0) diamond.

    PubMed

    Schenk, A K; Rietwyk, K J; Tadich, A; Stacey, A; Ley, L; Pakes, C I

    2016-08-01

    Synchrotron-based photoelectron spectroscopy experiments are presented that address a long standing inconsistency in the treatment of the C1s core level of hydrogen terminated (1 0 0) diamond. Through a comparison of surface and bulk sensitive measurements we show that there is a surface related core level component to lower binding energy of the bulk diamond component; this component has a chemical shift of [Formula: see text] eV which has been attributed to carbon atoms which are part of the hydrogen termination. Additionally, our results indicate that the asymmetry of the hydrogen terminated (1 0 0) diamond C1s core level is an intrinsic aspect of the bulk diamond peak which we have attributed to sub-surface carbon layers. PMID:27299369

  20. Femtomagnetism in graphene induced by core level excitation of organic adsorbates

    PubMed Central

    Ravikumar, Abhilash; Baby, Anu; Lin, He; Brivio, Gian Paolo; Fratesi, Guido

    2016-01-01

    We predict the induction or suppression of magnetism in the valence shell of physisorbed and chemisorbed organic molecules on graphene occurring on the femtosecond time scale as a result of core level excitations. For physisorbed molecules, where the interaction with graphene is dominated by van der Waals forces and the system is non-magnetic in the ground state, numerical simulations based on density functional theory show that the valence electrons relax towards a spin polarized configuration upon excitation of a core-level electron. The magnetism depends on efficient electron transfer from graphene on the femtosecond time scale. On the other hand, when graphene is covalently functionalized, the system is magnetic in the ground state showing two spin dependent mid gap states localized around the adsorption site. At variance with the physisorbed case upon core-level excitation, the LUMO of the molecule and the mid gap states of graphene hybridize and the relaxed valence shell is not magnetic anymore. PMID:27089847

  1. Femtomagnetism in graphene induced by core level excitation of organic adsorbates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravikumar, Abhilash; Baby, Anu; Lin, He; Brivio, Gian Paolo; Fratesi, Guido

    2016-04-01

    We predict the induction or suppression of magnetism in the valence shell of physisorbed and chemisorbed organic molecules on graphene occurring on the femtosecond time scale as a result of core level excitations. For physisorbed molecules, where the interaction with graphene is dominated by van der Waals forces and the system is non-magnetic in the ground state, numerical simulations based on density functional theory show that the valence electrons relax towards a spin polarized configuration upon excitation of a core-level electron. The magnetism depends on efficient electron transfer from graphene on the femtosecond time scale. On the other hand, when graphene is covalently functionalized, the system is magnetic in the ground state showing two spin dependent mid gap states localized around the adsorption site. At variance with the physisorbed case upon core-level excitation, the LUMO of the molecule and the mid gap states of graphene hybridize and the relaxed valence shell is not magnetic anymore.

  2. Femtomagnetism in graphene induced by core level excitation of organic adsorbates.

    PubMed

    Ravikumar, Abhilash; Baby, Anu; Lin, He; Brivio, Gian Paolo; Fratesi, Guido

    2016-01-01

    We predict the induction or suppression of magnetism in the valence shell of physisorbed and chemisorbed organic molecules on graphene occurring on the femtosecond time scale as a result of core level excitations. For physisorbed molecules, where the interaction with graphene is dominated by van der Waals forces and the system is non-magnetic in the ground state, numerical simulations based on density functional theory show that the valence electrons relax towards a spin polarized configuration upon excitation of a core-level electron. The magnetism depends on efficient electron transfer from graphene on the femtosecond time scale. On the other hand, when graphene is covalently functionalized, the system is magnetic in the ground state showing two spin dependent mid gap states localized around the adsorption site. At variance with the physisorbed case upon core-level excitation, the LUMO of the molecule and the mid gap states of graphene hybridize and the relaxed valence shell is not magnetic anymore. PMID:27089847

  3. High resolution core level spectroscopy of hydrogen-terminated (1 0 0) diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenk, A. K.; Rietwyk, K. J.; Tadich, A.; Stacey, A.; Ley, L.; Pakes, C. I.

    2016-08-01

    Synchrotron-based photoelectron spectroscopy experiments are presented that address a long standing inconsistency in the treatment of the C1s core level of hydrogen terminated (1 0 0) diamond. Through a comparison of surface and bulk sensitive measurements we show that there is a surface related core level component to lower binding energy of the bulk diamond component; this component has a chemical shift of -0.16+/- 0.05 eV which has been attributed to carbon atoms which are part of the hydrogen termination. Additionally, our results indicate that the asymmetry of the hydrogen terminated (1 0 0) diamond C1s core level is an intrinsic aspect of the bulk diamond peak which we have attributed to sub-surface carbon layers.

  4. Spin polarization and magnetic dichroism in core-level photoemission from ferromagnets

    SciTech Connect

    Menchero, J G

    1997-05-01

    In this thesis we present a theoretical investigation of angle- and spin-resolved core-level photoemission from ferromagnetic Fe and Ni. We also consider magneto-dichroic effects due to reversal of the photon helicity or reversal of the sample magnetization direction. In chapter 1, we provide a brief outline of the history of photoemission, and show how it has played an important role in the development of modern physics. We then review the basic elements of the theory of core-level photoemission, and discuss the validity of the some of the commonly-used approximations. In chapter 2, we present a one-electron theory to calculate spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectra for an arbitrary photon polarization. The Hamiltonian includes both spin-orbit and exchange interactions. As test cases for the theory, we calculate the spin polarization and magnetic dichroism for the Fe 2p core level, and find that agreement with experiment is very good.

  5. Local-field corrections to surface and interface core-level shifts in insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Rotenberg, E. ); Olmstead, M.A. )

    1992-11-15

    We present a model for the extra-atomic contributions to core-level shifts in insulating thin films on polarizable substrates. The final-state shift is calculated from the screening-dependent local fields at a photoemitting atom and shown to be comparable to the initial-state Madelung potential shift in polar crystals. For Xe(111) films, our model completely accounts for experimental results. For NaCl(100) and CaF{sub 2}(111) surfaces, we present predictions of surface core-level shifts for simple bulk terminations. We discuss corrections which can be incorporated into our model.

  6. Potassium-induced charge redistribution on Si(111) surfaces studied by core-level photoemission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Y. ); Chen, C.T.; Meigs, G.; Sette, F. ); Illing, G. ); Shigakawa, H. )

    1992-03-15

    High-resolution core-level photoemission spectra of the K/Si(111)(7{times}7) surface system are presented. The Si 2{ital p} results show that potassium adsorption induces a Si 2{ital p} core level to shift to o/Ihighero/P binding energy, i.e., to the opposite direction than that expected from the Si-K electronegativity differences. This result is compared with that of the K/Si(111)({radical}3 {times} {radical}3 ){ital R}30{degree}-B system and is interpreted in terms of the K-induced charge redistribution between the Si-adatom--rest-atom pair.

  7. Detection of subsurface core-level shifts in Si 2p core-level photoemission from Si(111)-(1x1):As

    SciTech Connect

    Paggel, J.J.; Hasselblatt, M.; Horn, K.

    1997-04-01

    The (7 x 7) reconstruction of the Si(111) surface arises from a lowering energy through the reduction of the number of dangling bonds. This reconstruction can be removed by the adsorption of atoms such as hydrogen which saturate the dangling bonds, or by the incorporation of atoms, such as arsenic which, because of the additional electron it possesses, can form three bonds and a nonreactive lone pair orbital from the remaining two electrons. Core and valence level photoemission and ion scattering data have shown that the As atoms replace the top silicon atoms. Previous core level spectra were interpreted in terms of a bulk and a single surface doublet. The authors present results demonstrate that the core level spectrum contains two more lines. The authors assign these to subsurface silicon layers which also experience changes in the charge distribution when a silicon atom is replaced by an arsenic atom. Subsurface core level shifts are not unexpected since the modifications of the electronic structure and/or of photohole screening are likely to decay into the bulk and not just to affect the top-most substrate atoms. The detection of subsurface components suggests that the adsorption of arsenic leads to charge flow also in the second double layer of the Si(111) surface. In view of the difference in atomic radius between As and Si, it was suggested that the (1 x 1): As surface is strained. The presence of charge rearrangement up to the second double layer implies that the atomic coordinates also exhibit deviations from their ideal Si(111) counterparts, which might be detected through a LEED I/V or photoelectron diffraction analysis.

  8. Phase coherence and pairing amplitude in photo-excited superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perfetti, Luca; Piovera, Christian; Zhang, Zailan

    2016-05-01

    New data on Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ (Bi2212) reveal interesting aspects of photoexcited superconductors. The electrons dynamics show that inelastic scattering by nodal quasiparticles decreases when the temperature is lowered below the critical value of the superconducting phase transition. This drop of electronic dissipation is astonishingly robust and survives to photoexcitation densities much larger than the value sustained by long-range superconductivity. The unconventional behavior of quasiparticle scattering is ascribed to superconducting correlations extending on a length scale comparable to the inelastic mean-free path. Our measurements indicate that strongly driven superconductors enter in a regime without phase coherence but finite pairing amplitude.

  9. Enhancement of Paramagnetic Relaxation by Photoexcited Gold Nanorods

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Tao; Wamer, Wayne G.; Subczynski, Witold K.; Hou, Shuai; Wu, Xiaochun; Yin, Jun-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy was used to investigate the switchable, light-dependent effects of gold nanorods (GNRs) on paramagnetic properties of nitroxide spin probes. The photoexcited GNRs enhanced the spin-spin and spin-lattice relaxations of nitroxide spin probes. It was shown that molecular oxygen plays the key role in this process. Our results demonstrate that ESR is a powerful tool for investigating the events following photoexcitation of GNRs. The novel light-controlled effects observed for GNRs on paramagnetic properties and activities of surrounding molecules have a number of significant applications where oxygen sensing and oxygen activity is important. PMID:27071507

  10. Core level shifts in Cu-Pd alloys as a function of bulk composition and structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boes, Jacob R.; Kondratyuk, Peter; Yin, Chunrong; Miller, James B.; Gellman, Andrew J.; Kitchin, John R.

    2015-10-01

    CuPd alloys are important materials in hydrogen purification, where they are used as dense Pd-based separation membranes. Cu is added to impart sulfur tolerance and improved mechanical properties. At intermediate compositions and T < 873 K, a BCC alloy (B2) phase occurs, which has superior separation characteristics to those of the FCC phases that form at high Cu and high Pd compositions. Identifying the composition and temperature window where the B2 phase forms is a critical need to enable the design of improved alloys. A composition spread alloy film of Cu and Pd was synthesized. The film was characterized by electron back scatter diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, providing the core level shifts as a function of bulk composition and bulk structure. An anomalous deviation in the Cu core level shift was observed in the composition range 0.33 < xPd < 0.55 over which the B2 phase occurs. Density functional theory calculations were used to simulate core level shifts in the FCC and B2 alloy structures. They suggest that the anomalous deviation in core level shift is due to formation of the ordered B2 phase in this composition range.

  11. Modeling Shallow Core-Level Transitions in the Reflectance Spectra of Gallium-Containing Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoute, Nicholas; Aspnes, David

    2012-02-01

    The electronic structure of covalent materials is typically approached by band theory. However, shallow core level transitions may be better modeled by an atomic-scale approach. We investigate shallow d-core level reflectance spectra in terms of a local atomic-multiplet theory, a novel application of a theory typically used for higher-energy transitions on more ionic type material systems. We examine specifically structure in reflectance spectra of GaP, GaAs, GaSb, GaSe, and GaAs1-xPx due to transitions that originate from Ga3d core levels and occur in the 20 to 25 eV range. We model these spectra as a Ga^+3 closed-shell ion whose transitions are influenced by perturbations on 3d hole-4p electron final states. These are specifically spin-orbit effects on the hole and electron, and a crystal-field effect on the hole, attributed to surrounding bond charges and positive ligand anions. Empirical radial-strength parameters were obtained by least-squares fitting. General trends with respect to anion electronegativity are consistent with expectations. In addition to the spin-orbit interaction, crystal-field effects play a significant role in breaking the degeneracy of the d levels, and consequently are necessary to understand shallow 3d core level spectra.

  12. Surface core-level shifts and atomic coordination at a stepped W(110) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Riffe, D.M.; Kim, B.; Erskine, J.L. ); Shinn, N.D. )

    1994-11-15

    Core-level 4[ital f][sub 7/2] photoemission spectra have been measured from a single, bifacial W crystal, which has both a flat W(110) and a vicinal, stepped W(110) [W(320)] surface. This procedure reduces uncertainties in the quantitative description of peaks in the spectra from W(320). Various analyses, including nonlinear least-squares curve fitting, show that the average surface core-level shift (SCS) for W(320) is only [similar to][minus]140 meV, compared to [minus]310 meV for W(110) and that, at a maximum, only two of five terrace rows are isoelectronic to W(110) surface atoms. The absence of a large SCS for the step-edge atoms contradicts earlier interpretations of W(320) core-level spectra and departs significantly from expectations based on atomic-coordination models or tight-binding calculations of a bulk truncated surface. We suggest that systematic errors are responsible for the differences in reported core-level shifts for W(320). Implications of possible step-edge-driven atomic rearrangements are discussed.

  13. Two-Color Ultrafast Photoexcited Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Camillone, N.; Dolocan, A.; Acharya, D.P.; Zahl, P.; Sutter, P.

    2011-05-26

    We report on two-color two-photon photoexcitation of a metal surface driven by ultrafast laser pulses and detected with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) tip as a proximate anode. Results are presented for two cases: (i) where the tip is retracted from the surface far enough to prohibit tunneling, and (ii) where the tip is within tunneling range of the surface. A delay-modulation technique is implemented to isolate the two-color photoemission from concurrent one-color two-photon photoemission and provide subpicosecond time-resolved detection. When applied with the tip in tunneling range, this approach effectively isolates the two-photon photoexcited current signal from the conventional tunneling current and enables subpicosecond time-resolved detection of the photoexcited surface electrons. The advantage of the two-color approach is highlighted by comparison with the one-color case where optical interference causes thermal modulation of the STM tip length, resulting in tunneling current modulations that are orders of magnitude larger than the current due to photoexcitation of surface electrons. By completely eliminating this interference, and thereby avoiding thermal modulation of the STM tip length, the two-color approach represents an important step toward the ultimate goal of simultaneous subnanometer and subpicosecond measurements of surface electron dynamics by ultrafast-laser-excited STM.

  14. Understanding photoexcitation dynamics in a three-step photoionization of atomic uranium and measurement of photoexcitation and photoionization cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, P. K.; Sahoo, A. C.; Das, R. C.; Shah, M. L.; Pulhani, A. K.; Manohar, K. G.; Dev, Vas

    2015-09-01

    Photoexcitation dynamics in a three-step photoionization of atomic uranium has been investigated using time-resolved two-color three-photon and delayed three-color three-photon photoionization signals. Investigations are carried out in an atomic beam of uranium coupled to a high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer using three tunable pulsed dye lasers. Dependence of both the signals on the second-step laser photon fluence is studied. Excited-level-to-excited-level photoexcitation cross section and photoionization cross section from the second excited level are simultaneously determined by analyzing the two-color three-photon and three-color three-photon photoionization signals using population rate equation model. Using this methodology, photoexcitation and photoionization cross sections at seven values of the second-step laser wavelength have been measured. From the measured values of the photoexcitation cross sections, we have obtained excited-level-to-excited-level transition probabilities and compared these with the values reported in the literature.

  15. First-principles interpretation of core-level spectroscopy of photoelectrochemical materials and processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pemmaraju, Sri Chaitanya Das; Prendergast, David

    2014-03-01

    We present two case studies of first-principles theoretical methods applied in conjunction with experimental core-level spectroscopy measurements to investigate the electronic structure and dynamical processes in molecular and interfacial systems relevant to photoelectrochemical (PEC) technologies. In the first, we study the core-level and valence spectroscopies of two zinc(II)-porphyrin based Donor-pi-Acceptor (D-p-A) dyes using the occupancy-constrained excited electron and core-hole (XCH) approach and time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) simulations. In the second, we use constrained DFT and TDDFT to interpret measured transient core-level shifts in time-resolved femtosecond x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, investigating the dynamics of the electron injection process from a N3 dye molecule chemisorbed onto a ZnO substrate. These studies illustrate the utility of first-principles methods in guiding the design of better PEC materials. This work was performed at the Molecular Foundry, LBNL, supported by the Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  16. Core-level binding-energy shifts due to ionic adsorbates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagus, Paul S.; Pacchioni, Gianfranco

    1993-11-01

    The mechanisms responsible for the core-level binding-energy (BE) shifts due to alkali-metal and halogen adsorption on metal surfaces are identified and characterized through theoretical analyses of the surface electronic structure. By means of cluster model calculations of the adsorption of K and F atoms on the Cu(100) surface, we show that ionic adsorbates, both cationic and anionic, lead to small BE shifts, typically <200 meV, of the substrate metal atoms. These small shifts arise from the cancellation of two large initial-state effects, the electric field created by the ions at the surface and the consequent polarization of the metal conduction-band electrons. These two mechanisms induce rather large shifts of opposite sign and similar magnitude in the substrate core-level BE's, with resulting small final shifts. This is true for all electronic states, clusters, adsorption sites, and substrate-adsorbate distances. Thus, substrate BE shifts do not provide information about the bonding nature and the adsorption site. On the other hand, ionic and covalent bonding between the substrate and the adsorbate lead to significantly different shifts in the core-level BE's of the adsorbate. The BE shifts of alkali-metal atoms adsorbed on metal surfaces as functions of the coverage provide an indication of the transition from an ionic bond at low coverage to a covalent bond at high coverage.

  17. Surface core-level shifts of GaAs(100)(2×4) from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punkkinen, M. P. J.; Laukkanen, P.; Kokko, K.; Ropo, M.; Ahola-Tuomi, M.; Väyrynen, I. J.; Komsa, H.-P.; Rantala, T. T.; Pessa, M.; Kuzmin, M.; Vitos, L.; Kollár, J.; Johansson, B.

    2007-09-01

    First-principles calculations show that measured surface core-level shifts (SCLSs) of the GaAs(100)(2×4) surfaces can be described within the initial state effects. The calculated As3d and Ga3d SCLSs for the β2 and α2 reconstructions of the GaAs(100)(2×4) surfaces are in reasonable agreement with recent measurements. In particular, the results confirm that both the lower and the higher binding energy SCLSs, relative to the bulk emission in the As3d photoelectron spectra, are intrinsic properties of the GaAs(100)(2×4) surfaces. The most positive and most negative As shifts are attributed to the third layer As atoms, which differs from the previous intuitive suggestions. In general, calculations show that significant SCLSs arise from deep layers, and that there are more than two SCLSs. Our previously measured As3d spectra are fitted afresh using the calculated SCLSs. The intensity ratios of the SCLSs, obtained from the fits, show that as the heating temperature of the GaAs(100)(2×4) surface is increased gradually, the area of the α2 reconstruction increases on the surface, but the β2 phase remains within the whole temperature range, in agreement with previous experimental findings. Our results show that the combination of the experimental and theoretical results is a prerequisite for the accurate analysis of the SCLSs of the complex reconstructed surfaces.

  18. Photo-excited broadband tunable terahertz metamaterial absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianna; Wang, Guocui; Zhang, Bo; He, Ting; He, Yanan; Shen, Jingling

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate a photo-excited broadband tunable metamaterial absorber for use in the terahertz region. The metamaterial absorber consists of a hybrid metal-semiconductor square split ring and a metallic ground plane that are separated by a dielectric resonator spacer. The conductivity of the silicon used to fill the gap in the metallic resonator is tuned actively as a function of the incident pump power, which results in frequency modulation of the resonance absorption peak. Broadband tunable metamaterial absorbers are produced by suitable placement of the photoconductive silicon in different critical regions of the metallic resonator. In addition, the proposed method is applicable to a concentric rings-based metallic resonator. The proposed photo-excited broadband tunable metamaterial absorber has numerous potential applications, including uses as terahertz modulators and switches.

  19. Electron collisional excitation and resonant photoexcitation of solar S XI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kastner, S. O.; Bhatia, A. K.

    1986-01-01

    The line emission of carbon-like S XI is predicted using a comprehensive 46-level model including the configurations 2p2, 2s2p3, 2p3s, 2p4, 2p3p, 2p3d. Relative intensities of allowed, intercombination, and forbidden lines are computed for quiet and active solar conditions. The process of photoexcitation by the Fe XIII 191.26 A line is included to study its effect on EUV lines and the infrared forbidden lines at 1.92 and 1.39 microns. It is concluded that an observation of the 1.92-micron line by Olsen, Anderson, and Stewart (1971) is consistent with quiet solar conditions in the absence of photoexcitation.

  20. Microscopic view on the ultrafast photoluminescence from photoexcited graphene.

    PubMed

    Winzer, Torben; Ciesielski, Richard; Handloser, Matthias; Comin, Alberto; Hartschuh, Achim; Malic, Ermin

    2015-02-11

    We present a joint theory-experiment study on ultrafast photoluminescence from photoexcited graphene. On the basis of a microscopic theory, we reveal two distinct mechanisms behind the occurring photoluminescence: besides the well-known incoherent contribution driven by nonequilibrium carrier occupations, we found a coherent part that spectrally shifts with the excitation energy. In our experiments, we demonstrate for the first time the predicted appearance and spectral shift of the coherent photoluminescence. PMID:25616043

  1. Dimensionality and doping effect on the Core-level X-ray photoemission satellites in layered ruthenates.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Haizhong; Li, Yi; Hu, Biao; Jin, Rongying; Plummer, E. W.; Zhang, Jiandi; Urbina, D.; Liu, Tijiang; Fobes, David; Mao, Zhiqiang

    2009-03-01

    Core-level photoelectron spectra of the layered perovskite crystal Srn+1RunO3n+1 (n = 1, 2, and 3) and Mn-doped Sr3Ru2O7 are investigated by x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) techniques. The Sr 3d and Ru 3d core-level spectra exhibit a two-peak structure, screened and unscreened peaks, indicating strong correlation effects among Ru 4d electrons. However, there are little changes of the core-level satellite features with n, suggesting the electron-electron correlation is mainly confined in the RuO2 plane. On the other hand, doping of Mn will drastically affect the core-level spectral weight, reflecting the doping-induced metal-to-insulator transition in the doped system. The position of Ru-core levels remain the same, thus, indicating no doping-induced change of Ru valence.

  2. Single-electron transport through the vortex core levels in clean superconductors.

    SciTech Connect

    Kopnin, N. B.; Mel'nikov, A. S.; Vinokur, V. M.; Materials Science Division; Helsinki Univ. of Technical Physics; L. D. Landau Inst. for Theoretical Physics; Russian Aacademy of Sciences

    2003-08-01

    We develop a microscopic theory of single-electron low-energy transport in normal-metal-superconductor-normal-metal hybrid structures in the presence of applied magnetic field introducing vortex lines in a superconductor layer. We show that vortex cores in a thick and clean superconducting layer are similar to mesoscopic conducting channels where the bound core states play the role of transverse modes. The transport through not very thick layers is governed by another mechanism, namely by tunneling via vortex core levels. We apply our method to calculation of the thermal conductance along the magnetic field.

  3. Effects of vibrational motion on core-level spectra of prototype organic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Uejio, Janel S.; Schwartz, Craig P.; Saykally, Richard J.; Prendergast, David

    2008-08-21

    A computational approach is presented for prediction and interpretation of core-level spectra of complex molecules. Applications are presented for several isolated organic molecules, sampling a range of chemical bonding and structural motifs. Comparison with gas phase measurements indicate that spectral lineshapes are accurately reproduced both above and below the ionization potential, without resort to ad hoc broadening. Agreement with experiment is significantly improved upon inclusion of vibrations via molecular dynamics sampling. We isolate and characterize spectral features due to particular electronic transitions enabled by vibrations, noting that even zero-point motion is sufficient in some cases.

  4. Orbitally modulated photoexcited Si I emission in the eclipsing composite-spectrum binary ζ Aurigae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, G. M.; Griffin, R. E. M.; Bennett, P. D.; O'Riain, N.

    2016-02-01

    We examine the little-known phenomenon of orbitally modulated Si I emission at λ 3905.523 Å and λ 4102.936 Å in composite-spectrum binaries, with specific reference to ζ Aurigae (K4 Ib + B5 V). The emission is detected in the isolated spectrum of the B-type dwarf secondary, and while λ 4102 Å is heavily blended with Hδ, λ 3905 Å falls in the B-star's featureless continuum. The narrowness of the emission (vturb ≃ 6 km s-1) demonstrates that it originates in the upper photosphere or deep chromosphere of the K star primary. We propose that photoexcitation by the hot star's UV continuum, followed by recombination and cascades, leads to resonant scattering and subsequent pumping of lower opacity transitions in the singlet and triplet systems of Si I. This process channels the UV continuum into select narrow emission lines. We have also identified weaker photoexcited emission of Fe II at λ 3938.289 Å. The strengths, positions, and widths of the λ 3905 Å emission line vary with orbital phase owing to changes in the dilution of the irradiating flux and in the geometrical aspect of the irradiated hemisphere. Utilizing the inherent spatial resolution provided by the illuminated patch, and assuming that the K star is spherical with isotropic emission, yields vsin i ˜ 5.7 km s-1. Evidence of tidal distortion was deduced from the timing of the rapidly rising phase of the emission just after periastron. Increasing the diagnostic potential requires radiative transfer modelling of the formation and centre-to-limb variation of the emission.

  5. Angle and temperature dependence of magnetic circular dichroism in core-level photoemission from Gd(0001)

    SciTech Connect

    Denecke, R.; Morais, J.; Ynzunza, R. X.; Menchero, J. G.; Liesegang, J.; Rice, M.; Kortright, J.; Hussain, Z.; Fadley, C. S.

    1997-04-01

    Magnetic dichroism in core-level photoelectron emission from solids represents a promising new element-specific probe of surface and interface atomic structure and magnetic order. One way of measuring such effects is by using photoelectrons excited by circular polarized radiation, thus leading to magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) if the intensity with right-circular polarized (RCP) light is not equal to that with left-circular polarized (LCP) light. The spin-integrated photoelectron intensity in a certain emission direction also in general depends on the direction of the magnetization in a magnetic material. In fact, if the magnetization lies in a surface mirror plane, then inverting its direction can provide a second way of measuring MCD. Purely atomic theoretical models have been successful in explaining many aspects of such data. By varying the emission direction one also probes the geometric structure of the sample. But such MCD in photoelectron angular distributions (MCDAD) then has to be interpreted also in terms of photoelectron diffraction. Measuring the temperature dependence of such MCD effects also provides a useful tool for studying magnetic transition temperatures. The authors have here studied such effects in core-level emission from Gd(0001).

  6. Core-level shifts in fcc random alloys: A first-principles approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olovsson, W.; Göransson, C.; Pourovskii, L. V.; Johansson, B.; Abrikosov, I. A.

    2005-08-01

    First-principles theoretical calculations of the core-level binding-energy shift (CLS) for eight binary face-centered-cubic (fcc) disordered alloys, CuPd, AgPd, CuNi, NiPd, CuAu, PdAu, CuPt, and NiPt, are carried out within density-functional theory (DFT) using the coherent potential approximation. The shifts of the Cu and Ni 2p3/2 , Ag and Pd 3d5/2 , and Pt and Au 4f7/2 core levels are calculated according to the complete screening picture, which includes both initial-state (core-electron energy eigenvalue) and final-state (core-hole screening) effects in the same scheme. The results are compared with available experimental data, and the agreement is shown to be good. The CLSs are analyzed in terms of initial- and final-state effects. We also compare the complete screening picture with the CLS obtained by the transition-state method, and find very good agreement between these two alternative approaches for the calculations within the DFT. In addition the sensitivity of the CLS to relativistic and magnetic effects is studied.

  7. Strongly correlated valence electrons and core-level chemical bonding of Lithium at terapascal pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Anguang; Zhang, Fan

    2015-03-01

    As the simplest pure metal, lithium exhibits some novel properties on electrical conductivity and crystal structures under high pressure. All-electron density functional theory simulations, recently developed by using the linear combination of localized Slater atomic orbitals, revealed that the bandwidth of its valence bands remains almost unchanged within about 3.5 eV even up to a terapascal pressure range. This indicates that the development from delocalized to strongly correlated electronic systems takes place under compression, resulting in metal-semiconductor and superconductivity transitions together with a sequence of new high-pressure crystal phases, discovered experimentally. In contrast to the valence bands, the core-level bands become broadening up to about 10 eV at terapascal pressures. It means the transformation from chemical non-bonding to bonding for core electrons. Thus, dense lithium under compression can be characterized as core-level chemical bonding and a completely new class of strongly correlated materials with narrow bands filled in s-electron shells only.

  8. Core-level photoemission and work-function investigation of Na on Cu(110)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, C.; Shi, X.; Tang, D.; Heskett, D.; Tsuei, K.-D.

    1993-10-01

    Core-level photoemission, low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), and work-function change measurements have been carried out to study the coverage dependence of Na/Cu(110) at room temperature. The results of LEED and work-function measurements are qualitatively similar to most other investigations of alkali-metal adsorption on fcc(110) metal surfaces. With LEED, we observed an alkali-metal-induced (1×2) reconstruction at intermediate coverage. We have performed a simple calculation to account for the work-function differences between Na/fcc(110) and Na/fcc(111) metal surfaces. The comparison of coverage-dependent core-level binding-energy shifts between Na/Cu(110) and Na/Cu(111) reveals that a low-coverage plateau in the curve of binding energy vs Na coverage for Na/Cu(110) is associated with the Na-induced reconstruction, and can be accounted for within a localized picture of the reconstruction.

  9. Core level excitations—A fingerprint of structural and electronic properties of epitaxial silicene

    SciTech Connect

    Friedlein, R. Fleurence, A.; Aoyagi, K.; Yamada-Takamura, Y.; Jong, M. P. de; Van Bui, H.; Wiggers, F. B.; Yoshimoto, S.; Koitaya, T.; Shimizu, S.; Noritake, H.; Mukai, K.; Yoshinobu, J.

    2014-05-14

    From the analysis of high-resolution Si 2p photoelectron and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra, we show that core level excitations of epitaxial silicene on ZrB{sub 2}(0001) thin films are characteristically different from those of sp{sup 3}-hybridized silicon. In particular, it is revealed that the lower Si 2p binding energies and the low onset in the NEXAFS spectra as well as the occurrence of satellite features in the core level spectra are attributed to the screening by low-energy valence electrons and interband transitions between π bands, respectively. The analysis of observed Si 2p intensities related to chemically distinct Si atoms indicates the presence of at least one previously unidentified component. The presence of this component suggests that the observation of stress-related stripe domains in scanning tunnelling microscopy images is intrinsically linked to the relaxation of Si atoms away from energetically unfavourable positions.

  10. Quanty for core level spectroscopy - excitons, resonances and band excitations in time and frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haverkort, Maurits W.

    2016-05-01

    Depending on the material and edge under consideration, core level spectra manifest themselves as local excitons with multiplets, edge singularities, resonances, or the local projected density of states. Both extremes, i.e., local excitons and non-interacting delocalized excitations are theoretically well under control. Describing the intermediate regime, where local many body interactions and band-formation are equally important is a challenge. Here we discuss how Quanty, a versatile quantum many body script language, can be used to calculate a variety of different core level spectroscopy types on solids and molecules, both in the frequency as well as the time domain. The flexible nature of Quanty allows one to choose different approximations for different edges and materials. For example, using a newly developed method merging ideas from density renormalization group and quantum chemistry [1-3], Quanty can calculate excitons, resonances and band-excitations in x-ray absorption, photoemission, x-ray emission, fluorescence yield, non-resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, resonant inelastic x-ray scattering and many more spectroscopy types. Quanty can be obtained from: http://www.quanty.org.

  11. Near-surface transport of semiconductor nanoclusters upon cyclic photoexcitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekhtyar', M. L.; Rozenbaum, V. M.; Trakhtenberg, L. I.

    2016-07-01

    A mechanism for the directed motion of a semiconductor nanocluster along a polar substrate upon cyclic photoexcitation that alters the electron density distribution inside the particle is studied. A model that allows us to estimate the average velocity and optimize the system parameters (particle size, distance between the particle and the substrate, the average cycle duration, and charge distribution in the substrate) so as to ensure the maximum velocity is proposed. At the optimum parameters, the average velocity of directed motion can be quite high (~3 mm/s).

  12. Photoexcitation dynamics in thin films of insulated molecular wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, M. H.; Frampton, M. J.; Anderson, H. L.; Herz, L. M.

    2006-12-01

    A study is presented on how encapsulation of conjugated polymer chains affects the motion of photoexcitations and the formation of interchain aggregates in solid films. It is shown that threading of a poly(diphenylene vinylene) backbone inside insulating cyclodextrins (rotaxination) and/or complexation of the chains with poly(ethylene oxide) are effective means of preventing the diffusion of excitons to nonradiative defect sites. Ultrafast time-resolved photoluminescence data reveal that excitation transfer between encapsulated chains is still possible and, for the case of rotaxination, is likely to be facilitated through close packing of end groups belonging to adjacent chains.

  13. Shape resonance phenomena in CO following K-shell photoexcitation

    SciTech Connect

    Truesdale, C.M.; Southworth, S.H.; Kobrin, P.H.; Becker, U.; Lindle, D.W.; Kerkhoff, H.G.; Shirley, D.A.

    1983-04-25

    Electron cross sections and asymmetries following photoexcitation of the CO K shells were measured directly. Energy analysis of ejected electrons yielded cross sections exhibiting sigma shape resonances in the C(1s), C(KVV), and O(1s) channels, and a ..pi.. resonance in the C(KVV) channel, confirming earlier indirect measurements. Asymmetry measurements showed a sigma shape resonance in the C(1s) channel, in good agreement with the predictions of Dehmer and Dill. The C(KVV) ..pi.. resonance showed nearly isotropic behavior.

  14. Production of excited neutral and ionic photofragments following core-level excitation in molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, R. A.; Wen, C.-R.; Tan, K.; Chen, J.-M.

    1990-05-01

    We have performed the first experiments to examine the neutral fragmentation paths following direct core-level excitation in a molecule. Using monochromatized synchrotron radiation in the range 100-140 eV, we have monitored the dispersed UV/optical fluorescence resulting from excitation of a Si 2p electron in SiF4. The main features in the fluorescence spectrum have been identified as emission from the SiF+4 D state and from excited SiF, Si, F, and Si+. Features in the fluorescence excitation spectra are assigned to excitation of a Si 2p electron to unoccupied valence orbitals, Rydberg orbitals, and shape resonances. There is a large enhancement in the yield of excited-state fragments following core-to-Rydberg excitation, which is due to the greater probability of the core-excited Rydberg state decaying, via a resonant Auger process, to highly excited, unbound states of SiF+4.

  15. Alkyl-terminated Si(111) surfaces: A high-resolution, core level photoelectron spectroscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, J.; Linford, M.R.; Wigren, C.; Cao, R.; Pianetta, P.; Chidsey, C.E.

    1999-01-01

    The bonding of alkyl monolayers to Si(111) surfaces has been studied with high-resolution core level photoelectron spectroscopy (PES). Two very different wet-chemical methods have been used to prepare the alkyl monolayers: (i) Olefin insertion into the H{endash}Si bond of the H{endash}Si(111) surface, and (ii) replacement of Cl on the Cl{endash}Si(111) surface by an alkyl group from an alkyllithium reagent. In both cases, PES has revealed a C 1s component shifted to lower binding energy and a Si 2p component shifted to higher binding energy. Both components are attributed to the presence of a C{endash}Si bond at the interface. Along with photoelectron diffraction data [Appl. Phys. Lett. {bold 71}, 1056, (1997)], these data are used to show that these two synthetic methods can be used to functionalize the Si(111) surface. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Exciton and core-level electron confinement effects in transparent ZnO thin films

    PubMed Central

    Mosquera, Adolfo A.; Horwat, David; Rashkovskiy, Alexandr; Kovalev, Anatoly; Miska, Patrice; Wainstein, Dmitry; Albella, Jose M.; Endrino, Jose L.

    2013-01-01

    The excitonic light emission of ZnO films have been investigated by means of photoluminescence measurements in ultraviolet-visible region. Exciton confinement effects have been observed in thin ZnO coatings with thickness below 20 nm. This is enhanced by a rise of the intensity and a blue shift of the photoluminescence peak after extraction of the adsorbed species upon annealing in air. It is found experimentally that the free exciton energy (determined by the photoluminescence peak) is inversely proportional to the square of the thickness while core-level binding energy is inversely proportional to the thickness. These findings correlate very well with the theory of kinetic and potential confinements.

  17. Physics of the Be(10{bar 1} 0) Surface Core Level Spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Lizzit, S.; Pohl, K. |; Baraldi, A.; Comelli, G.; Fritzsche, V.; Plummer, E.W. |; Stumpf, R.; Hofmann, P. ||

    1998-10-01

    Photoelectron diffraction has been utilized to confirm the theoretical prediction that the surface core level shifts observed for Be(10{bar 1}0) have been improperly assigned. The original assignment based upon the relative intensity of the shifted components was intuitively obvious: the peak with the largest shift of {minus}0.7 eV with respect to the bulk was associated with the surface plane, the next peak shifted by {minus}0.5 eV stems from the second layer, and the third peak at {minus}0.22 eV from the third and fourth layers. First-principles theory and our experimental data show that the largest shift is associated with the second plane, not the first plane. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society }

  18. An experimental and theoretical core-level study of tautomerism in guanine.

    PubMed

    Plekan, Oksana; Feyer, Vitaliy; Richter, Robert; Coreno, Marcello; Vall-Llosera, Gemma; Prince, Kevin C; Trofimov, Alexander B; Zaytseva, Irina L; Moskovskaya, Tatyana E; Gromov, Evgeniy V; Schirmer, Jochen

    2009-08-20

    The core level photoemission and near edge X-ray photoabsorption spectra of guanine in the gas phase have been measured and the results interpreted with the aid of high level ab initio calculations. Tautomers are clearly identified spectroscopically, and their relative free energies and Boltzmann populations at the temperature of the experiment (600 K) have been calculated and compared with the experimental results and with previous calculations. We obtain good agreement between experiment and the Boltzmann weighted theoretical photoemission spectra, which allows a quantitative determination of the ratio of oxo to hydroxy tautomer populations. For the photoabsorption spectra, good agreement is found for the C 1s and O 1s spectra but only fair agreement for the N 1s edge. PMID:19634878

  19. Communication: Application of state-specific multireference coupled cluster methods to core-level excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Brabec, Jiri; Bhaskaran-Nair, Kiran; Govind, Niranjan; Pittner, Jiri; Kowalski, Karol

    2012-11-07

    The concept of the model space underlying multireference coupled-cluster (MRCC) formulations is a powerful tool to deal with complex correlation effects for various electronic states. Here, we demonstrate that iterative state-specific MRCC methods (SS-MRCC) based on properly defined model spaces can be used to describe core-level excited states even when canonical Hartree-Fock orbitals are utilized. We show that the SS-MRCC models with single and double excitations (SSMRCCSD) are comparable in accuracy to high-level single reference equation-of-motion coupled cluster (EOMCC) formalism. We also demonstrate that the SS-MRCC methods are capable of providing high accuracy results without experiencing numerical problems of the EOMCC methods.

  20. Exploring the core level shift origin of sulfur and thiolates on Pd(111) surfaces.

    PubMed

    Salvarezza, Roberto Carlos; Carro, Pilar

    2015-10-01

    Thiol molecules on planar metal surfaces are widely used for building sensing and electronic devices and also as capping agents to protect and to control the size and shape of nanoparticles. In the case of Pd the thiol molecules exhibit a complex behavior because C-S bond scission is possible, resulting in a significant amount of co-adsorbed S. Therefore identification of these species on Pd is a key point for many applications, a task that is usually achieved by XPS. Here we show, from DFT calculations, that the core level shift (CLS) of the S 2p binding energy (BE) of thiol and sulfur on different thiol-Pd(111) surface models strongly depends on the adsorbed or subsurface state of sulfur atoms. Our results reflect the complexity of S 2p BE behavior and contribute to understanding and reanalyzing the experimental data of thiolated Pd surfaces. PMID:26325179

  1. Surface core-level binding energy shifts for MgO(100).

    PubMed

    Nelin, Connie J; Uhl, Felix; Staemmler, Volker; Bagus, Paul S; Fujimori, Yuichi; Sterrer, Martin; Kuhlenbeck, Helmut; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2014-10-28

    Theoretical and experimental results for the surface core-level binding energy, BE, shifts, SCLS, for MgO(100) are presented and the anomalous O(1s) SCLS is interpreted in terms of the surface electronic structure. While the Mg(2p) surface BE shifts to a higher value than bulk by ≈1 eV as expected from the different surface and bulk Madelung potentials, the O(1s) SCLS is almost 0 rather than ≈-1 eV, expected from the Madelung potentials. The distortion of the surface atoms from the spherical symmetry of the bulk Mg and O atoms is examined by a novel theoretical procedure. The anomalous O SCLS is shown to arise from the increase of the effective size of surface O anions. PMID:25212984

  2. Quantum confinement, core level shifts, and dopant segregation in P-doped Si⟨110⟩ nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jiaxin; Chan, Tzu-Liang; Chelikowsky, James R.

    2010-10-01

    We examine P-doped Si⟨110⟩ nanowires by employing a real-space pseudopotential method. We find the defect wave function becomes more localized along the nanowire axis and the donor ionization energy increases, owing to quantum confinement. It is more difficult to dope a P atom into a Si⟨110⟩ nanowire than to dope Si bulk because the formation energy increases with decreasing size. By comparing the formation energy for different P positions within a nanowire, we find that if a P atom at the nanowire surface can overcome the energy barrier close to the surface, there is a tendency for the dopant to reside within the nanowire core. We calculate P core levels shift as P changes position within the nanowire and provide a means for x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy experiments to determine the location of P atoms within a Si nanowire.

  3. Plasmon response of a quantum-confined electron gas probed by core-level photoemission

    SciTech Connect

    Ozer, Mustafa M; Moon, Eun Ju; Eguiluz, Adolfo G; Weitering, Harm H

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate the existence of quantized 'bulk' plasmons in ultrathin magnesium films on Si(111) by analyzing plasmon-loss satellites in core-level photoemission spectra, recorded as a function of the film thickness d. Remarkably, the plasmon energy is shown to vary as 1/d{sup 2} all the way down to three atomic layers. The loss spectra are dominated by the n=1 and n=2 normal modes, consistent with the excitation of plasmons involving quantized electronic subbands. With decreasing film thickness, spectral weight is gradually transferred from the plasmon modes to the low-energy single-particle excitations. These results represent striking manifestations of the role of quantum confinement on plasmon resonances in precisely controlled nanostructures.

  4. Characterization of combustion chamber products by core-level photoabsorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kellar, S. A.; Huff, W. R.A.; Moler, E J; Yeah, S.; Hussain, Z.

    1997-04-01

    The lubricating performance of motor oil is adversely affected by the carbon soot contamination that is a natural by-product of the combustion process. Particularly in diesel engines, {open_quote}blow-by{close_quote} is a problem that greatly decreases the longevity of the engine-lubricating oil. Motor oil manufacturers spend considerable resources developing new oil formulations that counteract the adverse affects of this combustion soot. At present, the only effective way to test new formulations is in a working engine. This process is obviously expensive and not especially efficient. In this ongoing work in collaboration with Chevron Research and Technology, the authors goal is to find a form of carbon that chemically resembles the soot created by the {open_quote}blow-by{close_quote} in a diesel engine. The chemically correct soot substitute can be used in bench tests to replace the expensive full motor testing for new formulations. The final testing would still be done in the test motors but only with promising candidates. To these ends, Near Edge X-ray Adsorption spectroscopy Extended Fine Structure (NEXAFS) is an attractive technique in that it has chemical specificity through the core-level binding energy and because it probes the chemically important unoccupied molecular orbitals of the material. Core-level photoabsorption has been used to characterize the empty electronic states of a wide variety of materials. Specifically, the near-edge region of the photoabsorption process has been used to determine the relative quantity of sp{sup 2} and sp{sup 3}bonding in carbon films. The samples were fine grained powders pressed into pellets. The C(1s) absorption spectra were collected from each sample by measuring the total electron yield from the sample as a function of photon energy. The absorption intensity was normalized to the incoming photon flux by measuring the photoyield from a fine gold mesh.

  5. Separation of distinct photoexcitation species in femtosecond transient absorption microscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xiao, Kai; Ma, Ying -Zhong; Simpson, Mary Jane; Doughty, Benjamin; Yang, Bing

    2016-02-03

    Femtosecond transient absorption microscopy is a novel chemical imaging capability with simultaneous high spatial and temporal resolution. Although several powerful data analysis approaches have been developed and successfully applied to separate distinct chemical species in such images, the application of such analysis to distinguish different photoexcited species is rare. In this paper, we demonstrate a combined approach based on phasor and linear decomposition analysis on a microscopic level that allows us to separate the contributions of both the excitons and free charge carriers in the observed transient absorption response of a composite organometallic lead halide perovskite film. We found spatialmore » regions where the transient absorption response was predominately a result of excitons and others where it was predominately due to charge carriers, and regions consisting of signals from both contributors. Lastly, quantitative decomposition of the transient absorption response curves further enabled us to reveal the relative contribution of each photoexcitation to the measured response at spatially resolved locations in the film.« less

  6. Photoexcited quantum dots for killing multidrug-resistant bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtney, Colleen M.; Goodman, Samuel M.; McDaniel, Jessica A.; Madinger, Nancy E.; Chatterjee, Anushree; Nagpal, Prashant

    2016-05-01

    Multidrug-resistant bacterial infections are an ever-growing threat because of the shrinking arsenal of efficacious antibiotics. Metal nanoparticles can induce cell death, yet the toxicity effect is typically nonspecific. Here, we show that photoexcited quantum dots (QDs) can kill a wide range of multidrug-resistant bacterial clinical isolates, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli, and extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae and Salmonella typhimurium. The killing effect is independent of material and controlled by the redox potentials of the photogenerated charge carriers, which selectively alter the cellular redox state. We also show that the QDs can be tailored to kill 92% of bacterial cells in a monoculture, and in a co-culture of E. coli and HEK 293T cells, while leaving the mammalian cells intact, or to increase bacterial proliferation. Photoexcited QDs could be used in the study of the effect of redox states on living systems, and lead to clinical phototherapy for the treatment of infections.

  7. Photoexcited ZnO nanoparticles with controlled defects as a highly sensitive oxygen sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Taku; Shimizu, Yoshiki; Yasuda, Hidehiro; Ito, Tsuyohito

    2016-07-01

    Conductance of photoexcited ZnO nanoparticles with various defects has been investigated in oxygen. ZnO nanoparticles, which show strong photoluminescence peaks originating from interstitial zinc atom (Zni) and singly charged oxygen vacancy (VO+), show oxygen-pressure-dependent conductance changes caused by photoexcitation. Herein, a model is proposed to simulate the conductance changes.

  8. Low-temperature galvanomagnetic studies of nominally undoped germanium subjected to intrinsic photoexcitation

    SciTech Connect

    Bannaya, V. F.

    2015-09-15

    The results of studying the heating of charge carriers by an electric field in nominally undoped Ge (with impurity concentrations of (N{sub a} + N{sub g}) ≤ 5 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup –3}) subjected to interband illumination are reported. It is necessary in this situation to take into account two types of free charge carriers. In the case of such generation, the relation between the concentrations of electrons and holes depends to a large extent on the value of the electric field since this field differently affects the recombination coefficients of charge carriers and gives rise to new effects. The results of experimental studies of the conductivity σ and the Hall constant R{sub H} in n-Ge and p-Ge at T = 4.2 K and at different intensities of intrinsic photoexcitation are reported. A model of interband recombination, which takes into account deep-level impurity centers, is suggested for explanation of the results.

  9. Photo-excited terahertz switch based on composite metamaterial structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guocui; Zhang, Jianna; Zhang, Bo; He, Ting; He, Yanan; Shen, Jingling

    2016-09-01

    A photo-excited terahertz switch based on a composite metamaterial structure was designed by integration of photoconductive silicon into the gaps of split-ring resonators. The conductivity of the silicon that was used to fill the gaps in the split-ring resonators was tuned dynamically as a function of the incident pump power using laser excitation, leading to a change in the composite metamaterial structure's properties. We studied the transmission characteristics of the composite metamaterial structure for various silicon conductivities, and the results indicated that this type of composite metamaterial structure could be used as a resonance frequency tunable terahertz metamaterial switch. We also designed other structures by filling different gaps with silicon, and proved that these structures could be used as terahertz metamaterial switches can change the working mode from a single frequency to multiple frequencies.

  10. Theory of Primary Photoexcitations in Donor-Acceptor Copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryanpour, Karan; Dutta, Tirthankar; Huynh, Uyen N. V.; Vardeny, Zeev Valy; Mazumdar, Sumit

    2015-12-01

    We present a generic theory of primary photoexcitations in low band gap donor-acceptor conjugated copolymers. Because of the combined effects of strong electron correlations and broken symmetry, there is considerable mixing between a charge-transfer exciton and an energetically proximate triplet-triplet state with an overall spin singlet. The triplet-triplet state, optically forbidden in homopolymers, is allowed in donor-acceptor copolymers. For an intermediate difference in electron affinities of the donor and the acceptor, the triplet-triplet state can have a stronger oscillator strength than the charge-transfer exciton. We discuss the possibility of intramolecular singlet fission from the triplet-triplet state, and how such fission can be detected experimentally.

  11. Theory of Primary Photoexcitations in Donor-Acceptor Copolymers.

    PubMed

    Aryanpour, Karan; Dutta, Tirthankar; Huynh, Uyen N V; Vardeny, Zeev Valy; Mazumdar, Sumit

    2015-12-31

    We present a generic theory of primary photoexcitations in low band gap donor-acceptor conjugated copolymers. Because of the combined effects of strong electron correlations and broken symmetry, there is considerable mixing between a charge-transfer exciton and an energetically proximate triplet-triplet state with an overall spin singlet. The triplet-triplet state, optically forbidden in homopolymers, is allowed in donor-acceptor copolymers. For an intermediate difference in electron affinities of the donor and the acceptor, the triplet-triplet state can have a stronger oscillator strength than the charge-transfer exciton. We discuss the possibility of intramolecular singlet fission from the triplet-triplet state, and how such fission can be detected experimentally. PMID:26765027

  12. High-resolution core-level photoemission study of dense Pb overlayers on Si(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Won Hoon; Kim, Keun Su; Yeom, Han Woong

    2008-11-01

    Structure and bonding configuration of dense Pb overlayers on the Si(111) surface have been studied by low-energy-electron diffraction and high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation. Several representative phases in its devil’s staircase phase diagram have been systematically investigated by varying the Pb coverage at 200-300 K. Pb5d photoelectron spectra indicate that there exist two distinct bonding configurations of Pb, which are interpreted as the hollow and on-top (T1) sites of the structure models proposed earlier. In case of surface Si atoms, mainly two different bonding environments are revealed by surface Si2p components for the low-density 7×3 phase. These can be assigned to T1 and modified on-top (T1') sites surrounding hollow-site adatoms. As the coverage increases, the minority site T1 converts to T1' making the topmost Si layer have a unique bonding configuration. This behavior is also consistent with the structure models. The temperature-dependent study reveals that the 7×3 phase undergoes a reversible phase transition into a 1×1 phase. This phase transition induces no significant change in Pb core levels but a marginal increase in the Si2p component for the T1' sites. We suggest a plausible scenario of the phase transition based on the structure model with 1.2 monolayer Pb and the active diffusion of hollow-site adatoms.

  13. Pressure-induced crossing of the core levels in 5 d metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tal, Alexey A.; Katsnelson, Mikhail I.; Ekholm, Marcus; Jönsson, H. Johan M.; Dubrovinsky, Leonid; Dubrovinskaia, Natalia; Abrikosov, Igor A.

    2016-05-01

    A pressure-induced interaction between core electrons, the core-level crossing (CLC) transition, has been observed in hcp Os at P ≈400 GPa [L. Dubrovinsky et al., Nature (London) 525, 226 (2015)], 10.1038/nature14681. By carrying out a systematic theoretical study for all metals of the 5 d series (Hf, Ta, W, Re, Os, Ir, Pt, Au) we have found that the CLC transition is a general effect for this series of metals. While in Pt it occurs at ≈1500 GPa , at a pressure substantially higher than in Os, in Ir it occurs already at 80 GPa. Moreover, we predict that in Re the CLC transition may take place already at ambient pressure. We explain the effect of the CLC and analyze the shift of the transition pressure across the series within the Thomas-Fermi model. In particular, we show that the effect has many common features with the atomic collapse in rare-earth elements.

  14. Core-level anionic photofragmentation of gaseous CCl4 and solid-state analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, K. T.; Chen, J. M.; Lee, J. M.; Haw, S. C.; Chou, T. L.; Chen, S. A.; Chen, T. H.

    2009-09-01

    The dissociation dynamics of anionic and excited neutral fragments of gaseous CCl4 and CCl4 adsorbed on Si(100) ˜90K following Cl2p core-level excitations were investigated on combining measurements of photon-induced anionic dissociation, x-ray absorption, and uv-visible dispersed fluorescence. The transitions of core electrons to high Rydberg states or doubly excited states near Cl2p ionization thresholds of gaseous CCl4 remarkably enhance the production of excited neutral fragments ( C∗ and CCl∗ ); this enhancement is attributed to the contribution from the shake-modified resonant Auger decay and/or postcollision interaction (PCI). The Cl- anion is significantly reinforced in the vicinity of the Cl2p1/2,3/2 ionization threshold of gaseous CCl4 , originating from PCI-mediated photoelectron recapture. The Cl2p→7a1∗ excitation for CCl4/Si(100) at ˜90K enhances the Cl- desorption yield at a submonolayer level. This resonant enhancement of Cl- yield at the 7a1∗ resonance in the Cl2p edge at a submonolayer level occurs through the formation of high-lying molecular-ion states of CCl4 adsorbed on a Si surface.

  15. Core-level x-ray photoemission: Deviations from threshold behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, D. L.; Frota, H. O.; Oliveira, L. N.; Wilkins, J. W.

    1985-07-01

    We present a systematic numerical study of core-level x-ray photoemission intensity in metals, with emphasis upon studying the deviations from behavior asymptotically close to threshold. For a model with a contact potential and linear conduction-electron dispersion, we have evaluated the photoemission intensity for core-hole phase shifts δ(0) between 0.05π and 0.5π. We find the following results. (i) The asymptotic regime extends out to 0.01 to 0.1 times the conduction bandwidth (D) from threshold. The range of the asymptotic regime decreases with increasing (absolute) phase shift. (ii) The linear relation between the integrated photoemission intensity and the asymptotic form holds for all phase shifts above ~0.1D. Due to our normalization procedure we cannot say whether it holds below this value. (iii) Discrepancies exist between numerical estimates of the deviations from asymptotic behavior and approximate analytic estimates. (iv) A definition of the frequency-dependent threshold singularity exponent α(ω) in terms of a moment of the photoemission intensity is stable out to the conduction-band edge and may prove useful to experimentalists attempting to extract exponents from their data.

  16. Gamma Spectra Resulting From the Annihilation of Positrons with Electrons in Single, Selected Core Levels of Cu, Ag and Au

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S; Eshed, A; Goktepeli, S; Sterne, P A; Koymen, A R; Chen, W C; Weiss, A H

    2005-07-25

    The {gamma}-ray energy spectra due to positron annihilation with the 3p core-level of Cu, the 4p core-level of Ag, and 5p core level of Au were obtained separately from the total annihilation spectrum by measuring the energies of {gamma}-rays time coincident with Auger electrons emitted as a result of filling the core-hole left by annihilation. The results of these measurements are compared to the total annihilation spectra and with LDA based theoretical calculations. A comparison of area normalized momentum distributions with the individual cores extracted from the Doppler measurements shows good qualitative agreement, however, in all three spectra, the calculated values of the momentum density appears to fall below the measured values as the momentum increases. The discrepancies between theory and experiment are well outside the statistical uncertainties of the experiment and become more pronounced with increasing Z going down the column from Cu to Ag to Au. The comparison with the experimental results clearly indicates that the calculations are not predicting the correct ratio of high momentum to low momentum spectral weight and suggest the need to improve the treatment of many body electron-positron correlation effects in annihilation as they pertain to core levels.

  17. Pronounced Surface Band Bending of Thin-Film Silicon Revealed by Modeling Core Levels Probed with Hard X-rays.

    PubMed

    Wippler, David; Wilks, Regan G; Pieters, Bart E; van Albada, Sacha J; Gerlach, Dominic; Hüpkes, Jürgen; Bär, Marcus; Rau, Uwe

    2016-07-13

    Enhancing the probing depth of photoemission studies by using hard X-rays allows the investigation of buried interfaces of real-world device structures. However, it also requires the consideration of photoelectron-signal attenuation when evaluating surface effects. Here, we employ a computational model incorporating surface band bending and exponential photoelectron-signal attenuation to model depth-dependent spectral changes of Si 1s and Si 2s core level lines. The data were acquired from hydrogenated boron-doped microcrystalline thin-film silicon, which is applied in silicon-based solar cells. The core level spectra, measured by hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy using different excitation energies, reveal the presence of a 0.29 nm thick surface oxide layer. In the silicon film a downward surface band bending of eVbb = -0.65 eV over ∼6 nm obtained via inverse modeling explains the observed core level shifts and line broadening. Moreover, the computational model allows the extraction of the "real" Si 1s and Si 2s bulk core level binding energies as 1839.13 and 150.39 eV, and their natural Lorentzian line widths as 496 and 859 meV, respectively. These values significantly differ from those directly extracted from the measured spectra. Because band bending usually occurs at material surfaces we highly recommend the detailed consideration of signal integration over depth for quantitative statements from depth-dependent measurements. PMID:27294978

  18. Proton-coupled electron transfer with photoexcited metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Wenger, Oliver S

    2013-07-16

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) plays a crucial role in many enzymatic reactions and is relevant for a variety of processes including water oxidation, nitrogen fixation, and carbon dioxide reduction. Much of the research on PCET has focused on transfers between molecules in their electronic ground states, but increasingly researchers are investigating PCET between photoexcited reactants. This Account describes recent studies of excited-state PCET with d(6) metal complexes emphasizing work performed in my laboratory. Upon photoexcitation, some complexes release an electron and a proton to benzoquinone reaction partners. Others act as combined electron-proton acceptors in the presence of phenols. As a result, we can investigate photoinduced PCET involving electron and proton transfer in a given direction, a process that resembles hydrogen-atom transfer (HAT). In other studies, the photoexcited metal complexes merely serve as electron donors or electron acceptors because the proton donating and accepting sites are located on other parts of the molecular PCET ensemble. We and others have used this multisite design to explore so-called bidirectional PCET which occurs in many enzymes. A central question in all of these studies is whether concerted proton-electron transfer (CPET) can compete kinetically with sequential electron and proton transfer steps. Short laser pulses can trigger excited-state PCET, making it possible to investigate rapid reactions. Luminescence spectroscopy is a convenient tool for monitoring PCET, but unambiguous identification of reaction products can require a combination of luminescence spectroscopy and transient absorption spectroscopy. Nevertheless, in some cases, distinguishing between PCET photoproducts and reaction products formed by simple photoinduced electron transfer (ET) (reactions that don't include proton transfer) is tricky. Some of the studies presented here deal directly with this important problem. In one case study we

  19. Charge relaxation and recombination in photo-excited Mott insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prelovšek, P.; Lenarčič, Z.

    2016-04-01

    Recent femtosecond pump-probe experiments on Mott insulators reveal charge recombination, which is in picosecond range, i.e., much faster than in clean bandgap semiconductors although excitation gaps in Mott insulators are even larger. The charge response in photo-excited insulators can be generally divided in femtosecond transient relaxation of charge excitations, which are holons and doublons, and a second slower, but still very fast, holon-doublon (HD) recombination. We present a theory of the recombination rate of the excited HD pairs, based on the two-dimensional (2D) model relevant for cuprates, which shows that such fast processes can be explained even quantitatively with the multi-magnon emission. We show that the condition for the exponential decay as observed in the experiment is the existence of the exciton, i.e., the bound HD pair. Its recombination rate is exponentially dependent on the charge gap and on the magnon energy, while the ultrafast process can be traced back to strong charge-spin coupling. We comment also fast recombination times in the one-dimensional (1D) Mott insulators, as e.g., organic salts. The recombination rate in the latter cases can be explained with the stronger coupling with phonon excitations.

  20. Thermalization after photoexcitation from the perspective of optical spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogoj, Jan; Vidmar, Lev; Mierzejewski, Marcin; Trugman, Stuart A.; Bonča, Janez

    2016-07-01

    We analyze the thermalization of a photoexcited charge carrier coupled to a single branch of quantum phonons within the Holstein model. To this end, we calculate the far-from-equilibrium time evolution of a pure many-body state and compare it with predictions of the thermal Gibbs ensemble. We show that at strong enough carrier excitation, the nonequilibrium system evolves towards a thermal steady state. Our analysis is based on two classes of observables. First, the occupations of fermionic momenta, which are the eigenvalues of the one-particle density matrix, match in the steady state the values in the corresponding Gibbs ensemble. This indicates thermalization of static fermionic correlations on the entire lattice. Second, the dynamic current-current correlations, including the time-resolved optical conductivity, also take the form of their thermal counterparts. Remarkably, both static and dynamic fermionic correlations thermalize with identical temperatures. Our results suggest that the subsequent relaxation processes, observed in time-resolved ultrafast spectroscopy, may be efficiently described by applying quasithermal approaches, e.g., multitemperature models.

  1. Ultrafast electron injection into photo-excited organic molecules.

    PubMed

    Cvetko, Dean; Fratesi, Guido; Kladnik, Gregor; Cossaro, Albano; Brivio, Gian Paolo; Venkataraman, Latha; Morgante, Alberto

    2016-08-10

    Charge transfer rates at metal/organic interfaces affect the efficiencies of devices for organic based electronics and photovoltaics. A quantitative study of electron transfer rates, which take place on the femtosecond timescale, is often difficult, especially since in most systems the molecular adsorption geometry is unknown. Here, we use X-ray resonant photoemission spectroscopy to measure ultrafast charge transfer rates across pyridine/Au(111) interfaces while also controlling the molecular orientation on the metal. We demonstrate that a bi-directional charge transfer across the molecule/metal interface is enabled upon creation of a core-exciton on the molecule with a rate that has a strong dependence on the molecular adsorption angle. Through density functional theory calculations, we show that the alignment of molecular levels relative to the metal Fermi level is dramatically altered when a core-hole is created on the molecule, allowing the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital to fall partially below the metal Fermi level. We also calculate charge transfer rates as a function of molecular adsorption geometry and find a trend that agrees with the experiment. These findings thus give insight into the charge transfer dynamics of a photo-excited molecule on a metal surface. PMID:27444572

  2. Photoexcited energy transfer in a weakly coupled dimer

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hernandez, Laura Alfonso; Nelson, Tammie; Tretiak, Sergei; Fernandez-Alberti, Sebastian

    2015-01-08

    Nonadiabatic excited-state molecular dynamics (NA-ESMD) simulations have been performed in order to study the time-dependent exciton localization during energy transfer between two chromophore units of the weakly coupled anthracene dimer dithia-anthracenophane (DTA). Simulations are done at both low temperature (10 K) and room temperature (300 K). The initial photoexcitation creates an exciton which is primarily localized on a single monomer unit. Subsequently, the exciton experiences an ultrafast energy transfer becoming localized on either one monomer unit or the other, whereas delocalization between both monomers never occurs. In half of the trajectories, the electronic transition density becomes completely localized on themore » same monomer as the initial excitation, while in the other half, it becomes completely localized on the opposite monomer. In this article, we present an analysis of the energy transfer dynamics and the effect of thermally induced geometry distortions on the exciton localization. Finally, simulated fluorescence anisotropy decay curves for both DTA and the monomer unit dimethyl anthracene (DMA) are compared. As a result, our analysis reveals that changes in the transition density localization caused by energy transfer between two monomers in DTA is not the only source of depolarization and exciton relaxation within a single DTA monomer unit can also cause reorientation of the transition dipole.« less

  3. Photoexcited energy transfer in a weakly coupled dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, Laura Alfonso; Nelson, Tammie; Tretiak, Sergei; Fernandez-Alberti, Sebastian

    2015-01-08

    Nonadiabatic excited-state molecular dynamics (NA-ESMD) simulations have been performed in order to study the time-dependent exciton localization during energy transfer between two chromophore units of the weakly coupled anthracene dimer dithia-anthracenophane (DTA). Simulations are done at both low temperature (10 K) and room temperature (300 K). The initial photoexcitation creates an exciton which is primarily localized on a single monomer unit. Subsequently, the exciton experiences an ultrafast energy transfer becoming localized on either one monomer unit or the other, whereas delocalization between both monomers never occurs. In half of the trajectories, the electronic transition density becomes completely localized on the same monomer as the initial excitation, while in the other half, it becomes completely localized on the opposite monomer. In this article, we present an analysis of the energy transfer dynamics and the effect of thermally induced geometry distortions on the exciton localization. Finally, simulated fluorescence anisotropy decay curves for both DTA and the monomer unit dimethyl anthracene (DMA) are compared. As a result, our analysis reveals that changes in the transition density localization caused by energy transfer between two monomers in DTA is not the only source of depolarization and exciton relaxation within a single DTA monomer unit can also cause reorientation of the transition dipole.

  4. Theoretical predictions of the impact of nuclear dynamics and environment on core-level spectra of organic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prendergast, David; Schwartz, Craig; Uejio, Janel; Saykally, Richard

    2009-03-01

    Core-level spectroscopy provides an element-specific probe of local electronic structure and bonding, but linking details of atomic structure to measured spectra relies heavily on accurate theoretical interpretation. We present first principles simulations of the x-ray absorption of a range of organic molecules both in isolation and aqueous solvation, highlighting the spectral impact of internal nuclear motion as well as solvent interactions. Our approach uses density functional theory with explicit inclusion of the core-level excited state within a plane-wave supercell framework. Nuclear degrees of freedom are sampled using various molecular dynamics techniques. We indicate specific cases for molecules in their vibrational ground state at experimental conditions, where nuclear quantum effects must be included. Prepared by LBNL under Contract DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  5. Effects of non-local exchange on core level shifts for gas-phase and adsorbed molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Van den Bossche, M.; Grönbeck, H.; Martin, N. M.; Gustafson, J.; Lundgren, E.; Hakanoglu, C.; Weaver, J. F.

    2014-07-21

    Density functional theory calculations are often used to interpret experimental shifts in core level binding energies. Calculations based on gradient-corrected (GC) exchange-correlation functionals are known to reproduce measured core level shifts (CLS) of isolated molecules and metal surfaces with reasonable accuracy. In the present study, we discuss a series of examples where the shifts calculated within a GC-functional significantly deviate from the experimental values, namely the CLS of C 1s in ethyl trifluoroacetate, Pd 3d in PdO and the O 1s shift for CO adsorbed on PdO(101). The deviations are traced to effects of the electronic self-interaction error with GC-functionals and substantially better agreements between calculated and measured CLS are obtained when a fraction of exact exchange is used in the exchange-correlation functional.

  6. Trap density probing on top-gate MoS2 nanosheet field-effect transistors by photo-excited charge collection spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Kyunghee; Raza, Syed Raza Ali; Lee, Hee Sung; Jeon, Pyo Jin; Pezeshki, Atiye; Min, Sung-Wook; Kim, Jin Sung; Yoon, Woojin; Ju, Sang-Yong; Lee, Kimoon; Im, Seongil

    2015-03-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) field-effect transistors (FETs) have been extensively studied, but most of the FETs with gate insulators have displayed negative threshold voltage values, which indicates the presence of interfacial traps both shallow and deep in energy level. Despite such interface trap issues, reports on trap densities in MoS2 are quite limited. Here, we probed top-gate MoS2 FETs with two- (2L), three- (3L), and four-layer (4L) MoS2/dielectric interfaces to quantify deep-level interface trap densities by photo-excited charge collection spectroscopy (PECCS), and reported the result that deep-level trap densities over 1012 cm-2 may exist in the interface and bulk MoS2 near the interface. Transfer curve hysteresis and PECCS measurements show that shallow traps and deep traps are not that different in density order from each other. We conclude that our PECCS analysis distinguishably provides valuable information on deep level interface/bulk trap densities in 2D-based FETs.Two-dimensional (2D) molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) field-effect transistors (FETs) have been extensively studied, but most of the FETs with gate insulators have displayed negative threshold voltage values, which indicates the presence of interfacial traps both shallow and deep in energy level. Despite such interface trap issues, reports on trap densities in MoS2 are quite limited. Here, we probed top-gate MoS2 FETs with two- (2L), three- (3L), and four-layer (4L) MoS2/dielectric interfaces to quantify deep-level interface trap densities by photo-excited charge collection spectroscopy (PECCS), and reported the result that deep-level trap densities over 1012 cm-2 may exist in the interface and bulk MoS2 near the interface. Transfer curve hysteresis and PECCS measurements show that shallow traps and deep traps are not that different in density order from each other. We conclude that our PECCS analysis distinguishably provides valuable information on deep level interface

  7. Photoexcitation dynamics in SWCNT from sub-10 fs to ms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzani, Guglielmo

    2006-03-01

    Photophisics in Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes, SWCNT-PEG, prepared by HiPco embedded PMMA is investigated with cw and pulse photo-excitation. Using ultra-short pulses in the visible and near infrared, with time duration of 7 fs and 20 fs respectively, pump-probe spectroscopy is carried out in SWCNT-PEG films in air at room temperature. Photo-bleaching recovery and photoinduced absorption build-up, upon excitation into the second absorption band, are time resolved providing a time constant of 40 plus/minus 5 fs. This is associated to exciton relaxation within semiconducting NTs, due to Fano-type resonances between localized excitonic levels and the underlying continuum density. Pumping in different regions of the absorption spectrum and probing a broad range of wavelengths, gives a complete description of the phenomenon. After relaxation, the decay of the equilibrated exciton occurs with a broad distribution of time constants, which is consistent with the inhomogeneous broadening of the sample. When using the shortest pulses (sub-10 fs) coherent phonons are clearly detected in the transmission difference traces. A radial breathing mode (RBM) at 250 wavenumber is observed, with dephasing of 1.2 ps. Anharmonic coupling between the RBM mode and the G-mode is detected for the first time in the time domain. Using cw excitation at 2.3 and 1.3 eV we observed photorefractivity in SWCNT-PEG samples, kept in vacuum at low temperature, in close analogy with conjugated polymers. Charges, which are photogenerated in the films, can separate giving rise to local electric fields which in turn induce Stark shift of the excitonic resonance.

  8. Photo-excitation of carotenoids causes cytotoxicity via singlet oxygen production

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshii, Hiroshi; Yoshii, Yukie; Asai, Tatsuya; Furukawa, Takako; Takaichi, Shinichi; Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Some photo-excited carotenoids have photosensitizing ability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer They are able to produce ROS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Photo-excited fucoxanthin can produce singlet oxygen through energy transfer. -- Abstract: Carotenoids, natural pigments widely distributed in algae and plants, have a conjugated double bond system. Their excitation energies are correlated with conjugation length. We hypothesized that carotenoids whose energy states are above the singlet excited state of oxygen (singlet oxygen) would possess photosensitizing properties. Here, we demonstrated that human skin melanoma (A375) cells are damaged through the photo-excitation of several carotenoids (neoxanthin, fucoxanthin and siphonaxanthin). In contrast, photo-excitation of carotenoids that possess energy states below that of singlet oxygen, such as {beta}-carotene, lutein, loroxanthin and violaxanthin, did not enhance cell death. Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by photo-excited fucoxanthin or neoxanthin was confirmed using a reporter assay for ROS production with HeLa Hyper cells, which express a fluorescent indicator protein for intracellular ROS. Fucoxanthin and neoxanthin also showed high cellular penetration and retention. Electron spin resonance spectra using 2,2,6,6-tetramethil-4-piperidone as a singlet oxygen trapping agent demonstrated that singlet oxygen was produced via energy transfer from photo-excited fucoxanthin to oxygen molecules. These results suggest that carotenoids such as fucoxanthin, which are capable of singlet oxygen production through photo-excitation and show good penetration and retention in target cells, are useful as photosensitizers in photodynamic therapy for skin disease.

  9. On the selective photoexcitation of molecules within the homogeneous width of optical lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izmailov, Azad Ch.; Mahmoudi, Mohammad; Tajalli, Habib

    2000-03-01

    We investigate the photoexcitation of molecules of a gas, caused by the change of the state of the coherent population trapping of the open Λ-system of quantum levels at the sharp change of phase and amplitude parameters of the two-frequency laser pumping. Analysis is carried out both on the basis of the Schrödinger equation and in the formalism of the density matrix of molecules in the case of homogeneously broadened spectral lines. The maximum photoexcitation takes place at the two-quantum resonance between lower long-lived states of the Λ-system. It is shown, that the narrow, high-contrast peak of the photoexcitation appears on the comparatively low and wide background, caused by collisions of molecules. Conditions are determined, when the influence of this background is minimum and the spectral width of the photoexcitation peak is much less than the homogeneous widths of the optical lines of resonance transitions in the Λ-system. Such photoexcitation may be used in the technology of isotope (isomer) separation, selective photochemistry and photobiology even at essential overlap of optical spectra of different molecules.

  10. Photo-excitation of carotenoids causes cytotoxicity via singlet oxygen production.

    PubMed

    Yoshii, Hiroshi; Yoshii, Yukie; Asai, Tatsuya; Furukawa, Takako; Takaichi, Shinichi; Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa

    2012-01-01

    Carotenoids, natural pigments widely distributed in algae and plants, have a conjugated double bond system. Their excitation energies are correlated with conjugation length. We hypothesized that carotenoids whose energy states are above the singlet excited state of oxygen (singlet oxygen) would possess photosensitizing properties. Here, we demonstrated that human skin melanoma (A375) cells are damaged through the photo-excitation of several carotenoids (neoxanthin, fucoxanthin and siphonaxanthin). In contrast, photo-excitation of carotenoids that possess energy states below that of singlet oxygen, such as β-carotene, lutein, loroxanthin and violaxanthin, did not enhance cell death. Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by photo-excited fucoxanthin or neoxanthin was confirmed using a reporter assay for ROS production with HeLa Hyper cells, which express a fluorescent indicator protein for intracellular ROS. Fucoxanthin and neoxanthin also showed high cellular penetration and retention. Electron spin resonance spectra using 2,2,6,6-tetramethil-4-piperidone as a singlet oxygen trapping agent demonstrated that singlet oxygen was produced via energy transfer from photo-excited fucoxanthin to oxygen molecules. These results suggest that carotenoids such as fucoxanthin, which are capable of singlet oxygen production through photo-excitation and show good penetration and retention in target cells, are useful as photosensitizers in photodynamic therapy for skin disease. PMID:22185691

  11. The decay dynamics of photoexcited argon cluster ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. A.; Gotts, N. G.; Winkel, J. F.; Hallett, R.; Woodward, C. A.; Stace, A. J.; Whitaker, B. J.

    1992-07-01

    Following the photoexcitation of argon cluster ions, Ar+n for n in the range 4-25, kinetic energy release measurements have been undertaken on the fragments using two quite separate techniques. For Ar+4-Ar+6, fragment ion kinetic energy spectra were recorded at 532 nm in a crossed beam apparatus as a function of the angle of polarization of the laser radiation with respect to the incident ion beam. Only Ar+ from Ar+4 was observed to exhibit a polarization dependence together with a comparatively high kinetic energy release. The principal fragment ion Ar+2 was found both to emerge with a low kinetic energy release and to display no dependence on the angle of polarization of the radiation. In a second series of experiments, mass and kinetic energy resolved cluster ions were photodissociated in the entrance to a time-of-flight (TOF) device of variable length. The subsequent deflection of all ions allowed for time resolved measurements to be undertaken on the neutral photofragments. Following the absorption of a photon, all cluster ions up to Ar+25 were found to eject one/two neutral atoms with comparatively high kinetic energies. Any remaining internal energy appears to be dissipated through the loss of further neutral atoms with low kinetic energies. An analysis of the laser polarization dependence of these events, shows that those atoms identified as having high kinetic energies are ejected on a time scale which is short compared with the rotation period of a cluster (≂10 ps). These experimental observations are consistent with the results of recent molecular dynamics simulations of excited states in rare gas clusters by Landman, Jortner, and co-workers [J. Phys. Chem. 91, 4890 (1987); J. Chem. Phys. 88, 4273 (1988)]. Kinetic energy releases calculated from the TOF spectra exhibit marked fluctuations as a function of cluster size, with Ar+15 showing a minimum and Ar+19 a maximum. It is suggested that such behavior is part of a dynamic response to changes in

  12. Ultrafast terahertz response in photoexcited, vertically grown few-layer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Maixia; Quan, Baogang; He, Jingwen; Yao, Zehan; Gu, Changzhi; Li, Junjie; Zhang, Yan

    2016-03-01

    The terahertz (THz) response from vertically aligned few-layer graphene samples with and without femtosecond optical excitation was investigated. The frequency-dependent optical conductivity of the photoexcited vertically aligned few-layer graphene had a strong free carrier response. Upon photoexcitation, a transient decrease in THz transmission on the subpicosecond timescale was observed. A modulation depth of nearly 16% was demonstrated in the range of the photoexcitation power used. The photoinduced ultrafast response presented here is distinct from previous studies on horizontally grown graphene. The mechanism underlying this photoconductive ultrafast response was investigated by measuring the transmission properties and by calculating the carrier density. The results of these studies are promising for the development of high-performance THz modulators and ultrafast switchable THz photoelectric devices.

  13. Analysis of photoexcitation energy dependence in the photoluminescence of firefly luciferin.

    PubMed

    Hiyama, Miyabi; Akiyama, Hidefumi; Mochizuki, Toshimitsu; Yamada, Kenta; Koga, Nobuaki

    2014-01-01

    The whole pathways for photoluminescence, which include absorption, relaxation and emission, of firefly luciferin in aqueous solutions of different pH values with different photoexcitation energies were theoretically investigated by considering protonation/deprotonation. It is experimentally known that the color of fluorescence changes from green to red with a decrease in the photoexcitation energy. We confirmed with the theoretical analysis that the peak energy shift in the fluorescence spectra with varying photoenergies is due to a change in photoluminescence pathway. When the photoexcitation energy is decreased, the red emission from a monoanion form of firefly luciferin with carboxylate and phenolate groups and N-protonated thiazoline ring occurs irrespective of the pH values. However, because the species abundant in the solution and those excited by the photon depend on the solution pH, the pathway leading to the monoanion form changes with the solution pH. PMID:24446724

  14. Investigating photoexcitation-induced mitochondrial damage by chemotherapeutic corroles using multimode optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jae Youn; Lubow, David J.; Sims, Jessica D.; Gray, Harry B.; Mahammed, Atif; Gross, Zeev; Medina-Kauwe, Lali K.; Farkas, Daniel L.

    2012-01-01

    We recently reported that a targeted, brightly fluorescent gallium corrole (HerGa) is highly effective for breast tumor detection and treatment. Unlike structurally similar porphryins, HerGa exhibits tumor-targeted toxicity without the need for photoexcitation. We have now examined whether photoexcitation further modulates HerGa toxicity, using multimode optical imaging of live cells, including two-photon excited fluorescence, differential interference contrast (DIC), spectral, and lifetime imaging. Using two-photon excited fluorescence imaging, we observed that light at specific wavelengths augments the HerGa-mediated mitochondrial membrane potential disruption of breast cancer cells in situ. In addition, DIC, spectral, and fluorescence lifetime imaging enabled us to both validate cell damage by HerGa photoexcitation and investigate HerGa internalization, thus allowing optimization of light dose and timing. Our demonstration of HerGa phototoxicity opens the way for development of new methods of cancer intervention using tumor-targeted corroles.

  15. Probing core-electron orbitals by scanning transmission electron microscopy and measuring the delocalization of core-level excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Jong Seok; Odlyzko, Michael L.; Xu, Peng; Jalan, Bharat; Mkhoyan, K. Andre

    2016-04-01

    By recording low-noise energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy maps from crystalline specimens using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, it is possible to probe core-level electron orbitals in real space. Both the 1 s and 2 p orbitals of Sr and Ti atoms in SrTi O3 are probed, and their projected excitation potentials are determined. This paper also demonstrates experimental measurement of the electronic excitation impact parameter and the delocalization of an excitation due to Coulombic beam-orbital interaction.

  16. Graphene on Au-coated SiOx substrate: Its visibility and intrinsic core-level photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chung-Lin; Chen, Jhih-Wei; Wang, Chiang-Lun; Chen, Chia-Hao; Chen, Yi-Chun

    2012-02-01

    With the motivation of precisely and intrinsically characterizing a exfoliate graphene using photoelectron spectroscopy, a conducting substrate having high optical contrast is greatly desired. Here, we demonstrate that exfoliated graphene can be optically visible on a thin 9-nm Au-coated SiOx substrate, and can be easily conducted into scanning photoelectron microscopy/spectroscopy (SPEM/S) studies. Because of the elimination of charging effect, precisely core-level characterization of exfoliated graphene is presented with different numbers of layers. Consequently, the usage of Au-coated SiOx substrate serves a simple but effective method to study pristine graphene by photoelectron spectroscopy and other electron-detection techniques.

  17. Effects of carrier-carrier scattering on population inversion in graphene under pulse photoexcitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satou, Akira; Ryzhii, Victor; Otsuji, Taiichi

    2015-01-01

    We study the carrier relaxation dynamics in intrinsic graphene after pulse photoexcitation and reveal effects of intraband carrier-carrier scattering on population inversion in the terahertz region, by conducting simulation based on the quasi-classical Boltzmann equation. It is demonstrated that by changing the dielectric constant of the surrounding materials the rate of carrier-carrier scattering can be controlled and the relaxation dynamics differs for cases with low and high dielectric constants. It is also found that the Pauli blocking of photogeneration in case of the pulse photoexcitation causes decrease in the photocarrier concentration and thus weakening of population inversion with higher dielectric constant.

  18. Electronic noise in high electron-mobility transistors under photo-excitation conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Marinchio, H.; Sabatini, G.; Varani, L.; Palermo, C.; Shiktorov, P.; Starikov, E.; Gruzinskis, V.; Ziade, P.; Kallassy, Z.

    2009-04-23

    The hydrodynamic approach based on the carrier concentration and velocity conservation equations is used to investigate the influence of photo-excitation of plasma waves at the beating frequency of two lasers on the intrinsic extra noise in InGaAs HEMTs caused by thermally-induced plasma oscillations. It is found that, by increasing the amplitude of the photo-excitation, a significant supression of the intrinsic excess noise is observed at the beating frequency as well as at all the frequencies where plasma waves can be excited.

  19. Suppression of self-interstitials in silicon during ion implantation via in-situ photoexcitation

    SciTech Connect

    Ravi, J.; Erokhin, Yu.; Christensen, K.; Rozgonyi, G.A.; Patnaik, B.K.; White, C.W.

    1995-02-01

    The influence of in-situ photoexcitation during low temperature implantation on self-interstitial agglomeration following annealing has been investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A reduction in the level of as-implanted damage determined by RBS and TEM occurs athermally during 150 keV self-ion implantation. The damage reduction following a 300 C anneal suggests that it is mostly divacancy related. Subsequent thermal annealing at 800 C resulted in the formation of (311) rod like defects or dislocation loops for samples with and without in-situ photoexcitation, respectively. Estimation of the number of self-interstitials bound by these defects in the sample without in-situ photoexcitation corresponds to the implanted dose; whereas for the in-situ photoexcitation sample a suppression of {approx}2 orders in magnitude is found. The kinetics of the athermal annealing process are discussed within the framework of either a recombination enhanced defect reaction mechanism, or a charge state enhanced defect migration and Coulomb interaction.

  20. Electron-deformation mechanism of photoexcitation of hypersound in semiconductors in a dc electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Chigarev, N V

    2002-09-30

    The effect of a dc electric field on photoexcitation of a hypersonic pulse in a semiconductor via an electron-deformation mechanism is studied. The profiles of acoustic pulses are simulated for different directions of the electric field. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  1. Photoexcited breathers in conjugated polyenes: An excited-state molecular dynamics study

    PubMed Central

    Tretiak, S.; Saxena, A.; Martin, R. L.; Bishop, A. R.

    2003-01-01

    π-conjugated polymers have become an important class of materials for electronic devices. Design of these devices requires understanding such processes as photochemical reactions, spatial dynamics of photoexcitations, and energy and charge transport, which in turn involve complex coupled electron-vibrational dynamics. Here we study nonlinear photoexcitation dynamics in the polyene oligomers by using a quantum-chemical method suitable for the simulation of excited-state molecular dynamics in extended molecular systems with sizes up to hundreds of atoms. The method is based on the adiabatic propagation of the ground-state and transition single-electron density matrices along the trajectory. The simulations reveal formation of a self-localized vibronic excitation (“breather” or multiquanta bound state) with a typical period of 34 fs and allows us to identify specific slow and fast nuclear motions strongly coupled to the electronic degrees of freedom. The effect of chain imperfections and chemical defects on the dynamics is also investigated. A complementary two-dimensional analysis of corresponding transition density matrices provides an efficient way to monitor time-dependent real-space localization of the photoexcitation by identifying the underlying changes in charge densities and bond orders. Possible correlated electronic and vibrational spectroscopic signatures of photoexcited breathers are predicted, and generalizations to energy localization in complex macromolecules are discussed. PMID:12594339

  2. Core-level spectroscopy investigation of the Mo{sub 0.75}Re{sub 0.25}(100) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Lyman, P.F.; Zehner, D.M.

    1993-10-01

    Preferential surface segregation in the Mo{sub 0.75}(100) surface region was investigated using high-resolution core-level spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation. The magnitude and direction of the surface core-level shifts observed in this study can be qualitatively understood by comparison to W and Mo core-level shifts. Measured core-level intensities are found to be consistent with the segregation of Mo to the surface of the alloy, with an enrichment of Re in the second layer (as found in previous investigations). It is inferred that both Tc and Os will segregate to the Mo{sub 0.75}Re{sub 0.25}(100) surface.

  3. Effect of iodine impurity on relaxation of photoexcited silver chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Vostrikova, Yu. V. Klyuev, V. G.

    2008-03-15

    The time and temperature dependences of relaxation of excited AgCl and AgCl:I crystals is studied by the method of photostimulated flash of luminescence. The presence of iodine impurity in silver chloride gives rise to hole recombination (luminescence) centers and hole traps in the band gap. It is shown that the main contribution to the decrease in the concentration of electrons localized at deep traps is made by the recombination of electrons with holes released thermally from shallow localization levels (iodine-related centers). Estimation of activation energy for the relaxation process showed that these energies for the AgCl and AgCl:I samples under study are the same within the experimental error and are equal to E{sub rel1} = 0.01 {+-} 0.0005 eV for the initial stage of relaxation and E{sub rel2} = 0.09 {+-} 0.005 eV for the final state. This fact indicates that the majority of hole traps involved in the relaxation process in AgCl are related to iodine impurity. In the course of thermal relaxation in AgCl, relocalization of nonequilibrium charge carriers from shallow levels to deep levels is observed. The depth of the corresponding trap is E{sub arl} = 0.174 {+-} 0.03 eV.

  4. Evidence of the nature of core-level photoemission satellites using angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Moler, E.J.; Kellar, S.A.; Huff, W.R.A.

    1997-04-01

    The authors present a unique method of experimentally determining the angular momentum and intrinsic/extrinsic origin of core-level photoemission satellites by examining the satellite diffraction pattern in the Angle Resolved Photoemission Extended Fine Structure (ARPEFS) mode. They show for the first time that satellite peaks not associated with chemically differentiated atomic species display an ARPEFS intensity oscillation. They present ARPEFS data for the carbon 1s from ({radical}3x{radical}3)R30 CO/Cu(111) and p2mg(2xl)CO/Ni(110), nitrogen 1s from c(2x2) N{sub 2}/Ni(100), cobalt 1s from p(1x1)Co/Cu(100), and nickel 3p from clean nickel (111). The satellite peaks and tails of the Doniach-Sunjic line shapes in all cases exhibit ARPEFS curves which indicate an angular momentum identical to the main peak and are of an intrinsic nature.

  5. Real-time TDDFT simulations of time-resolved core-level spectroscopies in solid state systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pemmaraju, Sri Chaitanya Das; Prendergast, David; Theory of Nanostructured Materials Facility Team

    The advent of sub-femtosecond time-resolved core-level spectroscopies based on high harmonic generated XUV pulses has enabled the study of electron dyanamics on characteristic femtosecond time-scales. Unambiguous interpretation of these powerful yet complex spectroscopies however requires the development of theoretical algorithms capable of modeling light-matter interaction across a wide energy range spanning both valence and core orbitals. In this context we present a recent implementation of the velocity-gauge formalism of real-time TDDFT within a linear combination of atomic orbital (LCAO) framework, which facilitates efficient numerical treatment of localized semi-core orbitals. Dynamics and spectra obtained from LCAO based simulations are compared to those from a real-space grid implementation. Potential applications are also illustrated by applying the method towards interpreting recent atto-second time-resolved IR-pump XUV-probe spectroscopies investigating sub-cycle excitation dynamics in bulk silicon.

  6. Ab initio study of 3s core-level x-ray photoemission spectra in transition metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Manabu; Igarashi, Jun-Ichi

    2010-01-01

    We calculate the 3s - and 4s -core-level x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) spectra in the ferromagnetic and nonmagnetic transition metals by developing an ab initio method. We obtain the spectra exhibiting the characteristic shapes as a function of binding energy in good agreement with experimental observations. The spectral shapes are strikingly different between the majority spin channel and the minority spin channel for ferromagnetic metals Ni, Co, and Fe, that is, large intensities appear in the higher binding-energy side of the main peak (satellite) in the majority spin channel. Such satellite or shoulder intensities are also obtained for nonmagnetic metals V and Ru. These behaviors are elucidated in terms of the change of the one-electron states induced by the core-hole potential.

  7. On sulfur core level binding energies in thiol self-assembly and alternative adsorption sites: An experimental and theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Juanjuan; Kara, Abdelkader; Pasquali, Luca; Bendounan, Azzedine; Sirotti, Fausto; Esaulov, Vladimir A.

    2015-09-01

    Characteristic core level binding energies (CLBEs) are regularly used to infer the modes of molecular adsorption: orientation, organization, and dissociation processes. Here, we focus on a largely debated situation regarding CLBEs in the case of chalcogen atom bearing molecules. For a thiol, this concerns the case when the CLBE of a thiolate sulfur at an adsorption site can be interpreted alternatively as due to atomic adsorption of a S atom, resulting from dissociation. Results of an investigation of the characteristics of thiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) obtained by vacuum evaporative adsorption are presented along with core level binding energy calculations. Thiol ended SAMs of 1,4-benzenedimethanethiol (BDMT) obtained by evaporation on Au display an unconventional CLBE structure at about 161.25 eV, which is close to a known CLBE of a S atom on Au. Adsorption and CLBE calculations for sulfur atoms and BDMT molecules are reported and allow delineating trends as a function of chemisorption on hollow, bridge, and atop sites and including the presence of adatoms. These calculations suggest that the 161.25 eV peak is due to an alternative adsorption site, which could be associated to an atop configuration. Therefore, this may be an alternative interpretation, different from the one involving the adsorption of atomic sulfur resulting from the dissociation process of the S-C bond. Calculated differences in S(2p) CLBEs for free BDMT molecules, SH group sulfur on top of the SAM, and disulfide are also reported to clarify possible errors in assignments.

  8. On sulfur core level binding energies in thiol self-assembly and alternative adsorption sites: An experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Jia, Juanjuan; Kara, Abdelkader; Pasquali, Luca; Bendounan, Azzedine; Sirotti, Fausto; Esaulov, Vladimir A

    2015-09-14

    Characteristic core level binding energies (CLBEs) are regularly used to infer the modes of molecular adsorption: orientation, organization, and dissociation processes. Here, we focus on a largely debated situation regarding CLBEs in the case of chalcogen atom bearing molecules. For a thiol, this concerns the case when the CLBE of a thiolate sulfur at an adsorption site can be interpreted alternatively as due to atomic adsorption of a S atom, resulting from dissociation. Results of an investigation of the characteristics of thiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) obtained by vacuum evaporative adsorption are presented along with core level binding energy calculations. Thiol ended SAMs of 1,4-benzenedimethanethiol (BDMT) obtained by evaporation on Au display an unconventional CLBE structure at about 161.25 eV, which is close to a known CLBE of a S atom on Au. Adsorption and CLBE calculations for sulfur atoms and BDMT molecules are reported and allow delineating trends as a function of chemisorption on hollow, bridge, and atop sites and including the presence of adatoms. These calculations suggest that the 161.25 eV peak is due to an alternative adsorption site, which could be associated to an atop configuration. Therefore, this may be an alternative interpretation, different from the one involving the adsorption of atomic sulfur resulting from the dissociation process of the S-C bond. Calculated differences in S(2p) CLBEs for free BDMT molecules, SH group sulfur on top of the SAM, and disulfide are also reported to clarify possible errors in assignments. PMID:26374051

  9. On sulfur core level binding energies in thiol self-assembly and alternative adsorption sites: An experimental and theoretical study

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Juanjuan; Kara, Abdelkader E-mail: vladimir.esaulov@u-psud.fr; Pasquali, Luca; Bendounan, Azzedine; Sirotti, Fausto; Esaulov, Vladimir A. E-mail: vladimir.esaulov@u-psud.fr

    2015-09-14

    Characteristic core level binding energies (CLBEs) are regularly used to infer the modes of molecular adsorption: orientation, organization, and dissociation processes. Here, we focus on a largely debated situation regarding CLBEs in the case of chalcogen atom bearing molecules. For a thiol, this concerns the case when the CLBE of a thiolate sulfur at an adsorption site can be interpreted alternatively as due to atomic adsorption of a S atom, resulting from dissociation. Results of an investigation of the characteristics of thiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) obtained by vacuum evaporative adsorption are presented along with core level binding energy calculations. Thiol ended SAMs of 1,4-benzenedimethanethiol (BDMT) obtained by evaporation on Au display an unconventional CLBE structure at about 161.25 eV, which is close to a known CLBE of a S atom on Au. Adsorption and CLBE calculations for sulfur atoms and BDMT molecules are reported and allow delineating trends as a function of chemisorption on hollow, bridge, and atop sites and including the presence of adatoms. These calculations suggest that the 161.25 eV peak is due to an alternative adsorption site, which could be associated to an atop configuration. Therefore, this may be an alternative interpretation, different from the one involving the adsorption of atomic sulfur resulting from the dissociation process of the S–C bond. Calculated differences in S(2p) CLBEs for free BDMT molecules, SH group sulfur on top of the SAM, and disulfide are also reported to clarify possible errors in assignments.

  10. High-resolution core-level spectroscopy of Si(100)c(4 × 2) and some metal-induced Si(111)√3 × √3 surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhrberg, R. I. G.

    2001-12-01

    High-resolution core-level spectroscopy has been applied to the Si(100)c(4 × 2) surface. A correct decomposition of the Si 2p spectrum of the clean surface is important for studies of adsorption of different species and the formation of various surface reconstructions. A very well-resolved Si 2p spectrum is presented for the Si(100)c(4 × 2) surface. The decomposition of this spectrum verifies the original decomposition scheme introduced by Landemark et al (Landemark E, Karlsson C J, Chao Y-C and Uhrberg R I G 1992 Phys. Rev. Lett. 69 1588). Core-level spectra of some metal-induced Si(111)√3 × √3 surfaces are also presented. A comparison is made between the √3 × √3 reconstructions formed on Si(111) by In, a group III atom, and by Sn, a group IV atom. Both the 4d core levels of the adatoms and the Si 2p core-level spectra are discussed. Different kinds of deviation from an ideal surface may introduce a significant broadening of the core-level spectra. The effect of additional Ag atoms is discussed in the case of the Ag/Si(111)√3 × √3 surface. By reducing the surplus of Ag atoms on this surface, a Si 2p spectrum with extremely narrow components has been obtained.

  11. Model of Ultrafast Intersystem Crossing in Photoexcited Transition-Metal Organic Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    van Veenendaal, Michel; Chang, Jun; Fedro, A.J.

    2010-07-01

    The mechanism behind fast intersystem crossing in transition-metal complexes is shown to be a result of the dephasing of the photoexcited state to the phonon continuum of a different state with a significantly different transition metal-ligand distance. The coupling is a result of the spin-orbit interaction causing a change in the local moment. A recurrence to the initial state is prevented by the damping of the phonon oscillation. The decay time is faster than the oscillation frequency of the transition metal-ligand stretch mode, in agreement with experiment. For energies above the region where the strongest coupling occurs, a slower 'leakage-type' decay is observed. If the photoexcited state is lower in energy than the state it couples to, then there is no decay.

  12. Spin filtering neutrons with a proton target dynamically polarized using photo-excited triplet states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haag, M.; van den Brandt, B.; Eichhorn, T. R.; Hautle, P.; Wenckebach, W. Th.

    2012-06-01

    In a test of principle a neutron spin filter has been built, which is based on dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) using photo-excited triplet states. This DNP method has advantages over classical concepts as the requirements for cryogenic equipment and magnets are much relaxed: the spin filter is operated in a field of 0.3 T at a temperature of about 100 K and has performed reliably over periods of several weeks. The neutron beam was also used to analyze the polarization of the target employed as a spin filter. We obtained an independent measurement of the proton spin polarization of ˜0.13 in good agreement with the value determined with NMR. Moreover, the neutron beam was used to measure the proton spin polarization as a function of position in the naphthalene sample. The polarization was found to be homogeneous, even at low laser power, in contradiction to existing models describing the photo-excitation process.

  13. Fluxes of nonequilibrium photo-excited phonons along surfaces of crystals without an inversion center

    SciTech Connect

    Blokh, M.D.

    1988-01-01

    The flux of nonequilibrium phonons excited by light in the near-surface domain of a crystal or a thin plate is investigated. An exact expression is obtained for the phonon energy flux for a crystal with a polar direction and its polarization dependence is analyzed. The magnitude of the energy flux can reach the incident light intensity. The temperature difference produced by the flux of nonequilibrium photo-excited phonons is found.

  14. Ultrafast Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Using a Photoexcited Low-Temperature-Grown GaAs Tip

    SciTech Connect

    Donati, G.P.; Rodriguez, G.; Taylor, A.J.

    1999-05-21

    The authors report ultrafast scanning tunneling microscopy using a low-temperature-grown GaAs tip photoexcited by 100-fs, 800-nm pulses. They use this tip to detect picosecond transients on a coplanar stripline and demonstrate a temporal resolution of 1.7 ps. A dependence of the transient signal upon spatial position of the tip is revealed, indicating that the signal arises from areas on the sample smaller than {approximately}20nm.

  15. Electrochemical immobilization of Fluorescent labelled probe molecules on a FTO surface for affinity detection based on photo-excited current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haruyama, Tetsuya; Wakabayashi, Ryo; Cho, Takeshi; Matsuyama, Sho-taro

    2011-10-01

    Photo-excited current can be generated at a molecular interface between a photo-excited molecules and a semi-conductive material in appropriate condition. The system has been recognized for promoting photo-energy devices such as an organic dye sensitized solar-cell. The photo-current generated reactions are totally dependent on the interfacial energy reactions, which are in a highly fluctuated interfacial environment. The authors investigated the photo-excited current reaction to develop a smart affinity detection method. However, in order to perform both an affinity reaction and a photo-excited current reaction at a molecular interface, ordered fabrications of the functional (affinity, photo-excitation, etc.) molecules layer on a semi-conductive surface is required. In the present research, we would like to present the fabrication and functional performance of photo-excited current-based affinity assay device and its application for detection of endocrine disrupting chemicals. On the FTO surface, fluorescent pigment labelled affinity peptide was immobilized through the EC tag (electrochemical-tag) method. The modified FTO produced a current when it was irradiated with diode laser light. However, the photo current decreased drastically when estrogen (ES) coexisted in the reaction solution. In this case, immobilized affinity probe molecules formed a complex with ES and estrogen receptor (ER). The result strongly suggests that the photo-excited current transduction between probe molecule-labelled cyanine pigment and the FTO surface was partly inhibited by a complex that formed at the affinity oligo-peptide region in a probe molecule on the FTO electrode. The bound bulky complex may act as an impediment to perform smooth transduction of photo-excited current in the molecular interface. The present system is new type of photo-reaction-based analysis. This system can be used to perform simple high-sensitive homogeneous assays.

  16. Skin-depth lattice strain, core-level trap depression and valence charge polarization of Al surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan; Bo, Maolin; Liu, Yonghui; Guo, Yongling; Wang, Haibin; Yue, Jian; Huang, Yongli

    2016-01-01

    Clarifying the origin for surface core-level shift (SCLS) and gaining quantitative information regarding the coordination-resolved local strain, binding energy (BE) shift and cohesive energy change have been a challenge. Here, we show that a combination of the bond order-length-strength (BOLS) premise, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and the ab initio density functional theory (DFT) calculations of aluminum (Al) 2p3/2 energy shift of Al surfaces has enabled us to derive such information, namely, (i) the 2p3/2 energy of an isolated Al atom (72.146 ± 0.003eV) and its bulk shift (0.499 eV); (ii) the skin lattice contracts by up to 12.5% and the BE density increases by 70%; and (iii) the cohesive energy drops up to 38%. It is affirmed that the shorter and stronger bonds between under-coordinated atoms provide a perturbation to the Hamiltonian and hence lead to the local strain, quantum entrapment and valence charge polarization. Findings should help in understanding the phenomena of surface pre-melting and skin-high elasticity, in general.

  17. Core-level Photoemission Study for Cuprates with a Dynamical Mean-Field Approach Considering Realistic Crystal Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariki, Atsushi; Uozumi, Takayuki

    2013-03-01

    Recently, remarkable experimental progress reveals some characteristic spectral features in the 2p3/2main line of Cu 2p core-level X-ray photoemission spectra (XPS). The structures show strong material dependence and drastic changes for electron or hole doping. Van Veenendaal et al., pointed out that the main line shape is strongly affected by the so-called nonlocal screening which is accompanied by a formation of a Zhang-Rice singlet (ZRS) in the XPS final state. On the other hand, Taguchi et al., shows these features are reproduced by introducing an phenomenological extended impurity model. We consider that this topic on 2pXPS of cuprates still remain controversial. In this study, we propose another approach based on the dynamical mean field theory(DMFT) considering the realistic crystal structure. Many-particle effects including the ZRS is appropriately embedded in the hybridization function of a single impurity Anderson model through the DMFT self-consistent cycle. Our approach reproduces experimental results and shows that the Cu 2p3/2 main line is closely related with the quasi-particle structure near the Fermi energy.

  18. Bandgap modulation in photoexcited topological insulator Bi2Te3 via atomic displacements.

    PubMed

    Hada, Masaki; Norimatsu, Katsura; Tanaka, Sei Ichi; Keskin, Sercan; Tsuruta, Tetsuya; Igarashi, Kyushiro; Ishikawa, Tadahiko; Kayanuma, Yosuke; Miller, R J Dwayne; Onda, Ken; Sasagawa, Takao; Koshihara, Shin-Ya; Nakamura, Kazutaka G

    2016-07-14

    The atomic and electronic dynamics in the topological insulator (TI) Bi2Te3 under strong photoexcitation were characterized with time-resolved electron diffraction and time-resolved mid-infrared spectroscopy. Three-dimensional TIs characterized as bulk insulators with an electronic conduction surface band have shown a variety of exotic responses in terms of electronic transport when observed under conditions of applied pressure, magnetic field, or circularly polarized light. However, the atomic motions and their correlation between electronic systems in TIs under strong photoexcitation have not been explored. The artificial and transient modification of the electronic structures in TIs via photoinduced atomic motions represents a novel mechanism for providing a comparable level of bandgap control. The results of time-domain crystallography indicate that photoexcitation induces two-step atomic motions: first bismuth and then tellurium center-symmetric displacements. These atomic motions in Bi2Te3 trigger 10% bulk bandgap narrowing, which is consistent with the time-resolved mid-infrared spectroscopy results. PMID:27421417

  19. Bandgap modulation in photoexcited topological insulator Bi2Te3 via atomic displacements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hada, Masaki; Norimatsu, Katsura; Tanaka, Sei'ichi; Keskin, Sercan; Tsuruta, Tetsuya; Igarashi, Kyushiro; Ishikawa, Tadahiko; Kayanuma, Yosuke; Miller, R. J. Dwayne; Onda, Ken; Sasagawa, Takao; Koshihara, Shin-ya; Nakamura, Kazutaka G.

    2016-07-01

    The atomic and electronic dynamics in the topological insulator (TI) Bi2Te3 under strong photoexcitation were characterized with time-resolved electron diffraction and time-resolved mid-infrared spectroscopy. Three-dimensional TIs characterized as bulk insulators with an electronic conduction surface band have shown a variety of exotic responses in terms of electronic transport when observed under conditions of applied pressure, magnetic field, or circularly polarized light. However, the atomic motions and their correlation between electronic systems in TIs under strong photoexcitation have not been explored. The artificial and transient modification of the electronic structures in TIs via photoinduced atomic motions represents a novel mechanism for providing a comparable level of bandgap control. The results of time-domain crystallography indicate that photoexcitation induces two-step atomic motions: first bismuth and then tellurium center-symmetric displacements. These atomic motions in Bi2Te3 trigger 10% bulk bandgap narrowing, which is consistent with the time-resolved mid-infrared spectroscopy results.

  20. Photoexcitation of adsorbates on metal surfaces: One-step or three-step

    SciTech Connect

    Petek, Hrvoje

    2012-09-07

    In this essay we discuss the light-matter interactions at molecule-covered metal surfaces that initiate surface photochemistry. The hot-electron mechanism for surface photochemistry, whereby the absorption of light by a metal surface creates an electron-hole pair, and the hot electron scatters through an unoccupied resonance of adsorbate to initiate nuclear dynamics leading to photochemistry, has become widely accepted. Yet, ultrafast spectroscopic measurements of molecule-surface electronic structure and photoexcitation dynamics provide scant support for the hot electron mechanism. Instead, in most cases the adsorbate resonances are excited through photoinduced substrate-to-adsorbate charge transfer. Based on recent studies of the role of coherence in adsorbate photoexcitation, as measured by the optical phase and momentum resolved two-photon photoemission measurements, we examine critically the hot electron mechanism, and propose an alternative description based on direct charge transfer of electrons from the substrate to adsorbate. The advantage of this more quantum mechanically rigorous description is that it informs how material properties of the substrate and adsorbate, as well as their interaction, influence the frequency dependent probability of photoexcitation and ultimately how light can be used to probe and control surface femtochemistry.

  1. Impacts of electronically photo-excited NO2 on air pollution in the South Coast Air Basin of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ensberg, J. J.; Carreras-Sospedra, M.; Dabdub, D.

    2010-02-01

    A new path for hydroxyl radical formation via photo-excitation of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and the reaction of photo-excited NO2 with water is evaluated using the UCI-CIT model for the South Coast Air Basin of California (SoCAB). Two separate studies predict different reaction rates, which differ by nearly an order of magnitude, for the reaction of photo-excited NO2 with water. Impacts of this new chemical mechanism on ozone and particulate matter formation, while utilizing both reaction rates, are quantified by simulating two summer episodes. First, sensitivity simulations are conducted to evaluate the uncertainty in the rate of reaction of photo-excited NO2 with water reported in the literature. Results indicate that the addition of photo-excited NO2 chemistry increases peak 8-h average ozone and particulate matter concentrations. The importance of this new chemistry is then evaluated in the context of pollution control strategies. A series of simulations are conducted to generate isopleths for ozone and particulate matter concentrations, varying baseline nitrogen oxides (NOx) and volatile organic compounds (VOC) emissions. Isopleths are obtained using 1987 emissions, to represent past conditions, and 2005, to represent current conditions in the SoCAB. Results show that the sensitivity of modeled pollutant control strategies due to photoexcitation decreases with the decrease in baseline emissions from 1987 to 2005. Results show that including NO2 photo-excitation, increases the sensitivity of ozone concentration with respect to changes in NOx emissions for both years. In particular, decreasing NOx emissions in 2005 when NO2 photo-excitation is included, while utilizing the higher reaction rate, leads to ozone relative reduction factors that are 15% lower than in a case without photo-excited NO2. This implies that photoexcitation increases the effectiveness in reducing ozone through NOx emissions reductions alone, which has implications for the assessment of future

  2. Optimization of Extreme Ultraviolet Light Source from High Harmonic Generation for Condensed-Phase Core-Level Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ming-Fu; Verkamp, Max A.; Ryland, Elizabeth S.; Benke, Kristin; Zhang, Kaili; Carlson, Michaela; Vura-Weis, Josh

    2015-06-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (XUV) light source from high-order harmonic generation has been shown to be a powerful tool for core-level spectroscopy. In addition, this light source provides very high temporal resolution (10-18 s to 10-15 s) for time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy. Most applications of the light source have been limited to the studies of atomic and molecular systems, with technique development focused on optimizing for shorter pulses (i.e. tens of attoseconds) or higher XUV energy (i.e. ~keV range). For the application to general molecular systems in solid and liquid forms, however, the XUV photon flux and stability are highly demanded due to the strong absorption by substrates and solvents. In this case, the main limitation is due to the stability of the high order generation process and the limited bandwidth of the XUV source that gives only discrete even/odd order peaks. Consequently, this results in harmonic artifact noise that overlaps with the resonant signal. In our current study, we utilize a semi-infinite cell for high harmonic generation from two quantum trajectories (i.e. short and long) at over-driven NIR power. This condition, produces broad XUV spectrum without using complicated optics (e.g. hollow-core fibers and double optical gating). This light source allows us to measure the static absorption spectrum of the iron M-edge from a Fe(acac)3 molecular solid film, which shows a resonant feature of 0.01 OD (~2.3% absorption). Moreover, we also investigate how sample roughness affects the static absorption spectrum. We are able to make smooth solar cell precursor materials (i.e. PbI2 and PbBr2) by spin casting and observe iodine (50 eV) and bromine (70 eV) absorption edges in the order of 0.05 OD with minimal harmonic artifact noise.

  3. Sugar radicals formed by photo-excitation of guanine cation radical in oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Adhikary, Amitava; Collins, Sean; Khanduri, Deepti; Sevilla, Michael D.

    2008-01-01

    This work presents evidence that photo-excitation of guanine cation radical (G•+) in dGpdG and DNA-oligonucleotides: TGT, TGGT, TGGGT, TTGTT, TTGGTT, TTGGTTGGTT, AGA and AGGGA in frozen glassy aqueous solutions at low temperatures leads to hole transfer to the sugar phosphate backbone and results in high yields of deoxyribose radicals. In this series of oligonucleotides we find that, G•+ on photo-excitation, at 143 K leads to the formation of predominantly C5′• and C1′• with small amounts of C3′•. Photo-conversion yields of G•+ to sugar radicals in oligonucleotides decreased as the overall chain length increased. However, for high molecular weight dsDNA (salmon testes) in frozen aqueous solutions substantial conversion of G•+ to C1′• (only) sugar radical is still found (ca. 50%). Within the cohort of sugar radicals formed we find a relative increase in the formation of C1′• with length of the oligonucleotide along with decreases in C3′• and C5′• For dsDNA in frozen solutions, only the formation of C1′• is found via photo-excitation of G•+ without a significant temperature dependence (77 K to 180 K). Long wavelength visible light (>540 nm) is observed to be about as effective as light under 540 nm for photoconversion of G•+ to sugar radicals for short oligonucleotides but gradually loses effectiveness with chain length. This wavelength dependence is attributed to base-to-base hole transfer for wavelengths >540 nm. Base-to-sugar hole transfer is suggested to dominate under 540 nm. These results may have implications for a number of investigations of hole transfer through DNA in which DNA-holes are subjected to continuous visible illumination. PMID:17547448

  4. Method And Apparatus For Examining A Tissue Using The Spectral Wing Emission Therefrom Induced By Visible To Infrared Photoexcitation.

    DOEpatents

    Alfano, Robert R.; Demos, Stavros G.; Zhang, Gang

    2003-12-16

    Method and an apparatus for examining a tissue using the spectral wing emission therefrom induced by visible to infrared photoexcitation. In one aspect, the method is used to characterize the condition of a tissue sample and comprises the steps of (a) photoexciting the tissue sample with substantially monochromatic light having a wavelength of at least 600 nm; and (b) using the resultant far red and near infrared spectral wing emission (SW) emitted from the tissue sample to characterize the condition of the tissue sample. In one embodiment, the substantially monochromatic photoexciting light is a continuous beam of light, and the resultant steady-state far red and near infrared SW emission from the tissue sample is used to characterize the condition of the tissue sample. In another embodiment, the substantially monochromatic photoexciting light is a light pulse, and the resultant time-resolved far red and near infrared SW emission emitted from the tissue sample is used to characterize the condition of the tissue sample. In still another embodiment, the substantially monochromatic photoexciting light is a polarized light pulse, and the parallel and perpendicular components of the resultant polarized time-resolved SW emission emitted from the tissue sample are used to characterize the condition of the tissue sample.

  5. Ultrafast Enhancement of Ferromagnetism via Photoexcited Holes inGaMnAs

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.; Cotoros, I.; Dani, K.M.; Liu, X.; Furdyna, J.K.; Chemla, D.S.

    2007-02-17

    We report on the observation of ultrafast photo-enhanced ferromagnetism in GaMnAs. It is manifested as a transient magnetization increase on a 100-ps time scale, after an initial sub-ps demagnetization. The dynamic magnetization enhancement exhibits a maximum below the Curie temperature {Tc} and dominates the demagnetization component when approaching {Tc}. We attribute the observed ultrafast collective ordering to the p-d exchange interaction between photoexcited holes and Mn spins, leading to a correlation-induced peak around 20K and a transient increase in {Tc}.

  6. Neutral dissociation of hydrogen following photoexcitation of HCl at the chlorine K edge

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, D.L.; Arrasate, M.E.; Martin, R.; Vanderford, B.; Lindle, D.W.; Cotter, J.; Neill, P.; Fisher, G.R.; Perera, R.C.; Leung, K.T.; Levin, J.C.; Sellin, I.A.; Simon, M.; Simon, M.; Uehara, Y.; Whitfield, S.B.

    1998-04-01

    Time-of-flight mass spectroscopy was used to study the relaxation dynamics of HCl following photoexcitation in the vicinity of the Cl K edge ({approximately}2.8keV) using monochromatic synchrotron radiation. At the lowest resonant excitation to the 6{sigma}{sup {asterisk}} antibonding orbital, almost half of the excited molecules decay by emission of a neutral H atom, mostly in coincidence with a highly charged Cl{sup n+} ion. The present work demonstrates that neutral-atom emission can be a significant decay channel for excited states with very short lifetimes (1 fs). {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  7. [Photoexcitation mechanism of photoconductive device by organic/inorganic thin-film heteropairing].

    PubMed

    Jin, Hui; Teng, Feng; Liu, Jun-Feng; Meng, Xian-Guo; Xu, Zheng; Hou, Yan-Bing; Xu, Xu-Rong

    2004-08-01

    Photoconductive devices with organic (polyvinylcarbazole-PVK)/inorganic (zinc-sulfide--ZnS) thin-film heteropairing were fabricated. In external field, the excitation profile of the steady-state photoconductivity and the primary photoexcitation process of hybrid devices were presented and discussed. Comparison of photoconductivity of the devices and absorption spectra of PVK and ZnS implied that both layers absorption contributes to the photocurrent, but the effective part is at the interface of PVK and ZnS. The dependence of maximum photocurrent on the applied voltage and the dark and illuminated current spectra indicates the ultrafast charge transfer at the interface. PMID:15766107

  8. Nonequilibrium plasmon emission drives ultrafast carrier relaxation dynamics in photoexcited graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamm, J. M.; Page, A. F.; Bravo-Abad, J.; Garcia-Vidal, F. J.; Hess, O.

    2016-01-01

    The fast decay of carrier inversion in photoexcited graphene has been attributed to optical phonon emission and Auger recombination. Plasmon emission provides another pathway that, as we show here, drives the carrier relaxation dynamics on ultrafast time scales. In studying the nonequilibrium relaxation dynamics we find that plasmon emission effectively converts inversion into hot carriers, whose energy is then extracted by optical phonon emission. This mechanism not only explains the observed femtosecond lifetime of inversion but also offers the prospect for atomically thin ultrafast plasmon emitters.

  9. X-ray resonant photoexcitation: linewidths and energies of Kα transitions in highly charged Fe ions.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, J K; Bernitt, S; Epp, S W; Steinbrügge, R; Beilmann, C; Brown, G V; Eberle, S; Graf, A; Harman, Z; Hell, N; Leutenegger, M; Müller, A; Schlage, K; Wille, H-C; Yavaş, H; Ullrich, J; Crespo López-Urrutia, J R

    2013-09-01

    Photoabsorption by and fluorescence of the Kα transitions in highly charged iron ions are essential mechanisms for x-ray radiation transfer in astrophysical environments. We study photoabsorption due to the main Kα transitions in highly charged iron ions from heliumlike to fluorinelike (Fe24+ to Fe17+) using monochromatic x rays around 6.6 keV at the PETRA III synchrotron photon source. Natural linewidths were determined with hitherto unattained accuracy. The observed transitions are of particular interest for the understanding of photoexcited plasmas found in x-ray binary stars and active galactic nuclei. PMID:25166661

  10. Hydration shell effects in the relaxation dynamics of photoexcited Fe-II complexes in water

    SciTech Connect

    Nalbach, P.; Achner, A. J. A.; Frey, M.; Grosser, M.; Thorwart, M.; Bressler, C.

    2014-07-28

    We study the relaxation dynamics of photoexcited Fe-II complexes dissolved in water and identify the relaxation pathway which the molecular complex follows in presence of a hydration shell of bound water at the interface between the complex and the solvent. Starting from a low-spin state, the photoexcited complex can reach the high-spin state via a cascade of different possible transitions involving electronic as well as vibrational relaxation processes. By numerically exact path integral calculations for the relaxational dynamics of a continuous solvent model, we find that the vibrational life times of the intermittent states are of the order of a few ps. Since the electronic rearrangement in the complex occurs on the time scale of about 100 fs, we find that the complex first rearranges itself in a high-spin and highly excited vibrational state, before it relaxes its energy to the solvent via vibrational relaxation transitions. By this, the relaxation pathway can be clearly identified. We find that the life time of the vibrational states increases with the size of the complex (within a spherical model), but decreases with the thickness of the hydration shell, indicating that the hydration shell acts as an additional source of fluctuations.

  11. Interactions between photoexcited NIR emitting CdHgTe quantum dots and graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagtap, Amardeep M.; Varade, Vaibhav; Konkena, Bharathi; Ramesh, K. P.; Chatterjee, Abhijit; Banerjee, Arup; Pendyala, Naresh Babu; Koteswara Rao, K. S. R.

    2016-02-01

    Hydrothermally grown mercury cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdHgTe QDs) are decorated on graphene oxide (GO) sheets through physisorption. The structural change of GO through partial reduction of oxygen functional groups is observed with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in GO-QDs composites. Raman spectroscopy provides relatively a small change (˜1.1 times) in D/G ratio of band intensity and red shift in G band from 1606 cm-1 to 1594 cm-1 in GO-CdHgTe QDs (2.6 nm) composites, which indicates structural modification of GO network. Steady state and time resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy shows the electronic interactions between photoexcited near infrared emitting CdHgTe QDs and GO. Another interesting observation is PL quenching in the presence of GO, and it is quite effective in the case of smaller size QDs (2.6 nm) compared to the larger size QDs (4.2 nm). Thus, the observed PL quenching is attributed to the photogenerated electron transfer from QDs to GO. The photoexcited electron transfer rate decreases from 2.2 × 109 to 1.5 × 108 s-1 with increasing particle size from 2.6 to 4.2 nm. Photoconductivity measurements on QDs-GO composite devices show nearly 3 fold increase in the current density under photo-illumination, which is a promising aspect for solar energy conversion and other optoelectronic applications.

  12. Theoretical and experimental study of dynamics of photoexcited carriers in GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Shishehchi, Sara; Bellotti, Enrico; Rudin, Sergey; Garrett, Gregory A.; Wraback, Michael

    2013-12-21

    We present a theoretical and experimental study of the sub-picosecond dynamics of photo-excited carriers in GaN. In the theoretical model, interaction with an external ultrafast laser pulse is treated coherently and to account for the scattering mechanisms and dephasing processes, a generalized Monte-Carlo simulation is used. The scattering mechanisms included are carrier interactions with polar optical phonons and acoustic phonons, and carrier-carrier Coulomb interactions. We study the effect of different scattering mechanisms on the carrier densities. In the case that the excitation energy satisfies the threshold for polar optical scattering, phonon contribution is the dominant process in relaxing the system, otherwise, carrier-carrier mechanism is dominant. Furthermore, we present the temperature and pulse power dependent normalized luminescence intensity. The results are presented over a range of temperatures, electric field, and excitation energy of the laser pulse. For comparison, we also report the experimental time-resolved photoluminescence studies on GaN samples. There is a good agreement between the simulation and experiment in normalized luminescence intensity results. Therefore, we show that we can explain the dynamics of the photo-excited carriers in GaN by including only carrier-carrier and carrier-phonon interactions and a relatively simple two-band electronic structure model.

  13. Spin-Orbit Effects in Spin-Resolved L2,3 Core Level Photoemission of 3d Ferromagnetic Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Komesu, T; Waddill, G D; Yu, S W; Butterfield, M; Tobin, J G

    2007-10-02

    We present spin-resolved 2p core level photoemission for the 3d transition metal films of Fe and Co grown on Cu(100). We observe clear spin asymmetry in the main 2p core level photoemission peaks of Fe and Co films consistent with trends in the bulk magnetic moments. The spin polarization can be strongly enhanced, by variation of the experimental geometry, when the photoemission is undertaken with circularly polarized light, indicating that spin-orbit interaction can have a profound in spin polarized photoemission. Further spin polarized photoemission studies using variable circularly polarized light at high photon energies, high flux are indicated, underscoring the value of synchrotron measurements at facilities with increased beam stability.

  14. Electronic Charges and Electric Potential at LaAlO3/SrTiO3 Interfaces Studied by Core-Level Photoemission Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Harold

    2011-08-19

    We studied LaAlO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3} interfaces for varying LaAlO{sub 3} thickness by core-level photoemission spectroscopy. In Ti 2p spectra for conducting 'n-type' interfaces, Ti{sup 3+} signals appeared, which were absent for insulating 'p-type' interfaces. The Ti{sup 3+} signals increased with LaAlO{sub 3} thickness, but started well below the critical thickness of 4 unit cells for metallic transport. Core-level shifts with LaAlO{sub 3} thickness were much smaller than predicted by the polar catastrophe model. We attribute these observations to surface defects/adsorbates providing charges to the interface even below the critical thickness.

  15. Experimental verification of the surface termination in the topological insulator TlBiSe2 using core-level photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, Kenta; Ye, Mao; Schwier, Eike F.; Nurmamat, Munisa; Shirai, Kaito; Nakatake, Masashi; Ueda, Shigenori; Miyamoto, Koji; Okuda, Taichi; Namatame, Hirofumi; Taniguchi, Masaki; Ueda, Yoshifumi; Kimura, Akio

    2013-12-01

    The surface termination of the promising topological insulator TlBiSe2 has been studied by surface- and bulk-sensitive probes. Our scanning tunneling microscopy has unmasked for the first time the unusual surface morphology of TlBiSe2 obtained by cleaving, where islands are formed by residual atoms on the cleaved plane. The chemical condition of these islands was identified using core-level spectroscopy. We observed thallium core-level spectra that are strongly deformed by a surface component in sharp contrast to the other elements. We propose a simple explanation for this behavior by assuming that the sample cleaving breaks the bonding between thallium and selenium atoms, leaving the thallium layer partially covering the selenium layer. These findings will assist the interpretation of future experimental and theoretical studies of this surface.

  16. Observation of core-level binding energy shifts between (100) surface and bulk atoms of epitaxial CuInSe{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, A.J.; Berry, G.; Rockett, A.

    1997-04-01

    Core-level and valence band photoemission from semiconductors has been shown to exhibit binding energy differences between surface atoms and bulk atoms, thus allowing one to unambiguously distinguish between the two atomic positions. Quite clearly, surface atoms experience a potential different from the bulk due to the lower coordination number - a characteristic feature of any surface is the incomplete atomic coordination. Theoretical accounts of this phenomena are well documented in the literature for III-V and II-VI semiconductors. However, surface state energies corresponding to the equilibrium geometry of (100) and (111) surfaces of Cu-based ternary chalcopyrite semiconductors have not been calculated or experimental determined. These compounds are generating great interest for optoelectronic and photovoltaic applications, and are an isoelectronic analog of the II-VI binary compound semiconductors. Surface core-level binding energy shifts depend on the surface cohesive energies, and surface cohesive energies are related to surface structure. For ternary compound semiconductor surfaces, such as CuInSe{sub 2}, one has the possibility of variations in surface stoichiometry. Applying standard thermodynamical calculations which consider the number of individual surface atoms and their respective chemical potentials should allow one to qualitatively determine the magnitude of surface core-level shifts and, consequently, surface state energies.

  17. Study on dynamics of photoexcited charge injection and trapping in CdS quantum dots sensitized TiO{sub 2} nanowire array film electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, Shan; Cheng, Ke; Yuan, Zhanqiang; Xu, Suyun; Cheng, Gang; Du, Zuliang

    2014-05-19

    The photoexcited electrons transfer dynamics of the CdS quantum dots (QDs) deposited in TiO{sub 2} nanowire array films are studied using surface photovoltage (SPV) and transient photovoltage (TPV) techniques. By comparing the SPV results with different thicknesses of QDs layers, we can separate the dynamic characteristics of photoexcited electrons injection and trapping. It is found that the TPV signals of photoexcited electrons trapped in the CdS QDs occur at timescales of about 2 × 10{sup −8} s, which is faster than that of the photoexcited electrons injected from CdS into TiO{sub 2}. More than 90 nm of the thickness of the CdS QDs layer will seriously affect the photoexcited electrons transfer and injection.

  18. Study on dynamics of photoexcited charge injection and trapping in CdS quantum dots sensitized TiO2 nanowire array film electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Shan; Cheng, Ke; Yuan, Zhanqiang; Xu, Suyun; Cheng, Gang; Du, Zuliang

    2014-05-01

    The photoexcited electrons transfer dynamics of the CdS quantum dots (QDs) deposited in TiO2 nanowire array films are studied using surface photovoltage (SPV) and transient photovoltage (TPV) techniques. By comparing the SPV results with different thicknesses of QDs layers, we can separate the dynamic characteristics of photoexcited electrons injection and trapping. It is found that the TPV signals of photoexcited electrons trapped in the CdS QDs occur at timescales of about 2 × 10-8 s, which is faster than that of the photoexcited electrons injected from CdS into TiO2. More than 90 nm of the thickness of the CdS QDs layer will seriously affect the photoexcited electrons transfer and injection.

  19. Role of photoexcited nitrogen dioxide chemistry on ozone formation and emission control strategy over the Pearl River Delta, China

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new hydroxyl radical formation pathway via photo-excited nitrogen dioxide chemistry is incorporated into a chemistry-only box model as well as a 3D air quality model to examine its potential role on ozone formation and emission control strategy over the Pearl River Delta region...

  20. Non-equilibrium photoexcited carrier effects in a graphene-based Josephson junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsumura, Kohei; Furukawa, Naoki; Ito, Hironori; Watanabe, Eiichiro; Tsuya, Daiju; Takayanagi, Hideaki

    2016-01-01

    We studied the superconducting proximity effect under photoexcitation by illuminating a superconductor/monolayer graphene/superconductor (SGS) Josephson junction with monochromatic light at a wavelength of 1.31 μm. Although the critical current Ic can be controlled by the irradiation power P, its variation cannot be explained by modification of the carrier density, which has been reported for semiconductor-based Josephson junctions. The estimated electron temperature of graphene is proportional to P δ , where δ ≃ 1 / 3 . This relation clearly indicates that photogenerated non-equilibrium carrier dynamics are responsible for the variation of Ic with P. We suggest that the SGS junction can directly mediate interactions between the optical field and the superconducting state.

  1. Dynamics and photoexcitation in MX and MXX[prime] chain solids

    SciTech Connect

    Gammel, J.T. ); Saxena, A.; Bishop, A.R. )

    1992-01-01

    Nonlinear adiabatic dynamics associated with nonlinear excitations in MX and MXX' chain materials are numerically studied within a discrete, 3/4-filled, two-band, tight-binding extended Peierls-Hubbard model. Both Hartree-Fock (HF) adiabatic molecular relaxation and molecular dynamics techniques are employed to investigate the time evolution of solitons, polarons, bipolarons in charge-density-wave (CDW), bond-order-wave (BOW) and spin-density-wave (SDW) ground state materials. Photoexcitations are performed between (i) continuum levels, (ii) localized levels, (iii) continuum and localized levels. The subsequent formation and time evolution of excitons, defect pairs, breathers, and, for the MXX' solids, charge separation are studied in terms of energy levels and distortion patterns. These results are compared with the dynamics of previously studied 1/2-filled, one-band, SSH-type electron-phonon models, used for studying polyenes and polyynes, and experimental data.

  2. Dynamics and photoexcitation in MX and MXX{prime} chain solids

    SciTech Connect

    Gammel, J.T.; Saxena, A.; Bishop, A.R.

    1992-12-01

    Nonlinear adiabatic dynamics associated with nonlinear excitations in MX and MXX` chain materials are numerically studied within a discrete, 3/4-filled, two-band, tight-binding extended Peierls-Hubbard model. Both Hartree-Fock (HF) adiabatic molecular relaxation and molecular dynamics techniques are employed to investigate the time evolution of solitons, polarons, bipolarons in charge-density-wave (CDW), bond-order-wave (BOW) and spin-density-wave (SDW) ground state materials. Photoexcitations are performed between (i) continuum levels, (ii) localized levels, (iii) continuum and localized levels. The subsequent formation and time evolution of excitons, defect pairs, breathers, and, for the MXX` solids, charge separation are studied in terms of energy levels and distortion patterns. These results are compared with the dynamics of previously studied 1/2-filled, one-band, SSH-type electron-phonon models, used for studying polyenes and polyynes, and experimental data.

  3. Transient reflectance of photoexcited Cd{sub 3}As{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, C. P. Berggren, Bryan S.; Arushanov, Ernest; Nateprov, Alex; Hosseini, Tahereh; Kouklin, Nikolai

    2015-06-08

    We report ultrafast transient-grating measurements of crystals of the three-dimensional Dirac semimetal cadmium arsenide, Cd{sub 3}As{sub 2}, at both room temperature and 80 K. After photoexcitation with 1.5-eV photons, charge-carriers relax by two processes, one of duration 500 fs and the other of duration 3.1 ps. By measuring the complex phase of the change in reflectance, we determine that the faster signal corresponds to a decrease in absorption, and the slower signal to a decrease in the light's phase velocity, at the probe energy. We attribute these signals to electrons' filling of phase space, first near the photon energy and later at lower energy. We attribute their decay to cooling by rapid emission of optical phonons, then slower emission of acoustic phonons. We also present evidence that both the electrons and the lattice are strongly heated.

  4. Non-Band-Gap Photoexcitation of Hydroxylated TiO2

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The photochemistry of TiO2 has been studied intensively since it was discovered that TiO2 can act as a photocatalyst. Nevertheless, it has proven difficult to establish the detailed charge-transfer processes involved, partly because the excited states involved are difficult to study. Here we present evidence of the existence of hydroxyl-induced excited states in the conduction band region. Using two-photon photoemission, we show that stepwise photoexcitation from filled band gap states lying 0.8 eV below the Fermi level of rutile TiO2(110) excites hydroxyl-induced states 2.73 eV above the Fermi level that has an onset energy of ∼3.1 eV. The onset is shifted to lower energy by the coadsorption of molecular water, which suggests a means of tuning the energy of the excited state. PMID:26267712

  5. Two-color photoexcitation of Rydberg states via an electric quadrupole transition

    SciTech Connect

    Li Leping; Gu Quanli; Knee, J. L.; Wright, J. D.; DiSciacca, J. M.; Morgan, T. J.

    2008-03-15

    We report the observation of an electric quadrupole transition between the 4s{sup '}[1/2]{sub 0}{sup o} and 3d[3/2]{sub 2}{sup o} states in the spectrum of argon and use it in the first step of a scheme to excite Rydberg states. The initial identification of the transition is based on one-color, two-photon photoionization. A different experiment utilizing two-color, two-photon photoexcitation to Rydberg states confirms the identification. Despite the unavoidable background of one-color, two-photon photoionization, the latter experimental technique makes possible two-photon spectroscopy of Rydberg states using a resonant intermediate state populated by an electric quadrupole transition.

  6. Highly efficient terahertz wave modulators by photo-excitation of organics/silicon bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Hyung Keun; Kang, Chul; Hwang, In-Wook; Yoon, Youngwoon; Lee, Kiejin; Kee, Chul-Sik; Lee, Joong Wook

    2014-07-07

    Using hybrid bilayer systems comprising a molecular organic semiconductor and silicon, we achieve optically controllable active terahertz (THz) modulators that exhibit extremely high modulation efficiencies. A modulation efficiency of 98% is achieved from thermally annealed C{sub 60}/silicon bilayers, due to the rapid photo-induced electron transfer from the excited states of the silicon onto the C{sub 60} layer. Furthermore, we demonstrate the broadband modulation of THz waves. The cut-off condition of the system that is determined by the formation of efficient charge separation by the photo-excitation is highly variable, changing the system from insulating to metallic. The phenomenon enables an extremely high modulation bandwidth and rates of electromagnetic waves of interest. The realization of near-perfect modulation efficiency in THz frequencies opens up the possibilities of utilizing active modulators for THz spectroscopy and communications.

  7. Ultrafast Relaxation Dynamics of Photoexcited Zinc-Porphyrin: Electronic-Vibrational Coupling.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Baxter; Nieto-Pescador, Jesus; Gundlach, Lars

    2016-08-18

    Cyclic tetrapyrroles are the active core of compounds with crucial roles in living systems, such as hemoglobin and chlorophyll, and in technology as photocatalysts and light absorbers for solar energy conversion. Zinc-tetraphenylporphyrin (Zn-TPP) is a prototypical cyclic tetrapyrrole that has been intensely studied in past decades. Because of its importance for photochemical processes the optical properties are of particular interest, and, accordingly, numerous studies have focused on light absorption and excited-state dynamics of Zn-TPP. Relaxation after photoexcitation in the Soret band involves internal conversion that is preceded by an ultrafast process. This relaxation process has been observed by several groups. Hitherto, it has not been established if it involves a higher lying "dark" state or vibrational relaxation in the excited S2 state. Here we combine high time resolution electronic and vibrational spectroscopy to show that this process constitutes vibrational relaxation in the anharmonic S2 potential. PMID:27482847

  8. Hyperpolarization of Thin Films with Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Using Photoexcited Triplet Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tateishi, Kenichiro; Negoro, Makoto; Kagawa, Akinori; Uesaka, Tomohiro; Kitagawa, Masahiro

    2013-08-01

    With dynamic nuclear polarization using the photoexcited triplet electron spin (triplet-DNP) of pentacene, nuclear spins can be hyperpolarized even in a low magnetic field at room temperature. Several demonstrations have been performed using bulk crystals. Hyperpolarization in a thin film with triplet-DNP enables new applications, such as general NMR spectroscopy and the polarized target of unstable nuclei. In this work, we succeeded in polarizing 1H spins in a thin film fabricated by the cell method. We obtained a 1H spin polarization of 12.9% using a 7-μm-thick film of p-terphenyl doped with pentacene in 0.4 T at room temperature. We also obtained a 1H spin polarization of 3.9% in 0.4 T at 150 K using a 60-μm-thick film of trans-stilbene doped with pentacene, whose single crystal cannot be made easily by conventional methods.

  9. Broadband transient absorption study of photoexcitations in lead halide perovskites: Towards a multiband picture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, Benoy; Sampat, Siddharth; Danilov, Evgeny O.; Peng, Weina; Rupich, Sara M.; Chabal, Yves J.; Gartstein, Yuri N.; Malko, Anton V.

    2016-04-01

    Ultrafast transient pump-probe measurements of thin CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite films over a wide spectral range from 350 to 800 nm reveal a family of photoinduced bleach (PB) and absorption (PA) features unequivocally pointing to the fundamentally multiband character of the underlying electronic structure. Excitation pump-energy dependent kinetics of three long-lived PB peaks at 1.65, 2.55, and 3.15 eV along with a broad PA band shows the involvement of band-edge thermalized carriers in all transitions and at least four, possibly more, electronic bands. The evolution of the transient signatures is described in terms of the redistribution of the conserved oscillator strength of the whole system. The multiband perspective opens up different directions for understanding and controlling photoexcitations in hybrid perovskites.

  10. Wavepacket splitting and two-pathway deactivation in the photoexcited visual pigment isorhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Polli, Dario; Weingart, Oliver; Brida, Daniele; Poli, Emiliano; Maiuri, Margherita; Spillane, Katelyn M; Bottoni, Andrea; Kukura, Philipp; Mathies, Richard A; Cerullo, Giulio; Garavelli, Marco

    2014-02-24

    Isorhodopsin is the visual pigment analogue of rhodopsin. It shares the same opsin environment but it embeds 9-cis retinal instead of 11-cis. Its photoisomerization is three times slower and less effective. The mechanistic rationale behind this observation is revealed by combining high-level quantum-mechanical/molecular-mechanical simulations with ultrafast optical spectroscopy with sub-20 fs time resolution and spectral coverage extended to the near-infrared. Whereas in rhodopsin the photoexcited wavepacket has ballistic motion through a single conical intersection seam region between the ground and excited states, in isorhodopsin it branches into two competitive deactivation pathways involving distinct conical intersection funnels. One is rapidly accessed but unreactive. The other is slower, as it features extended steric interactions with the environment, but it is productive as it follows forward bicycle pedal motion. PMID:24481600

  11. Photoexcited escape probability, optical gain, and noise in quantum well infrared photodetectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, B. F.; Zussman, A.; Gunapala, S. D.; Asom, M. T.; Kuo, J. M.; Hobson, W. S.

    1992-01-01

    We present a detailed and thorough study of a wide variety of quantum well infrared photodetectors (QWIPs), which were chosen to have large differences in their optical and transport properties. Both n- and p-doped QWIPs, as well as intersubband transitions based on photoexcitation from bound-to-bound, bound-to-quasi-continuum, and bound-to-continuum quantum well states were investigated. The measurements and theoretical analysis included optical absorption, responsivity, dark current, current noise, optical gain, hot carrier mean free path; net quantum efficiency, quantum well escape probability, quantum well escape time, as well as detectivity. These results allow a better understanding of the optical and transport physics and thus a better optimization of the QWIP performance.

  12. Ultrafast lattice response of photoexcited thin films studied by X-ray diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Herzog, Marc; Bojahr, André; Leitenberger, Wolfram; Hertwig, Andreas; Bargheer, Matias

    2014-01-01

    Using ultrafast X-ray diffraction, we study the coherent picosecond lattice dynamics of photoexcited thin films in the two limiting cases, where the photoinduced stress profile decays on a length scale larger and smaller than the film thickness. We solve a unifying analytical model of the strain propagation for acoustic impedance-matched opaque films on a semi-infinite transparent substrate, showing that the lattice dynamics essentially depend on two parameters: One for the spatial profile and one for the amplitude of the strain. We illustrate the results by comparison with high-quality ultrafast X-ray diffraction data of SrRuO3 films on SrTiO3 substrates. PMID:26798784

  13. Photo-ionization and photo-excitation of curcumin investigated by laser flash photolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Tingting; Kun, Li; Gao, Bo; Zhu, Rongrong; Wu, Xianzheng; Wang, ShiLong

    2013-12-01

    Curcumin (Cur) has putative antitumor properties. In the current study, we examined photophysical and photochemical properties of Cur using laser flash photolysis. The results demonstrated that Cur could be photo-ionized at 355 nm laser pulse to produce radical cation (Currad +) and solvated electron esol- in 7:3 ethanol-water mixtures. The quantum yield of Cur photo-ionization and the ratio of photo-ionization to photo-excitation were also determined. Currad + could be transferred into neutral radical of Cur (Currad ) via deprotonation with the pKa 4.13. The excited singlet of Cur (1Cur*) could be transferred into excited triplet (3Cur*), which could be quenched by oxygen to produce singlet oxygen 1O2∗. Reaction of 3Cur* with tryptophan was confirmed. The results encourage developing curcumin as a photosensitive antitumor agent.

  14. Spatiotemporal dynamics of photoexcited quasiparticles in two-dimensional crystals studied by ultrafast laser techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Nardeep

    Layered materials in which atomic sheets are stacked together by weak van der Waals forces can be used to fabricate two-dimensional systems. They represent a diverse and rich, but largely unexplored, source of materials. Atomically-thin structures derived from these materials possess a number of interesting electrical, optical, and mechanical properties, and are attractive for new nanodevices. For their applications in semiconductor industry, it is necessary to understand the dynamics of photoexcited quasiparticles that occur on ultrafast time scales of less than one nanosecond. In this dissertation, I discuss ultrafast optical experimental techniques and results from various two-dimensional materials, which provide information about electronic dynamics. First, a second harmonic generation technique that can be used to find the crystalline orientation, thickness uniformity, layer stacking, and single-crystal domain size is discussed, with results presented on exfoliated and chemical vapor deposition MoS2 samples. Second, a third harmonic generation technique is discussed, which can be used to explore nonlinear optical properties of materials, and results are presented on graphene and few-layer graphite films. Third, a spatially resolved femtosecond pump-probe is described, which can be used to study hot carrier and photoexcited phonon dynamics and results are presented on Bi2 Se3 sample. Then, exciton dynamics in MoS2 and MoSe2 are explored by using transient absorption microscopy with a high spatiotemporal resolution. Finally, a polarization-resolved femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy that can be used to study valley and spin dynamics is discussed, with results presented on monolayer, few-layer, and bulk MoSe2 samples.

  15. Photoexcitation of Yb-doped aluminosilicate fibers at 250 nm: evidence for excitation transfer from oxygen deficiency centers to Yb{sup 3+}

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, C. G.; Keister, K. E.; Dragic, P. D.; Eden, J. G.; Croteau, A.

    2010-10-15

    Emission spectra in the {approx}240-1100 nm wavelength region as well as the temporally resolved decay of Yb{sup 3+} and point defect spontaneous emission have been recorded when aluminosilicate optical fibers doped with Yb are irradiated with {approx}160 fs laser pulses having a central wavelength of {approx}250 nm (({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){omega}=5 eV). Photoexcitation of the fibers in this region of the deep ultraviolet (UV) provides access simultaneously to the Type II Si oxygen deficiency center (ODC), the non-bridging oxygen hole center (NBOHC: an oxygen-excess defect), and the Ge ODC. Emission from all of these defects in the ultraviolet and/or visible is observed, as is intense fluorescence at 976 nm from Yb{sup 3+}. Absorption measurements conducted in the {approx}230-265 nm region with a sequence of UV light-emitting diodes reveal a continuum peaking at {approx}248 nm and having a spectral width of {approx}18 nm (FWHM), confirming that the 250 nm laser pump is photoexciting predominantly the ODC. The temporal histories of the optically active defect and rare earth ion emission waveforms, in combination with time-integrated spectra, suggest that the Si ODC(II) triplet state directly excites Yb{sup 3+} as well as at least one other intrinsic defect in the silica network. Prolonged exposure of the Yb-doped fibers to 250 nm radiation yields increased Yb{sup 3+}, NBOHC, and Si ODC(II) singlet emission which is accompanied by a decline in Si ODC(II) triplet fluorescence, thus reinforcing the conclusion--drawn on the basis of luminescence decay constants--that the triplet state of Si ODC(II) is the immediate precursor to the NBOHC and is partially responsible for Yb ion emission at 976 nm. This conclusion is consistent with the observation that exposure of fiber to 5 eV radiation slightly suppresses ODC absorption in the {approx}240-255 nm region while simultaneously introducing an absorption continuum extending from 260 nm to below 235 nm (({Dirac_h}/2{pi

  16. Density Functional Theory Study of the Energetics, Electronic Structure, and Core-Level Shifts of NO Adsorption on the Pt(111) Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Z. H.; Da Silva, J. L. F.; Deng, H. Q.; Li, W. X.

    2009-01-01

    In this work, we report a first-principles investigation of the energetics, structures, electronic properties, and core-level shifts of NO adsorption on the Pt(111) surface. Our calculations are based on density functional theory within the framework of the ultrasoft pseudopotential plane-wave and the all-electron projected augmented-wave methods. We found that at 0.25, 0.50, and 0.75 monolayer, NO adsorbs preferentially in the fcc, fcc+top, and fcc+top+hcp sites, respectively. The geometric parameters, adsorption energies, vibrational frequencies, and work-function changes are in good agreement with the experimental data. The interaction between NO and Pt(111) was found to follow a donation-back-donation process, in which the NO {sigma} states donate electrons to the substrate Pt d states, while the substrate Pt d states back donate to the NO {pi} states. Though there is an overall net charge transfer from the substrate to the NO adsorbate regardless of the adsorption sites and coverages, the spatial redistribution of the transferred electron is site dependent. The charge accumulation for NO in the top sites occurs closer to the surface than NO in the hollow sites, which results in the reduction of the Pt(111) surface work function for the top NO but an increase for the hollow NO. The core-level shifts of the topmost surface Pt atoms coordinated with top and hollow NO molecules at different coverages are in excellent agreement with experiments. In contrast, the N 1s core-level shifts between top and hollow NO ({approx}0.7 eV) deviated significantly from the zero shift found in experiments. Our analysis indicates that the difference may come from the thermal vibration and rotation of adsorbed NO on the Pt(111) surface.

  17. Thermal stability of the Rh(110) missing-row reconstruction: Combination of real-time core-level spectroscopy and ab initio modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Baraldi, A.; Comelli, G.; Rosei, R.; Lizzit, S.; Bondino, F.; Sbraccia, C.; Bonini, N.; Baroni, S.; Mikkelsen, A.; Andersen, J.N.

    2005-08-15

    The thermal stability of the (1x2) missing-row phase of Rh(110), whose first layer is an ordered array of one-dimensional atomic chains, is investigated using high-resolution core-level spectroscopy and density functional calculations. The time evolution of the spectra indicates that this phase is metastable towards deconstruction into a (1x1) phase. Our calculations unveil the mechanism of this process, which is shown to be ignited by surface defects, and provide a value for the activation energy in good agreement with experimental findings.

  18. Deep Earthquakes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frohlich, Cliff

    1989-01-01

    Summarizes research to find the nature of deep earthquakes occurring hundreds of kilometers down in the earth's mantle. Describes further research problems in this area. Presents several illustrations and four references. (YP)

  19. Structural origin of Si-2p core-level shifts from Si(100)-c[4x2] surface: A spectral x-ray photoelectron diffraction study

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X.; Tonner, B.P.; Denlinger, J.

    1997-04-01

    The authors have performed angle-resolved x-ray photoelectron diffraction (XPD) from a Si(100)-c(4x2) surface to study the structural origin of Si-2p core-level shifts. In the experiment, the highly resolved surface Si-2p core-level spectra were measured as a fine grid of hemisphere and photon energies, using the SpectroMicroscopy Facility {open_quotes}ultraESCA{close_quotes} instrument. By carefully decomposing the spectra into several surface peaks, the authors are able to obtain surface-atom resolved XPD patterns. Using a multiple scattering analysis, they derived a detailed atomic model for the Si(100)-c(4x2) surface. In this model, the asymmetric dimers were found tilted by 11.5 plus/minus 2.0 degrees with bond length of 2.32 plus/minus 0.05{angstrom}. By matching model XPD patterns to experiment, the authors can identify which atoms in the reconstructed surface are responsible for specific photoemission lines in the 2p spectrum.

  20. Layer-dependent Debye temperature and thermal expansion of Ru(0001) by means of high-energy resolution core-level photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrari, Eugenio; Galli, Lorenzo; Miniussi, Elisa; Morri, Maurizio; Panighel, Mirko; Ricci, Maria; Lacovig, Paolo; Lizzit, Silvano; Baraldi, Alessandro

    2010-11-15

    The layer-dependent Debye temperature of Ru(0001) is determined by means of high-energy resolution core-level photoelectron spectroscopy measurements. The possibility to disentangle three different components in the Ru 3d{sub 5/2} spectrum of Ru(0001), originating from bulk, first-, and second-layer atoms, allowed us to follow the temperature evolution of their photoemission line shapes and binding energies. Temperature effects were detected, namely, a lattice thermal expansion and a layer-dependent phonon broadening, which was interpreted within the framework of the Hedin-Rosengren formalism based on the Debye theory. The resulting Debye temperature of the top-layer atoms is 295{+-}10 K, lower than that of the bulk (T=668{+-}5 K) and second-layer (T=445{+-}10 K) atoms. While these results are in agreement with the expected phonon softening at the surface, we show that a purely harmonic description of the motion of the surface atoms is not valid, since anharmonic effects contribute significantly to the position and line shape of the different core-level components.

  1. Angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure of the Ni 3p, Cu 3s, and Cu 3p core levels of the respective clean (111) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Huff, W.R. |; Chen, Y.; Kellar, S.A.; Moler, E.J. |; Hussain, Z.; Huang, Z.Q.; Zheng, Y.; Shirley, D.A.

    1997-07-01

    We report a non-s initial-state angle-resolved photoemission extended fine-structure (ARPEFS) study of clean surfaces for the purpose of further understanding the technique. The surface structure sensitivity of ARPEFS applied to clean surfaces and to arbitrary initial states is studied using normal photoemission data taken from the Ni 3p core levels of a Ni(111) single crystal and the Cu 3s and the Cu 3p core levels of a Cu(111) single crystal. The Fourier transforms of these clean surface data are dominated by backscattering. Unlike the s initial-state data, the p initial-state data show a peak in the Fourier transform corresponding to in-plane scattering from the six nearest neighbors to the emitter. Evidence was seen for single-scattering events from the same plane as the emitters and double-scattering events. Using a recently developed, multiple-scattering calculation program, ARPEFS data from clean surfaces and from p initial states can be modeled to high precision. Although there are many layers of emitters when measuring photoemission from a clean surface, test calculations show that the ARPEFS signal is dominated by photoemission from atoms in the first two crystal layers. Thus ARPEFS applied to clean surfaces is sensitive to surface reconstruction. The best-fit calculation for clean Ni(111) indicates an expansion of the first two layers. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  2. Picosecond time evolution of photoexcitations at 2.33 eV in α-sexithyenil thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzani, G.; Danieli, R.; Muccini, M.; Taliani, C.

    1993-11-01

    Picosecond time dynamics of the isotropic as well as the anisotropic transient absorption saturation have been measured in an α-sexithyenil (T6) thin film at room temperature by photoinduced absorption and resonant Kerr-gate experiments. Strongly damped photoacoustical oscillations have been detected superimposed on the photobleaching signal, providing a way to evaluate the sound speed in T6 films along the normal to the substrate; VS~=16 Å/ps. A stretched exponential function has been used to describe the time recovery of the total photoexcited population yielding a time constant τ=3.5 ns with an exponent α=0.5. This is indicative of dispersive diffusion towards recombination centers via intermolecular hopping; the Kerr-gate transmission decay provides an estimate of the photoexcitation diffusion constant, namely, D=6×10-3 cm2/s.

  3. Quenching of photoexcited states of the proteins chromophores and introduced into the protein macromolecules fluorescent probes by heavy metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnikov, A. G.; Dyachuk, O. A.; Melnikov, G. V.

    2015-03-01

    We have studied the processes of quenching of photoexcited states of fluorescent probes and quenching of the fluorescence of the chromophores of human serum albumin (HSA) by heavy metal ions (HM): cations Tl+, Pb2+, Cu2+, Cd2+, and the anion of iodine (I-). We used the dye from xanthene series - eosin as a fluorescent probe. By quenching of the fluorescence of protein chromophores we found an influence of HM on the structure of proteins, resulting in a shift of the peak of the fluorescence of HSA tryptophanyl. This can be explained by proteins denaturation under the influence of heavy metals and penetration of water into the inner environment of HSA tryptophan. It was established that the constant of the quenching of the probe phosphorescence is much higher than the fluorescence, which is explained by significantly longer lifetime of the photoexcited states of fluorescent probes in the triplet state than in the singlet.

  4. Electron heating due to microwave photoexcitation in the high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs two dimensional electron system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanayaka, A. N.; Mani, R. G.; Wegscheider, W.

    2013-12-01

    We extract the electron temperature in the microwave photo-excited high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs two dimensional electron system (2DES) by studying the influence of microwave radiation on the amplitude of Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations (SdHOs) in a regime where the cyclotron frequency, ωc, and the microwave angular frequency, ω, satisfy 2ω ≤ ωc ≤ 3.5ω The results indicate that increasing the incident microwave power has a weak effect on the amplitude of the SdHOs and therefore the electron temperature, in comparison to the influence of modest temperature changes on the dark-specimen SdH effect. The results indicate negligible electron heating under modest microwave photo-excitation, in good agreement with theoretical predictions.

  5. Visualization of Photoexcited Carrier Responses in a Solar Cell Using Optical Pump—Terahertz Emission Probe Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanishi, Hidetoshi; Ito, Akira; Takayama, Kazuhisa; Kawayama, Iwao; Murakami, Hironaru; Tonouchi, Masayoshi

    2016-05-01

    We observed photoexcited carrier responses in solar cells excited by femtosecond laser pulses with spatial and temporal resolution using an optical pump-terahertz emission probe technique. We visualized the ultrafast local variation of the intensity of terahertz emission from a polycrystalline silicon solar cell using this technique and clearly observed the change in signals between a grain boundary and the inside of a grain in the solar cell. Further, the time evolution of the pump-probe signals of the polycrystalline and monocrystalline silicon solar cells was observed, and the relaxation times of photoexcited carriers in the emitter layers of crystalline silicon solar cells were estimated using this technique. The estimated relaxation time was consistent with the lifetime of the Auger recombination process that was dominant in heavily doped silicon used as an emitter layer for the silicon solar cells, which is difficult to obtain with photoluminescence method commonly used for the evaluation of solar cells.

  6. Electron heating due to microwave photoexcitation in the high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs two dimensional electron system

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanayaka, A. N.; Mani, R. G.; Wegscheider, W.

    2013-12-04

    We extract the electron temperature in the microwave photo-excited high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs two dimensional electron system (2DES) by studying the influence of microwave radiation on the amplitude of Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations (SdHOs) in a regime where the cyclotron frequency, ω{sub c}, and the microwave angular frequency, ω, satisfy 2ω ≤ ω{sub c} ≤ 3.5ω The results indicate that increasing the incident microwave power has a weak effect on the amplitude of the SdHOs and therefore the electron temperature, in comparison to the influence of modest temperature changes on the dark-specimen SdH effect. The results indicate negligible electron heating under modest microwave photo-excitation, in good agreement with theoretical predictions.

  7. EXAFS studies on the structure of photoexcited cyclopentadienylnickelnitrosyl(C{sub 5}H{sub 5}NiNO)

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L.X.; Bowman, M.K.; Montano, A.; Norris, J.R. |

    1993-05-01

    The structures of C{sub 5}H{sub 5}NiNO in a reversible photochemical reaction were studied via EXAFS, FTIR, and optical absorption spectroscopies. A photoexcited intermediate with distinctively different EXAFS, IR, and optical absorption spectra from those of the ground state molecules was generated upon irradiation using 365 mn light at 20K in a 3-methylpentane solution. The reverse reaction was induced by irradiation with 310 mn light. The EXAFS data analysis has shown a 0.12 {Angstrom} elongation of the Ni-N bond and the bending, of Ni-N-0 in the photoexcited intermediate. Several ZINDO calculations were conducted based on the structures obtained from the EXAFS spectroscopy. These calculations reproduced the changes in the optical spectra and the intramolecular electron transfer in C{sub 5}H{sub 5}NiNO.

  8. EXAFS studies on the structure of photoexcited cyclopentadienylnickelnitrosyl(C[sub 5]H[sub 5]NiNO)

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L.X.; Bowman, M.K.; Montano, A. ); Norris, J.R. Chicago Univ., IL . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1993-01-01

    The structures of C[sub 5]H[sub 5]NiNO in a reversible photochemical reaction were studied via EXAFS, FTIR, and optical absorption spectroscopies. A photoexcited intermediate with distinctively different EXAFS, IR, and optical absorption spectra from those of the ground state molecules was generated upon irradiation using 365 mn light at 20K in a 3-methylpentane solution. The reverse reaction was induced by irradiation with 310 mn light. The EXAFS data analysis has shown a 0.12 [Angstrom] elongation of the Ni-N bond and the bending, of Ni-N-0 in the photoexcited intermediate. Several ZINDO calculations were conducted based on the structures obtained from the EXAFS spectroscopy. These calculations reproduced the changes in the optical spectra and the intramolecular electron transfer in C[sub 5]H[sub 5]NiNO.

  9. Deep learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecun, Yann; Bengio, Yoshua; Hinton, Geoffrey

    2015-05-01

    Deep learning allows computational models that are composed of multiple processing layers to learn representations of data with multiple levels of abstraction. These methods have dramatically improved the state-of-the-art in speech recognition, visual object recognition, object detection and many other domains such as drug discovery and genomics. Deep learning discovers intricate structure in large data sets by using the backpropagation algorithm to indicate how a machine should change its internal parameters that are used to compute the representation in each layer from the representation in the previous layer. Deep convolutional nets have brought about breakthroughs in processing images, video, speech and audio, whereas recurrent nets have shone light on sequential data such as text and speech.

  10. Deep learning.

    PubMed

    LeCun, Yann; Bengio, Yoshua; Hinton, Geoffrey

    2015-05-28

    Deep learning allows computational models that are composed of multiple processing layers to learn representations of data with multiple levels of abstraction. These methods have dramatically improved the state-of-the-art in speech recognition, visual object recognition, object detection and many other domains such as drug discovery and genomics. Deep learning discovers intricate structure in large data sets by using the backpropagation algorithm to indicate how a machine should change its internal parameters that are used to compute the representation in each layer from the representation in the previous layer. Deep convolutional nets have brought about breakthroughs in processing images, video, speech and audio, whereas recurrent nets have shone light on sequential data such as text and speech. PMID:26017442

  11. Delayed fluorescence spectra of intact leaves photoexcited by sunlight measured with a multichannel Fourier-transform chemiluminescence spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akita, Saeka; Yano, Ayako; Ishii, Hiroshi; Satoh, Chikahiro; Akai, Nobuyuki; Nakata, Munetaka

    2013-06-01

    Delayed fluorescence spectra of intact leaves of Green pak choi (Brassica rapa var. chinensis) were measured with a multichannel Fourier-transform chemiluminescence spectrometer, which we developed recently. The intact samples, photoexcited by sunlight without artificial light sources, showed delayed fluorescence around 740 nm with a lifetime of ˜6 s. The observed spectra were deconvoluted into two Gaussian bands: the delayed fluorescence from photosystem II and photosystem I complexes. Their relative intensities depended on the chlorophyll concentration, but their wavelengths were unchanged.

  12. Photoexcited-induced sensitivity of InGaAs surface QDs to environment.

    PubMed

    Milla, M J; Ulloa, J M; Guzmán, A

    2014-11-01

    A detailed analysis of the impact of illumination on the electrical response of In0.5Ga0.5As surface nanostructures is carried out as a function of different relative humidity conditions. The importance of the surface-to-volume ratio for sensing applications is once more highlighted. From dark-to-photo conditions, the sheet resistance (SR) of a three-dimensional In0.5Ga0.5As nanostructure decays two orders of magnitude compared with that of a two-dimensional nanostructure. The electrical response is found to be vulnerable to the energy of the incident light and the external conditions. Illuminating with high energy light translates into an SR reduction of one order of magnitude under humid atmospheres, whereas it remains nearly unchanged under dry environments. Conversely, lighting with energy below the bulk energy bandgap, shows a negligible effect on the electrical properties regardless the local moisture. Both illumination and humidity are therefore needed for sensing. Photoexcited carriers can only contribute to conductivity if surface states are inactive due to water physisorption. The strong dependence of the electrical response on the environment makes these nanostructures very suitable for the development of highly sensitive and efficient sensing devices. PMID:25325146

  13. External electric field effects on state energy and photoexcitation dynamics of diphenylpolyenes.

    PubMed

    Nakabayashi, Takakazu; Wahadoszamen, Md; Ohta, Nobuhiro

    2005-05-18

    External electric field effects on state energy and photoexcitation dynamics have been examined for para-substituted and unsubstituted all-trans-diphenylpolyenes doped in a film, based on the steady-state and picosecond time-resolved measurements of the field effects on absorption and fluorescence. The substitution dependence of the electroabsorption spectra shows that the dipole moment of the substituted stilbene in the Franck-Condon excited state becomes larger with increasing difference between the Hammet constants of the substituents. Fluorescence quantum yields of 4-(dimethylamino)-4'-nitrostilbene and 4-(dimethylamino)-4'-nitrodiphenylbutadiene are markedly reduced by an electric field, suggesting that the rates of the intramolecular charge transfer (CT) from the fluorescent state to the nonradiative CT state are accelerated by an external electric field. The magnitude of the field-induced decrease in fluorescence lifetime has been evaluated. The isomerization of the unsubstituted all-trans-diphenylpolyenes to the cis forms is shown to be a significant nonradiative pathway even in a film. Field-induced quenching of their fluorescence as well as field-induced decrease in fluorescence lifetime suggests that the trans to cis photoisomerization is enhanced by an electric field. PMID:15884948

  14. Enhanced dipole moments in photo-excited TTF-TCNQ dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Mina; Miyamoto, Yoshiyuki; Scheffler, Matthias

    2011-07-01

    We have studied the dynamics of electron transfer between the molecules of an organic donor-acceptor pair upon absorption of light. Specifically, we considered the tetrathiafulvalene (TTF)-7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) donor-acceptor pair using time-dependent density functional theory with local-density approximation. The molecular planes of the two components are parallel to each other, and the optical transition probability is found to be highest when the optical electric field is parallel to these planes. Under these conditions, absorption induces additional electron transfer from TTF to TCNQ in the π-orbitals perpendicular to the molecular plane and, consequently, we found that the dimer's dipole moment perpendicular to the molecular axes is enhanced with the increase rate of 1% in 15 fs. This enhancement reflects the fact that photo-excited electron-hole pairs tend to dissociate, i.e. electrons and holes move away from each other. We thus suggest potential photovoltaic devices employing these molecules as building blocks.

  15. Kinetic Parameters of Photo-Excited Triplet State of Pentacene Determined by Dynamic Nuclear Polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawahara, Tomomi; Sakaguchi, Satoshi; Tateishi, Kenichiro; Tang, Tsz Leung; Uesaka, Tomohiro

    2015-04-01

    The lifetimes and spin-lattice relaxation time of photo-excited triplet electron of pentacene doped in p-terphenyl at room temperature have been investigated. Values of spin-lattice relaxation time previously reported in ESR studies are inconsistent with each other. In this paper, we determined these time constants based on proton signals enhanced by dynamic nuclear polarization using the electrons (Triplet-DNP). The combined analysis of dependences of proton signal intensities on the delay time of polarization transfer and laser pulse structure allows us to disentangle contributions of the lifetimes and spin-lattice relaxation time. The lifetimes of triplet sublevels with ms = 0 and ±1 were determined to be 22.3 and 88 µs, respectively. The spin-lattice relaxation time was found to be longer than 300 µs, hence the time evolution of the electron population in the triplet state is governed by the lifetimes. It was also found that the proton signal enhancement is limited at a high repetition rate by the partial cancellation of the electron spin polarization by the remaining population produced by the preceding laser pulses.

  16. Transient Spectroscopy of Photoexcitations and Morphology Control of Organometal Trihalide Perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Yaxin; Lafalce, Evan; Sheng, Chuan-Xiang; Zhang, Chuang; Sun, Dali; Vardeny, Zeev Valy

    We studied the photoexcitation dynamics in various hybrid perovskites by using broadband ps transient photomodulation (PM) spectroscopy and variable stripe length (VSL) technique. We observed both excitonic and free carriers spectral features in MAPbI3 but mainly excitonic transition in MAPbI1.1Br1.9 and MAPbI3-xClx films. We also fabricated MAPbBr3 films with nano-crystal pinning (NCP) treatment, which allows for smaller crystalline grain size. The transient spectra show a narrower and longer-lived photobleaching band in NCP treated films consistent with the increase in the photoluminescence efficiency. In addition the net optical gain measured by VSL is markedly increased up to 300 cm-1, and the lasing threshold is concurrently reduced. Measurement of the waveguide losses in the NCP films shows that the improvement in lasing properties can partly be attributed to the reduced optical scattering. Work supported by the AFOSR through a MURI Grant RA 9550-14-1-0037.

  17. Distinguishing between plasmon-induced and photoexcited carriers in a device geometry

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Bob Y.; Zhao, Hangqi; Manjavacas, Alejandro; McClain, Michael; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J.

    2015-01-01

    The use of surface plasmons, charge density oscillations of conduction electrons of metallic nanostructures, to boost the efficiency of light-harvesting devices through increased light-matter interactions could drastically alter how sunlight is converted into electricity or fuels. These excitations can decay directly into energetic electron–hole pairs, useful for photocurrent generation or photocatalysis. However, the mechanisms behind plasmonic carrier generation remain poorly understood. Here we use nanowire-based hot-carrier devices on a wide-bandgap semiconductor to show that plasmonic carrier generation is proportional to internal field-intensity enhancement and occurs independently of bulk absorption. We also show that plasmon-induced hot electrons have higher energies than carriers generated by direct excitation and that reducing the barrier height allows for the collection of carriers from plasmons and direct photoexcitation. Our results provide a route to increasing the efficiency of plasmonic hot-carrier devices, which could lead to more efficient devices for converting sunlight into usable energy. PMID:26165521

  18. Photoexcited carriers in organic light emitting materials and blended films observed by surface photovoltage spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jihua; Gordon, Keith C.; McQuillan, A. James; Zidon, Yigal; Shapira, Yoram

    2005-04-01

    The electronic structure of the widely-used light emitting materials, 2,5-bis(5-tert-butyl-2-benzoxazolyl) thiophene (BBOT), poly( N -vinylcarbazole) (PVK) thin films have been characterized using surface photovoltage spectroscopy. The photo-induced charge separation and transfer processes in both blend films of PVK:BBOT and PVK:TPD:BBOT, where TPD is N,N' -diphenyl- N,N' -bis(3-methylphenyl)-[ 1,1' -biphenyl]- 4,4' -diamine have also been investigated. The results of the photo-induced contact potential difference (CPD) change show that BBOT film is an electron-transporting material while PVK film is a hole-transporting one. The photoluminescence and electroluminescence results of the blend films suggest an exciplex interaction between BBOT and PVK or TPD. A positive CPD change due to photo-excitation of the BBOT in PVK:BBOT blend film is attributed to electron trapping at the localized state induced by dispersed BBOT species. In the PVK:TPD:BBOT blend films, a positive CPD change, which starts at the same transition energy as in the former blend film but is significantly enhanced, is observed and explained in terms of charge transfer between the involved energy structures of the blend components. The dependence of the observed effects on the blend composition and ensuing electronic structure is discussed.

  19. Nonequilibrium versus equilibrium molecular dynamics studies of solvation dynamics after photoexcitation of OClO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunnerson, Kim N.; Brooksby, Craig; Prezhdo, Oleg V.; Reid, Philip J.

    2007-10-01

    The results of our earlier work [C. Brooksby, O. V. Prezhdo, and P. J. Reid, J. Chem. Phys. 119, 9111 (2003)] rationalizing the surprisingly weak solvent dependence of the dynamics following photoexcitation of chlorine dioxide in water, chloroform, and cyclohexane are thoroughly tested. Comparisons are made between equilibrium and nonequilibrium solvent response, equilibrium response in the ground and excited electronic states, as well as the cumulant and direct evaluation of the optical response function. In general, the linear response and cumulant approximations are found to hold, although minor deviations are found with all solvents. The ground state, linear response, and cumulant data show best agreement with experiment, most likely due to the better tested ground-state force field and the robust behavior of the linear response and cumulant approximations. The main conclusion of our earlier work explaining the weak solvent dependence by the domination of the van der Waals interaction component remains intact within the more advanced treatments. However, the molecular origin of this surprising experimental observation is different in water and chloroform compared to cyclohexane.

  20. Importance of quantum correction for the quantitative simulation of photoexcited scanning tunneling spectra of semiconductor surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnedler, M.; Dunin-Borkowski, R. E.; Ebert, Ph.

    2016-05-01

    Photoexcited scanning tunneling spectroscopy is a promising technique for the determination of carrier concentrations, surface photovoltages, and potentials of semiconductors with atomic spatial resolution. However, extraction of the desired quantities requires computation of the electrostatic potential induced by the proximity of the tip and the tunnel current. This calculation is based on an accurate solution of the Poisson as well as the continuity equations for the tip-vacuum-semiconductor system. For this purpose, the carrier current densities are modeled by classical drift and diffusion equations. However, for small tip radii and highly doped materials, the drift and diffusion transport model significantly overestimates a semiconductor's carrier concentration near the surface, making the quantification of physical properties impossible. In this paper, we apply quantum correction to the drift and diffusion model, in order to account for the so-called quantum compressibility, i.e., reduced compressibility of the carrier gas due to the Pauli principle, in the region of the tip-induced band bending. We compare carrier concentrations, potentials, and tunnel currents derived with and without quantum correction for GaN (10 1 ¯0 ) and GaAs(110) surfaces to demonstrate its necessity.

  1. Diffusion-assisted photoexcitation transfer in coupled semiconducting carbon nanotube thin films.

    PubMed

    Grechko, Maksim; Ye, Yumin; Mehlenbacher, Randy D; McDonough, Thomas J; Wu, Meng-Yin; Jacobberger, Robert M; Arnold, Michael S; Zanni, Martin T

    2014-06-24

    We utilize femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy to study dynamics of photoexcitation migration in films of semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes. Films of nanotubes in close contact enable energy migration such as needed in photovoltaic and electroluminescent devices. Two types of films composed of nanotube fibers are utilized in this study: densely packed and very porous. By comparing exciton kinetics in these films, we characterize excitation transfer between carbon nanotubes inside fibers versus between fibers. We find that intrafiber transfer takes place in both types of films, whereas interfiber transfer is greatly suppressed in the porous one. Using films with different nanotube composition, we are able to test several models of exciton transfer. The data are inconsistent with models that rely on through-space interfiber energy transfer. A model that fits the experimental results postulates that interfiber transfer occurs only at intersections between fibers, and the excitons reach the intersections by diffusing along the long-axis of the tubes. We find that time constants for the inter- and intrafiber transfers are 0.2-0.4 and 7 ps, respectively. In total, hopping between fibers accounts for about 60% of all exciton downhill transfer prior to 4 ps in the dense film. The results are discussed with regards to transmission electron micrographs of the films. This study provides a rigorous analysis of the photophysics in this new class of promising materials for photovoltaics and other technologies. PMID:24806792

  2. Spatially Resolved Photoexcited Charge-Carrier Dynamics in Phase-Engineered Monolayer MoS2

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yamaguchi, Hisato; Blancon, Jean-Christophe; Kappera, Rajesh; Lei, Sidong; Najmaei, Sina; Mangum, Benjamin D.; Gupta, Gautam; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Lou, Jun; Chhowalla, Manish; et al

    2014-12-18

    A fundamental understanding of the intrinsic optoelectronic properties of atomically thin transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) is crucial for its integration into high performance semiconductor devices. We investigate the transport properties of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) grown monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) under photo-excitation using correlated scanning photocurrent microscopy and photoluminescence imaging. We examined the effect of local phase transformation underneath the metal electrodes on the generation of photocurrent across the channel length with diffraction-limited spatial resolution. While maximum photocurrent generation occurs at the Schottky contacts of semiconducting (2H-phase) MoS2, after the metallic phase transformation (1T-phase), the photocurrent peak is observed towardsmore » the center of the device channel, suggesting a strong reduction of native Schottky barriers. Analysis using the bias and position dependence of the photocurrent indicates that the Schottky barrier heights are few meV for 1T- and ~200 meV for 2H-contacted devices. We also demonstrate that a reduction of native Schottky barriers in a 1T device enhances the photo responsivity by more than one order of magnitude, a crucial parameter in achieving high performance optoelectronic devices. The obtained results pave a pathway for the fundamental understanding of intrinsic optoelectronic properties of atomically thin TMDs where Ohmic contacts are necessary for achieving high efficiency devices with low power consumption.« less

  3. Amoeba-inspired nanoarchitectonic computing: solving intractable computational problems using nanoscale photoexcitation transfer dynamics.

    PubMed

    Aono, Masashi; Naruse, Makoto; Kim, Song-Ju; Wakabayashi, Masamitsu; Hori, Hirokazu; Ohtsu, Motoichi; Hara, Masahiko

    2013-06-18

    Biologically inspired computing devices and architectures are expected to overcome the limitations of conventional technologies in terms of solving computationally demanding problems, adapting to complex environments, reducing energy consumption, and so on. We previously demonstrated that a primitive single-celled amoeba (a plasmodial slime mold), which exhibits complex spatiotemporal oscillatory dynamics and sophisticated computing capabilities, can be used to search for a solution to a very hard combinatorial optimization problem. We successfully extracted the essential spatiotemporal dynamics by which the amoeba solves the problem. This amoeba-inspired computing paradigm can be implemented by various physical systems that exhibit suitable spatiotemporal dynamics resembling the amoeba's problem-solving process. In this Article, we demonstrate that photoexcitation transfer phenomena in certain quantum nanostructures mediated by optical near-field interactions generate the amoebalike spatiotemporal dynamics and can be used to solve the satisfiability problem (SAT), which is the problem of judging whether a given logical proposition (a Boolean formula) is self-consistent. SAT is related to diverse application problems in artificial intelligence, information security, and bioinformatics and is a crucially important nondeterministic polynomial time (NP)-complete problem, which is believed to become intractable for conventional digital computers when the problem size increases. We show that our amoeba-inspired computing paradigm dramatically outperforms a conventional stochastic search method. These results indicate the potential for developing highly versatile nanoarchitectonic computers that realize powerful solution searching with low energy consumption. PMID:23565603

  4. Photoexcited carrier trapping and recombination at Fe centers in GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uždavinys, T. K.; Marcinkevičius, S.; Leach, J. H.; Evans, K. R.; Look, D. C.

    2016-06-01

    Fe doped GaN was studied by time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The shape of PL transients at different temperatures and excitation powers allowed discrimination between electron and hole capture to Fe3+ and Fe2+ centers, respectively. Analysis of the internal structure of Fe ions and intra-ion relaxation rates suggests that for high repetition rates of photoexciting laser pulses the electron and hole trapping takes place in the excited state rather than the ground state of Fe ions. Hence, the estimated electron and hole capture coefficients of 5.5 × 10-8 cm3/s and 1.8 × 10-8 cm3/s should be attributed to excited Fe3+ and Fe2+ states. The difference in electron capture rates determined for high (MHz) and low (Hz) (Fang et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 107, 051901 (2015)) pulse repetition rates may be assigned to the different Fe states participating in the carrier capture. A weak temperature dependence of the electron trapping rate shows that the potential barrier for the multiphonon electron capture is small. A spectral feature observed at ˜420 nm is assigned to the radiative recombination of an electron in the ground Fe2+ state and a bound hole.

  5. Kh a 1,2 hyperesatellites of 3d transition metals and their photoexcitation energy dependence.

    SciTech Connect

    Diamant, R.; Kao, C.; Huotari, S; Hamalainen, K; Sharon, R; Deutsch, M.

    2009-06-25

    Hollow atoms in which the K shell is empty while the outer shells are populated allow studying a variety of important and unusual properties of atoms. The diagram x-ray emission lines of such atoms, the K{sup h} {alpha}{sub 1,2} hypersatellites (HSs), were measured for the 3d transition metals, Z = 23-30, with a high energy resolution using photoexcitation by monochromatized synchrotron radiation. Good agreement with ab initio relativistic multiconfigurational Dirac-Fock calculations was found. The measured HS intensity variation with the excitation energy yields accurate values for the excitation thresholds, excludes contributions from shake-up processes, and indicates domination near threshold of a nonshake process. The Z variation of the HS shifts from the diagram line K{alpha}{sub 1,2}, the K{sup h}{alpha}{sub 1}-K{sup h}{alpha}{sub 2} splitting, and the K{sup h}{alpha}{sub 1}/K{sup h}{alpha}{sub 2} intensity ratio, derived from the measurements, are also discussed with a particular emphasis on the QED corrections and Breit interaction.

  6. X-ray absorption structural study of a reversible, photoexcited charge-transfer state

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L.X.; Bowman, M.K.; Norris, J.R. Univ. of Chicago, IL ); Montano, P.A. )

    1993-05-19

    Electron-transfer reactions can be accompanied by significant nuclear movements. Nuclear motion appears to be especially vital to the reversible, photoinduced charge-transfer chemistry of cyclopentadienylnickel nitrosyl (C[sub 5]H[sub 5]NiNO). Although extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy has recorded photoinduced changes in the ligation of myoglobins, similar X-ray studies of electron-transfer chemistry have not been reported. Here we examine reversible, photoinduced structural changes in C[sub 5]H[sub 5]NiNO by EXAFS and propose a mechanism for the electron-transfer chemistry. This work demonstrates that EXAFS can measure distance changes accompanying photoinduced electron transfer to provide new details of the geometry of photoexcited state and suggests that electron transfer occurs in the transient, optically excited states of C[sub 5]H[sub 5]NiNO and C[sub 5]H[sub 5]NiNO[sup CT] as dictated by NO movement that produces either C[sub 5]H[sub 5]NiNO[sup CT] or C[sub 5]H[sub 5]NiNO[sup GS]. 14 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Nonequilibrium dynamics of photoexcited electrons in graphene: Collinear scattering, Auger processes, and the impact of screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomadin, Andrea; Brida, Daniele; Cerullo, Giulio; Ferrari, Andrea C.; Polini, Marco

    2013-07-01

    We present a combined analytical and numerical study of the early stages (sub-100-fs) of the nonequilibrium dynamics of photoexcited electrons in graphene. We employ the semiclassical Boltzmann equation with a collision integral that includes contributions from electron-electron (e-e) and electron-optical phonon interactions. Taking advantage of circular symmetry and employing the massless Dirac fermion (MDF) Hamiltonian, we are able to perform an essentially analytical study of the e-e contribution to the collision integral. This allows us to take particular care of subtle collinear scattering processes—processes in which incoming and outgoing momenta of the scattering particles lie on the same line—including carrier multiplication (CM) and Auger recombination (AR). These processes have a vanishing phase space for two-dimensional MDF bare bands. However, we argue that electron-lifetime effects, seen in experiments based on angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, provide a natural pathway to regularize this pathology, yielding a finite contribution due to CM and AR to the Coulomb collision integral. Finally, we discuss in detail the role of physics beyond the Fermi golden rule by including screening in the matrix element of the Coulomb interaction at the level of the random phase approximation (RPA), focusing in particular on the consequences of various approximations including static RPA screening, which maximizes the impact of CM and AR processes, and dynamical RPA screening, which completely suppresses them.

  8. Correlation between N 1s core level x-ray photoelectron and x-ray absorption spectra of amorphous carbon nitride films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quirós, C.; Gómez-García, J.; Palomares, F. J.; Soriano, L.; Elizalde, E.; Sanz, J. M.

    2000-08-01

    This work presents a comparative analysis of the N 1s core level spectra, as measured by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), of amorphous CNx films which gives evidence of the existing correlation between the different components that constitute the respective spectra. After annealing, the contribution of XPS at 399.3 eV and the components of XAS at 399.6 and 400.8 eV are clearly enhanced. They are assigned to sp2 with two neighbors and to sp states of nitrogen. In addition, the XPS component at 401.3 eV is related to the XAS feature at 402.0 eV and has been assigned to sp2 nitrogen bonded to three carbon neighbors.

  9. Deep Lysimeter

    DOEpatents

    Hubbell, Joel M.; Sisson, James B.

    2004-06-01

    A deep lysimeter including a hollow vessel having a chamber, a fill conduit extending into the chamber through apertures, a semi-permeable member mounted on the vessel and in fluid communication with the fill conduit, and a line connection for retrieving the lysimeter.

  10. High-resolution core-level photoemission study of Eu-induced (3x2)/(3x4) reconstruction on Ge(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzmin, M.; Peraelae, R. E.; Laukkanen, P.; Ahola-Tuomi, M.; Vaeyrynen, I. J.

    2006-09-15

    We have investigated Eu-induced Ge(111)-(3x2)/(3x4) reconstruction by high-resolution core-level photoelectron spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation and low-energy electron diffraction. Recent scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) observations [Phys. Rev. B 73, 125332 (2006)] revealed that the Ge arrangement of this reconstruction can be well described in terms of the honeycomb chain-channel (HCC) geometry proposed earlier for metal/Si(111)-(3x1) and -(3x2) surfaces; the Eu atoms, however, were found to reside at two different adsorption sites in the Eu/Ge(111)-(3x2)/(3x4) reconstruction, in contrast to the equivalent adsorption sites (e.g., T4) occupied in the case of Si. The present photoemission results provide further information about the atomic arrangement of Eu/Ge(111)-(3x2)/(3x4). In particular, we show that the Ge 3d core-level data cannot be interpreted by the HCC structure with the Eu atoms adsorbed only on T4 sites, giving a spectroscopic support for the suggestions based on the earlier STM data. We consider here a modified HCC-based configuration for the Eu/Ge(111)-(3x2)/(3x4) surface where the Eu atoms occupy two different sites in the empty channel between the neighboring Ge honeycomb chains. The atomic models are discussed in the context of the Ge 3d and Eu 4f data as well as the previous results available in the literature. Finally, we propose a structural model that allows us to account for the present photoemission and earlier STM findings.

  11. Li induced effects in the core level and π-band electronic structure of graphene grown on C-face SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Johansson, Leif I. Xia, Chao; Virojanadara, Chariya

    2015-11-15

    Studies of the effects induced in the electronic structure after Li deposition, and subsequent heating, on graphene samples prepared on C-face SiC are reported. The as prepared graphene samples are essentially undoped, but after Li deposition, the Dirac point shifts down to 1.2 eV below the Fermi level due to electron doping. The shape of the C 1s level also indicates a doping concentration of around 10{sup 14 }cm{sup −2} after Li deposition, when compared with recent calculated results of core level spectra of graphene. The C 1s, Si 2p, and Li 1s core level results show little intercalation directly after deposition but that most of the Li has intercalated after heating at 280 °C. Heating at higher temperatures leads to desorption of Li from the sample, and at 1030 °C, Li can no longer be detected on the sample. The single π-band observable from multilayer C-face graphene samples in conventional angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy is reasonably sharp both on the initially prepared sample and after Li deposition. After heating at 280 °C, the π-band appears more diffuse and possibly split. The Dirac point becomes located at 0.4 eV below the Fermi level, which indicates occurrence of a significant reduction in the electron doping concentration. Constant energy photoelectron distribution patterns extracted from the as prepared graphene C-face sample and also after Li deposition and heating at 280 °C look very similar to earlier calculated distribution patterns for monolayer graphene.

  12. Photoexcited Surface Frustrated Lewis Pairs for Heterogeneous Photocatalytic CO2 Reduction.

    PubMed

    Ghuman, Kulbir Kaur; Hoch, Laura B; Szymanski, Paul; Loh, Joel Y Y; Kherani, Nazir P; El-Sayed, Mostafa A; Ozin, Geoffrey A; Singh, Chandra Veer

    2016-02-01

    In this study we investigated, theoretically and experimentally, the unique photoactive behavior of pristine and defected indium oxide surfaces providing fundamental insights into their excited state properties as well as an explanation for the experimentally observed enhanced activity of defected indium oxide surfaces for the gas-phase reverse water gas shift reaction, CO2 + H2 + hν→ CO + H2O in the light compared to the dark. To this end, a detailed excited-state study of pristine and defected forms of indium oxide (In2O3, In2O3-x, In2O3(OH)y and In2O3-x(OH)y) surfaces was performed using time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations, the results of which were supported experimentally by transient absorption spectroscopy and photoconductivity measurements. It was found that the surface frustrated Lewis pairs (FLPs) created by a Lewis acidic coordinately unsaturated surface indium site proximal to an oxygen vacancy and a Lewis basic surface hydroxide site in In2O3-x(OH)y become more acidic and basic and hence more active in the ES compared to the GS. This provides a theoretical mechanism responsible for the enhanced activity and reduced activation energy of the photochemical reverse water gas shift reaction observed experimentally for In2O3-x(OH)y compared to the thermochemical reaction. This fundamental insight into the role of photoexcited surface FLPs for catalytic CO2 reduction could lead to improved photocatalysts for solar fuel production. PMID:26759919

  13. Ballistic phonon production in photoexcited Ge, GaAs, and Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Msall, M. E.; Wolfe, J. P.

    2002-05-01

    Phonon imaging and photoluminescence measurements are used to determine the frequency and spatial distribution of optically generated nonequilibrium phonons in Si, Ge, and GaAs at 1.7 K. At low excitation levels the thermalization of photoexcited carriers and the subsequent phonon down-conversion produce a broad frequency distribution of acoustic phonons that ``quasidiffuse'' in the crystal. These phonons produce a temporally broad heat pulse when detected at a distance from the excitation point. At moderate excitation levels (typically a 10-nS pulse with a power density of ~20 W/mm2), the laser pulse produces a dense electron-hole plasma that can radically change the frequency distribution of nonequilibrium phonons. The plasma is a potentially rich source of low-frequency acoustic phonons, characterized by a temporally sharp heat pulse at a remote detector. The fraction of low-frequency phonons in the heat pulses is smallest in the direct-gap semiconductor GaAs, where rapid recombination depletes the populations of electrons and holes in just a few nanoseconds. More noticeable low frequency phonon components are seen in heat pulses in the indirect-gap semiconductors Ge and Si. At sufficiently high excitation densities (~60 W/mm2) in Ge, there is a suppression of the low-frequency phonon signal, which may result from phonon absorption within a cloud of electron hole droplets. An interesting alternative hypothesis is that the acoustic phonons created in the plasma are sufficiently dense to initiate phonon coalescence, whereby phonons are localized by phonon-phonon scattering over a relatively long period (500 ns). This localized ``hot spot'' could provide the phonon wind that drives the initial rapid expansion of the electron-hole plasma into the crystal.

  14. Light to Electrons to Bonds: Imaging Water Splitting and Collecting Photoexcited Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leenheer, Andrew Jay

    Photoelectrochemical devices can store solar energy as chemical bonds in fuels, but more control over the materials involved is needed for economic feasibility. Both efficient capture of photon energy into electron energy and subsequent electron transfer and bond formation are necessary, and this thesis explores various steps of the process. To look at the electrochemical fuel formation step, the spatially-resolved reaction rate on a water-splitting electrode was imaged during operation at a few-micron scale using optical microscopy. One method involved localized excitation of a semiconductor photoanode and recording the growth rate of bubbles to determine the local reaction rate. A second method imaged the reactant profile with a pH-sensitive fluorophore in the electrolyte to determine the local three-dimensional pH profile at patterned electrocatalysts in a confocal microscope. These methods provide insight on surface features optimal for efficient electron transfer into fuel products. A second set of studies examined the initial process of photoexcited electron transport and collection. An independent method to measure the minority carrier diffusion length in semiconductor photoelectrodes was developed, in which a wedge geometry is back illuminated with a small scanned spot. The diffusion length can be determined from the exponential decrease of photocurrent with thickness, and the method was demonstrated on solid-state silicon wedge diodes, as well as tungsten oxide thin-film wedge photoanodes. Finally, the possibility of absorbing and collecting sub-bandgap illumination via plasmon-enhanced hot carrier internal photoemission was modeled to predict the energy conversion efficiency. The effect of photon polarization on emission yield was experimentally tested using gold nanoantennas buried in silicon, and the correlation was found to be small.

  15. Photo-excited states in germanium at liquid-helium temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Culbertson, J.C.

    1982-12-01

    A wide variety of experimental work dealing with the basic properties of photoexcited states in Ge at liquid helium temperatures is presented. The primary emphasis is on the electron-hole liquid (EHL) and the free exciton (FE). The EHL is composed of two interpenetrating Fermi liquids, one of electrons and one of holes, each with its own Fermi level. The FE dealt with here is a mobile, loosely bound state of an electron and a hole. We report the first absolute measurement of the density dependence of the enhancement factor g/sub eh/(0) for the EHL in Ge. This factor g/sub eh/(0) is a measure of the electron-hole spatial correlation function, and provides a valuable and sensitive test for the predictions of various many-body-theory approximations. An EHL droplet - FE gas system confined to a strain induced potential well was used. The measurement approach relied on only a few simple and verifiable assumptions. A byproduct of this work was the measurement as a function of stress of: the electron and hole Fermi levels E/sub F//sup e/ and E/sub F//sup h/, the EHL density n/sub l/, the condensation energy phi of a FE relative to the EHL, and the binding energy of a FE (E/sub x/) relative to free carriers (FC). The decay of a FE-FC system confined to a strain induced potential well is studied. The first direct measurement of the FE diffusivity D/sub x/ is reported. The evolution in time of spatial profiles of FE luminescence were measured. From these FE density profiles, D/sub x/(4.2K) approx. = to 300 cm/sup 2/ s/sup -1/, the surface recombination velocity S approx. = 3000 cm s/sup -1/, and the FE lifetime tau/sub x/ = 27 ..mu..s with surface effects excluded were determined. (WHK)

  16. Deep smarts.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Dorothy; Swap, Walter

    2004-09-01

    When a person sizes up a complex situation and rapidly comes to a decision that proves to be not just good but brilliant, you think, "That was smart." After you watch him do this a few times, you realize you're in the presence of something special. It's not raw brainpower, though that helps. It's not emotional intelligence, either, though that, too, is often involved. It's deep smarts. Deep smarts are not philosophical--they're not"wisdom" in that sense, but they're as close to wisdom as business gets. You see them in the manager who understands when and how to move into a new international market, in the executive who knows just what kind of talk to give when her organization is in crisis, in the technician who can track a product failure back to an interaction between independently produced elements. These are people whose knowledge would be hard to purchase on the open market. Their insight is based on know-how more than on know-what; it comprises a system view as well as expertise in individual areas. Because deep smarts are experienced based and often context specific, they can't be produced overnight or readily imported into an organization. It takes years for an individual to develop them--and no time at all for an organization to lose them when a valued veteran walks out the door. They can be taught, however, with the right techniques. Drawing on their forthcoming book Deep Smarts, Dorothy Leonard and Walter Swap say the best way to transfer such expertise to novices--and, on a larger scale, to make individual knowledge institutional--isn't through PowerPoint slides, a Web site of best practices, online training, project reports, or lectures. Rather, the sage needs to teach the neophyte individually how to draw wisdom from experience. Companies have to be willing to dedicate time and effort to such extensive training, but the investment more than pays for itself. PMID:15449858

  17. SO2 photoexcitation mechanism links mass-independent sulfur isotopic fractionation in cryospheric sulfate to climate impacting volcanism.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Shohei; Schmidt, Johan A; Johnson, Matthew S; Danielache, Sebastian O; Yamada, Akinori; Ueno, Yuichiro; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2013-10-29

    Natural climate variation, such as that caused by volcanoes, is the basis for identifying anthropogenic climate change. However, knowledge of the history of volcanic activity is inadequate, particularly concerning the explosivity of specific events. Some material is deposited in ice cores, but the concentration of glacial sulfate does not distinguish between tropospheric and stratospheric eruptions. Stable sulfur isotope abundances contain additional information, and recent studies show a correlation between volcanic plumes that reach the stratosphere and mass-independent anomalies in sulfur isotopes in glacial sulfate. We describe a mechanism, photoexcitation of SO2, that links the two, yielding a useful metric of the explosivity of historic volcanic events. A plume model of S(IV) to S(VI) conversion was constructed including photochemistry, entrainment of background air, and sulfate deposition. Isotopologue-specific photoexcitation rates were calculated based on the UV absorption cross-sections of (32)SO2, (33)SO2, (34)SO2, and (36)SO2 from 250 to 320 nm. The model shows that UV photoexcitation is enhanced with altitude, whereas mass-dependent oxidation, such as SO2 + OH, is suppressed by in situ plume chemistry, allowing the production and preservation of a mass-independent sulfur isotope anomaly in the sulfate product. The model accounts for the amplitude, phases, and time development of Δ(33)S/δ(34)S and Δ(36)S/Δ(33)S found in glacial samples. We are able to identify the process controlling mass-independent sulfur isotope anomalies in the modern atmosphere. This mechanism is the basis of identifying the magnitude of historic volcanic events. PMID:23417298

  18. SO2 photoexcitation mechanism links mass-independent sulfur isotopic fractionation in cryospheric sulfate to climate impacting volcanism

    PubMed Central

    Hattori, Shohei; Schmidt, Johan A.; Johnson, Matthew S.; Danielache, Sebastian O.; Yamada, Akinori; Ueno, Yuichiro; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2013-01-01

    Natural climate variation, such as that caused by volcanoes, is the basis for identifying anthropogenic climate change. However, knowledge of the history of volcanic activity is inadequate, particularly concerning the explosivity of specific events. Some material is deposited in ice cores, but the concentration of glacial sulfate does not distinguish between tropospheric and stratospheric eruptions. Stable sulfur isotope abundances contain additional information, and recent studies show a correlation between volcanic plumes that reach the stratosphere and mass-independent anomalies in sulfur isotopes in glacial sulfate. We describe a mechanism, photoexcitation of SO2, that links the two, yielding a useful metric of the explosivity of historic volcanic events. A plume model of S(IV) to S(VI) conversion was constructed including photochemistry, entrainment of background air, and sulfate deposition. Isotopologue-specific photoexcitation rates were calculated based on the UV absorption cross-sections of 32SO2, 33SO2, 34SO2, and 36SO2 from 250 to 320 nm. The model shows that UV photoexcitation is enhanced with altitude, whereas mass-dependent oxidation, such as SO2 + OH, is suppressed by in situ plume chemistry, allowing the production and preservation of a mass-independent sulfur isotope anomaly in the sulfate product. The model accounts for the amplitude, phases, and time development of Δ33S/δ34S and Δ36S/Δ33S found in glacial samples. We are able to identify the process controlling mass-independent sulfur isotope anomalies in the modern atmosphere. This mechanism is the basis of identifying the magnitude of historic volcanic events. PMID:23417298

  19. Pi topology and spin alignment in unique photoexcited triplet and quintet states arising from four unpaired electrons of an organic spin system.

    PubMed

    Teki, Yoshio; Toichi, Tetuya; Nakajima, Satoru

    2006-03-01

    Syntheses, electronic structures in the ground state, unique photoexcited states, and spin alignment are reported for novel biradical 1, which was designed as an ideal model compound to investigate photoinduced spin alignment in the excited state. Electron spin resonance (ESR), time-resolved ESR (TRESR), and laser-excitation pulsed ESR experiments were carried out. The magnetic properties were examined with a SQUID magnetometer. In the electronic ground state, two radical moieties interact very weakly (almost no interaction) with each other through the closed-shell diphenylanthracene spin coupler. On photoirradiation, a novel lowest photoexcited state with the intermediate spin (S = 1) arising from four unpaired electrons with low-lying quintet (S = 2) photoexcited state was detected. The unique triplet state has an interesting electronic structure, the D value of which is reduced by antiferromagnetic spin alignment between two radical spins through the excited triplet spin coupler. The general theoretical predictions of the spin alignment and the reduction of the fine-structure splitting of the triplet bis(radical) systems are presented. The fine-structure splitting of the unique photoexcited triplet state of 1, as well as the existence of the low-lying quintet state, is interpreted well on the basis of theoretical predictions. Details of the spin alignment in the photoexcited states are discussed. PMID:16372362

  20. Photoexcited carrier relaxation dynamics in pentacene probed by ultrafast optical spectroscopy: Influence of morphology on relaxation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorsmølle, V. K.; Averitt, R. D.; Demsar, J.; Smith, D. L.; Tretiak, S.; Martin, R. L.; Chi, X.; Crone, B. K.; Ramirez, A. P.; Taylor, A. J.

    2009-10-01

    We present a comparative study of ultrafast photoexcited state relaxation in pentacene single crystals and in pure and C60-doped pentacene films using optical pump-probe spectroscopy. The photoinduced absorption spectra in pentacene crystals is consistent with a dominant singlet-triplet fission decay channel for above-gap excitation. This decay channel is suppressed in thin films and even further suppressed by electron trapping in C60-doped films. Thus we show that suppression of triplet state production, which is necessary for free carrier formation and thus photovoltaic and photodiode performance, is controllable via sample morphology.

  1. The evolution of Ga and As core levels in the formation of Fe/GaAs (001):A high resolution soft x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic study

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Jamie; Neal, James; Shen, Tiehan; Morton, Simon; Tobin, James; Waddill, George Dan; Matthew, Jim; Greig, Denis; Hopkinson, Mark

    2008-07-14

    A high resolution soft x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic study of Ga and As 3d core levels has been conducted for Fe/GaAs (001) as a function of Fe thickness. This work has provided unambiguous evidence of substrate disrupting chemical reactions induced by the Fe overlayer--a quantitative analysis of the acquired spectra indicates significantly differing behavior of Ga and As during Fe growth, and our observations have been compared with existing theoretical models. Our results demonstrate that the outdiffusing Ga and As remain largely confined to the interface region, forming a thin intermixed layer. Whereas at low coverages Fe has little influence on the underlying GaAs substrate, the onset of substrate disruption when the Fe thickness reaches 3.5 Angstrom results in major changes in the energy distribution curves (EDCs) of both As and Ga 3d cores. Our quantitative analysis suggests the presence of two additional As environments of metallic character: one bound to the interfacial region and another which, as confirmed by in situ oxidation experiments, surface segregates and persists over a wide range of overlayer thickness. Analysis of the corresponding Ga 3d EDCs found not two, but three additional environments--also metallic in nature. Two of the three are interface resident whereas the third undergoes outdiffusion at low Fe coverages. Based on the variations of the integrated intensities of each component, we present a schematic of the proposed chemical makeup of the Fe/GaAs (001) system.

  2. The Evolution of Ga and As Core Levels in the Formation of Fe/GaAs(001): A High Resolution Soft X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopic Study

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J W; Neal, J R; Shen, T H; Morton, S A; Tobin, J G; Waddill, G D; Matthew, J D; Greig, D; Hopkinson, M

    2006-12-08

    A high resolution soft x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic study of Ga and As 3d core levels has been conducted for Fe/GaAs (001) as a function of Fe thickness. This work has provided unambiguous evidence of substrate disrupting chemical reactions induced by the Fe overlayer--a quantitative analysis of the acquired spectra indicates significantly differing behavior of Ga and As during Fe growth, and our observations have been compared with existing theoretical models. Our results demonstrate that the outdiffusing Ga and As remain largely confined to the interface region, forming a thin intermixed layer. Whereas at low coverages Fe has little influence on the underlying GaAs substrate, the onset of substrate disruption when the Fe thickness reaches 3.5 {angstrom} results in major changes in the energy distribution curves (EDCs) of both As and Ga 3d cores. Our quantitative analysis suggests the presence of two new As environments of metallic character; one bound to the interfacial region and another which, as confirmed by in-situ oxidation experiments, surface segregates and persists over a wide range of overlayer thickness. Analysis of the corresponding Ga 3d EDCs found not two, but three new environments--also metallic in nature. Two of the three are interface-resident whereas the third undergoes outdiffusion at low Fe coverages. Based on the variations of the integrated intensities of each component, we present a schematic of the proposed chemical make-up of the Fe/GaAs (001) system.

  3. Synthesis Dependent Core Level Binding Energy Shift in the Oxidation State of Platinum Coated on Ceria–Titania and its Effect on Catalytic Decomposition of Methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Karakoti, A. S.; King, Jessica; Vincent, Abhilash; Seal, Sudipta

    2010-11-20

    Synergistic interaction of catalyst and support has attracted the interest of the catalytic community for several decades. The decomposition/oxidation of alcohols for the production of hydrogen as a source of fuel requires such support catalyst interaction. Recent studies have suggested the active role of oxide based supports on the catalytic ability of noble metals such as gold, platinum and palladium. Herein, we report the effect of synthesis technique on the catalytic activity of platinum coated on mixed ceria-titania support system. Wet impregnation technique followed by calcination was compared with the chemical reduction of platinum during the coating over oxide support. Methanol decomposition studied using an in-house built catalytic reactor coupled to a mass spectrometer showed that catalyst prepared by thermal reduction of platinum demonstrated better catalytic ability than the catalyst prepared by chemical reduction of platinum. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the size of both platinum and ceria-titania particles remained unchanged, while the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed that the oxidation state of platinum was modified by different coating procedures. A shift in the core level binding energy of the Pt 4f towards lower binding energy was observed with chemical reduction. Based on the XPS data it was found that platinum (on ceria-titania supports) in mixed oxidation state outperformed the Pt in reduced metallic state. Results from catalysis and in situ Fourier transform infra red spectroscopy are presented and discussed.

  4. The evolution of Ga and As core levels in the formation of Fe/GaAs (001): A high resolution soft x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic study

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Jamie D. W.; Neal, James R.; Shen, Tiehan H.; Morton, Simon A.; Tobin, James G.; Dan Waddill, G.; Matthew, Jim A. D.; Greig, Denis; Hopkinson, Mark

    2008-07-15

    A high resolution soft x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic study of Ga and As 3d core levels has been conducted for Fe/GaAs (001) as a function of Fe thickness. This work has provided unambiguous evidence of substrate disrupting chemical reactions induced by the Fe overlayer--a quantitative analysis of the acquired spectra indicates significantly differing behavior of Ga and As during Fe growth, and our observations have been compared with existing theoretical models. Our results demonstrate that the outdiffusing Ga and As remain largely confined to the interface region, forming a thin intermixed layer. Whereas at low coverages Fe has little influence on the underlying GaAs substrate, the onset of substrate disruption when the Fe thickness reaches 3.5 A results in major changes in the energy distribution curves (EDCs) of both As and Ga 3d cores. Our quantitative analysis suggests the presence of two additional As environments of metallic character: one bound to the interfacial region and another which, as confirmed by in situ oxidation experiments, surface segregates and persists over a wide range of overlayer thickness. Analysis of the corresponding Ga 3d EDCs found not two, but three additional environments--also metallic in nature. Two of the three are interface resident whereas the third undergoes outdiffusion at low Fe coverages. Based on the variations of the integrated intensities of each component, we present a schematic of the proposed chemical makeup of the Fe/GaAs (001) system.

  5. The influence of oxygen adsorption on the NEXAFS and core-level XPS spectra of the C{sub 60} derivative PCBM

    SciTech Connect

    Brumboiu, Iulia Emilia Eriksson, Olle; Brena, Barbara; Ericsson, Leif; Hansson, Rickard; Moons, Ellen

    2015-02-07

    Fullerenes have been a main focus of scientific research since their discovery due to the interesting possible applications in various fields like organic photovoltaics (OPVs). In particular, the derivative [6,6]-phenyl-C{sub 60}-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) is currently one of the most popular choices due to its higher solubility in organic solvents compared to unsubstituted C{sub 60}. One of the central issues in the field of OPVs is device stability, since modules undergo deterioration (losses in efficiency, open circuit voltage, and short circuit current) during operation. In the case of fullerenes, several possibilities have been proposed, including dimerization, oxidation, and impurity related deterioration. We have studied by means of density functional theory the possibility of oxygen adsorption on the C{sub 60} molecular moiety of PCBM. The aim is to provide guidelines for near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements which can probe the presence of atomic or molecular oxygen on the fullerene cage. By analysing several configurations of PCBM with one or more adsorbed oxygen atoms, we show that a joint core level XPS and O1s NEXAFS investigation could be effectively used not only to confirm oxygen adsorption but also to pinpoint the bonding configuration and the nature of the adsorbate.

  6. Understanding surface core-level shifts using the Auger parameter: A study of Pd atoms adsorbed on ultrathin SiO2 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaden, William E.; Büchner, Christin; Lichtenstein, Leonid; Stuckenholz, Stefanie; Ringleb, Franziska; Heyde, Markus; Sterrer, Martin; Freund, Hans-Joachim; Giordano, Livia; Pacchioni, Gianfranco; Nelin, Connie J.; Bagus, Paul S.

    2014-03-01

    Auger parameter (Δα) measurements have been employed to determine the extent to which initial- and final-state effects govern surface core-level shifts in x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements of Pd atoms confined between a bilayer SiO2 film and its Ru(0001) support. For atoms bound in this manner, we note negative binding energy shifts (ΔBEs) of ˜0.3 eV, relative to the Pd 3d peak position in the bulk, and attribute these shifts to large variations in the initial-state orbital energies of the supported atoms (˜1.1 eV towards EF), coupled with decreased final-state relaxation contributions (˜0.8 eV). Theoretical calculations reveal that, despite small partial positive charges and decreased final-state screening, the decreased 4d-5sp hybridization of the undercoordinated Pd atoms results in large enough upward 3d orbital-energy shifts to yield the net-negative ΔBE noted by XPS.

  7. Layer-by-layer resolved core-level shifts in CaF[sub 2] and SrF[sub 2] on Si(111): Theory and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Rotenberg, E. ); Denlinger, J.D. ); Leskovar, M.; Hessinger, U.; Olmstead, M.A. )

    1994-10-15

    Using x-ray-photoelectron spectroscopy and Auger-electron spectroscopy, we have resolved surface, bulk, and interface Ca and F core-level emission in thin films (3--8 triple layers) of CaF[sub 2] and SrF[sub 2] on Si(111). We confirmed these assignments using x-ray-photoelectron diffraction (XPD) and surface modification. XPD was also used to identify the growth modes of the films as being either laminar or layer plus islands; in the latter case we have resolved buried and uncovered interface F and Ca/Sr emission. We compare the observed energy differences between surface, bulk, and interface emission to theoretical estimates of the extra-atomic contributions to emission energies. We find excellent agreement considering only the Madelung (electrostatic) potentials for the initial-state contribution and polarization response for the final-state contribution, including the effect of tetragonal strain. Small discrepancies for emission from metal atoms bonded to the Si substrate are interpreted in terms of chemical shifts.

  8. Ionic pathways following UV photoexcitation of the (HI)2 van der Waals dimer.

    PubMed

    Vidma, Konstantin V; Parker, David H; Bogdanchikov, Georgii A; Baklanov, Alexey V; Kochubei, Sergei A

    2010-03-11

    Photodissociation of the (HI)(2) van der Waals dimers at 248 nm and nearby wavelengths has been studied using time-of-flight mass spectrometry and velocity map imaging. I(2)(+) product ions with a translational temperature of 130 K and "translationally hot" I(+) ions with an average kinetic energy of E(t) = 1.24 +/- 0.03 eV and angular anisotropy beta = 1.92 +/- 0.11 were detected as dimer-specific ionic photofragments. Velocity map images of the I(2)(+) and I(+) species were found to be qualitatively similar to those observed in the case of photoexcitation of the (CH(3)I)(2) dimer (J. Chem. Phys. 2005, 122, 204301). As in the case of the (CH(3)I)(2) dimer, the absence of neutral I(2)-specific features in the ionic species images from (HI)(2) allows us to eliminate neutral molecular I(2) as a precursor of I(+) and I(2)(+). Similar to the case of (CH(3)I)(2), we deduce that the observed I(2)(+) ions are produced in their (2)Pi(3/2,g) ground electronic state as a result of photodissociation of the ionized dimer (HI)(2)(+) + h nu --> I(2)(+) + .... The formation of "translationally hot" I(+) ions is attributed to photodissociation of nascent vibrationally excited I(2)(+) with an average vibrational energy of 1.05 +/- 0.10 eV. This vibrational excitation is explained by the nonequilibrium initial I-I distance in I(2)(+) arising in photodissociation of (HI)(2)(+) after prompt release of the light H atoms. On the basis of our ab initio calculated value for the I-I distance of (3.17 A) in the (HI)(2)(+) precursor dimer, the vibrational excitation of I(2)(+) is expected to be 1.02 eV, which is in quantitative agreement with our experimentally deduced value. The interpretation of our results was supported by ab initio calculations of the structure and energy of neutral and ionized dimers of HI at the MP4(SDTQ)//MP2 level. PMID:19827807

  9. Ultrafast Control of Magnetism in Ferromagnetic Semiconductors via Photoexcited Transient Carriers

    SciTech Connect

    Cotoros, Ingrid A.

    2008-12-01

    The field of spintronics offers perspectives for seamless integration of coupled and inter-tunable electrical and magnetic properties in a single device. For integration of the spin degree of freedom with current electronic technology, new semiconductors are needed that show electrically-tunable magnetic properties at room temperature and above. Dilute magnetic semiconductors derived from III-V compounds, like GaMnAs and InMnAs, show coupled and tunable magnetic, transport, and optical properties, due to the fact that their ferromagnetism is hole-mediated. These unconventional materials are ideal systems for manipulating the magnetic order by changing the carrier polarization, population density, and energy band distribution of the complementary subsystem of holes. This is the main theme we cover in this thesis. In particular, we develop a unique setup by use of ultraviolet pump, near-infrared probe femtosecond laser pulses, that allows for magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE) spectroscopy experiments. We photo-excite transient carriers in our samples, and measure the induced transient magnetization dynamics. One set of experiments performed allowed us to observe for the first time enhancement of the ferromagnetic order in GaMnAs, on an ultrafast time scale of hundreds of picoseconds. The corresponding transient increase of Curie temperature (Tc, the temperature above which a ferromagnetic material loses its permanent magnetism) of about 1 K for our experimental conditions is a very promising result for potential spintronics applications, especially since it is seconded by observation of an ultrafast ferromagnetic to paramagnetic phase transition above Tc. In a different set of experiments, we "write" the magnetization in a particular orientation in the sample plane. Using an ultrafast scheme, we alter the distribution of holes in the system and detect signatures of the particular memory state in the subsequent magnetization dynamics, with unprecedented hundreds of

  10. Femtosecond transient infrared and stimulated Raman spectroscopy shed light on the relaxation mechanisms of photo-excited peridinin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Donato, Mariangela; Ragnoni, Elena; Lapini, Andrea; Foggi, Paolo; Hiller, Roger G.; Righini, Roberto

    2015-06-01

    By means of one- and two-dimensional transient infrared spectroscopy and femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy, we investigated the excited state dynamics of peridinin, a carbonyl carotenoid occurring in natural light harvesting complexes. The presence of singly and doubly excited states, as well as of an intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) state, makes the behavior of carbonyl carotenoids in the excited state very complex. In this work, we investigated by time resolved spectroscopy the relaxation of photo-excited peridinin in solvents of different polarities and as a function of the excitation wavelength. Our experimental results show that a characteristic pattern of one- and two-dimensional infrared bands in the C=C stretching region allows monitoring the relaxation pathway. In polar solvents, moderate distortions of the molecular geometry cause a variation of the single/double carbon bond character, so that the partially ionic ICT state is largely stabilized by the solvent reorganization. After vertical photoexcitation at 400 nm of the S2 state, the off-equilibrium population moves to the S1 state with ca. 175 fs time constant; from there, in less than 5 ps, the non-Franck Condon ICT state is reached, and finally, the ground state is recovered in 70 ps. That the relevant excited state dynamics takes place far from the Franck Condon region is demonstrated by its noticeable dependence on the excitation wavelength.

  11. Observation of photoexcitation of Fe-oxide grown on TiO2(100) by visible light irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawauchi, Taizo; Nagatsuka, Naoki; Fukutani, Katsuyuki

    2016-12-01

    Electronic excitation of materials is of fundamental and technological importance and interest in terms of photoinduced phase transition, photovoltaics, and photocatalysis. In the present study, photoexcitation of Fe2 O 3 epitaxially grown on rutile TiO2(100) was investigated with conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy (CEMS) under dominantly visible-light irradiation. 57Fe was deposited on the substrate at a substrate temperature of 973 K, and the resulting film was characterized by RHEED and XPS. After deposition of Fe on TiO2(100), it was found that Fe was oxidized to Fe 3+, and the structure was analyzed to be the rhombohedral phase of Fe2 O 3. While the CEMS spectrum without light irradiation showed a quadrupole splitting of 0.80 mm/s with an isomer shift of +0.25 mm/s, an additional component with a quadrupole splitting of 0.85 and an isomer shift of +0.67 mm/s was observed under light irradiation. The latter component corresponds to a reduced state of Fe at the octahedral site surrounded by oxygen atoms. The lifetime of this photoexcited state is discussed.

  12. UVA-visible photo-excitation of guanine radical cations produces sugar radicals in DNA and model structures

    PubMed Central

    Adhikary, Amitava; Malkhasian, Aramice Y. S.; Collins, Sean; Koppen, Jessica; Becker, David; Sevilla, Michael D.

    2005-01-01

    This work presents evidence that photo-excitation of guanine radical cations results in high yields of deoxyribose sugar radicals in DNA, guanine deoxyribonucleosides and deoxyribonucleotides. In dsDNA at low temperatures, formation of C1′• is observed from photo-excitation of G•+ in the 310–480 nm range with no C1′• formation observed ≥520 nm. Illumination of guanine radical cations in 2′dG, 3′-dGMP and 5′-dGMP in aqueous LiCl glasses at 143 K is found to result in remarkably high yields (∼85–95%) of sugar radicals, namely C1′•, C3′• and C5′•. The amount of each of the sugar radicals formed varies dramatically with compound structure and temperature of illumination. Radical assignments were confirmed using selective deuteration at C5′ or C3′ in 2′-dG and at C8 in all the guanine nucleosides/tides. Studies of the effect of temperature, pH, and wavelength of excitation provide important information about the mechanism of formation of these sugar radicals. Time-dependent density functional theory calculations verify that specific excited states in G•+ show considerable hole delocalization into the sugar structure, in accord with our proposed mechanism of action, namely deprotonation from the sugar moiety of the excited molecular radical cation. PMID:16204456

  13. Magneto-transport characteristics of a 2D electron system driven to negative magneto-conductivity by microwave photoexcitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mani, Ramesh; Kriisa, A.

    2015-03-01

    Negative diagonal magneto-conductivity/resistivity is a spectacular- and thought provoking- property of driven, far-from-equilibrium, low dimensional electronic systems. The physical response of this exotic electronic state is not yet fully understood since it is rarely encountered in experiment. The microwave-radiation-induced zero-resistance state in the high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs 2D electron system is believed to be an example where negative magneto-conductivity/resistivity is responsible for the observed phenomena. Here, we examine the magneto-transport characteristics of this negative conductivity/resistivity state in the microwave photo-excited two-dimensional electron system (2DES) through a numerical solution of the associated boundary value problem. The results suggest, surprisingly, that a bare negative diagonal conductivity/resistivity state in the 2DES under photo-excitation should yield a positive diagonal resistance with a concomitant sign reversal in the Hall voltage. Transport measurements are supported by the DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Material Sciences and Engineering Division under DE-SC0001762. Additional support by the ARO under W911NF-07-01-015.

  14. Surface Recombination Limited Lifetimes of Photoexcited Carriers in Few-Layer Transition Metal Dichalcogenide MoS₂.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haining; Zhang, Changjian; Rana, Farhan

    2015-12-01

    We present results on photoexcited carrier lifetimes in few-layer transition metal dichalcogenide MoS2 using nondegenerate ultrafast optical pump-probe technique. Our results show a sharp increase of the carrier lifetimes with the number of layers in the sample. Carrier lifetimes increase from few tens of picoseconds in monolayer samples to more than a nanosecond in 10-layer samples. The inverse carrier lifetime was found to scale according to the probability of the carriers being present at the surface layers, as given by the carrier wave function in few layer samples, which can be treated as quantum wells. The carrier lifetimes were found to be largely independent of the temperature, and the inverse carrier lifetimes scaled linearly with the photoexcited carrier density. These observations are consistent with defect-assisted carrier recombination, in which the capture of electrons and holes by defects occurs via Auger scatterings. Our results suggest that carrier lifetimes in few-layer samples are surface recombination limited due to the much larger defect densities at surface layers compared with the inner layers. PMID:26535607

  15. Enhanced Photoexcited Carrier Separation in Oxygen-Doped ZnIn2 S4 Nanosheets for Hydrogen Evolution.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenlong; Zhang, Lei; Xie, Junfeng; Zhang, Xiaodong; Liu, Qinghua; Yao, Tao; Wei, Shiqiang; Zhang, Qun; Xie, Yi

    2016-06-01

    Limited by the relatively sluggish charge-carrier separation in semiconductors, the photocatalytic performance is still far below what is expected. Herein, a model of ZnIn2 S4 (ZIS) nanosheets with oxygen doping is put forward to obtain in-depth understanding of the role that doping atoms play in photocatalysis. It shows enhanced photocatalytic activity compared with pristine ZIS. The electron dynamics analyzed by ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy reveals that the average recovery lifetime of photoexcited electrons is increased by 1.53 times upon oxygen incorporation into the ZIS crystals, indicating enhanced separation of photoexcited carriers in oxygen-doped ZIS nanosheets. As expected, the oxygen-doped ZIS nanosheets show a remarkably improved photocatalytic activity with a hydrogen evolution rate of up to 2120 μmol h(-1)  g(-1) under visible-light irradiation, which is 4.5 times higher than that of the pristine ZIS nanosheets. PMID:27100950

  16. Continuous-time core-level photon-stimulated desorption spectroscopy for monitoring soft x-ray-induced reactions of molecules adsorbed on a single-crystal surface

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, L.-C.; Wen, C.-R.

    2006-05-15

    Continuous-time core-level photon-stimulated desorption (PSD) spectroscopy was proposed for monitoring the soft x-ray-induced reactions of molecules adsorbed on a single-crystal surface. Monochromatic synchrotron radiation was used as a soft x-ray light source in the photon-induced reactions of CF{sub 3}Cl adsorbed on a Si(111)-7x7 surface at 30 K and also as a probe for studying the produced fluorination states of the bonding surface Si atom in the positive-ion PSD spectroscopy. The F{sup +} PSD spectrum was obtained by monitoring the F{sup +} signal as a function of incident photon energy near the Si(2p) edge (98-110 eV). Sequential F{sup +} PSD spectra were measured as a function of photon exposure at four adsorbate coverages (the first dose=0.3x10{sup 15} molecules/cm{sup 2}, the second dose=0.8x10{sup 15} molecules/cm{sup 2}, the third dose=2.2x10{sup 15} molecules/cm{sup 2}, and the fourth dose=3.2x10{sup 15} molecules/cm{sup 2}). For the first and second CF{sub 3}Cl-dosed surfaces, the sequential F{sup +} PSD spectra show the variation of their shapes with photon exposure and indicate the formation of surface SiF species. The sequential F{sup +} PSD spectra for the third and fourth CF{sub 3}Cl-dosed surfaces also show the variation of their shapes with photon exposure and depict the production of surface SiF and SiF{sub 3} species.

  17. Deep pockets for deep seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    Peter Auster, a fisheries ecologist with the National Undersea Research Center in Connecticut, plans to assess degradation of the deep-shelf seafloor from bottom trawling. Magnus Ngoile, an official with Tanzania's National Environmental Management Council, will work on building capacity of poor villagers to protect their coastline. And Alison Rieser, a lawyer with the University of Maine School of Law, will produce a textbook to educate scientists on how to apply the law for marine conservation.These individuals are among 11 recipients of the Pew Charitable Trust's 10th annual marine conservation fellowships, announced on July 12. With each recipient receiving an award of $150,000, the program is the world's largest award for marine conservationists. Other 1999 recipients will be involved with areas including investigating marine pollution in the Arctic region, examining economic incentives for conservation in Baja, Mexico, and establishing a marine conservation biology training program for minority students.

  18. The requisite electronic structure theory to describe photoexcited nonadiabatic dynamics: nonadiabatic derivative couplings and diabatic electronic couplings.

    PubMed

    Subotnik, Joseph E; Alguire, Ethan C; Ou, Qi; Landry, Brian R; Fatehi, Shervin

    2015-05-19

    Electronically photoexcited dynamics are complicated because there are so many different relaxation pathways: fluorescence, phosphorescence, radiationless decay, electon transfer, etc. In practice, to model photoexcited systems is a very difficult enterprise, requiring accurate and very efficient tools in both electronic structure theory and nonadiabatic chemical dynamics. Moreover, these theoretical tools are not traditional tools. On the one hand, the electronic structure tools involve couplings between electonic states (rather than typical single state energies and gradients). On the other hand, the dynamics tools involve propagating nuclei on multiple potential energy surfaces (rather than the usual ground state dynamics). In this Account, we review recent developments in electronic structure theory as directly applicable for modeling photoexcited systems. In particular, we focus on how one may evaluate the couplings between two different electronic states. These couplings come in two flavors. If we order states energetically, the resulting adiabatic states are coupled via derivative couplings. Derivative couplings capture how electronic wave functions change as a function of nuclear geometry and can usually be calculated with straightforward tools from analytic gradient theory. One nuance arises, however, in the context of time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT): how do we evaluate derivative couplings between TD-DFT excited states (which are tricky, because no wave function is available)? This conundrum was recently solved, and we review the solution below. We also discuss the solution to a second, pesky problem of origin dependence, whereby the derivative couplings do not (strictly) satisfy translation variance, which can lead to a lack of momentum conservation. Apart from adiabatic states, if we order states according to their electronic character, the resulting diabatic states are coupled via electronic or diabatic couplings. The couplings

  19. Investigation of the generation of singlet oxygen in ensembles of photoexcited silicon nanocrystals by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantinova, E. A. Demin, V. A.; Timoshenko, V. Yu.

    2008-09-15

    The generation of singlet oxygen is investigated and its concentration upon photoexcitation of silicon nanocrystals in porous silicon layers is determined using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. The relaxation times of spin centers, i.e., silicon dangling bonds, in vacuum and in an oxygen atmosphere in the dark and under illumination of the samples are measured for the first time. It is revealed that the spin-lattice relaxation in porous silicon is retarded as compared to that in a single-crystal substrate. From analyzing experimental data, a microscopic model is proposed for interaction of oxygen molecules in the triplet state and spin centers at the surface of silicon nanocrystals. The results obtained have demonstrated that porous silicon holds promise for the use as a photosensitizer of molecular oxygen in biomedical applications.

  20. Influence of mesoscopic ordering on the photoexcitation transfer dynamics in supramolecular assemblies of oligo- p-phenylenevinylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, M. H.; Hoeben, F. J. M.; Jonkheijm, P.; Schenning, A. P. H. J.; Meijer, E. W.; Silva, C.; Herz, L. M.

    2006-01-01

    We have investigated the influence of molecular arrangement on the transfer rates of photoexcitations along supramolecular assemblies of hydrogen-bonded oligo- p-phenylenevinylene (OPV) molecules for two different packing geometries. For well-defined, helical stacks of monofunctional OPVs fast (≈50 ps) photoluminescence depolarization and excitation transfer to dopants was observed, in agreement with semi-coherent exciton diffusion. For disordered assemblies of bifunctional OPVs incorporating a spacer to link adjacent molecules, depolarization and energy transfer dynamics occur on a longer time scale (≈nanosecond). This strongly suggests that such spacers need to be tuned carefully as they may otherwise interfere with the π-stacking thereby reducing the intermolecular electronic coupling.

  1. Photoexcitation and ionization in carbon dioxide - Theoretical studies in the separated-channel static-exchange approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padial, N.; Csanak, G.; Mckoy, B. V.; Langhoff, P. W.

    1981-01-01

    Vertical-electronic static-exchange photoexcitation and ionization cross sections are reported which provide a first approximation to the complete dipole spectrum of CO2. Separated-channel static-exchange calculations of vertical-electronic transition energies and oscillator strengths, and Stieltjes-Chebyshev moment methods were used in the development. Detailed comparisons were made of the static-exchange excitation and ionization spectra with photoabsorption, electron-impact excitation, and quantum-defect estimates of discrete transition energies and intensities, and with partial-channel photoionization cross sections obtained from fluorescence measurements and from tunable-source and (e, 2e) photoelectron spectroscopy. Results show that the separate-channel static-exchange approximation is generally satisfactory in CO2.

  2. The first photoexcitation step of ruthenium-based models for artificial photosynthesis highlighted by resonance Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Carmen; Neugebauer, Johannes; Presselt, Martin; Uhlemann, Ute; Schmitt, Michael; Rau, Sven; Popp, Jürgen; Reiher, Markus

    2007-05-31

    Ruthenium-polypyridine and related complexes play an important role as models for light-harvesting antenna systems to be employed in artificial photosynthesis. In this theoretical and experimental work, the first photoexcitation step of a tetranuclear [Ru2Pd2] complex composed of two ruthenium-bipyridyl subunits and two palladium-based fragments, {[(tbbpy)2Ru(tmbi)]2[Pd(allyl)]2}2+ (tbbpy = 4,4'-di-tert-butyl-2,2'-bipyridine, tmbi = 5,6,5',6'-tetramethyl-2,2'-bibenzimidazolate), is investigated by means of experimental and theoretical resonance Raman spectroscopy. The calculated spectra, which were obtained within the short-time approximation combined with time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT), reproduce the experimental spectrum with excellent agreement. We also compared calculations on off-resonance Raman spectra, for which a completely different theoretical approach has to be used, to experimental ones and again found very good agreement. The [Ru2Pd2] complex represents the probably largest system for which a quantum chemical frequency analysis and a calculation of conventional Raman as well as resonance Raman spectra with reasonable basis sets have been performed. A comparison between the resonance Raman spectra of the [Ru2Pd2] complex and its mononuclear [Ru] building block [(tbbpy)2Ru(tmbi)]2+ and a normal-mode analysis reveal that the [Ru2Pd2] resonance Raman spectrum is composed uniquely from peaks arising from the [Ru] fragment. This observation and an analysis of the Kohn-Sham orbitals mainly involved in the initial electronic excitation in the TDDFT description of the [Ru2Pd2] system support the hypothesis that the initial photoexcitation step of [Ru2Pd2] is a charge-transfer excitation from the ruthenium atoms to the adjacent butyl-2,2'-bipyridine ligands. PMID:17489631

  3. Efficient generation of charges via below-gap photoexcitation of polymer-fullerene blend films investigated by terahertz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkinson, P.; Lloyd-Hughes, J.; Johnston, M. B.; Herz, L. M.

    2008-09-01

    Using optical-pump terahertz-probe spectroscopy, we have investigated the time-resolved conductivity dynamics of photoexcited polymer-fullerene bulk heterojunction blends for two model polymers: poly[3-hexylthiophene] (P3HT) and poly[2-methoxy-5-( 3,7 -dimethyloctyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene] (MDMO-PPV) blended with [6,6]-phenyl- C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM). The observed terahertz-frequency conductivity is characteristic of dispersive charge transport for photoexcitation both at the π-π∗ absorption peak (560 nm for P3HT) and significantly below it (800 nm). The photoconductivity at 800 nm is unexpectedly high, which we attribute to the presence of a charge-transfer complex. We report the excitation-fluence dependence of the photoconductivity over more than four orders of magnitude, obtained by utilizing a terahertz spectrometer based upon on either a laser oscillator or an amplifier source. The time-averaged photoconductivity of the P3HT:PCBM blend is over 20 times larger than that of P3HT, indicating that long-lived hole polarons are responsible for the high photovoltaic efficiency of polymer:fullerene blends. At early times (˜ps) the linear dependence of photoconductivity upon fluence indicates that interfacial charge transfer dominates as an exciton decay pathway, generating charges with mobility of at least ˜0.1cm2V-1s-1 . At later times, a sublinear relationship shows that carrier-carrier recombination effects influence the conductivity on a longer time scale (>1μs) with a bimolecular charge annihilation constant for the blends that is approximately two to three orders of magnitude smaller than that typical for neat polymer films.

  4. Ligand field splittings in core level transitions for transition metal (TM) oxides: Tanabe-Sugano diagrams and (TM) dangling bonds in vacated O-atom defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucovsky, Gerry; Wu, Kun; Pappas, Brian; Whitten, Jerry

    2013-04-01

    Defect states in the forbidden band-gap below the conduction band edge are active as electron traps in nano-grain high-) transition metal (TM) oxides with thickness >0.3 nm, e.g., ZrO2 and HfO2. These oxides have received considerable attention as gate-dielectrics in complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) devices, and more recently are emerging as candidates for charge storage and memory devices. To provide a theoretical basis for device functionality, ab-initio many-electron theory is combined with X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to study O K edge and TM core level transitions. These studies identify ligand field splittings (ΔLF) for defect state features,. When compared with those obtained from O-atom and TM-atom core spectroscopic transitions, this provides direct information about defect state sun-nm bonding arrangements. comparisons are made for (i) elemental TiO2 and Ti2O3 with different formal ionic charges, Ti4+ and Ti3+ and for (ii) Magneli Phase alloys, TinO2n-1, n is an integer 9>=n>3, and (TiO2)x(HfO2)1-x alloys. The alloys display multi-valent behavior from (i) different ionic-charge states, (ii} local bond-strain, and (iii) metallic hopping transport. The intrinsic bonding defects in TM oxides are identified as pairs of singly occupied dangling bonds. For 6-fold coordinated Ti-oxides defect excited states in 2nd derivative O K pre-edge spectra are essentially the same as single Ti-atom d2 transitions in Tanabe-Sugano (T-S) diagrams. O-vacated site defects in 8-fold coordinated ZrO2 and HfO2 are described by d8 T-S diagrams. T-S defect state ordering and splittings are functions of the coordination and symmetry of vacated site bordering TM atoms. ΔLF values from the analysis of T-S diagrams indicate medium range order (MRO) extending to 3rd and 4th nearest-neighbor (NN) TM-atoms. Values are different for 6-fold Ti, and 8-fold ZrO2 and HfO2, and scale inversely with differences in respective formal ionic radii. O-vacated site bonding

  5. Deep Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    Deep vein thrombosis, or DVT, is a blood clot that forms in a vein deep in the body. Most deep vein clots occur in the ... vein swells, the condition is called thrombophlebitis. A deep vein thrombosis can break loose and cause a serious problem ...

  6. Deep Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Deep Vein Thrombosis Overview What is deep vein thrombosis? Deep vein thrombosis (also called DVT) is a blood clot in a vein deep inside your body. These clots usually occur in your leg veins. While DVT is a fairly common condition, it is ...

  7. Deep Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    Deep vein thrombosis, or DVT, is a blood clot that forms in a vein deep in the body. Most deep vein clots occur in the lower leg or ... vein swells, the condition is called thrombophlebitis. A deep vein thrombosis can break loose and cause a ...

  8. H elimination and metastable lifetimes in the UV photoexcitation of diacetylene

    PubMed Central

    Silva, R.; Gichuhi, W. K.; Huang, C.; Doyle, M. B.; Kislov, V. V.; Mebel, A. M.; Suits, A. G.

    2008-01-01

    We present an experimental investigation of the UV photochemistry of diacetylene under collisionless conditions. The H loss channel is studied using DC slice ion imaging with two-color reduced-Doppler detection at 243 nm and 212 nm. The photochemistry is further studied deep in the vacuum UV, that is, at Lyman-alpha (121.6 nm). Translational energy distributions for the H + C4H product arising from dissociation of C4H2 after excitation at 243, 212, and 121.6 nm show an isotropic angular distribution and characteristic translational energy profile suggesting statistical dissociation from the ground state or possibly from a low-lying triplet state. From these distributions, a two-photon dissociation process is inferred at 243 nm and 212 nm, whereas at 121.6 nm, a one-photon dissociation process prevails. The results are interpreted with the aid of ab initio calculations on the reaction pathways and statistical calculations of the dissociation rates and product branching. In a second series of experiments, nanosecond time-resolved phototionization measurements yield a direct determination of the lifetime of metastable triplet diacetylene under collisionless conditions, as well as its dependence on excitation energy. The observed submicrosecond lifetimes suggest that reactions of metastable diacetylene are likely to be less important in Titan's atmosphere than previously believed. PMID:18697925

  9. Terahertz dielectric response of photoexcited carriers in Si revealed via single-shot optical-pump and terahertz-probe spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Minami, Yasuo; Horiuchi, Kohei; Masuda, Kaisei; Takeda, Jun; Katayama, Ikufumi

    2015-10-26

    We have demonstrated accurate observations of terahertz (THz) dielectric response due to photoexcited carriers in a Si plate via single-shot optical-pump and THz-probe spectroscopy. In contrast to conventional THz time-domain spectroscopy, this spectroscopic technique allows single-shot detection of the THz response of materials at a given delay time between the pump and THz pulses, thereby sufficiently extending the time interval between the pump pulses. As a result, we can accurately measure the dielectric properties of materials, while avoiding artifacts in the response caused by the accumulation of long-lived photoexcited carriers. Using our single-shot scheme, the transmittance of a Si plate was measured in the range of 0.5–2.5 THz with different pump fluences. Based on a Drude model analysis, the optically induced complex dielectric constant, plasma frequency, and damping rate in the THz region were quantitatively evaluated.

  10. Characterizing the Solvated Structure of Photoexcited [Os(terpy)₂](2+) with X-ray Transient Absorption Spectroscopy and DFT Calculations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoyi; Pápai, Mátyás; Møller, Klaus B; Zhang, Jianxin; Canton, Sophie E

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing the geometric and electronic structures of individual photoexcited dye molecules in solution is an important step towards understanding the interfacial properties of photo-active electrodes. The broad family of "red sensitizers" based on osmium(II) polypyridyl compounds often undergoes small photo-induced structural changes which are challenging to characterize. In this work, X-ray transient absorption spectroscopy with picosecond temporal resolution is employed to determine the geometric and electronic structures of the photoexcited triplet state of [Os(terpy)₂](2+) (terpy: 2,2':6',2″-terpyridine) solvated in methanol. From the EXAFS analysis, the structural changes can be characterized by a slight overall expansion of the first coordination shell [OsN₆]. DFT calculations supports the XTA results. They also provide additional information about the nature of the molecular orbitals that contribute to the optical spectrum (with TD-DFT) and the near-edge region of the X-ray spectra. PMID:26907233

  11. Deep venous thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    Deep venous thrombosis is a condition that occurs when a blood clot forms in a vein deep inside a part ... M, et al. Executive Summary: Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis. 9th ed. American College of Chest ...

  12. Deep Ecology and Subjectivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foley, Grover

    1988-01-01

    Describes Deep Ecology and criticizes its limitations. Discusses mysticism, the bomb, freedom, subjectivity and power as they are addressed by Deep Ecology. Stresses the need to teach ecological balance. (CW)

  13. Taoism and Deep Ecology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sylvan, Richard; Bennett, David

    1988-01-01

    Contrasted are the philosophies of Deep Ecology and ancient Chinese. Discusses the cosmology, morality, lifestyle, views of power, politics, and environmental philosophies of each. Concludes that Deep Ecology could gain much from Taoism. (CW)

  14. Preventing Deep Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Education FAQs Preventing Deep Vein Thrombosis Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Preventing Deep Vein Thrombosis FAQ174, August 2011 PDF ... Your Practice Patient Safety & Quality Payment Reform (MACRA) Education & Events Annual ... Pamphlets Teen Health About ACOG About Us Leadership & ...

  15. Deep vein thrombosis - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    You were treated for deep venous thrombosis (DVT). This is a condition in which a blood clot forms in a vein that is not on ... especially if it gets worse upon taking a deep breath in You cough up blood

  16. Heating of the magnetic-ion spin system in modulation doped ZnMnSe/ZnBeSe quantum wells by means of photoexcitation.

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, D.; Astakhov, G. V.; Yakovlev, D. R.; Barrick, T.; Crooker, S. A.; Hansen, L.; Ossau, W.; Molenkamp, L. W.

    2002-01-01

    Heating of the spin system of magnetic ions by means of photoexcited carriers has been studied in modulation-doped (Zn,Mn)Se/(Zn,Be)Se quantum well structures with different electron densities varying from about 10{sup 9} to 5.5 x 10{sup 11} cm{sup -2}. The elevated temperature of the magnetic ions manifests in a reduced Zeeman splitting of the carriers already for low excitation densities. The efficiency of the heating decreases with increasing electron concentration.

  17. Moving solvated electrons with light: Nonadiabatic mixed quantum/classical molecular dynamics simulations of the relocalization of photoexcited solvated electrons in tetrahydrofuran (THF)

    SciTech Connect

    Bedard-Hearn, Michael J.; Larsen, Ross E.; Schwartz, Benjamin J.

    2006-11-21

    Motivated by recent ultrafast spectroscopic experiments [Martini et al., Science 293, 462 (2001)], which suggest that photoexcited solvated electrons in tetrahydrofuran (THF) can relocalize (that is, return to equilibrium in solvent cavities far from where they started), we performed a series of nonequilibrium, nonadiabatic, mixed quantum/classical molecular dynamics simulations that mimic one-photon excitation of the THF-solvated electron. We find that as photoexcited THF-solvated electrons relax to their ground states either by continuous mixing from the excited state or via nonadiabatic transitions, {approx}30% of them relocalize into cavities that can be over 1 nm away from where they originated, in close agreement with the experiments. A detailed investigation shows that the ability of excited THF-solvated electrons to undergo photoinduced relocalization stems from the existence of preexisting cavity traps that are an intrinsic part of the structure of liquid THF. This explains why solvated electrons can undergo photoinduced relocalization in solvents like THF but not in solvents like water, which lack the preexisting traps necessary to stabilize the excited electron in other places in the fluid. We also find that even when they do not ultimately relocalize, photoexcited solvated electrons in THF temporarily visit other sites in the fluid, explaining why the photoexcitation of THF-solvated electrons is so efficient at promoting recombination with nearby scavengers. Overall, our study shows that the defining characteristic of a liquid that permits the photoassisted relocalization of solvated electrons is the existence of nascent cavities that are attractive to an excess electron; we propose that other such liquids can be found from classical computer simulations or neutron diffraction experiments.

  18. Deep Web video

    ScienceCinema

    None Available

    2012-03-28

    To make the web work better for science, OSTI has developed state-of-the-art technologies and services including a deep web search capability. The deep web includes content in searchable databases available to web users but not accessible by popular search engines, such as Google. This video provides an introduction to the deep web search engine.

  19. Deep Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Deep Vein Thrombosis? Español Deep vein thrombosis (throm-BO-sis), or DVT, is a blood clot that forms in a vein deep in the body. Blood clots occur when blood ...

  20. Deep Web video

    SciTech Connect

    None Available

    2009-06-01

    To make the web work better for science, OSTI has developed state-of-the-art technologies and services including a deep web search capability. The deep web includes content in searchable databases available to web users but not accessible by popular search engines, such as Google. This video provides an introduction to the deep web search engine.

  1. Deep Space Telecommunications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuiper, T. B. H.; Resch, G. M.

    2000-01-01

    The increasing load on NASA's deep Space Network, the new capabilities for deep space missions inherent in a next-generation radio telescope, and the potential of new telescope technology for reducing construction and operation costs suggest a natural marriage between radio astronomy and deep space telecommunications in developing advanced radio telescope concepts.

  2. Manipulation of an Innate Escape Response in Drosophila: Photoexcitation of acj6 Neurons Induces the Escape Response

    PubMed Central

    Manoli, Devanand S.; Zhang, Feng; Deisseroth, Karl; Baker, Bruce S.; Scott, Matthew P.

    2009-01-01

    Background The genetic analysis of behavior in Drosophila melanogaster has linked genes controlling neuronal connectivity and physiology to specific neuronal circuits underlying a variety of innate behaviors. We investigated the circuitry underlying the adult startle response, using photoexcitation of neurons that produce the abnormal chemosensory jump 6 (acj6) transcription factor. This transcription factor has previously been shown to play a role in neuronal pathfinding and neurotransmitter modality, but the role of acj6 neurons in the adult startle response was largely unknown. Principal Findings We show that the activity of these neurons is necessary for a wild-type startle response and that excitation is sufficient to generate a synthetic escape response. Further, we show that this synthetic response is still sensitive to the dose of acj6 suggesting that that acj6 mutation alters neuronal activity as well as connectivity and neurotransmitter production. Results/Significance These results extend the understanding of the role of acj6 and of the adult startle response in general. They also demonstrate the usefulness of activity-dependent characterization of neuronal circuits underlying innate behaviors in Drosophila, and the utility of integrating genetic analysis into modern circuit analysis techniques. PMID:19340304

  3. Features of the electrical conductivity of TlInSe{sub 2} under photoexcitation and X-ray excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Madatov, R. S. Najafov, A. I.; Mustafayev, Yu. M.; Gazanfarov, M. R.; Movsumova, I. M.

    2015-09-15

    The current–voltage characteristics of TlInSe{sub 2} crystals under photoexcitation and X-ray excitation are studied. The parameters of the trap, which are equal to N{sub t} = 5 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup –3}, n{sub t} = 4.5 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup –3}, and ΔE{sub t} = 0.42 eV, are calculated. The calculated values of N{sub t} and n{sub t} before and after X-ray excitation are equal to 3 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup –3} and 3.2 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup –3}, respectively. The dependences of the X-ray conductances on the radiation intensity are studied for TlInSe{sub 2} crystals at various accelerating voltages V{sub a} and it is determined that the X-ray conductance K{sub σ} decreases exponentially as the accelerating voltage V{sub a} and radiation dose increase.

  4. Mesoscopic structural phase progression in photo-excited VO2 revealed by time-resolved x-ray diffraction microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yi; Cai, Zhonghou; Chen, Pice; Zhang, Qingteng; Highland, Matthew J.; Jung, Il Woong; Walko, Donald A.; Dufresne, Eric M.; Jeong, Jaewoo; Samant, Mahesh G.; Parkin, Stuart S. P.; Freeland, John W.; Evans, Paul G.; Wen, Haidan

    2016-02-01

    Dynamical phase separation during a solid-solid phase transition poses a challenge for understanding the fundamental processes in correlated materials. Critical information underlying a phase transition, such as localized phase competition, is difficult to reveal by measurements that are spatially averaged over many phase separated regions. The ability to simultaneously track the spatial and temporal evolution of such systems is essential to understanding mesoscopic processes during a phase transition. Using state-of-the-art time-resolved hard x-ray diffraction microscopy, we directly visualize the structural phase progression in a VO2 film upon photoexcitation. Following a homogenous in-plane optical excitation, the phase transformation is initiated at discrete sites and completed by the growth of one lattice structure into the other, instead of a simultaneous isotropic lattice symmetry change. The time-dependent x-ray diffraction spatial maps show that the in-plane phase progression in laser-superheated VO2 is via a displacive lattice transformation as a result of relaxation from an excited monoclinic phase into a rutile phase. The speed of the phase front progression is quantitatively measured, and is faster than the process driven by in-plane thermal diffusion but slower than the sound speed in VO2. The direct visualization of localized structural changes in the time domain opens a new avenue to study mesoscopic processes in driven systems.

  5. Time Evolution of Charge Carriers & Phonons after Photo-Excitation by an Ultra-Short Light Pulse in Bulk Germanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahy, Stephen; Murphy-Armando, Felipe; Trigo, Mariano; Savic, Ivana; Murray, Eamonn; Reis, David

    We have calculated the time-evolution of carriers and generated phonons in Ge after ultrafast photo-excitation above the direct band-gap. The relevant electron-phonon and anharmonic phonon scattering rates are obtained from first-principles electronic structure calculations. Measurements of the x-ray diffuse scattering after excitation near the L point in the Brillouin zone find a relatively slow (5 ps, compared to the typical electron-phonon energy relaxation of the Gamma-L phonon) increase of the phonon population. We find this is due to emission caused by the scattering of electrons between the Delta and L valleys, after the initial depopulation of the Gamma valley. The relative slowness of this process is due to a combination of causes: (i) the finite time for the initial depopulation of the conduction Gamma valley; (ii) the associated electron-phonon coupling is relatively weaker (compared to Gamma-L, Gamma-Delta and Delta-Delta couplings) ; (iii) the TA associated phonon has a long lifetime and (iv) the depopulation of the Delta valley suppresses the phonon emission. Supported by Science Foundation Ireland, Grant 12/1A/1601.

  6. Photoexcitation and charge-transfer-to-solvent relaxation dynamics of the I(-)(CH3CN) complex.

    PubMed

    Mak, Chun C; Timerghazin, Qadir K; Peslherbe, Gilles H

    2013-08-15

    Photoexcitation of iodide-acetonitrile clusters, I(-)(CH3CN)n, to the charge-transfer-to-solvent (CTTS) state and subsequent cluster relaxation could result in the possible formation of cluster analogues of the bulk solvated electron. In this work, the relaxation process of the CTTS excited iodide-acetonitrile binary complex, [I(-)(CH3CN)]*, is investigated using rigorous ab initio quantum chemistry calculations and direct-dynamics simulations to gain insight into the role and motion of iodine and acetonitrile in the relaxation of CTTS excited I(-)(CH3CN)n. Computed potential energy curves and profiles of the excited electron vertical detachment energy for [I(-)(CH3CN)]* along the iodine-acetonitrile distance coordinate reveal for the first time significant dispersion effects between iodine and the excited electron, which can have a significant stabilizing effect on the latter. Results of direct-dynamics simulations demonstrate that [I(-)(CH3CN)]* undergoes dissociation to iodine and acetonitrile fragments, resulting in decreased stability of the excited electron. The present work provides strong evidence of solvent translational motion and iodine ejection as key aspects of the early time relaxation of CTTS excited I(-)(CH3CN)n that can also have a substantial impact on the subsequent electron solvation processes and further demonstrates that intricate details of the relaxation process of CTTS excited iodide-polar solvent molecule clusters make it heavily solvent-dependent. PMID:23819756

  7. Double photoexcitation of He atoms by attosecond xuv pulses in the presence of intense few-cycle infrared lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, X.M.; Lin, C.D.

    2005-03-01

    We studied the photoelectron spectra of He atoms resulting from double photoexcitation to autoionizing states by an attosecond xuv pulse in the presence of intense few-cycle Ti:sapphire lasers using the time-dependent hyperspherical close-coupling method. In its first application we show that the combination of a weak xuv pulse and an intense infrared laser offers an efficient means for probing states that cannot be reached by single photoabsorption experiments alone. The method provides an alternative approach of studying Stark induced states at field strength much higher than that available for a dc electric field. Using parameters from the presently available attosecond pulses and infrared lasers we showed that the four singlet 2l2l{sup '} doubly excited states of He are prominently excited in such experiments. The dependence of the shape of the autoionizing states thus generated has been studied with respect to the intensity and the carrier-envelope phase of the few-cycle laser pulses.

  8. Spatially Resolved Photoexcited Charge-Carrier Dynamics in Phase-Engineered Monolayer MoS2

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, Hisato; Blancon, Jean-Christophe; Kappera, Rajesh; Lei, Sidong; Najmaei, Sina; Mangum, Benjamin D.; Gupta, Gautam; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Lou, Jun; Chhowalla, Manish; Crochet, Jared J.; Mohite, Aditya D.

    2014-12-18

    A fundamental understanding of the intrinsic optoelectronic properties of atomically thin transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) is crucial for its integration into high performance semiconductor devices. We investigate the transport properties of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) grown monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) under photo-excitation using correlated scanning photocurrent microscopy and photoluminescence imaging. We examined the effect of local phase transformation underneath the metal electrodes on the generation of photocurrent across the channel length with diffraction-limited spatial resolution. While maximum photocurrent generation occurs at the Schottky contacts of semiconducting (2H-phase) MoS2, after the metallic phase transformation (1T-phase), the photocurrent peak is observed towards the center of the device channel, suggesting a strong reduction of native Schottky barriers. Analysis using the bias and position dependence of the photocurrent indicates that the Schottky barrier heights are few meV for 1T- and ~200 meV for 2H-contacted devices. We also demonstrate that a reduction of native Schottky barriers in a 1T device enhances the photo responsivity by more than one order of magnitude, a crucial parameter in achieving high performance optoelectronic devices. The obtained results pave a pathway for the fundamental understanding of intrinsic optoelectronic properties of atomically thin TMDs where Ohmic contacts are necessary for achieving high efficiency devices with low power consumption.

  9. Photoexcited Nuclear Dynamics with Ab Initio Electronic Structure Theory: Is TD-DFT Ready For the Challenge?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subotnik, Joseph

    In this talk, I will give a broad overview of our work in nonadiabatic dynamics, i.e. the dynamics of strongly coupled nuclear-electronic motion whereby the relaxation of a photo-excited electron leads to the heating up of phonons. I will briefly discuss how to model such nuclear motion beyond mean field theory. Armed with the proper framework, I will then focus on how to calculate one flavor of electron-phonon couplings, known as derivative couplings in the chemical literature. Derivative couplings are the matrix elements that couple adiabatic electronic states within the Born-Oppenheimer treatment, and I will show that these matrix elements show spurious poles using formal (frequency-independent) time-dependent density functional theory. To correct this TD-DFT failure, a simple approximation will be proposed and evaluated. Finally, time permitting, I will show some ab initio calculations whereby one can use TD-DFT derivative couplings to study electronic relaxation through a conical intersection.

  10. Mesoscopic structural phase progression in photo-excited VO2 revealed by time-resolved x-ray diffraction microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yi; Cai, Zhonghou; Chen, Pice; Zhang, Qingteng; Highland, Matthew J.; Jung, Il Woong; Walko, Donald A.; Dufresne, Eric M.; Jeong, Jaewoo; Samant, Mahesh G.; Parkin, Stuart S. P.; Freeland, John W.; Evans, Paul G.; Wen, Haidan

    2016-01-01

    Dynamical phase separation during a solid-solid phase transition poses a challenge for understanding the fundamental processes in correlated materials. Critical information underlying a phase transition, such as localized phase competition, is difficult to reveal by measurements that are spatially averaged over many phase separated regions. The ability to simultaneously track the spatial and temporal evolution of such systems is essential to understanding mesoscopic processes during a phase transition. Using state-of-the-art time-resolved hard x-ray diffraction microscopy, we directly visualize the structural phase progression in a VO2 film upon photoexcitation. Following a homogenous in-plane optical excitation, the phase transformation is initiated at discrete sites and completed by the growth of one lattice structure into the other, instead of a simultaneous isotropic lattice symmetry change. The time-dependent x-ray diffraction spatial maps show that the in-plane phase progression in laser-superheated VO2 is via a displacive lattice transformation as a result of relaxation from an excited monoclinic phase into a rutile phase. The speed of the phase front progression is quantitatively measured, and is faster than the process driven by in-plane thermal diffusion but slower than the sound speed in VO2. The direct visualization of localized structural changes in the time domain opens a new avenue to study mesoscopic processes in driven systems. PMID:26915398