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Sample records for deep eutectic solvents

  1. Deep eutectic solvents: syntheses, properties and applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qinghua; De Oliveira Vigier, Karine; Royer, Sébastien; Jérôme, François

    2012-11-01

    Within the framework of green chemistry, solvents occupy a strategic place. To be qualified as a green medium, these solvents have to meet different criteria such as availability, non-toxicity, biodegradability, recyclability, flammability, and low price among others. Up to now, the number of available green solvents are rather limited. Here we wish to discuss a new family of ionic fluids, so-called Deep Eutectic Solvents (DES), that are now rapidly emerging in the current literature. A DES is a fluid generally composed of two or three cheap and safe components that are capable of self-association, often through hydrogen bond interactions, to form a eutectic mixture with a melting point lower than that of each individual component. DESs are generally liquid at temperatures lower than 100 °C. These DESs exhibit similar physico-chemical properties to the traditionally used ionic liquids, while being much cheaper and environmentally friendlier. Owing to these remarkable advantages, DESs are now of growing interest in many fields of research. In this review, we report the major contributions of DESs in catalysis, organic synthesis, dissolution and extraction processes, electrochemistry and material chemistry. All works discussed in this review aim at demonstrating that DESs not only allow the design of eco-efficient processes but also open a straightforward access to new chemicals and materials. PMID:22806597

  2. Functionalization of graphene using deep eutectic solvents.

    PubMed

    Hayyan, Maan; Abo-Hamad, Ali; AlSaadi, Mohammed AbdulHakim; Hashim, Mohd Ali

    2015-12-01

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) have received attention in various applications because of their distinctive properties. In this work, DESs were used as functionalizing agents for graphene due to their potential to introduce new functional groups and cause other surface modifications. Eighteen different types of ammonium- and phosphonium-salt-based DESs were prepared and characterized by FTIR. The graphene was characterized by FTIR, STA, Raman spectroscopy, XRD, SEM, and TEM. Additional experiments were performed to study the dispersion behavior of the functionalized graphene in different solvents. The DESs exhibited both reduction and functionalization effects on DES-treated graphene. Dispersion stability was investigated and then characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy and zeta potential. DES-modified graphene can be used in many applications, such as drug delivery, wastewater treatment, catalysts, composite materials, nanofluids, and biosensors. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first investigation on the use of DESs for graphene functionalization. PMID:26264683

  3. Functionalization of graphene using deep eutectic solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayyan, Maan; Abo-Hamad, Ali; AlSaadi, Mohammed AbdulHakim; Hashim, Mohd Ali

    2015-08-01

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) have received attention in various applications because of their distinctive properties. In this work, DESs were used as functionalizing agents for graphene due to their potential to introduce new functional groups and cause other surface modifications. Eighteen different types of ammonium- and phosphonium-salt-based DESs were prepared and characterized by FTIR. The graphene was characterized by FTIR, STA, Raman spectroscopy, XRD, SEM, and TEM. Additional experiments were performed to study the dispersion behavior of the functionalized graphene in different solvents. The DESs exhibited both reduction and functionalization effects on DES-treated graphene. Dispersion stability was investigated and then characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy and zeta potential. DES-modified graphene can be used in many applications, such as drug delivery, wastewater treatment, catalysts, composite materials, nanofluids, and biosensors. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first investigation on the use of DESs for graphene functionalization.

  4. Spontaneous vesicle formation in a deep eutectic solvent.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Saffron J; Atkin, Rob; Warr, Gregory G

    2016-02-14

    Solvent penetration experiments and small-angle X-ray scattering reveal that phospholipids dissolved in a deep eutectic solvent (DES) spontaneously self-assemble into vesicles above the lipid chain melting temperature. This means DESs are one of the few nonaqueous solvents that mediate amphiphile self-assembly, joining a select set of H-bonding molecular solvents and ionic liquids. PMID:26701210

  5. Hydrolase-catalyzed biotransformations in deep eutectic solvents.

    PubMed

    Gorke, Johnathan T; Srienc, Friedrich; Kazlauskas, Romas J

    2008-03-14

    Hydrolases show good catalytic activity in deep eutectic solvents, despite the presence of urea, which can denature enzymes, or alcohols, which can interfere with hydrolase-catalyzed reactions. PMID:18309428

  6. Application of deep eutectic solvents in the extraction and separation of target compounds from various samples.

    PubMed

    Tang, Baokun; Zhang, Heng; Row, Kyung Ho

    2015-03-01

    Deep eutectic solvents, as a new type of eco-friendly solvent, have attracted increasing attention in chemistry for the extraction and separation of target compounds from various samples. To summarize the application of deep eutectic solvents, this review highlights some of the unique properties of deep eutectic solvents and deep-eutectic-solvent-based materials, as well as their applications in extraction and separation. In this paper, the available data and references in this field are reviewed to summarize the application developments of deep eutectic solvents. Based on the development of deep eutectic solvents, the exploitation of new deep eutectic solvents and deep-eutectic-solvent-based materials are expected to diversify into extraction and separation. PMID:25581398

  7. Improving agar electrospinnability with choline-based deep eutectic solvents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One percent agar (% wt) was dissolved in the deep eutectic solvent (DES), (2-hydroxyethyl) trimethylammonium chloride/urea at a 1:2 molar ratio, and successfully electrospun into nanofibers. An existing electrospinning set-up, operated at 50 deg C, was adapted for use with an ethanol bath to collect...

  8. Deep eutectic solvents in countercurrent and centrifugal partition chromatography.

    PubMed

    Roehrer, Simon; Bezold, Franziska; Garca, Eva Marra; Minceva, Mirjana

    2016-02-19

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) were evaluated as solvents in centrifugal partition chromatography, a liquid-liquid chromatography separation technology. To this end, the partition coefficients of ten natural compounds of different hydrophobicity were determined in non-aqueous biphasic systems containing DES. The influence of the composition of DESs and the presence of water in the biphasic system on the partition coefficient were also examined. In addition, several process relevant physical properties of the biphasic system, such as the density and viscosity of the phases, were measured. A mixture of three to four hydrophobic compounds was successfully separated in a centrifugal partition extractor using a heptane/ethanol/DES biphasic system. PMID:26810802

  9. Ionic liquids and deep eutectic solvents in natural products research: mixtures of solids as extraction solvents.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yuntao; van Spronsen, Jaap; Witkamp, Geert-Jan; Verpoorte, Robert; Choi, Young Hae

    2013-11-22

    Mixtures of solid chemicals may become liquid under certain conditions. These liquids are characterized by the formation of strong ionic (ionic liquids) or hydrogen bonds (deep eutectic solvents). Due to their extremely low vapor pressure, they are now widely used in polymer chemistry and synthetic organic chemistry, yet little attention has been paid to their use as extraction solvents of natural products. This review summarizes the preparation of ionic liquids and deep eutectic solvents with natural product components and recent progress in their applications to the extraction and analysis of natural products as well as the recovery of extracted compounds from their extracts. Additionally, various factors affecting extraction features of ionic liquids and deep eutectic solvents, as well as potential useful technologies including microwave and ultrasound to increase the extraction efficiency, are discussed. PMID:24188074

  10. Differential Microscopic Mobility of Components within a Deep Eutectic Solvent

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wagle, Durgesh V.; Baker, Gary A.; Mamontov, Eugene

    2015-07-13

    From macroscopic measurements of deep eutectic solvents such as glyceline (1:2 molar ratio of choline chloride to glycerol), the long-range translational diffusion of the larger cation (choline) is known to be slower compared to that of the smaller hydrogen bond donor (glycerol). However, when the diffusion dynamics are analyzed on the subnanometer length scale, we discover that the displacements associated with the localized diffusive motions are actually larger for choline. This counterintuitive diffusive behavior can be understood as follows. The localized diffusive motions confined in the transient cage of neighbor particles, which precede the cage-breaking long-range diffusion jumps, are moremore » spatially constrained for glycerol than for choline because of the stronger hydrogen bonds the former makes with chloride anions. The implications of differential localized mobility of the constituents should be especially important for applications where deep eutectic solvents are confined on the nanometer length scale and their long-range translational diffusion is strongly inhibited (e.g., within microporous media).« less

  11. Differential Microscopic Mobility of Components within a Deep Eutectic Solvent

    SciTech Connect

    Wagle, Durgesh V.; Baker, Gary A.; Mamontov, Eugene

    2015-07-13

    From macroscopic measurements of deep eutectic solvents such as glyceline (1:2 molar ratio of choline chloride to glycerol), the long-range translational diffusion of the larger cation (choline) is known to be slower compared to that of the smaller hydrogen bond donor (glycerol). However, when the diffusion dynamics are analyzed on the subnanometer length scale, we discover that the displacements associated with the localized diffusive motions are actually larger for choline. This counterintuitive diffusive behavior can be understood as follows. The localized diffusive motions confined in the transient cage of neighbor particles, which precede the cage-breaking long-range diffusion jumps, are more spatially constrained for glycerol than for choline because of the stronger hydrogen bonds the former makes with chloride anions. The implications of differential localized mobility of the constituents should be especially important for applications where deep eutectic solvents are confined on the nanometer length scale and their long-range translational diffusion is strongly inhibited (e.g., within microporous media).

  12. Differential Microscopic Mobility of Components within a Deep Eutectic Solvent.

    PubMed

    Wagle, Durgesh V; Baker, Gary A; Mamontov, Eugene

    2015-08-01

    From macroscopic measurements of deep eutectic solvents such as glyceline (1:2 molar ratio of choline chloride to glycerol), the long-range translational diffusion of the larger cation (choline) is known to be slower compared to that of the smaller hydrogen bond donor (glycerol). However, when the diffusion dynamics are analyzed on the subnanometer length scale, we find that the displacements associated with the localized diffusive motions are actually larger for choline. This counterintuitive diffusive behavior can be understood as follows. The localized diffusive motions confined in the transient cage of neighbor particles, which precede the cage-breaking long-range diffusion jumps, are more spatially constrained for glycerol than for choline because of the stronger hydrogen bonds the former makes with chloride anions. The implications of such differential localized mobility of the constituents should be especially important for applications where deep eutectic solvents are confined on the nanometer length scale and their long-range translational diffusion is strongly inhibited (e.g., within microporous media). PMID:26267182

  13. Deep eutectic solvent pretreatment and subsequent saccharification of corncob.

    PubMed

    Procentese, Alessandra; Johnson, Erin; Orr, Valerie; Garruto Campanile, Anna; Wood, Jeffery A; Marzocchella, Antonio; Rehmann, Lars

    2015-09-01

    Ionic liquid (ILs) pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass has attracted broad scientific interest, despite high costs, possible toxicity and energy intensive recycling. An alternative group of ionic solvents with similar physicochemical properties are deep eutectic solvents (DESs). Corncob residues were pretreated with three different DES systems: choline chloride and glycerol, choline chloride and imidazole, choline chloride and urea. The pretreated biomass was characterised in terms of lignin content, sugars concentration, enzymatic digestibility and crystallinity index. A reduction of lignin and hemicellulose content resulted in increased crystallinity of the pretreated biomass while the crystallinity of the cellulose fraction could be reduced, depending on DES system and operating conditions. The subsequent enzymatic saccharification was enhanced in terms of rate and extent. A total of 41 g fermentable sugars (27 g glucose and 14 g xylose) could be recovered from 100g corncob, representing 76% (86% and 63%) of the initially available carbohydrates. PMID:26005926

  14. Properties of Polyvinylpyrrolidone in a Deep Eutectic Solvent.

    PubMed

    Sapir, Liel; Stanley, Christopher B; Harries, Daniel

    2016-05-19

    Deep eutectic solvents (DES) are mixtures of two or more components with high melting temperatures, which form a liquid at room temperature. These DES hold great promise as green solvents for chemical processes, as they are inexpensive and environmentally friendly. Specifically, they present a unique solvating environment to polymers that is different from water. Here, we use small angle neutron scattering to study the polymer properties of the common, water-soluble, polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) in the prominent DES formed by a 1:2 molar mixture of choline chloride and urea. We find that the polymer adopts a slightly different structure in DES than in water, so that at higher concentrations the polymer favors a more expanded conformation compared to the same concentration in water. Yet, the osmotic pressure of PVP solutions in DES is very similar to that in water, indicating that both solvents are of comparable quality and that the DES components interact favorably with PVP. The osmotic pressure measurements within this novel class of promising solvents should be of value toward future technological applications as well as for osmotic stress experiments in nonaqueous environments. PMID:26963367

  15. Improving agar electrospinnability with choline-based deep eutectic solvents.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Ana M M; Souza, Hiléia K S; Uknalis, Joseph; Liu, Shih-Chuan; Gonçalves, Maria P; Liu, LinShu

    2015-09-01

    Very recently our group has produced novel agar-based fibers by an electrospinning technique using water as solvent and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) as co-blending polymer. Here, we tested the deep eutectic solvent (DES), (2-hydroxyethyl)trimethylammonium chloride/urea prepared at 1:2 molar ratio, as an alternative solvent medium for agar electrospinning. The electrospun materials were collected with an ethanol bath adapted to a previous electrospinning set-up. One weight percent agar-in-DES showed improved viscoelasticity and hence, spinnability, when compared to 1 wt% agar-in-water and pure agar nanofibers were successfully electrospun if working above the temperature of sol-gel transition (∼80 °C). By changing the solvent medium we decreased the PVA concentration (5 wt% starting solution) and successfully produced composite fibers with high agar contents (50/50 agar/PVA). Best composite fibers were formed with the 50/50 and 30/70 agar/PVA solutions. These fibers were mechanically resistant, showed tailorable surface roughness and diverse size distributions, with most of the diameters falling in the sub-micron range. Both nano and micro forms of agar fibers (used separately or combined) may have potential for the design of new and highly functional agar-based materials. PMID:26116384

  16. Assessing the toxicity and biodegradability of deep eutectic solvents.

    PubMed

    Wen, Qing; Chen, Jing-Xin; Tang, Yu-Lin; Wang, Juan; Yang, Zhen

    2015-08-01

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) have emerged as a new type of promising ionic solvents with a broad range of potential applications. Although their ecotoxicological profile is still poorly known, DESs are generally regarded as "green" because they are composed of ammonium salts and H-bond donors (HBDs) which are considered to be eco-friendly. In this work, cholinium-based DESs comprised of choline chloride (ChCl) and choline acetate (ChAc) as the salt and urea (U), acetamide (A), glycerol (G) and ethylene glycol (EG) as the HBD were evaluated for their toxic effects on different living organisms such as Escherichia coli (a bacterium), Allium sativum (garlic, a plant) and hydra (an invertebrate), and their biodegradabilities were assessed by means of closed bottle tests. These DESs possessed an anti-bacterial property and exhibited inhibitory effects on the test organisms adopted, depending on the composition and concentration of the DES. The mechanism for the impact of DESs and their components on different living organisms can be associated to their interactions with the cellular membranes. Not all DESs can be considered readily biodegradable. By extending the limited knowledge about the toxicity and biodegradation of this particular solvent family, this investigation on DESs provides insight into our structure-based understanding of their ecotoxicological behavior. PMID:25800513

  17. Protease activation in glycerol-based deep eutectic solvents

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hua; Baker, Gary A.; Holmes, Shaletha

    2011-01-01

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) consisting of mixtures of a choline salt (chloride or acetate form) and glycerol are prepared as easily accessible, biodegradable, and inexpensive alternatives to conventional aprotic cation-anion paired ionic liquids. These DES systems display excellent fluidity coupled with thermal stability to nearly 200 °C. In this work, the transesterification activities of cross-linked proteases (subtilisin and α-chymotrypsin), immobilized on chitosan, were individually examined in these novel DESs. In the 1:2 molar ratio mixture of choline chloride/glycerol containing 3% (v/v) water, cross-linked subtilisin exhibited an excellent activity (2.9 μmo l min−1 g−1) in conjunction with a selectivity of 98% in the transesterification reaction of N-acetyl-L-phenylalanine ethyl ester with 1-propanol. These highly encouraging results advocate more extensive exploration of DESs in protease-mediated biotransformations of additional polar substrates and use of DESs in biocatalysis more generally. PMID:21909232

  18. Deep eutectic solvents as novel extraction media for phenolic compounds from model oil.

    PubMed

    Gu, Tongnian; Zhang, Mingliang; Tan, Ting; Chen, Jia; Li, Zhan; Zhang, Qinghua; Qiu, Hongdeng

    2014-10-11

    Deep eutectic solvents (DES) as a new kind of green solvent were used for the first time to excellently extract phenolic compounds from model oil. It was also proved that DES could be used to extract other polar compounds from non-polar or weakly-polar solvents by liquid-phase microextraction. PMID:25144155

  19. Deep eutectic solvents: sustainable media for nanoscale and functional materials.

    PubMed

    Wagle, Durgesh V; Zhao, Hua; Baker, Gary A

    2014-08-19

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) represent an alternative class of ionic fluids closely resembling room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs), although, strictly speaking, they are distinguished by the fact that they also contain an organic molecular component (typically, a hydrogen bond donor like a urea, amide, acid, or polyol), frequently as the predominant constituent. Practically speaking, DESs are attractive alternatives to RTILs, sharing most of their remarkable qualities (e.g., tolerance to humidity, negligible vapor pressure, thermostability, wide electrochemical potential windows, tunability) while overcoming several limitations associated with their RTIL cousins. Particularly, DESs are typically, less expensive, more synthetically accessible (typically, from bulk commodity chemicals using solvent/waste-free processes), nontoxic, and biodegradable. In this Account, we provide an overview of DESs as designer solvents to create well-defined nanomaterials including shape-controlled nanoparticles, electrodeposited films, metal-organic frameworks, colloidal assemblies, hierarchically porous carbons, and DNA/RNA architectures. These breakthroughs illustrate how DESs can fulfill multiple roles in directing chemistry at the nanoscale: acting as supramolecular template, metal/carbon source, sacrificial agent (e.g., ammonia release from urea), and/or redox agent, all in the absence of formal stabilizing ligand (here, solvent and stabilizer are one and the same). The ability to tailor the physicochemical properties of DESs is central to controlling their interfacial behavior. The preorganized "supramolecular" nature of DESs provides a soft template to guide the formation of bimodal porous carbon networks or the evolution of electrodeposits. A number of essential parameters (viscosity, polarity, surface tension, hydrogen bonding), plus coordination with solutes/surfaces, all play significant roles in modulating species reactivity and mass transport properties governing the genesis of nanostructure. Furthermore, DES components may modulate nucleation and growth mechanisms by charge neutralization, modification of reduction potentials (or chemical activities), and passivation of particular crystal faces, dictating growth along preferred crystallographic directions. Broad operational windows for electrochemical reactions coupled with their inherent ionic nature facilitate the electrodeposition of alloys and semiconductors inaccessible to classical means and the use of cosolvents or applied potential control provide under-explored strategies for mediating interfacial interactions leading to control over film characteristics. The biocompatibility of DESs suggests intriguing potential for the construction of biomolecular architectures in these novel media. It has been demonstrated that nucleic acid structures can be manipulated in the ionic, crowded, dehydrating (low water activity) DES environment-including the adoption of duplex helical structures divergent from the canonical B form and parallel G-quadruplex DNA persisting near water's boiling point-challenging the misconception that water is a necessity for maintenance of nucleic acid structure/functionality and suggesting an enticing trajectory toward DNA/RNA-based nanocatalysis within a strictly anhydrous medium. DESs offer tremendous opportunities and open intriguing perspectives for generating sophisticated nanostructures within an anhydrous or low-water medium. We conclude this Account by offering our thoughts on the evolution of the field, pointing to areas of clear and compelling utility which will surely see fruition in the coming years. Finally, we highlight a few hurdles (e.g., need for a universal nomenclature, absence of water-immiscible, oriented-phase, and low-viscosity DESs) which, once navigated, will hasten progress in this area. PMID:24892971

  20. A novel green approach for the chemical modification of silica particles based on deep eutectic solvents.

    PubMed

    Gu, Tongnian; Zhang, Mingliang; Chen, Jia; Qiu, Hongdeng

    2015-06-18

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs), as a novel class of green solvents, were successfully applied as eco-friendly and sustainable reaction media for fast surface modification of spherical porous silica, resulting in stationary phases for high-performance liquid chromatography. The new reaction media were advantageous over organic solvents in many aspects, such as the high dispersibility of silica spheres and their non-volatility. PMID:25985926

  1. Natural deep eutectic solvents as new potential media for green technology.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yuntao; van Spronsen, Jaap; Witkamp, Geert-Jan; Verpoorte, Robert; Choi, Young Hae

    2013-03-01

    Developing new green solvents is one of the key subjects in Green Chemistry. Ionic liquids (ILs) and deep eutectic solvents, thus, have been paid great attention to replace current harsh organic solvents and have been applied to many chemical processing such as extraction and synthesis. However, current ionic liquids and deep eutectic solvents have still limitations to be applied to a real chemical industry due to toxicity against human and environment and high cost of ILs and solid state of most deep eutectic solvents at room temperature. Recently we discovered that many plant abundant primary metabolites changed their state from solid to liquid when they were mixed in proper ratio. This finding made us hypothesize that natural deep eutectic solvents (NADES) play a role as alternative media to water in living organisms and tested a wide range of natural products, which resulted in discovery of over 100 NADES from nature. In order to prove deep eutectic feature the interaction between the molecules was investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. All the tested NADES show clear hydrogen bonding between components. As next step physical properties of NADES such as water activity, density, viscosity, polarity and thermal properties were measured as well as the effect of water on the physical properties. In the last stage the novel NADES were applied to the solubilization of wide range of biomolecules such as non-water soluble bioactive natural products, gluten, starch, and DNA. In most cases the solubility of the biomolecules evaluated in this study was greatly higher than water. Based on the results the novel NADES may be expected as potential green solvents at room temperature in diverse fields of chemistry. PMID:23427801

  2. Natural deep eutectic solvents as new potential media for green technology.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Dai Y; van Spronsen J; Witkamp GJ; Verpoorte R; Choi YH

    2013-03-05

    Developing new green solvents is one of the key subjects in Green Chemistry. Ionic liquids (ILs) and deep eutectic solvents, thus, have been paid great attention to replace current harsh organic solvents and have been applied to many chemical processing such as extraction and synthesis. However, current ionic liquids and deep eutectic solvents have still limitations to be applied to a real chemical industry due to toxicity against human and environment and high cost of ILs and solid state of most deep eutectic solvents at room temperature. Recently we discovered that many plant abundant primary metabolites changed their state from solid to liquid when they were mixed in proper ratio. This finding made us hypothesize that natural deep eutectic solvents (NADES) play a role as alternative media to water in living organisms and tested a wide range of natural products, which resulted in discovery of over 100 NADES from nature. In order to prove deep eutectic feature the interaction between the molecules was investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. All the tested NADES show clear hydrogen bonding between components. As next step physical properties of NADES such as water activity, density, viscosity, polarity and thermal properties were measured as well as the effect of water on the physical properties. In the last stage the novel NADES were applied to the solubilization of wide range of biomolecules such as non-water soluble bioactive natural products, gluten, starch, and DNA. In most cases the solubility of the biomolecules evaluated in this study was greatly higher than water. Based on the results the novel NADES may be expected as potential green solvents at room temperature in diverse fields of chemistry.

  3. Efficient continuous synthesis of high purity deep eutectic solvents by twin screw extrusion.

    PubMed

    Crawford, D E; Wright, L A; James, S L; Abbott, A P

    2016-03-01

    Mechanochemical synthesis has been applied to the rapid synthesis of Deep Eutectic Solvents (DESs), including Reline 200 (choline chloride : urea, 1 : 2), in a continuous flow methodology by Twin Screw Extrusion (TSE). This gave products in higher purity and with Space Time Yields (STYs), four orders of magnitude greater than for batch methods. PMID:26911554

  4. Natural deep eutectic solvents as a new extraction media for phenolic metabolites in Carthamus tinctorius L.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yuntao; Witkamp, Geert-Jan; Verpoorte, Robert; Choi, Young Hae

    2013-07-01

    Developing green solvents with low toxicity and cost is an important issue for the biochemical industry. Synthetic ionic liquids and deep eutectic solvents have received considerable attention due to their negligible volatility at room temperature, high solubilization ability, and tunable selectivity. However, the potential toxicity of the synthetic ionic liquids and the solid state at room temperature of most deep eutectic solvents hamper their application as extraction solvents. In this study, a wide range of recently discovered natural ionic liquids and deep eutectic solvents (NADES) composed of natural compounds were investigated for the extraction of phenolic compounds of diverse polarity. Safflower was selected as a case study because its aromatic pigments cover a wide range of polarities. Many advantageous features of NADES (such as their sustainability, biodegradability combined with acceptable pharmaceutical toxicity profiles, and their high solubilization power of both polar and nonpolar compounds) suggest their potential as green solvents for extraction. Experiments with different NADES and multivariate data analysis demonstrated that the extractability of both polar and less polar metabolites was greater with NADES than conventional solvents. The water content in NADES proved to have the biggest effect on the yield of phenolic compounds. Most major phenolic compounds were recovered from NADES with a yield between 75% and 97%. This study reveals the potential of NADES for applications involving the extraction of bioactive compounds from natural sources. PMID:23710664

  5. A novel group of quaternary ammonium salts as ionic liquids and deep eutectic solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparrow, Christopher R.

    2011-12-01

    A growing number of non-toxic and biodegradable deep eutectic solvents (DES) have been discovered in recent years. This group encompasses the solidified crystalline material 3-(2-aminopyrimidin-1-yl)propanoate (3-2AP), a primary ammonium cation that is a construct of a typical DES. Synthesis of 3-(2-aminopyrimidin-1-yl)propanoate by quarternerization of the amine in the aromatic ring creates a novel deep eutectic solvent. An additional alteration to the DES construct is observed with the formation of a zwitterion between the positively charged quartenary amine group and the negatively charged carboxylate counter ion. The molecular arrangement, or construct, of a deep eutectic solvent will determine both its structure and application in industry. This report describes the synthesis and characterization of an 80:20 urea/3-2AP eutectic mixture with a melting point of 50°C, nearly 120°C lower than the melting temperature of 3-2AP (172.5°C). A cytotoxicity profile for 3-2AP exposed to A549 bronchoaveolar carcinoma cells revealed an LD50 of 337.65 mug/ml.

  6. Micelle structure in a deep eutectic solvent: a small-angle scattering study.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Fernandez, A; Edler, K J; Arnold, T; Heenan, R K; Porcar, L; Terrill, N J; Terry, A E; Jackson, A J

    2016-05-18

    In recent years many studies into green solvents have been undertaken and deep eutectic solvents (DES) have emerged as sustainable and green alternatives to conventional solvents since they may be formed from cheap non-toxic organic precursors. In this study we examine amphiphile behaviour in these novel media to test our understanding of amphiphile self-assembly within environments that have an intermediate polarity between polar and non-polar extremes. We have built on our recently published results to present a more detailed structural characterisation of micelles of sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) within the eutectic mixture of choline chloride and urea. Here we show that SDS adopts an unusual cylindrical aggregate morphology, unlike that seen in water and other polar solvents. A new morphology transition to shorter aggregates was found with increasing concentration. The self-assembly of SDS was also investigated in the presence of water; which promotes the formation of shorter aggregates. PMID:27157993

  7. In situ PM-IRRAS of a glassy carbon electrode/deep eutectic solvent interface.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Luciana; Schennach, Robert; Gollas, Bernhard

    2015-05-21

    The interface of a 1?:?2 molar choline chloride/ethylene glycol deep eutectic solvent with a glassy carbon electrode has been investigated by polarization modulation reflection-absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS). Temporal spectral changes at open circuit potential show the experiments to be surface sensitive and indicate slow adsorption of electrolyte molecules on the electrode surface. In situ spectroelectrochemical PM-IRRAS measurements reveal characteristic potential-dependent changes of band intensities and wavenumber-shifts in the surface spectra. The potential dependent spectral changes are discussed in terms of adsorption, reduction, desorption and reorientation of choline cations at the interface. Analogies are drawn to the ionic layer structure proposed for the architecture of electrode/ionic liquid interfaces. The results show that in situ PM-IRRAS is generally applicable to glassy carbon electrodes and to electrode interfaces with deep eutectic solvents. PMID:25908481

  8. Green extraction of grape skin phenolics by using deep eutectic solvents.

    PubMed

    Cvjetko Bubalo, Marina; Ćurko, Natka; Tomašević, Marina; Kovačević Ganić, Karin; Radojčić Redovniković, Ivana

    2016-06-01

    Conventional extraction techniques for plant phenolics are usually associated with high organic solvent consumption and long extraction times. In order to establish an environmentally friendly extraction method for grape skin phenolics, deep eutectic solvents (DES) as a green alternative to conventional solvents coupled with highly efficient microwave-assisted and ultrasound-assisted extraction methods (MAE and UAE, respectively) have been considered. Initially, screening of five different DES for proposed extraction was performed and choline chloride-based DES containing oxalic acid as a hydrogen bond donor with 25% of water was selected as the most promising one, resulting in more effective extraction of grape skin phenolic compounds compared to conventional solvents. Additionally, in our study, UAE proved to be the best extraction method with extraction efficiency superior to both MAE and conventional extraction method. The knowledge acquired in this study will contribute to further DES implementation in extraction of biologically active compounds from various plant sources. PMID:26830574

  9. Natural deep eutectic solvents providing enhanced stability of natural colorants from safflower (Carthamus tinctorius).

    PubMed

    Dai, Yuntao; Verpoorte, Robert; Choi, Young Hae

    2014-09-15

    A certain combination of natural products in the solid state becomes liquid, so called natural deep eutectic solvents (NADES). Recently, they have been considered promising new green solvents for foods, cosmetics and pharmaceuticals due to their unique solvent power which can dissolve many non-water-soluble compounds and their low toxicity. However, in addition to the features as solvents, the stabilisation ability of NADES for compounds is important for their further applications. In the study, the stability analysis demonstrates that natural pigments from safflower are more stable in sugar-based NADES than in water or 40% ethanol solution. Notably, the stabilisation capacity of NADES can be adjusted by reducing water content with increasing viscosity. The strong stabilisation ability is due to the formation of strong hydrogen bonding interactions between solutes and NADES molecules. The stabilising ability of NADES for phenolic compounds shows great promise for their applications in food, cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries. PMID:24767033

  10. Alcohol based-deep eutectic solvent (DES) as an alternative green additive to increase rotenone yield

    SciTech Connect

    Othman, Zetty Shafiqa; Hassan, Nur Hasyareeda; Zubairi, Saiful Irwan

    2015-09-25

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) are basically molten salts that interact by forming hydrogen bonds between two added components at a ratio where eutectic point reaches a melting point lower than that of each individual component. Their remarkable physicochemical properties (similar to ionic liquids) with remarkable green properties, low cost and easy handling make them a growing interest in many fields of research. Therefore, the objective of pursuing this study is to analyze the potential of alcohol-based DES as an extraction medium for rotenone extraction from Derris elliptica roots. DES was prepared by a combination of choline chloride, ChCl and 1, 4-butanediol at a ratio of 1/5. The structure of elucidation of DES was analyzed using FTIR, {sup 1}H-NMR and {sup 13}C-NMR. Normal soaking extraction (NSE) method was carried out for 14 hours using seven different types of solvent systems of (1) acetone; (2) methanol; (3) acetonitrile; (4) DES; (5) DES + methanol; (6) DES + acetonitrile; and (7) [BMIM] OTf + acetone. Next, the yield of rotenone, % (w/w), and its concentration (mg/ml) in dried roots were quantitatively determined by means of RP-HPLC. The results showed that a binary solvent system of [BMIM] OTf + acetone and DES + acetonitrile was the best solvent system combination as compared to other solvent systems. It contributed to the highest rotenone content of 0.84 ± 0.05% (w/w) (1.09 ± 0.06 mg/ml) and 0.84 ± 0.02% (w/w) (1.03 ± 0.01 mg/ml) after 14 hours of exhaustive extraction time. In conclusion, a combination of the DES with a selective organic solvent has been proven to have a similar potential and efficiency as of ILs in extracting bioactive constituents in the phytochemical extraction process.

  11. Alcohol based-deep eutectic solvent (DES) as an alternative green additive to increase rotenone yield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othman, Zetty Shafiqa; Hassan, Nur Hasyareeda; Zubairi, Saiful Irwan

    2015-09-01

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) are basically molten salts that interact by forming hydrogen bonds between two added components at a ratio where eutectic point reaches a melting point lower than that of each individual component. Their remarkable physicochemical properties (similar to ionic liquids) with remarkable green properties, low cost and easy handling make them a growing interest in many fields of research. Therefore, the objective of pursuing this study is to analyze the potential of alcohol-based DES as an extraction medium for rotenone extraction from Derris elliptica roots. DES was prepared by a combination of choline chloride, ChCl and 1, 4-butanediol at a ratio of 1/5. The structure of elucidation of DES was analyzed using FTIR, 1H-NMR and 13C-NMR. Normal soaking extraction (NSE) method was carried out for 14 hours using seven different types of solvent systems of (1) acetone; (2) methanol; (3) acetonitrile; (4) DES; (5) DES + methanol; (6) DES + acetonitrile; and (7) [BMIM] OTf + acetone. Next, the yield of rotenone, % (w/w), and its concentration (mg/ml) in dried roots were quantitatively determined by means of RP-HPLC. The results showed that a binary solvent system of [BMIM] OTf + acetone and DES + acetonitrile was the best solvent system combination as compared to other solvent systems. It contributed to the highest rotenone content of 0.84 ± 0.05% (w/w) (1.09 ± 0.06 mg/ml) and 0.84 ± 0.02% (w/w) (1.03 ± 0.01 mg/ml) after 14 hours of exhaustive extraction time. In conclusion, a combination of the DES with a selective organic solvent has been proven to have a similar potential and efficiency as of ILs in extracting bioactive constituents in the phytochemical extraction process.

  12. Tailoring properties of natural deep eutectic solvents with water to facilitate their applications.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yuntao; Witkamp, Geert-Jan; Verpoorte, Robert; Choi, Young Hae

    2015-11-15

    Previously it was demonstrated that natural deep eutectic solvents (NADES) are promising green solvents for the extraction of natural products. However, despite their potential, an obvious disadvantage of NADES is the high viscosity. Here we explored the dilution effect on the structures and physicochemical properties of NADES and their improvements of applications using quercetin and carthamin. The results of FT-IR and (1)H NMR experiments demonstrated that there are intensive H-bonding interactions between the two components of NADES and dilution with water caused the interactions weaken gradually and even disappeared completely at around 50% (v/v) water addition. A small amount of water could reduce the viscosity of NADES to the range of water and increase the conductivity by up to 100 times for some NADES. This study provides the basis for modulating NADES in a controllable way for their applications in food processing, enzyme reactions, pharmaceuticals and cosmetics. PMID:25976992

  13. Investigation on drug solubility enhancement using deep eutectic solvents and their derivatives.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng; Lee, Ping I

    2016-05-30

    Deep eutectic solvent (DES) is a room temperature liquid typically formed by mixing two solid compounds, such as a quaternary ammonium salt (QAS) (e.g. choline chloride) and a hydrogen bond donor (HBD) (e.g. urea or a carboxylic acid) at their eutectic composition. Very often, a range of room temperature liquids can also be obtained near the eutectic composition. Hence, it is more convenient to introduce a more general term deep eutectic solvent derivatives (DESDs) to describe a wide range of DES-like derivatives including those derived from ternary mixtures. The melting point of the mixture is lowered because the hydrogen bonding between DESD components reduces the lattice energy of components of the eutectic system. Based on the analysis of available data for 22 such choline chloride-based DES pairs, we found that the observed melting point depression can be statistically correlated with the difference between the hydrogen bonding contribution (δh) and the polar contribution (δp) to the solubility parameter of the hydrogen bond donor (HBD) component. The correlation was validated with a new DESD based on glycolic acid and choline chloride, which form DESDs at a molar ratio between 1:1 and 1:4 with DES-like properties. As a room temperature liquid, this DESD exhibits a wide range of solubility enhancement on several weakly basic poorly water-soluble drugs. For example, the solubility of itraconazole, piroxicam, lidocaine, and posaconazole has been observed to increase by 6700, 430, 28, and 6400-fold, respectively as compared to their aqueous solubility at room temperature. Furthermore, another new ternary DESD based on choline chloride, glycolic acid, and oxalic acid at a molar ratio of 1:1.6:0.4 is shown to further increase the solubility of itraconazole to a remarkable level of 5.36mg/mL (a 53,600-fold increase!). Because the components of such DESDs can include those biodegradable ones that had previously been used in formulated human products, the potential applicability of suitable DESDs to drug delivery, especially in enhancing drug solubility for topical formulations could be very attractive. PMID:27079143

  14. Folding and imaging of DNA nanostructures in anhydrous and hydrated deep-eutectic solvents.

    PubMed

    Gllego, Isaac; Grover, Martha A; Hud, Nicholas V

    2015-06-01

    There is great interest in DNA nanotechnology, but its use has been limited to aqueous or substantially hydrated media. The first assembly of a DNA nanostructure in a water-free solvent, namely a low-volatility biocompatible deep-eutectic solvent composed of a 4:1 mixture of glycerol and choline chloride (glycholine), is now described. Glycholine allows for the folding of a two-dimensional DNA origami at 20?C in six days, whereas in hydrated glycholine, folding is accelerated (?3?h). Moreover, a three-dimensional DNA origami and a DNA tail system can be folded in hydrated glycholine under isothermal conditions. Glycholine apparently reduces the kinetic traps encountered during folding in aqueous solvent. Furthermore, folded structures can be transferred between aqueous solvent and glycholine. It is anticipated that glycholine and similar solvents will allow for the creation of functional DNA structures of greater complexity by providing a milieu with tunable properties that can be optimized for a range of applications and nanostructures. PMID:25900011

  15. Self-aggregation of sodium dodecyl sulfate within (choline chloride + urea) deep eutectic solvent.

    PubMed

    Pal, Mahi; Rai, Rewa; Yadav, Anita; Khanna, Rajesh; Baker, Gary A; Pandey, Siddharth

    2014-11-11

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) have shown tremendous promise as green solvents with low toxicity and cost. Understanding molecular aggregation processes within DESs will not only enhance the application potential of these solvents but also help alleviate some of the limitations associated with them. Among DESs, those comprising choline chloride and appropriate hydrogen-bond donors are inexpensive and easy to prepare. On the basis of fluorescence probe, electrical conductivity, and surface tension experiments, we present the first clear lines of evidence for self-aggregation of an anionic surfactant within a DES containing a small fraction of water. Namely, well-defined assemblies of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) apparently form in the archetype DES Reline comprising a 1:2 molar mixture of choline chloride and urea. Significant enhancement in the solubility of organic solvents that are otherwise not miscible in choline chloride-based DESs is achieved within Reline in the presence of SDS. The remarkably improved solubility of cyclohexane within SDS-added Reline is attributed to the presence of spontaneously formed cyclohexane-in-Reline microemulsions by SDS under ambient conditions. Surface tension, dynamic light scattering (DLS), small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), density, and dynamic viscosity measurements along with responses from the fluorescence dipolarity and microfluidity probes of pyrene and 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane are employed to characterize these aggregates. Such water-free oil-in-DES microemulsions are appropriately sized to be considered as a new type of nanoreactor. PMID:25314953

  16. Tetrabutylammonium bromide (TBABr)-based deep eutectic solvents (DESs) and their physical properties.

    PubMed

    Yusof, Rizana; Abdulmalek, Emilia; Sirat, Kamaliah; Rahman, Mohd Basyaruddin Abdul

    2014-01-01

    Density, viscosity and ionic conductivity data sets of deep eutectic solvents (DESs) formed by tetrabutylammonium bromide (TBABr) paired with ethlyene glycol, 1,3-propanediol, 1,5-pentanediol and glycerol hydrogen bond donors (HBDs) are reported. The properties of DES were measured at temperatures between 303 K and 333 K for HBD percentages of 66.7% to 90%. The effects of HBDs under different temperature and percentages are systematically analyzed. As expected, the measured density and viscosity of the studied DESs decreased with an increase in temperature, while ionic conductivity increases with temperature. In general, DESs made of TBABr and glycerol showed the highest density and viscosity and the lowest ionic conductivity when compared to other DESs. The presence of an extra hydroxyl group on glycerol in a DES affected the properties of the DES. PMID:24932572

  17. Deep-eutectic solvents playing multiple roles in the synthesis of polymers and related materials.

    PubMed

    Carriazo, Daniel; Serrano, María Concepción; Gutiérrez, María Concepción; Ferrer, María Luisa; del Monte, Francisco

    2012-07-21

    The aim of this review is to provide an exposition of some of the most recent applications of deep-eutectic solvents (DESs) in the synthesis of polymers and related materials. We consider that there is plenty of room for the development of fundamental research in the field of DESs because their compositional flexibility makes the number of DESs susceptible of preparation unlimited and so do the range of properties that DESs can attain. Ultimately, these properties can be transferred into the resulting materials in terms of both tailored morphologies and compositions. Thus, interesting applications can be easily envisaged, especially in those fields in which the preparation of high-tech products via low cost processes is critical. We hope that the preliminary work surveyed in this review will encourage scientists to explore the promising perspectives offered by DESs. PMID:22695767

  18. Surfactant Behavior of Sodium Dodecylsulfate in Deep Eutectic Solvent Choline Chloride/Urea.

    PubMed

    Arnold, T; Jackson, A J; Sanchez-Fernandez, A; Magnone, D; Terry, A E; Edler, K J

    2015-12-01

    Deep eutectic solvents (DES) resemble ionic liquids but are formed from an ionic mixture instead of being a single ionic compound. Here we present some results that demonstrate that surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) remains surface-active and shows self-assembly phenomena in the most commonly studied DES, choline chloride/urea. X-ray reflectivity (XRR) and small angle neutron scattering (SANS) suggest that the behavior is significantly different from that in water. Our SANS data supports our determination of the critical micelle concentration using surface-tension measurements and suggests that the micelles formed in DES do not have the same shape and size as those seen in water. Reflectivity measurements have also demonstrated that the surfactants remain surface-active below this concentration. PMID:26540438

  19. Selected issues related to the toxicity of ionic liquids and deep eutectic solvents--a review.

    PubMed

    Kudłak, Błażej; Owczarek, Katarzyna; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2015-08-01

    Green Chemistry plays a more and more important role in implementing rules of sustainable development to prevent environmental pollution caused by technological processes, while simultaneously increasing the production yield. Ionic liquids (ILs) and deep eutectic solvents (DESs) constitute a very broad group of substances. Apart from many imperfections, ILs and DESs have been the most promising discoveries in the world of Green Chemistry in recent years. The main advantage of ILs is their unique physicochemical properties-they are very desirable from the technological point of view, but apart from these benefits, ILs appear to be highly toxic towards organisms from different trophic levels. DES areas of usage are very spread, because they cover organic synthesis, extraction processes, electrochemistry, enzymatic reactions and many others. Moreover, DESs seem to be a less toxic alternative to ionic liquids. New possibilities of applications and future development trends are sought and presented, including such important solutions of life branches as pharmaceuticals' production and medicine. PMID:26040266

  20. Imidazole-based deep eutectic solvents for starch dissolution and plasticization.

    PubMed

    Zdanowicz, Magdalena; Spychaj, Tadeusz; Mąka, Honorata

    2016-04-20

    Potato starch and high-amylose starch were treated with imidazole-based deep eutectic solvents (DESs) as dissolution and plasticization media. Beside imidazole (IM) for two-component DESs preparation choline chloride (CC), glycerol (G) or carboxylic acids (citric or malic) were used. An influence of water content in starch (as well as an extra water in the starch/DES system) on polymer dissolution and plasticization processes was investigated. Dissolution and gelatinization of starch in DESs were followed via DSC and laser scanning microscopy. A rheometric characteristics revealed an influence of starch/DES system storage time on the plasticization process. The tendency to recrystallization of compression-molded-starch films was evaluated using XRD technique. High dissolution and plasticization effectiveness of CC/IM and G/IM and a low tendency to film retrogradation of thermoplasticized starch were noted. PMID:26876869

  1. Characterization and antimicrobial phototoxicity of curcumin dissolved in natural deep eutectic solvents.

    PubMed

    Wikene, Kristine Opsvik; Bruzell, Ellen; Tønnesen, Hanne Hjorth

    2015-12-01

    Natural deep eutectic solvents (NADES) are a novel class of eutectics which show a unique potential as solubilizer of water insoluble compounds. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the potential of NADES as a solvent for the hydrophobic photosensitizer curcumin for use in antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT). Two of the seventeen NADES initially prepared (i.e., NADES GS and MC3) solubilized >0.05mg/ml curcumin and were further characterized. The hydrolytic stability (i.e., t1/2) of curcumin in NADES was comparable to or up to 2-10 times higher than previously reported results in cyclodextrins and up to >1300 times higher than results reported in buffer at pH8. The photolytic stability increased by a factor 5.6-10 in GS compared to the most photostable cyclodextrin and surfactant preparations reported previously. This NADES seemed to lock curcumin in its colorless diketo conformer, resulting in higher photostability than in ethanol and in the NADES MC3. The curcumin-NADES preparations dissolved rapidly in aqueous media and formed supersaturated solutions of curcumin. Precipitation of curcumin was observed after ≤1h depending on the dilution factor (pH<8). The NADES MC3 containing curcumin photoinactivated Escherichia coli at a lower curcumin concentration (1.25μM) than in any previously investigated preparations of curcumin. The ability of NADES to lock curcumin within one specific molecular conformation and also to potentiate the phototoxic effect of this photosensitizer emphasizes the unique properties of the NADES as a solvent. PMID:26410725

  2. One-pot synthesis of per-O-acetylated hemiacetals from free sugars in a deep eutectic solvent.

    PubMed

    Rokade, Sunil M; Bhate, Prakash M

    2015-10-30

    Free sugars reacted with acetic anhydride in a deep eutectic solvent made from choline chloride and ZnCl2 at 90 C to afford the corresponding peracetates that on further heating to 100 C underwent selective deacetylation at the anomeric position to furnish the corresponding peracetylated hemiacetals in good yield. PMID:26335374

  3. Enzymatic selective synthesis of 1,3-DAG based on deep eutectic solvent acting as substrate and solvent.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Chao-Xi; Qi, Sui-Jian; Xin, Rui-Pu; Yang, Bo; Wang, Yong-Hua

    2015-11-01

    In this study, enzymatic selective esterification of oleic acid with glycerol based on deep eutectic solvent acting as substrate and solvent was studied. As choline chloride (ChCl) or betaine can effectively change the chemical reaction characteristics of glycerol when they are mixed with a certain molar ratio of glycerol, several factors crucial to the lipase catalytic esterification of glycerol with oleic acid was investigated. Results showed that, betaine had more moderate effects than ChCl on the lipase, and water content had an important influence of the esterification and the enzyme selectivity. Significant changes of the glyceride compositions and enzyme selectivity were found in ChCl adding system compared with pure glycerol system; optimum accumulation of DAG especially 1,3-DAG because of the eutectic effect of ChCl was found in this system. Furthermore, in a model 1,3-DAG esterification synthesis system catalyzed by Novozym 435, high content (42.9mol%) of the 1,3-DAG could be obtained in ChCl adding system within 1h. PMID:26210852

  4. Tailoring and recycling of deep eutectic solvents as sustainable and efficient extraction media.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Kyung Min; Lee, Min Sang; Nam, Min Woo; Zhao, Jing; Jin, Yan; Lee, Dong-Kyu; Kwon, Sung Won; Jeong, Ji Hoon; Lee, Jeongmi

    2015-12-11

    The present study demonstrates that deep eutectic solvents (DESs) with the highest extractability can be designed by combining effective DES components from screening diverse DESs. The extraction of polar ginseng saponins from white ginseng was used as a way to demonstrate the tuneability as well as recyclability of DESs. A newly designed ternary DES (GPS-5) composed of glycerol, l-proline, and sucrose at 9:4:1 was used as a sustainable and efficient extraction medium. Based on the anti-tumor activity on HCT-116 cancer cells, it was confirmed that GPS-5 was merely an extraction solvent with no influence of the bioactivity of the ginsenosides extracted. Excellent recovery of the extracted saponins was easily achieved through solid-phase extraction (SPE). Recycling of the DES was accomplished by simple freeze-drying of the washed solutions from the SPE. The extraction efficiencies of the DESs recycled once, twice, and thrice were 92%, 85%, and 83% of that of the freshly synthesized solvent. PMID:26585205

  5. Hydrothermal liquefaction of de-oiled Jatropha curcas cake using Deep Eutectic Solvents (DESs) as catalysts and co-solvents.

    PubMed

    Alhassan, Yahaya; Kumar, Naveen; Bugaje, Idris M

    2016-01-01

    Biomass liquefaction using ionic liquids (ILs) as catalysts has received appreciable attention, in renewable fuels and chemicals production, recently. However, issues associated with the production cost, long reaction time and use of volatile solvents are undeniably challenging. Thus, Deep Eutectic Solvents (DESs) emerged as promising and potential ILs substitutes. The hydrothermal liquefaction of de-oiled Jatropha curcas cake was catalyzed by four synthesized DESs as catalysts and co-solvents for selective extraction. Proximate and ultimate analyses including ash, moisture and carbon contents of bio-crude produced varied slightly. The higher heating values found ranges from 21.15 ± 0.82 MJ/kg to 24.30 ± 0.98 MJ/kg. The bio-crude yields obtained using ChCl-KOH DES was 43.53 wt% and ChCl-p-TsOH DES was 38.31 wt%. Bio-crude yield using ChCl-FeCl3 DES was 30.80 wt%. It is suggested that, the selectivity of bio-crude could be improved, by using DESs as catalyst and co-solvent in HTL of biomass such as de-oiled J. curcas cake. PMID:26276400

  6. Deep eutectic solvents as efficient solvent system for the extraction of κ-carrageenan from Kappaphycus alvarezii.

    PubMed

    Das, Arun Kumar; Sharma, Mukesh; Mondal, Dibyendu; Prasad, Kamalesh

    2016-01-20

    Three different deep eutectic solvents (DESs) prepared by the complexation of choline chloride with urea, ethylene glycol and glycerol along with their hydrated counterparts were used for the selective extraction of κ-carrageenan from Kappaphycus alvarezii. Upon comparison of the quality of the polysaccharide with the one obtained using water as extraction media as well as the one extracted using widely practiced conventional method, it was found that, the physicochemical as well as rheological properties of κ-carrageenan obtained using DESs as solvents was at par to the one obtained using conventional method and was superior in quality when compared to κ-carrageenan obtained using water as solvent. Considering the tedious nature of the extraction method employed in conventional extraction process, the DESs can be considered as suitable alternative solvents for the facile extraction of the polysaccharide directly from the seaweed. However, among the hydrated and non-hydrated DESs, the hydrated ones were found to be more effective in comparison to their non-hydrated counterparts. PMID:26572431

  7. Improved antibacterial phototoxicity of a neutral porphyrin in natural deep eutectic solvents.

    PubMed

    Wikene, Kristine Opsvik; Bruzell, Ellen; Tønnesen, Hanne Hjorth

    2015-07-01

    Neutral porphyrins for antibacterial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) have received little attention due to their tendency to aggregate in aqueous media and reports of low phototoxic effect. These compounds may be less toxic to cells than positively and negatively charged photosensitisers. The preparation of highly bacterial phototoxic formulations of neutral porphyrins remains an open field of research with great potential if achievable. The purpose of this study was to develop novel hydrophilic formulations of the neutral porphyrin 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-porphyrin (THPP) by use of natural deep eutectic solvents (NADES) prepared by the solvent evaporation method. Physical and photochemical stability and in vitro photoinactivation of Enterococcus faecalis and Escherichia coli were investigated. Two of the 15 NADES investigated demonstrated superior solubilising properties of THPP. The photostability of THPP was higher in NADES than in methanol. A 100-fold dilution of the preparations with buffer to a final concentration of 0.5-5 nM THPP resulted in complete photoinactivation of E. faecalis and E. coli both in their exponential and stationary phase. THPP demonstrated significantly higher phototoxicity when formulated in NADES than in other aqueous preparations like phosphate buffered saline. NADES as a formulation concept for photosensitisers shows a great potential in aPDT. PMID:25966307

  8. Evaluation of toxicity and biodegradability of choline chloride based deep eutectic solvents.

    PubMed

    Radošević, Kristina; Bubalo, Marina Cvjetko; Srček, Višnje Gaurina; Grgas, Dijana; Dragičević, Tibela Landeka; Redovniković, Ivana Radojčić

    2015-02-01

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) have been dramatically expanding in popularity as a new generation of environmentally friendly solvents with possible applications in various industrial fields, but their ecological footprint has not yet been thoroughly investigated. In the present study, three choline chloride-based DESs with glucose, glycerol and oxalic acid as hydrogen bond donors were evaluated for in vitro toxicity using fish and human cell line, phytotoxicity using wheat and biodegradability using wastewater microorganisms through closed bottle test. Obtained in vitro toxicity data on cell lines indicate that choline chloride: glucose and choline chloride:glycerol possess low cytotoxicity (EC50>10 mM for both cell lines) while choline chloride:oxalic acid possess moderate cytotoxicity (EC50 value 1.64 mM and 4.19 mM for fish and human cell line, respectively). Results on phytotoxicity imply that tested DESs are non-toxic with seed germination EC50 values higher than 5000 mg L(-1). All tested DESs were classified as'readily biodegradable' based on their high levels of mineralization (68-96%). These findings indicate that DESs have a green profile and a good prospect for a wider use in the field of green technologies. PMID:25463852

  9. Extraction of phenolic compounds from virgin olive oil by deep eutectic solvents (DESs).

    PubMed

    García, Aránzazu; Rodríguez-Juan, Elisa; Rodríguez-Gutiérrez, Guillermo; Rios, José Julian; Fernández-Bolaños, Juan

    2016-04-15

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) are "green" solvents, applied in this study for the extraction of phenolic compounds from virgin olive oil (VOO). Different combinations of DES consisting of choline chloride (ChCl) in various mixing ratios with sugars, alcohols, organic acids, and urea, as well as a mixture of three sugars were used. The yields of the DES extractions were compared with those from conventional 80% (v/v) methanol/water. DES showed a good solubility of phenolic compounds with different polarities. The two most abundant secoiridoid derivatives in olive oil, oleacein and oleocanthal, extracted with ChCl/xylitol and ChCl/1,2-propanediol showed an increase of 20-33% and 67.9-68.3% with respect to conventional extraction, respectively. To our knowledge, this is the first time that phenolic compounds have been extracted from VOO oil using DES. Our results suggest that DES offers an efficient, safe, sustainable, and cost effective alternative to methanol for extraction of bioactive compounds from VOO. PMID:26616988

  10. Solvatochromic probe behavior within choline chloride-based deep eutectic solvents: effect of temperature and water.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Ashish; Pandey, Siddharth

    2014-12-18

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) have shown potential as promising environmentally friendly alternatives to conventional solvents. Many common and popular DESs are obtained by simply mixing a salt and a H-bond donor. Properties of such a DES depend on its constituents. Change in temperature and addition of water, a benign cosolvent, can change the physicochemical properties of DESs. The effect of changing temperature and addition of water on solvatochromic probe behavior within three DESs formed from choline chloride combined with 1,2-ethanediol, glycerol, and urea, respectively, in 1:2 mol ratios termed ethaline, glyceline, and reline is presented. Increase in temperature results in reduced H-bond donating acidity of the DESs. Dipolarity/polarizability and H-bond accepting basicity do not change with changing temperature of the DESs. The response of the fluorescence probe pyrene also indicates a decrease in the polarity of the DESs as temperature is increased. Addition of water to DES results in increased dipolarity/polarizability and a decrease in H-bond accepting basicity. Except for pyrene, solvatochromic probes exhibit responses close to those predicted from ideal-additive behavior with slight preferential solvation by DES within the aqueous mixtures. Pyrene response reveals significant preferential solvation by DES and/or the presence of solvent-solvent interactions, especially within aqueous mixtures of ethaline and glyceline, the DESs constituted of H-bond donors with hydroxyl functionalities. FTIR absorbance and Raman spectroscopic measurements of aqueous DES mixtures support the outcomes from solvatochromic probe responses. Aqueous mixtures of ethaline and glyceline possess relatively more interspecies H-bonds as compared to aqueous mixtures of reline, where interstitial accommodation of water within the reline molecular network appears to dominate. PMID:25418894

  11. Magnetic solid-phase extraction of protein with deep eutectic solvent immobilized magnetic graphene oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kaijia; Wang, Yuzhi; Ding, Xueqin; Huang, Yanhua; Li, Na; Wen, Qian

    2016-02-01

    As a new type of green solvent, four kinds of choline chloride (ChCl)-based deep eutectic solvents (DESs) have been synthesized, and then a core-shell structure magnetic graphene oxide (Fe3O4-NH2@GO) nanoparticles have been prepared and coated with the ChCl-based DESs. Magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) based Fe3O4-NH2@GO@DES was studied for the first time for the extraction of proteins. The characteristic results of vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FT-IR), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) indicated the successful preparation of Fe3O4-NH2@GO@DES. The concentrations of proteins in studies were determined by a UV-vis spectrophotometer. The advantages of Fe3O4-NH2@GO@DES in protein extraction were compared with Fe3O4-NH2@GO and Fe3O4-NH2, and Fe3O4-NH2@GO@ChCl-glycerol was selected as the suitable extraction solvent. The influence factors of the extraction process such as the pH value, the temperature, the extraction time, the concentration of protein and the amount of Fe3O4-NH2@GO@ChCl-glycerol were evaluated. Desorption experimental result showed 98.73% of BSA could be eluted from the solid extractant with 0.1 mol/L Na2HPO4 solution contained 1 mol/L NaCl. Besides, the conformation of BSA was not changed during the elution by the investigation of circular dichromism (CD) spectra. Furthermore, the analysis of real sample demonstrated that the prepared magnetic nanoparticles did have extraction ability on proteins in bovine whole blood. PMID:26653436

  12. Deep eutectic solvents in polymerizations: a greener alternative to conventional syntheses.

    PubMed

    del Monte, Francisco; Carriazo, Daniel; Serrano, María C; Gutiérrez, María C; Ferrer, M Luisa

    2014-04-01

    The use of deep eutectic solvents (DESs) that act as all-in-one solvent-template-reactant systems offers an interesting green alternative to conventional syntheses in materials science. This Review aims to provide a comprehensive overview to emphasize the similarities and discrepancies between DES-assisted and conventional syntheses and rationalize certain green features that are common for the three DES-assisted syntheses described herein: one case of radical polymerization and two cases of polycondensations. For instance, DESs contain the precursor itself and some additional components that either provide certain functionality (e.g., drug delivery and controlled release, or electrical conductivity) to the resulting materials or direct their formation with a particular structure (e.g., hierarchical-type). Moreover, DESs provide a reaction medium, so polymerizations are ultimately carried out in a solventless fashion. This means that DES-assisted syntheses match green chemistry principles 2 and 5 because of the economy of reagents and solvents, whereas the functionality incorporated by the second component allows the need for any post-synthesis derivatization to be minimized or even fully avoided (principle 8). DESs also provide new precursors that favor more efficient polymerization (principle 6) by decreasing the energy input required for reaction progress. Finally, the use of mild reaction conditions in combination with the compositional versatility of DESs, which allows low-toxic components to be selected, is also of interest from the viewpoint of green chemistry because it opens up the way to design biocompatible and/or eco-friendly synthetic methods (principle 3). PMID:24376090

  13. A green deep eutectic solvent-based aqueous two-phase system for protein extracting.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kaijia; Wang, Yuzhi; Huang, Yanhua; Li, Na; Wen, Qian

    2015-03-15

    As a new type of green solvent, deep eutectic solvent (DES) has been applied for the extraction of proteins with an aqueous two-phase system (ATPS) in this work. Four kinds of choline chloride (ChCl)-based DESs were synthesized to extract bovine serum albumin (BSA), and ChCl-glycerol was selected as the suitable extraction solvent. Single factor experiments have been done to investigate the effects of the extraction process, including the amount of DES, the concentration of salt, the mass of protein, the shaking time, the temperature and PH value. Experimental results show 98.16% of the BSA could be extracted into the DES-rich phase in a single-step extraction under the optimized conditions. A high extraction efficiency of 94.36% was achieved, while the conditions were applied to the extraction of trypsin (Try). Precision, repeatability and stability experiments were studied and the relative standard deviations (RSD) of the extraction efficiency were 0.4246% (n=3), 1.6057% (n=3) and 1.6132% (n=3), respectively. Conformation of BSA was not changed during the extraction process according to the investigation of UV-vis spectra, FT-IR spectra and CD spectra of BSA. The conductivity, dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to explore the mechanism of the extraction. It turned out that the formation of DES-protein aggregates play a significant role in the separation process. All the results suggest that ChCl-based DES-ATPS are supposed to have the potential to provide new possibilities in the separation of proteins. PMID:25732422

  14. Deep Eutectic Solvents Modified Molecular Imprinted Polymers for Optimized Purification of Chlorogenic Acid from Honeysuckle.

    PubMed

    Li, Guizhen; Wang, Wei; Wang, Qian; Zhu, Tao

    2016-02-01

    Deep eutectic solvents (DES) were synthesized with choline chloride (ChCl), and DES modified molecular imprinted polymers (DES-MIPs), DES modified non-imprinted polymers (DES-NIPs, without template), MIPs and NIPs were prepared in an identical procedure. Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) were used to characterize the obtained polymers. Rebinding experiment and solid-phase extraction (SPE) were used to prove the high selectivity adsorption properties of the polymers. Box-Behnken design (BBD) with three factors was used to optimize the extraction condition of chlorogenic acid (CA) from honeysuckles. The optimum extraction conditions were found to be ultrasonic time optimized (20 min), the volume fraction of ethanol (60%) and ratio of liquid to material (15 mL g(-1)). Under these conditions, the mean extraction yield of CA was 12.57 mg g(-1), which was in good agreement with the predicted BBD model value. Purification of hawthorn extract was achieved by SPE process, and SPE recoveries of CA were 72.56, 64.79, 69.34 and 60.08% by DES-MIPs, DES-NIPs, MIPs and NIPs, respectively. The results showed DES-MIPs had potential for promising functional adsorption material for the purification of bioactive compounds. PMID:26347506

  15. Synthesis and thermo-physical properties of deep eutectic solvent-based graphene nanofluids.

    PubMed

    Fang, Y K; Osama, M; Rashmi, W; Shahbaz, K; Khalid, M; Mjalli, F S; Farid, M M

    2016-02-19

    This study introduces a new class of heat transfer fluids by dispersing functionalised graphene oxide nanoparticles (GNPs) in ammonium and phosphonium-based deep eutectic solvents (DESs) without the aid of a surfactant. Different molar ratios of salts and hydrogen bond donors (HBD) were used to synthesise DESs for the preparation of different concentrations of graphene nanofluids (GNFs). The concentrations of GNPs were 0.01 wt%, 0.02 wt% and 0.05 wt %. Homogeneous and stable suspensions of nanofluids were obtained by high speed homogenisation and an ultrasonication process. The stability of the GNFs was determined through visual observation for 4 weeks followed by a centrifugal process (5000-20,000 rpm) for 30 min in addition to zeta potential studies. Dispersion of the GNPs in DES was observed using an optical microscope. The synthesised DES-based GNFs showed no particle agglomeration and formation of sediments in the nanofluids. Thermo-physical properties such as thermal conductivity and specific heat of the nanofluids were also investigated in this research. The highest thermal conductivity enhancement of 177% was observed. The findings of this research provide a new class of engineered fluid for heat transfer applications as a function of temperature, type and composition DESs as well as the GNPs concentration. PMID:26766874

  16. Electrochemical fabrication of nanoporous copper films in choline chloride-urea deep eutectic solvent.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Q B; Abbott, Andrew P; Yang, C

    2015-06-14

    Nanoporous copper films were fabricated by a facile electrochemical alloying/dealloying process without the need of a template. A deep eutectic solvent made from choline chloride (ChCl) and urea was used with zinc oxide as the metal salt. Cyclic voltammetry was used to characterise the electrochemical reduction of zinc and follow Cu-Zn alloy formation on the copper substrate at elevated temperatures from 353 to 393 K. The alloy formation was confirmed by X-ray diffraction spectra. 3D, open and bicontinuous nanoporous copper films were obtained by in situ electrochemically etching (dealloying) of the zinc component in the Cu-Zn surface alloys at an appropriate potential (-0.4 V vs. Ag). This dealloying process was found to be highly temperature dependent and surface diffusion controlled, which involved the self-assembly of copper atoms at the alloy/electrolyte interface. Additionally, the effects of the deposition parameters, including deposition temperature, current density as well as total charge density on resulting the microstructure were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscope. PMID:25972227

  17. Toxicity profile of choline chloride-based deep eutectic solvents for fungi and Cyprinus carpio fish.

    PubMed

    Juneidi, Ibrahim; Hayyan, Maan; Mohd Ali, Ozair

    2016-04-01

    An investigation on the toxicological assessment of 10 choline chloride (ChCl)-based deep eutectic solvents (DESs) towards four fungi strains and Cyprinus carpio fish was conducted. ChCl was combined with materials from different chemical groups such as alcohols, sugars, acids and others to form DESs. The study was carried out on the individual DES components, their aqueous mixture before DES formation and their formed DESs. The agar disc diffusion method was followed to investigate their toxicity on four fungi strains selected as a model of eukaryotic microorganisms (Phanerochaete chrysosporium, Aspergillus niger, Lentinus tigrinus and Candida cylindracea). Among these DESs, ChCl:ZnCl2 exhibited the highest inhibition zone diameter towards the tested fungi growth in vitro, followed by the acidic group (malonic acid and p-toluenesulfonic acid). Another study was conducted to test the acute toxicity and determine the lethal concentration at 50 % (LC50) of the same DESs on C. carpio fish. The inhibition range and LC50 of DESs were found to be different from their individual components. DESs were found to be less toxic than their mixture or individual components. The LC50 of ChCl:MADES is much higher than that of ChCl:MAMix. Moreover, the DESs acidic group showed a lower inhibition zone on fungi growth. Thus, DESs should be considered as new components with different physicochemical properties and toxicological profiles, and not merely compositions of compounds. PMID:26743645

  18. [Deep eutectic solvent: a new kind of mobile phase modifier for hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography].

    PubMed

    Tan, Ting; Qiao, Xin; Wan, Yiqun; Qiu, Hongdeng

    2015-09-01

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) were used as a new kind of mobile phase modifier in hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC). In our experiment, a SiO2 column (150 mm x 4.6 mm, 3 m) was selected to separate several nucleobases and nucleosides by using the mixed solution of acetonitrile and DES (choline chloride-ethylene glycol (1:3, mol/mol) ) as mobile phase. Subsequently, the concentrations of DESs in acetonitrile and the column temperature on the effect of separation were investigated. According to the experimental results, better separation of nucleobases and nucleosides was obtained by using acetonitrile and DESs mixed solution as mobile phase than that using traditional water-based solution. For example, a baseline separation between cytosine and cytidine cannot be achieved by HILIC with water-based mobile phase, however, greater improvement was gained by HILIC with modified DES-acetonitrile mobile phase. Meanwhile, the retention times of nucleobases and nucleosides decreased as the proportion of DESs in acetonitrile increased, the most significant decrease of which was with cytidine. Similar retention behavior took place with the effect of column temperature. Decreased retention times of the analytes were observed as column temperature increased. The experimental results indicated that this new method may solve some separation difficulties in traditional water-based HILIC, which also successfully verify the feasibility of DESs as mobile phase modifiers. PMID:26753279

  19. Ultrasound assisted-deep eutectic solvent extraction of iron from sheep, bovine and chicken liver samples.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Erkan; Soylak, Mustafa

    2015-05-01

    A green, novel and effective ultrasound assisted-deep eutectic solvent (DES) extraction (UA-DES-E) procedure was developed for extraction of iron from sheep, bovine and chicken liver samples. The analytical parameters including type and composition DES, volume of DES, ultrasonication time and ratio of sample to DES were optimized by using 50mg of the NIST SRM 1577b bovine liver certified reference material. The limit of detection (LOD) and the limit of quantification (LOQ) were found as 0.026g mL(-1) and 0.085g mL(-1), respectively. The relative standard deviation (RSD) as a result of 7 replicates of 50mg of certified reference material was 1.4%. The accuracy of proposed method was checked by the addition/recovery tests to NIST SRM 1577b bovine liver and a sheep liver. The extraction method was applied to extraction of iron from bovine, sheep and chicken liver samples retail from markets at Kayseri, Turkey with satisfactory results (recoveries higher than 95%). PMID:25702999

  20. Enzyme-Catalyzed Henry Reaction in Choline Chloride-Based Deep Eutectic Solvents.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xuemei; Zhang, Suoqin; Zheng, Liangyu

    2016-01-28

    The enzyme-catalyzed Henry reaction was realized using deep eutectic solvents (DESs) as a reaction medium. The lipase from Aspergillus niger (lipase AS) showed excellent catalytic activity toward the substrates aromatic aldehydes and nitromethane in choline chloride:glycerol at a molar ratio of 1:2. Addition of 30 vol% water to DES further improved the lipase activity and inhibited DES-catalyzed transformation. A final yield of 92.2% for the lipase AS-catalyzed Henry reaction was achieved under optimized reaction conditions in only 4 h. In addition, the lipase AS activity was improved by approximately 3-fold in a DES-water mixture compared with that in pure water, which produced a final yield of only 33.4%. Structural studies with fluorescence spectroscopy showed that the established strong hydrogen bonds between DES and water may be the main driving force that affects the spatial conformation of the enzyme, leading to a change in lipase activity. The methodology was also extended to the aza-Henry reaction, which easily occurred in contrast to that in pure water. The enantioselectivity of both Henry and aza-Henry reactions was not found. However, the results are still remarkable, as we report the first use of DES as a reaction medium in a lipase-catalyzed Henry reaction. PMID:26437947

  1. Synthesis and thermo-physical properties of deep eutectic solvent-based graphene nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Y. K.; Osama, M.; Rashmi, W.; Shahbaz, K.; Khalid, M.; Mjalli, F. S.; Farid, M. M.

    2016-02-01

    This study introduces a new class of heat transfer fluids by dispersing functionalised graphene oxide nanoparticles (GNPs) in ammonium and phosphonium-based deep eutectic solvents (DESs) without the aid of a surfactant. Different molar ratios of salts and hydrogen bond donors (HBD) were used to synthesise DESs for the preparation of different concentrations of graphene nanofluids (GNFs). The concentrations of GNPs were 0.01 wt%, 0.02 wt% and 0.05 wt %. Homogeneous and stable suspensions of nanofluids were obtained by high speed homogenisation and an ultrasonication process. The stability of the GNFs was determined through visual observation for 4 weeks followed by a centrifugal process (5000-20 000 rpm) for 30 min in addition to zeta potential studies. Dispersion of the GNPs in DES was observed using an optical microscope. The synthesised DES-based GNFs showed no particle agglomeration and formation of sediments in the nanofluids. Thermo-physical properties such as thermal conductivity and specific heat of the nanofluids were also investigated in this research. The highest thermal conductivity enhancement of 177% was observed. The findings of this research provide a new class of engineered fluid for heat transfer applications as a function of temperature, type and composition DESs as well as the GNPs concentration.

  2. Imidazole tailored deep eutectic solvents for CO2 capture enhanced by hydrogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lingdi; Huang, Junhua; Zhang, Xiangping; Zhang, Suojiang; Gao, Jubao; Zeng, Shaojuan

    2015-11-01

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) have emerged as promising alternative candidates for CO2 capture in recent years. In this work, several novel DESs were firstly prepared to enhance CO2 absorption. Structural and physical properties of DESs were investigated, as well as their absorption performance of CO2. A distinct depression in the melting point up to 80 K of DESs was observed compared with that of BMIMCl. The observed red shifts of the C2H group in an imidazolium ring and its chemical shifts downfield in NMR spectra are indicative of a hydrogen bond interaction between BMIMCl and MEA. In particular, CO2 uptake in MEA : ILs (4 : 1) at room temperature and atmospheric pressure is up to 21.4 wt%, which is higher than that of 30 wt% MEA (13%). A hydrogen bond related mechanism was proposed in which ILs act as a medium to improve CO2 uptake through hydrogen bonds. Finally, the firstly reported overall heat of CO2 absorption is slightly higher than that of 30 wt% MEA, implying that the hydrogen bonds of DESs contribute to the overall heat of CO2 absorption. This study reveals that the heat of CO2 absorption can be tailored by the proper molar ratio of MEA and ILs. PMID:26435384

  3. Magnetic Fe-Co films electroplated in a deep-eutectic-solvent-based plating bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanai, T.; Shiraishi, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Ohgai, T.; Nakano, M.; Suzuki, K.; Fukunaga, H.

    2015-05-01

    We fabricated Fe-Co films from a deep eutectic solvent (DES)-based plating bath and investigated magnetic properties of the plated films. The plating baths were obtained by stirring the mixture of choline chloride, ethylene glycol, FeCl2.4H2O, and CoCl2.6H2O. The composition of the plated films depended on the amount of FeCl2.4H2O in the plating bath, and Fe content of the films was varied from 0 to 100 at. %. Depending on the Fe content, the saturation magnetization and the coercivity of the films varied. The Fe76Co24 film shows high saturation magnetization and smooth surface, and the change in the saturation magnetization shows good agreement with the expected change by the Slater-Pauling curve. High current efficiency (>90%) could be obtained in the wide film composition. From these results, we concluded that the DES-based plating bath is one of effective baths for the Fe-Co films with high current efficiency.

  4. Enhancing cellulose accessibility of corn stover by deep eutectic solvent pretreatment for butanol fermentation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guo-Chao; Ding, Ji-Cai; Han, Rui-Zhi; Dong, Jin-Jun; Ni, Ye

    2016-03-01

    In this study, an effective corn stover (CS) pretreatment method was developed for biobutanol fermentation. Deep eutectic solvents (DESs), consisted of quaternary ammonium salts and hydrogen donors, display similar properties to room temperature ionic liquid. Seven DESs with different hydrogen donors were facilely synthesized. Choline chloride:formic acid (ChCl:formic acid), an acidic DES, displayed excellent performance in the pretreatment of corn stover by removal of hemicellulose and lignin as confirmed by SEM, FTIR and XRD analysis. After optimization, glucose released from pretreated CS reached 17.0 g L(-1) and yield of 99%. The CS hydrolysate was successfully utilized in butanol fermentation by Clostridium saccharobutylicum DSM 13864, achieving butanol titer of 5.63 g L(-1) with a yield of 0.17 g g(-1) total sugar and productivity of 0.12 g L(-1)h(-1). This study demonstrates DES could be used as a promising and biocompatible pretreatment method for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass into biofuel. PMID:26597485

  5. A facile approach to prepare a dual functionalized DNA based material in a bio-deep eutectic solvent.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Dibyendu; Bhatt, Jitkumar; Sharma, Mukesh; Chatterjee, Shruti; Prasad, Kamalesh

    2014-04-18

    DNA (Salmon testes) was functionalized by Fe3O4 nanoparticles and protonated layered dititanate sheets (H2·Ti2O5·H2O) in a mixture of choline chloride and ethylene glycol (a deep eutectic solvent) to yield a hybrid material having magnetic and antibacterial properties. Ti sheets were found to interact with the phosphate moieties, while Fe interacted with the base pair of DNA in the hybrid material. PMID:24609301

  6. In Vitro and In Vivo Toxicity Profiling of Ammonium-Based Deep Eutectic Solvents

    PubMed Central

    Hayyan, Maan; Looi, Chung Yeng; Hayyan, Adeeb; Wong, Won Fen; Hashim, Mohd Ali

    2015-01-01

    The cytotoxic potential of ammonium-based deep eutectic solvents (DESs) with four hydrogen bond donors, namely glycerine (Gl), ethylene glycol (EG), triethylene glycol (TEG) and urea (U) were investigated. The toxicity of DESs was examined using In Vitro cell lines and In Vivo animal model. IC50 and selectivity index were determined for the DESs, their individual components and their combinations as aqueous solutions for comparison purposes. The cytotoxicity effect of DESs varied depending on cell lines. The IC50 for the GlDES, EGDES, UDES and TEGDES followed the sequence of TEGDES< GlDES< EGDES< UDES for OKF6, MCF-7, A375, HT29 and H413, respectively. GlDES was selective against MCF-7 and A375, EGDES was selective against MCF-7, PC3, HepG2 and HT29, UDES was selective against MCF-7, PC3, HepG2 and HT29, and TEGDES was selective against MCF-7 and A375. However, acute toxicity studies using ICR mice showed that these DESs were relatively toxic in comparison to their individual components. DES did not cause DNA damage, but it could enhance ROS production and induce apoptosis in treated cancer cells as evidenced by marked LDH release. Furthermore, the examined DESs showed less cytotoxicity compared with ionic liquids. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that combined In Vitro and In Vivo toxicity profiles of DESs were being demonstrated, raising the toxicity issue of these neoteric mixtures and their potential applicability to be used for therapeutic purposes. PMID:25679975

  7. Deep eutectic solvent-assisted synthesis of biodegradable polyesters with antibacterial properties.

    PubMed

    García-Argüelles, Sara; Serrano, M Concepción; Gutiérrez, María C; Ferrer, M Luisa; Yuste, Luis; Rojo, Fernando; del Monte, Francisco

    2013-07-30

    Bacterial infection related to the implantation of medical devices represents a serious clinical complication, with dramatic consequences for many patients. In past decades, numerous attempts have been made to develop materials with antibacterial and/or antifouling properties by the incorporation of antibiotic and/or antiseptic compounds. In this context, deep eutectic solvents (DESs) are acquiring increasing interest not only as efficient carriers of active principle ingredients (APIs) but also as assistant platforms for the synthesis of a wide repertoire of polymer-related materials. Herein, we have successfully prepared biodegradable poly(octanediol-co-citrate) polyesters with acquired antibacterial properties by the DES-assisted incorporation of quaternary ammonium or phosphonium salts into the polymer network. In the resulting polymers, the presence of these salts (i.e., choline chloride, tetraethylammonium bromide, hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide, and methyltriphenylphosphonium bromide) inhibits bacterial growth in the early postimplantation steps, as tested in cultures of Escherichia coli on solid agar plates. Later, positive polymer cytocompatibility is expected to support cell colonization, as anticipated from in vitro preliminary studies with L929 fibroblasts. Finally, the attractive elastic properties of these polyesters permit matching those of soft tissues such as skin. For all of these reasons, we envisage the utility of some of these antibacterial, biocompatible, and biodegradable polyesters as potential candidates for the preparation of antimicrobial wound dressings. These results further emphasize the enormous versatility of DES-assisted synthesis for the incorporation, in the synthesis step, of a wide palette of APIs into polymeric networks suitable for biomedical applications. PMID:23808373

  8. In Vitro and In Vivo toxicity profiling of ammonium-based deep eutectic solvents.

    PubMed

    Hayyan, Maan; Looi, Chung Yeng; Hayyan, Adeeb; Wong, Won Fen; Hashim, Mohd Ali

    2015-01-01

    The cytotoxic potential of ammonium-based deep eutectic solvents (DESs) with four hydrogen bond donors, namely glycerine (Gl), ethylene glycol (EG), triethylene glycol (TEG) and urea (U) were investigated. The toxicity of DESs was examined using In Vitro cell lines and In Vivo animal model. IC50 and selectivity index were determined for the DESs, their individual components and their combinations as aqueous solutions for comparison purposes. The cytotoxicity effect of DESs varied depending on cell lines. The IC50 for the GlDES, EGDES, UDES and TEGDES followed the sequence of TEGDES< GlDES< EGDES< UDES for OKF6, MCF-7, A375, HT29 and H413, respectively. GlDES was selective against MCF-7 and A375, EGDES was selective against MCF-7, PC3, HepG2 and HT29, UDES was selective against MCF-7, PC3, HepG2 and HT29, and TEGDES was selective against MCF-7 and A375. However, acute toxicity studies using ICR mice showed that these DESs were relatively toxic in comparison to their individual components. DES did not cause DNA damage, but it could enhance ROS production and induce apoptosis in treated cancer cells as evidenced by marked LDH release. Furthermore, the examined DESs showed less cytotoxicity compared with ionic liquids. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that combined In Vitro and In Vivo toxicity profiles of DESs were being demonstrated, raising the toxicity issue of these neoteric mixtures and their potential applicability to be used for therapeutic purposes. PMID:25679975

  9. Electrodeposition, Morphology, Composition, and Corrosion Performance of Zn-Mn Coatings from a Deep Eutectic Solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fashu, S.; Gu, C. D.; Zhang, J. L.; Zheng, H.; Wang, X. L.; Tu, J. P.

    2015-01-01

    Different Zn-Mn coatings were successfully electrodeposited on copper substrates from deep eutectic solvent-based electrolytes containing boric acid as an additive. The main objective of this work was to optimize the Zn/Mn ratios and morphologies of the as-electrodeposited Zn-Mn films in order to obtain better corrosion protection performance coatings. The electrodeposition behaviors of Zn-Mn alloys as studied by cyclic voltammetry showed that with increase in electrolyte Mn(II) concentration, Zn(II) ion reduction occurs at higher overpotentials while Mn reduction occurs at lower overpotentials, and this in turn enhances Mn incorporation into the deposit. Characterization results showed that the electrodeposition potential and electrolyte Mn(II) concentration significantly affects the Mn content, crystal structure, surface morphology, and corrosion performance of the deposits. With increase in electrodeposition potential and electrolyte Mn(II) concentration, the alloy Mn increased and the grain morphology was refined. The crystal structure of Zn-Mn deposits consists of Zn and hexagonal close packed ɛ-phase Zn-Mn at low electrodeposition potentials and low electrolyte Mn(II) content. However, at high electrodeposition potentials and electrolyte Mn(II) contents, the crystal structure was only composed of hexagonal close packed ɛ-phase Zn-Mn. Corrosion measurements show that all the Zn-Mn samples have a passivating behavior and exhibits higher corrosion resistances when compared to those from aqueous solutions. Thus, optimum electrodeposition potential and electrolyte Mn(II) concentration were determined producing compact Zn-Mn films with the best corrosion resistance.

  10. PC-SAFT Modeling of CO2 Solubilities in Deep Eutectic Solvents.

    PubMed

    Zubeir, Lawien F; Held, Christoph; Sadowski, Gabriele; Kroon, Maaike C

    2016-03-10

    Perturbed-Chain Statistical Associating Fluid Theory (PC-SAFT), a physically based model that accounts for different molecular interactions explicitly, was applied to describe for the first time the phase behavior of deep eutectic solvents (DESs) with CO2 at temperatures from 298.15 to 318.15 K and pressures up to 2 MPa. DESs are mixtures of two solid compounds, a hydrogen bond donor (HBD) and a hydrogen bond acceptor (HBA), which form liquids upon mixing with melting points far below that of the individual compounds. In this work, the HBD is lactic acid and the HBAs are tetramethylammonium chloride, tetraethylammonium chloride, and tetrabutylammonium chloride. Two different modeling strategies were considered for the PC-SAFT modeling. In the first strategy, the so-called pseudo-pure component approach, a DES was considered as a pseudo-pure compound, and its pure-component parameters were obtained by fitting to pure DES density data. In the second strategy, the so-called individual-component approach, a DES was considered to consist of two individual components (HBA and HBD), and the pure-component parameters of the HBA and HBD were obtained by fitting to the density of aqueous solutions containing only the individual compounds of the DES. In order to model vapor-liquid equilibria (VLE) of DES + CO2 systems, binary interaction parameters were adjusted to experimental data from the literature and to new data measured in this work. It was concluded that the individual-component strategy allows quantitative prediction of the phase behavior of DES + CO2 systems containing those HBD:HBA molar ratios that were not used for kij fitting. In contrast, applying the pseudo-pure component strategy required DES-composition specific kij parameters. PMID:26814164

  11. Evidence of self-aggregation of cationic surfactants in a choline chloride+glycerol deep eutectic solvent.

    PubMed

    Pal, Mahi; Singh, Ranjan K; Pandey, Siddharth

    2015-08-24

    Based on fluorescence probe, electrical conductivity, surface tension, small-angle X-ray/dynamic light scattering, and transmission electron microscopy experiments, we present the first clear lines of evidence for self-aggregation of cationic surfactants of the n-alkyltrimethylammonium family within an archetypical deep eutectic solvent comprised of a 1:2 molar mixture of choline chloride and glycerol. Estimated thermodynamic parameters suggest this self-aggregation process to be less entropically driven than that in water. These novel water-free self-assemblies might serve as dynamic soft templates to direct the growth of size- or shape-tailored nanoparticles within water-restricted media. PMID:26080073

  12. Green synthesis of polymer monoliths incorporated with carbon nanotubes in room temperature ionic liquid and deep eutectic solvents.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-Shun; Gao, Shu-Ping; Huang, Yan-Ping; Liu, Zhao-Sheng

    2016-07-01

    In this work, an efficient method to prepare polymer monoliths with incorporated carbon nanotubes in a mixture of room temperature ionic liquid and deep eutectic solvents was developed. With assistance of the binary green solvent, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate and choline chloride/ethylene glycol, single-walled carbon nanotubes were dispersed successfully in pre-polymerization mixture without need of oxidative cutting of carbon nanotubes, which may allow depletion of the emission of volatile organic compounds into environment. The novel single-walled carbon nanotubes monolith was evaluated by capillary electrochromatography. Compared with the monolith made without single-walled carbon nanotubes, the monolith with the incorporation of single-walled carbon nanotubes exhibited high column efficiency (251,000plates/m) in the chromatographic separation. The morphology of the monolith can be tuned by the composition of mixture of ionic liquids and deep eutectic solvents to afford good column permeability and excellent separation ability for small molecules of alkyl phenones and alkyl benzenes. The results demonstrated that the method is a green strategy for the fabrication of multifunctional polymer monoliths. PMID:27154683

  13. RETRACTED: Neoteric FT-IR investigation on the functional groups of phosphonium-based deep eutectic solvents.

    PubMed

    Aissaoui, Tayeb; AlNashef, Inas M; Hayyan, Maan; Hashim, Mohd Ali

    2015-10-01

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) are novel solvent media that are currently under investigation as an alternative to ionic liquids and conventional solvents. The physical properties of DESs as well as their mild environmental footprint and potentially critical industrial application necessitate understanding the interaction of functional groups on both the salt and hydrogen bond donor (HBD). In this study, four DESs were prepared by mixing triethylenglycol, diethylenglycol, ethylenglycol, and glycerol as HBDs with methyltriphenylphosphonium bromide as a salt at a molar ratio of 1:4. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was conducted to highlight the chemical structure and mechanism of the combination of the four DESs. New spectra illustrating the combination of the functional groups of the HBDs and salt were observed and interpreted. This study is the first to investigate the properties of neoteric phosphonium-based DESs. PMID:25985123

  14. Fast environment-friendly ball mill-assisted deep eutectic solvent-based extraction of natural products.

    PubMed

    Wang, Man; Wang, Jiaqin; Zhang, Yue; Xia, Qian; Bi, Wentao; Yang, Xiaodi; Chen, David Da Yong

    2016-04-22

    A fast environment-friendly extraction method, ball mill-assisted deep eutectic solvent-based extraction, was used for the extraction of natural products from plants. In this study, tanshinones were selected as target compounds to evaluate the efficiency of the developed extraction method. Under the optimized experimental conditions, cryptotanshinone (0.176mg/g), tanshinone I (0.181mg/g), and tanshinone II A (0.421mg/g) were extracted from Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge, and the developed method was found to be greener, more efficient, and faster than conventional, environmentally harmful extraction methods such as methanol-based ultrasound-assisted extraction and heat reflux extraction. The analytical performances including recovery, reproducibility (RSD, n=5), correlation of determination (r(2)), and the limit of detection, with the ranges of 96.1-103.9%, 1.6-1.9%, 0.9973-0.9984, and 5-8ng/mL, were respectively obtained. Application of ball mill-assisted deep eutectic solvent-based extraction may fundamentally shape the future development of extraction methods. PMID:27033981

  15. Development of green betaine-based deep eutectic solvent aqueous two-phase system for the extraction of protein.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Wang, Yuzhi; Xu, Kaijia; Huang, Yanhua; Wen, Qian; Ding, Xueqin

    2016-05-15

    Six kinds of new type of green betaine-based deep eutectic solvents (DESs) have been synthesized. Deep eutectic solvent aqueous two-phase systems (DES-ATPS) were established and successfully applied in the extraction of protein. Betaine-urea (Be-U) was selected as the suitable extractant. Single factor experiments were carried out to determine the optimum conditions of the extraction process, such as the salt concentration, the mass of DES, the separation time, the amount of protein, the temperature and the pH value. The extraction efficiency could achieve to 99.82% under the optimum conditions. Mixed sample and practical sample analysis were discussed. The back extraction experiment was implemented and the back extraction efficiency could reach to 32.66%. The precision experiment, repeatability experiment and stability experiment were investigated. UV-vis, FT-IR and circular dichroism (CD) spectra confirmed that the conformation of protein was not changed during the process of extraction. The mechanisms of extraction were researched by dynamic light scattering (DLS), the measurement of the conductivity and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). DES-protein aggregates and embraces phenomenon play considerable roles in the separation process. All of these results indicated that betaine-based DES-ATPS may provide a potential substitute new method for the separation of proteins. PMID:26992491

  16. Experimental evidence for the participation of deep eutectic solvents in silver chloride crystal formation at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatt, Jitkumar; Mondal, Dibyendu; Prasad, Kamalesh

    2016-05-01

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) obtained by the complexation of choline chloride (ChoCl) as hydrogen bond acceptor and hydrogen bond donors such as ethylene glycol (ChoCl-EG 1:2) and glycerol (ChoCl-Gly 1:2) were used as media for the formation of AgCl crystals. Although formation of AgCl crystals was observed in both the solvents but the rate of formation of crystals was faster in ChoCl-EG 1:2 at low temperature (4-5 °C). In the crystals, cholinium cations were found to be present with chloride ions bridged with Ag ions resulting generation of 1D network of AgCl2 anions.

  17. Highly efficient extraction of anthocyanins from grape skin using deep eutectic solvents as green and tunable media.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Kyung Min; Zhao, Jing; Jin, Yan; Heo, Seong Rok; Han, Se Young; Yoo, Da Eun; Lee, Jeongmi

    2015-12-01

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) were investigated as tunable, environmentally benign, yet superior extraction media to enhance the extraction of anthocyanins from grape skin, which is usually discarded as waste. Ten DESs containing choline chloride as hydrogen bond acceptor combined with different hydrogen bond donors were screened for high extraction efficiencies based on the anthocyanin extraction yields. As a result, citric acid, D-(+)-maltose, and fructose were selected as the effective DES components, and the newly designed DES, CM-6 that is composed of citric acid and D-(+)-maltose at 4:1 molar ratio, exhibited significantly higher levels of anthocyanin extraction yields than conventional extraction solvents such as 80% aqueous methanol. The final extraction method was established based on the ultrasound-assisted extraction under conditions optimized using response surface methodology. Its extraction yields were double or even higher than those of conventional methods that are time-consuming and use volatile organic solvents. Our method is truly a green method for anthocyanin extraction with great extraction efficiency using a minimal amount of time and solvent. Moreover, this study suggested that grape skin, the by-products of grape juice processing, could serve as a valuable source for safe, natural colorants or antioxidants by use of the eco-friendly extraction solvent, CM-6. PMID:26534763

  18. Utilization of deep eutectic solvents as novel mobile phase additives for improving the separation of bioactive quaternary alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ting; Zhang, Mingliang; Wan, Yiqun; Qiu, Hongdeng

    2016-03-01

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) were used as novel mobile phase additives to improve chromatographic separation of four quaternary alkaloids including coptisine chloride, sanguinarine, berberine chloride and chelerythrine on a C18 column. DESs as a new class of ionic liquids are renewably sourced, environmentally benign, low cost and easy to prepare. Seven DESs were obtained by mixing different hydrogen acceptors and hydrogen-bond donors. The effects of organic solvents, the concentration of DESs, the types of DESs and the pH values of the buffer solution on the separation of the analytes were investigated. The composition of acetonitrile and 1.0% deep eutectic solvents aqueous solution (pH 3.3, adjusted with hydrochloric acid) in a 32:68 (v/v) ratio was used as optimized mobile phase, with which four quaternary alkaloids were well separated. When a small amount of DESs was added in the mobile phase for the separation of alkaloids on the C18 column, noticeable improvements were distinctly observed such as decreasing peak tailing and improving resolution. The separation mechanism mediated by DESs as mobile phase additives can be attributed to combined effect of both hydrogen acceptors and hydrogen-bond donors. For example, choline chloride can effectively cover the residual silanols on silica surface and ethylene glycol can reduce the retention time of analytes. The proposed method has been applied to determine BerbC in Lanqin Chinese herbal oral solution and BerbC tablet. Utilization of DESs in mobile phase can efficiently improve separation and selectivity of analytes from complex samples. PMID:26717817

  19. Ionic liquids and deep eutectic mixtures as new solvents for the synthesis of vanadium fluorides and oxyfluorides.

    PubMed

    Aidoudi, Farida H; Byrne, Peter J; Allan, Pheobe K; Teat, Simon J; Lightfoot, Philip; Morris, Russell E

    2011-04-28

    An exploratory study of the synthesis of vanadium (oxy)fluorides (VOFs) using ionic liquids (ILs) and deep eutectic mixtures (DESs) as a solvent yielded 10 different materials. The previously reported chain type: (NH(4))(2)VF(5) (1), (NH(4))(2)VOF(4) (2), NH(4)VO(3) (3) and (H(2)NH(2)(CH(2))(2)NH(2))VF(5) (9) have been successfully produced for the first time using ILs as the reaction media. The monomeric (HNH(2)CH(3))(2)VOF(4)(H(2)O) (4), the dimer (HNH(2)CH(3))(4)V(2)O(2)F(8) (5) and the 1D chains (HNH(2)CH(3))(2)VF(5) (6), (H(2)O)(2)VF(3) (7), α-(H(2)NH(2)(CH(2))(2)NH(2))VOF(4) (8) and β-(H(2)NH(2)(CH(2))(2)NH(2))VOF(4) (10) are novel materials. Template control has also been achieved by the selective choice of ILs or the appropriate deep eutectic mixture, where the expected template is delivered to the reaction by the partial breakdown of the urea derivative portion of the DES. PMID:21409203

  20. Theoretical evidence of charge transfer interaction between SO₂ and deep eutectic solvents formed by choline chloride and glycerol.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongping; Chang, Yonghui; Zhu, Wenshuai; Wang, Changwei; Wang, Chao; Yin, Sheng; Zhang, Ming; Li, Huaming

    2015-11-21

    The nature of the interaction between deep eutectic solvents (DESs), formed by ChCl and glycerol, and SO2 has been systematically investigated using the M06-2X density functional combined with cluster models. Block-localized wave function energy decomposition (BLW-ED) analysis shows that the interaction between SO2 and DESs is dominated by a charge transfer interaction. After this interaction, the SO2 molecule becomes negatively charged, whereas the ChCl-glycerol molecule is positively charged, which is the result of Lewis acid-base interaction. The current result affords a theoretical proof that it is highly useful and efficient to manipulate the Lewis acidity of absorbents for SO2 capture. Moreover, hydrogen bonding as well as electrostatic interactions may also contribute to the stability of the complex. Structure analysis shows that solvent molecules will adjust their geometries to interact with SO2. In addition, the structure of SO2 is barely changed after interaction. The interaction energy between different cluster models and SO2 ranges from -6.8 to -14.4 kcal mol(-1). It is found that the interaction energy is very sensitive to the solvent structure. The moderate interaction between ChCl-glycerol and SO2 is consistent with the concept that highly efficient solvents for SO2 absorption should not only be solvable but also regenerable. PMID:26446782

  1. Ultrasound and deep eutectic solvent (DES): a novel blend of techniques for rapid and energy efficient synthesis of oxazoles.

    PubMed

    Singh, Balvant S; Lobo, Hyacintha R; Pinjari, Dipak V; Jarag, Krishna J; Pandit, Aniruddha B; Shankarling, Ganapati S

    2013-01-01

    The present work deals with the synthesis of novel oxazole compounds by using effective combination of ultrasound (US) and deep eutectic solvent (DES). The reaction was also conducted by thermal method (NUS) and the comparative studies are provided. It was observed that applying ultrasound not only improved yields and reduced reaction times but also saved more than 85% energy as shown by energy consumption calculations. The advantages of using DES as reaction medium is highlighted from the fact that it is bio-degradable, non-toxic, recyclable and could be easily prepared using inexpensive raw materials. The recyclability for DES was studied wherein it was found that ultrasound has no negative effects on DES even up to four runs. In addition, the present work is the first report on the combinative use of DES and US in organic synthesis. PMID:22784641

  2. Electrochemical exfoliation of graphite in quaternary ammonium-based deep eutectic solvents: a route for the mass production of graphane.

    PubMed

    Abdelkader, Amr M; Patten, Hollie V; Li, Zheling; Chen, Yiqiang; Kinloch, Ian A

    2015-07-14

    We demonstrate a facile and scalable electrochemical approach to exfoliate graphite, which permits in situ hydrogenation of the resultant graphene via a solvated NR(4+) graphite compound in quaternary ammonium-based deep eutectic solvents. Spectroscopic studies reveal the presence of sp(3) C-H bonds in the hydrogenated graphene. The resulting materials consist of micrometre-sized and predominantly monolayer to few layers thick hydrogenated graphenic flakes. A large band gap (∼4 eV) further establishes the high level of hydrogenation. It is also possible to tune the band gap introduced to the graphene by controlling the level of hydrogenation. The mechanism of the exfoliation and hydrogenation is also discussed. PMID:26074262

  3. Fabrication of PbS thin films composed of highly (200)-oriented nano-/micro-rods in deep eutectic solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun; Zhang, Jianjun; Xu, Huifang; Ouyang, Yan; Zhan, Funan; Li, Qiang

    2015-08-01

    PbS thin films composed of highly (200)-oriented shuttle-like nano-/micro-rods were successfully fabricated on glass substrates by the environment friendly ionothermal method at 140 °C in deep eutectic solvent (DES). The as-prepared products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) and photoluminescence (PL) spectra, respectively. The possible mechanism of the oriented growth of PbS nano-/micro-rods was discussed. The PbS thin films composed of shuttle-like nano-/micro-rods exhibited a large absorbance property in the wavelength range of 350-1100 nm, and moreover, the PL spectrum had a broad emission band centered at 490 nm. The shuttle-like PbS nano-/micro-rods-based thin films might have potential application in solar cells.

  4. Microwave heating synthesis and formation mechanism of chalcopyrite structured CuInS{sub 2} nanorods in deep eutectic solvent

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jianjun Chen, Jun; Li, Qiang

    2015-03-15

    Graphical abstract: Chalcopyrite structured CuInS{sub 2} nanorods were synthesized by an environmentally friendly microwave heating method in deep eutectic solvent. Results show that microwave heating time plays an important role in the formation of CuInS{sub 2} nanostructure phase. The SEM results indicated that the obtained CuInS{sub 2} nanostructures display rod-like morphology with diameters of about 40 nm and lengths of about 400 nm. The UV–vis spectrum results indicated that the CuInS{sub 2} nanorods exhibit strong absorption from the entire visible light region to the near-infrared region beyond 1100 nm. The possible growth mechanism of CuInS{sub 2} nanorods was discussed. - Abstract: Chalcopyrite structured CuInS{sub 2} nanorods were synthesized by an environmentally friendly microwave heating method in deep eutectic solvent. The as-synthesized CuInS{sub 2} nanorods were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), respectively. The results indicated that the obtained CuInS{sub 2} nanostructures display rod-like morphology with diameters of about 40 nm and lengths of about 400 nm. The influences of microwave heating time on the formation of CuInS{sub 2} phase were discussed. Ultraviolet–visible (UV–vis) and photoluminescence (PL) spectra were utilized to investigate the optical properties of CuInS{sub 2} nanorods. The results showed that the as-synthesized CuInS{sub 2} nanorods exhibit strong absorption from the entire visible light region to the near-infrared region beyond 1100 nm. PL spectrum of the as-synthesized CuInS{sub 2} nanorods displays an emission peak centered at 580 nm under excitation wavelength of 366 nm at room temperature. The possible growth mechanism of CuInS{sub 2} nanorods was discussed.

  5. Evaluation of alcohol-based deep eutectic solvent in extraction and determination of flavonoids with response surface methodology optimization.

    PubMed

    Bi, Wentao; Tian, Minglei; Row, Kyung Ho

    2013-04-12

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) are emerging rapidly as a new type of green solvent instead of an ionic liquid (IL), and are typically formed by mixing choline chloride with hydrogen bond donors. Few studies have applied DESs to the extraction and determination of bioactive compounds. Therefore, in the present study, DESs were used to extract flavonoids (myricetin and amentoflavone), which are well known and widely used antioxidants, to extend their applications. A range of alcohol-based DESs with different alcohols to choline chloride (ChCl) mixing ratios were used for extraction using several extraction methods. Other factors, such as temperature, time, water addition and solid/liquid ratio, were examined systematically using a response surface methodology (RSM). A total of 0.031 and 0.518 mg g(-1) of myricetin and amentoflavone were extracted under the optimized conditions: 35 vol% of water in ChCl/1,4-butanediol (1/5) at 70.0 °C for 40.0 min and a solid/liquid ratio of 1/1 (g 10 mL(-1)). Good linearity was obtained from 0.1 × 10(-3) to 0.1 mg mL(-1) (r(2)>0.999). The excellent properties of DESs highlight their potential as promising green solvents for the extraction and determination of a range of bioactive compounds or drugs. PMID:23481471

  6. Lipase-catalyzed (trans)esterification of 5-hydroxy- methylfurfural and separation from HMF esters using deep-eutectic solvents.

    PubMed

    Krystof, Monika; Pérez-Sánchez, María; Domínguez de María, Pablo

    2013-04-01

    5-Hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) is a valuable biomass-derived building block. Among possible HMF valorization products, a broad range of HMF esters can be synthesized. These HMF esters have found some promising applications, such as monomers, fuels, additives, surfactants, and fungicides, and thus several catalytic approaches for HMF (trans)esterifications have been reported. The intrinsic reactivity of HMF is challenging, forcing the use of mild reaction conditions to avoid by-product formation. This paper explores the lipase-catalyzed (trans)esterification of HMF with different acyl donors (carboxylic acids and methyl- and ethyl esters) mostly in solvent-free conditions. The results demonstrate that lipases may be promising alternatives for the synthesis of HMF esters-with high productivities and reactions at high substrate loadings-provided that robust systems for lipase immobilization are applied to assure an adequate reusability of the enzymes. Once (trans)esterifications have been conducted, the separation of unreacted HMF and HMF esters is performed by using deep-eutectic solvents (DES) as separation agents. DES are able to dissolve hydrogen-bond donors (e.g., HMF), whereas non-hydrogen-bond donors (in this case HMF esters) form a second phase. By using this approach, high ester purities (>99 %) and efficiencies (up to >90 % HMF ester recovery) in separations were obtained by using choline chloride-based DES. PMID:23456887

  7. Application of natural deep eutectic solvents to the extraction of anthocyanins from Catharanthus roseus with high extractability and stability replacing conventional organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yuntao; Rozema, Evelien; Verpoorte, Robert; Choi, Young Hae

    2016-02-19

    Natural deep eutectic solvents (NADES) have attracted a great deal of attention in recent times as promising green media. They are generally composed of neutral, acidic or basic compounds that form liquids of high viscosity when mixed in certain molar ratio. Despite their potential, viscosity and acid or basic nature of some ingredients may affect the extraction capacity and stabilizing ability of the target compounds. To investigate these effects, extraction with a series of NADES was employed for the analysis of anthocyanins in flower petals of Catharanthus roseus in combination with HPLC-DAD-based metabolic profiling. Along with the extraction yields of anthocyanins their stability in NADES was also studied. Multivariate data analysis indicates that the lactic acid-glucose (LGH), and 1,2-propanediol-choline chloride (PCH) NADES present a similar extraction power for anthocyanins as conventional organic solvents. Furthermore, among the NADES employed, LGH exhibits an at least three times higher stabilizing capacity for cyanidins than acidified ethanol, which facilitates their extraction and analysis process. Comparing NADES to the conventional organic solvents, in addition to their reduced environmental impact, they proved to provide higher stability for anthocyanins, and therefore have a great potential as possible alternatives to those organic solvents in health related areas such as food, pharmaceuticals and cosmetics. PMID:26822320

  8. Molecularly imprinted polymers combination with deep eutectic solvents for solid-phase extraction of caffeic acid from hawthorn.

    PubMed

    Li, Guizhen; Tang, Weiyang; Cao, Weimin; Wang, Qian; Zhu, Tao

    2015-08-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) with caffeic acid as template and non-imprinted polymers (NIPs) materials were prepared in the same procedure. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and adsorption capacity test were used to evaluate characteristic of the new materials. MIPs, NIPs and C18 were used for rapid purification of caffeic acid from hawthorn with solid-phase extraction ( SPE) , and extract yields of caffeic acid with the proposed materials were 3.46 µg/g, 1.01 µg/g and 1.17 µg/g, respectively. To optimize the MIPs-SPE procedures, different kinds of elution solutions were studied. Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) were prepared by choline chloride (ChCl)-glycerol (1/2, n/n) and choline chloride-urea (1/ 2, n/n). Methanol was mixed with the two kinds of DESs (glycerol-based DESs, urea-based DESs) in different ratios (0.5:1, 1:1, 2:1, 3:1, 4:1, 5:1, v/v), and they were used to investigated as elution solutions in the above MIPs-SPE procedures. The results showed that MIPs were potential SPE materials, and methanol/ glycerol-based DESs (3 :1, v/v) had the best elution capability with the recovery of 82.32%. PMID:26749853

  9. The Effect of Temperature on Kinetics and Diffusion Coefficients of Metallocene Derivatives in Polyol-Based Deep Eutectic Solvents.

    PubMed

    Bahadori, Laleh; Chakrabarti, Mohammed Harun; Manan, Ninie Suhana Abdul; Hashim, Mohd Ali; Mjalli, Farouq Sabri; AlNashef, Inas Muen; Brandon, Nigel

    2015-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the density, dynamic viscosity and ionic conductivity of several deep eutectic solvents (DESs) containing ammonium-based salts and hydrogen bond donvnors (polyol type) are investigated. The temperature-dependent electrolyte viscosity as a function of molar conductivity is correlated by means of Walden's rule. The oxidation of ferrocene (Fc/Fc+) and reduction of cobaltocenium (Cc+/Cc) at different temperatures are studied by cyclic voltammetry and potential-step chronoamperometry in DESs. For most DESs, chronoamperometric transients are demonstrated to fit an Arrhenius-type relation to give activation energies for the diffusion of redox couples at different temperatures. The temperature dependence of the measured conductivities of DES1 and DES2 are better correlated with the Vogel-Tamman-Fulcher equation. The kinetics of the Fc/Fc+ and Cc+/Cc electrochemical systems have been investigated over a temperature range from 298 to 338 K. The heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant is then calculated at different temperatures by means of a logarithmic analysis. The glycerol-based DES (DES5) appears suitable for further testing in electrochemical energy storage devices. PMID:26642045

  10. Electro-codeposition of Ni-SiO2 nanocomposite coatings from deep eutectic solvent with improved corrosion resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ruiqian; Hou, Yuanyuan; Liang, Jun

    2016-03-01

    Electro-codeposition of nano-sized SiO2 particles into the metal matrix in aqueous solution is generally difficult. In this paper, the nano-sized SiO2 particles were successfully codeposited in the Ni matrix from a choline chloride (ChCl)/ethylene glycol (EG) based deep eutectic solvent (DES) by pulse electro-codeposition. The effects of nano-sized SiO2 particles on electrochemical behaviour of Ni(II) were investigated. The microstructure, composition and corrosion resistance of pure Ni and Ni-SiO2 nanocomposite coatings were explored. Results showed that the SiO2 nanoparticles exhibited excellent dispersion stability in ChCl:2EG DES without any stabilizing additives and the presence of SiO2 nanoparticles have significant effects on the nucleation mechanism of Ni. The maximum content of SiO2 nanoparticles in composite coatings can achieve 4.69 wt.%, which closes to the level of co-deposition micro-sized SiO2 particles from aqueous solution. The Ni-SiO2 nanocomposite coatings exhibit much better corrosion resistance than pure Ni coating, and the corrosion resistance performance increases with increasing SiO2 content in the composite coatings.

  11. The Effect of Temperature on Kinetics and Diffusion Coefficients of Metallocene Derivatives in Polyol-Based Deep Eutectic Solvents

    PubMed Central

    Bahadori, Laleh; Chakrabarti, Mohammed Harun; Manan, Ninie Suhana Abdul; Hashim, Mohd Ali; Mjalli, Farouq Sabri; AlNashef, Inas Muen; Brandon, Nigel

    2015-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the density, dynamic viscosity and ionic conductivity of several deep eutectic solvents (DESs) containing ammonium-based salts and hydrogen bond donvnors (polyol type) are investigated. The temperature-dependent electrolyte viscosity as a function of molar conductivity is correlated by means of Walden’s rule. The oxidation of ferrocene (Fc/Fc+) and reduction of cobaltocenium (Cc+/Cc) at different temperatures are studied by cyclic voltammetry and potential-step chronoamperometry in DESs. For most DESs, chronoamperometric transients are demonstrated to fit an Arrhenius-type relation to give activation energies for the diffusion of redox couples at different temperatures. The temperature dependence of the measured conductivities of DES1 and DES2 are better correlated with the Vogel-Tamman-Fulcher equation. The kinetics of the Fc/Fc+ and Cc+/Cc electrochemical systems have been investigated over a temperature range from 298 to 338 K. The heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant is then calculated at different temperatures by means of a logarithmic analysis. The glycerol-based DES (DES5) appears suitable for further testing in electrochemical energy storage devices. PMID:26642045

  12. Dynamic Solvent Control of a Reaction in Ionic Deep Eutectic Solvents: Time-Resolved Fluorescence Measurements of Reactive and Nonreactive Dynamics in (Choline Chloride + Urea) Melts.

    PubMed

    Das, Anuradha; Biswas, Ranjit

    2015-08-01

    Dynamic fluorescence anisotropy and Stokes shift measurements of [f choline chloride + (1 - f) urea)] deep eutectic solvents at f = 0.33 and 0.40 have been carried out using a dipolar solute, coumarin 153 (C153), in the temperature range 298 ? T ? 333 K. Subsequently, measured time-dependent solvent response is utilized to investigate the dynamic solvent control on the measured rates of photoexcited intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) reactions of two molecules, 4-(1-azetidinyl)benzonitrile (P4C) and 4-(1-pyrrolidinyl)benzonitrile (P5C), occurring in these media. Measured average reaction time scales (??(rxn)?) exhibit the following dependence on average solvation times scales (??(s)?): ??(rxn)? ? ??(s)?(?) with ? = 0.5 and 0.35 for P4C and P5C, respectively. Such a strong dynamic solvent control of ??(rxn)?, particularly for P4C, is different from earlier observations with these ICT molecules in conventional molecular solvents. Excitation wavelength-dependent fluorescence emissions of C153 and trans-2-[4-(dimethylamino)styryl]-benzothiazole (DMASBT), which differ widely in average fluorescence lifetimes (??(life)?), suggest the presence of substantial spatial heterogeneity in these systems. Dynamic heterogeneity is reflected via the following fractional viscosity (?) dependences of ??(s)? and ??(r)? (??(r)? being solute's average rotation time): ??x? ? (?/T)(p) with 0.7 ? p ? 0.9. Different correlations between ??(s)? and ??(r)? emerge at different temperature regimes, indicating variable frictional coupling at low and high temperatures. Estimated dynamic Stokes shifts in these media vary between ?1200 and ?1600 cm(-1), more than 50% of which possess a time scale much faster than the temporal resolution (?75 ps) employed in these measurements. Estimated activation energy for ? is closer to that for ??(r)? than that for ??(s)?, suggesting ??(s)? being more decoupled from ? than ??(r)?. PMID:26159658

  13. Deep eutectic solvent (DES) as a pretreatment for oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFB) in production of sugar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nor, Nur Atikah Md; Mustapha, Wan Aida Wan; Hassan, Osman

    2015-09-01

    Oil Palm Empty Fruit Bunch (OPEFB) was pretreated using Deep Eutectic Solvent (DES) at different parameters to enable a highest yield of sugar. DES is a combination of two or more cheap and safe components to form a eutectic mixture through hydrogen bond interaction, which has a melting point lower than that of each component. DES can be used to replace ionic liquids (ILs), which are more expensive and toxic. In this study, OPEFB was pretreated with DES mixture of choline chloride: urea in 1:2 molar ratio. The pretreatment was performed at temperature 110°C and 80°C for 4 hours and 1 hour. Pretreatment A (110°C, 4 hours), B (110°C, 1 hour), C (80°C, 4 hours) and D (80°C, 1 hour). Enzymatic hydrolysis was done by using the combination of two enzymes, namely, Cellic Ctec2 and Cellic Htec2. The treated fiber is tested for crystallinity using XRD and functional group analysis using FTIR, to check the effect of the pretreatment on the fiber and compared it with the untreated fiber. From XRD analysis, DES successfully gave an effect towards degree of crystallinity of cellulose. Pretreatment A (110°C, 4 hours) and B (110°C, 1 hour) successfully reduce the percentage of crystallinity while pretreatment C (80°C, 4 hours) and D (80°C, 1 hour) increased the percentage of crystallinity. From FTIR analysis, DES cannot remove the functional group of lignin and hemicellulose but it is believed that DES can expose the structure of cellulose. Upon enzymatic hydrolysis, DES-treated fiber successfully produced sugar but not significantly when compared with raw. Pretreatment A (110°C, 4 hours), B (110°C, 1 hour), C (80°C, 4 hours) and D (80°C, 1 hour) produced glucose at the amount of 60.47 mg/ml, 66.33 mg/ml, 61.96 mg/ml and 59.12 mg/ml respectively. However, pretreatment C gave the highest xylose (70.01 mg/ml) production compared to other DES pretreatments.

  14. Electrochemistry and speciation of Au(+) in a deep eutectic solvent: growth and morphology of galvanic immersion coatings.

    PubMed

    Ballantyne, Andrew D; Forrest, Gregory C H; Frisch, Gero; Hartley, Jennifer M; Ryder, Karl S

    2015-11-11

    In this study we compare the electrochemical and structural properties of three gold salts AuCl, AuCN and KAu(CN)2 in a Deep Eutectic Solvent (DES) electrolyte (Ethaline 200) in order to elucidate factors affecting the galvanic deposition of gold coatings on nickel substrates. A chemically reversible diffusion limited response was observed for AuCl, whereas AuCN and KAu(CN)2 showed much more complicated, kinetically limited responses. Galvanic exchange reactions were performed on nickel substrates from DES solutions of the three gold salts; the AuCN gave a bright gold coating, the KAu(CN)2 solution give a visibly thin coating, whilst the coating from AuCl was dull, friable and poorly adhesive. This behaviour was rationalised by the differing speciation for each of these compounds, as evidenced by EXAFS methods. Analysis of EXAFS data shows that AuCl forms the chlorido-complex [AuCl2](-), AuCN forms a mixed [AuCl(CN)](-) species, whereas KAu(CN)2 maintains its [Au(CN)2](-) structure. The more labile Cl(-) enables easier reduction of Au when compared to the tightly bound cyanide species, hence leading to slower kinetics of deposition and differing electrochemical behaviour. We conclude that metal speciation in DESs is a function of the initial metal salt and that this has a strong influence on the mechanism and rate of growth, as well as on the morphology of the metal deposit obtained. In addition, these coatings are also extremely promising from a technological perspective as Electroless Nickel Immersion Gold (ENIG) finishes in the printed circuit board (PCB) industry, where the elimination of acid in gold plating formulation could potentially lead to more reliable coatings. Consequently, these results are both significant and timely. PMID:26523806

  15. Molecular and ionic diffusion in aqueous - deep eutectic solvent mixtures: probing inter-molecular interactions using PFG NMR.

    PubMed

    D'Agostino, Carmine; Gladden, Lynn F; Mantle, Mick D; Abbott, Andrew P; Ahmed, Essa I; Al-Murshedi, Azhar Y M; Harris, Robert C

    2015-06-21

    Pulsed field gradient (PFG) NMR has been used to probe self-diffusion of molecular and ionic species in aqueous mixtures of choline chloride (ChCl) based deep eutectic solvents (DESs), in order to elucidate the effect of water on motion and inter-molecular interactions between the different species in the mixtures, namely the Ch(+) cation and hydrogen bond donor (HBD). The results reveal an interesting and complex behaviour of such mixtures at a molecular level. In general, it is observed that the hydroxyl protons ((1)H) of Ch(+) and the hydrogen bond donor have diffusion coefficients significantly different from those measured for their parent molecules when water is added. This indicates a clear and significant change in inter-molecular interactions. In aqueous Ethaline, the hydroxyl species of Ch(+) and HBD show a stronger interaction with water as water is added to the system. In the case of Glyceline, water has little effect on both hydroxyl proton diffusion of Ch(+) and HBD. In Reline, it is likely that water allows the formation of small amounts of ammonium hydroxide. The most surprising observation is from the self-diffusion of water, which is considerably higher that expected from a homogeneous liquid. This leads to the conclusion that Reline and Glyceline form mixtures that are inhomogeneous at a microscopic level despite the hydrophilicity of the salt and HBD. This work shows that PFG NMR is a powerful tool to elucidate both molecular dynamics and inter-molecular interactions in complex liquid mixtures, such as the aqueous DES mixtures. PMID:25994171

  16. Magnetic graphene oxide modified with choline chloride-based deep eutectic solvent for the solid-phase extraction of protein.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanhua; Wang, Yuzhi; Pan, Qi; Wang, Ying; Ding, Xueqin; Xu, Kaijia; Li, Na; Wen, Qian

    2015-06-01

    Four kinds of green deep eutectic solvents (DESs) based on choline chloride (ChCl) have been synthesized and coated on the surface of magnetic graphene oxide (Fe3O4@GO) to form Fe3O4@GO-DES for the magnetic solid-phase extraction of protein. X-ray diffraction (XRD), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) were employed to characterize Fe3O4@GO-DES, and the results indicated the successful preparation of Fe3O4@GO-DES. The UV-vis spectrophotometer was used to measure the concentration of protein after extraction. Single factor experiments proved that the extraction amount was influenced by the types of DESs, solution temperature, solution ionic strength, extraction time, protein concentration and the amount of Fe3O4@GO-DES. Comparison of Fe3O4@GO and Fe3O4@GO-DES was carried out by extracting bovine serum albumin, ovalbumin, bovine hemoglobin and lysozyme. The experimental results showed that the proposed Fe3O4@GO-DES performs better than Fe3O4@GO in the extraction of acidic protein. Desorption of protein was carried out by eluting the solid extractant with 0.005 mol L(-1) Na2HPO4 contained 1 mol L(-1) NaCl. The obtained elution efficiency was about 90.9%. Attributed to the convenient magnetic separation, the solid extractant could be easily recycled. PMID:26002214

  17. Preparation of porous lead from shape-controlled PbO bulk by in situ electrochemical reduction in ChCl-EG deep eutectic solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ru, Juanjian; Hua, Yixin; Xu, Cunying; Li, Jian; Li, Yan; Wang, Ding; Zhou, Zhongren; Gong, Kai

    2015-12-01

    Porous lead with different shapes was firstly prepared from controlled geometries of solid PbO bulk by in situ electrochemical reduction in choline chloride-ethylene glycol deep eutectic solvents at cell voltage 2.5 V and 353 K. The electrochemical behavior of PbO powders on cavity microelectrode was investigated by cyclic voltammetry. It is indicated that solid PbO can be directly reduced to metal in the solvent and a nucleation loop is apparent. Constant voltage electrolysis demonstrates that PbO pellet can be completely converted to metal for 13 h, and the current efficiency and specific energy consumption are about 87.79% and 736.82 kWh t-1, respectively. With the electro-deoxidation progress on the pellet surface, the reduction rate reaches the fastest and decreases along the distance from surface to inner center. The morphologies of metallic products are porous and mainly consisted of uniform particles which connect with each other by finer strip-shaped grains to remain the geometry and macro size constant perfectly. In addition, an empirical model of the electro-deoxidation process from spherical PbO bulk to porous lead is also proposed. These findings provide a novel and simple route for the preparation of porous metals from oxide precursors in deep eutectic solvents at room temperature.

  18. Preparation of a nitro-substituted tris(indolyl)methane modified silica in deep eutectic solvents for solid-phase extraction of organic acids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Na; Wang, Jiamin; Liao, Yuan; Shao, Shijun

    2016-05-01

    A new sorbent for solid-phase extraction was synthesized by chemical immobilization of nitro-substituted tris(indolyl)methane on silica in new and green deep eutectic solvents. Elemental analysis results indicated that deep eutectic solvents could be an alternative to the traditional solvents in preparing nitro-substituted tris(indolyl)methane modified silica. Coupled with high performance liquid chromatography, the extraction performance of the sorbent was evaluated by using four organic acids as model analytes. The rebinding experiments results showed that the nitro-substituted tris(indolyl)methane modified silica sorbent had a good adsorption capacity towards the selected organic acids. Under the appropriate experimental conditions, good precision and wide linear ranges with coefficient of determination (R(2)) of higher than 0.9957 were obtained, and the limits of detection were in the range of 0.50-2.0μgL(-1) for the organic acids tested. The developed solid-phase extraction-high performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection (SPE-HPLC-DAD) method was successfully applied for the determination of organic acids in two drinking samples with recoveries ranging from 76.7% to 110.0% and 67.7% to 104.0% for all the selected organic acids, respectively. PMID:26946003

  19. Density relaxation and particle motion characteristics in a non-ionic deep eutectic solvent (acetamide + urea): Time-resolved fluorescence measurements and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Anuradha; Das, Suman; Biswas, Ranjit

    2015-01-21

    Temperature dependent relaxation dynamics, particle motion characteristics, and heterogeneity aspects of deep eutectic solvents (DESs) made of acetamide (CH{sub 3}CONH{sub 2}) and urea (NH{sub 2}CONH{sub 2}) have been investigated by employing time-resolved fluorescence measurements and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. Three different compositions (f) for the mixture [fCH{sub 3}CONH{sub 2} + (1 − f)NH{sub 2}CONH{sub 2}] have been studied in a temperature range of 328-353 K which is ∼120-145 K above the measured glass transition temperatures (∼207 K) of these DESs but much lower than the individual melting temperature of either of the constituents. Steady state fluorescence emission measurements using probe solutes with sharply different lifetimes do not indicate any dependence on excitation wavelength in these metastable molten systems. Time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy measurements reveal near-hydrodynamic coupling between medium viscosity and rotation of a dissolved dipolar solute. Stokes shift dynamics have been found to be too fast to be detected by the time-resolution (∼70 ps) employed, suggesting extremely rapid medium polarization relaxation. All-atom simulations reveal Gaussian distribution for particle displacements and van Hove correlations, and significant overlap between non-Gaussian (α{sub 2}) and new non-Gaussian (γ) heterogeneity parameters. In addition, no stretched exponential relaxations have been detected in the simulated wavenumber dependent acetamide dynamic structure factors. All these results are in sharp contrast to earlier observations for ionic deep eutectics with acetamide [Guchhait et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 104514 (2014)] and suggest a fundamental difference in interaction and dynamics between ionic and non-ionic deep eutectic solvent systems.

  20. Density relaxation and particle motion characteristics in a non-ionic deep eutectic solvent (acetamide + urea): time-resolved fluorescence measurements and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Das, Anuradha; Das, Suman; Biswas, Ranjit

    2015-01-21

    Temperature dependent relaxation dynamics, particle motion characteristics, and heterogeneity aspects of deep eutectic solvents (DESs) made of acetamide (CH3CONH2) and urea (NH2CONH2) have been investigated by employing time-resolved fluorescence measurements and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. Three different compositions (f) for the mixture [fCH3CONH2 + (1 - f)NH2CONH2] have been studied in a temperature range of 328-353 K which is ∼120-145 K above the measured glass transition temperatures (∼207 K) of these DESs but much lower than the individual melting temperature of either of the constituents. Steady state fluorescence emission measurements using probe solutes with sharply different lifetimes do not indicate any dependence on excitation wavelength in these metastable molten systems. Time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy measurements reveal near-hydrodynamic coupling between medium viscosity and rotation of a dissolved dipolar solute. Stokes shift dynamics have been found to be too fast to be detected by the time-resolution (∼70 ps) employed, suggesting extremely rapid medium polarization relaxation. All-atom simulations reveal Gaussian distribution for particle displacements and van Hove correlations, and significant overlap between non-Gaussian (α2) and new non-Gaussian (γ) heterogeneity parameters. In addition, no stretched exponential relaxations have been detected in the simulated wavenumber dependent acetamide dynamic structure factors. All these results are in sharp contrast to earlier observations for ionic deep eutectics with acetamide [Guchhait et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 104514 (2014)] and suggest a fundamental difference in interaction and dynamics between ionic and non-ionic deep eutectic solvent systems. PMID:25612718

  1. A detailed study of cholinium chloride and levulinic acid deep eutectic solvent system for CO2 capture via experimental and molecular simulation approaches.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Ruh; Atilhan, Mert; Anaya, Baraa; Khraisheh, Majeda; Garca, Gregorio; ElKhattat, Ahmed; Tariq, Mohammad; Aparicio, Santiago

    2015-08-28

    Choline chloride + levulinic acid deep eutectic solvent is studied as a suitable material for CO2 capturing purposes. The most relevant physicochemical properties of this solvent are reported together with the CO2 solubility as a function of temperature. The corrosivity of this solvent is studied showing better performance than amine-based solvents. A theoretical study using both density functional theory and molecular dynamics approaches is carried out to analyze the properties of this fluid from the nanoscopic viewpoint, and their relationship with the macroscopic behavior of the system and its ability for CO2 capturing. The behavior of the liquid-gas interface is also studied and its role on the CO2 absorption mechanism is analyzed. The reported combined experimental and theoretical approach leads to a complete picture of the behavior of this new sorbent with regard to CO2, which together with its low cost, and the suitable environmental and toxicological properties of this solvent, lead to a promising candidate for CO2 capturing technological applications. PMID:26214080

  2. Separation of the isomers of benzene poly(carboxylic acid)s by quaternary ammonium salt via formation of deep eutectic solvents.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yucui; Li, Jian; Ren, Shuhang; Niu, Muge; Wu, Weize

    2014-11-26

    Because of similar properties and very low volatility, isomers of benzene poly(carboxylic acid)s (BPCAs) are very difficult to separate. In this work, we found that isomers of BPCAs could be separated efficiently by quaternary ammonium salts (QASs) via formation of deep eutectic solvents (DESs). Three kinds of QASs were used to separate the isomers of BPCAs, including the isomers of benzene tricarboxylic acids (trimellitic acid, trimesic acid, and hemimellitic acid) and the isomers of benzene dicarboxylic acids (phthalic acid and isophthalic acid). Among the QASs, tetraethylammonium chloride was found to have the best performance, which could completely separate BPCA isomers in methyl ethyl ketone solutions. It was found that the hydrogen bond forming between QAS and BPCA results in the selective separation of BPCA isomers. QAS in DES was regenerated effectively by the antisolvent method, and the regenerated QAS was reused four times with the same high efficiency. PMID:25351281

  3. Electrochemical synthesis of copper nanoparticles using cuprous oxide as a precursor in choline chloride-urea deep eutectic solvent: nucleation and growth mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Q B; Hua, Y X

    2014-12-28

    The electrochemical nucleation and growth kinetics of copper nanoparticles on a Ni electrode have been studied with cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry in the choline chloride (ChCl)-urea based deep eutectic solvent (DES). The copper source was introduced into the solvent by the dissolution of Cu(I) oxide (Cu2O). Cyclic voltammetry indicates that the electroreduction of Cu(I) species in the DES is a diffusion-controlled quasi-reversible process. The analysis of the chronoamperometric transient behavior during electrodeposition suggests that the deposition of copper on the Ni electrode at low temperatures follows a progressive nucleation and three-dimensional growth controlled by diffusion. The effect of temperature on the diffusion coefficient of Cu(I) species that is present in the solvent and electron transfer rate constant obeys the Arrhenius law, according to which the activation energies are estimated to be 49.20 and 21.72 kJ mol(-1), respectively. The initial stage of morphological study demonstrates that both electrode potential and temperature play important roles in controlling the nucleation and growth kinetics of the nanocrystals during the electrodeposition process. Electrode potential is observed to affect mainly the nucleation process, whereas temperature makes a major contribution to the growth process. PMID:25387166

  4. Part I: Virtual laboratory versus traditional laboratory: Which is more effective for teaching electrochemistry? Part II: The green synthesis of aurones using a deep eutectic solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, Ian C.

    The role of the teaching laboratory in science education has been debated over the last century. The goals and purposes of the laboratory are still debated and while most science educators consider laboratory a vital part of the education process, they differ widely on the purposes for laboratory and what methods should be used to teach laboratory. One method of instruction, virtual labs, has become popular among some as a possible way of capitalizing on the benefits of lab in a less costly and more time flexible format. The research regarding the use of virtual labs is limited and the few studies that have been done on General Chemistry labs do not use the virtual labs as a substitute for hands-on experiences, but rather as a supplement to a traditional laboratory program. This research seeks to determine the possible viability of a virtual simulation to replace a traditional hands-on electrochemistry lab in the General Chemistry II course sequence. The data indicate that for both content knowledge and the development of hands-on skills the virtual lab showed no significant difference in overall scores on the assessments, but that an individual item related to the physical set-up of a battery showed better scores for the hands-on labs over the virtual labs. Further research should be done to determine if these results are similar in other settings with the use of different virtual labs and how the virtual labs compare to other laboratories using different learning styles and learning goals. One often cited purpose of laboratory experiences in the context of preparing chemists is to simulate the experiences common in chemical research so graduate experience in a research laboratory was a necessary part of my education in the field of laboratory instruction. This research experience provided me the opportunity, to complete an organic synthesis of aurones using a deep eutectic solvent. These solvents show unique properties that make them a viable alternative to ionic liquids. Aurones are a unique biological product in many plants and preliminary research has shown that these chemicals could be viable drug candidates. The use of the deep eutectic solvent provides a green and inexpensive way to make large numbers of different aurones quickly. In this dissertation, we show the synthesis of 12 different aurones using this method.

  5. Ionothermal synthesis of two oxalate-bridged lanthanide(III) chains with slow magnetization relaxation by using a deep eutectic solvent.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yan; Liu, Jun-Liang; Zhang, Ze-Min; Lin, Wei-Quan; Lin, Zhuo-Jia; Tong, Ming-Liang

    2013-09-28

    Two novel isostructural oxalate-bridged lanthanide(III) chains, (choline)[Ln(ox)(H2O)3Cl]Cl·H2O (Ln = Dy/Er), were first obtained ionothermally by using a choline chloride-oxalic acid eutectic mixture as both solvent and structure-directing agent, both of which show field-induced slow relaxation of magnetization. PMID:23903323

  6. Glass transition dynamics and conductivity scaling in ionic deep eutectic solvents: The case of (acetamide + lithium nitrate/sodium thiocyanate) melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathy, Satya N.; Wojnarowska, Zaneta; Knapik, Justyna; Shirota, Hideaki; Biswas, Ranjit; Paluch, Marian

    2015-05-01

    A detailed investigation on the molecular dynamics of ionic deep eutectic solvents (acetamide + lithium nitrate/sodium thiocyanate) is reported. The study was carried out employing dielectric relaxation spectroscopy covering seven decades in frequency (10-1-106 Hz) and in a wide temperature range from 373 K down to 173 K, accessing the dynamic observables both in liquid and glassy state. The dielectric response of the ionic system has been presented in the dynamic window of modulus formalism to understand the conductivity relaxation and its possible connection to the origin of localized motion. Two secondary relaxation processes appear below glass transition temperature. Our findings provide suitable interpretation on the nature of secondary Johari-Goldstein process describing the ion translation and orientation of dipoles in a combined approach using Ngai's coupling model. A nearly constant loss feature is witnessed at shorter times/lower temperatures. We also discuss the ac conductivity scaling behavior using Summerfield approach and random free energy barrier model which establish the time-temperature superposition principle. These experimental observations have fundamental importance on theoretical elucidation of the conductivity relaxation and glass transition phenomena in molten ionic conductors.

  7. Preparation of bio-deep eutectic solvent triggered cephalopod shaped silver chloride-DNA hybrid material having antibacterial and bactericidal activity.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Jitkumar; Mondal, Dibyendu; Bhojani, Gopal; Chatterjee, Shruti; Prasad, Kamalesh

    2015-11-01

    2.5% w/w DNA (Salmon testes) was solubilized in a bio-deep eutectic solvent [(bio-DES), obtained by the complexation of choline chloride and ethylene glycol at 1:2 molar ratio] containing 1% w/w of silver chloride (AgCl) to yield a AgCl decorated DNA based hybrid material. Concentration dependent formation of AgCl crystals in the DES was observed and upon interaction with DNA it gave formation of a cephalopod shaped hybrid material. DNA was found to maintain its chemical and structural stability in the material. Further, AgCl microstructures were found to have orderly self assembled on the DNA helices indicating the electrostatic interaction between Ag(+) and phosphate side chain of DNA as a driving force for the formation of the material with ordered microstructural distribution of AgCl. Furthermore, the functionalized material exhibited excellent antibacterial and bactericidal activity against both Gram negative and Gram positive pathogenic bacteria. PMID:26249573

  8. Glass transition dynamics and conductivity scaling in ionic deep eutectic solvents: The case of (acetamide + lithium nitrate/sodium thiocyanate) melts

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathy, Satya N. Wojnarowska, Zaneta; Knapik, Justyna; Paluch, Marian; Shirota, Hideaki; Biswas, Ranjit

    2015-05-14

    A detailed investigation on the molecular dynamics of ionic deep eutectic solvents (acetamide + lithium nitrate/sodium thiocyanate) is reported. The study was carried out employing dielectric relaxation spectroscopy covering seven decades in frequency (10{sup −1}-10{sup 6} Hz) and in a wide temperature range from 373 K down to 173 K, accessing the dynamic observables both in liquid and glassy state. The dielectric response of the ionic system has been presented in the dynamic window of modulus formalism to understand the conductivity relaxation and its possible connection to the origin of localized motion. Two secondary relaxation processes appear below glass transition temperature. Our findings provide suitable interpretation on the nature of secondary Johari-Goldstein process describing the ion translation and orientation of dipoles in a combined approach using Ngai’s coupling model. A nearly constant loss feature is witnessed at shorter times/lower temperatures. We also discuss the ac conductivity scaling behavior using Summerfield approach and random free energy barrier model which establish the time-temperature superposition principle. These experimental observations have fundamental importance on theoretical elucidation of the conductivity relaxation and glass transition phenomena in molten ionic conductors.

  9. Emulsification liquid-liquid microextraction based on deep eutectic solvent: An extraction method for the determination of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and seven polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from water samples.

    PubMed

    Khezeli, Tahere; Daneshfar, Ali; Sahraei, Reza

    2015-12-18

    In this study, for the first time, a simple, inexpensive and sensitive method named emulsification liquid-liquid microextraction based on deep eutectic solvent (ELLME-DES) was used for the extraction of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene (BTE) and seven polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from water samples. In a typical experiment, 100μL of DES (as water-miscible extraction solvent) was added to 1.5mL of sample solution containing target analytes. A homogeneous solution was formed immediately. Injection of 100μL of THF (as emulsifier agent) into homogeneous solution provided a turbid state. After extraction, phase separation (aqueous phase/DES rich phase) was performed by centrifugation. DES rich phase was withdrawn by a micro-syringe and submitted to isocratic reverse-phase HPLC with UV detection. Under optimum conditions obtained by response surface methodology (RSM) and desirability function (DF), the calibration graphs were linear in the concentration range from 10 to 200μg/L for benzene, 10-400μg/L for toluene, 1-400μg/L for ethylbenzene, biphenyl, chrysene and fluorene, and 0.1-400μg/L for anthracene, benzo[a]pyrene, phenanthrene and pyrene. The coefficients of determination (r(2)) and limits of detection were 0.9924-0.9997 and 0.02-6.8μg/L, respectively. This procedure was successfully applied to the determination of target analytes in spiked water samples. The relative mean recoveries ranged from 93.1 to 103.3%. PMID:26614169

  10. Deep eutectic liquid organic salt as a new solvent for liquid-phase microextraction and its application in ligandless extraction and preconcentraion of lead and cadmium in edible oils.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Mehdi; Dadfarnia, Shayessteh; Shabani, Ali Mohammad Haji; Tamaddon, Fatemeh; Azadi, Davood

    2015-11-01

    Deep eutectic liquid organic salt was used as the solvent and a liquid phase microextraction (DES-LPME) combined with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) was developed for separation, preconcentration and determination of lead and cadmium in edible oils. A 4:1 mixture of deep eutectic solvent and 2% nitric acid (200 µL) was added to an oil sample. The mixture was vortexed and transferred into a water bath at 50 °C and stirred for 5 minutes. After the extraction was completed, the phases were separated by centrifugation, and the enriched analytes in the deep eutectic solvent phase were determined by ETAAS. Under optimized extraction conditions and for an oil sample of 28 g, enhancement factors of 198 and 195 and limits of detection (defined as 3 Sb/m) of 8 and 0. 2 ng kg(-1) were achieved for lead and cadmium respectively. The method was successfully applied to the determination of lead and cadmium in various edible oils. PMID:26452873

  11. Use of formulations based on choline chloride-malonic acid deep eutectic solvent for back end of line cleaning in integrated circuit fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taubert, Jenny

    Interconnection layers fabricated during back end of line processing in semiconductor manufacturing involve dry etching of a low-k material and deposition of copper and metal barriers to create copper/dielectric stacks. After plasma etching steps used to form the trenches and vias in the dielectric, post etch residues (PER) that consist of organic polymer, metal oxides and fluorides, form on top of copper and low-k dielectric sidewalls. Currently, most semiconductor companies use semi aqueous fluoride (SAF) based formulations containing organic solvent(s) for PER removal. Unfortunately, these formulations adversely impact the environmental health and safety (EHS) requirements of the semiconductor industry. Environmentally friendly "green" formulations, free of organic solvents, are preferred as alternatives to remove PER. In this work, a novel low temperature molten salt system, referred as deep eutectic solvent (DES) has been explored as a back end of line cleaning (BEOL) formulation. Specifically, the DES system comprised of two benign chemicals, malonic acid (MA) and choline chloride (CC), is a liquid at room temperature. In certain cases, the formulation was modified by the addition of glacial acetic acid (HAc). Using these formulations, selective removal of three types of PER generated by timed CF4/O2 etching of DUV PR films on Cu was achieved. Type I PER was mostly organic in character (fluorocarbon polymer type) and had a measured thickness of 160 nm. Type II PER was much thinner (25 nm) and consisted of a mixture of organic and inorganic compounds (copper fluorides). Further etching generated 17 nm thick Type III PER composed of copper fluorides and oxides. Experiments were also conducted on patterned structures. Cleaning was performed by immersing samples in a temperature controlled (30 or 40° C) double jacketed vessel for a time between 1 and 5 minutes. Effectiveness of cleaning was characterized using SEM, XPS and single frequency impedance measurements. Type II and III residues, which contained copper compounds were removed in CC/MA DES within five minutes through dissolution and subsequent complexation of copper by malonic acid. Removal of Type I PER required the addition of glacial acetic acid to the DES formulation. Single frequency impedance measurement appears to be a good in situ method to follow the removal of the residues. High water solubility of the components of the system in conjunction with their environmental friendly nature, make the DES an attractive alternative to SAF.

  12. Synthesis of monoclinic structured BiVO4 spindly microtubes in deep eutectic solvent and their application for dye degradation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Yu, Yaqin; Cao, Lixin; Su, Ge; Liu, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Lan; Wang, Yonggang

    2010-09-15

    Monoclinic structured spindly bismuth vanadate microtubes were fabricated on a large scale by a simple ionothermal treatment in the environment-friendly green solvent of urea/choline chloride. The as-prepared samples were characterized by XRD, SEM, TEM, IR and their photocatalytic activity was evaluated by photocatalytic decolorization of rhodamine B aqueous solution under visible-light irradiation. As-obtained BiVO(4) microtubes exhibit the spindly shape with a side length of ca. 800 nm and a wall thickness of ca. 100 nm. The opening of these microtubes presents a saw-toothed structure, which is seldom in other tube-shaped materials. The formation mechanism of the spindly microtubes is ascribed to the complex cooperation of the reaction-crystallization process controlled by BiOCl and the nucleation-growth process of nanosheets induced by solvent molecules attached on the surface of microtubes. Such spindly microtubes exhibit much higher visible-light photocatalytic activity than that of bulk BiVO(4) prepared by solid-state reaction, possibly resulting from their large surface area and improved crystallinity. PMID:20576353

  13. Dissolution of biological samples in deep eutectic solvents: an approach for extraction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons followed by liquid chromatography-fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Helalat-Nezhad, Zahra; Ghanemi, Kamal; Fallah-Mehrjardi, Mehdi

    2015-05-15

    A novel sample preparation method based on the complete dissolution of marine biological samples in choline chloride-oxalic acid (ChCl-Ox) deep eutectic solvent was developed for fast and efficient extraction of eight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) using minimum volumes of cyclohexane. The extracted PAHs were purified and then measured by high-performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence detection (HPLC-FL). The effect of key parameters on extraction recoveries and precision was investigated. At optimized conditions, the studied samples were dissolved under atmospheric pressure in ChCl-Ox (1:2) at 55°C for 30min, which is considerably lower than the temperature used in the classical and current methods. After dissolution, it took approximately 20min to quantitatively extract the PAHs from ChCl-Ox using 5mL cyclohexane. Depending on the analyte, the developed method was linear over the calibration range 1.0-250, 2.0-250, and 5.0-250ngg(-1), with r(2)>0.996. The detection limits of the method were between 0.50 and 3.08ngg(-1). The intra-day and inter-day precisions (based on the relative standard deviation, n=5) of the spiked PAHs at a concentration level of 50ngg(-1) were better than 12.6% and 13.3%, respectively. Individual PAH recoveries from spiked marine fish and macroalgae samples were in the range of 71.6% to 109.6%. For comparison, the spiked samples were also subjected to the Soxhlet extraction method. The simplicity of the procedure, high extraction efficiency, short analysis time, and use of safe and inexpensive components suggest the proposed method has a high potential for utilization in routine trace PAH analysis in biological samples. PMID:25857544

  14. Tuning the gallium content of metal precursors for Cu(In,Ga)Se2 thin film solar cells by electrodeposition from a deep eutectic solvent.

    PubMed

    Malaquias, João C; Regesch, David; Dale, Phillip J; Steichen, Marc

    2014-02-14

    Controlling the Ga incorporation of Cu-In-Ga metal precursors for Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) solar cells is one of the main challenges for low cost electrodeposition processes, mainly due to the difficulty in electrodepositing metallic Ga from aqueous electrolytes. In this work we use the deep eutectic solvent (DES) Choline Chloride : Urea (ChCl : U - 1 : 2) to efficiently codeposit In-Ga on Cu and Mo electrodes. We control the Ga/(Ga+In) (Ga/III) ratio of the films via the mass fluxes. The electrochemical behavior of ChCl : U containing GaCl3 and InCl3 is studied by rotating disk electrode cyclic voltammetry (CV) on Mo and Cu electrodes. CV revealed on both Mo and Cu electrodes that the electrochemical behavior of the ChCl : U-GaCl3-InCl3 system is the superposition of the individual In and Ga electrochemistry. On a Cu electrode the morphology, crystal structure and element distribution of the deposits were a function of the Ga/III ratio. We demonstrate the precise control of Ga incorporation over a large composition range from 0.1 ≤ Ga/III ≤ 0.9 and proved that ED from DES is a straightforward, robust and efficient process. First solar cells based on Mo/Cu/In-Ga metal stacks achieved efficiencies as high as 7.9% with a Voc of 520 mV. PMID:24382400

  15. Dielectric Relaxations of (Acetamide + Electrolyte) Deep Eutectic Solvents in the Frequency Window, 0.2 ≤ ν/GHz ≤ 50: Anion and Cation Dependence.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Kallol; Das, Anuradha; Choudhury, Samiran; Barman, Anjan; Biswas, Ranjit

    2015-06-25

    Dielectric relaxation (DR) measurements in the frequency range 0.2 ≤ ν/GHz ≤ 50 have been carried out for neat molten acetamide and six different (acetamide + electrolyte) deep eutectic solvents (DESs) for investigating ion effects on DR dynamics in these ionic DESs. Electrolytes used are lithium salts of bromide (LiBr), nitrate (LiNO3), and perchlorate (LiClO4); sodium salts of perchlorate (NaClO4) and thiocyante (NaSCN); and potassium thiocyanate (KSCN). With these electrolytes acetamide forms DESs approximately at an 80:20 mol ratio. Simultaneous fits to the measured permittivity (ε′) and loss (ε″) spectra of these DESs at ∼293 K require a sum of four Debye (4-D) processes with relaxation times spread over picosecond to nanosecond regime. In contrast, DR spectra for neat molten acetamide (∼354 K) depict 2-D relaxation with time constants ∼50 ps and ∼5 ps. For both the neat and ionic systems, the undetected dispersion, ε∞ – n(D)2, remains to be ∼3–4. Upon comparison, measured DR dynamics reveal pronounced anion and cation effects. Estimated static dielectric constants (ε0) from fits for these DESs cover the range 12 < ε0 < 30 and are remarkably lower than that (ε0 ∼ 64) measured for molten acetamide at ∼354 K. Hydrodynamic effective rotation volumes (Veff) estimated from the slowest DR relaxation time constants vary with ion identity and are much smaller than the molecular volume of acetamide. This decrease of ε0 and Veff is attributed respectively to the pinning of acetamide molecules by ions and orientation jumps and undetected portion to the limited frequency coverage employed in these measurements PMID:26012789

  16. Natural deep eutectic solvent mediated pretreatment of rice straw: bioanalytical characterization of lignin extract and enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated biomass residue.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Adepu K; Parikh, Bhumika S; Pravakar, Mohanty

    2016-05-01

    The present investigation demonstrated pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass rice straw using natural deep eutectic solvents (NADESs), and separation of high-quality lignin and holocellulose in a single step. Qualitative analysis of the NADES extract showed that the extracted lignin was of high purity (>90 %), and quantitative analysis showed that nearly 60 ± 5 % (w/w) of total lignin was separated from the lignocellulosic biomass. Addition of 5.0 % (v/v) water during pretreatment significantly enhanced the total lignin extraction, and nearly 22 ± 3 % more lignin was released from the residual biomass into the NADES extract. X-ray diffraction studies of the untreated and pretreated rice straw biomass showed that the crystallinity index ratio was marginally decreased from 46.4 to 44.3 %, indicating subtle structural alterations in the crystalline and amorphous regions of the cellulosic fractions. Thermogravimetric analysis of the pretreated biomass residue revealed a slightly higher T dcp (295 °C) compared to the T dcp (285 °C) of untreated biomass. Among the tested NADES reagents, lactic acid/choline chloride at molar ratio of 5:1 extracted maximum lignin of 68 ± 4 mg g(-1) from the rice straw biomass, and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis of the residual holocellulose enriched biomass showed maximum reducing sugars of 333 ± 11 mg g(-1) with a saccharification efficiency of 36.0 ± 3.2 % in 24 h at 10 % solids loading. PMID:26032452

  17. A green ultrasonic-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction based on deep eutectic solvent for the HPLC-UV determination of ferulic, caffeic and cinnamic acid from olive, almond, sesame and cinnamon oil.

    PubMed

    Khezeli, Tahere; Daneshfar, Ali; Sahraei, Reza

    2016-04-01

    A simple, inexpensive and sensitive ultrasonic-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction method based on deep eutectic solvent (UALLME-DES) was used for the extraction of three phenolic acids (ferulic, caffeic and cinnamic) from vegetable oils. In a typical experiment, deep eutectic solvent as green extraction solvent was added to n-hexane (as a typical oil medium) containing target analytes. Subsequently, the extraction was accelerated by sonication. After the extraction, phase separation (DES rich phase/n-hexane phase) was performed by centrifugation. DES rich phase (lower phase) was withdrawn by a micro-syringe and submitted to isocratic reverse-phase HPLC with UV detection. Under optimum conditions obtained by response surface methodology (RSM) and desirability function (DF), the method has good linear calibration ranges (between 1.30 and 1000 µg L(-1)), coefficients of determination (r(2)>0.9949) and low limits of detection (between 0.39 and 0.63 µg L(-1)). This procedure was successfully applied to the determination of target analytes in olive, almond, sesame and cinnamon oil samples. The relative mean recoveries ranged from 94.7% to 104.6%. PMID:26838445

  18. Structure Property Relationships in Imidazole-based Deep Eutectic Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terheggen, Logan; Cosby, Tyler; Sangoro, Joshua

    2015-03-01

    Deep eutectic mixtures of levulinic acid with a systematic series of imidazoles are measured by broadband dielectric spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to investigate the impact of steric interactions on charge transport and structural dynamics. An enhancement of dc conductivity is found in each of the imidazoles upon the addition of levulinic acid. However, the extent of increase is dependent upon the alkyl substitution on the imidazole ring. These results highlight the importance of molecular structure on hydrogen bonding and charge transport in deep eutectic mixtures.

  19. Ambient temperature deposition of gallium nitride/gallium oxynitride from a deep eutectic electrolyte, under potential control.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sujoy; Sampath, S

    2016-05-11

    A ternary, ionically conducting, deep eutectic solvent based on acetamide, urea and gallium nitrate is reported for the electrodeposition of gallium nitride/gallium indium nitride under ambient conditions; blue and white light emitting photoluminescent deposits are obtained under potential control. PMID:27074315

  20. Charge Transport and Structural Dynamics in Deep Eutectic Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosby, Tyler; Holt, Adam; Terheggen, Logan; Griffin, Philip; Benson, Roberto; Sangoro, Joshua

    2015-03-01

    Charge transport and structural dynamics in a series of imidazole and carboxylic acid-based deep eutectic mixtures are investigated by broadband dielectric spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, calorimetry, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. It is found that the extended hydrogen-bonded networks characteristic of imidazoles are broken down upon addition of carboxylic acids, resulting in an increase in dc conductivity of the mixtures. These results are discussed within the framework of recent theories of hydrogen bonding and proton transport.

  1. Dissolution enhancement of active pharmaceutical ingredients by therapeutic deep eutectic systems.

    PubMed

    Aroso, Ivo M; Silva, João C; Mano, Francisca; Ferreira, Ana S D; Dionísio, Madalena; Sá-Nogueira, Isabel; Barreiros, Susana; Reis, Rui L; Paiva, Alexandre; Duarte, Ana Rita C

    2016-01-01

    A therapeutic deep eutectic system (THEDES) is here defined as a deep eutectic solvent (DES) having an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) as one of the components. In this work, THEDESs are proposed as enhanced transporters and delivery vehicles for bioactive molecules. THEDESs based on choline chloride (ChCl) or menthol conjugated with three different APIs, namely acetylsalicylic acid (AA), benzoic acid (BA) and phenylacetic acid (PA), were synthesized and characterized for thermal behaviour, structural features, dissolution rate and antibacterial activity. Differential scanning calorimetry and polarized optical microscopy showed that ChCl:PA (1:1), ChCl:AA (1:1), menthol:AA (3:1), menthol:BA (3:1), menthol:PA (2:1) and menthol:PA (3:1) were liquid at room temperature. Dissolution studies in PBS led to increased dissolution rates for the APIs when in the form of THEDES, compared to the API alone. The increase in dissolution rate was particularly noticeable for menthol-based THEDES. Antibacterial activity was assessed using both Gram-positive and Gram-negative model organisms. The results show that all the THEDESs retain the antibacterial activity of the API. Overall, our results highlight the great potential of THEDES as dissolution enhancers in the development of novel and more effective drug delivery systems. PMID:26586342

  2. Charge transport and structural dynamics in carboxylic-acid-based deep eutectic mixtures.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Philip J; Cosby, Tyler; Holt, Adam P; Benson, Roberto S; Sangoro, Joshua R

    2014-08-01

    Charge transport and structural dynamics in the 1:2 mol ratio mixture of lidocaine and decanoic acid (LID-DA), a model deep eutectic mixture (DEM), have been characterized over a wide temperature range using broad-band dielectric spectroscopy and depolarized dynamic light scattering. Additionally, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements were performed to assess the degree of proton transfer between the neutral parent molecules. From our detailed analysis of the dielectric spectra, we have determined that this carboxylic-acid-based DEM is approximately 25% ionic at room temperature. Furthermore, we have found that the characteristic diffusion rate of mobile charge carriers is practically identical to the rate of structural relaxation at all measured temperatures, indicating that fast proton transport does not occur in LID-DA. Our results demonstrate that while LID-DA exhibits the thermal characteristics of a DEM, its charge transport properties resemble those of a protic ionic liquid. PMID:25025600

  3. Recycling of electric arc furnace dust through dissolution in deep eutectic ionic liquids and electrowinning.

    PubMed

    Bakkar, Ashraf

    2014-09-15

    The dust waste formed during steelmaking in electric arc furnace (EAF) is rich in ferrous and nonferrous metals. Recycling of this dust as a raw material in iron or steel-making is hazardous and therefore it is mostly dumped. This paper demonstrates recycling of EAF dust through selective dissolution of metal oxides in a deep eutectic ionic liquid. It was found that about 60% of Zn and 39% of Pb could be dissolved from the dust when stirred for 48h in 1 choline chloride:2 urea ionic liquid at 60°C. The resultant electrolyte was subsequently fed to a conventional three-electrode cell where cyclic voltammetry (CV) measurements were conducted to describe its electrochemical behavior. Two deposition peaks were determined and ascribed to deposition of zinc and lead. Static potentials were successively applied to electrowin metallic zinc. SEM/EDX investigations showed that the zinc electrowon contained remarkable contents of lead. PMID:25156719

  4. High-performance dye-sensitized solar cells based on solvent-free electrolytes produced from eutectic melts.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yu; Cao, Yiming; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Mingkui; Li, Renzhi; Wang, Peng; Zakeeruddin, Shaik M; Grätzel, Michael

    2008-08-01

    Low-cost excitonic solar cells based on organic optoelectronic materials are receiving an ever-increasing amount of attention as potential alternatives to traditional inorganic photovoltaic devices. In this rapidly developing field, the dye-sensitized solar cell (DSC) has achieved so far the highest validated efficiency of 11.1% (ref. 2) and remarkable stability. However, the cells with the best performance use volatile solvents in their electrolytes, which may be prohibitive for outdoor solar panels in view of the need for robust encapsulation. Solvent-free room-temperature ionic liquids have been pursued as an attractive solution to this dilemma, and device efficiencies of over 7% were achieved by using some low-viscosity formulations containing 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium thiocyanate, selenocyanate, tricyanomethide or tetracyanoborate. Unfortunately, apart from tetracyanoborate, all of these low-viscosity melts proved to be unstable under prolonged thermal stress and light soaking. Here, we introduce the concept of using eutectic melts to produce solvent-free liquid redox electrolytes. Using a ternary melt in conjunction with a nanocrystalline titania film and the amphiphilic heteroleptic ruthenium complex Z907Na (ref. 10) as a sensitizer, we reach excellent stability and an unprecedented efficiency of 8.2% under air-mass 1.5 global illumination. Our results are of importance to realize large-scale outdoor applications of mesoscopic DSCs. PMID:18587401

  5. Deep catalytic oxidative desulfurization (ODS) of dibenzothiophene (DBT) with oxalate-based deep eutectic solvents (DESs).

    PubMed

    Lü, Hongying; Li, Pengcheng; Deng, Changliang; Ren, Wanzhong; Wang, Shunan; Liu, Pan; Zhang, Han

    2015-07-01

    An oxalate-based DES with a tetrabutyl ammonium chloride and oxalate acid molar ratio of 1/2 (TBO1 : 2) exhibited high activity in oxidative desulfurization (ODS) of dibenzothiophene (DBT) under mild reaction conditions. It is potentially a promising and highly environmentally friendly approach for desulfurization of fuels. PMID:26051675

  6. Eutectic salt catalyzed environmentally benign and highly efficient Biginelli reaction.

    PubMed

    Azizi, Najmadin; Dezfuli, Sahar; Hahsemi, Mohmmad Mahmoodi

    2012-01-01

    A simple deep eutectic solvent based on tin (II) chloride was used as a dual catalyst and environmentally benign reaction medium for an efficient synthesis of 3,4-dihydropyrimidin-2(1H)-one derivatives, from aromatic and aliphatic aldehydes, 1,3-dicarbonyl compounds, and urea in good-to-excellent yields and short reaction time. This simple ammonium deep eutectic solvent, easily synthesized from choline chloride and tin chloride, is relatively inexpensive and recyclable, making it applicable for industrial applications. PMID:22649326

  7. Eutectic Salt Catalyzed Environmentally Benign and Highly Efficient Biginelli Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Azizi, Najmadin; Dezfuli, Sahar; Hahsemi, Mohmmad Mahmoodi

    2012-01-01

    A simple deep eutectic solvent based on tin (II) chloride was used as a dual catalyst and environmentally benign reaction medium for an efficient synthesis of 3,4-dihydropyrimidin-2(1H)-one derivatives, from aromatic and aliphatic aldehydes, 1,3-dicarbonyl compounds, and urea in good-to-excellent yields and short reaction time. This simple ammonium deep eutectic solvent, easily synthesized from choline chloride and tin chloride, is relatively inexpensive and recyclable, making it applicable for industrial applications. PMID:22649326

  8. Deep Metastable Eutectic Nanometer-Scale Particles in the MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reitmeijer, Frans J. M.; Nash, J. A., III

    2011-01-01

    Laboratory vapor phase condensation experiments systematically yield amorphous, homogeneous, nanoparticles with unique deep metastable eutectic compositions. They formed during the nucleation stage in rapidly cooling vapor systems. These nanoparticles evidence the complexity of the nucleation stage. Similar complex behavior may occur during the nucleation stage in quenched-melt laboratory experiments. Because of the bulk size of the quenched system many of such deep metastable eutectic nanodomains will anneal and adjust to local equilibrium but some will persist metastably depending on the time-temperature regime and melt/glass transformation.

  9. Combined NMR and molecular dynamics modeling study of transport properties in sulfonamide based deep eutectic lithium electrolytes: LiTFSI based binary systems.

    PubMed

    Pauric, Allen D; Halalay, Ion C; Goward, Gillian R

    2016-03-01

    The trend toward Li-ion batteries operating at increased (>4.3 V vs. Li/Li(+)) voltages requires the development of novel classes of lithium electrolytes with electrochemical stability windows exceeding those of LiPF6/carbonate electrolyte solutions. Several new classes of electrolytes have been synthesized and investigated over the past decade, in the search for LIB electrolytes with improved properties (increased hydrolytic stability, improved thermal abuse tolerance, higher oxidation voltages, etc.) compared with the present state-of-the-art LiPF6 and organic carbonates-based formulations. Among these are deep eutectic electrolytes (DEEs), which share many beneficial characteristics with ionic liquids, such as low vapor pressure and large electrochemical stability windows, with the added advantage of a significantly higher lithium transference number. The present work presents the pulsed field gradient NMR characterization of the transport properties (diffusion coefficients and cation transport numbers) of binary DEEs consisting of a sulfonamide solvent and lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide salt. Insights into the structural and dynamical properties, which enable one to rationalize the observed ionic conductivity behavior were obtained from a combination of NMR data and MD simulations. The insights thus gained should assist the formulation of novel DEEs with improved properties for LIB applications. PMID:26871506

  10. Electroplated Fe-Co-Ni films prepared from deep-eutectic-solvent-based plating baths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanai, Takeshi; Shiraishi, Kotaro; Akiyoshi, Toshiki; Azuma, Keita; Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Ohgai, Takeshi; Morimura, Takao; Nakano, Masaki; Fukunaga, Hirotoshi

    2016-05-01

    We fabricated soft magnetic films from DES-based plating baths, and investigated magnetic properties of the plated films. The plating baths were obtained by stirring the mixture of choline chloride, ethylene glycol, FeCl2 ṡ 4H2O, NiCl2 ṡ 6H2O and CoCl2 ṡ 6H2O. The composition of the electroplated film depended on the amount of the reagent in the plating bath, and we consequently obtained the films with various composition. The current efficiency of the plating process shows high values (> 88 %) in the wide composition range. The soft magnetic films with low coercivity were obtained at the Fe compositions of ≈ 30 at.% and > 80 at.%, and we found that low coercivity could be realized by the control of the film composition. We also found that the Fe-rich films prepared from DES-based plating bath have some advantages as a soft magnetic phase for a nanocomposite magnet due to their high saturation magnetization and very fine crystal structure.

  11. One-step fabrication of nanostructured Ni film with lotus effect from deep eutectic solvent.

    PubMed

    Gu, Changdong; Tu, Jiangping

    2011-08-16

    We report a procedure to fabricate nanostructured Ni films via programmed electrochemical deposition from a choline-chloride-based ionic liquid at a high temperature of 90 °C. Three electrodeposition modes using constant voltage, pulse voltage, and reverse pulse voltage produce a variety of nanostructured Ni films with micro/nanobinary surface architectures, such as nanosheets, aligned nanostrips, and hierarchical flowers. The nanostructured Ni films possess face-centered cubic crystal structure. Amazingly, it is found that the electrodeposited Ni films deliver the superhydrophobic surfaces without any further modifications by low surface-energy materials, which might be attributed to the vigorous micro/nanobinary architectures and the surface chemical composition. The electrochemical measurements reveal that the superhydrophobic Ni film exhibit an obvious passivation phenomenon, which could provide enhanced corrosion resistance for the substrate in the aqueous solutions. PMID:21739965

  12. Novel binary deep eutectic electrolytes for rechargeable Li-ion batteries based on mixtures of alkyl sulfonamides and lithium perfluoroalkylsulfonimide salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiculescu, O. E.; DesMarteau, D. D.; Creager, S. E.; Haik, O.; Hirshberg, D.; Shilina, Y.; Zinigrad, E.; Levi, M. D.; Aurbach, D.; Halalay, I. C.

    2016-03-01

    Ionic liquids (IL's) were proposed for use in Li-ion batteries (LIBs), in order to mitigate some of the well-known drawbacks of LiPF6/mixed organic carbonates solutions. However, their large cations seriously decrease lithium transference numbers and block lithium insertion sites at electrode-electrolyte interfaces, leading to poor LIB rate performance. Deep eutectic electrolytes (DEEs) (which share some of the advantages of ILs but possess only one cation, Li+), were then proposed, in order to overcome the difficulties associated with ILs. We report herein on the preparation, thermal properties (melting, crystallization, and glass transition temperatures), transport properties (specific conductivity and viscosity) and thermal stability of binary DEEs based on mixtures of lithium bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonimide or lithium bis(fluoro)sulfonimide salts with an alkyl sulfonamide solvent. Promise for LIB applications is demonstrated by chronoamperometry on Al current collectors, and cycling behavior of negative and positive electrodes. Residual current densities of 12 and 45 nA cm-2 were observed at 5 V vs. Li/Li+ on aluminum, 1.5 and 16 nA cm-2 at 4.5 V vs. Li/Li+, respectively for LiFSI and LiTFSI based DEEs. Capacities of 220, 130, and 175 mAh· g-1 were observed at low (C/13 or C/10) rates, respectively for petroleum coke, LiMn1/3Ni1/3Co1/3O2 (a.k.a. NMC 111) and LiAl0.05Co0.15Ni0.8O2 (a.k.a. NCA).

  13. Eutectic nucleation in hypoeutectic Al-Si alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Nafisi, S. Ghomashchi, R.; Vali, H.

    2008-10-15

    The nucleation mechanism of eutectic grains in hypoeutectic Al-Si foundry alloys has been investigated by examining deep etched specimens in high-resolution field emission gun scanning electron microscope (FEG-SEM) and by using in-situ Focused Ion Beam (FIB) milling and microscopy. Both unmodified and Sr-modified alloys were studied to characterize the nucleation mechanism of eutectic silicon flakes and fibers. It is proposed that following nucleation of eutectic Al on the primary {alpha}-Al dendrites, fine Si particles form at the solidification front upon which the eutectic Si flakes and fibers could develop. The formation of small Si particles is attributed to Si enrichment of the remaining melt due to the formation of eutectic Al (aluminum spikes) at the eutectic temperature. A hypothesis is then proposed to explain the mechanism of eutectic grains formation with main emphasis on the eutectic Si phase.

  14. Study of Eutectic Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, W. R.

    1985-01-01

    The objectives of this program are to determine the influence of convection on the microstructure of eutectics and to develop a technique for revealing the longitudinal microstructure of the MnBi-Bi eutectic. Both objectives aim at trying to explain the observed influence of space processing on the microstructure of MnBi-Bi. A computer program was developed and used to determine the concentration field in front of a growing lamellar eutectic. From this the deviation of the interfacial concentration from the eutectic composition was calculated as a function of eutectic composition, freezing rate, convection, and lamellar spacing.

  15. Catalytic dehydration of carbohydrates suspended in organic solvents promoted by AlCl3 /SiO2 coated with choline chloride.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; De Oliveira Vigier, Karine; Gu, Yanlong; Jérôme, François

    2015-01-01

    We show that the coating of choline chloride on silica-supported AlCl3 allows the dehydration of carbohydrates to successfully proceed in low boiling point organic solvents. The concept is based on the in situ formation of a deep eutectic liquid phase on the catalyst surface, thus facilitating the interaction between the solid catalyst and insoluble carbohydrate. PMID:25404114

  16. A simple model for examining composition effects in eutectic nucleation

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, James R; Jiang, Feng; Liaw, Peter K

    2007-01-01

    We present a simple thermodynamic calculation for a strongly partitioning eutectic system, to examine how the critical nucleus energy changes, depending upon assumptions of the chemical diffusion. The calculations show that for strongly partitioning systems, the maximum undercooling may occur at a composition significantly different than the eutectic composition, particularly if the rate of diffusion is slow in the undercooled state. These simple calculations emphasize the role that partitioning and composition may play in determining optimal compositions in metallic glass systems, which typically occur near (but not at) deep eutectic compositions.

  17. Study of eutectic formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, W. R.; Eisa, G. F.; Baskaran, V.; Richardson, D. C.

    1984-01-01

    A theory was developed for the influence of convection on the microstructure of lamellar eutectics. Convection is predicted to produce a coarser microstructure, especially at low freezing rates and large volume fractions of the minority phase. Similary convection is predicted to lower the interfacial undercooling, especially at low freezing rates. Experiments using spin-up/spin-down were performed on the Mn-Bi eutectic. This stirring had a dramatic effect on the microstructure, not only making it coarser but at low freezing rates also changing the morphology of the MnBi. The coarsering persisted to moderately high freezing rates. At the lowest freezing rate, vigorous stirring caused the MnBi to be concentrated at the periphery of the ingot and absent along the center. Progress was made on developing a technique for revealing the three-dimensional microstructure of the MnBi eutectic by time-lapse videotaping while etching.

  18. Part I: Virtual Laboratory versus Traditional Laboratory: Which Is More Effective for Teaching Electrochemistry? Part II: The Green Synthesis of Aurones Using a Deep Eutectic Solvent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, Ian C.

    2013-01-01

    The role of the teaching laboratory in science education has been debated over the last century. The goals and purposes of the laboratory are still debated and while most science educators consider laboratory a vital part of the education process, they differ widely on the purposes for laboratory and what methods should be used to teach…

  19. Part I: Virtual Laboratory versus Traditional Laboratory: Which Is More Effective for Teaching Electrochemistry? Part II: The Green Synthesis of Aurones Using a Deep Eutectic Solvent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, Ian C.

    2013-01-01

    The role of the teaching laboratory in science education has been debated over the last century. The goals and purposes of the laboratory are still debated and while most science educators consider laboratory a vital part of the education process, they differ widely on the purposes for laboratory and what methods should be used to teach

  20. Improving prediction of secondary structure, local backbone angles, and solvent accessible surface area of proteins by iterative deep learning.

    PubMed

    Heffernan, Rhys; Paliwal, Kuldip; Lyons, James; Dehzangi, Abdollah; Sharma, Alok; Wang, Jihua; Sattar, Abdul; Yang, Yuedong; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2015-01-01

    Direct prediction of protein structure from sequence is a challenging problem. An effective approach is to break it up into independent sub-problems. These sub-problems such as prediction of protein secondary structure can then be solved independently. In a previous study, we found that an iterative use of predicted secondary structure and backbone torsion angles can further improve secondary structure and torsion angle prediction. In this study, we expand the iterative features to include solvent accessible surface area and backbone angles and dihedrals based on Cα atoms. By using a deep learning neural network in three iterations, we achieved 82% accuracy for secondary structure prediction, 0.76 for the correlation coefficient between predicted and actual solvent accessible surface area, 19° and 30° for mean absolute errors of backbone φ and ψ angles, respectively, and 8° and 32° for mean absolute errors of Cα-based θ and τ angles, respectively, for an independent test dataset of 1199 proteins. The accuracy of the method is slightly lower for 72 CASP 11 targets but much higher than those of model structures from current state-of-the-art techniques. This suggests the potentially beneficial use of these predicted properties for model assessment and ranking. PMID:26098304

  1. Improving prediction of secondary structure, local backbone angles, and solvent accessible surface area of proteins by iterative deep learning

    PubMed Central

    Heffernan, Rhys; Paliwal, Kuldip; Lyons, James; Dehzangi, Abdollah; Sharma, Alok; Wang, Jihua; Sattar, Abdul; Yang, Yuedong; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2015-01-01

    Direct prediction of protein structure from sequence is a challenging problem. An effective approach is to break it up into independent sub-problems. These sub-problems such as prediction of protein secondary structure can then be solved independently. In a previous study, we found that an iterative use of predicted secondary structure and backbone torsion angles can further improve secondary structure and torsion angle prediction. In this study, we expand the iterative features to include solvent accessible surface area and backbone angles and dihedrals based on Cα atoms. By using a deep learning neural network in three iterations, we achieved 82% accuracy for secondary structure prediction, 0.76 for the correlation coefficient between predicted and actual solvent accessible surface area, 19° and 30° for mean absolute errors of backbone φ and ψ angles, respectively, and 8° and 32° for mean absolute errors of Cα-based θ and τ angles, respectively, for an independent test dataset of 1199 proteins. The accuracy of the method is slightly lower for 72 CASP 11 targets but much higher than those of model structures from current state-of-the-art techniques. This suggests the potentially beneficial use of these predicted properties for model assessment and ranking. PMID:26098304

  2. Low-transition-temperature mixtures (LTTMs): a new generation of designer solvents.

    PubMed

    Francisco, María; van den Bruinhorst, Adriaan; Kroon, Maaike C

    2013-03-11

    A new generation of designer solvents emerged in the last decade as promising green media for multiple applications, including separation processes: the low-transition-temperature mixtures (LTTMs). They can be prepared by mixing natural high-melting-point starting materials, which form a liquid by hydrogen-bond interactions. Among them, deep-eutectic solvents (DESs) were presented as promising alternatives to conventional ionic liquids (ILs). Some limitations of ILs are overcome by LTTMs, which are cheap and easy to prepare from natural and readily available starting materials, biodegradable, and renewable. PMID:23401138

  3. Coatings for directional eutectics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rairden, J. R.; Jackson, M. R.

    1976-01-01

    Coatings developed to provide oxidation protection for the directionally-solidified eutectic alloy NiTaC-B (4.4 weight percent Cr) were evaluated. Of seven Co-, Fe- and Ni-base coatings that were initially investigated, best resistance to cyclic oxidation was demonstrated by duplex coatings fabricated by depositing a layer of NiCrAl(Y) by vacuum evaporation from an electron beam source followed by deposition of an Al overlayer using the pack cementation process. It was found that addition of carbon to the coating alloy substantially eliminated the problem of fiber denudation in TaC-type eutectic alloys. Burner rig cycled NiTaC-B samples coated with Ni-20Cr-5Al-0.1C-0.1Y+Al and rupture-tested at 1100 deg C performed as well as or better than uncoated, vacuum cycled and air-tested NiTaC-13; however, a slight degradation with respect to uncoated material was noted in air-stress rupture tests at 870 deg C for both cycled and uncycled samples.

  4. Processing eutectics in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, F. C.; Galasso, S. F.

    1975-01-01

    The investigations of directional solidification have indicated the necessity of establishing a secure foundation in earth-based laboratory processing in order to properly assess low-gravity processing. Emphasis was placed on evaluating the regularity of microstructure of the rod-like eutectic Al-Al3Ni obtained under different conditions of growth involving the parameters of thermal gradient, solidification rate, and interfacial curvature. In the case of Al-Al3Ni, where the Al3Ni phase appears as facets rods, solidification rate was determined to be a controlling parameter. Zone melting of thin eutectic films showed that for films of the order of 10 to 20 micrometers thick, the extra surface energy appears to act to stabilize a regular microstructure. The results suggest that the role of low-gravity as provided in space-laboratory processing of materials is to be sought in the possibility of generating a higher thermal gradient in the solidifying ingot for a given power input-output arrangement than can be obtained under normal one-g processes.

  5. Composition formulas of binary eutectics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Y. P.; Dong, D. D.; Dong, C.; Luo, L. J.; Wang, Q.; Qiang, J. B.; Wang, Y. M.

    2015-12-01

    The present paper addresses the long-standing composition puzzle of eutectic points by introducing a new structural tool for the description of short-range-order structural unit, the cluster-plus-glue-atom model. In this model, any structure is dissociated into a 1st-neighbor cluster and a few glue atoms between the clusters, expressed by a cluster formula [cluster]gluex. This model is applied here to establish the structural model for eutectic liquids, assuming that a eutectic liquid consist of two subunits issued from the relevant eutectic phases, each being expressed by the cluster formula for ideal metallic glasses, i.e., [cluster](glue atom)1 or 3. A structural unit is then composed of two clusters from the relevant eutectic phases plus 2, 4, or 6 glue atoms. Such a dual cluster formulism is well validated in all boron-containing (except those located by the extreme phase diagram ends) and in some commonly-encountered binary eutectics, within accuracies below 1 at.%. The dual cluster formulas vary extensively and are rarely identical even for eutectics of close compositions. They are generally formed with two distinctly different cluster types, with special cluster matching rules such as cuboctahedron plus capped trigonal prism and rhombidodecahedron plus octahedral antiprism.

  6. Composition formulas of binary eutectics

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Y. P.; Dong, D. D.; Dong, C.; Luo, L. J.; Wang, Q.; Qiang, J. B.; Wang, Y. M.

    2015-01-01

    The present paper addresses the long-standing composition puzzle of eutectic points by introducing a new structural tool for the description of short-range-order structural unit, the cluster-plus-glue-atom model. In this model, any structure is dissociated into a 1st-neighbor cluster and a few glue atoms between the clusters, expressed by a cluster formula [cluster]gluex. This model is applied here to establish the structural model for eutectic liquids, assuming that a eutectic liquid consist of two subunits issued from the relevant eutectic phases, each being expressed by the cluster formula for ideal metallic glasses, i.e., [cluster](glue atom)1 or 3. A structural unit is then composed of two clusters from the relevant eutectic phases plus 2, 4, or 6 glue atoms. Such a dual cluster formulism is well validated in all boron-containing (except those located by the extreme phase diagram ends) and in some commonly-encountered binary eutectics, within accuracies below 1 at.%. The dual cluster formulas vary extensively and are rarely identical even for eutectics of close compositions. They are generally formed with two distinctly different cluster types, with special cluster matching rules such as cuboctahedron plus capped trigonal prism and rhombidodecahedron plus octahedral antiprism. PMID:26658618

  7. Composition formulas of binary eutectics.

    PubMed

    Ma, Y P; Dong, D D; Dong, C; Luo, L J; Wang, Q; Qiang, J B; Wang, Y M

    2015-01-01

    The present paper addresses the long-standing composition puzzle of eutectic points by introducing a new structural tool for the description of short-range-order structural unit, the cluster-plus-glue-atom model. In this model, any structure is dissociated into a 1(st)-neighbor cluster and a few glue atoms between the clusters, expressed by a cluster formula [cluster]gluex. This model is applied here to establish the structural model for eutectic liquids, assuming that a eutectic liquid consist of two subunits issued from the relevant eutectic phases, each being expressed by the cluster formula for ideal metallic glasses, i.e., [cluster](glue atom)(1 or 3). A structural unit is then composed of two clusters from the relevant eutectic phases plus 2, 4, or 6 glue atoms. Such a dual cluster formulism is well validated in all boron-containing (except those located by the extreme phase diagram ends) and in some commonly-encountered binary eutectics, within accuracies below 1 at.%. The dual cluster formulas vary extensively and are rarely identical even for eutectics of close compositions. They are generally formed with two distinctly different cluster types, with special cluster matching rules such as cuboctahedron plus capped trigonal prism and rhombidodecahedron plus octahedral antiprism. PMID:26658618

  8. Template-Directed Directionally Solidified 3D Mesostructured AgCl-KCl Eutectic Photonic Crystals.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinwoo; Aagesen, Larry K; Choi, Jun Hee; Choi, Jaewon; Kim, Ha Seong; Liu, Jinyun; Cho, Chae-Ryong; Kang, Jin Gu; Ramazani, Ali; Thornton, Katsuyo; Braun, Paul V

    2015-08-19

    3D mesostructured AgCl-KCl photonic crystals emerge from colloidal templating of eutectic solidification. Solvent removal of the KCl phase results in a mesostructured AgCl inverse opal. The 3D-template-induced confinement leads to the emergence of a complex microstructure. The 3D mesostructured eutectic photonic crystals have a large stop band ranging from the near-infrared to the visible tuned by the processing. PMID:26177830

  9. Coatings for directional eutectics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rairden, J. R.; Jackson, M. R.

    1976-01-01

    Significant advances have been made in the development of an environmentally stable coating for a very high strength, directionally solidified eutectic alloy designated NiTaC-13. Three duplex (two-layer) coatings survived 3,000 hours on a cyclic oxidation test (1,100 C to 90 C). These coatings were fabricated by first depositing a layer of NiCrAl(Y) by vacuum evaporation from an electron beam heated source, followed by depositing an aluminizing overlayer. The alloy after exposure with these coatings was denuded of carbide fibers at the substrate/coating interface. It was demonstrated that TaC fiber denudation can be greatly retarded by applying a carbon-bearing coating. The coating was applied by thermal spraying followed by aluminization. Specimens coated with NiCrAlCY+Al survived over 2,000 hours in the cyclic oxidation test with essentially no TaC denudation. Coating ductility was studied for coated and heat-treated bars, and stress rupture life at 871 C and 1,100 C was determined for coated and cycled bars.

  10. Embedded Binary Eutectic Alloy Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrzan, D. C.; Shin, S. J.; Guzman, J.; Yuan, C.-W.; Liao, C. Y.; Stone, P. R.; Boswell-Koller, C. N.; Sawyer, C. A.; Bustillo, K. C.; Sherburne, M. P.; Conry, T.; Lieten, R. R.; Dubon, O. D.; Minor, A. M.; Watanabe, M.; Beeman, J. W.; Yu, K. M.; Ager, J. W.; Haller, E. E.

    2012-10-01

    The properties of binary eutectic alloy nanostructures embedded within a matrix are discussed. It is demonstrated that GeAu and GeSn nanostructures embedded in SiO2 form in a bilobed structure as predicted by a simple theory. Upon heating, the nanostructures melt and assume a nominally compositionally homogeneous structure. Slow cooling of the liquid returns the nanostructure to its equilibrium bilobed morphology. Rapid quenching yields a kinetically limited, nearly compositionally homogeneous solid. Rapid thermal annealing can convert this metastable structure again into the bilobed structure. It is, therefore, possible to switch between the bilobed structure and the homogenous structure. The kinetics of the homogeneous composition to bilobe structure transformation depend on composition. Tuning the composition enables one to tune the transformation temperature. Possible technological applications of these nanostructures are discussed.

  11. The promise of eutectics for aircraft turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.

    1977-01-01

    Gas turbine blades and vanes for the 1980s call for new materials with higher operational temperature capabilities. The potential increase of from 40 to 110 C in operational temperature capabilities predicted for directionally solidified eutectics is a larger increment over currently available alloys than previously obtained in any new turbine blade alloy. The paper discusses the properties of gamma/gamma prime-delta and NiTaC-13 directionally solidified first-generation eutectics for use as gas turbine blade materials. A few of the more promising second-generation eutectics for blade applications (gamma/gamma prime-alpha, NiTaC 3-116A) and for vane applications (gamma-beta, COTAC 74) are also discussed. Attention is given to mechanical properties, such as transverse ductility and shear strength, that can be inherently critical in a directionally solidified eutectic. Further R&D requirements for properties, coatings, and lower cost processing technology are identified.

  12. The promise of eutectics for aircraft turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.

    1977-01-01

    The current status of the first generation eutectics, gamma/gamma transition - delta and NiTaC-13, is described in detail. Several second generation systems, such as gamma/gamma transition - alpha and NiTaC 3-116A, gamma - beta, and COTAC 74 are also reviewed with particular emphasis on their critical physical and mechanical properties, future research directions, and potential applications. Results of recent cost-benefit analyses of eutectic turbine blades are discussed.

  13. Eutectic experiment development for space processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    A ground base test plan and a specimen evaluation scheme have been developed for the aluminum-copper eutectic solidification experiment to be run in the M518 multipurpose electric furnace during the Skylab mission. Besides thermal and solidification studies a detailed description is given of the quantitative metallographic technique which is appropriate for characterizing eutectic structures. This method should prove a key tool for evaluating specimen microstructure which is the most sensitive indicator of changes produced during solidification. It has been recommended that single grain pre-frozen eutectic specimens be used to simplify microstructural evaluation and to eliminate any porosity in the as-cast eutectic specimens. High purity (99.999%) materials from one supplier should be employed for all experiments. Laboratory studies indicate that porosity occurs in the MRC as-cast eutectic ingots but that this porosity can be eliminated by directional freezing. Chemical analysis shows that the MRC ingots are slightly Al rich and contain about .03% impurity. Because of the impurity content the lower cooldown rate (1.2 C/min) should be used for eutectic freezing if MRC material is used in the M518 furnace.

  14. New eutectic ionic liquids for lipase activation and enzymatic preparation of biodiesel.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hua; Baker, Gary A; Holmes, Shaletha

    2011-03-21

    The enzymatic preparation of biodiesel has been hampered by the lack of suitable solvents with desirable properties such as high lipase compatibility, low cost, low viscosity, high biodegradability, and ease of product separation. Recent interest in using ionic liquids (ILs) as advanced reaction media has led to fast reaction rates and high yields in the enzymatic synthesis of biodiesel. However, conventional (i.e., cation-anion paired) ILs based on imidazolium and other quaternary ammonium salts remain too expensive for wide application at industrial scales. In this study, we report on newly-synthesized eutectic ILs derived from choline acetate or choline chloride coupled with biocompatible hydrogen-bond donors, such as glycerol. These eutectic solvents have favorable properties including low viscosity, high biodegradability, and excellent compatibility with Novozym(®) 435, a commercial immobilized Candida antarctica lipase B. Furthermore, in a model biodiesel synthesis system, we demonstrate high reaction rates for the enzymatic transesterification of Miglyol(®) oil 812 with methanol, catalyzed by Novozym(®) 435 in choline acetate/glycerol (1:1.5 molar ratio). The high conversion (97%) of the triglyceride obtained within 3 h, under optimal conditions, suggests that these novel eutectic solvents warrant further exploration as potential media in the enzymatic production of biodiesel. PMID:21283901

  15. New eutectic ionic liquids for lipase activation and enzymatic preparation of biodiesel†

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hua; Baker, Gary A.; Holmes, Shaletha

    2012-01-01

    The enzymatic preparation of biodiesel has been hampered by the lack of suitable solvents with desirable properties such as high lipase compatibility, low cost, low viscosity, high biodegradability, and ease of product separation. Recent interest in using ionic liquids (ILs) as advanced reaction media has led to fast reaction rates and high yields in the enzymatic synthesis of biodiesel. However, conventional (i.e., cation–anion paired) ILs based on imidazolium and other quaternary ammonium salts remain too expensive for wide application at industrial scales. In this study, we report on newly-synthesized eutectic ILs derived from choline acetate or choline chloride coupled with biocompatible hydrogen-bond donors, such as glycerol. These eutectic solvents have favorable properties including low viscosity, high biodegradability, and excellent compatibility with Novozym® 435, a commercial immobilized Candida antarctica lipase B. Furthermore, in a model biodiesel synthesis system, we demonstrate high reaction rates for the enzymatic transesterification of Miglyol® oil 812 with methanol, catalyzed by Novozym® 435 in choline acetate/glycerol (1 : 1.5 molar ratio). The high conversion (97%) of the triglyceride obtained within 3 h, under optimal conditions, suggests that these novel eutectic solvents warrant further exploration as potential media in the enzymatic production of biodiesel. PMID:21283901

  16. Metastability of Au-Ge liquid nanocatalysts: Ge vapor-liquid-solid nanowire growth far below the bulk eutectic temperature.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Hemant; Marshall, Ann F; Goldthorpe, Irene A; Chidsey, Christopher E D; McIntyre, Paul C

    2007-12-01

    The vapor-liquid-solid mechanism of nanowire (NW) growth requires the presence of a liquid at one end of the wire; however, Au-catalyzed Ge nanowire growth by chemical vapor deposition can occur at approximately 100 degrees C below the bulk Au-Ge eutectic. In this paper, we investigate deep sub-eutectic stability of liquid Au-Ge catalysts on Ge NWs quantitatively, both theoretically and experimentally. We construct a binary Au-Ge phase diagram that is valid at the nanoscale and show that equilibrium arguments, based on capillarity, are inconsistent with stabilization of Au-Ge liquid at deep sub-eutectic temperatures, similar to those used in Ge NW growth. Hot-stage electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction are used to test the predictions of nanoscale phase equilibria. In addition to Ge supersaturation of the Au-Ge liquid droplet, which has recently been invoked as an explanation for deep sub-eutectic Ge NW growth, we find evidence of a substantial kinetic barrier to Au solidification during cooling below the nanoscale Au-Ge eutectic temperature. PMID:19206662

  17. Properties of rapidly dissolving eutectic mixtures of poly(ethylene glycol) and fenofibrate: the eutectic microstructure.

    PubMed

    Law, Devalina; Wang, Weili; Schmitt, Eric A; Qiu, Yihong; Krill, Steven L; Fort, James J

    2003-03-01

    Poly(ethylene glycol) or PEG is an ideal inactive component for preparing simple binary eutectic mixtures because of its low entropy of fusion ( approximately 0.0076 J/mol-K), lower melting point (approximately 62 degrees C) compared to most pharmaceuticals, miscibility with drugs at elevated temperatures, and its covalent crystalline lattice. Implication of these physicochemical properties on eutectic crystallization and size reduction of the drug is discussed. Enhancement of the dissolution rate of a poorly soluble compound through the formation of PEG-drug eutectics was investigated using fenofibrate. Solid dispersions of PEG-fenofibrate when characterized, revealed that PEG and fenofibrate form a simple eutectic mixture containing 20-25%(w/w) fenofibrate at the eutectic point. Eutectic crystallization led to the formation of an irregular microstructure in which fenofibrate crystals were found to be less than 10 microm in size. Dissolution rate improvement of fenofibrate correlated with the phase diagram, and the amount of fenofibrate released from the dispersions that contained fenofibrate as a eutectic mixture was at least 10-fold higher compared to untreated fenofibrate. On aging, the dissolution rate of the dispersion containing 15%(w/w) fenofibrate in PEG remained unaltered. The results indicate that PEG-drug eutectic formation is a valuable option for particle size reduction and subsequent dissolution rate improvement. PMID:12587112

  18. Nucleation-controlled microstructures and anomalous eutectic formation in undercooled Co-Sn and Ni-Si eutectic melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mingjun; Kuribayashi, Kazuhiko

    2003-12-01

    Co-20.5 at. pct Sn and Ni-21.4 at. pct Si eutectic alloys have been levitated and undercooled in an electromagnetic levitator (EML) and then solidified spontaneously at different undercoolings. The original surface and cross-sectional morphologies of these solidified samples consist of separate eutectic colonies regardless of melt undercooling, indicating that microstructures in the free solidification of the eutectic systems are nucleation controlled. Regular lamellae always grow from the periphery of an independent anomalous eutectic grain in each eutectic colony. This typical morphology shows that the basic unit should be a single eutectic colony, when discussing the solidification behavior. Special emphasis is focused on the anomalous eutectic formation after a significant difference in linear kinetic coefficients is recognized for terminal eutectic phases, in particular when a eutectic reaction contains a nonfaceted disordered solid solution and a faceted ordered intermetallic compound as the terminal eutectic phases. It is this remarkable difference in the linear kinetic coefficients that leads to a pronounced difference in kinetic undercoolings. The sluggish kinetics in the interface atomic attachment of the intermetallic compound originates the occurrence of the decoupled growth of two eutectic phases. Hence, the current eutectic models are modified to incorporate kinetic undercooling, in order to account for the competitive growth behavior of eutectic phases in a single eutectic colony. The critical condition for generating the decoupled growth of eutectic phases is proposed. Further analysis reveals that a dimensionless critical undercooling may be appropriate to show the tendency for the anomalous eutectic-forming ability when considering the difference in linear kinetic coefficients of terminal eutectic phases. This qualitative criterion, albeit crude with several approximations and assumptions, can elucidate most of the published experimental results with the correct order of magnitude. Solidification modes in some eutectic alloys are predicted on the basis of the present criterion. Future work that may result in some probable errors is briefly directed to improve the model.

  19. Reactive eutectic brazing of nitinol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Low, Ke-Bin

    Although NiTiNb alloys are well known as wide-hysteresis shape-memory alloys with important applications as coupling materials, the significance of one aspect of the Ni-Ti-Nb ternary system has not been fully appreciated. Based on the existence of a quasibinary NiTi-Nb eutectic isopleth in this ternary system, a novel braze method has been devised to fabricate metallurgical bonds between functional nitinol (NiTi) sections. When NiTi and pure Nb are brought into contact at temperatures above 1170°C, spontaneous melting occurs, forming a liquid that is extremely reactive and not only wets NiTi surfaces, but also apparently dissolves oxide scales, obviating the need for fluxes and providing for efficient capillary flow into joint crevices. The melting process is diffusion-controlled and rate-limited by the diffusivity of Nb in the liquid. The braze liquid will subsequently solidify into microstructures containing predominantly ordered NiTi and disordered bcc-Nb. Mechanical tests revealed that the braze joints are strong, ductile, and biocompatible. With appropriate post-braze aging, the functional performance of the parent NiTi alloy can be restored. Micro-alloying the Nb fluer metal with Zr or tungsten showed great potential for solution-strengthening of the braze joints. For applications where biocompatibility is not an issue, Nb metal can be substituted by pure vanadium as the braze filler, which is demonstrated to possess tensile strengths that can be potentially superior to the Nb counterparts.

  20. Stability of eutectic interface during directional solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Han, S.H.

    1996-04-23

    Directional solidification of eutectic alloys shows different types of eutectic morphologies. These include lamellar, rod, oscillating and tilting modes. The growth of these morphologies occurs with a macroscopically planar interface. However, under certain conditions, the planar eutectic front becomes unstable and gives rise to a cellular or a dendritic structure. This instability leads to the cellular/dendritic structure of either a primary phase or a two-phase structure. The objective of this work is to develop a fundamental understanding of the instability of eutectic structure into cellular/dendritic structures of a single phase and of two-phases. Experimental studies have been carried out to examine the transition from a planar to two-phase cellular and dendritic structures in a ceramic system of Alumina-Zirconia (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2}) and in a transparent organic system of carbon tetrabromide and hexachloroethane (CBr{sub 4}-C{sub 2}Cl{sub 6}). Several aspects of eutectic interface stability have been examined.

  1. Directionally solidified eutectic alloy gamma-beta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tewari, S. N.

    1977-01-01

    A pseudobinary eutectic alloy composition was determined by a previously developed bleed-out technique. The directionally solidified eutectic alloy with a composition of Ni-37.4Fe-10.0Cr-9.6Al (in wt%) had tensile strengths decreasing from 1,090 MPa at room temperature to 54 MPa at 1,100 C. The low density, excellent microstructural stability, and oxidation resistance of the alloy during thermal cycling suggest that it might have applicability as a gas turbine vane alloy while its relatively low high temperature strength precludes its use as a blade alloy. A zirconium addition increased the 750 C strength, and a tungsten addition was ineffective. The gamma=beta eutectic alloys appeared to obey a normal freezing relation.

  2. Some physicochemical studies on organic eutectics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, R. K.; Singh, S. K.; Singh, R. A.

    2007-03-01

    The phase diagrams of phenothiazine with each of m-nitrobenzoic acid ( m-NBA) and m-dinitrobenzene ( m-DNB) have been studied by thaw-melt method. These materials have been characterized by X-ray diffraction. Growth behavior of the parent components, eutectic and charge transfer complex (CTC) studied by measuring the rate of movement of the growth front in a capillary suggests the applicability of Hillig-Turnbull equation for the system. Microstructure and electrical conductivities of congruent melting complexes and eutectics have been determined. The low electrical conductivities of these materials have been due to weak interaction and mixed stacking of donor and acceptor. Excess thermodynamics functions of the charge-transfer (CT) materials and eutectics have been determined.

  3. Phase-field modeling of eutectic growth.

    PubMed

    Drolet, F; Elder, K R; Grant, M; Kosterlitz, J M

    2000-06-01

    A phase-field model of eutectic growth is proposed in terms of a free energy F, which is a functional of a liquid-solid order parameter psi, and a conserved concentration field c. The model is shown to recover the important features of a eutectic phase diagram and to reduce to the standard sharp-interface formulation of nonequilibrium growth. It is successfully applied to the study of directional solidification when the solid phase is a single or two phase state. The crystallization of a eutectic compound under isothermal conditions is also considered. For that process, the transformed volume fraction and psi-field structure factor, both measured during numerical simulations, closely match theoretical predictions. Three possible growth mechanisms are also identified: diffusion-limited growth, lamellar growth, and spinodal decomposition. PMID:11088365

  4. Deep Eutectic Salt Formulations Suitable as Advanced Heat Transfer Fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Raade, Justin; Roark, Thomas; Vaughn, John; Bradshaw, Robert

    2013-07-22

    Concentrating solar power (CSP) facilities are comprised of many miles of fluid-filled pipes arranged in large grids with reflective mirrors used to capture radiation from the sun. Solar radiation heats the fluid which is used to produce steam necessary to power large electricity generation turbines. Currently, organic, oil-based fluid in the pipes has a maximum temperature threshold of 400 °C, allowing for the production of electricity at approximately 15 cents per kilowatt hour. The DOE hopes to foster the development of an advanced heat transfer fluid that can operate within higher temperature ranges. The new heat transfer fluid, when used with other advanced technologies, could significantly decrease solar electricity cost. Lower costs would make solar thermal electricity competitive with gas and coal and would offer a clean, renewable source of energy. Molten salts exhibit many desirable heat transfer qualities within the range of the project objectives. Halotechnics developed advanced heat transfer fluids (HTFs) for application in solar thermal power generation. This project focused on complex mixtures of inorganic salts that exhibited a high thermal stability, a low melting point, and other favorable characteristics. A high-throughput combinatorial research and development program was conducted in order to achieve the project objective. Over 19,000 candidate formulations were screened. The workflow developed to screen various chemical systems to discover salt formulations led to mixtures suitable for use as HTFs in both parabolic trough and heliostat CSP plants. Furthermore, salt mixtures which will not interfere with fertilizer based nitrates were discovered. In addition for use in CSP, the discovered salt mixtures can be applied to electricity storage, heat treatment of alloys and other industrial processes.

  5. Microstructure Of MnBi/Bi Eutectic Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, William R.; Eisa, G. F.; Baskaran, B.; Richardson, Donald C.

    1988-01-01

    Collection of three reports describes studies of directional solidification of MnBi/Bi eutectic alloy. Two of the reports, "Influence of Convection on Lamellar Spacing of Eutectics" and "Influence of Convection on Eutectic Microstructure," establish theoretical foundation for remaining document. Reports seek to quantify effect of convection on concentration field of growing lamellar eutectic. Remaining report, "Study of Eutectic Formation," begins by continuing theoretical developments. New technique under development by one of the authors helps to reveal three-dimensional microstructures of alloys.

  6. Pb-free Sn-Ag-Cu ternary eutectic solder

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Iver E.; Yost, Frederick G.; Smith, John F.; Miller, Chad M.; Terpstra, Robert L.

    1996-06-18

    A Pb-free solder includes a ternary eutectic composition consisting essentially of about 93.6 weight % Sn-about 4.7 weight % Ag-about 1.7 weight % Cu having a eutectic melting temperature of about 217.degree. C. and variants of the ternary composition wherein the relative concentrations of Sn, Ag, and Cu deviate from the ternary eutectic composition to provide a controlled melting temperature range (liquid-solid "mushy" zone) relative to the eutectic melting temperature (e.g. up to 15.degree. C. above the eutectic melting temperature).

  7. Perfect cellular eutectic growth in directionally solidified NiAl-Cr(Mo) hypereutectic alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Zhao; Shen, Jun; Zhang, Jianfei; Wang, Lei; Fu, Hengzhi

    2012-09-01

    Cellular eutectic microstructures with fully lamellar morphology were observed in the directionally solidified Ni-31Al-32Cr-6Mo (at%) hypereutectic alloy at withdrawal rates of 15, 25 and 50 ?m/s, but the morphologies of cellular microstructures did not change consecutively with increasing withdrawal rate. The growth interfaces were deep cellular at withdrawal rates of 15 and 50 ?m/s, but it changed to be shallow cellular at rate of 25 ?m/s. The reason is that the interface undercooling comes to minimum at the middle rate of 25 ?m/s. If the interface undercooling decreases, the tendency of constitutional undercooling will be weaken. The small constitutional undercooling will increase the interface stability, so that the interface morphology changes from deep cellular to shallow cellular. The shallow cellular growth interface led to a perfect cellular eutectic microstructure, which was analogous to the planar eutectic microstructure. In this case, the widths of the intercellular regions were narrowest, no coarse or irregular plates existed at the cell boundaries, and the thicknesses of the lamellae were almost uniform. The properties of the alloy may be markedly improved.

  8. Crystallography of Alumina-YAG-Eutectic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, Serene C.; Sayir, Ali; Dickerson, Robert M.; Matson, Lawrence E.

    2000-01-01

    Multiple descriptions of the alumina-YAG eutectic crystallography appear in the ceramic literature. The orientation between two phases in a eutectic system has direct impact on residual stress, morphology, microstructural stability, and high temperature mechanical properties. A study to demonstrate that the different crystallographic relationships can be correlated with different growth constraints was undertaken. Fibers produced by Laser-Heated Float Zone (LHFZ) and Edge-defined Film-fed Growth (EFG) were examined. A map of the orientation relationship between Al2O3 and Y3Al5O12 and their relationship to the fiber growth axis as a function of pull rate are presented. Regions in which a single orientation predominates are identified.

  9. Two-stage eutectic metal brushes

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, John S

    2009-07-14

    A two-stage eutectic metal brush assembly having a slip ring rigidly coupled to a shaft, the slip ring being electrically coupled to first voltage polarity. At least one brush is rigidly coupled to a second ring and slidingly engaged to the slip ring. Eutectic metal at least partially fills an annulus between the second ring and a stationary ring. At least one conductor is rigidly coupled to the stationary ring and electrically coupled to a second voltage polarity. Electrical continuity is maintained between the first voltage polarity and the second voltage polarity. Periodic rotational motion is present between the stationary ring and the second ring. Periodic rotational motion is also present between the brush and the slip ring.

  10. Molten salt eutectics from atomistic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaraman, Saivenkataraman; Thompson, Aidan P.; von Lilienfeld, O. Anatole

    2011-09-01

    Despite their importance for solar thermal power applications, phase-diagrams of molten salt mixture heat transfer fluids (HTFs) are not readily accessible from first principles. We present a molecular dynamics scheme general enough to identify eutectics of any HTF candidate mixture. The eutectic mixture and temperature are located using the liquid mixture free energy and the pure component solid-liquid free energy differences. The liquid mixture free energy is obtained using thermodynamic integration over particle identity transmutations sampled with molecular dynamics at a single temperature. Drawbacks of conventional phase diagram mapping methodologies are avoided by not considering solid mixtures, thereby evading expensive computations of solid phase free energies. Numerical results for binary and ternary mixtures of alkali nitrates agree well with experimental measurements.

  11. Sinterability of corundum with borosilicate eutectic melts

    SciTech Connect

    Andrianov, N.T.; Barbakadze, I.G.; Gusev, V.V.

    1987-03-01

    The authors assess the sinterability of corundum in a liquid-phase sintering process by comparatively testing eutectic wetting agents variously comprised of borosilicate glass and the oxides of magnesium, calcium, and barium. Their analysis accounts for the surface tension and roughness of the corundum and results in the determination of a temperature-dependent wetting angle and of a wetting threshold for the borosilicate glass compositions which indicates a so-called tentative-chemical or irreversible wetting.

  12. Investigation of a solvent polluted industrial site on a deep sandstone-mudstone sequence in the UK. Part 1. Site description and groundwater flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, Philip Keith; Jakobsen, Rasmus; Gosk, Edmund; Lerner, David Nicholas; Burston, Mark William

    1993-08-01

    The sources and subsurface movement of chlorinated hydrocarbon solvents have been investigated at an industrial site, as part of a wider study of groundwater pollution by these solvents in the area of Coventry (UK). This paper presents a description of the site and groundwater flow as a prelude to a second paper describing the distribution, transport and fate of pollutants. Both open boreholes and a single borehole incorporating a multilevel sampler were constructed, and pumping and tracer tests performed. The latter borehole was the most successful in defining hydraulic heads for individual aquifer units. The cyclic pumping of the production borehole was analysed using a computer model to gain hydraulic data for aquifer and aquitard units. The tracer test defined, qualitatively, the role played by matrix diffusion in solute transport within the dual porosity aquifer. It is concluded that horizontal groundwater flow is dominant along fissured, moderately permeable sandstone layers. The low permeabilities of mudstone layers maintain high vertical hydraulic gradients. Sorption of contaminants on to the aquifer matrix is likely to be low, owing to a low fraction of organic carbon. However, matrix diffusion will serve to attenuate peak concentrations of pollutants and stretch pollution pulses in time.

  13. Resolving issues of content uniformity and low permeability using eutectic blend of camphor and menthol.

    PubMed

    Gohel, M C; Nagori, S A

    2009-11-01

    The aim of present study were to arrest the problem of content uniformity without the use of harmful organic solvent and to improve ex vivo permeability of captopril, a low dose class III drug as per biological classification system. Eutectic mixture of camphor and menthol was innovatively used in the work. Captopril solution in eutectic mixture was blended with Avicel PH 102 and then the mixture was blended with mannitol in different ratios. Formulated batches were characterized for angle of repose and Carr's index. A selected batch was filled in hard gelatin capsule. Tablet dosage form was also developed. Capsules and tablets were characterized for in vitro drug release in 0.1N HCl. Additionally, the captopril tablets were analyzed for content uniformity and ex vivo drug permeation study using rat ileum in modified apparatus. The measurement of angle of repose and Carr's index revealed that the powder blend exhibited good flow property and compressibility. The captopril capsules and tablets exhibited immediate drug release in 0.1 N HCl. The captopril tablets passed content uniformity test as per IP 1996. Ex vivo permeation of captopril, formulated with eutectic mixture, was faster than control. The permeation was increased by 15% at the end of 3 h. Tablets and capsule exhibited reasonable short term stability with no considerable change in performance characteristics. PMID:20376214

  14. Resolving Issues of Content Uniformity and Low Permeability Using Eutectic Blend of Camphor and Menthol

    PubMed Central

    Gohel, M. C.; Nagori, S. A.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of present study were to arrest the problem of content uniformity without the use of harmful organic solvent and to improve ex vivo permeability of captopril, a low dose class III drug as per biological classification system. Eutectic mixture of camphor and menthol was innovatively used in the work. Captopril solution in eutectic mixture was blended with Avicel PH 102 and then the mixture was blended with mannitol in different ratios. Formulated batches were characterized for angle of repose and Carr's index. A selected batch was filled in hard gelatin capsule. Tablet dosage form was also developed. Capsules and tablets were characterized for in vitro drug release in 0.1N HCl. Additionally, the captopril tablets were analyzed for content uniformity and ex vivo drug permeation study using rat ileum in modified apparatus. The measurement of angle of repose and Carr's index revealed that the powder blend exhibited good flow property and compressibility. The captopril capsules and tablets exhibited immediate drug release in 0.1 N HCl. The captopril tablets passed content uniformity test as per IP 1996. Ex vivo permeation of captopril, formulated with eutectic mixture, was faster than control. The permeation was increased by 15% at the end of 3 h. Tablets and capsule exhibited reasonable short term stability with no considerable change in performance characteristics. PMID:20376214

  15. Solvent substitution

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Office of Technology Development and the Air Force Engineering and Services Center convened the First Annual International Workshop on Solvent Substitution on December 4--7, 1990. The primary objectives of this joint effort were to share information and ideas among attendees in order to enhance the development and implementation of required new technologies for the elimination of pollutants associated with industrial use of hazardous and toxic solvents; and to aid in accelerating collaborative efforts and technology transfer between government and industry for solvent substitution. There were workshop sessions focusing on Alternative Technologies, Alternative Solvents, Recovery/Recycling, Low VOC Materials and Treatment for Environmentally Safe Disposal. The 35 invited papers presented covered a wide range of solvent substitution activities including: hardware and weapons production and maintenance, paint stripping, coating applications, printed circuit boards, metal cleaning, metal finishing, manufacturing, compliance monitoring and process control monitoring. This publication includes the majority of these presentations. In addition, in order to further facilitate information exchange and technology transfer, the US Air Force and DOE solicited additional papers under a general Call for Papers.'' These papers, which underwent review and final selection by a peer review committee, are also included in this combined Proceedings/Compendium. For those involved in handling, using or managing hazardous and toxic solvents, this document should prove to be a valuable resource, providing the most up-to-date information on current technologies and practices in solvent substitution. Individual papers are abstracted separated.

  16. Use of eutectic mixtures for preparation of monolithic carbons with CO₂-adsorption and gas-separation capabilities.

    PubMed

    López-Salas, N; Jardim, E O; Silvestre-Albero, A; Gutiérrez, M C; Ferrer, M L; Rodríguez-Reinoso, F; Silvestre-Albero, J; del Monte, F

    2014-10-21

    With global warming becoming one of the main problems our society is facing nowadays, there is an urgent demand to develop materials suitable for CO2 storage as well as for gas separation. Within this context, hierarchical porous structures are of great interest for in-flow applications because of the desirable combination of an extensive internal reactive surface along narrow nanopores with facile molecular transport through broad "highways" leading to and from these pores. Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) have been recently used in the synthesis of carbon monoliths exhibiting a bicontinuous porous structure composed of continuous macroporous channels and a continuous carbon network that contains a certain microporosity and provides considerable surface area. In this work, we have prepared two DESs for the preparation of two hierarchical carbon monoliths with different compositions (e.g., either nitrogen-doped or not) and structure. It is worth noting that DESs played a capital role in the synthesis of hierarchical carbon monoliths not only promoting the spinodal decomposition that governs the formation of the bicontinuous porous structure but also providing the precursors required to tailor the composition and the molecular sieve structure of the resulting carbons. We have studied the performance of these two carbons for CO2, N2, and CH4 adsorption in both monolithic and powdered form. We have also studied the selective adsorption of CO2 versus CH4 in equilibrium and dynamic conditions. We found that these materials combined a high CO2-sorption capacity besides an excellent CO2/N2 and CO2/CH4 selectivity and, interestingly, this performance was preserved when processed in both monolithic and powdered form. PMID:25255054

  17. Deep Desulfurization of Diesel Fuels with Plasma/Air as Oxidizing Medium, Diperiodatocuprate (III) as Catalyzer and Ionic Liquid as Extraction Solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ban, Lili; Liu, Ping; Ma, Cunhua; Dai, Bin

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, the oxidative desulfurization (ODS) system is directly applied to deal with the catalytic oxidation of sulfur compounds of sulfur-containing model oil by dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma in the presence of air plus an extraction step with the oxidation-treated fuel put over ionic liquid [BMIM]FeCl4 (1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrachloroferrate). This new system exhibited an excellent desulfurization effect. The sulfur content of DBT in diesel oil decreased from 200 ppm to 4.92 ppm (S removal rate up to 97.5%) under the following optimal reaction conditions: air flow rate (ν) of 60 mL/min, amplitude of applied voltage (U) on DBD of 16 kV, input frequency (f) of 79 kHz, catalyst amount (ω) of 1.25 wt%, reaction time (t) of 10 min. Moreover, a high desulfurization rate was obtained during oxidation of benzothiophene (BT) or 4,6-DMDBT (4,6-dimethyl-dibenzothiophene) under the aforementioned conditions. The oxidation reactivity of different S compounds was decreased in the order of DBT, 4,6-DMDBT and BT. The remarkable advantage of the novel ODS system is that the desulfurization condition applies in the presence of air at ambient conditions without peroxides, aqueous solvent or biphasic oil-aqueous solution system.

  18. Synthesis and electronic applications of oxide-metal eutectic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Holder, J.D.; Cochran, J.K.; Hill, D.N.; Chapman, A.T.; Clark, G.W.

    1980-01-01

    A review is given of important developments in the synthesis of oxide-metal eutectic composites and the composite application in the continuing development of field emitters. Known metal oxide-metal binary and ternary eutectic systems are listed. The synthesis, electrical conductivity, thermodynamics, and applications are discussed. (FS)

  19. Solidification of eutectic system alloys in space (M-19)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohno, Atsumi

    1993-01-01

    It is well known that in the liquid state eutectic alloys are theoretically homogeneous under 1 g conditions. However, the homogeneous solidified structure of this alloy is not obtained because thermal convection and non-equilibrium solidification occur. The present investigators have clarified the solidification mechanisms of the eutectic system alloys under 1 g conditions by using the in situ observation method; in particular, the primary crystals of the eutectic system alloys never nucleated in the liquid, but instead did so on the mold wall, and the crystals separated from the mold wall by fluid motion caused by thermal convection. They also found that the equiaxed eutectic grains (eutectic cells) are formed on the primary crystals. In this case, the leading phase of the eutectic must agree with the phase of the primary crystals. In space, no thermal convection occurs so that primary crystals should not move from the mold wall and should not appear inside the solidified structure. Therefore no equiaxed eutectic grains will be formed under microgravity conditions. Past space experiments concerning eutectic alloys were classified into two types of experiments: one with respect to the solidification mechanisms of the eutectic alloys and the other to the unidirectional solidification of this alloy. The former type of experiment has the problem that the solidified structures between microgravity and 1 g conditions show little difference. This is why the flight samples were prepared by the ordinary cast techniques on Earth. Therefore it is impossible to ascertain whether or not the nucleation and growth of primary crystals in the melt occur and if primary crystals influence the formation of the equiaxed eutectic grains. In this experiment, hypo- and hyper-eutectic aluminum copper alloys which are near eutectic point are used. The chemical compositions of the samples are Al-32.4mass%Cu (Hypo-eutectic) and Al-33.5mass%Cu (hyper-eutectic). Long rods for the samples are cast by the Ohno Continuous Casting Process and they show the unidirectionally solidified structure. Each flight and ground sample was made of these same rods. The dimensions of all samples are 4.5 mm in diameter and 23.5 mm in length. Each sample is put in a graphite capsule and then vacuum sealed in a double silica ampoule. Then the ampoule is put in the tantalum cartridge and sealed by electron beam welding. For onbard experiments, a Continuous Heating Furnance (CHF) will be used for melting and solidifying samples under microgravity conditions. Six flight samples will be used. Four samples are hypo-eutectic and two are hyper-eutectic alloys. The surface of the two hypo-eutectic alloy samples are covered with aluminum oxide film to prevent Marangoni convection expected under microgravity conditions. Each sample will be heated to 700 C and held at that temperature for 5 min. After that the samples will be allowed to cool to 500 C in the furnace and they will be taken out of the furnace for He gas cooling. The heating and cooling diagrams for the flight experiments are shown. After collecting the flight samples, the solidified structures of the samples will be examined and the mechanisms of eutectic solidification under microgravity conditions will be determined. It is likely that successful flight experiment results will lead to production of high quality eutectic alloys and eutectic composite materials in space.

  20. Controlled Growth of Rubrene Nanowires by Eutectic Melt Crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Jeyon; Hyon, Jinho; Park, Kyung-Sun; Cho, Boram; Baek, Jangmi; Kim, Jueun; Lee, Sang Uck; Sung, Myung Mo; Kang, Youngjong

    2016-03-01

    Organic semiconductors including rubrene, Alq3, copper phthalocyanine and pentacene are crystallized by the eutectic melt crystallization. Those organic semiconductors form good eutectic systems with the various volatile crystallizable additives such as benzoic acid, salicylic acid, naphthalene and 1,3,5-trichlorobenzene. Due to the formation of the eutectic system, organic semiconductors having originally high melting point (Tm > 300 °C) are melted and crystallized at low temperature (Te = 40.8–133 °C). The volatile crystallizable additives are easily removed by sublimation. For a model system using rubrene, single crystalline rubrene nanowires are prepared by the eutectic melt crystallization and the eutectic-melt-assisted nanoimpinting (EMAN) technique. It is demonstrated that crystal structure and the growth direction of rubrene can be controlled by using different volatile crystallizable additives. The field effect mobility of rubrene nanowires prepared using several different crystallizable additives are measured and compared.

  1. Diffusionless crystal growth in a eutectic system during rapid solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Galenko, P. K. Herlach, D. M.

    2006-07-15

    Experiments on nonequilibrium rapid eutectic growth are surveyed. The applicability limits of the modern theoretical models describing rapid solidification of binary systems are assessed. A problem of rapid eutectic growth when the local equilibrium is violated in the solute diffusion field (in the bulk liquid and at the solid-liquid interface) is formulated. An analytical solution to the problem of rapid lamellar eutectic growth under local nonequilibrium conditions in the solute diffusion field is found. It is shown that the diffusion-limited growth of a eutectic pattern ceases as soon as a chemically homogeneous crystalline phase begins to grow when the critical point V=V{sub D} is achieved (V is the solid-liquid interface velocity and V{sub D} is the solute diffusion speed in the bulk liquid). At V {>=} V{sub D}, eutectic decomposition is suppressed and the nascent homogeneous crystalline phase has the initial (nominal) chemical composition of the binary system.

  2. Controlled Growth of Rubrene Nanowires by Eutectic Melt Crystallization

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jeyon; Hyon, Jinho; Park, Kyung-Sun; Cho, Boram; Baek, Jangmi; Kim, Jueun; Lee, Sang Uck; Sung, Myung Mo; Kang, Youngjong

    2016-01-01

    Organic semiconductors including rubrene, Alq3, copper phthalocyanine and pentacene are crystallized by the eutectic melt crystallization. Those organic semiconductors form good eutectic systems with the various volatile crystallizable additives such as benzoic acid, salicylic acid, naphthalene and 1,3,5-trichlorobenzene. Due to the formation of the eutectic system, organic semiconductors having originally high melting point (Tm > 300 °C) are melted and crystallized at low temperature (Te = 40.8–133 °C). The volatile crystallizable additives are easily removed by sublimation. For a model system using rubrene, single crystalline rubrene nanowires are prepared by the eutectic melt crystallization and the eutectic-melt-assisted nanoimpinting (EMAN) technique. It is demonstrated that crystal structure and the growth direction of rubrene can be controlled by using different volatile crystallizable additives. The field effect mobility of rubrene nanowires prepared using several different crystallizable additives are measured and compared. PMID:26976527

  3. Controlled Growth of Rubrene Nanowires by Eutectic Melt Crystallization.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jeyon; Hyon, Jinho; Park, Kyung-Sun; Cho, Boram; Baek, Jangmi; Kim, Jueun; Lee, Sang Uck; Sung, Myung Mo; Kang, Youngjong

    2016-01-01

    Organic semiconductors including rubrene, Alq3, copper phthalocyanine and pentacene are crystallized by the eutectic melt crystallization. Those organic semiconductors form good eutectic systems with the various volatile crystallizable additives such as benzoic acid, salicylic acid, naphthalene and 1,3,5-trichlorobenzene. Due to the formation of the eutectic system, organic semiconductors having originally high melting point (Tm > 300 °C) are melted and crystallized at low temperature (Te = 40.8-133 °C). The volatile crystallizable additives are easily removed by sublimation. For a model system using rubrene, single crystalline rubrene nanowires are prepared by the eutectic melt crystallization and the eutectic-melt-assisted nanoimpinting (EMAN) technique. It is demonstrated that crystal structure and the growth direction of rubrene can be controlled by using different volatile crystallizable additives. The field effect mobility of rubrene nanowires prepared using several different crystallizable additives are measured and compared. PMID:26976527

  4. Solvent Production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This article describes production of butanol [acetone-butanol-ethanol, (also called AB or ABE or solvent)] by fermentation using both traditional and current technologies. AB production from agricultural commodities such as corn and molasses was an important historical fermentation. Unfortunately,...

  5. CATALYTIC GASIFICATION OF COAL USING EUTECTIC SALT MIXTURES

    SciTech Connect

    1998-10-01

    This progress report on the Department of Energy project DE-FG-97FT97263 entitled, ''Catalytic Gasification of Coal Using Eutectic Salt Mixtures,'' covers the period April-September 1998. The specific aims of the project for this period were to identify appropriate eutectic salt mixture catalysts for the gasification of Illinois No.6 coal, evaluate various impregnation or catalyst addition methods to improve catalyst dispersion, and evaluate gasification performance in a bench-scale fixed bed reactor. The project is being conducted jointly by Clark Atlanta University (CAU), the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) and the Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) with CAU as the prime contractor. Several single salt catalysts and binary and ternary eutectic catalysts were investigated at Clark Atlanta University. Physical mixing and incipient wetness methods were investigated as catalyst addition techniques. Gasification was carried out using TGA at CAU and UTSI and with a fixed-bed reactor at UTSI. The results showed better gasification activity in the presence of the catalysts tested. The eutectic salt studies showed clear agreement between the melting points of the prepared eutectics and reported literature values. The order of catalytic activity observed was ternary > binary > single salt. With the soluble single salt catalysts, the incipient wetness method was found to give better results than physical mixing technique. Also, catalyst preparation conditions such as catalyst loading, drying time and temperature were found to influence the gasification rate. Based on the Clark Atlanta University studies on Task 1, the project team selected the 43.5%Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-31.5%Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-25%K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} ternary eutectic and the 29%Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-71%K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and 2.3%KNO{sub 3}-97.7%K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} binary eutectic for the fixed bed studies at UTSI. The eutectic salts were found to be highly insoluble in aqueous medium. As a result the technique of adding the eutectic to the raw coal was found to be better than using wet methods. Also, addition of the catalyst to the raw coal appeared to give better gasification results than addition to pyrolyzed coal. In addition, eutectic catalysts added to the coal yielded better gasification rates than rates obtained by mixing the individual salts in the eutectic ratio with the coal. These results, especially with the eutectic catalysts are very significant since the use of the low melting eutectics will reduce the severity of gasification processes.

  6. CATALYTIC GASIFICATION OF COAL USING EUTECTIC SALT MIXTURES

    SciTech Connect

    2000-04-01

    This progress report on the Department of Energy project DE-FG-97FT97263 entitled, ''Catalytic Gasification of Coal Using Eutectic Salt Mixtures'', covers the period April-September 1998. The specific aims of the project for this period were to identify appropriate eutectic salt mixture catalysts for the gasification of Illinois No.6 coal, evaluate various impregnation or catalyst addition methods to improve catalyst dispersion, and evaluate gasification performance in a bench-scale fixed bed reactor. The project is being conducted jointly by Clark Atlanta University (CAU), the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) and the Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) with CAU as the prime contractor. Several single salt catalysts and binary and ternary eutectic catalysts were investigated at Clark Atlanta University. Physical mixing and incipient wetness methods were investigated as catalyst addition techniques. Gasification was carried out using TGA at CAU and UTSI and with a fixed-bed reactor at UTSI. The results showed better gasification activity in the presence of the catalysts tested. The eutectic salt studies showed clear agreement between the melting points of the prepared eutectics and reported literature values. The order of catalytic activity observed was ternary > binary > single salt. With the soluble single salt catalysts, the incipient wetness method was found to give better results than physical mixing technique. Also, catalyst preparation conditions such as catalyst loading, drying time and temperature were found to influence the gasification rate. Based on the Clark Atlanta University studies on Task 1, the project team selected the 43.5%Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-31.5%Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-25%K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} ternary eutectic and the 29%Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-71%K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and 2.3% KNO{sub 3}-97.7%K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} binary eutectic for the fixed bed studies at UTSI. The eutectic salts were found to be highly insoluble in aqueous medium. As a result the technique of adding the eutectic to the raw coal was found to be better than using wet methods. Also, addition of the catalyst to the raw coal appeared to give better gasification results than addition to pyrolyzed coal. In addition, eutectic catalysts added to the coal yielded better gasification rates than rates obtained by mixing the individual salts in the eutectic ratio with the coal. These results, especially with the eutectic catalysts are very significant since the use of the low melting eutectics will reduce the severity of gasification processes.

  7. Halide eutectic growth experiment MA-131

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yue, A. S.; Yue, B. K.; Lee, J. Y. M.

    1976-01-01

    Fiberlike sodium chloride/lithium fluoride eutectic mixtures have been produced on earth and in space by the directional solidification technique. Macroscopic and microscopic examinations were made on longitudinal and transverse sections of Apollo Soyuz Test Project space grown and earth grown ingots. It was found that samples grown in space have a higher percentage of fibers alined with the growth axis. The enhanced alinement of fibers is attributed to the absence of convection currents in the liquid during solidification. Optical transmittance measurements of transverse sections of the space grown and earth grown ingots were performed with an infrared spectrometer. For a given sample thickness, the highest transmittance was obtained from ingots grown in space. For samples of different thicknesses, grown either in space or on earth, it was found that the thinner the sample, the higher the transmittance. This is in agreement with the general optical property of transparent materials.

  8. Directionally solidified iron-base eutectic alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tewari, S. N.

    1976-01-01

    Pseudobinary eutectic alloys with nominal compositions of Fe-25Ta-22Ni-10Cr and Fe-15.5Nb-14.5Ni-6.0Cr were directionally solidified at 0.5 centimeter per hour. Their microstructure consisted of the fcc, iron solid-solution, matrix phase reinforced by about 41-volume-percent, hcp, faceted Fe2Ta fibers and 41-volume-percent, hcp, Fe2Nb lamellae for the tantalum- and niobium-containing alloys, respectively. The microstructural stability under thermal cycling and the temperature dependence of tensile properties were investigated. These alloys showed low elevated-temperature strength and were not considered suitable for application in aircraft-gas-turbine blades although they may have applicability as vane materials.

  9. Use of Microgravity to Control the Microstructure of Eutectics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox. William R.; Regel, Liya L.

    1999-01-01

    This grant began in June of 1996. Its long term goal is to be able to control the microstructure of directionally solidified eutectic alloys, through an improved understanding of the influence of convection. The primary objective of the projects in the present grant is to test hypotheses for the reported influence of microgravity on the microstructure of eutectics. The prior experimental results on the influence of microgravity on the microstructure of eutectics have been contradictory. With lamellar eutectics, microgravity had a negligible effect on the microstructure. Microgravity experiments with fibrous eutectics sometimes showed a finer microstructure and sometimes a coarser microstructure. Most research has been done on the MnBi/Bi rod-like eutectic. Larson and Pirich obtained a two-fold finer microstructure both from microgravity and by use of a magnetic field to quench buoyancy-driven convection. Smith, on the other hand, observed no change in microgravity. Prior theoretical work at Clarkson University showed that buoyancy-driven convection in the vertical Bridgman configuration is not vigorous enough to alter the concentration field in front of a growing eutectic sufficiently to cause a measurable change in microstructure. We assumed that the bulk melt was at the eutectic composition and that freezing occurred at the extremum, i.e. with minimum total undercooling at the freezing interface. There have been four hypotheses attempting to explain the observed changes in microstructure of fibrous eutectics caused by convection: I .A fluctuating freezing rate, combined with unequal kinetics for fiber termination and branching. 2. Off-eutectic composition, either in the bulk melt due to an off-eutectic feed or at the freezing interface because of departure from the extremum condition. 3. Presence of a strong habit modifying impurity whose concentration at the freezing interface would be altered by convection. At the beginning of the present grant, we favored the first of these hypotheses and set out to test it both experimentally and theoretically. We planned the following approaches: I .Pass electric current pulses through the MnBi/Bi eutectic during directional solidification in order to produce an oscillatory freezing rate. 2. Directionally solidify the MnBi/Bi eutectic on Mir using the QUELD II gradient freeze furnace developed by Professor Smith at Queen's University. 3. Select another fibrous eutectic system for investigation using the Accelerated Crucible Rotation Technique to introduce convection. 4. Develop theoretical models for eutectic solidification with an oscillatory freezing rate. Because of the problems with Mir, we substituted ground-based experiments at Queen's University with QUELD II vertical and horizontal, with and without vibration of the furnace. The Al-Si system was chosen for the ACRT experiments. Three related approaches were used to model eutectic solidification with an oscillatory freezing rate. A sharp interface model was used to calculate composition oscillations at the freezing interface in response to imposed freezing rate oscillations.

  10. Influence of convection on rod spacing of eutectics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caram, R.; Chandrasekhar, S.; Wilcox, W. R.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a three-dimensional numerical model to study the influence of convection on the rod-like microstructure of an eutectic system. This model is based on a central finite difference approach. By applying it, the average concentration near the solid/liquid interface of a growing rod-like eutectic was determined for eutectic compositions C(e) of 0.03, 0.05, and 0.10. Following Jackson and Hunt (1966), the average interfacial composition was converted to a change of undercooling at the interface and, finally, to spacing between the rods. The change in rod spacing with increasing intensity of convection was calculated assuming the eutectic grows at minimum interfacial undercooling. It was confirmed that an increase in convection should coarsen the microstructure (i.e., the rod spacing increases with increasing intensity of stirring).

  11. New eutectic alloys and their heats of transformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farkas, D.; Birchenall, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    Eutectic compositions and congruently melting intermetallic compounds in binary and multicomponent systems among common elements such as Al, Ca, Cu, Mg, P, Si, and Zn may be useful for high temperature heat storage. In this work, heats of fusion of new multicomponent eutectics and intermetallic phases are reported, some of which are competitive with molten salts in heat storage density at high temperatures. The method used to determine unknown eutectic compositions combined results of differential thermal analysis, metallography, and microprobe analysis. The method allows determination of eutectic compositions in no more than three steps. The heats of fusion of the alloys were measured using commercial calorimeters, a differential thermal analyzer, and a differential scanning calorimeter.

  12. The microstructure of MnBi/Bi eutectic alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravishankar, P. S.; Wilcox, W. R.; Larson, D. J.

    1980-01-01

    Directionally solidified eutectic alloys of the system MnBi/Bi have been investigated with reference to the dependence of the fiber spacing on the growth rate and the interfacial temperature gradient. It is found that the fiber spacing varies as the inverse square root of the growth rate and does not depend on the temperature gradient in contrast to the claims that all faceted/non-faceted eutectics should show a temperature gradient influence.

  13. DNA–Based Asymmetric Catalysis: Role of Ionic Solvents and Glymes

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hua; Shen, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Recently, DNA has been evaluated as a chiral scaffold for metal complexes to construct so called ‘DNA-based hybrid catalysts’, a robust and inexpensive alternative to enzymes. The unique chiral structure of DNA allows the hybrid catalysts to catalyze various asymmetric synthesis reactions. However, most current studies used aqueous buffers as solvents for these asymmetric reactions, where substrates/products are typically suspended in the solutions. The mass transfer limitation usually requires a long reaction time. To overcome this hurdle and to advance DNA-based asymmetric catalysis, we evaluated a series of ionic liquids (ILs), inorganic salts, deep eutectic solvents (DES), glymes, glycols, acetonitrile and methanol as co-solvents/additives for the DNA-based asymmetric Michael addition. In general, these additives induce indistinguishable changes to the DNA B-form duplex conformation as suggested by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, but impose a significant influence on the catalytic efficiency of the DNA-based hybrid catalyst. Conventional organic solvents (e.g. acetonitrile and methanol) led to poor product yields and/or low enantioselectivities. Most ILs and inorganic salts cause the deactivation of the hybrid catalyst except 0.2 M [BMIM][CF3COO] (95.4% ee and 93% yield) and 0.2 M [BMIM]Cl (93.7% ee and 89% yield). Several other additives have also been found to improve the catalytic efficiency of the DNA-based hybrid catalyst (control reaction without additive gives >99% ee and 87% yield): 0.4 M glycerol (>99% ee and 96% yield at 5 °C or 96.2% ee and 83% yield at room temperature), 0.2 M choline chloride/glycerol (1:2) (92.4% ee and 90% yield at 5 °C or 94.0% ee and 88% yield at room temperature), and 0.5 M dipropylene glycol dimethyl ether (>99% ee and 87% yield at room temperature). The use of some co-solvents/additives allows the Michael addition to be performed at a higher temperature (e.g. room temperature vs 5 °C) and a shorter reaction time (24 h vs 3 days). In addition, we found that a brief pre-sonication (5 min) of DNA in MOPS buffer prior to the reaction could improve the performance of the DNA-based hybrid catalyst. We have also shown that this DNA-based catalysis method is suitable for a variety of different substrates and relatively large-scale reactions. In conclusion, a judicious selection of benign co-solvents/additives could improve the catalytic efficiency of DNA-based hybrid catalyst. PMID:25386337

  14. Lamellar coupled growth in the neopentylglycol-(D)camphor eutectic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witusiewicz, V. T.; Sturz, L.; Hecht, U.; Rex, S.

    2014-01-01

    Lamellar eutectic growth was investigated in the transparent organic alloy neopentylglycol-(D)camphor of eutectic composition (NPG-45.3 wt% DC) using bulk (3D) and thin (2D) samples. Two types of eutectic grains were observed in the polycrystalline samples, either with lamellae well aligned to the direction of solidification or inclined at an angle of 21.5±1.5°. The well aligned grains were used for determining lamellar spacing as function of growth velocity V and temperature gradient G. Based on these data the Jackson-Hunt constant was evaluated to be KJH=1.60±0.15 μm3 s-1. For low growth velocity experiments the contact angles for (DC) and (NPG) lamellae at eutectic triple junctions were also evaluated, being θ(DC)=50.9±4.1° and θ(NPG)=41.8±4.7°, respectively. Using these values, as well as phase diagram data and the Gibbs-Thomson coefficients, the chemical coefficient of diffusion of (D)camphor in the eutectic liquid at eutectic temperature 53 °C was estimated to be DL=97±15 μm2 s-1.

  15. Influence of convection on eutectic microstructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baskaran, V.; Eisa, G. F.; Wilcox, W. R.

    1985-01-01

    When the MnBi-Bi eutectic is directionally solidified, it forms fibers of MnBi in a matrix of bismuth. When the material solidified in space at rates of 30 and 50 cm/hr, the average fiber spacing lambda was about one half of the value obtained in cases in which the same material solidified on earth. Neither an altered temperature gradient nor a fluctuating freezing rate are apparently responsible for the change in lambda, and the possibility is studied that natural convection increases lambda on earth by perturbing the compositional field in the melt ahead of the growing solid. A theoretical analysis is conducted along with some experiments. On the basis of the theoretical results for lamellar growth, it is concluded that the spacing lambda increases with increasing stirring, especially at small freezing rates. The experiments indicate that at low growth rates the cross-sectional area of the MnBi blades increases with increased stirring and with decreased growth rate.

  16. Directionally solidified eutectic gamma-gamma nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, M. R. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A directionally solidified multivariant eutectic gamma-gamma prime nickel-base superalloy casting having improved high temperature properties was developed. The alloy is comprised of a two phase eutectic structure consisting essentially of on a weight percent base, 6.0 to 9.0 aluminum, 5.0 to 17.0 tantalum, 0-10 cobalt, 0-6 vanadium, 0-6 rhenium, 2.0-6.0 tungsten, and the balance being nickel, subject to the proviso that the sum of the atomic percentages of aluminum plus tantalum is within the range of from 19-22, and the ratio of atomic percentages of tantalum to aluminum plus tantalum is within the range of from 0.12 to 0.23. Embedded within the gamma nickel-base matrix are aligned eutectic gamma prime phase (primarily nickel-aluminum-tantalum) reinforcing fibers.

  17. Ternary eutectic dendrites: Pattern formation and scaling properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rátkai, László; Szállás, Attila; Pusztai, Tamás; Mohri, Tetsuo; Gránásy, László

    2015-04-01

    Extending previous work [Pusztai et al., Phys. Rev. E 87, 032401 (2013)], we have studied the formation of eutectic dendrites in a model ternary system within the framework of the phase-field theory. We have mapped out the domain in which two-phase dendritic structures grow. With increasing pulling velocity, the following sequence of growth morphologies is observed: flat front lamellae → eutectic colonies → eutectic dendrites → dendrites with target pattern → partitionless dendrites → partitionless flat front. We confirm that the two-phase and one-phase dendrites have similar forms and display a similar scaling of the dendrite tip radius with the interface free energy. It is also found that the possible eutectic patterns include the target pattern, and single- and multiarm spirals, of which the thermal fluctuations choose. The most probable number of spiral arms increases with increasing tip radius and with decreasing kinetic anisotropy. Our numerical simulations confirm that in agreement with the assumptions of a recent analysis of two-phase dendrites [Akamatsu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 105502 (2014)], the Jackson-Hunt scaling of the eutectic wavelength with pulling velocity is obeyed in the parameter domain explored, and that the natural eutectic wavelength is proportional to the tip radius of the two-phase dendrites. Finally, we find that it is very difficult/virtually impossible to form spiraling two-phase dendrites without anisotropy, an observation that seems to contradict the expectations of Akamatsu et al. Yet, it cannot be excluded that in isotropic systems, two-phase dendrites are rare events difficult to observe in simulations.

  18. Ternary eutectic dendrites: Pattern formation and scaling properties

    SciTech Connect

    Rátkai, László; Szállás, Attila; Pusztai, Tamás; Mohri, Tetsuo; Gránásy, László

    2015-04-21

    Extending previous work [Pusztai et al., Phys. Rev. E 87, 032401 (2013)], we have studied the formation of eutectic dendrites in a model ternary system within the framework of the phase-field theory. We have mapped out the domain in which two-phase dendritic structures grow. With increasing pulling velocity, the following sequence of growth morphologies is observed: flat front lamellae → eutectic colonies → eutectic dendrites → dendrites with target pattern → partitionless dendrites → partitionless flat front. We confirm that the two-phase and one-phase dendrites have similar forms and display a similar scaling of the dendrite tip radius with the interface free energy. It is also found that the possible eutectic patterns include the target pattern, and single- and multiarm spirals, of which the thermal fluctuations choose. The most probable number of spiral arms increases with increasing tip radius and with decreasing kinetic anisotropy. Our numerical simulations confirm that in agreement with the assumptions of a recent analysis of two-phase dendrites [Akamatsu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 105502 (2014)], the Jackson-Hunt scaling of the eutectic wavelength with pulling velocity is obeyed in the parameter domain explored, and that the natural eutectic wavelength is proportional to the tip radius of the two-phase dendrites. Finally, we find that it is very difficult/virtually impossible to form spiraling two-phase dendrites without anisotropy, an observation that seems to contradict the expectations of Akamatsu et al. Yet, it cannot be excluded that in isotropic systems, two-phase dendrites are rare events difficult to observe in simulations.

  19. Ternary eutectic dendrites: Pattern formation and scaling properties.

    PubMed

    Rátkai, László; Szállás, Attila; Pusztai, Tamás; Mohri, Tetsuo; Gránásy, László

    2015-04-21

    Extending previous work [Pusztai et al., Phys. Rev. E 87, 032401 (2013)], we have studied the formation of eutectic dendrites in a model ternary system within the framework of the phase-field theory. We have mapped out the domain in which two-phase dendritic structures grow. With increasing pulling velocity, the following sequence of growth morphologies is observed: flat front lamellae → eutectic colonies → eutectic dendrites → dendrites with target pattern → partitionless dendrites → partitionless flat front. We confirm that the two-phase and one-phase dendrites have similar forms and display a similar scaling of the dendrite tip radius with the interface free energy. It is also found that the possible eutectic patterns include the target pattern, and single- and multiarm spirals, of which the thermal fluctuations choose. The most probable number of spiral arms increases with increasing tip radius and with decreasing kinetic anisotropy. Our numerical simulations confirm that in agreement with the assumptions of a recent analysis of two-phase dendrites [Akamatsu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 105502 (2014)], the Jackson-Hunt scaling of the eutectic wavelength with pulling velocity is obeyed in the parameter domain explored, and that the natural eutectic wavelength is proportional to the tip radius of the two-phase dendrites. Finally, we find that it is very difficult/virtually impossible to form spiraling two-phase dendrites without anisotropy, an observation that seems to contradict the expectations of Akamatsu et al. Yet, it cannot be excluded that in isotropic systems, two-phase dendrites are rare events difficult to observe in simulations. PMID:25903891

  20. Lead-bismuth eutectic technology for Hyperion reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Kapernick, R. J.; McClure, P. R.; Trapp, T. J.

    2013-10-01

    A small lead-bismuth eutectic-cooled reactor concept (referred to as the Hyperion reactor concept) is being studied at Los Alamos National Laboratory and Hyperion Power Generation. In this report, a critical assessment of the lead-bismuth eutectic technology for Hyperion reactor is presented based on currently available knowledge. Included are: material compatibility, oxygen control, thermal hydraulics, polonium control. The key advances in the technology and their applications to Hyperion reactor design are analyzed. Also, the near future studies in main areas of the technology are recommended for meeting the design requirements.

  1. Selecting Resolving Agents with Respect to Their Eutectic Compositions.

    PubMed

    Szeleczky, Zsolt; Semsey, Sándor; Bagi, Péter; Pálovics, Emese; Faigl, Ferenc; Fogassy, Elemér

    2016-03-01

    In order to develop a resolution procedure for a given racemic compound, the first and the most important step is finding the most suitable resolving agent. We studied 18 individual resolutions that were carried out with resolving agents having high eutectic composition. We found that very high enantiomeric excess values were obtained in all cases. We assume that the eutectic composition of a given resolving agent is one of the most important properties that should always be considered during the search for the most efficient resolving agent. Chirality 28:230-234, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26797938

  2. Refinement of Eutectic Silicon Phase of Aluminum A356 Alloy Using High-Intensity Ultrasonic Vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Jian, Xiaogang; Han, Qingyou

    2006-01-01

    The eutectic silicon in A356 alloy can be refined and modified using either chemical, quench, or superheating modification. We observed, for the first time, that the eutectic silicon can also be significantly refined using high-intensity ultrasonic vibration. Rosette-like eutectic silicon is formed during solidification of specimen treated with high-intensity ultrasonic vibration.

  3. Catalytic Gasification of Coal using Eutectic Salt Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Atul Sheth; Pradeep Agrawal; Yaw D. Yeboah

    1998-12-04

    The objectives of this study are to: identify appropriate eutectic salt mixture catalysts for coal gasification; assess agglomeration tendency of catalyzed coal; evaluate various catalyst impregnation techniques to improve initial catalyst dispersion; evaluate effects of major process variables (such as temperature, system pressure, etc.) on coal gasification; evaluate the recovery, regeneration and recycle of the spent catalysts; and conduct an analysis and modeling of the gasification process to provide better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms and kinetics of the process. A review of the collected literature was carried out. The catalysts which have been used for gasification can be roughly classified under the following five groups: alkali metal salts; alkaline earth metal oxides and salts; mineral substances or ash in coal; transition metals and their oxides and salts; and eutectic salt mixtures. Studies involving the use of gasification catalysts have been conducted. However, most of the studies focused on the application of individual catalysts. Only two publications have reported the study of gasification of coal char in CO2 and steam catalyzed by eutectic salt mixture catalysts. By using the eutectic mixtures of salts that show good activity as individual compounds, the gasification temperature can be reduced possibly with still better activity and gasification rates due to improved dispersion of the molten catalyst on the coal particles. For similar metal/carbon atomic ratios, eutectic catalysts were found to be consistently more active than their respective single salts. But the exact roles that the eutectic salt mixtures play in these are not well understood and details of the mechanisms remain unclear. The effects of the surface property of coals and the application methods of eutectic salt mixture catalysts with coal chars on the reactivity of gasification will be studied. Based on our preliminary evaluation of the literature, a ternary eutectic salt mixture consisting of Li- Na- and K- carbonates has the potential as gasification catalyst. To verify the literature reported, melting points for various compositions consisting of these three salts and the temperature range over which the mixture remained molten were determined in the lab. For mixtures with different concentrations of the three salts, the temperatures at which the mixtures were found to be in complete molten state were recorded. By increasing the amount of Li2CO3, the melting temperature range was reduced significantly. In the literature, the eutectic mixtures of Li- Na- and K-carbonates are claimed to have a lower activation energy than that of K2CO3 alone and they remain molten at a lower temperature than pure K2CO3. The slow increase in the gasification rates with eutectics reported in the literature is believed to be due to a gradual penetration of the coals and coal char particles by the molten and viscous catalyst phase. The even spreading of the salt phase seems to increase the overall carbon conversion rate. In the next reporting period, a number of eutectic salts and methods of their application on the coal will be identified and tested.

  4. Directional solidification of eutectic composites in space environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yue, A. S.

    1972-01-01

    The Ni-Ni3Ta eutectic and a nickel-base alloy containing 30 wt pct Ta were solidified unidirectionally in an electron beam floating zone melting apparatus. It was found that the volume fraction of the Ni3Ta phase in the Ni-Ni3Ta eutectic mixture was increased from 7.6 to 36 volume pct in agreement with the theory as predicted. Tensile properties of the randomly solidified and unidirectionally solidified Ni-Ni3Ta eutectic were determined as function of solidification rate and temperature. It was found that the ultimate tensile strength decreased as both the test temperature and solidification rate increased. An elongation of 40 pct was obtained for a nickelbase alloy containing 30 wt at room temperature. This unusually large elongation was attributed to the superplastic behavior of the alloy. The critical currents versus the external fields at 2.5, 3.0, 3.5 and 4.2 deg for the unidirectionally solidified Pb-Sn eutectic were measured. The values of critical fields at zero critical currents were obtained by extrapolation.

  5. Microstructural evolution of eutectic Au-Sn solder joints

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Ho Geon

    2002-05-31

    Current trends toward miniaturization and the use of lead(Pb)-free solder in electronic packaging present new problems in the reliability of solder joints. This study was performed in order to understand the microstructure and microstructural evolution of small volumes of nominally eutectic Au-Sn solder joints (80Au-20Sn by weight), which gives insight into properties and reliability.

  6. Devitrification studies of wollastonite-tricalcium phosphate eutectic glass.

    PubMed

    Magallanes-Perdomo, M; Pena, P; De Aza, P N; Carrodeguas, R G; Rodríguez, M A; Turrillas, X; De Aza, S; De Aza, A H

    2009-10-01

    The present paper describes and discusses the devitrification and crystallization process of wollastonite-tricalcium phosphate (W-TCP) eutectic glass. This process was studied in situ from room temperature up to 1375 degrees C, by neutron diffractometry in vacuum. The data obtained were combined and compared with those performed in ambient atmosphere by differential thermal analysis and with those of samples fired in air at selected temperatures, and then cooled down and subsequently studied by laboratory XRD and field emission scanning electron microscopy fitted with energy X-ray dispersive spectroscopy. The experimental evidence indicates that the devitrification of W-TCP eutectic glass begins at approximately 870 degrees C with the crystallization of a Ca-deficient apatite phase, followed by wollastonite-2M (CaSiO(3)) crystallization at approximately 1006 degrees C. At 1375 degrees C, the bio-glass-ceramic is composed of quasi-rounded colonies formed by a homogeneous mixture of pseudowollastonite (CaSiO(3)) and alpha-tricalcium phosphate (Ca(3)(PO(4))(2)). This microstructure corresponds to irregular eutectic structures. It was also found that it is possible to obtain from the eutectic composition of the wollastonite-tricalcium phosphate binary system a wide range of bio-glass-ceramics, with different crystalline phases present, through appropriate design of thermal treatments. PMID:19427932

  7. Eutectic alloys. Citations from the International Aerospace Abstracts data base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, P.

    1980-01-01

    These 250 abstracts from the international literature provide summaries of the preparation, treatments, composition and structure, and properties of eutectic alloys. Techniques for directional solidification and treatments including glazing, coating, and fiber reinforcement are discussed. In addition to the mechanical and thermal properties, the superconducting, corrosion, resistance, and thermionic emission and adsorption properties are described.

  8. Solvent wash solution

    DOEpatents

    Neace, James C.

    1986-01-01

    Process for removing diluent degradation products from a solvent extraction solution, which has been used to recover uranium and plutonium from spent nuclear fuel. A wash solution and the solvent extraction solution are combined. The wash solution contains (a) water and (b) up to about, and including, 50 volume percent of at least one-polar water-miscible organic solvent based on the total volume of the water and the highly-polar organic solvent. The wash solution also preferably contains at least one inorganic salt. The diluent degradation products dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent and the organic solvent extraction solvent do not dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent. The highly-polar organic solvent and the extraction solvent are separated.

  9. Solvent wash solution

    DOEpatents

    Neace, J.C.

    1984-03-13

    A process is claimed for removing diluent degradation products from a solvent extraction solution, which has been used to recover uranium and plutonium from spent nuclear fuel. A wash solution and the solvent extraction solution are combined. The wash solution contains (a) water and (b) up to about, and including, 50 vol % of at least one-polar water-miscible organic solvent based on the total volume of the water and the highly-polar organic solvent. The wash solution also preferably contains at least one inorganic salt. The diluent degradation products dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent and the organic solvent extraction solvent do not dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent. The highly-polar organic solvent and the extraction solvent are separated.

  10. Use of Microgravity to Control the Microstructure of Eutectics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, William R.; Regel, Liya L.; Smith, Reginald W.

    1998-01-01

    This grant began in June of 1996. Its long term goal is to be able to control the microstructure of directionally solidified eutectic alloys, through an improved understanding of the influence of convection. The primary objective of the present projects is to test hypotheses for the reported influence of microgravity on the microstructure of three fibrous eutectics (MnBi-Bi, InSb-NiSb, Al3Ni-Al). A secondary objective is to determine the influence of convection on the microstructure of other eutectic alloys. Two doctoral students and a masters student supported as a teaching assistant were recruited for this research. Techniques were developed for directional solidification of MnBi-Bi eutectics with periodic application of current pulses to produce an oscillatory freezing rate. Image analysis techniques were developed to obtain the variation in MnBi fiber spacing, which was found to be normally distributed. The mean and standard deviation of fiber spacing were obtained for several freezing conditions. Eighteen ampoules were prepared for use in the gradient freeze furnace QUELD developed at Queen's University for use in microgravity. Nine of these ampoules will be solidified soon at Queen's in a ground-based model. We hope to solidify the other nine in the QUELD that is mounted on the Canadian Microgravity Isolation Mount on MIR. Techniques are being developed for directional solidification of the Al-Si eutectic at different freezing rates, with and without application of accelerated crucible rotation to induce convection. For the first time, theoretical methods are being developed to analyze eutectic solidification with an oscillatory freezing rate. In a classical sharp-interface model, we found that an oscillatory freezing rate increases the deviation of the average interfacial composition from the eutectic, and increases the undercooling of the two phases by different amounts. This would be expected to change the volume fraction solidifying and the fiber spacing. Because of difficulties in tracking the freezing interfaces of the two solid phases, a phase-field model is also being developed. A paper demonstrating application of phase field methods to periodic structures has been submitted for publication.

  11. The UC2-x - Carbon eutectic: A laser heating study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manara, D.; Boboridis, K.; Morel, S.; De Bruycker, F.

    2015-11-01

    The UC2-x - carbon eutectic has been studied by laser heating and fast multi-wavelength pyrometry under inert atmosphere. The study has been carried out on three compositions, two of which close to the phase boundary of the UC2-x - C miscibility gap (with C/U atomic ratios 2 and 2.1), and one, more crucial, with a large excess of carbon (C/U = 2.82). The first two compositions were synthesised by arc-melting. This synthesis method could not be applied to the last composition, which was therefore completed directly by laser irradiation. The U - C - O composition of the samples was checked by using a combustion method in an ELTRA® analyser. The eutectic temperature, established to be 2737 K ± 20 K, was used as a radiance reference together with the cubic - tetragonal (α → β) solid state transition, fixed at 2050 K ± 20 K. The normal spectral emissivity of the carbon-richer compounds increases up to 0.7, whereas the value 0.53 was established for pure hypostoichiometric uranium dicarbide at the limit of the eutectic region. This increase is analysed in the light of the demixing of excess carbon, and used for the determination of the liquidus temperature (3220 K ± 50 K for UC2.82). Due to fast solid state diffusion, also fostered by the cubic - tetragonal transition, no obvious signs of a lamellar eutectic structure could be observed after quenching to room temperature. The eutectic surface C/UC2-x composition could be qualitatively, but consistently, followed during the cooling process with the help of the recorded radiance spectra. Whereas the external liquid surface is almost entirely constituted by uranium dicarbide, it gets rapidly enriched in demixed carbon upon freezing. Demixed carbon seems to quickly migrate towards the inner bulk during further cooling. At the α → β transition, uranium dicarbide covers again the almost entire external surface.

  12. CATALYTIC GASIFICATION OF COAL USING EUTECTIC SALT MIXTURES

    SciTech Connect

    1999-10-01

    This is the progress report for the DOE grant DE-FG26-97FT97263 entitled, ''Catalytic Gasification of Coal Using Eutectic Salt Mixtures'' for the period April 1999 to October 1999. The project is being conducted jointly by Clark Atlanta University, the University of Tennessee Space Institute and Georgia Institute of Technology. The overall objectives of the project are to identify appropriate eutectic salt mixture catalysts for coal gasification; assess agglomeration tendency of catalyzed coal; evaluate various catalyst impregnation techniques to improve initial catalyst dispersion; evaluate effects of major process variables (such as temperature and system pressure) on coal gasification; evaluate the recovery, regeneration and recycle of the spent catalysts; and conduct thorough analysis and modeling of the gasification process to provide better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms and kinetics of the process. During this reporting period, free swelling index measurements of the coal, fixed-bed gasification experiments, kinetic modeling of the catalyzed gasification, and X-ray diffraction analysis of catalyst and gasified char samples were undertaken. The gasification experiments were carried out using two different eutectic salt mixtures of Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} (LNK) system and Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} (NK) system. The gasification process followed a Langmuir-Hinshelwood type model. At 10 wt% of catalyst loading, the activation energy of the ternary catalyst system (LNK) was about half (98kJ/mol) the activation energy of the single catalyst system (K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}), which is about 170 kJ/ mole. The binary catalyst system (NK) showed activation energy of about 201 kJ/mol, which is slightly higher, compared to the K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} catalyst system. The ternary catalyst system was a much better eutectic catalyst system compared to the binary or single catalyst system. In general, a eutectic with a melting point less than the gasification temperature is a better substitute to the single alkali metal salts because they have good catalyst distribution and dispersion in the carbon matrix. The free selling index of the coal was about 1.5 (1 to 2) in comparison to 2.5 (2 to 3) for the coal samples with ternary eutectic. The results for the raw coal were consistent with those from the Penn State Coal Bank. The XRD characterization showed unidentified peaks in the spectra of some of the samples and require further studies to draw any conclusions at the point.

  13. Nucleation and Growth of Eutectic Si in Al-Si Alloys with Na Addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J. H.; Barrirero, J.; Engstler, M.; Aboulfadl, H.; Mücklich, F.; Schumacher, P.

    2015-03-01

    Al-5 wt pct Si-based alloys with Na additions (19 and 160 ppm) have been produced by controlled sand casting and melt spinning. Entrained droplet technique and differential scanning calorimetry were employed to investigate the nucleation behavior of eutectic Si. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography were used to investigate the distribution of Na atoms within eutectic Si and at the interfaces between eutectic Si and eutectic Al. It was found that (i) only 19 ppm Na addition results into a high undercooling (49 K (49 °C)) of the entrained eutectic droplet. However, further increasing Na addition up to 160 ppm exerts no positive effect on the nucleation of eutectic Si, instead a decreased undercooling (29 K (29 °C)) was observed. (ii) Na addition suppresses the growth of eutectic Si due to the Na segregation at the interface between eutectic Si and eutectic Al, and (iii) Na addition promotes significant multiple Si twins, which can be attributed to the proposed adsorption of Na atoms at the intersection of Si twins and along the <112>Si growth direction of Si. The present investigation demonstrates, for the first time, a direct observation on the distribution of Na atoms within eutectic Si and thereby provides strong experimental supports to the well-accepted impurity-induced twinning growth mechanism and poisoning of the twin plane re-entrant edge growth mechanism.

  14. Three-dimensional reconstruction of anomalous eutectic in laser remelted Ni-30 wt.% Sn alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yong-Qing; Lin, Xin; Wang, Zhi-Tai; Wang, Li-Lin; Song, Meng-Hua; Yang, Hai-Ou; Huang, Wei-Dong

    2015-12-01

    Laser remelting has been performed on Ni-30 wt.% Sn hypoeutectic alloy. An anomalous eutectic formed at the bottom of the molten pool when the sample was remelted thoroughly. 3D morphologies of the α-Ni and Ni3Sn phases in the anomalous eutectic region were obtained and investigated using serial sectioning reconstruction technology. It is found that the Ni3Sn phase has a continuous interconnected network structure and the α-Ni phase is distributed as separate particles in the anomalous eutectic, which is consistent with the electron backscatter diffraction pattern examinations. The α-Ni particles in the anomalous eutectic are supersaturated with Sn element as compared with the equilibrium phase diagram. Meanwhile, small wavy lamella eutectics coexist with anomalous eutectics. The Trivedi-Magnin-Kurz model was used to estimate undercooling with lamellar spacing. The results suggest that the critical undercooling found in undercooling solidification is not a sufficient condition for anomalous eutectic formation. Besides, α-Ni particles in the anomalous eutectic do not exhibit a completely random misorientation and some neighboring α-Ni particles have the same orientation. It is shown that both the coupled and decoupled growth of the eutectic two phases can generate the α-Ni + Ni3Sn anomalous eutectic structure.

  15. Eutectic bonding of boron-aluminum structural components. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niemann, J. T.; Garrett, R. A.

    1974-01-01

    Eutectic bonding is a diffusion brazing process developed for fabricating boron-aluminum components from composite monolayer. This process relies on the diffusion of a thin surface film of copper into the aluminum matrix to form a liquid phase when heated above the copper-aluminum eutectic temperature of 1018 F. This type of fabrication offers design flexibility in that skin thickness may be varied, the stiffness geometry and orientation can be varied, and local reinforcement can be added. In addition, this type of boron-aluminum structure offers high efficiency. Also, this method of construction can be cost-comparative with complex titanium shapes; simple tooling permits easy layup, bonding is a one-step operation, and little finish machining is required.

  16. High resolution microstructural and microchemical analysis of zirconia eutectic interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Notis, M.R.

    1993-03-17

    Resolution of microscopic analytical methods has greatly improved over the past decade, and it is now possible to examine periodic variations in structure and chemistry at a scale much finer than the spacing typical of eutectic structures (1-5 [mu]m). During the current year, studies were completed on ZrO[sub 2]-NiO and ZrO[sub 2]-MnO eutectic systems, and study was initiated on microchemical variation in two spinodal systems: Cu-Ni-Sn and SnO[sub 2]-TiO[sub 2]. Work was also initiated on metal/oxide interface microchemistry, in particular the corrosion interface resulting during oxidation of Cu-Sn alloys. 6 figs.

  17. Electrochemical method of producing eutectic uranium alloy and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Horton, James A.; Hayden, H. Wayne

    1995-01-01

    An apparatus and method for continuous production of liquid uranium alloys through the electrolytic reduction of uranium chlorides. The apparatus includes an electrochemical cell formed from an anode shaped to form an electrolyte reservoir, a cathode comprising a metal, such as iron, capable of forming a eutectic uranium alloy having a melting point less than the melting point of pure uranium, and molten electrolyte in the reservoir comprising a chlorine or fluorine containing salt and uranium chloride. The method of the invention produces an eutectic uranium alloy by creating an electrolyte reservoir defined by a container comprising an anode, placing an electrolyte in the reservoir, the electrolyte comprising a chlorine or fluorine containing salt and uranium chloride in molten form, positioning a cathode in the reservoir where the cathode comprises a metal capable of forming an uranium alloy having a melting point less than the melting point of pure uranium, and applying a current between the cathode and the anode.

  18. Coatings for directional eutectics. [for corrosion and oxidation resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felten, E. J.; Strangman, T. E.; Ulion, N. E.

    1974-01-01

    Eleven coating systems based on MCrAlY overlay and diffusion aluminide prototypes were evaluated to determine their capability for protecting the gamma/gamma prime-delta directionally solidified eutectic alloy (Ni-20Cb-6Cr-2.5Al) in gas turbine engine applications. Furnace oxidation and hot corrosion, Mach 0.37 burner-rig, tensile ductility, stress-rupture and thermomechanical fatigue tests were used to evaluate the coated gamma/gamma prime-delta alloy. The diffusion aluminide coatings provided adequate oxidation resistance at 1144 K (1600 F) but offered very limited protection in 114 K (1600 F) hot corrosion and 1366 K (2000 F) oxidation tests. A platinum modified NiCrAlY overlay coating exhibited excellent performance in oxidation testing and had no adverse effects upon the eutectic alloy.

  19. Embedded Binary Eutectic Alloy Nanostructures as Phase Change Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrzan, D. C.; Shin, S. J.; Guzman, J.; Yuan, C. W.; Liao, C. Y.; Boswell-Koller, C. N.; Stone, P. R.; Dubon, O. D.; Minor, A. M.; Watanabe, M.; Beeman, J. W.; Yu, K. M.; Ager, J. W., III; Haller, E. E.

    2010-03-01

    Phase change materials are essential components of both optical data storage and emerging static random access memory technologies. We suggest a new approach to development of phase change memory materials: embedded binary eutectic-alloy nanostructures. The approach exploits the unique properties binary eutectic-alloys that emerge when they are embedded within nanoscale voids. The equilibrium, as-grown, morphology of GeSn nanostructures within SiO2 is a phase separated, bi-crystalline, bi-lobed state. The rapid cooling following pulsed laser melting stabilizes an amorphous, homogeneously mixed state. Subsequent annealing recrystallizes the bi-lobed state. Further, the composition of the alloy can be used to tune the recrystallization temperature over the range of temperatures between 150C and 500C. Thus these nanostructures display the requisite crystalline-amorphous-crystalline transition, and enable tuning of the relevant transformation temperatures.

  20. Corrosion of ODS steels in lead bismuth eutectic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosemann, P.; Thau, H. T.; Johnson, A. L.; Maloy, S. A.; Li, N.

    2008-02-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels are advanced materials being developed for high temperature applications. Their properties (high temperature strength, creep resistance, corrosion/oxidation resistance) make them potentially usable for high temperature applications in liquid metal cooled systems like liquid lead-bismuth eutectic cooled reactors and spallation sources. Corrosion tests on five different ODS alloys were performed in flowing liquid lead-bismuth eutectic in the DELTA Loop at the Los Alamos National Laboratory at 535 C for 200 h and 600 h. The tested materials were chromium alloyed ferritic/martensitic steels (12YWT, 14YWT, MA957) and Cr-Al alloyed steels (PM2000, MA956). It was shown that the Al alloyed ODS steel above 5.5 wt% Al (PM2000) is highly resistant to corrosion and oxidation in the conditions examined, and that the corrosion properties of the ODS steels depend strongly on their grain size.

  1. NEPTUNIUM SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Dawson, L.R.; Fields, P.R.

    1959-10-01

    The separation of neptunium from an aqueous solution by solvent extraction and the extraction of neptunium from the solvent solution are described. Neptunium is separated from an aqueous solution containing tetravalent or hexavalent neptunium nitrate, nitric acid, and a nitrate salting out agent, such as sodium nitrate, by contacting the solution with an organic solvent such as diethyl ether. Subsequently, the neptunium nitrate is extracted from the organic solvent extract phase with water.

  2. An approximate formula for recalescence in binary eutectic alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohsaka, K.; Trinh, E. H.

    1993-01-01

    In alloys, solidification takes place along various paths which may be ascertained via phase diagrams; while there would be no single formula applicable to all alloys, an approximate formula for a specific solidification path would be useful in estimating the fraction of the solid formed during recalescence. A formulation is here presented of recalescence in binary eutectic alloys. This formula is applied to Ag-Cu alloys which are of interest in containerless solidification, due to their formation of supersaturated solutions.

  3. Eutectic Syntheses of Graphitic Carbon with High Pyrazinic Nitrogen Content.

    PubMed

    Fechler, Nina; Zussblatt, Niels P; Rothe, Regina; Schlögl, Robert; Willinger, Marc-Georg; Chmelka, Bradley F; Antonietti, Markus

    2016-02-01

    Mixtures of phenols/ketones and urea show eutectic behavior upon gentle heating. These mixtures possess liquid-crystalline-like phases that can be processed. The architecture of phenol/ketone acts as structure-donating motif, while urea serves as melting-point reduction agent. Condensation at elevated temperatures results in nitrogen-containing carbons with remarkably high nitrogen content of mainly pyrazinic nature. PMID:26178584

  4. Solvents safety handbook

    SciTech Connect

    De Renzo, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    Know solvents and how to protect yourself from dangerous exposure to them. Instant information for decision-making regarding industrial solvents in everyday use, is provided in this handbook which is a compilation of data on 335 hazardous and frequently-used solvents.

  5. Solvent recycle/recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Paffhausen, M.W.; Smith, D.L.; Ugaki, S.N.

    1990-09-01

    This report describes Phase I of the Solvent Recycle/Recovery Task of the DOE Chlorinated Solvent Substitution Program for the US Air Force by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, EG G Idaho, Inc., through the US Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office. The purpose of the task is to identify and test recovery and recycling technologies for proposed substitution solvents identified by the Biodegradable Solvent Substitution Program and the Alternative Solvents/Technologies for Paint Stripping Program with the overall objective of minimizing hazardous wastes. A literature search to identify recycle/recovery technologies and initial distillation studies has been conducted. 4 refs.

  6. Solvents and sustainable chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Welton, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Solvents are widely recognized to be of great environmental concern. The reduction of their use is one of the most important aims of green chemistry. In addition to this, the appropriate selection of solvent for a process can greatly improve the sustainability of a chemical production process. There has also been extensive research into the application of so-called green solvents, such as ionic liquids and supercritical fluids. However, most examples of solvent technologies that give improved sustainability come from the application of well-established solvents. It is also apparent that the successful implementation of environmentally sustainable processes must be accompanied by improvements in commercial performance. PMID:26730217

  7. Metastable Eutectic Equilibrium in Natural Environments: Recent Development and Research Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.; Nuth, Joseph A., III; Jablonska, Mariola; Karner, James M.

    2000-01-01

    Chemical ordering at metastable eutectics was recognized in non-equilibrium gas-to- solid condensation experiments to constrain 'silicate' dust formation in O-rich circumstellar environments. The predictable metastable eutectic behavior successfully predicted the observed ferromagnesiosilica compositions of circumstellar dust presolar and solar nebula grains in the matrix of the collected aggregate IDPs (Interplanetary Dust Particles). Many of the experimentally determined metastable eutectic solids match the fundamental building blocks of common rock-forming layer silicates: this could have implications for the origin of Life. The physical conditions conducive to metastable eutectic behavior, i.e. high temperature and (ultra) fast quenching, lead to unique amorphous, typically nano- to micrometer-sized, materials. The new paradigm of metastable eutectic behavior opens the door to new and exciting research opportunities in uncovering the many implications of these unique amorphous, and typically nano-to micrometer-sized, metastable eutectic materials.

  8. Metastable Eutectic Equilibrium in Natural Environments: Recent Developments and Research Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rietmeijer, Fans J. M.; Nuth, Joseph A., II; Jablonska, Mariola; Karner, James M.

    2000-01-01

    Chemical ordering at metastable eutectics was recognized in non-equilibrium gas-to- solid condensation experiments to constrain 'silicate' dust formation in O-rich circumstellar environments. The predictable metastable eutectic behavior successfully predicted the observed ferromagnesiosilica, compositions of circumstellar dust, presolar and solar nebula grains in the matrix of the collected aggregate IDPs. Many of the experimentally determined metastable eutectic solids match the fundamental building blocks of common rock-forming layer silicates: this could have implications for the origin of Life. The physical conditions conducive to metastable eutectic behavior, i.e. high temperature and (ultra)fast quenching, lead to unique amorphous, typically nano- to micrometer-sized, materials. The new paradigm of metastable eutectic behavior opens the door to new and exciting research opportunities in uncovering the many implications of these unique amorphous and typically nano- to micrometer-sized, metastable eutectic materials.

  9. Radioscopic visualization of isothermal solidification of eutectic Ga-In alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Derebail, R.; Koster, J.N.

    1996-08-01

    The phase diagram for a gallium-indium alloy shows that the eutectic is formed at a temperature of 15.3 C and has a eutectic composition of 14.2 at. pct In (21.4 wt pct In). A eutectic melt is expected to solidify completely when the eutectic temperature is reached. This requires that no gravitational segregation occurs in the melt. A survey of the available literature on eutectic Ga-In revealed no prior experiments on the in situ visualization of solidification. The goal of this experimental work was to observe the isothermal solidification of a vertical layer of molten eutectic Ga-In in real-time using X-ray radioscopy.

  10. CATALYTIC GASIFICATION OF COAL USING EUTECTIC SALT MIXTURES

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    1999-04-01

    The project, ''Catalytic Gasification of Coal Using Eutectic Salt Mixtures'', is being conducted jointly by Clark Atlanta University (CAU), the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) and the Georgia Institute of Technology (GT). The aims of the project are to: identify appropriate eutectic salt mixture catalysts for the gasification of Illinois No.6 coal; evaluate various impregnation or catalyst addition methods to improve catalyst dispersion; evaluate effects of major process variables (e.g., temperature, system pressure, etc.) on coal gasification; evaluate the recovery, regeneration and recycle of the spent catalysts in a bench-scale fixed bed reactor; and conduct thorough analysis and modeling of the gasification process to provide a better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms and kinetics of the process. The eutectic catalysts increased gasification rate significantly. The methods of catalyst preparation and addition had significant effect on the catalytic activity and coal gasification. The incipient wetness method gave more uniform catalyst distribution than that of physical mixing for the soluble catalysts resulting in higher gasification rates for the incipient wetness samples. The catalytic activity increased by varying degrees with catalyst loading. The above results are especially important since the eutectic catalysts (with low melting points) yield significant gasification rates even at low temperatures. Among the ternary eutectic catalysts studied, the system 39% Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-38.5% Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-22.5% Rb{sub 2}CO{sub 3} showed the best activity and will be used for further bench scale fixed-bed gasification reactor in the next period. Based on the Clark Atlanta University studies in the previous reporting period, the project team selected the 43.5% Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-31.5% Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-25% K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} ternary eutectic and the 29% Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-71% K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} binary eutectic for the fixed-bed studies at UTSI during this reporting period. Temperature was found to have a significant effect on the rate of gasification of coal. The rate of gasification increased up to 1400 F. Pressure did not have much effect on the gasification rates. The catalyst loading increased the gasification rate and approached complete conversion when 10 wt% of catalyst was added to the coal. Upon further increasing the catalyst amount to 20-wt% and above, there was no significant rise in gasification rate. The rate of gasification was lower for a 2:1 steam to char molar ratio (60%) compared to gasification rates at 3.4:1 molar ratio of steam-to-char where the conversion approached 100%. The characterization results of Georgia Tech are very preliminary and inconclusive and will be made available in the next report.

  11. Micro-to-nano-scale deformation mechanisms of a bimodal ultrafine eutectic composite.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seoung Wan; Kim, Jeong Tae; Hong, Sung Hwan; Park, Hae Jin; Park, Jun-Young; Lee, Nae Sung; Seo, Yongho; Suh, Jin Yoo; Eckert, Jrgen; Kim, Do Hyang; Park, Jin Man; Kim, Ki Buem

    2014-01-01

    The outstading mechanical properties of bimodal ultrafine eutectic composites (BUECs) containing length scale hierarchy in eutectic structure were demonstrated by using AFM observation of surface topography with quantitative height measurements and were interpreted in light of the details of the deformation mechanisms by three different interface modes. It is possible to develop a novel strain accommodated eutectic structure for triggering three different interface-controlled deformation modes; (I) rotational boundary mode, (II) accumulated interface mode and (III) individual interface mode. A strain accommodated microstructure characterized by the surface topology gives a hint to design a novel ultrafine eutectic alloys with excellent mechanical properties. PMID:25265897

  12. Bonding of sapphire to sapphire by eutectic mixture of aluminum oxide and zirconium oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deluca, J. J. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    An element comprising sapphire, ruby or blue sapphire can be bonded to another element of such material with a eutectic mixture of aluminum oxide and zirconium oxide. The bonding mixture may be applied in the form of a distilled water slurry or by electron beam vapor deposition. In one embodiment the eutectic is formed in situ by applying a layer of zirconium oxide and then heating the assembly to a temperature above the eutectic temperature and below the melting point of the material from which the elements are formed. The formation of a sapphire rubidium maser cell utilizing eutectic bonding is shown.

  13. Bonding of sapphire to sapphire by eutectic mixture of aluminum oxide and zirconium oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deluca, J. J. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    Bonding of an element comprising sapphire, ruby or blue sapphire to another element of such material with a eutectic mixture of aluminum oxide and zirconium oxide is discussed. The bonding mixture may be applied in the form of a distilled water slurry or by electron beam vapor deposition. In one embodiment the eutectic is formed in situ by applying a layer of zirconium oxide and then heating the assembly to a temperature above the eutectic temperature and below the melting point of the material from which the elements are formed. The formation of a sapphire rubidium maser cell utilizing eutectic bonding is shown.

  14. Micro-to-nano-scale deformation mechanisms of a bimodal ultrafine eutectic composite

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seoung Wan; Kim, Jeong Tae; Hong, Sung Hwan; Park, Hae Jin; Park, Jun-Young; Lee, Nae Sung; Seo, Yongho; Suh, Jin Yoo; Eckert, Jrgen; Kim, Do Hyang; Park, Jin Man; Kim, Ki Buem

    2014-01-01

    The outstading mechanical properties of bimodal ultrafine eutectic composites (BUECs) containing length scale hierarchy in eutectic structure were demonstrated by using AFM observation of surface topography with quantitative height measurements and were interpreted in light of the details of the deformation mechanisms by three different interface modes. It is possible to develop a novel strain accommodated eutectic structure for triggering three different interface-controlled deformation modes; (I) rotational boundary mode, (II) accumulated interface mode and (III) individual interface mode. A strain accommodated microstructure characterized by the surface topology gives a hint to design a novel ultrafine eutectic alloys with excellent mechanical properties. PMID:25265897

  15. Synthesis of cerium rich intermetallics using molten metal eutectics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Patricia Christine

    Metal eutectic fluxes are useful for exploratory synthesis of new intermetallic phases. In this work the use of cerium/transition metal eutectics such as: Ce/Co, Ce/Ni, and Ce/Fe have yielded many new synthetically and magnetically complex phases. Structural units that were previously observed in phases grown in La/Ni eutectic reactions have also been observed in new structures and analogs grown from cerium/transition metal eutectics. These structural units include a main group element coordinated by 9 rare-earth atoms (such as the Al Ce9 clusters seen in Ce31.0(2)Fe11.8(5)Al6.5(6) B13C4), trigonal planar FeC3 units (also seen in Ce31.0(2)Fe11.8(5)Al6.5(6)B 13C4), iron clusters capped by light elements (Fe4C 6 frustrated tetrahedral in Ce21Fe8M7C 14, and larger Fe clusters in Ce33Fe14B25 C34). Variants of these building blocks were observed in Ce10Co2B7C16 with square Co units and chains of B and C connected to them, Fe2C8 units observed in Ce7Fe2C9, and FeC4 observed in Ce4FeGa0.85Al0.15C4 and Ce4FeAlC4. Two new phases were grown from Ce/Fe eutectic, Ce33Fe 14B25C34 and Ce33Fe13B 18C34 which exhibits very similar structures, but significantly different magnetic behavior. Structurally these two phases are similar. Both crystallize in the Im-3m space group, but differ by the centering of the Fe clusters. Ce33Fe14B25C34 contains Fe clusters centered by B atoms and Al doped on the Fe2 site. In Ce33Fe13B18C34, the Fe cluster is a perfect cuboctahedron. Ce33Fe14B25 C34 exhibits mixed valent behavior of cerium at 75K and no magnetic moment on iron, where-as Ce33Fe13B18C 34 exhibits tetravalent cerium and its iron clusters undergo a ferromagnetic transition at 180K. Another borocarbide, Ce10Co2B7C 16 was synthesized from Ce/Co eutectic flux. This structure features squares of Co surrounded by chains of C and B and a sea of cerium atoms. Temperature dependent magnetic susceptibility measurements at 1 Tesla were fit to a modified Curie-Weiss law and a moment per Ce was calculated to be 2.70microB. Field dependent data were collected at 200K and 2K. Paramagnetic behavior dominated at 200K and at 2K, ferromagnetic behavior was observed. XPS measurements were used to confirm that Ce is in the 3+ oxidation state. Intermetallics containing different Fe clusters (Y5Mg 5Fe4AlSi, La6Fe10Al3Si, Ce21Fe8Al7-xSixC12, and Ce33Fe13.1Al1.1B24.8C 34) were explored as potential catalysts for conversion of methane to Carbon Nanotubes (CNT). Different growth temperatures were explored. At 690ºC, Ce33Fe14B25C34 catalyzed the growth of single walled carbon nanotubes, Ce21Fe8Al7-x SixC12 multiwalled carbon nanotubes, and all other structures did not catalyze the growth of CNT.

  16. Solvent extraction of diatomite

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, W.

    1984-07-24

    There is provided a method of extracting hydrocarbons from a diatomite ore. The particle size of the ore is first reduced to form a processed ore. The processed ore is then mixed with a substantially irregular granular material to form an unstratified ore mixture having increased permeability to an extracting solvent. The unstratified ore mixture is then permeated with an extracting solvent to obtain a hydrocarbon-solvent stream from which hydrocarbons are subsequently separated. The irregular granular material may be sand.

  17. Refinement of Promising Coating Compositions for Directionally Cast Eutectics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strangman, T. E.; Felten, E. J.; Benden, R. S.

    1976-01-01

    The successful application of high creep strength, directionally solidified gamma/gamma prime-delta (Ni-19.7Cb-6Cr-2.5Al) eutectic superalloy turbine blades requires the development of suitable coatings for airfoil, root and internal blade surfaces. In order to improve coatings for the gamma/gamma prime-delta alloy, the current investigation had the goals of (1) refining promising coating compositions for directionally solidified eutectics, (2) evaluating the effects of coating/ substrate interactions on the mechanical properties of the alloy, and (3) evaluating diffusion aluminide coatings for internal surfaces. Burner rig cyclic oxidation, furnace cyclic hot corrosion, ductility, and thermal fatigue tests indicated that NiCrAlY+Pt(63 to 127 micron Ni-18Cr-12Al-0.3Y + 6 micron Pt) and NiCrAlY(63 to 127 micron Ni-18Cr-12Al-0.3Y) coatings are capable of protecting high temperature gas path surfaces of eutectic alloy airfoils. Burner rig (Mach 0.37) testing indicated that the useful coating life of the 127 micron thick coatings exceeded 1000 hours at 1366 K (2000 deg F). Isothermal fatigue and furnance hot corrosion tests indicated that 63 micron NiCrAlY, NiCrAlY + Pt and platinum modified diffusion aluminide (Pt + Al) coating systems are capable of protecting the relatively cooler surfaces of the blade root. Finally, a gas phase coating process was evaluated for diffusion aluminizing internal surfaces and cooling holes of air-cooled gamma/gamma prime-delta turbine blades.

  18. Directional solidification of Pb-Sn eutectic with vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caram, Rubens; Banan, Mohsen; Wilcox, William R.

    1991-01-01

    Pb-Sn eutectic alloy was directionally solidified at 1.4 to 3.2 cm/hr with forced convection induced by axial vibration of the growth ampoule with a frequency of 10 to 40 Hz and an amplitude of 0.5 to 1.0 mm. To determine the exact growth rate, an interface demarcation technique was applied. The lamellar spacing was increased 10 to 40 percent in ingots solidified with vibration compared to those solidified without vibration. The average intensity of convection in the melt under axial vibration of the ampoule was estimated by comparing the experimental results with a theoretical model.

  19. Development of high temperature fasteners using directionally solidified eutectic alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, F. D.

    1972-01-01

    The suitability of the eutectics for high temperature fasteners was investigated. Material properties were determined as a function of temperature, and included shear parallel and perpendicular to the growth direction and torsion parallel to it. Techniques for fabricating typical fastener shapes included grinding, creep forming, and direct casting. Both lamellar Ni3Al-Ni3Nb and fibrous (Co,Cr,Al)-(Cr,Co)7C3 alloys showed promise as candidate materials for high temperature fastener applications. A brief evaluation of the performance of the best fabricated fastener design was made.

  20. Pattern Formation and Growth Kinetics in Eutectic Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jing Teng

    2007-12-01

    Growth patterns during liquid/solid phase transformation are governed by simultaneous effects of heat and mass transfer mechanisms, creation of new interfaces, jump of the crystallization units from liquid to solid and their rearrangement in the solid matrix. To examine how the above processes influence the scale of microstructure, two eutectic systems are chosen for the study: a polymeric system polyethylene glycol-p-dibromobenzene (PEG-DBBZ) and a simple molecular system succinonitrile (SCN)-camphor. The scaling law for SCN-camphor system is found to follow the classical Jackson-Hunt model of circular rod eutectic, where the diffusion in the liquid and the interface energy are the main physics governing the two-phase pattern. In contrast, a significantly different scaling law is observed for the polymer system. The interface kinetics of PEG phase and its solute concentration dependence thus have been critically investigated for the first time by directional solidification technique. A model is then proposed that shows that the two-phase pattern in polymers is governed by the interface diffusion and the interface kinetics. In SCN-camphor system, a new branch of eutectic, elliptical shape rodl, is found in thin samples where only one layer of camphor rods is present. It is found that the orientation of the ellipse can change from the major axis in the direction of the thickness to the direction of the width as the velocity and/or the sample thickness is decreased. A theoretical model is developed that predicts the spacing and orientation of the elliptical rods in a thin sample. The single phase growth patterns of SCN-camphor system were also examined with emphasis on the three-dimensional single cell and cell/dendrite transition. For the 3D single cell in a capillary tube, the entire cell shape ahead of the eutectic front can be described by the Saffmann-Taylor finger only at extremely low growth rate. A 3D directional solidification model is developed to characterize the cell shape and tip undercooling and the experimental results are compared with the predictions of the model. From the investigation of cell/dendrite transition, a model is proposed, from which the condition for the onset of the transition can be obtained.

  1. Divorced Eutectic Solidification of Mg-Al Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monas, Alexander; Shchyglo, Oleg; Kim, Se-Jong; Yim, Chang Dong; Höche, Daniel; Steinbach, Ingo

    2015-08-01

    We present simulations of the nucleation and equiaxed dendritic growth of the primary hexagonal close-packed -Mg phase followed by the nucleation of the -phase in interdendritic regions. A zoomed-in region of a melt channel under eutectic conditions is investigated and compared with experiments. The presented simulations allow prediction of the final properties of an alloy based on process parameters. The obtained results give insight into the solidification processes governing the microstructure formation of Mg-Al alloys, allowing their targeted design for different applications.

  2. Microstructure and mechanical properties of eutectic nickel alloy coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezborodov, V. P.; Saraev, Yu N.

    2016-04-01

    The paper discusses the peculiarities of a structure and a coating composition after reflow. It was established that the structure of coatings from nickel alloy is a solid solution based on nickel, the eutectic of γ-Ni+Ni3B composition and dispersed reinforcing particles. The content of alloying elements in the initial powder material determines the type of the coating structure and the formation of hypoeutectic or hypereutectic structures. The influence of formation conditions on the structure and physical-mechanical properties of the coatings is considered in this paper.

  3. Creep in Directionally Solidified NiAl-Mo Eutectics

    SciTech Connect

    Dudova, Marie; Kucharova, Kveta; Bartak, Tomas; Bei, Hongbin; George, Easo P; Somsen, Ch.; Dlouhy, A.

    2011-01-01

    A directionally solidified NiAl-Mo eutectic and an NiAl intermetallic, having respective nominal compositions Ni-45.5Al-9Mo and Ni-45.2Al (at.%), were loaded in compression at 1073 and 1173 K. Formidable strengthening by regularly distributed Mo fibres (average diameter 600 nm, volume fraction 14%) was observed. The fibres can support compression stresses transferred from the plastically deforming matrix up to a critical stress of the order of 2.5 GPa, at which point they yield. Microstructural evidence is provided for the dislocation-mediated stress transfer from the NiAl to the Mo phase.

  4. 3D Synchrotron Imaging of a Directionally Solidified Ternary Eutectic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennstedt, Anne; Helfen, Lukas; Steinmetz, Philipp; Nestler, Britta; Ratke, Lorenz

    2016-03-01

    For the first time, the microstructure of directionally solidified ternary eutectics is visualized in three dimensions, using a high-resolution technique of X-ray tomography at the ESRF. The microstructure characterization is conducted with a photon energy, allowing to clearly discriminate the three phases Ag2Al, Al2Cu, and α-Aluminum solid solution. The reconstructed images illustrate the three-dimensional arrangement of the phases. The Ag2Al lamellae perform splitting and merging as well as nucleation and disappearing events during directional solidification.

  5. Eutectic Morphology of Al-7Si-0.3Mg Alloys with Scandium Additions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandee, Phromphong; Gourlay, C. M.; Belyakov, S. A.; Ozaki, Ryota; Yasuda, Hideyuki; Limmaneevichitr, Chaowalit

    2014-09-01

    The mechanisms of Al-Si eutectic refinement due to scandium (Sc) additions have been studied in an Al-7Si-0.3Mg foundry alloy. The evolution of eutectic microstructure is studied by thermal analysis and interrupted solidification, and the distribution of Sc is studied by synchrotron micro-XRF mapping. Sc is shown to cause significant refinement of the eutectic silicon. The results show that Sc additions strongly suppress the nucleation of eutectic silicon due to the formation of ScP instead of AlP. Sc additions change the macroscopic eutectic growth mode to the propagation of a defined eutectic front from the mold walls opposite to the heat flux direction similar to past work with Na, Ca, and Y additions. It is found that Sc segregates to the eutectic aluminum and AlSi2Sc2 phases and not to eutectic silicon, suggesting that impurity-induced twinning does not operate. The results suggest that Sc refinement is mostly caused by the significantly reduced silicon nucleation frequency and the resulting increase in mean interface growth rate.

  6. SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF NEPTUNIUM

    DOEpatents

    Butler, J.P.

    1958-08-12

    A process is described for the recovery of neptuniunn from dissolver solutions by solvent extraction. The neptunium containing solution should be about 5N, in nitric acid.and about 0.1 M in ferrous ion. The organic extracting agent is tributyl phosphate, and the neptuniunn is recovered from the organic solvent phase by washing with water.

  7. ONSITE SOLVENT RECOVERY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study evaluated the product quality, waste reduction/pollution prevention, and economic aspects of three technologies for onsite solvent recovery: atmospheric batch distillation, vacuum heat-pump distillation, and a low-emission vapor degreaser with closed solvent, liquid an...

  8. Solvent-free synthesis

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter gives a brief introduction about solvent-free reactions whose importance can be gauged by the increasing number of publications every year during the last decade. The mechanistic aspects of the reactions under solvent-free conditions have been highlighted. Our observ...

  9. Ternary eutectic growth of nanostructured thermoelectric Ag-Pb-Te materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hsin-jay; Foo, Wei-jian; Chen, Sinn-wen; Jeffrey Snyder, G.

    2012-07-01

    Nanostructured Ag-Pb-Te thermoelectric materials were fabricated by unidirectionally solidifying the ternary Ag-Pb-Te eutectic and near-eutectic alloys using the Bridgeman method. Specially, the Bridgman-grown eutectic alloy exhibited a partially aligned lamellar microstructure, which consisted of Ag5Te3 and Te phases, with additional 200-600 nm size particles of PbTe. The self-assembled interfaces altered the thermal and electronic transport properties in the bulk Ag-Pb-Te eutectic alloy. Presumably due to phonon scattering from the nanoscale microstructure, a low thermal conductivity (? = 0.3 W/mK) was achieved of the eutectic alloy, leading to a zT peak of 0.41 at 400 K.

  10. Ternary eutectic growth of nanostructured thermoelectric Ag-Pb-Te materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hsin-jay; Chen, Sinn-wen; Foo, Wei-jian; Jeffrey Snyder, G.

    2012-07-09

    Nanostructured Ag-Pb-Te thermoelectric materials were fabricated by unidirectionally solidifying the ternary Ag-Pb-Te eutectic and near-eutectic alloys using the Bridgeman method. Specially, the Bridgman-grown eutectic alloy exhibited a partially aligned lamellar microstructure, which consisted of Ag{sub 5}Te{sub 3} and Te phases, with additional 200-600 nm size particles of PbTe. The self-assembled interfaces altered the thermal and electronic transport properties in the bulk Ag-Pb-Te eutectic alloy. Presumably due to phonon scattering from the nanoscale microstructure, a low thermal conductivity ({kappa} = 0.3 W/mK) was achieved of the eutectic alloy, leading to a zT peak of 0.41 at 400 K.

  11. Electrochemical method of producing eutectic uranium alloy and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Horton, J.A.; Hayden, H.W.

    1995-01-10

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for continuous production of liquid uranium alloys through the electrolytic reduction of uranium chlorides. The apparatus includes an electrochemical cell formed from an anode shaped to form an electrolyte reservoir, a cathode comprising a metal, such as iron, capable of forming a eutectic uranium alloy having a melting point less than the melting point of pure uranium, and molten electrolyte in the reservoir comprising a chlorine or fluorine containing salt and uranium chloride. The method of the invention produces an eutectic uranium alloy by creating an electrolyte reservoir defined by a container comprising an anode, placing an electrolyte in the reservoir, the electrolyte comprising a chlorine or fluorine containing salt and uranium chloride in molten form, positioning a cathode in the reservoir where the cathode comprises a metal capable of forming an uranium alloy having a melting point less than the melting point of pure uranium, and applying a current between the cathode and the anode. 2 figures.

  12. A fully coupled 2D model of equiaxed eutectic solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Charbon, Ch.; LeSar, R.

    1995-12-31

    We propose a model of equiaxed eutectic solidification that couples the macroscopic level of heat diffusion with the microscopic level of nucleation and growth of the eutectic grains. The heat equation with the source term corresponding to the latent heat release due to solidification is calculated numerically by means of an implicit finite difference method. In the time stepping scheme, the evolution of solid fraction is deduced from a stochastic model of nucleation and growth which uses the local temperature (interpolated from the FDM mesh) to determine the local grain density and the local growth rate. The solid-liquid interface of each grain is tracked by using a subdivision of each grain perimeter in a large number of sectors. The state of each sector (i.e. whether it is still in contact with the liquid or already captured by an other grain) and the increase of radius of each grain during one time step allows one to compute the increase of solid fraction. As for deterministic models, the results of the model are the evolution of temperature and of solid fraction at any point of the sample. Moreover the model provides a complete picture of the microstructure, thus not limiting the microstructural information to the average grain density but allowing one to compute any stereological value of interest. We apply the model to the solidification of gray cast iron.

  13. New insights into eutectic cream skin penetration enhancement.

    PubMed

    Fiala, Sarah; Roman, Marie; Inacio, Ricardo; Mashal, Sumaia; Brown, Marc B; Jones, Stuart A

    2016-02-29

    The manner in which the eutectic cream EMLA(®) enhances the percutaneous penetration of lidocaine and prilocaine into human skin is still not fully understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate if the modification of drug aggregation played a role in the way EMLA(®) facilitates delivery. Light scattering analysis of lidocaine alone in water gave a critical aggregation concentration (CAC) of 572μM and a mean aggregate size of 58.8nm. The analysis of prilocaine in identical conditions gave a CAC of 1177μM and a mean aggregate size of 105.7±24.8nm. When the two drugs were mixed at their eutectic 1:1 ratio in water the CAC reduced to 165.8μM and the aggregate size was 43.82nm. This lidocaine-prilocaine interaction in water was further modified upon addition of polyoxyethylene hydrogenated castor oil, the surfactant in the EMLA aqueous phase, to produce aggregates of <20nm. The physical characterisation data suggested that it was the EMLA cream's surfactant that modified the drug molecular interactions in the aqueous continuous phase and caused a 6 fold higher drug penetration through human epidermal tissue compared to the oil formulations tested in this study. PMID:26732522

  14. Alternative Green Solvents Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maloney, Phillip R.

    2012-01-01

    Necessary for safe and proper functioning of equipment. Mainly halogenated solvents. Tetrachloride, Trichloroethylene (TCE), CFC-113. No longer used due to regulatory/safety concerns. Precision Cleaning at KSC: Small % of total parts. Used for liquid oxygen (LOX) systems. Dual solvent process. Vertrel MCA (decafluoropentane (DFP) and trons-dichloroethylene) HFE-7100. DFP has long term environmental concerns. Project Goals: a) Identify potential replacements. b) 22 wet chemical processes. c) 3 alternative processes. d) Develop test procedures. e) Contamination and cleaning. f) Analysis. g) Use results to recommend alternative processes. Conclusions: a) No alternative matched Vertrel in this study. b) No clear second place solvent. c) Hydrocarbons- easy; Fluorinated greases- difficult. d) Fluorinated component may be needed in replacement solvent. e) Process may need to make up for shortcoming of the solvent. f) Plasma and SCC02 warrant further testing.

  15. SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Jonke, A.A.

    1957-10-01

    In improved solvent extraction process is described for the extraction of metal values from highly dilute aqueous solutions. The process comprises contacting an aqueous solution with an organic substantially water-immiscible solvent, whereby metal values are taken up by a solvent extract phase; scrubbing the solvent extract phase with an aqueous scrubbing solution; separating an aqueous solution from the scrubbed solvent extract phase; and contacting the scrubbed solvent phase with an aqueous medium whereby the extracted metal values are removed from the solvent phase and taken up by said medium to form a strip solution containing said metal values, the aqueous scrubbing solution being a mixture of strip solution and an aqueous solution which contains mineral acids anions and is free of the metal values. The process is particularly effective for purifying uranium, where one starts with impure aqueous uranyl nitrate, extracts with tributyl phosphate dissolved in carbon tetrachloride, scrubs with aqueous nitric acid and employs water to strip the uranium from the scrubbed organic phase.

  16. Solvent alternatives guide

    SciTech Connect

    Elion, J.M.; Monroe, K.R.; Hill, E.A.

    1996-06-01

    It is no longer legal to manufacture or import chlorofluorocarbon 113 or methyl chloroform solvents, and companies that currently clean their parts with either material are now required to implement environmentally safe substitutes. To help find alternative methods, Research Triangle Institute`s Surface Cleaning Technology Program has designed a Solvent Alternatives Guide (SAGE), an online tool that enables access to practical information and recommendations for acceptable solvents. Developed in partnership with the US Environmental Protection Agency, SAGE is available free of charge on the Internet`s World Wide Web.

  17. X-Ray Videomicroscopy Studies of Eutectic Al-Si Solidification in Al-Si-Cu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathiesen, R. H.; Arnberg, L.; Li, Y.; Meier, V.; Schaffer, P. L.; Snigireva, I.; Snigirev, A.; Dahle, A. K.

    2011-01-01

    Al-Si eutectic growth has been studied in-situ for the first time using X-ray video microscopy during directional solidification (DS) in unmodified and Sr-modified Al-Si-Cu alloys. In the unmodified alloys, Si is found to grow predominantly with needle-like tip morphologies, leading a highly irregular progressing eutectic interface with subsequent nucleation and growth of Al from the Si surfaces. In the Sr-modified alloys, the eutectic reaction is strongly suppressed, occurring with low nucleation frequency at undercoolings in the range 10 K to 18 K. In order to transport Cu rejected at the eutectic front back into the melt, the modified eutectic colonies attain meso-scale interface perturbations that eventually evolve into equiaxed composite-structure cells. The eutectic front also attains short-range microscale interface perturbations consistent with the characteristics of a fibrous Si growth. Evidence was found in support of Si nucleation occurring on potent particles suspended in the melt. Yet, both with Sr-modified and unmodified alloys, Si precipitation alone was not sufficient to facilitate the eutectic reaction, which apparently required additional undercooling for Al to form at the Si-particle interfaces.

  18. CHLORINATED SOLVENT PLUME CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This lecture will cover recent success in controlling and assessing the treatment of shallow ground water plumes of chlorinated solvents, other halogenated organic compounds, and methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE).

  19. SOLVENT WASTE REDUCTION ALTERNATIVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This publication contains edited versions of presentations on this subject made at five Technology Transfer seminars in 1988. Chapters are included on land disposal regulations and requirements; waste solvent disposal alternatives from various industries such as process equipment...

  20. Continuous countercurrent membrane column for the separation of solute/solvent and solvent/solvent systems

    DOEpatents

    Nerad, Bruce A.; Krantz, William B.

    1988-01-01

    A reverse osmosis membrane process or hybrid membrane - complementary separator process for producing enriched product or waste streams from concentrated and dilute feed streams for both solvent/solvent and solute/solvent systems is described.

  1. Lead-bismuth eutectic as advanced reactor collant : operational experience

    SciTech Connect

    Woloshun, K. A.; Watts, V.; Li, N.

    2004-01-01

    Some proposed advanced reactor concepts would be cooled by lead or lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE). An LBE test loop was designed and built at Los Alamos to develop the engineering and materials technology necessary to successfully implement LBE as a coolant (Fig. 1). Operational since December 2001, this test loop has been used to develop and demonstrate safe operation, oxygen concentration and metal corrosion control, instrumentation, thermal-hydraulic performance of heat exchangers and recuperators, and free convection and forced pumping. This paper discusses the technology development and lessons learned from the operation of this facility. A LBE test loop has been operational since December 2001. Using procedures, training, and engineering controls, this loop has operated without an accident. Continuous improvements in operation procedures and instrumentation over these years have resulted in a facility of high reliability, providing the groundwork for the use of LBE as a reactor coolant for temperatures up to 550 C.

  2. On the phenomenology of tilted domains in lamellar eutectic growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caroli, B.; Caroli, C.; Fauve, S.

    1992-03-01

    We show that, due to the coupling between tilt (amplitude of the antisymmetric part of the font profile) and phase dynamics, the phenomenology of tilt domains of finite width proposed by Coullet et al. within the assumption of a subcritical homogeneous tilt bifurcation retains the same qualitative features when this bifurcation is direct, as is the case for lamellar eutectics. Nous montrons que, du fait du couplage entre les dynamiques d'inclinaison (amplitude de la partie impaire du profil de front) et de phase, la phénoménologie des domaines d'inclinaison de largeur finie proposée par Coullet et al. pour le cas d'une bifurcation d'inclinaison homogène sous critique garde les mêmes caractéristiques qualitatives quand cette bifurcation est directe, comme c'est le cas pour la croissance eutectique lamellaire.

  3. Numerical modeling of the creep behavior of unidirectional eutectic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Kolluru, D.V.; Pollock, T.M.

    1998-05-01

    Finite element methods have been used to study the continuum aspects of the creep behavior of unidirectional discontinuous composites loaded parallel and transverse to the fiber axis. Microstructural features unique to eutectic composites are emphasized in these parametric studies. Modeling predicts that fiber creep resistance, the degree of load transfer to the fiber and flow constraint at fiber ends govern the longitudinal creep response. The transverse creep response is most sensitive to the matrix creep properties. These differences in strengthening mechanisms result in a pronounced anisotropy of minimum creep rates. Variations in microstructural parameters, including the fiber creep resistance and fiber aspect ratio, influence the composite creep strength through the load transfer and flow constraint. Load transfer and misfit-induced residual stresses affect the initial creep transients significantly. The results of the simulations are compared to analytical models and experimental creep data.

  4. Heat-resistant eutectic alloys with carbide-intermetallic strengthening

    SciTech Connect

    Kachanov, E.B.; Petrushin, N.V.; Svetlov, I.L.

    1995-09-01

    Some important characteristics of gas turbine engines (in the first place the thrust and the efficiency) depend on the gas temperature and hence are determined by the service life of the blades. Heat-resistant nickel alloys are used for casting blades that can work at maximum temperatures of 1050-1100{degrees}C. However, more efficient engines need materials with a higher operating temperature and high-temperature strength. The work concerns the principles of alloying and structure formation of eutectic heat-resistant alloys on a nickel base with carbide and intermetallic strengthening. Their main mechanical properties at high temperatures are analyzed in comparison with the characteristics of high-temperature single-crystal nickel alloys, and the possibility of using them for casting turbine blades of high-temperature gas-turbine engines is considered.

  5. Directional solidification of Pb-Sn eutectics with vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caram, Rubens; Banan, Mohsen; Wilcox, William R.

    1991-01-01

    Pb-Sn eutectic alloy was directionally solidified at 1.4 to 3.2 cm/hr with forced convection induced by axial vibration of the growth ampoule with a frequency of 10 to 40 Hz and an amplitude of 0.5 to 1.0 mm. To determine the exact growth rate, an interface demarcation technique was applied. The lamellar spacing was increased 10 to 40 percent in ingots solidified with vibration compared to those solidified without vibration. The number of grain boundaries was increased by vibration. The average intensity of convection in the melt under axial vibration of the ampoule was estimated by comparing the experimental results with a theoretical model.

  6. Alkaline extraction of polonium from liquid lead bismuth eutectic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinitz, S.; Neuhausen, J.; Schumann, D.

    2011-07-01

    The production of highly radiotoxic polonium isotopes poses serious safety concerns for the development of future nuclear systems cooled by lead bismuth eutectic (LBE). In this paper it is shown that polonium can be extracted efficiently from LBE using a mixture of alkaline metal hydroxides (NaOH + KOH) in a temperature range between 180 and 350 °C. The extraction ratio was analyzed for different temperatures, gas blankets and phase ratios. A strong dependence of the extraction performance on the redox properties of the cover gas was found. While hydrogen facilitates the removal of polonium, oxygen has a negative influence on the extraction. These findings open new possibilities to back up the safety of future LBE based nuclear facilities.

  7. Self Assembled Structures by Directional Solidification of Eutectics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, Frederick W.; Sayir, Ali

    2004-01-01

    Interest in ordered porous structures has grown because of there unique properties such as photonic bandgaps, high backing packing density and high surface to volume ratio. Inspired by nature, biometric strategies using self assembled organic molecules dominate the development of hierarchical inorganic structures. Directional solidification of eutectics (DSE) also exhibit self assembly characteristics to form hierarchical metallic and inorganic structures. Crystallization of diphasic materials by DSE can produce two dimensional ordered structures consisting of rods or lamella. By selective removal of phases, DSE is capable to fabricate ordered pore arrays or ordered pin arrays. Criteria and limitations to fabricate hierarchical structures will be presented. Porous structures in silicon base alloys and ceramic systems will be reported.

  8. Traceable Co-C eutectic points for thermocouple calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Jahan, F.; Ballico, M. J.

    2013-09-11

    National Measurement Institute of Australia (NMIA) has developed a miniature crucible design suitable for measurement by both thermocouples and radiation thermometry, and has established an ensemble of five Co-C eutectic-point cells based on this design. The cells in this ensemble have been individually calibrated using both ITS-90 radiation thermometry and thermocouples calibrated on the ITS-90 by the NMIA mini-coil methodology. The assigned ITS-90 temperatures obtained using these different techniques are both repeatable and consistent, despite the use of different furnaces and measurement conditions. The results demonstrate that, if individually calibrated, such cells can be practically used as part of a national traceability scheme for thermocouple calibration, providing a useful intermediate calibration point between Cu and Pd.

  9. Treatment of textile wastewaters using Eutectic Freeze Crystallization.

    PubMed

    Randall, D G; Zinn, C; Lewis, A E

    2014-01-01

    A water treatment process needs to recover both water and other useful products if the process is to be viewed as being financially and environmentally sustainable. Eutectic Freeze Crystallization (EFC) is one such sustainable water treatment process that is able to produce both pure ice (water) and pure salt(s) by operating at a specific temperature. The use of EFC for the treatment of water is particularly useful in the textile industry because ice crystallization excludes all impurities from the recovered water, including dyes. Also, EFC can produce various salts with the intention of reusing these salts in the process. This study investigated the feasibility of EFC as a treatment method for textile industry wastewaters. The results showed that EFC can be used to convert 95% of the wastewater stream to pure ice (98% purity) and sodium sulfate. PMID:25116506

  10. SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF RUTHENIUM

    DOEpatents

    Hyman, H.H.; Leader, G.R.

    1959-07-14

    The separation of rathenium from aqueous solutions by solvent extraction is described. According to the invention, a nitrite selected from the group consisting of alkali nitrite and alkaline earth nitrite in an equimolecular quantity with regard to the quantity of rathenium present is added to an aqueous solution containing ruthenium tetrantrate to form a ruthenium complex. Adding an organic solvent such as ethyl ether to the resulting mixture selectively extracts the rathenium complex.

  11. Supercritical solvent coal extraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compton, L. E. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Yields of soluble organic extract are increased up to about 50% by the supercritical extraction of particulate coal at a temperature below the polymerization temperature for coal extract fragments (450 C.) and a pressure from 500 psig to 5,000 psig by the conjoint use of a solvent mixture containing a low volatility, high critical temperature coal dissolution catalyst such as phenanthrene and a high volatility, low critical temperature solvent such as toluene.

  12. Rapidly solidified Ag-Cu eutectics: A comparative study using drop-tube and melt fluxing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Y.; Mullis, A. M.; Cochrane, R. F.

    2016-03-01

    A comparative study of rapid solidification of Ag-Cu eutectic alloy processed via melt fluxing and drop-tube techniques is presented. A computational model is used to estimate the cooling rate and undercooling of the free fall droplets as this cannot be determined directly. SEM micrographs show that both materials consist of lamellar and anomalous eutectic structures. However, below the critical undercooling the morphologies of each are different in respect of the distribution and volume of anomalous eutectic. The anomalous eutectic in flux- undercooled samples preferentially forms at cell boundaries around the lamellar eutectic in the cell body. In drop-tube processed samples it tends to distribute randomly inside the droplets and at much smaller volume fractions. That the formation of the anomalous eutectic can, at least in part, be suppressed in the drop-tube is strongly suggestive that the formation of anomalous eutectic occurs via remelting process, which is suppressed by rapid cooling during solidification.

  13. CATALYTIC GASIFICATION OF COAL USING EUTECTIC SALT MIXTURES

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Yaw D. Yeboah; Dr. Yong Xu; Dr. Atul Sheth; Dr. Pradeep Agrawal

    2001-12-01

    The Gas Research Institute (GRI) estimates that by the year 2010, 40% or more of U.S. gas supply will be provided by supplements including substitute natural gas (SNG) from coal. These supplements must be cost competitive with other energy sources. The first generation technologies for coal gasification e.g. the Lurgi Pressure Gasification Process and the relatively newer technologies e.g. the KBW (Westinghouse) Ash Agglomerating Fluidized-Bed, U-Gas Ash Agglomerating Fluidized-Bed, British Gas Corporation/Lurgi Slagging Gasifier, Texaco Moving-Bed Gasifier, and Dow and Shell Gasification Processes, have several disadvantages. These disadvantages include high severities of gasification conditions, low methane production, high oxygen consumption, inability to handle caking coals, and unattractive economics. Another problem encountered in catalytic coal gasification is deactivation of hydroxide forms of alkali and alkaline earth metal catalysts by oxides of carbon (CO{sub x}). To seek solutions to these problems, a team consisting of Clark Atlanta University (CAU, a Historically Black College and University, HBCU), the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) and Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) proposed to identify suitable low melting eutectic salt mixtures for improved coal gasification. The research objectives of this project were to: Identify appropriate eutectic salt mixture catalysts for coal gasification; Assess agglomeration tendency of catalyzed coal; Evaluate various catalyst impregnation techniques to improve initial catalyst dispersion; Determine catalyst dispersion at high carbon conversion levels; Evaluate effects of major process variables (such as temperature, system pressure, etc.) on coal gasification; Evaluate the recovery, regeneration and recycle of the spent catalysts; and Conduct an analysis and modeling of the gasification process to provide better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms and kinetics of the process.

  14. Eutectic superalloys by edge-defined, film-fed growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurley, G. F.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility of producing directionally solidified eutectic alloy composites by edge-defined, film-fed growth (EFG) was carried out. The three eutectic alloys which were investigated were gamma + delta, gamma/gamma prime + delta, and a Co-base TaC alloy containing Cr and Ni. Investigations into the compatibility and wettability of these metals with various carbides, borides, nitrides, and oxides disclosed that compounds with the largest (negative) heats of formation were most stable but poorest wetting. Nitrides and carbides had suitable stability and low contact angles but capillary rise was observed only with carbides. Oxides would not give capillary rise but would probably fulfill the other wetting requirements of EFG. Tantalum carbide was selected for most of the experimental portion of the program based on its exhibiting spontaneous capillary rise and satisfactory slow rate of degradation in the liquid metals. Samples of all three alloys were grown by EFG with the major experimental effort restricted to gamma + delta and gamma/gamma prime + delta alloys. In the standard, uncooled EFG apparatus, the thermal gradient was inferred from the growth speed and was 150 to 200 C/cm. This value may be compared to typical gradients of less than 100 C/cm normally achieved in a standard Bridgman-type apparatus. When a stream of helium was directed against the side of the bar during growth, the gradient was found to improve to about 250 C/cm. In comparison, a theoretical gradient of 700 C/cm should be possible under ideal conditions, without the use of chills. Methods for optimizing the gradient in EFG are discussed, and should allow attainment of close to the theoretical for a particular configuration.

  15. Cleaning without chlorinated solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.M.; Simandl, R.F.

    1994-12-31

    Because of health and environmental concerns, many regulations have been passed in recent years regarding the use of chlorinated solvents. The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant has had an active program to find alternatives for these solvents used in cleaning applications for the past 7 years. During this time frame, the quantity of solvents purchased has been reduced by 92%. The program has been a twofold effort. Vapor degreasers used in batch cleaning-operations have been replaced by ultrasonic cleaning with aqueous detergent, and other organic solvents have been identified for use in hand-wiping or specialty operations. In order to qualify these alternatives for use, experimentation was conducted on cleaning ability as well as effects on subsequent operations such as welding, painting and bonding. Cleaning ability was determined using techniques such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) which are capable of examining monolayer levels of contamination on a surface. Solvents have been identified for removal of rust preventative oils, lapping oils, machining coolants, lubricants, greases, and mold releases. Solvents have also been evaluated for cleaning urethane foam spray guns, swelling of urethanes and swelling of epoxies.

  16. Cleaning without chlorinated solvents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, L. M.; Simandl, R. F.

    1995-01-01

    Because of health and environmental concerns, many regulations have been passed in recent years regarding the use of chlorinated solvents. The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant has had an active program to find alternatives for these solvents used in cleaning applications for the past 7 years. During this time frame, the quantity of solvents purchased has been reduced by 92 percent. The program has been a twofold effort. Vapor degreasers used in batch cleaning operations have been replaced by ultrasonic cleaning with aqueous detergent, and other organic solvents have been identified for use in hand-wiping or specialty operations. In order to qualify these alternatives for use, experimentation was conducted on cleaning ability as well as effects on subsequent operations such as welding, painting, and bonding. Cleaning ability was determined using techniques such as x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) which are capable of examining monolayer levels of contamination on a surface. Solvents have been identified for removal of rust preventative oils, lapping oils, machining coolants, lubricants, greases, and mold releases. Solvents have also been evaluated for cleaning urethane foam spray guns, swelling of urethanes, and swelling of epoxies.

  17. Characterization of alumina/yttrium-aluminum garnet and alumina/yttrium-aluminum perovskite eutectics

    SciTech Connect

    Matson, L.E.; Hay, R.S.; Mah, T.

    1990-08-01

    Alumina/yttrium-aluminum garnet (YAG) and alumina/yttrium-aluminum perovskite (YAP) eutectics were made by directional solidification. The two systems were characterized using transmitted polarized light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The alumina/YAG system exhibited a degenerate eutectic with a Chinese script morphology, while the alumina/YAP eutectic had a rod/lamellae morphology. The c-axis of alumina was aligned perpendicular to the solidification direction, and elongated grains were aligned along the solidification direction in both systems. A single orientation relationship between alumina and YAG was observed. Several orientation relationships were observed in the alumina/YAP system. 5 refs.

  18. Microstructure and Strength of NiTi-Nb Eutectic Braze Joining NiTi Wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liqiang; Wang, Cong; Dunand, David C.

    2015-04-01

    NiTi wires were brazed together via liquid eutectic formation between NiTi and Nb powders deposited at the wire contact region. The brazed region shows proeutectic NiTi(Nb) in contact with the wires, sandwiching a NiTi-Nb eutectic structure, whose microhardness and stiffness, as characterized via nanoindentation, are higher than the NiTi wires, while also showing signs of high ductility. NiTi-Nb eutectic bonding may thus be a viable approach for producing shape-memory NiTi scaffolds brazed from stacked, woven, or braided wires.

  19. 3D optical metamaterials formed by holographic assembly and directed solidification of eutectics (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Paul V.

    2015-09-01

    Nanoscale integration of materials in three dimensions is critical for the realization of a number of highly functional optical metamaterials. Starting with structures enabled via eutectic solidification and holographic lithography, our team is applying unique template-based and post-synthetic materials transformations in conjunction with powerful computational design tools to develop the scientific underpinnings of, and to produce, 3D metamaterials derived from directionally solidified eutectics. Our approach involves close interactions among computational design, photonic theory, eutectic materials development, template fabrication, materials chemistry, and optical characterization.

  20. Effect of residual thermal stresses on the creep of eutectic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Svetlov, I.L.; Epishin, A.I.; Pirogov, E.N.

    1986-01-01

    A method is proposed for calculating the residual thermal stresses in eutectic composites within the framework of a volumetric stressstrain state. The authors constructed creep curves of a directional y/y'-NbC eutectic at different temperatures and stresses. It was shown that residual thermal stresses in the matrix are the reason for the lower ultimate strength of eutectic composites compared to commercial heat-resistant nickel alloys at moderate temperatures. The proposed method may also be used for synthetic composites, but only under certain conditions.

  1. Effect of boron on the microstructure of near-eutectic Al-Si alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Yuying . E-mail: wyy532001@163.com; Liu Xiangfa; Bian Xiufang

    2007-02-15

    The effect of boron on the microstructure of a near-eutectic Al-Si alloy (ZL109) was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron beam microprobe analysis (EPMA). It was found that {alpha}-Al dendrites and eutectic clusters were significantly refined by the addition of boron. Another interesting discovery is that the near-eutectic alloy exhibited hypereutectic structure characteristics when the level of boron added exceeds 0.3%, i.e., primary Si is precipitated in the eutectic microstructure. A new type of nucleation substrate for the primary Si is found, Al {sub x}Ca {sub m}B {sub n}Si. This appears to be the main reason for the precipitation of primary Si.

  2. Eutectic structures in friction spot welding joint of aluminum alloy to copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Junjun; Suhuddin, Uceu F. H.; Cardillo, Maria E. B.; dos Santos, Jorge F.

    2014-05-01

    A dissimilar joint of AA5083 Al alloy and copper was produced by friction spot welding. The Al-MgCuAl2 eutectic in both coupled and divorced manners were found in the weld. At a relatively high temperature, mass transport of Cu due to plastic deformation, material flow, and atomic diffusion, combined with the alloy system of AA5083 are responsible for the ternary eutectic melting.

  3. Eutectic structures in friction spot welding joint of aluminum alloy to copper

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Junjun Suhuddin, Uceu F. H.; Cardillo, Maria E. B.; Santos, Jorge F. dos

    2014-05-12

    A dissimilar joint of AA5083 Al alloy and copper was produced by friction spot welding. The Al-MgCuAl{sub 2} eutectic in both coupled and divorced manners were found in the weld. At a relatively high temperature, mass transport of Cu due to plastic deformation, material flow, and atomic diffusion, combined with the alloy system of AA5083 are responsible for the ternary eutectic melting.

  4. Halogenated solvent remediation

    DOEpatents

    Sorenson, Kent S.

    2004-08-31

    Methods for enhancing bioremediation of ground water contaminated with nonaqueous halogenated solvents are disclosed. A preferred method includes adding a composition to the ground water wherein the composition is an electron donor for microbe-mediated reductive dehalogenation of the halogenated solvents and enhances mass transfer of the halogenated solvents from residual source areas into the aqueous phase of the ground water. Illustrative compositions effective in these methods include surfactants such as C.sub.2 -C.sub.4 carboxylic acids and hydroxy acids, salts thereof, esters of C.sub.2 -C.sub.4 carboxylic acids and hydroxy acids, and mixtures thereof. Especially preferred compositions for use in these methods include lactic acid, salts of lactic acid, such as sodium lactate, lactate esters, and mixtures thereof. The microbes are either indigenous to the ground water, or such microbes can be added to the ground water in addition to the composition.

  5. Halogenated solvent remediation

    DOEpatents

    Sorenson, Jr., Kent S.

    2008-11-11

    Methods for enhancing bioremediation of ground water contaminated with nonaqueous halogenated solvents are disclosed. An illustrative method includes adding an electron donor for microbe-mediated anaerobic reductive dehalogenation of the halogenated solvents, which electron donor enhances mass transfer of the halogenated solvents from residual source areas into the aqueous phase of the ground water. Illustrative electron donors include C.sub.2-C.sub.4 carboxylic acids and hydroxy acids, salts thereof, esters of C.sub.2-C.sub.4 carboxylic acids and hydroxy acids, and mixtures thereof, of which lactic acid, salts of lactic acid--such as sodium lactate, lactate esters, and mixtures thereof are particularly illustrative. The microbes are either indigenous to the ground water, or such microbes can be added to the ground water in addition to the electron donor.

  6. Safe battery solvents

    DOEpatents

    Harrup, Mason K.; Delmastro, Joseph R.; Stewart, Frederick F.; Luther, Thomas A.

    2007-10-23

    An ion transporting solvent maintains very low vapor pressure, contains flame retarding elements, and is nontoxic. The solvent in combination with common battery electrolyte salts can be used to replace the current carbonate electrolyte solution, creating a safer battery. It can also be used in combination with polymer gels or solid polymer electrolytes to produce polymer batteries with enhanced conductivity characteristics. The solvents may comprise a class of cyclic and acyclic low molecular weight phosphazenes compounds, comprising repeating phosphorus and nitrogen units forming a core backbone and ion-carrying pendent groups bound to the phosphorus. In preferred embodiments, the cyclic phosphazene comprises at least 3 phosphorus and nitrogen units, and the pendent groups are polyethers, polythioethers, polyether/polythioethers or any combination thereof, and/or other groups preferably comprising other atoms from Group 6B of the periodic table of elements.

  7. Solvent resistant copolyimide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Alice C. (Inventor); St. Clair, Terry L. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A solvent resistant copolyimide was prepared by reacting 4,4'-oxydiphthalic anhydride with a diaimine blend comprising, based on the total amount of the diamine blend, about 75 to 90 mole percent of 3,4'-oxydianiline and about 10 to 25 mole percent p-phenylene diamine. The solvent resistant copolyimide had a higher glass transition temperature when cured at 350.degree. , 371.degree. and 400.degree. C. than LaRC.TM.-IA. The composite prepared from the copolyimide had similar mechanical properties to LaRC.TM.-IA. Films prepared from the copolyimide were resistant to immediate breakage when exposed to solvents such as dimethylacetamide and chloroform. The adhesive properties of the copolyimide were maintained even after testing at 23.degree., 150.degree., 177.degree. and 204.degree. C.

  8. Separation by solvent extraction

    DOEpatents

    Holt, Jr., Charles H.

    1976-04-06

    17. A process for separating fission product values from uranium and plutonium values contained in an aqueous solution, comprising adding an oxidizing agent to said solution to secure uranium and plutonium in their hexavalent state; contacting said aqueous solution with a substantially water-immiscible organic solvent while agitating and maintaining the temperature at from -1.degree. to -2.degree. C. until the major part of the water present is frozen; continuously separating a solid ice phase as it is formed; separating a remaining aqueous liquid phase containing fission product values and a solvent phase containing plutonium and uranium values from each other; melting at least the last obtained part of said ice phase and adding it to said separated liquid phase; and treating the resulting liquid with a new supply of solvent whereby it is practically depleted of uranium and plutonium.

  9. The influence of ternary alloying elements on the Al-Si eutectic microstructure and the Si morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darlapudi, A.; McDonald, S. D.; Terzi, S.; Prasad, A.; Felberbaum, M.; StJohn, D. H.

    2016-01-01

    The influence of the ternary alloying elements Cu, Mg and Fe on the Al-Si eutectic microstructure is investigated using a commercial purity Al-10 wt%Si alloy in unmodified and Sr-modified conditions. A change in the Al-Si eutectic microstructure was associated with a change in the nucleation density of the eutectic grains caused by the addition of ternary alloying elements. When the ternary alloying element addition resulted in an increase in the eutectic nucleation frequency, a fibrous to flake-like transition was observed within the eutectic grain. When the ternary alloying element addition decreased the eutectic nucleation frequency significantly, a change in the eutectic morphology from flake-like to a mixture of flake-like and fibrous morphologies was observed. The mechanism of Al-Si eutectic modification is discussed. The growth velocity of the eutectic grain - liquid interface and the constitutional driving force available for growth are proposed as important parameters that influence the degree of eutectic modification in Al-Si alloys.

  10. Phase transformation and deformation behavior of NiTi-Nb eutectic joined NiTi wires.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liqiang; Wang, Cong; Zhang, Lai-Chang; Chen, Liangyu; Lu, Weijie; Zhang, Di

    2016-01-01

    NiTi wires were brazed together via eutectic reaction between NiTi and Nb powder deposited at the wire contact region. Phase transformation and deformation behavior of the NiTi-Nb eutectic microstructure were investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and cyclic loading-unloading tests. Results show that R phase and B19' martensite transformation are induced by plastic deformation. R phase transformation, which significantly contributes to superelasticity, preferentially occurs at the interfaces between NiTi and eutectic region. Round-shaped Nb-rich phase with rod-like and lamellar-type eutectics are observed in eutectic regions. These phases appear to affect the deformation behavior of the brazed NiTi-Nb region via five distinct stages in stress-strain curves: (I) R phase reorientation, (II) R phase transformation from parent phase, (III) elastic deformation of reoriented martensite accompanied by the plastic deformation of Nb-rich phase and lamellar NiTi-Nb eutectic, (IV) B19' martensitic transformation, and (V) plastic deformation of the specimen. PMID:27049025

  11. The roles of Eu during the growth of eutectic Si in Al-Si alloys

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiehua; Hage, Fredrik; Wiessner, Manfred; Romaner, Lorenz; Scheiber, Daniel; Sartory, Bernhard; Ramasse, Quentin; Schumacher, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Controlling the growth of eutectic Si and thereby modifying the eutectic Si from flake-like to fibrous is a key factor in improving the properties of Al-Si alloys. To date, it is generally accepted that the impurity-induced twinning (IIT) mechanism and the twin plane re-entrant edge (TPRE) mechanism as well as poisoning of the TPRE mechanism are valid under certain conditions. However, IIT, TPRE or poisoning of the TPRE mechanism cannot be used to interpret all observations. Here, we report an atomic-scale experimental and theoretical investigation on the roles of Eu during the growth of eutectic Si in Al-Si alloys. Both experimental and theoretical investigations reveal three different roles: (i) the adsorption at the intersection of Si facets, inducing IIT mechanism, (ii) the adsorption at the twin plane re-entrant edge, inducing TPRE mechanism or poisoning of the TPRE mechanism, and (iii) the segregation ahead of the growing Si twins, inducing a solute entrainment within eutectic Si. This investigation not only demonstrates a direct experimental support to the well-accepted poisoning of the TPRE and IIT mechanisms, but also provides a full picture about the roles of Eu atoms during the growth of eutectic Si, including the solute entrainment within eutectic Si. PMID:26328541

  12. Spontaneous Formation of Eutectic Crystal Structures in Binary and Ternary Charged Colloids due to Depletion Attraction.

    PubMed

    Toyotama, Akiko; Okuzono, Tohru; Yamanaka, Junpei

    2016-01-01

    Crystallization of colloids has extensively been studied for past few decades as models to study phase transition in general. Recently, complex crystal structures in multi-component colloids, including alloy and eutectic structures, have attracted considerable attention. However, the fabrication of 2D area-filling colloidal eutectics has not been reported till date. Here, we report formation of eutectic structures in binary and ternary aqueous colloids due to depletion attraction. We used charged particles + linear polyelectrolyte systems, in which the interparticle interaction could be represented as a sum of the electrostatic, depletion, and van der Waals forces. The interaction was tunable at a lengthscale accessible to direct observation by optical microscopy. The eutectic structures were formed because of interplay of crystallization of constituent components and accompanying fractionation. An observed binary phase diagram, defined by a mixing ratio and inverse area fraction of the particles, was analogous to that for atomic and molecular eutectic systems. This new method also allows the adjustment of both the number and wavelengths of Bragg diffraction peaks. Furthermore, these eutectic structures could be immobilized in polymer gel to produce self-standing materials. The present findings will be useful in the design of the optical properties of colloidal crystals. PMID:26984298

  13. Gravity-induced anomalies in interphase spacing reported for binary eutectics.

    PubMed

    Smith, Reginald W

    2002-10-01

    It has been reasoned that desirable microstructural refinement in binary eutectics could result from freezing in reduced-gravity. It is recognized that the interphase spacing in a binary eutectic is controlled by solute transport and that, on Earth, buoyancy-driven convection may enhance this. Hence, it has been presumed that the interphase spacing ought to decrease when a eutectic alloy is frozen under conditions of much-reduced gravity, where such buoyancy effects would be largely absent. The result of such speculation has been that many workers have frozen various eutectics under reduced gravity and have reported that, although some eutectics became finer, others showed no change, and some even became coarser. This reported varied behavior will be reviewed in the light of long term studies by the author at Queen's University, including recent microgravity studies in which samples of two eutectic alloy systems, MnBi-Bi and MnSb-Sb, were frozen under very stable conditions and showed no change in interphase spacing. PMID:12446324

  14. The roles of Eu during the growth of eutectic Si in Al-Si alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiehua; Hage, Fredrik; Wiessner, Manfred; Romaner, Lorenz; Scheiber, Daniel; Sartory, Bernhard; Ramasse, Quentin; Schumacher, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Controlling the growth of eutectic Si and thereby modifying the eutectic Si from flake-like to fibrous is a key factor in improving the properties of Al-Si alloys. To date, it is generally accepted that the impurity-induced twinning (IIT) mechanism and the twin plane re-entrant edge (TPRE) mechanism as well as poisoning of the TPRE mechanism are valid under certain conditions. However, IIT, TPRE or poisoning of the TPRE mechanism cannot be used to interpret all observations. Here, we report an atomic-scale experimental and theoretical investigation on the roles of Eu during the growth of eutectic Si in Al-Si alloys. Both experimental and theoretical investigations reveal three different roles: (i) the adsorption at the intersection of Si facets, inducing IIT mechanism, (ii) the adsorption at the twin plane re-entrant edge, inducing TPRE mechanism or poisoning of the TPRE mechanism, and (iii) the segregation ahead of the growing Si twins, inducing a solute entrainment within eutectic Si. This investigation not only demonstrates a direct experimental support to the well-accepted poisoning of the TPRE and IIT mechanisms, but also provides a full picture about the roles of Eu atoms during the growth of eutectic Si, including the solute entrainment within eutectic Si.

  15. Spontaneous Formation of Eutectic Crystal Structures in Binary and Ternary Charged Colloids due to Depletion Attraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyotama, Akiko; Okuzono, Tohru; Yamanaka, Junpei

    2016-03-01

    Crystallization of colloids has extensively been studied for past few decades as models to study phase transition in general. Recently, complex crystal structures in multi-component colloids, including alloy and eutectic structures, have attracted considerable attention. However, the fabrication of 2D area-filling colloidal eutectics has not been reported till date. Here, we report formation of eutectic structures in binary and ternary aqueous colloids due to depletion attraction. We used charged particles + linear polyelectrolyte systems, in which the interparticle interaction could be represented as a sum of the electrostatic, depletion, and van der Waals forces. The interaction was tunable at a lengthscale accessible to direct observation by optical microscopy. The eutectic structures were formed because of interplay of crystallization of constituent components and accompanying fractionation. An observed binary phase diagram, defined by a mixing ratio and inverse area fraction of the particles, was analogous to that for atomic and molecular eutectic systems. This new method also allows the adjustment of both the number and wavelengths of Bragg diffraction peaks. Furthermore, these eutectic structures could be immobilized in polymer gel to produce self-standing materials. The present findings will be useful in the design of the optical properties of colloidal crystals.

  16. Phase transformation and deformation behavior of NiTi-Nb eutectic joined NiTi wires

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liqiang; Wang, Cong; Zhang, Lai-Chang; Chen, Liangyu; Lu, Weijie; Zhang, Di

    2016-01-01

    NiTi wires were brazed together via eutectic reaction between NiTi and Nb powder deposited at the wire contact region. Phase transformation and deformation behavior of the NiTi-Nb eutectic microstructure were investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and cyclic loading-unloading tests. Results show that R phase and B19′ martensite transformation are induced by plastic deformation. R phase transformation, which significantly contributes to superelasticity, preferentially occurs at the interfaces between NiTi and eutectic region. Round-shaped Nb-rich phase with rod-like and lamellar-type eutectics are observed in eutectic regions. These phases appear to affect the deformation behavior of the brazed NiTi-Nb region via five distinct stages in stress-strain curves: (I) R phase reorientation, (II) R phase transformation from parent phase, (III) elastic deformation of reoriented martensite accompanied by the plastic deformation of Nb-rich phase and lamellar NiTi-Nb eutectic, (IV) B19′ martensitic transformation, and (V) plastic deformation of the specimen. PMID:27049025

  17. Ternary eutectic growth of Ag-Cu-Sb alloy within ultrasonic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Wei; Hong, Zhenyu; Wei, Bingbo

    2007-08-01

    The liquid to solid transformation of ternary Ag42.4Cu21.6Sb36 eutectic alloy was accomplished in an ultrasonic field with a frequency of 35 kHz, and the growth mechanism of this ternary eutectic was examined. Theoretical calculations predict that the sound intensity in the liquid phase at the solidification interface increases gradually as the interface moves up from the sample bottom to its top. The growth mode of ( ɛ + θ + Sb) ternary eutectic exhibits a transition of “divorced eutectic—mixture of anomalous and regular structures—regular eutectic” along the sample axis due to the inhomogeneity of sound field distribution. In the top zone with the highest sound intensity, the cavitation effect promotes the three eutectic phases to nucleate independently, while the acoustic streaming efficiently suppresses the coupled growth of eutectic phases. In the meantime, the ultrasonic field accelerates the solute transportation at the solid-liquid interface, which reduces the solute solubility of eutectic phases.

  18. Formation mechanism of primary phases and eutectic structures within undercooled Pb-Sb-Sn ternary alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weili; Dai, Fuping; Wei, Bingbo

    2007-08-01

    The solidification characteristics of three types of Pb-Sb-Sn ternary alloys with different primary phases were studied under substantial undercooling conditions. The experimental results show that primary (Pb) and SbSn phases grow in the dendritic mode, whereas primary (Sb) phase exhibits faceted growth in the form of polygonal blocks and long strips. (Pb) solid solution phase displays strong affinity with SbSn intermetallic compound so that they produce various morphologies of pseudobinary eutectics, but it can only grow in the divorced eutectic mode together with (Sb) phase. Although (Sb) solid solution phase and SbSn intermetallic compound may grow cooperatively within ternary eutectic microstructures, they seldom form pseudobinary eutectics independently. The (Pb)+(Sb)+SbSn ternary eutectic structure usually shows lamellar morphology, but appears as anomalous eutectic when its volume fraction becomes small. EDS analyses reveal that all of the three primary (Pb), (Sb) and SbSn phases exhibit conspicuous solute trapping effect during rapid solidification, which results in the remarkable extension of solute solubility.

  19. Spontaneous Formation of Eutectic Crystal Structures in Binary and Ternary Charged Colloids due to Depletion Attraction

    PubMed Central

    Toyotama, Akiko; Okuzono, Tohru; Yamanaka, Junpei

    2016-01-01

    Crystallization of colloids has extensively been studied for past few decades as models to study phase transition in general. Recently, complex crystal structures in multi-component colloids, including alloy and eutectic structures, have attracted considerable attention. However, the fabrication of 2D area-filling colloidal eutectics has not been reported till date. Here, we report formation of eutectic structures in binary and ternary aqueous colloids due to depletion attraction. We used charged particles + linear polyelectrolyte systems, in which the interparticle interaction could be represented as a sum of the electrostatic, depletion, and van der Waals forces. The interaction was tunable at a lengthscale accessible to direct observation by optical microscopy. The eutectic structures were formed because of interplay of crystallization of constituent components and accompanying fractionation. An observed binary phase diagram, defined by a mixing ratio and inverse area fraction of the particles, was analogous to that for atomic and molecular eutectic systems. This new method also allows the adjustment of both the number and wavelengths of Bragg diffraction peaks. Furthermore, these eutectic structures could be immobilized in polymer gel to produce self-standing materials. The present findings will be useful in the design of the optical properties of colloidal crystals. PMID:26984298

  20. Directionally solidified pseudo-binary eutectics of Ni-Cr-(Hf, Zr)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Y. G.; Ashbrook, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    A pseudo-binary eutectic, in which the intermetallic Ni7Hf2 reinforces the Ni-Cr solid solution phase, was previously predicted in the Ni-Cr-Hf system by a computer analysis. The experimental determination of pseudo binary eutectic compositions and the directional solidification of the Ni-Cr-Hf, Zr, and Ni-Cr-Zr eutectic alloys are discussed. To determine unknown eutectics, chemical analyses were made of material bled from near eutectic ingots during incipient melting. Nominal compositions in weight percent of Ni-18.6Cr-24.0HF, Ni19.6Cr-12.8Zr-2.8Hf, and Ni-19.2Cr-14.8Zr formed aligned pseudo-binary eutectic structures. The melting points were about 1270 C. The reinforcing intermetallic phases were identified as noncubic (Ni,Cr)7Hf2 and (Ni,Cr)7(Hf,Zr)2, and face centered cubic (Ni,Cr)5Zr. The volume fraction of the reinforcing phases were about 0.5.

  1. Laser-Induced Melting of Co-C Eutectic Cells as a New Research Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Ham, E.; Ballico, M.; Jahan, F.

    2015-08-01

    A new laser-based technique to examine heat transfer and energetics of phase transitions in metal-carbon fixed points and potentially to improve the quality of phase transitions in furnaces with poor uniformity is reported. Being reproducible below 0.1 K, metal-carbon fixed points are increasingly used as reference standards for the calibration of thermocouples and radiation thermometers. At NMIA, the Co-C eutectic point is used for the calibration of thermocouples, with the fixed point traceable to the International Temperature Scale (ITS-90) using radiation thermometry. For thermocouple use, these cells are deep inside a high-uniformity furnace, easily obtaining excellent melting plateaus. However, when used with radiation thermometers, the essential large viewing cone to the crucible restricts the furnace depth and introduces large heat losses from the front furnace zone, affecting the quality of the phase transition. Short laser bursts have been used to illuminate the cavity of a conventional Co-C fixed-point cell during various points in its melting phase transition. The laser is employed to partially melt the metal at the rear of the crucible providing a liquid-solid interface close to the region being observed by the reference pyrometer. As the laser power is known, a quantitative estimate of can be made for the Co-C latent heat of fusion. Using a single laser pulse during a furnace-induced melt, a plateau up to 8 min is observed before the crucible resumes a characteristic conventional melt curve. Although this plateau is satisfyingly flat, well within 100 mK, it is observed that the plateau is laser energy dependent and elevates from the conventional melt "inflection-point" value.

  2. Theoretical Investigation of Binary Eutectic Alloy Nanoscale Phase Diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boswell-Koller, Cosima Nausikaa

    Recently, embedded binary eutectic alloy nanostructures (BEANs) have drawn some attention. A previously calculated equilibrium structure map predicts four possible nanocrystal alloy morphologies: phase-separated, bi-lobe, core-shell and inverse core-shell governed by two dimensionless interface energy parameters. The shape of the bilobe nanoparticles is obtained by finding the surface area of all interfaces that minimizes the overall energy, while also maintaining mechanical equilibrium at the triple point. Two representative alloy systems displaying eutectic phase diagrams and negligible solid solubility were chosen: GeSn and AuGe. GeSn samples were prepared by sequential implantation of Ge and Sn into SiO2. AuGe samples were prepared by implanting Ge within Au-doped silica films. Transmission electron microscopy images revealed bi-lobe nanocrystals in both samples. Therefore, the interface energies in both systems must be such that the dimensionless parameters lie in the region of bi-lobe stability. Careful analysis of the bi-lobe structure leads to the determination of two dimensionless length scales, which describe the bi-lobe independent of the size of the nanoparticle. These two parameters, eta 1 and eta 2 can be used to calculate contours of equal eta 1 and eta 2 over the entire range of bi-lobe stability. Experimental measurement and comparison to predicted structures leads to determination of acting dimensionless interface energies. Experimentally available wetting data is then used to calculate the remaining interface energies in the system. gamma Ge(s)/SiO2 was found to be between 0.82-0.99 J/m2 . gamma Ge0.22Sn0.78(l)/SiO2 and gamma Au0.53Ge0.47(l)/SiO2 are determined to be 1.20 and 0.94 J/m2 , respectively. To investigate the possibility of size effects at the nanoscale, size dependent phase diagrams for the AuGe and GeSn system are determined. This is done by the theoretical approach first outlined by Weissmueller et al., which takes into account the energy contribution of the various morphologies listed above. Results from this calculation are compared to those using the tangent line construction approach. The composition dependent surface energies of binary alloy liquids required in this calculation are determined using Butler's equation.

  3. Solvent vapor collector

    DOEpatents

    Ellison, Kenneth; Whike, Alan S.

    1979-01-30

    A solvent vapor collector is mounted on the upstream inlet end of an oven having a gas-circulating means and intended for curing a coating applied to a strip sheet metal at a coating station. The strip sheet metal may be hot and solvent vapors are evaporated at the coating station and from the strip as it passes from the coating station to the oven. Upper and lower plenums within a housing of the collector are supplied with oven gases or air from the gas-circulating means and such gases or air are discharged within the collector obliquely in a downstream direction against the strip passing through that collector to establish downstream gas flows along the top and under surfaces of the strip so as, in turn, to induct solvent vapors into the collector at the coating station. A telescopic multi-piece shroud is usefully provided on the housing for movement between an extended position in which it overlies the coating station to collect solvent vapors released thereat and a retracted position permitting ready cleaning and adjustment of that coating station.

  4. ONSITE SOLVENT RECOVERY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study evaluated the product quality, waste reduction/pollution prevention, and economic aspects of three technologies for onsite solvent recovery. The technologies were (1) atmospheric batch distillation, (2) vacuum heat-pump distillation, and (3) low-emission vapor degreas...

  5. Organic solvent topical report

    SciTech Connect

    COWLEY, W.L.

    1999-05-13

    This report provides the basis for closing the organic solvent safety issue. Sufficient information is presented to conclude that risk posed by an organic solvent fire is within risk evaluation guidelines. This report updates information contained in Analysis of Consequences of Postulated Solvent Fires in Hanford Site Waste Tanks. WHC-SD-WM-CN-032. Rev. 0A (Cowley et al. 1996). However, this document will not replace Cowley et al (1996) as the primary reference for the Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) until the recently submitted BIO amendment (Hanson 1999) is approved by the US Department of Energy. This conclusion depends on the use of controls for preventing vehicle fuel fires and for limiting the use of flame cutting in areas where hot metal can fall on the waste surface.The required controls are given in the Tank Waste Remediation System Technical Safety Requirements (Noorani 1997b). This is a significant change from the conclusions presented in Revision 0 of this report. Revision 0 of this calcnote concluded that some organic solvent fire scenarios exceeded risk evaluation guidelines, even with controls imposed.

  6. Solvent extraction processes compared

    SciTech Connect

    Kogut, K.E.

    1994-04-01

    Solvent ectraction processes are often difficult to compare. Waste processors need to understand how the process works in order to make a good choice for waste stream applications. The technologies used by Carver-Greenfield Process, B.E.S.T., and NuKEM`s method are described.

  7. ENGINEERING BULLETIN: SOLVENT EXTRACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solvent extraction does not destroy hazardous contaminants, but is a means of separating those contaminants from soils, sludges, and sediments, thereby reducing the volume of the hazardous material that must be treated. enerally it is used as one in a series of unit operations an...

  8. SOLVENT EXTRACTION TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solvent extraction does not destroy wastes, but is a means of separating hazardous contaminants from soils, sludges, and sediments, thereby reducing the volume of the hazardous waste that must be treated. enerally it is used as one ina series of unit operations, and can reduce th...

  9. DESIGNING GREENER SOLVENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Computer-aided design of chemicals and chemical mixtures provides a powerful tool to help engineers identify cleaner process designs and more-benign alternatives to toxic industrial solvents. Three software programs are discussed: (1) PARIS II (Program for Assisting the Replaceme...

  10. Organic solvent topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Cowley, W.L.

    1998-04-30

    This report is the technical basis for the accident and consequence analyses used in the Hanford Tank Farms Basis for Interim Operation. The report also contains the scientific and engineering information and reference material needed to understand the organic solvent safety issue. This report includes comments received from the Chemical Reactions Subcommittee of the Tank Advisory Panel.

  11. Microanalysis of an oxidized cobalt oxide: Zirconia eutectic

    SciTech Connect

    Bentley, J.; McKernan, S.; Carter, C.B.; Revcolevschi, A.

    1993-12-31

    The compositions of CoO, Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}, and Ca-stabilized cubic ZrO{sub 2} in an oxidized directionally solidified CoO-ZrO{sub 2} eutectic were determined by PEELS and EDS. An oxygen gradient exists across the Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} with highest levels near the ZrO{sub 2} interface. Oxygen ELNES for CoO and Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} are quite different; published oxygen ELNES have been incorrectly attributed to CoO. Normalized Co-L{sub 23} white line intensity (WLI) ratios for CoO and Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} are similar (0.53 {plus_minus} 0.02) but L{sub 3}/L{sub 2} WLI ratios are 3.88 and 2.58, respectively. ELCE data suggest Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} has the inverse spinel structure.

  12. Preparation of eutectic substrate mixtures for enzymatic conversion of ATC to L-cysteine at high concentration levels.

    PubMed

    Youn, Sung Hun; Park, Hae Woong; Choe, Deokyeong; Shin, Chul Soo

    2014-06-01

    High concentration eutectic substrate solutions for the enzymatic production of L-cysteine were prepared. Eutectic melting of binary mixtures consisting of D,L-2-amino-Δ(2)-thiazoline-4-carboxylic acid (ATC) as a substrate and malonic acid occurred at 39 °C with an ATC mole fraction of 0.5. Formation of eutectic mixtures was confirmed using SEM, SEM-EDS, and XPS surface analyses. Sorbitol, MnSO4, and NaOH were used as supplements for the enzymatic reactions. Strategies for sequential addition of five compounds, including a binary ATC mixture and supplements, during preparation of eutectic substrate solutions were established. Eutectic substrate solutions were stable for 24 h. After 6 h of enzymatic reactions, a 550 mM L-cysteine yield was obtained from a 670 mM eutectic ATC solution. PMID:24249216

  13. Microstructural evolution and thermal stability of aluminum-cerium-nickel ternary eutectic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fodran, Eric John

    The engineering community has identified several applications in which the use of a lightweight alloy for elevated temperature service, in substitution for current heavier and more costly alloys, would have a substantial benefit. This need for structural materials to perform at elevated temperatures has driven researchers to develop novel alloys as well as processing routes to manufacture them and obtain optimum microstructures. Previous studies on aluminum based binary eutectic systems have proven that the aluminum alloy system shows promising potential for satisfying this need. This has motivated the investigation of the solidification and thermal stability of the Al-12 wt% Ce-5 wt% Ni ternary eutectic performed in this investigation. The solidification behavior of the Al-Ce-Ni ternary eutectic was conducted via solidification of various compositions at and above the eutectic composition in a copper chill mold, thus allowing the observation of various solidification rates on a single ingot. Directional solidification of the ternary eutectic was also conducted to further study the unique microstructures forms. After casting the ingots were analyzed for the composition of phases in the microstructure via X-ray diffraction, and the distribution of the phases determined by scanning electron microscopy. The solidification of the ternary eutectic was found to occur much like that of a faceted/non-faceted binary couples growth. The thermal stability of the microstructure was also studied. Ternary eutectic microstructures were heat treated at various temperatures for time intervals up to 100 hours. The coupled growth microstructures were found to coarsen at temperature above 400°C, which was associated with a loss in hardness. Coarsening of the microstructures at elevated temperatures was also observed to occur by multiple mechanisms: an Ostwald ripening within the eutectic cell, and an accelerated coarsening at the cell boundaries due to increased diffusion at boundaries. Unique ternary eutectic structures were found to be comprised of a fine distribution of chains of alternating Al11Ce3 and Al3Ni intermetallics in an aluminum matrix. The unique microstructures formed are believed to be driven by the solute diffusion profile at the solid/liquid interface during solidification. This suggests that it may not be possible to generate a microstructure comprised of a homogeneous distribution of multiple product phases in a continuous matrix on solidification from a single parent phase, such as that of the solidification of ternary eutectics.

  14. Solvent-Ion Interactions in Salt Water: A Simple Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willey, Joan D.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a procedurally quick, simple, and inexpensive experiment which illustrates the magnitude and some effects of solvent-ion interactions in aqueous solutions. Theoretical information, procedures, and examples of temperature, volume and hydration number calculations are provided. (JN)

  15. Directional solidification of Al2-Cu-Al and Al3-Ni-Al eutectics during TEXUS rocket flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Favier, J. J.; Degoer, J.

    1984-01-01

    One lamellar eutectic sample and one fiber-like eutectic sample were solidified directionally during the TEXUS-6 rocket flight. The microstructures and the results of the thermal analysis, obtained from the temperatures recorded on the cartridge skin, are compared. No appreciable modifications of the regularity of the eutectic structures were observed by passing from 1 g to 0.0001 g in these experiments. No steady state growth conditions were achieved in these experiments.

  16. The effect of porosity and gamma-gamma-prime eutectic content on the fatigue behavior of hydrogen charged PWA 1480

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, J.; Dreshfield, R. L.; Gabb, T. P.

    1991-01-01

    The study addresses the effect of systematically varying gamma-gamma-prime eutectic content and porosity level on the fatigue life of a hydrogen-charged single crystal PWA 1480 superalloy. Four microstructural variants are produced, and differences in gamma-gamma-prime eutectic morphology among the four processing variants are analyzed. Single valued tensile test data indicate that the tensile and yield strength of the PWA 1480 are degraded by hydrogen charging, with the exception of the material given a eutectic solution treatment. It is shown that the reduction of the fatigue life can be minimized by a duplex thermomechanical treatment consisting of a eutectic solution followed by hot isostatic pressing.

  17. DESIGNING ENVIRONMENTALLY BENIGN SOLVENT SUBSTITUTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Since the signing of 1987 Montreal Protocol, reducing and eliminating the use of harmful solvents has become an internationally imminent environmental protection mission. Solvent substitution is an effective way to achieve this goal. The Program for Assisting the Replacement of...

  18. Solvent substitution for electronic products

    SciTech Connect

    Benkovich, M.K.

    1992-01-01

    Allied-Signal Inc., Kansas City Division (KCD), manufactures the electrical, electrochemical, mechanical, and plastic components for nuclear weapons. The KCD has made a commitment to eliminate the use of chlorohydrocarbon (CHC) and chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) solvents to the greatest technical extent possible consistent with nuclear safety and stockpile reliability requirements. Current cleaning processes in the production departments use trichloroethylene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and various CFC-113 based solvents. Several non-halogenated solvents (Solvent A - an aqueous solvent based on N,N-dimethylacetamide, Solvent B - an aqueous mixture of ethanol amines, Solvent C - a hydrocarbon solvent based on octadecyl acetate, Solvent D - a terpene (d-limonene) hydrocarbon solvent combined with emulsifiers, Solvent E - a terpene (d-limonene) hydrocarbon solvent combined with a separation agent, d-limonene, and isopropyl alcohol) were evaluated to determine the most effective, non-chlorinated, non-fluorinated, alternate solvent cleaning system. All of these solvents were evaluated using current manual spray cleaning processes. The solvents were evaluated for their effectiveness in removing a rosin based RMA solder flux, a particular silicone mold release, and oils, greases, mold releases, resins, etc. The Meseran Surface Analyzer was used to measure organic contamination on the samples before and after cleaning. An Omega Meter Model 600 was also used to detect solder flux residues. Solvents C, D, E and d-limonene the best alternatives to trichloroethylene for removing all of the contaminants tested. For this particular electronic assembly, d-limonene was chosen as the alternate because of material compatibility and long-term reliability concerns.

  19. Solvent Immersion Imprint Lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Vasdekis, Andreas E.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Grate, Jay W.; Kelly, Ryan T.; Konopka, Allan; Xantheas, Sotiris S.; Chang, M. T.

    2014-06-21

    The mechanism of polymer disolution was explored for polymer microsystem prototyping, including microfluidics and optofluidics. Polymer films are immersed in a solvent, imprinted and finally brought into contact with a non-modified surface to permanently bond. The underlying polymer-solvent interactions were experimentally and theoretically investigated, and enabled rapid polymer microsystem prototyping. During imprinting, small molecule integration in the molded surfaces was feasible, a principle applied to oxygen sensing. Polystyrene (PS) was employed for microbiological studies at extreme environmental conditions. The thermophile anaerobe Clostridium Thermocellum was grown in PS pore-scale micromodels, revealing a double mean generation lifetime than under ideal culture conditions. Microsystem prototyping through directed polymer dissolution is simple and accessible, while simultaneous patterning, bonding, and surface/volume functionalization are possible in less than one minute.

  20. PARIS II: DESIGNING GREENER SOLVENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    PARIS II (the program for assisting the replacement of industrial solvents, version II), developed at the USEPA, is a unique software tool that can be used for customizing the design of replacement solvents and for the formulation of new solvents. This program helps users avoid ...

  1. Hazardous solvent substitution

    SciTech Connect

    Twitchell, K.E.

    1995-11-01

    Eliminating hazardous solvents is good for the environment, worker safety, and the bottom line. However, even though we are motivated to find replacements, the big question is `What can we use as replacements for hazardous solvents?`You, too, can find replacements for your hazardous solvents. All you have to do is search for them. Search through the vendor literature of hundreds of companies with thousands of products. Ponder the associated material safety data sheets, assuming of course that you can obtain them and, having obtained them, that you can read them. You will want to search the trade magazines and other sources for product reviews. You will want to talk to users about how well the product actually works. You may also want to check US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and other government reports for toxicity and other safety information. And, of course, you will want to compare the product`s constituent chemicals with the many hazardous constituency lists to ensure the safe and legal use of the product in your workplace.

  2. Directional solidification of the alumina-zirconia ceramic eutectic system

    SciTech Connect

    Boldt, C.

    1994-07-27

    It is possible to produce alumina-zirconia ceramic samples through existing solidification techniques. The resulting microstructures typically consist of rods of zirconia in an alumina matrix, although a lamellar structure has been noted in some cases. In nearly all cases, colony growth was present which may possibly result from grain size, repeated nucleation events, and lamellar oscillations. In the same vein, it appears that the amount of impurities within the system might be the underlying cause for the colony growth. Colony growth was diminished through impurity control as the higher purity samples exhibited colony free behavior. In addition to colony formations, faceted alumina dendrites or nonfaceted zirconia dendrites may result in the ceramic if the sample is solidified out of the coupled zone. In all cases, for larger-sized Bridgman samples, a lower limit in the eutectic spacing was noted. The solidification model which includes the kinetic effect has been developed, although the effect appears to be negligible under present experimental conditions. A spacing limit might also occur due to the result of heat flow problems. Heat flow out of the ceramic is difficult to control, often causing radial and not axial growth. This behavior is exaggerated in the presence of impurities. Thus, higher purity powders should always be used. Higher purity samples, in addition to yielding a more microstructurally uniform ceramic, also showed increased directionality. In the future, the kinetic model needs to be examined in more detail, and further research needs to be accomplished in the area of molten ceramics. Once better system constants are in place, the kinetic model will give a better indication of the behavior in the alumina-zirconia system.

  3. Image matching technology in high power LED's eutectic welding.

    PubMed

    Ge, Peng; Yin, Peipei; Wang, Hong; Chang, Tianhai

    2014-06-01

    As the integration packaging density of high-power LED (Light Emitting Diode) chip modules become higher and higher, the accuracy and speed of visual inspection require higher demands correspondingly. The accurate position matching of substrates and flip-chip LEDs is one of the key technologies in the automatic eutectic welding process. In this paper we propose a method based on image features to complete the matching of the substrates and the flip-chip LEDs. Firstly, the substrate images and the flip-chip images are pre-processed respectively to obtain binary images. Then we apply Hough transformation to detect straight lines on the binary images, and find out the main linear directions to trigger the mechanical arms to adjust the positions of the substrate and the chip initially. Thirdly, we use eight neighbors interconnected domain algorithm for the first time to locate notable features of the substrate, and pass the located information to the control system to trigger the mechanical arm to adjust the substrate for the second time. At the same time, projection algorithm is applied to locate the anode of the flip-chip to drive the mechanical arm to adjust the position of the flip-chip again. Finally, the position information is used to trigger the mechanical arm to accomplish the matching of the substrate and the flip-chip. The proposed method improves the speed of matching on the basis of the accuracy of matching, which achieves these requirements of real-time and high accuracy applications. PMID:24921546

  4. Interphase anisotropy effects on lamellar eutectics: a numerical study.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Supriyo; Choudhury, Abhik; Plapp, Mathis; Bottin-Rousseau, Sabine; Faivre, Gabriel; Akamatsu, Silvère

    2015-02-01

    In directional solidification of binary eutectics, it is often observed that two-phase lamellar growth patterns grow tilted with respect to the direction z of the imposed temperature gradient. This crystallographic effect depends on the orientation of the two crystal phases α and β with respect to z. Recently, an approximate theory was formulated that predicts the lamellar tilt angle as a function of the anisotropy of the free energy of the solid(α)-solid(β) interphase boundary. We use two different numerical methods-phase field (PF) and dynamic boundary integral (BI)-to simulate the growth of steady periodic patterns in two dimensions as a function of the angle θ(R) between z and a reference crystallographic axis for a fixed relative orientation of α and β crystals, that is, for a given anisotropy function (Wulff plot) of the interphase boundary. For Wulff plots without unstable interphase-boundary orientations, the two simulation methods are in excellent agreement with each other and confirm the general validity of the previously proposed theory. In addition, a crystallographic "locking" of the lamellae onto a facet plane is well reproduced in the simulations. When unstable orientations are present in the Wulff plot, it is expected that two distinct values of the tilt angle can appear for the same crystal orientation over a finite θ(R) range. This bistable behavior, which has been observed experimentally, is well reproduced by BI simulations but not by the PF model. Possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed. PMID:25768518

  5. Construction and Characterization of Mini-ruthenium-Carbon Eutectic Cells for Industrial Use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diril, A.; Bourson, F.; Parga, C.; Sadli, M.

    2015-12-01

    High-temperature eutectic fixed points have proved to be convenient tools for temperature scale dissemination and thermometer calibrations/checks at temperatures above 1100°C. In order to investigate the feasibility of metal-carbon eutectic cells in industrial applications as a means for assessing the traceability of non-contact thermometers, a batch of cells was constructed at LNE-Cnam, NPL, and TUBITAK UME. Compared to the usual dimensions of high-temperature fixed point cells (45 mm in length × 24 mm in diameter), a new cell design was created to fit with industrial applications. TUBITAK UME constructed and characterized five ruthenium-carbon (Ru-C) eutectic cells of dimensions 24 mm in length × 24 mm in diameter. One of these cells has been selected and characterized at CEA premises. Ru-C eutectic cells have been evaluated in terms of short-term repeatability, reproducibility, furnace effect, sharp temperature ramps, and the effect of cell location. Measurements at TÜBİTAK UME have been performed with a transfer standard pyrometer calibrated at the copper point and a BB3500pg high-temperature blackbody furnace was used for construction and measurement. For the measurements at CEA, a Land Standard—HIMERT S1 radiation thermometer and a VITI induction furnace were used. In this article results of the measurements at TÜBİTAK UME and CEA will be presented. The possible use of these mini-eutectic cells as industrial temperature standards will be discussed.

  6. Deformation and fracture of a directionally solidified NiAl-28Cr-6Mo eutectic alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, X. F.; Johnson, D. R.; Noebe, R. D.; Oliver, B. F.

    1995-01-01

    A directionally solidified alloy based on the NiAl-(Cr, Mo) eutectic was examined by transmission and scanning electron microscopy to characterize the microstructure and room temperature deformation and fracture behavior. The microstructure consisted of a lamellar morphology with a group of zone axes (111) growth direction for both the NiAl and (Cr, Mo) phases. The interphase boundary between the eutectic phases was semicoherent and composed of a well-defined dislocation network. In addition, a fine array of coherent NiAl precipitates was dispersed throughout the (Cr, Mo) phase. The eutectic morphology was stable at 1300 K with only coarsening of the NiAl precipitates occurring after heat treatment for 1.8 ks (500 h). Fracture of the aligned eutectic is characterized primarily by a crack bridging/renucleation mechanism and is controlled by the strength of the semicoherent interface between the two phases. However, contributions to the toughness of the eutectic may arise from plastic deformation of the NiAl phase and the geometry associated with the fracture surface.

  7. PU/SS EUTECTIC ASSESSMENT IN 9975 PACKAGINGS IN A STORAGE FACILITY DURING EXTENDED FIRE

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, N.

    2012-03-26

    In a radioactive material (RAM) packaging, the formation of eutectic at the Pu/SS (plutonium/stainless steel) interface is a serious concern and must be avoided to prevent of leakage of fissile material to the environment. The eutectic temperature for the Pu/SS is rather low (410 C) and could seriously impact the structural integrity of the containment vessel under accident conditions involving fire. The 9975 packaging is used for long term storage of Pu bearing materials in the DOE complex where the Pu comes in contact with the stainless steel containment vessel. Due to the serious consequences of the containment breach at the eutectic site, the Pu/SS interface temperature is kept well below the eutectic formation temperature of 410 C. This paper discusses the thermal models and the results for the extended fire conditions (1500 F for 86 minutes) that exist in a long term storage facility and concludes that the 9975 packaging Pu/SS interface temperature is well below the eutectic temperature.

  8. The experimental study of the polonium-210 release from Li17-Pb83 eutectic

    SciTech Connect

    Schipakin, O.; Borisov, N.; Churkin, S.

    1994-12-31

    The polonium contamination hazard arise as a result of accidental Po-210 release from breeding blanket material - melted Li17Pb83 eutectic - in the environment. The experimental study of Po-210 release rates from eutectic were carry out in atmosphere of noble gases and air with different humidity in 1992-1993. In these experiments used method of carrier-gas flowing above melted eutectic surface. The main findings presented by RDIPE and Karpov Institute are: (1) The polonium-210 release rate strongly increase with eutectic temperature from 150 to 450{degrees}C. (2) The Po-210 release rate in the noble carrier-gas is in proportion with polonium concentration in eutectic in studied range from 10{sup {minus}7} to 10{sup {minus}4} Ci/g. (3) The Po-210 release rate in air remarkably effected by the surface oxide film also. (4) In these experiments for the first time were studied differently gaseous and aerosol polonium-210 fractions release rates. The experimental results and corresponding estimates showed needs the technological and accidental cleaning systems equipped by complex filters of gaseous and aerosols polonium-210 forms.

  9. A quantitative study of factors influencing lamellar eutectic morphology during solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaukler, W. F. S.

    1981-01-01

    The factors that influence the shape of the solid-liquid interface of a lamellar binary eutectic alloy are evaluated. Alloys of carbon tetrabromide and hexachloroethane which serve as a transparent analogue of lamellar metallic eutectics are used. The observed interface shapes are analyzed by computer-aided methods. The solid-liquid interfacial free energies of each of the individual phases comprising the eutectic system are measured as a function of composition using a 'grain boundary groove' technique. The solid-liquid interfacial free energy of the two phases are evaluated directly from the eutectic interface. The phase diagram for the system, the heat of fusion as a function of composition, and the density as a function of composition are measured. The shape of the eutectic interface is controlled mainly by the solid-liquid and solid-solid interfacial free energy relationships at the interface and by the temperature gradient present, rather than by interlamellar diffusion in the liquid at the interface, over the range of growth rates studied.

  10. Solvent replacement for green processing.

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, J; Chin, B; Huibers, P D; Garcia-Valls, R; Hatton, T A

    1998-01-01

    The implementation of the Montreal Protocol, the Clean Air Act, and the Pollution Prevention Act of 1990 has resulted in increased awareness of organic solvent use in chemical processing. The advances made in the search to find "green" replacements for traditional solvents are reviewed, with reference to solvent alternatives for cleaning, coatings, and chemical reaction and separation processes. The development of solvent databases and computational methods that aid in the selection and/or design of feasible or optimal environmentally benign solvent alternatives for specific applications is also discussed. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9539018

  11. SOLVENT FIRE BY-PRODUCTS

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D; Samuel Fink, S

    2006-05-22

    Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) conducted a burn test of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) solvent to determine the combustion products. The testing showed hydrogen fluoride gas is not a combustion product from a solvent fire when up to 70% of the solvent is consumed. The absence of HF in the combustion gases may reflect concentration of the modifier containing the fluoride groups in the unburned portion. SwRI reported results for other gases (CO, HCN, NOx, formaldehyde, and hydrocarbons). The results, with other supporting information, can be used for evaluating the consequences of a facility fire involving the CSSX solvent inventory.

  12. Solvent replacement for green processing.

    PubMed

    Sherman, J; Chin, B; Huibers, P D; Garcia-Valls, R; Hatton, T A

    1998-02-01

    The implementation of the Montreal Protocol, the Clean Air Act, and the Pollution Prevention Act of 1990 has resulted in increased awareness of organic solvent use in chemical processing. The advances made in the search to find "green" replacements for traditional solvents are reviewed, with reference to solvent alternatives for cleaning, coatings, and chemical reaction and separation processes. The development of solvent databases and computational methods that aid in the selection and/or design of feasible or optimal environmentally benign solvent alternatives for specific applications is also discussed. PMID:9539018

  13. Deep learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecun, Yann; Bengio, Yoshua; Hinton, Geoffrey

    2015-05-01

    Deep learning allows computational models that are composed of multiple processing layers to learn representations of data with multiple levels of abstraction. These methods have dramatically improved the state-of-the-art in speech recognition, visual object recognition, object detection and many other domains such as drug discovery and genomics. Deep learning discovers intricate structure in large data sets by using the backpropagation algorithm to indicate how a machine should change its internal parameters that are used to compute the representation in each layer from the representation in the previous layer. Deep convolutional nets have brought about breakthroughs in processing images, video, speech and audio, whereas recurrent nets have shone light on sequential data such as text and speech.

  14. Deep earthquakes

    SciTech Connect

    Frohlich, C.

    1989-01-01

    Earthquakes are often recorded at depths as great as 650 kilometers or more. These deep events mark regions where plates of the earth's surface are consumed in the mantle. But the earthquakes themselves present a conundrum: the high pressures and temperatures at such depths should keep rock from fracturing suddenly and generating a tremor. This paper reviews the research on this problem. Almost all deep earthquakes conform to the pattern described by Wadati, namely, they generally occur at the edge of a deep ocean and define an inclined zone extending from near the surface to a depth of 600 kilometers of more, known as the Wadati-Benioff zone. Several scenarios are described that were proposed to explain the fracturing and slipping of rocks at this depth.

  15. Deep learning.

    PubMed

    LeCun, Yann; Bengio, Yoshua; Hinton, Geoffrey

    2015-05-28

    Deep learning allows computational models that are composed of multiple processing layers to learn representations of data with multiple levels of abstraction. These methods have dramatically improved the state-of-the-art in speech recognition, visual object recognition, object detection and many other domains such as drug discovery and genomics. Deep learning discovers intricate structure in large data sets by using the backpropagation algorithm to indicate how a machine should change its internal parameters that are used to compute the representation in each layer from the representation in the previous layer. Deep convolutional nets have brought about breakthroughs in processing images, video, speech and audio, whereas recurrent nets have shone light on sequential data such as text and speech. PMID:26017442

  16. Production of low-density poly (4-methyl-1-pentene) foam via phase inversion from binary solvent/nonsovent systems

    SciTech Connect

    Simandl, R.F.; Robinson, D.N.; Bolinger, W.L.; Davis, W.E.

    1991-11-01

    Phase inversion from durene/naphthalene, durene/tmpdo, and durene/hexadecanol binary solvent/nonsolvent systems produced well interconnected, radiographically homogeneous, open-celled poly (4- methyl-1-pentene) or pmp foams. These foams ranged in density from 5 to 50 mg/cm{sup 2}. Foam homogeneity and casting efficiency were dependent on casting scheme, durene quality, solvent-to-nonsolvent ratio, and quench temperature. Foam density tracked linearly with dissolved-polymer content. Homogeneous, ultralow-density (5 to 6 mg/cm{sup 3}) foams were produced by using a 49/51 durene/naphthalene solvent eutectic. Foam hardness or firmness tracked somewhat linearly with foam density. Foams with densities above 20 mg/cm{sup 3} were too fragile to handle without damage.

  17. Secondary Confinement of Water Observed in Eutectic Melting of Aqueous Salt Systems in Nanopores.

    PubMed

    Meissner, Jens; Prause, Albert; Findenegg, Gerhard H

    2016-05-19

    Freezing and melting of aqueous solutions of alkali halides confined in the cylindrical nanopores of MCM-41 and SBA-15 silica was probed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). We find that the confinement-induced shift of the eutectic temperature in the pores can be significantly greater than the shift of the melting temperature of pure water. Greatest shifts of the eutectic temperature are found for salts that crystallize as oligohydrates at the eutectic point. This behavior is explained by the larger fraction of pore volume occupied by salt hydrates as compared to anhydrous salts, on the assumption that precipitated salt constitutes an additional confinement for ice/water in the pores. A model based on this secondary confinement effect gives a good representation of the experimental data. Salt-specific secondary confinement may play a role in a variety of fields, from salt-impregnated advanced adsorbents and catalysts to the thermal weathering of building materials. PMID:27124392

  18. Some Peculiarities of Eutectic Crystallization of LaB 6-(Ti,Zr)B 2 Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paderno, Yu.; Paderno, V.; Filippov, V.

    2000-10-01

    The structures of eutectic LaB6-(Ti,Zr)B2 alloys are studied after directional crystallization. The eutectic compositions and monovariant equilibrium between two quasibinary eutectics in this system were determined. Varying the TiB2/ZrB2 borides ratio permits us to control in their solid solutions the corresponding cell dimensions and, consequently, the boron-boron distances in the resulting quasibinary borides. Our previous assumptions that the perfectness of the real structure is determined by differences in the distances between boron atoms in boron sublattices of hexa- and diboride phases were confirmed. It is shown that forming the regular whiskers structure is much easier for complex (Ti,Zr)B2 boride than for individual TiB2 or ZrB2 borides.

  19. Surface structure of the liquid Au72Ge28 eutectic phase: X-ray reflectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pershan, P. S.; Stoltz, S. E.; Mechler, S.; Shpyrko, O. G.; Grigoriev, A. Y.; Balagurusamy, V. S. K.; Lin, B. H.; Meron, M.

    2009-09-01

    The surface structure of the liquid phase of the Au72Ge28 eutectic alloy has been measured using resonant and nonresonant x-ray reflectivity and grazing incidence x-ray diffraction. In spite of the significant differences in the surface tension of liquid Ge and Au the Gibbs adsorption enhancement of Ge concentration at the surface is minimal. This is in striking contrast to all the other binary alloys with large differences in the respective surface tensions measured up to date. In addition there is no evidence of the anomalous strong surface layering or in-plane crystalline order that has been reported for the otherwise quite similar liquid Au82Si18 eutectic. Instead, the surface of eutectic Au72Ge28 is liquidlike and the layering can be explained by the distorted crystal model with only slight modifications to the first layer.

  20. Structural and phonon transmission study of Ge-Au-Ge eutectically bonded interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Knowlton, W.B. |

    1995-07-01

    This thesis presents a structural analysis and phonon transparency investigation of the Ge-Au-Ge eutectic bond interface. Interface development was intended to maximize the interfacial ballistic phonon transparency to enhance the detection of the dark matter candidate WIMPs. The process which was developed provides an interface which produces minimal stress, low amounts of impurities, and insures Ge lattice continuity through the interface. For initial Au thicknesses of greater than 1,000 {angstrom} Au per substrate side, eutectic epitaxial growth resulted in a Au dendritic structure with 95% cross sectional and 90% planar Au interfacial area coverages. In sections in which Ge bridged the interface, lattice continuity across the interface was apparent. Epitaxial solidification of the eutectic interface with initial Au thicknesses < 500 A per substrate side produced Au agglomerations thereby reducing the Au planar interfacial area coverage to as little as 30%. The mechanism for Au coalescence was attributed to lateral diffusion of Ge and Au in the liquid phase during solidification. Phonon transmission studies were performed on eutectic interfaces with initial Au thicknesses of 1,000 {angstrom}, 500 {angstrom}, and 300 {angstrom} per substrate side. Phonon imaging of eutectically bonded samples with initial Au thicknesses of 300 {angstrom}/side revealed reproducible interfacial percent phonon transmissions from 60% to 70%. Line scan phonon imaging verified the results. Phonon propagation TOF spectra distinctly showed the predominant phonon propagation mode was ballistic. This was substantiated by phonon focusing effects apparent in the phonon imaging data. The degree of interface transparency to phonons and resulting phonon propagation modes correlate with the structure of the interface following eutectic solidification. Structural studies of samples with initial Au thickness of 1,000 {angstrom}/side appear to correspond with the phonon transmission study.

  1. Solvent Fractionation of Lignin

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Sabornie; Saito, Tomonori

    2014-01-01

    Lignin is a highly abundant source of renewable carbon that can be considered as a valuable sustainable source of biobased materials. The major issues for the commercial production of value added high performance lignin products are lignin s physical and chemical heterogenities. To overcome these problems, a variety of procedures have been developed to produce pure lignin suitable for high performace applications such as lignin-derived carbon materials. However, most of the isolation procedures affect lignin s properties and structure. In this chapter, a short review of the effect of solvent fractionation on lignin s properties and structure is presented.

  2. Deep Lysimeter

    DOEpatents

    Hubbell, Joel M.; Sisson, James B.

    2004-06-01

    A deep lysimeter including a hollow vessel having a chamber, a fill conduit extending into the chamber through apertures, a semi-permeable member mounted on the vessel and in fluid communication with the fill conduit, and a line connection for retrieving the lysimeter.

  3. Deep Trouble.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popke, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Discusses how the safety-related ruling by the National Federation of State High School Associations to eliminate the option of using 18-inch starting platforms in pools less than 4 feet deep may affect operators of swimming pools and the swim teams who use them. (EV)

  4. Numerical study: Iron corrosion-resistance in lead-bismuth eutectic coolant by molecular dynamics method

    SciTech Connect

    Arkundato, Artoto; Su'ud, Zaki; Abdullah, Mikrajuddin; Widayani,; Celino, Massimo

    2012-06-06

    In this present work, we report numerical results of iron (cladding) corrosion study in interaction with lead-bismuth eutectic coolant of advanced nuclear reactors. The goal of this work is to study how the oxygen can be used to reduce the corrosion rate of cladding. The molecular dynamics method was applied to simulate corrosion process. By evaluating the diffusion coefficients, RDF functions, MSD curves of the iron and also observed the crystal structure of iron before and after oxygen injection to the coolant then we concluded that a significant and effective reduction can be achieved by issuing about 2% number of oxygen atoms to lead-bismuth eutectic coolant.

  5. The influences of convection on directional solidification of eutectic Bi/MnBi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, David J., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Eutectic alloys of Bi-Mn were directionally solidified using the Bridgman-Stockbarger technique to determine the influences of gravitationally-driven thermo-solutal convection on the Bi-MnBi rod eutectic. Experiments were conducted that varied the level of convection by varying the growth parameters and growth orientation, by microgravity damping, by applied magnetic field damping, and by imposing forced convection. Peltier interface demarcation and in situ thermocouple measurements were used to monitor interface velocity and thermal gradient and to evaluate interface planarity.

  6. Wear resistance of composite material made of eutectic steel and bronze powders

    SciTech Connect

    Mikulyak, O.V.; Shurin, A.K.

    1994-07-01

    The tribological properties of a hardened steel U8-composite pair in contact in which bronze is used as the matrix and eutectic alloy powder (steel 30 Kh13 with 15 wt.% VC of eutectic structure) is used as a filler are studied under conditions of reciprocal sliding friction without lubrication. Composite and counterbody wear is not uniform and depends on the amount of filler within the range 20-80%. A composite with 80% filler has good tribological properties and satisfactory lathe machining.

  7. Solubility and excessive thermodynamic characteristics of Pr and Nd in the Ga-Sn eutectic alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melchakov, S. Yu.; Yamshchikov, L. F.; Osipenko, A. G.; Pozdeev, P. A.; Rusakov, M. A.

    2015-08-01

    The praseodymium and neodymium solubilities in the gallium-tin eutectic melt were measured for the first time in a temperature range of 423-1073 K using a high-temperature sampling technique. The data on the activity and solubility are used to calculate the activity coefficients, the excessive thermodynamic characteristics of α-praseodymium and α-neodymium in the Ga-Sn eutectic melts, and the separation factor for the Pr/Nd pair on gallium-tin electrodes in chloride melts.

  8. Numerical study: Iron corrosion-resistance in lead-bismuth eutectic coolant by molecular dynamics method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkundato, Artoto; Su'ud, Zaki; Abdullah, Mikrajuddin; Widayani, Celino, Massimo

    2012-06-01

    In this present work, we report numerical results of iron (cladding) corrosion study in interaction with lead-bismuth eutectic coolant of advanced nuclear reactors. The goal of this work is to study how the oxygen can be used to reduce the corrosion rate of cladding. The molecular dynamics method was applied to simulate corrosion process. By evaluating the diffusion coefficients, RDF functions, MSD curves of the iron and also observed the crystal structure of iron before and after oxygen injection to the coolant then we concluded that a significant and effective reduction can be achieved by issuing about 2% number of oxygen atoms to lead-bismuth eutectic coolant.

  9. Study of local structure in hyper-eutectic Zr-Cu-Al bulk glassy alloys by positron annihilation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiyama, T.; Ishii, K.; Yokoyama, Y.; Konno, T. J.; Iwase, A.; Hori, F.

    2016-01-01

    The Zr-Cu-Al bulk glassy (BG) alloy, which has amorphous structure, possesses various properties such as high strength and toughness with compositional dependence. In the present study, density, positron annihilation lifetime and coincidence Doppler Broadening measurement have been performed for various compositional hyper-eutectic Zr-Cu-Al BG alloys. The density of hyper-eutectic Zr-Cu-Al BG alloys increases with decreasing of Zr fraction. In contrast, positron lifetime for all compositional alloys is almost constant about 165 psec. In addition, the CDB ratio profile is almost the same for hyper-eutectic alloys. This unchanging trend of CDB ratio profile is quite different from that of hypo-eutectic BG alloys. These results reveal that different internal structure exists in hyper and hypo-eutectic BG alloys.

  10. Numerical study of the effect of the shape of the phase diagram on the eutectic freezing temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Ode, M.; Shimono, M.; Sasajima, N.; Yamada, Y.; Bloembergen, P.

    2013-09-11

    To evaluate the reliability of metal-carbon eutectic systems as fixed points for the next generation of high-temperature standards the effect of thermodynamic properties related to the shape of eutectic phase diagram on the freezing temperature is investigated within the context of the numerical multi-phase-field model. The partition coefficient and liquidus slopes of the two solids involved in the eutectic reaction are varied deliberately and independently. The difference between the eutectic temperature and the freezing temperature is determined in dependence of the solid/liquid (s/l) interface shape and concentration. Where appropriate reference is made to the Jackson-Hunt analytical theory. It is shown that there are mainly two typical conditions to decrease the undercooling: 1) a small liquidus slope and 2) the associated difference between the eutectic composition and the liquid composition during solidification.

  11. Microstructural variations induced by gravity level during directional solidification of near-eutectic iron-carbon type alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefanescu, Doru M.; Fiske, Michael R.; Curreri, Peter A.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of gravity on the microstructure of directionally solidified near-eutectic cast irons are studied, using a Bridgman-type automatic directional solidification furnace aboard a NASA KC-135 aircraft which flies parabolic arcs and generates alternating periods of low-g (0.01 to 0.001 g, 30 seconds long) and high-g (1.8 g, 1.5 minutes long). Results show a refinement of the interlamellar spacing of the eutectic during low-g processing of metastable Fe-C eutectic alloys. Low-g processing of stable Fe-C-Si eutectic alloys (lamellar or spheroidal graphic) results in a coarsening of the eutectic grain structure. Secondary dendrite arm spacing of austenite increases in low-g and decreases in high-g. The effectiveness of low-gravity in the removal of buoyancy-driven graphite phase segregation is demonstrated.

  12. Solidification of binary and Sr-modified Al-Si eutectic alloys - Theoretical analysis of solute fields

    SciTech Connect

    Sens, H.; Eustathopoulos, N.; Camel, D.; Favier, J.J. Ecole Nationale Superieure d'Electrochimie et d'Electrometallurgie, Saint-Martin-d'Heres )

    1992-07-01

    This paper analyzes experimental data in available literature concerning the eutectic spacing lambda and growth undercooling Delta-T in the Al-Si binary eutectic and in the strontium-modified eutectic. The expression for Delta-T obtained in Jackson and Hunt's model is used, before application of the minimum undercooling growth criterion. It is shown that, for the binary eutectic, the results can be interpreted quantitatively by means of this equation. On the other hand, it is shown that the results for the modified alloy cannot be interpreted on this basis and that a contribution of the kinetic undercooling for growth of Si has to be taken into account. A high level of kinetic undercooling is found (ranging from 5 to 15 K depending on the solidification rate). This analysis also predicts a significant silicon-enrichment of the interfacial liquid, especially in the modified eutectic (up to 2 wt pct). 13 refs.

  13. Microtexture and macrotexture formation in the containerless solidification of undercooled Ni-18.7 at.% Sn eutectic melts

    SciTech Connect

    Li Mingjun . E-mail: li.mingjun@jaxa.jp; Nagashio, Kosuke; Ishikawa, Takehiko; Yoda, Shinichi; Kuribayashi, Kazuhiko

    2005-02-01

    The microscopic orientations of Ni-18.7 at.% Sn eutectics solidified from undercooled states, in particular, within an individual eutectic colony and among neighboring eutectic colonies, have been measured with respect to the eutectic Ni{sub 3}Sn and Ni phases; this was done using a scanning electron microscope equipped with the electron backscatter diffraction pattern (EBSP) mapping technique. The EBSPs and inverse pole figures indicate that the Ni{sub 3}Sn intermetallic compound is continuous and well oriented whereas the Ni solid solution is discontinuous and randomly oriented within an anomalous eutectic grain. Further examination reveals that although Ni particulates are random from an overall view, most neighboring Ni grains have small misorientations of less than 10 deg . The specific solidification sequence and the effect of released crystallization heat on subsequent crystallization are further considered, which enables the primary Ni phase to segment into individual grains whereas Ni{sub 3}Sn does not due to higher entropy of fusion. A little rotation or floating within the constrained framework of the crystallizing Ni{sub 3}Sn compound may yield small misorientation angles. The discontinuous Ni particulates and continuous Ni{sub 3}Sn network are of great significance in revealing the anomalous eutectic formation. The orientation among independent eutectic colonies is random owing to the random appearance of nuclei throughout the volume of undercooled melts. The macrotextures of pole figures (PFs) of two eutectic phases are also mapped versus melt undercooling, which can be interpreted well when considering the nucleation frequency, variation of eutectic colony size, microtexture within a single eutectic colony, and the overall microstructure evolution as a function of melt undercooling.

  14. Solvent Blending Strategy to Upgrade MCU CSSX Solvent to Equivalent Next-Generation CSSX Solvent

    SciTech Connect

    Delmau, Laetitia Helene; Moyer, Bruce A

    2012-12-01

    The results of the present study have validated an equal-volume blending strategy for upgrading freshly prepared CSSX solvent to a blended solvent functionally equivalent to NG-CSSX solvent. It is shown that blending fresh CSSX solvent as currently used in MCU with an equal volume of an NG-CSSX solvent concentrate of appropriate composition yields a blended solvent composition (46.5 mM of MaxCalix, 3.5 mM of BOBCalixC6, 0.5 M of Cs-7SB, 3 mM of guanidine suppressor, and 1.5 mM of TOA in Isopar L) that exhibits equivalent batch ESS performance to that of the NG-CSSX solvent containing 50 mM of MaxCalix, 0.5 M of Cs-7SB, and 3 mM of guanidine suppressor in Isopar L. The solvent blend composition is robust to third-phase formation. Results also show that a blend containing up to 60% v/v of CSSX solvent could be accommodated with minimal risk. Extraction and density data for the effect of solvent concentration mimicking diluent evaporation or over-dilution of the equal-volume blended solvent are also given, providing input for setting operational limits. Given that the experiments employed all pristine chemicals, the results do not qualify a blended solvent starting with actual used MCU solvent, which can be expected to have undergone some degree of degradation. Consequently, further work should be considered to evaluate this risk and implement appropriate remediation if needed.

  15. Experimental investigation of forced-convection heat-transfer characteristics of lead-bismuth eutectic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lubarsky, Bernard

    1951-01-01

    The forced-convection heat-transfer characteristics of lead-bismuth eutectic were experimentally investigated. Experimental values of Nusselt number for lead-bismuth fell considerably below predicted values. The addition of a wetting agent did not change the heat transfer characteristics.

  16. Evaluation of magnesium-aluminum eutectic to improve combustion efficiency in low burning rate propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Northam, B. G.; Sullivan, E. M.

    1973-01-01

    A previous investigation indicated that combustion efficiency of low burning-rate propellants could be improved if the aluminum fuel was replaced by aluminum particles coated with a magnesium-aluminum eutectic alloy (ALCAL). The purpose of the present investigation was to evaluate the possibility of improving the combustion efficiency of these propellants by admixing the eutectic with the aluminum rather than coating the aluminum. Tests of three propellants similar in every respect except for the metal fuel were conducted in test motors with 4.54 kg (10 lbm) of propellant. The first propellant used aluminum fuel; the second contained aluminum admixed with magnesium-aluminum eutectic; the third used ALCAL. The test results show the the admixed fuel gave better low burning-rate combustion efficiency than the other two. The test results also showed that the ALCAL was deficient in that much, if not all, of the coating material could be found as the fine particles in a bimodal mix of aluminum and eutectic. The combustion efficiency of low burning-rate aluminized propellants can be significantly improved by mixing a small amount of magnesium-aluminum alloy with the aluminum fuel.

  17. A New Analytical Approach to Predict Spacing Selection in Lamellar and Rod Eutectic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catalina, Adrian V.; Sen, Subhayu; Stefanescu, D. M.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Jackson and Hunt (JH) theory has been modified to relax the assumption of isothermal solid/liquid interface(SLI) used in their treatment. Based on the predictions of this modified theory the traditional definitions of regular and irregular eutectics are revised. For regular eutectics the new model identifies a range of spacing within the limits defined by the minimum undercooling of the alpha and beta phase. For the irregular Al-Si eutectic system two different spacing selection mechanisms were identified: a) for a particular growth rate, a nearly isothermal interface can be achieved at a unique minimum spacing lambda(sub I); b) the average spacing (lambda(sub av) greater than lambda(sub I)) is essentially dictated by the undercooling of the faceted phase. Based on the modified theoretical model a semiempirical expression has been developed to account for the influence of the temperature gradient, which is dominant in the irregular Al-Si system. The behavior of the Fe-Fe3C eutectic is also discussed The theoretical calculations have been found to be in good agreement with the published experimental measurements.

  18. A New Analytical Approach to Predict Spacing Selection in Lamellar and Rod Eutectic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catalina, Adrian V.; Sen, Subhayu; Stefanescu, Doru M.

    2003-01-01

    The Jackson and Hunt (JH) theory has been modified to relax the assumption of isothermal solid liquid interface used in their treatment. Based on the predictions of this modified theory, the traditional definitions of regular and irregular eutectics are revised. For regular eutectics, the new model identifies a range of spacing within the limits defined by the minimum undercooling of the a and beta phases. For the irregular Al-Si eutectic system, two different spacing selection mechanisms were identified: (1) for a particular growth rate, a nearly isothermal interface can be achieved at a unique minimum spacing lambda (sub t); (2) the average spacing (lambda (sub av) greater than lambda (sub t) is essentially dictated by the undercooling of the faceted phase. Based on the modified theoretical model, a semiempirical expression has been developed to account for the influence of the temperature gradient, which is dominant in the irregular Al-Si system. The behavior of the Fe-Fe3C eutectic is also discussed. The theoretical calculations have been found to be in good agreement with the published experimental measurements.

  19. Mechanical Properties and Fracture Behavior of Directionally Solidified NiAl-V Eutectic Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milenkovic, Srdjan; Caram, Rubens

    2015-02-01

    Directional solidification of eutectic alloys has been recognized as promising technique for producing in situ composite materials exhibiting balance of properties. Therefore, an in situ NiAl-V eutectic composite has been successfully directionally solidified using Bridgman technique. The mechanical behavior of the composite including fracture resistance, microhardness, and compressive properties at room and elevated temperatures was investigated. Damage evolution and fracture characteristics were also discussed. The obtained results indicate that the NiAl-V eutectic retains high yield strength up to 1073 K (800 °C), above which there is a rapid decrease in strength. Its yield strength is higher than that of binary NiAl and most of the NiAl-based eutectics. The exhibited fracture toughness of 28.5 MPa√m is the highest of all other NiAl-based systems investigated so far. The material exhibited brittle fracture behavior of transgranular type and all observations pointed out that the main fracture micromechanism was cleavage.

  20. Use of Eutectic Fixed Points to Characterize a Spectrometer for Earth Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salim, Saber G. R.; Fox, Nigel P.; Woolliams, Emma R.; Winkler, Rainer; Pegrum, Heather M.; Sun, Tong; Grattan, Ken T. V.

    2007-12-01

    A small palm-sized, reference spectrometer, mounted on a remote-controlled model helicopter is being developed and tested by the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) in conjunction with City University, London. The developed system will be used as a key element for field vicarious calibration of optical earth observation systems in the visible-near infrared (VNIR) region. The spectrometer is hand held, low weight, and uses a photodiode array. It has good stray light rejection and wide spectral coverage, allowing simultaneous measurements from 400 to 900 nm. The spectrometer is traceable to NPL’s primary standard cryogenic radiometer via a high-temperature metal-carbon eutectic fixed-point blackbody. Once the fixed-point temperature has been determined (using filter radiometry), the eutectic provides a high emissivity and high stability source of known spectral radiance over the emitted spectral range. All wavelength channels of the spectrometer can be calibrated simultaneously using the eutectic transition without the need for additional instrumentation. The spectrometer itself has been characterized for stray light performance and wavelength accuracy. Its long-term and transportation stability has been proven in an experiment that determined the “World’s Bluest Sky”—a process that involved 56 flights, covering 100,000 km in 72 days. This vicarious calibration methodology using a eutectic standard is presented alongside the preliminary results of an evaluation study of the spectrometer characteristics.

  1. Solidification and microstructures of binary ice-I/hydrate eutectic aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCarthy, C.; Cooper, R.F.; Kirby, S.H.; Rieck, K.D.; Stern, L.A.

    2007-01-01

    The microstructures of two-phase binary aggregates of ice-I + salt-hydrate, prepared by eutectic solidification, have been characterized by cryogenic scanning electron microscopy (CSEM). The specific binary systems studied were H2O-Na2SO4, H2O-MgSO4, H2O-NaCl, and H2O-H2SO4; these were selected based on their potential application to the study of tectonics on the Jovian moon Europa. Homogeneous liquid solutions of eutectic compositions were undercooled modestly (??T - 1-5 ??C); similarly cooled crystalline seeds of the same composition were added to circumvent the thermodynamic barrier to nucleation and to control eutectic growth under (approximately) isothermal conditions. CSEM revealed classic eutectic solidification microstructures with the hydrate phase forming continuous lamellae, discontinuous lamellae, or forming the matrix around rods of ice-I, depending on the volume fractions of the phases and their entropy of dissolving and forming a homogeneous aqueous solution. We quantify aspects of the solidification behavior and microstructures for each system and, with these data articulate anticipated effects of the microstructure on the mechanical responses of the materials.

  2. Free energy change of off-eutectic binary alloys on solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohsaka, K.; Trinh, E. H.; Lin, J.-C.; Perepezko, J. H.

    1991-01-01

    A formula for the free energy difference between the undercooled liquid phase and the stable solid phase is derived for off-eutectic binary alloys in which the equilibrium solid/liquid transition takes place over a certain temperature range. The free energy change is then evaluated numerically for a Bi-25 at. pct Cd alloy modeled as a sub-subregular solution.

  3. The binary eutectic of NSAIDS and two-phase liquid system for enhanced membrane permeation.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xudong; Capomacchia, A C

    2005-01-01

    The eutectic properties of binary mixtures of some nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) with ibuprofen were studied using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and phase equilibrium diagrams. The melting points of selected NSAIDs were significantly depressed due to binary eutectic formation with ibuprofen. Ketoprofen and ibuprofen were selected to study the effect of eutectic formation on membrane permeation using Franz diffusion cells and snake skin as the model membrane. The presence of aqueous isopropyl alcohol (IPA) was necessary to completely transform the solid drugs into an oily state at ambient temperature. As much as the 99.6% of ibuprofen and the 88.8% of ketoprofen added were found in the oily phase of the two-phase liquid system formed when aqueous IPA was added to the eutectic mixture. Due to the high drug concentration in the oily phase, and maximum thermodynamic activity, the two-phase liquid system showed enhanced membrane permeation rates of ibuprofen (37.5 microg/cm2/hr) and ketoprofen (33.4 microg/cm2/hr) compared to other reference preparations used. PMID:15776808

  4. Femtosecond transient dichroism/birefringence studies of solute- solvent friction and solvent dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.J.; Castner, E.W. Jr.; Konitsky, W.; Waldeck, D.H.

    1994-02-01

    Ultrafast, heterodyne, polarization spectroscopies are used to measure solute-solvent frictional coupling and characterize the neat solvent`s relaxation dynamics on femtosecond and picosecond timescales.

  5. Transient and steady state creep response of ice I and magnesium sulfate hydrate eutectic aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCarthy, C.; Cooper, R.F.; Goldsby, D.L.; Durham, W.B.; Kirby, S.H.

    2011-01-01

    Using uniaxial compression creep experiments, we characterized the transient and steady state deformation behaviors of eutectic aggregates of system ice I and MgSO4 11H2O (MS11; meridianiite), which has significance because of its likely presence on moons of the outer solar system. Synthetic samples of eutectic liquid bulk composition, which produce eutectic colonies containing 0.35-0.50 volume fraction MS11, were tested as functions of colony size and lamellar spacing, temperature (230-250 K), and confining pressure (0.1 and 50 MPa) to strains ???0.2. Up to a differential stress of 6 MPa, the ice I-MS11 aggregates display an order of magnitude higher effective viscosity and higher stress sensitivity than do aggregates of pure polycrystalline ice at the same conditions. The creep data and associated microstructural observations demonstrate, however, that the aggregates are additionally more brittle than pure ice, approaching rate-independent plasticity that includes rupture of the hydrate phase at 6-8 MPa, depending on the scale of the microstructure. Microstructures of deformed samples reveal forms of semibrittle flow in which the hydrate phase fractures while the ice phase deforms plastically. Semibrittle flow in the icy shell of a planetary body would truncate the lithospheric strength envelope and thereby decrease the depth to the brittle-ductile transition by 55% and reduce the failure limit for compressional surface features from 10 to ???6 MPa. A constitutive equation that includes eutectic colony boundary sliding and intracolony flow is used to describe the steady state rheology of the eutectic aggregates. Copyright ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  6. Transient and steady state creep response of ice I and magnesium sulfate hydrate eutectic aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Christine; Cooper, Reid F.; Goldsby, David L.; Durham, William B.; Kirby, Stephen H.

    2011-04-01

    Using uniaxial compression creep experiments, we characterized the transient and steady state deformation behaviors of eutectic aggregates of system ice I and MgSO4 • 11H2O (MS11; meridianiite), which has significance because of its likely presence on moons of the outer solar system. Synthetic samples of eutectic liquid bulk composition, which produce eutectic colonies containing 0.35-0.50 volume fraction MS11, were tested as functions of colony size and lamellar spacing, temperature (230-250 K), and confining pressure (0.1 and 50 MPa) to strains ≤ 0.2. Up to a differential stress of 6 MPa, the ice I-MS11 aggregates display an order of magnitude higher effective viscosity and higher stress sensitivity than do aggregates of pure polycrystalline ice at the same conditions. The creep data and associated microstructural observations demonstrate, however, that the aggregates are additionally more brittle than pure ice, approaching rate-independent plasticity that includes rupture of the hydrate phase at 6-8 MPa, depending on the scale of the microstructure. Microstructures of deformed samples reveal forms of semibrittle flow in which the hydrate phase fractures while the ice phase deforms plastically. Semibrittle flow in the icy shell of a planetary body would truncate the lithospheric strength envelope and thereby decrease the depth to the brittle-ductile transition by 55% and reduce the failure limit for compressional surface features from 10 to ˜6 MPa. A constitutive equation that includes eutectic colony boundary sliding and intracolony flow is used to describe the steady state rheology of the eutectic aggregates.

  7. The fabrication of all-silicon micro gas chromatography columns using gold diffusion eutectic bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radadia, A. D.; Salehi-Khojin, A.; Masel, R. I.; Shannon, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    Temperature programming of gas chromatography (GC) separation columns accelerates the elution rate of chemical species through the column, increasing the speed of analysis, and hence making it a favorable technique to speedup separations in microfabricated GCs (micro-GC). Temperature-programmed separations would be preferred in an all-silicon micro-column compared to a silicon-Pyrex® micro-column given that the thermal conductivity and diffusivity of silicon is 2 orders of magnitude higher than Pyrex®. This paper demonstrates how to fabricate all-silicon micro-columns that can withstand the temperature cycling required for temperature-programmed separations. The columns were sealed using a novel bonding process where they were first bonded using a gold eutectic bond, then annealed at 1100 °C to allow gold diffusion into silicon and form what we call a gold diffusion eutectic bond. The gold diffusion eutectic-bonded micro-columns when examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM) and blade insertion techniques showed bonding strength comparable to the previously reported anodic-bonded columns. Gas chromatography-based methane injections were also used as a novel way to investigate proper sealing between channels. A unique methane elution peak at various carrier gas inlet pressures demonstrated the suitability of gold diffusion eutectic-bonded channels as micro-GC columns. The application of gold diffusion eutectic-bonded all-silicon micro-columns to temperature-programmed separations (120 °C min-1) was demonstrated with the near-baseline separation of n-C6 to n-C12 alkanes in 35 s.

  8. Simulations of the Eutectic Transformations in the Platinum-Carbon System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monas, A.; Bloembergen, P.; Dong, W.; Shchyglo, O.; Steinbach, I.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we present the simulation of the eutectic phase transitions in the Pt-C system, in terms of both freezing and melting, using the multi-phase-field model. The experimentally obtained heat-extraction and -injection rates associated with the induction of freezing and melting are converted into the corresponding rates for microstructure-scale simulations. In spite of the extreme differences in the volume fractions of the FCC-Pt-rich phase on the one hand and graphite (C) on the other, satisfactory results for the kinetics of solidification and melting have been obtained, involving reasonable offsets in temperature, inducing freezing and melting, with respect to the equilibrium eutectic temperature. For freezing in the simulations, the needle/rod-like morphology, as experimentally observed, was reproduced for different heat extraction rates. The seemingly anomalous peak characterizing the simulated freezing curves is ascribed to the speed up of the solidification process due to the curvature effect. Similarly, a peak is observed in the experimental freezing curves, also showing up more clearly with increasing freezing rates. Melting was simulated starting from a frozen structure produced by a freezing simulation. The simulations reproduce the experimental melting curves and, together with the simulated freezing curves, help to understand the phase transition of the Pt-C eutectic. Finally, the effect of metallic impurities was studied. As shown for Au, impurities affect the morphology of the eutectic structure, their impact increasing with the impurity content, i.e., they can act as modifiers of the structure, as earlier reported for irregular eutectics.

  9. On the nature of eutectic carbides in Cr-Ni white cast irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laird, G.; Nielsen, R. L.; MacMillan, N. H.

    1991-08-01

    The mechanical and tribological properties of white cast irons are strongly dependent on whether they contain M7C3 or M3C carbides (M = Fe, Cr, etc.). In an effort to improve the wear resistance of such materials, the United States Bureau of Mines has studied the effects of adding 0.3 to 2.3 wt pct (throughout) Si to hypoeutectic irons containing approximately 8.5 pct Cr and 6.0 pct Ni. The eutectic carbides formed were identified by electron microprobe analysis, X-ray diffraction, and scanning electron (SEM) and optical microscopies. In addition, differential thermal analysis (DTA) was used to study the process of solidification. At Si contents of 0.3 and 1.2 pct, the eutectic carbides exhibited a duplex structure, consisting of cores of M7C3 surrounded by shells of M3C. Additionally, the microstructure contained ledeburite (M3C + γFe (austenite)). At the higher Si content of 1.6 pct, the eutectic carbides consisted entirely of M7C3, and some ledeburite remained. Last, when the Si content was raised to 2.3 pct, the eutectic carbides again consisted entirely of M7C3, but ledeburite was no longer formed. These observations can be explained in terms of the effects of Si and, to a lesser extent, of Ni on the shape of the liquidus surface of the metastable Fe-Cr-C phase diagram. The addition of Si reduces the roles played by the four-phase class II p reaction L + M7C3 → M3C + γFe and the ledeburitic eutectic reaction L → M3C + γFe in the overall process of solidification.

  10. Deep Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Deep Vein Thrombosis Overview What is deep vein thrombosis? Deep vein thrombosis (also called DVT) is a blood clot in a vein deep inside your body. These clots usually occur in ...

  11. SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF URANIUM VALUES

    DOEpatents

    Feder, H.M.; Ader, M.; Ross, L.E.

    1959-02-01

    A process is presented for extracting uranium salt from aqueous acidic solutions by organic solvent extraction. It consists in contacting the uranium bearing solution with a water immiscible dialkylacetamide having at least 8 carbon atoms in the molecule. Mentioned as a preferred extractant is dibutylacetamide. The organic solvent is usually used with a diluent such as kerosene or CCl/sub 4/.

  12. Chemical reactivity: Inverse solvent design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truhlar, Donald G.

    2013-11-01

    Choosing a solvent for a particular reaction is often a matter of personal preference or the result of limited screening. Now, a computational method allows identification of a solvent that will enhance the kinetics of a reaction prior to running a wet experiment.

  13. Supercritical multicomponent solvent coal extraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, W. H.; Fong, W. S.; Pichaichanarong, P.; Chan, P. C. F.; Lawson, D. D. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    The yield of organic extract from the supercritical extraction of coal with larger diameter organic solvents such as toluene is increased by use of a minor amount of from 0.1 to 10% by weight of a second solvent such as methanol having a molecular diameter significantly smaller than the average pore diameter of the coal.

  14. Refinement of Eutectic Si in High Purity Al-5Si Alloys with Combined Ca and P Additions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Thomas Hartmut; Li, Jiehua; Schaffer, Paul Louis; Schumacher, Peter; Arnberg, Lars

    2015-01-01

    The effects of combined additions of Ca and P on the eutectic Si in a series of high purity Al-5 wt pct Si alloys have been investigated with the entrained droplet technique and complementary sets of conventional castings. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermal analysis were used to investigate the eutectic droplet undercooling and the recalescence undercooling, respectively. Optical microscopy, SEM, EPMA, and TEM were employed to characterize the resultant microstructures. It was found that 250 ppm Ca addition to Al-5Si wt pct alloys with higher P contents leads to a significant increase of the eutectic droplet undercooling. For low or moderate cooling rates, the TEM results underline that Ca additions do not promote Si twinning. Thus, a higher twin density cannot be expected in Ca containing Al-Si alloys after, e.g., sand casting. Consequently, a refinement of the eutectic Si from coarse flake-like to fine plate-like structure, rather than a modification of the eutectic Si to a fibrous morphology, was achieved. This strongly indicates that the main purpose of Ca additions is to counteract the coarsening effect of the eutectic Si imposed by higher P concentrations. Significant multiple Si twinning was observed in melt-spun condition; however, this can be attributed to the higher cooling rate. After DSC heating (slow cooling), most of Si twins disappeared. Thus, the well-accepted impurity-induced twinning mechanism may be not valid in the case of Ca addition. The possible refinement mechanisms were discussed in terms of nucleation and growth of eutectic Si. We propose that the pre-eutectic Al2Si2Ca phase and preferential formation of Ca3P2 deactivate impurity particles, most likely AlP, poisoning the nucleation sites for eutectic Si.

  15. Experimental Investigation of Evaporation Behavior of Polonium and Rare-Earth Elements in Lead-Bismuth Eutectic Pool

    SciTech Connect

    Shuji Ohno; Shinya Miyahara; Yuji Kurata; Ryoei Katsura; Shigeru Yoshida

    2006-07-01

    Equilibrium evaporation behavior was experimentally investigated for polonium ({sup 210}Po) in liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) and for rare-earth elements gadolinium (Gd) and europium (Eu) in LBE to understand and clarify the transfer behavior of toxic impurities from LBE coolant to a gas phase. The experiments utilized the 'transpiration method' in which saturated vapor in an isothermal evaporation pot was transported by inert carrier gas and collected outside of the pot. While the previous paper ICONE12-49111 has already reported the evaporation behavior of LBE and of tellurium in LBE, this paper summarizes the outlines and the results of experiments for important impurity materials {sup 210}Po and rare-earth elements which are accumulated in liquid LBE as activation products and spallation products. In the experiments for rare-earth elements, non-radioactive isotope was used. The LBE pool is about 330-670 g in weight and has a surface area of 4 cm x 14 cm. {sup 210}Po experiments were carried out with a smaller test apparatus and radioactive {sup 210}Po produced through neutron irradiation of LBE in the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR). We obtained fundamental and instructive evaporation data such as vapor concentration, partial vapor pressure of {sup 210}Po in the gas phase, and gas-liquid equilibrium partition coefficients of the impurities in LBE under the temperature condition between 450 and 750 deg. C. The {sup 210}Po test revealed that Po had characteristics to be retained in LBE but was still more volatile than LBE solvent. A part of Eu tests implied high volatility of rare-earth elements comparable to that of Po. This tendency is possibly related to the local enrichment of the solute near the pool surface and needs to be investigated more. These results are useful and indispensable for the evaluation of radioactive materials transfer to the gas phase in LBE-cooled nuclear systems. (authors)

  16. Deep smarts.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Dorothy; Swap, Walter

    2004-09-01

    When a person sizes up a complex situation and rapidly comes to a decision that proves to be not just good but brilliant, you think, "That was smart." After you watch him do this a few times, you realize you're in the presence of something special. It's not raw brainpower, though that helps. It's not emotional intelligence, either, though that, too, is often involved. It's deep smarts. Deep smarts are not philosophical--they're not"wisdom" in that sense, but they're as close to wisdom as business gets. You see them in the manager who understands when and how to move into a new international market, in the executive who knows just what kind of talk to give when her organization is in crisis, in the technician who can track a product failure back to an interaction between independently produced elements. These are people whose knowledge would be hard to purchase on the open market. Their insight is based on know-how more than on know-what; it comprises a system view as well as expertise in individual areas. Because deep smarts are experienced based and often context specific, they can't be produced overnight or readily imported into an organization. It takes years for an individual to develop them--and no time at all for an organization to lose them when a valued veteran walks out the door. They can be taught, however, with the right techniques. Drawing on their forthcoming book Deep Smarts, Dorothy Leonard and Walter Swap say the best way to transfer such expertise to novices--and, on a larger scale, to make individual knowledge institutional--isn't through PowerPoint slides, a Web site of best practices, online training, project reports, or lectures. Rather, the sage needs to teach the neophyte individually how to draw wisdom from experience. Companies have to be willing to dedicate time and effort to such extensive training, but the investment more than pays for itself. PMID:15449858

  17. Solvent degradation products in nuclear fuel processing solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Shook, H.E. Jr.

    1988-06-01

    The Savannah River Plant uses a modified Purex process to recover enriched uranium and separate fission products. This process uses 7.5% tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) dissolved in normal paraffin hydrocarbons for the solvent extraction of a nitric acid solution containing the materials to be separated. Periodic problems in product decontamination result from solvent degradation. A study to improve process efficiency has identified certain solvent degradation products and suggested mitigation measures. Undecanoic acid, lauric acid, and tridecanoic acid were tentatively identified as diluent degradation products in recycle solvent. These long-chain organic acids affect phase separation and lead to low decontamination factors. Solid phase extraction (SPE) was used to concentrate the organic acids in solvent prior to analysis by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). SPE and HPLC methods were optimized in this work for analysis of decanoic acid, undecanoic acid, and lauric acid in solvent. Accelerated solvent degradation studies with 7.5% TBP in normal paraffin hydrocarbons showed that long-chain organic acids and long-chain alkyl butyl phosphoric acids are formed by reactions with nitric acid. Degradation of both tributyl phosphate and hydrocarbon can be minimized with purified normal paraffin replacing the standard grade presently used. 12 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  18. COMPUTER AIDED SOLVENT DESIGN FOR THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solvent substitution is an effective and useful means of eliminating the use of harmful solvents, but finding substitute solvents which are less harmful and as effective as currently used solvents presents significant difficulties. Solvent substitution is a form of reverse engin...

  19. WASH SOLVENT REUSE IN PAINT PRODUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project evaluated solvent used to clean paint manufacture equipment for its utility in production of subsequent batches of solvent-borne paint. eusing wash solvent would reduce the amount of solvent disposed of as waste. he evaluation of this wash-solvent recovery technology...

  20. Cesium Concentration in MCU Solvent

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D

    2006-01-18

    During Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU) operations, Cs-137 concentrations in product streams will vary depending on the location in the process and on the recent process conditions. Calculations of cesium concentrations under a variety of operating conditions reveal the following: (1) Under nominal operations with salt solution feed containing 1.1 Ci Cs-137 per gallon, the maximum Cs-137 concentration in the process will occur in the strip effluent (SE) and equal 15-16.5 Ci/gal. (2) Under these conditions, the majority of the solvent will contain 0.005 to 0.01 Ci/gal, with a limited portion of the solvent in the contactor stages containing {approx}4 Ci/gal. (3) When operating conditions yield product near 0.1 Ci Cs-137/gal in the decontaminated salt solution (DSS), the SE cesium concentration will be the same or lower than in nominal operations, but majority of the stripped solvent will increase to {approx}2-3 Ci/gal. (4) Deviations in strip and waste stream flow rates cause the largest variations in cesium content: (a) If strip flow rates deviate by -30% of nominal, the SE will contain {approx}23 Ci/gal, although the cesium content of the solvent will increase to only 0.03 Ci/gal; (b) If strip flow rate deviates by -77% (i.e., 23% of nominal), the SE will contain 54 Ci/gal and solvent will contain 1.65 Ci/gal. At this point, the product DSS will just reach the limit of 0.1 Ci/gal, causing the DSS gamma monitors to alarm; and (c) Moderate (+10 to +30%) deviations in waste flow rate cause approximately proportional increases in the SE and solvent cesium concentrations. Recovery from a process failure due to poor cesium stripping can achieve any low cesium concentration required. Passing the solvent back through the contactors while recycling DSS product will produce a {approx}70% reduction during one pass through the contactors (assuming the stripping D value is no worse than 0.36). If the solvent is returned to the solvent hold tank (containing additional, unstripped solvent), 3.3 tank turnovers will reduce the cesium content by an order of magnitude. Under these conditions, the solvent cesium concentration can be reduced to <0.03 Ci/gal during 8 hours at nominal solvent flow rates (2.8 gpm).

  1. Occupational neurotoxicology of organic solvents and solvent mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Triebig, G. )

    1989-11-01

    The results of two field studies in painters and spray painters, the outcomes of examinations of workers with suspected work-related disease due to solvents, as well as data from an evaluation of an epidemiologic study in painters with confirmed occupational disease, are presented and discussed. The results of these studies and the experiences in occupational medicine in the Federal Republic of Germany do not support the assumption of high neurotoxic risks in solvent-exposed workers, which can be postulated from various epidemiologic studies from Scandinavian countries. Several factors may explain the different conclusions: (1) lower solvent exposures of German painters in the past decades; (2) false positive diagnosis of a toxic encephalopathy; (3) aetiological misclassification; (4) differences in legislation relevant for the acknowledgement of occupational diseases. In conclusion, there is a need for further well-designed epidemiologic studies in occupationally solvent-exposed workers. Suggestions regarding assessment of exposure and neurobehavioral tests are given.

  2. Insertion of nanoparticles into polymer brush under variable solvent conditions.

    PubMed

    Egorov, S A

    2012-10-01

    In this work, two-dimensional lattice-based self-consistent field theory is used to study the free energy cost associated with the insertion of a nanoparticle into a polymer brush. The nanoparticle is modeled as a cylinder and the self-consistent field equations are formulated on a cylindrical lattice. The use of two-dimensional formalism makes it possible to take into account the distortion of the brush density profile due to the embedded nanoinclusion. The insertion free energy penalty is analyzed as a function of the particle size, the brush grafting density, and the solvent quality. In agreement with the earlier simulation work, we find that the insertion free energy cost increases both with the particle size and the brush grafting density and decreases with deteriorating solvent quality. For nanoparticles located deep inside the brush, the insertion free energy is shown to scale with either squared (good solvent) or cubed (poor solvent) monomer volume fraction profile, in agreement with the earlier theoretical results. For shallow nanoinclusions located close to the brush surface, the insertion free energy is shown to scale linearly with the monomer volume fraction profile under both good and theta solvent conditions, again in agreement with the earlier work. PMID:23039611

  3. Insertion of nanoparticles into polymer brush under variable solvent conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorov, S. A.

    2012-10-01

    In this work, two-dimensional lattice-based self-consistent field theory is used to study the free energy cost associated with the insertion of a nanoparticle into a polymer brush. The nanoparticle is modeled as a cylinder and the self-consistent field equations are formulated on a cylindrical lattice. The use of two-dimensional formalism makes it possible to take into account the distortion of the brush density profile due to the embedded nanoinclusion. The insertion free energy penalty is analyzed as a function of the particle size, the brush grafting density, and the solvent quality. In agreement with the earlier simulation work, we find that the insertion free energy cost increases both with the particle size and the brush grafting density and decreases with deteriorating solvent quality. For nanoparticles located deep inside the brush, the insertion free energy is shown to scale with either squared (good solvent) or cubed (poor solvent) monomer volume fraction profile, in agreement with the earlier theoretical results. For shallow nanoinclusions located close to the brush surface, the insertion free energy is shown to scale linearly with the monomer volume fraction profile under both good and theta solvent conditions, again in agreement with the earlier work.

  4. EXPERIENCES IN DESIGNING SOLVENTS FOR THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    To meet the great need of replacing many harmful solvents commonly used by industry and the public with environmentally benign substitute solvents, the PARIS II solvent design software has been developed. Although the difficulty of successfully finding replacements increases with...

  5. Swelling of lignites in organic solvents

    SciTech Connect

    R.G. Makitra; D.V. Bryk

    2008-10-15

    Data on the swelling of Turkish lignites can be summarized using linear multiparameter equations that take into account various properties of solvents. Factors responsible for the amounts of absorbed solvents are the basicity and cohesion energy density of the solvents.

  6. Deep blast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    From southern New Mexico to the Great Slave Lake of Canada, scientists from the United States and Canada recently detonated 10 underground chemical explosions to generate a clearer picture of the Earth's crust and upper mantle. Called Project Deep Probe, the experiment is designed to see through the crust and into the upper mantle to a depth of 300 miles.In the United States, Earth scientists from Rice University, Purdue University, and the University of Oregon are participating in the project. “Researchers hope to get a picture of the upper mantle beneath the Rocky Mountains and the Colorado Plateau, to understand the role the mantle played in formation and uplift,” says Alan Levander of Rice. To enhance that “picture,” 750 portable seismographs were placed along a roughly north-south line extending from Crownpoint, New Mexico to Edmonton, Alberta. The seismic recordings will be used to enhance weak seismic waves that penetrated the upper mantle.

  7. Automated detection and characterization of microstructural features: application to eutectic particles in single crystal Ni-based superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tschopp, M. A.; Groeber, M. A.; Fahringer, R.; Simmons, J. P.; Rosenberger, A. H.; Woodward, C.

    2010-03-01

    Serial sectioning methods continue to produce an abundant amount of image data for quantifying the three-dimensional nature of material microstructures. Here, we discuss a methodology to automate detecting and characterizing eutectic particles taken from serial images of a production turbine blade made of a heat-treated single crystal Ni-based superalloy (PWA 1484). This method includes two important steps for unassisted eutectic particle characterization: automatically identifying a seed point within each particle and segmenting the particle using a region growing algorithm with an automated stop point. Once detected, the segmented eutectic particles are used to calculate microstructural statistics for characterizing and reconstructing statistically representative synthetic microstructures for single crystal Ni-based superalloys. The significance of this work is its ability to automate characterization for analysing the 3D nature of eutectic particles.

  8. Growth and microstructure evolution of the Nb{sub 2}Al-Al{sub 3}Nb eutectic in situ composite

    SciTech Connect

    Rios, C.T.; Ferrandini, P.L.; Milenkovic, S.; Caram, R. . E-mail: rcaram@fem.unicamp.br

    2005-03-15

    In situ composite materials obtained by directional growth of eutectic alloys usually show improved properties, that make them potential candidates for high temperature applications. The eutectic alloy found in the Al-Nb system is composed of the two intermetallic phases Al{sub 3}Nb (D0{sub 22}) and Nb{sub 2}Al (D8{sub b}). This paper describes the directional solidification of an Al-Nb eutectic alloy using a Bridgman type facility at growth rates varying from 1.0 to 2.9 cm/h. Longitudinal and transverse sections of grown samples were characterized regarding the solidification microstructure by using optical and scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction. Despite both phases being intermetallic compounds, the eutectic microstructure obtained was very regular. The results obtained were discussed regarding the effect of the growth rate on the microstructure, lamellar-rod transition and variation of phase volume fraction.

  9. SAGE--SOLVENT ALTERNATIVES GUIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    SAGE is a comprehensive guide designed to provide pollution prevention information on solvent and process alternatives for parts cleaning and degreasing. SAGE does not recommend any ozone depleting chemicals. SAGE was developed by the Surface Cleaning Program at Research Triang...

  10. ON-SITE SOLVENT RECOVERY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study evaluated the product quality, waste reduction/pollution prevention, and economic aspects of three technologies for onsite solvent recovery: atmospheric batch distillation, vacuum heat-pump distillation, and low-emission vapor degreasing. The atmospheric and vacuum ...

  11. RESIDUAL RISK ASSESSMENT: HALOGENATED SOLVENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This source category previously subjected to a technology-based standard will be examined to determine if health or ecological risks are significant enough to warrant further regulation for Halogenated Solvent Degreasing Facilities. These assessments utilize existing models and d...

  12. Studies of directionally solidified eutectic Bi/MnBi at low growth velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirich, R. G.

    1984-01-01

    The (lambda-squared)(V) deviation for diffusion-only rod eutectic growth, where lambda is the interrod spacing and V is the growth velocity, was studied at growth velocities less than 5 cm/h in directionally solidified eutectic Bi-Mn (Bi/MnBi). At lower growth velocities, (V less than 0.5 cm/h) morphological instability occurred which resulted in nonaligned, irregularly dispersed MnBi fibers. The (lambda-squared)(V) relation was experimentally determined over a range of growth velocities between 0.1 and 50 cm/h, thermal gradients in the liquid at the liquid-solid interface that varied from 40 to 120 C/cm and solidification orientation with respect to the direction of gravity. Naturally induced, convective instabilities are suggested as a possible growth velocity limit for cooperative growth in the Bi-Mn and related alloy systems.

  13. Superalloy eutectic composites with the VI A refractory elements - Cr, Mo and W

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, M. R.; Walter, J. L.

    1976-01-01

    The paper discusses the phase equilibria for the ternary systems NiAlCr, NiAlMo, and NiAlW, with emphasis on reactions from the liquid state, although some of the solid state reactions are mentioned. It is shown that eutectics in the Ni-Al-refractory element (Cr, Mo, W) systems offer the potential for high-temperature turbine blade and vane applications. In particular, it is shown that the phase diagrams of these ternary systems can be manipulated to alter the eutectic phases and morphologies by simple quaternary alloying modifications. The resultant combination of chemistry and structure can be controlled to ensure a behavior that is well-matched to hot section component materials requirements.

  14. Phase field simulation of a directional solidification of a ternary eutectic Mo-Si-B Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemi, O.; Hasemann, G.; Krüger, M.; Halle, T.

    2016-03-01

    We present a eutectic Phase-Field Model for a Mo-Si-B alloy at ternary eutectic composition (Mo-17.5Si-8B), under a constant thermal gradient. The process parameters like cooling rate and thermal gradient were obtained directly from the experimental procedure of zone melting. The equilibrium interface geometries and interface mobility were calculated using an isotropic model. The phase equilibria and the other thermodynamic parameters are obtained by linearizing the Mo-Si-B ternary phase diagram. We have investigated the effect of process parameters on the lamellar growth pattern and lamella pattern stability with respect to the Jackson-Hunt minimum undercooling spacing theory. In order to examine the generated results by the model, they were validated with experimental observed microstructures and measurements and showed to be in a good agreement with the experimental observations.

  15. Solidification of undercooled Ni-Sn eutectic alloy under microgravity conditions in the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piccone, T. J.; Wu, Y.; Shiohara, Y.; Flemings, M. C.; Harf, F. H.; Winsa, E. A.

    1987-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Columbia carried an Alloy Undercooling Experiment on its STS 61-C mission in January, 1986. The experiment was performed in an electromagnetic levitator. A sample of Ni-32.5 wt pct Sn eutectic was melted and solidified under microgravity conditions in the Space Shuttle. The specimen achieved only a fairly small undercooling, probably less than 30 K. The specimen was examined by optical and scanning electron microscopy. The surface and cross-sectional microstructures were primarily composed of normal lamellar eutectic, but showed several interesting features, including an apparent surface nucleation site, curved dendrites with nonorthogonal secondary arms, dendrite fragments with extremely fine arm spacing, submicron precipitates, and faceted crystals. The results of the space experiment are presented and compared with ground-based results obtained with the same alloy.

  16. Directional solidification of (Ti, Zr) carbide-(Ti, Zr) diboride eutectics

    SciTech Connect

    Sorrell, C.C.; Beratan, H.R.; Bradt, R.C.; Stubican, V.C.

    1984-03-01

    The ZrC-ZrB2, ZrC-TiB2, and TiC-TiB2 metal diboride-metal carbide pseudo-binary eutectic systems have been successfully solidified directionally by means of the floating zone method. The first and third of these eutectics possess a morphology consisting of columnar grains of parallel lamellae with interlamellar spacings that adhere to the lambda-squared (R) C relationship, while the second is noted to solidify in a Chinese calligraphy-like morphology of broken and deformed lamellae. This phenomenon may be related to solid solution effects, but it did not prevent the interlamellar spacings from following the aforementioned law. The calligraphic effect's values are larger than those of the other two systems, and the constant, C, is accordingly about an order of magnitude larger. All three of these cubic-hexagonal systems exhibited identical epitaxial relationships. 24 references.

  17. Development of Ti/Ti{sub 3}Sn functionally gradient material produced by eutectic bonding method

    SciTech Connect

    Kirihara, S.; Takeda, M.; Tsujimoto, T.

    1996-07-15

    Although many materials which have a single function have been developed, future needs are anticipated to include materials which have various functions. A functionally gradient material (FGM) which has characteristics of two different materials is a promising candidate for multi-functional material. The present methods for production of FGM, however, are very complicated and costly. In this study the authors answer the serious problem of high production cost by fabricating the FGM by a eutectic bonding method. This fabrication method includes structural control of FGM by changing the cooling process. They describe Ti/Ti{sub 3}Sn FGM obtained by the eutectic bonding method, and tell how the structure of its composition gradient part is changed by controlling the cooling process.

  18. High temperature oxidation resistant coatings for the directionally solidified Ni-Nb-Cr-Al eutectic superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strangman, T. E.; Ulion, N. E.; Felten, E. J.

    1977-01-01

    Protective coatings required for the Ni-Nb-Cr-Al directionally solidified eutectic superalloy were developed and evaluated on the basis of oxidation resistance, diffusional stability, thermal fatigue, and creep resistance. NiCrAlY+Pt and NiCrAlY physical vapor-deposition coating systems exhibited the best combination of properties. Burner-rig testing indicated that the useful life of a 127-micron-thick NiCrAlY+Pt coating exceeds 1000 h at 1366 K. Eutectic-alloy creep lives at 1311 K and a stress of 151.7 MN/sq m were greater for NiCrAlY+Pt-coated specimens than for uncoated specimens by a factor of two.

  19. Solvent choices and sustainable chemistry.

    PubMed

    Kemeling, Guido M

    2012-12-01

    No easy solutions: Choosing a solvent for a certain reaction is not easy, and involves sustainability on many levels. The choice can be motivated by wanting to reduce or avoid wastes, reduce resource use, lower risks to humans and the environment, lessen energy use, or other ways of avoiding liabilities and costs. ChemSusChem wishes to promote thoughtful discussions on solvent use, and outlines in this Editorial basic guidelines for authors and referees. PMID:23208851

  20. Revealing heterogeneous nucleation of primary Si and eutectic Si by AlP in hypereutectic Al-Si alloys

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiehua; Hage, Fredrik S.; Liu, Xiangfa; Ramasse, Quentin; Schumacher, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The heterogeneous nucleation of primary Si and eutectic Si can be attributed to the presence of AlP. Although P, in the form of AlP particles, is usually observed in the centre of primary Si, there is still a lack of detailed investigations on the distribution of P within primary Si and eutectic Si in hypereutectic Al-Si alloys at the atomic scale. Here, we report an atomic-scale experimental investigation on the distribution of P in hypereutectic Al-Si alloys. P, in the form of AlP particles, was observed in the centre of primary Si. However, no significant amount of P was detected within primary Si, eutectic Si and the Al matrix. Instead, P was observed at the interface between the Al matrix and eutectic Si, strongly indicating that P, in the form of AlP particles (or AlP ‘patch’ dependent on the P concentration), may have nucleated on the surface of the Al matrix and thereby enhanced the heterogeneous nucleation of eutectic Si. The present investigation reveals some novel insights into heterogeneous nucleation of primary Si and eutectic Si by AlP in hypereutectic Al-Si alloys and can be used to further develop heterogeneous nucleation mechanisms based on adsorption. PMID:27120994

  1. Deep pockets for deep seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    Peter Auster, a fisheries ecologist with the National Undersea Research Center in Connecticut, plans to assess degradation of the deep-shelf seafloor from bottom trawling. Magnus Ngoile, an official with Tanzania's National Environmental Management Council, will work on building capacity of poor villagers to protect their coastline. And Alison Rieser, a lawyer with the University of Maine School of Law, will produce a textbook to educate scientists on how to apply the law for marine conservation.These individuals are among 11 recipients of the Pew Charitable Trust's 10th annual marine conservation fellowships, announced on July 12. With each recipient receiving an award of $150,000, the program is the world's largest award for marine conservationists. Other 1999 recipients will be involved with areas including investigating marine pollution in the Arctic region, examining economic incentives for conservation in Baja, Mexico, and establishing a marine conservation biology training program for minority students.

  2. Influence of freezing rate changes of MnBi-Bi eutectic microstructure. [effects of space processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, W. R.; Doddi, K.; Nair, M.; Larson, D. J.

    1983-01-01

    In an attempt to explain the influence of space processing on the microstructure of MnBi-Bi, eutectic mixtures were directionally solidified with a sudden change of translation rate. The MnBi fiber spacing was able to adapt to the changing freezing rate as predicted by heat transfer computations. Thus the microstructure adapts more rapidly than the freezing rate could be changed in the present experiments.

  3. Selective Au-Si eutectic bonding for Si-based MEMS applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, A.; Lehew, S.; Yu, C.

    1995-05-22

    A novel method of fabricating three-dimensional silicon micro electromechanical systems (MEMS) is presented, using selectivity thin film deposited Au-Si eutectic bond pads. Utilizing this process, complicated structures such as microgrippers and microchannels are fabricated. Bond strengths are higher than the silicon fracture strength and the bond areas can be localized and aligned to the processed wafer. The process and the applications are described in this paper.

  4. Carbon: Eutectic Syntheses of Graphitic Carbon with High Pyrazinic Nitrogen Content (Adv. Mater. 6/2016).

    PubMed

    Fechler, Nina; Zussblatt, Niels P; Rothe, Regina; Schlögl, Robert; Willinger, Marc-Georg; Chmelka, Bradley F; Antonietti, Markus

    2016-02-01

    Starting from a powder mixture of ketones/urea, gentle heating results in liquefaction below the melting point of the respective components. The back-cover image shows a polarized optical microscopy image of a liquid-crystalline eutectic mixture in the supercooled liquidus, as discussed on page 1287 by N. Fechler and co-workers. This indicates the coupling of the monomers toward larger, preorganized assemblies. From this precursor system, "C2N" carbon is synthesized. PMID:26849666

  5. Comparison of Co-C Eutectic-Point Cells for Thermocouple Calibration Between SP and NMIJ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogura, H.; Holmsten, M.; Klason, P.

    2015-03-01

    As recently reported, the metal-carbon eutectic points seem to be useful as practical reference points for calibrating thermocouples. The melting temperature of the cobalt-carbon eutectic point (Co-C, is an ideal solution for a reference point being at approximately the middle between the freezing point of copper and the melting point of palladium . In this study, a comparison of reference Co-C cells used for thermocouple calibration service was performed between the Technical Institute of Sweden (SP) and the National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ) by means of two circulating Pt/Pd thermocouples and one circulating Co-C cell in order to investigate the reliability of thermocouple calibration at the Co-C eutectic point. The reference Co-C cell at SP was designed and constructed in the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), and provided to SP, while the reference Co-C cell at NMIJ as well as the circulating cell was designed and constructed at NMIJ. The melting temperature of the reference Co-C cells at SP and NMIJ were evaluated by using the calibrated radiation thermometers at NPL and NMIJ, respectively, prior to the circulation of the thermocouples and the cell between SP and NMIJ. The temperature difference between the reference cells of SP and NMIJ, as measured by means of the circulating thermocouples, was found to be within , while that measured by means of the circulating cell was found to be within . The temperature of reference cells at SP and NMIJ was found to agree within an expanded uncertainty in spite of different temperature traceability chains. This means that the calibration of thermocouples at the Co-C eutectic point was sufficiently reliable.

  6. Diffusion welding of a directionally solidified gamma/gamma prime - delta eutectic alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, T. J.

    1977-01-01

    Hot-press diffusion welding parameters were developed for a directionally solidified, gamma/gamma prime-delta eutectic alloy. Based on metallography, a good diffusion weld was achieved at 1100 C under 34.5 MPa (5 ksi) pressure for 1 hour. In addition, a dissimilar metal weld between gamma/gamma prime-delta and IN-100 was successfully made at 1100 C under 20.7 MPa (3 ksi) pressure for 1 hour.

  7. Electrode potentials of uranium in the LiCl-KCl-CsCl eutectic melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltsev, D. S.; Volkovich, V. A.; Vladykin, E. N.; Vasin, B. D.

    2015-08-01

    The electrode potentials of uranium in the melt of the eutectic mixture of lithium, potassium, and cesium chlorides are measured in the temperature range 573-1073 K. Formal standard potentials E U * (III)/U and the main thermodynamic characteristics of uranium trichloride in the LiCl-KCl-CsCl melt are calculated, and the electronic absorption spectra of UCl 6 3- ions are measured.

  8. Influence of gravity driven convection on the directional solidification of Bi/MnBi eutectic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirich, R. G.; Larson, D. J.

    1982-01-01

    The role of gravity on Bridgman-Stockharger directional solidification of eutectic Bi/MnBi has been studied in reduced gravity aboard NASA sounding rocket SPAR flight experiments and contrasted with normal gravity investigations. The directional solidification of eutectic Bi/MnBi results in a low volume fraction, faceted/nonfaceted aligned rod eutectic whose MnBi rod size, interrod spacing, thermal and magnetic properties are sensitive functions of solidification processing conditions. The morphology of the low-gravity samples showed striking differences compared with identically processed, normal gravity samples grown in the same apparatus. The MnBi rod diameter and interrod spacing distributions were significantly smaller, approximately 50 percent, for the low gravity samples compared with identically processed one gravity samples. Accompanying the smaller MnBi rod diameters observed in the flight samples, was an increase in permanent magnet properties which reached greater than 97 percent of the theoretical maximum. Gravitationally induced thermal instabilities in one-gravity which result in irregular interface movement and associated difficulty of the faceted MnBi phase to branch are suggested to explain the morphological differences between one and low gravity solidification.

  9. Directional solidification and characterization of near eutectic Sm2CO17/Co alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirich, Ronald G.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of directional solidification processing on the microstructural, compositional, and magnetic properties of near eutectic Co-Sm alloys (about 9 at. pct Sm) have been studied. Initial investigations have been performed at modest thermal gradients in the liquid, G(L) less than 60 C/cm and over a range of furnace (solidification) velocities, V = 0.8 45.4 cm/h. The primary dendrite spacing for near eutectic Sm2Co17/Co scaled with 1/sq rt V and varied from about 50 microns for V greater than or equal to 20 cm/h to hundreds of microns for V less than 10 cm/h, while the rod eutectic diameter and interrod spacing were an order of magnitude smaller. For both dendritic and cooperative growth, the associated permanent magnet properties were rather poor, e.g., remanence less than 4 kG and coercive force less than 1 kOe for the smallest dendrite and rod diameter dimensions encountered, although the magnetic hardness for the rod eutetic was larger than for the dendritic microstructure. Magnetization as a function of sample orientation indicated that the easy axis of magnetization was primarily along the direction of solidification for both ferromagnetic phases.

  10. A New Analytical Approach to Predict Spacing Selection in Lamellar and Rod Eutectic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catalina, Adrian V.; Sen, Subhayu; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we reexamine the Jackson and Hunt (JH) theory and relax the assumption of isothermal solid/liquid interface(SLI) used in their treatment. A modification of the term B. in the expression of the solute concentration profile is also proposed. Based on the predictions of this modified theory the traditional definitions of regular and irregular eutectics are discussed. For regular eutectics the new model identifies a range of spacing within the limits defined by the minimum undercooling of the alpha and beta phase. For the irregular Al-Si eutectic system in particular we identified two different spacing selection mechanisnis: a) for a particular growth rate, a nearly isothermal interface can be achieved at a unique minimum spacing lambda(sub I); b) the average spacing in the microstructure (lambda(sub av) > lambda(sub I)) is essentially dictated by the undercooling of the faceted phase. Based on the modified theoretical model a semi-empirical expression has been developed to account for the influence of the temperature gradient. The theoretical calculations have been found to be in good agreement with the published experimental measurements.

  11. Lamellar Spacing Selection in Al-Si Eutectic System: a Theoretical Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catalina, Adrian V.; Sen, Subhayu; Curreri, Peter A.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    It is well known that irregular eutectics such as Al-Si and Fe-C exhibit larger lamellar spacings and undercoolings compared to the predictions made by the Jackson and Hunt (JH) theory. In this paper, we reexamine the JH theory and relax some of the assumptions used in that treatment. The modified theoretical model has enhanced capabilities to predict the lamellar spacing in both regular and irregular eutectics. For the Al-Si system in particular we identified two different spacing selection mechanisms:a) for a particular growth rate, a nearly isothermal interface can be achieved at a unique minimum spacing lambda(sub I); b) the average spacing in the microstructure (lambda(sub av) greater than lambda(sub I)) is essentially dictated by the undercooling of the faceted phase. Based on the modified theoretical model a semi-empirical expression has been developed to account for the influence of the temperature gradient. Application of a Mullin and Sekerka type stability analysis for eutectics will also be presented and the results compared to the modified JH model. It will be shown that the both theoretical approaches are in good agreement with each other and also with the published experimental measurements.

  12. In-situ observation of eutectic growth in Al-based alloys by light microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witusiewicz, V. T.; Hecht, U.; Rex, S.

    2013-06-01

    An experimental method for the in-situ observation of solidification in eutectic metallic alloys growing at moderate temperatures, i.e. 500-600 °C was developed. It is based on unidirectional solidification of thin samples (200 to 700 μm thick) contained in rectangular quartz glass tubes allowing for in-situ observation of growth on the sample surface by means of light microscopy using a long-distance microscope. The method is illustrated for two-phase eutectic growth in Al-17.5Cu-1.0Ag, Al-11.8Si and Al-11.8Si-0.025Sr as well as for three phase growth in Al-13.3Cu-5.7Si, all at%. Coupled growth of lamellar Al-Al2Cu eutectic in Al-17.5Cu-1.0Ag was investigated in more detail with regard to spacing selection: experiments were performed in a temperature gradient of 38±1 K cm-1 using different, but constant withdrawal velocities ranging from 0.025 to 1.8 μm s-1. Measured spacing was compared with literature data and discussed with reference to the Jackson-Hunt theory and the recent amendment proposed by Akamatsu, Faivre, Karma and Plapp. In-situ observations were complemented by post-mortem metallographic analysis using SEM and EBSD in transverse sections.

  13. Spectrophotometric and electrochemical study of neptunium ions in molten NaCl-CsCl eutectic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uehara, Akihiro; Nagai, Takayuki; Fujii, Toshiyuki; Shirai, Osamu; Yamana, Hajimu

    2013-06-01

    The chemical oxidation states of NpO2+, Np4+ and Np3+ in NaCl-CsCl eutectic were controlled by using Cl2, O2, H2 and Ar gas mixtures, the redox behavior and electronic absorption properties of their Np ions were studied. The Np4+ was prepared from NpO2Cl by bubbling Cl2 gas into the melt in the presence of carbon rod. Np3+ was quantitatively prepared by bubbling H2-Ar gas mixture. The molar absorptivities of NpO2+, Np4+ and Np3+ were determined in molten NaCl-CsCl eutectic at 923 K and hypersensitive transitions of Np4+ and Np3+ ions were assigned. Since the polarizing ability of the cations in the NaCl-CsCl eutectic is lower than that in some other melts, it has been shown that the coordination symmetry of the Np-Cl complex is higher. In the electrochemical measurement of Np4+, the cathodic current for the reduction of Np4+ was found to be controlled by the diffusion of Np4+. The temperature dependence of the diffusion coefficient between 823 and 923 K was formulated to be lnD=-4304/T-6.172. The formal redox potential of the Np4+|Np3+ couple depended on the temperature, this dependence was formulated as ENp|Np∘'=-1.313+6.210×10-4T V (vs. Cl2|Cl-).

  14. Solvent/Non-Solvent Sintering To Make Microsphere Scaffolds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laurencin, Cato T.; Brown, Justin L.; Nair, Lakshmi

    2011-01-01

    A solvent/non-solvent sintering technique has been devised for joining polymeric microspheres to make porous matrices for use as drug-delivery devices or scaffolds that could be seeded with cells for growing tissues. Unlike traditional sintering at elevated temperature and pressure, this technique is practiced at room temperature and pressure and, therefore, does not cause thermal degradation of any drug, protein, or other biochemical with which the microspheres might be loaded to impart properties desired in a specific application. Also, properties of scaffolds made by this technique are more reproducible than are properties of comparable scaffolds made by traditional sintering. The technique involves the use of two miscible organic liquids: one that is and one that is not a solvent for the affected polymer. The polymeric microspheres are placed in a mold having the size and shape of the desired scaffold, then the solvent/non-solvent mixture is poured into the mold to fill the void volume between the microspheres, then the liquid mixture is allowed to evaporate. Some of the properties of the resulting scaffold can be tailored through choice of the proportions of the liquids and the diameter of the microspheres.

  15. Computational comparison of oxidation stability: Solvent/salt monomers vs solvent-solvent/salt pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong Young; Park, Min Sik; Lim, Younhee; Kang, Yoon-Sok; Park, Jin-Hwan; Doo, Seok-Gwang

    2015-08-01

    A fundamental understanding of the anodic stabilities of electrolytes is important for the development of advanced high-voltage electrolytes. In this study, we calculated and systematically compared the oxidation stabilities of monomeric solvents and anions, and bimolecular solvent-solvent and anion-solvent systems that are considered to be high-voltage electrolyte components, using ab initio calculations. Oxidation stabilities of solvent or anion monomers without considering specific solvation molecules cannot represent experimental oxidation stabilities. The oxidation of electrolytes usually forms neutral or cationic radicals, which immediately undergo further reactions stabilizing the products. Oxidatively driven intermolecular reactions are the main reason for the lower oxidation stabilities of electrolytes compared with those of monomeric compounds. Electrolyte components such as tetramethylene sulfone (TMS), ethyl methyl sulfone (EMS), bis(oxalate)borate (BOB-), and bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonamide (TFSI-) that minimize such intermolecular chemical reactions on oxidation can maintain the oxidation stabilities of monomers. In predictions of the theoretical oxidation stabilities of electrolytes, simple comparisons of highest occupied molecular orbital energies can be misleading, even if microsolvation or bulk clusters are considered. Instead, bimolecular solvent complexes with a salt anion should be at least considered in oxidation calculations. This study provides important information on fundamental and applied aspects of the development of electrolytes.

  16. Deep Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tips Share this! Home » Health Tips » Infectious Diseases Deep Vein Thrombosis Deep Vein Thrombosis is like a ticking time bomb — ... a warning about the serious dangers associated with deep vein thrombosis (DVT). This is a condition occurring ...

  17. Deep breathing after surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... way to do so is by doing deep breathing exercises. Deep breathing keeps your lungs well-inflated and healthy while ... uncomfortable. But if you do not practice deep breathing after surgery, you may develop lung problems, like ...

  18. Preventing Deep Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Preventing Deep Vein Thrombosis Home For Patients Search FAQs Preventing ... Vein Thrombosis FAQ174, August 2011 PDF Format Preventing Deep Vein Thrombosis Women's Health What is deep vein ...

  19. Coal liquefaction with supercritical solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Deshpande, G.V.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of density on the liquefaction kinetics of a bituminous coal (Bruceton, experimental mine), in the presence of a non-donor solvent (toluene) is examined. The effects of coal rank and type, and liquefaction solvent are also addressed. Donor solvents like piperidine gas higher conversions than non-donor solvents like toluene or water and heavy incorporation of piperidine is found in the soluble products of coal. The temperature (597-698 K), density (0.15-0.60 g/cc), mode of contact and solvent to coal ratio (6-30) had a significant effect on the product distribution. The stirrer speed and the presence of inerts like argon had no measurable effect on the product distribution. Based upon the experimental results, the following model is proposed. A fraction of coal dissolves instantaneously and this fraction increases with an increase in either the temperature or the density of the supercritical fluid. This dissolved fraction then undergoes pyrolysis reactions to give gasses, oils and asphaltenes and these products undergo retrogressive reactions giving char (THF insoluble products). The presence of a donor solvent or molecular hydrogen prevents the retrogressive reactions and a donor solvent reacts chemically with the coal to give greater yields of THF soluble products. A lumped kinetic model is presented to describe this behavior for the toluene-Bruceton bituminous coal system. This model adequately predicts the product distribution for the entire range of parameters used in this study and is completely consistent with the hypothesized liquefaction mechanism. It clearly shows that higher densities can increase both the reaction rate and the maximum conversion obtained.

  20. Feasibility study of tungsten as a diffusion barrier between nickel-chromium-aluminum and Gamma/Gamma prime - Delta eutectic alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, S. G.; Zellars, G. R.

    1978-01-01

    Coating systems proposed for potential use on eutectic alloy components in high-temperature gas turbine engines were studied with emphasis on deterioration of such systems by diffusion. A 1-mil thick W sheet was placed between eutectic alloys and a NiCrAl layer. Layered test specimens were aged at 1100 C for as long as long as 500 hours. Without the W barrier, the delta phase of the eutectic deteriorated by diffusion of Nb into the NiCrAl. Insertion of the W barrier stopped the diffusion of Nb from delta. Chromium diffusion from the NiCrAl into the gamma/gamma prime phase of the eutectic was greatly reduced by the barrier. However, the barrier thickness decreased with time; and W diffused into both the NiCrAl and the eutectic. When the delta platelets were alined parallel to the NiCrAl layer, rather than perpendicular, diffusion into the eutectic was reduced.

  1. Purification of used eutectic (LiCl-KCl) salt electrolyte from pyroprocessing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Yung-Zun; Lee, Tae-Kyo; Eun, Hee-Chul; Choi, Jung-Hoon; Kim, In-Tae; Park, Geun-Il

    2013-06-01

    The separation characteristics of surrogate rare-earth fission products in a eutectic (LiCl-KCl) molten salt were investigated. This system is based on the eutectic salt used for the pyroprocessing treatment of used nuclear fuel (UNF). The investigation was performed using an integrated rare-earth separation apparatus comprising a precipitation reactor, a solid detachment device, and a layer separation device. To separate rare-earth fission products, a phosphate precipitation method using both Li3PO4 and K3PO4 as a precipitant was performed. The use of an equivalent phosphate precipitant composed of 0.408 molar ratio-K3PO4 and 0.592 molar ratio-Li3PO4 can preserve the original eutectic ratio, LiCl-0.592 molar ratio (or 45.2 wt%), as well as provide a high separation efficiency of over 99.5% under conditions of 550 °C and Ar sparging when using La, Nd, Ce, and Pr chlorides. The mixture of La, Nd, Ce, and Pr phosphate had a typical monoclinic (or monazite) structure, which has been proposed as a reliable host matrix for the permanent disposal of a high-level waste form. To maximize the reusability of purified eutectic waste salt after rare-earth separation, the successive rare-earth separation process, which uses both phosphate precipitation and an oxygen sparging method, were introduced and tested with eight rare-earth (Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu and Gd) chlorides. In the successive rare-earth separation process, the phosphate reaction was terminated within 1 h at 550 °C, and a 4-8 h oxygen sparging time were required to obtain over a 99% separation efficiency at 700-750 °C. The mixture of rare-earth precipitates separated by the successive rare-earth separation process was found to be phosphate, oxychloride, and oxide. Through the successive rare-earth separation process, the eutectic ratio of purified salt maintained its original value, and impurity content including the residual precipitant of purified salt can be minimized.

  2. Coal liquefaction process with enhanced process solvent

    DOEpatents

    Givens, Edwin N.; Kang, Dohee

    1984-01-01

    In an improved coal liquefaction process, including a critical solvent deashing stage, high value product recovery is improved and enhanced process-derived solvent is provided by recycling second separator underflow in the critical solvent deashing stage to the coal slurry mix, for inclusion in the process solvent pool.

  3. Method of treating radioactively contaminated solvent waste

    SciTech Connect

    Jablonski, W.; Mallek, H.; Plum, W.

    1981-07-07

    A method of and apparatus for treating radioactively contaminated solvent waste are claimed. The solvent waste is supplied to material such as peat, vermiculite, diaton, etc. This material effects the distribution or dispersion of the solvent and absorbs the foreign substances found in the solvent waste. Air or an inert gas flows through the material in order to pick up the solvent portions which are volatile as a consequence of their vapor pressure. The thus formed gas mixture, which includes air or inert gas and solvent portions, is purified in a known manner by thermal, electrical, or catalytic combustion of the solvent portions.

  4. Implicit solvent models in VASP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, Kiran; Hennig, Richard

    2015-03-01

    Solid-liquid interfaces are at the heart of many modern-day technologies and presents challenge for materials simulation methods. A realistic first-principles computational study of such systems entails the inclusion of solvent effects. In our previous work, employing a linear implicit solvent model, we have demonstrated the importance of the inclusion of solvent effects on the calucaltions of reaction energy barriers and surface enegies of semiconductor nanocrystals. In this work we propose to extend the implicit solvent model to incorporate the effects of the ions in the solvent and also to include the effects of dilectric saturation phenomenon. A solvation model that includes the effects of ionic solution at a first principle level, takes us one step closer to a more realistic simulation of an electrochemical interface. Incorporating the dielectric saturation effects futher advance the capabilities of the state of the art DFT tools to study the Solid Electrolyte Interface(SEI) films formed on highly ionic surfaces such as Lithium halides.

  5. Microstructural development and mechanical behavior of eutectic bismuth-tin and eutectic indium-tin in response to high temperature deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, J.L.F. |

    1993-11-01

    The mechanical behavior and microstructure of eutectic Bi-Sn and In-Sn solders were studied in parallel in order to better understand high temperature deformation of these alloys. Bi-Sn solder joints were made with Cu substrates, and In-Sn joints were made with either Cu or Ni substrates. The as-cast microstructure of Bi-Sn is complex regular, with the two eutectic phases interconnected in complicated patterns. The as-cast microstructure of In-Sn depends on the substrate. In-Sn on Cu has a non-uniform microstructure caused by diffusion of Cu into the solder during sample preparation, with regions of the Sn-rich {gamma} phase imbedded in a matrix of the In-rich {beta} phase. The microstructure of In-Sn on Ni is uniform and lamellar and the two phases are strongly coupled. The solders deform non-uniformly, with deformation concentrating in a band along the length of the sample for Bi-Sn and In-Sn on Cu, though the deformation is more diffuse in In-Sn than in Bi-Sn. Deformation of In-Sn on Ni spreads throughout the width of the joint. The different deformation patterns affect the shape of the stress-strain curves. Stress-strain curves for Bi-Sn and In-Sn on Cu exhibit sharp decays in the engineering stress after reaching a peak. Most of this stress decay is removed for In-Sn on Ni. The creep behavior of In-Sn also depends on the substrate, with the creep deformation controlled by the soft P phase of the eutectic for In-Sn on Cu and controlled by the harder {gamma} phase for In-Sn on Ni. When In-Sn on Ni samples are aged, the microstructure coarsens and changes to an array of {gamma} phase regions in a matrix of the {beta} phase, and the creep behavior changes to resemble that of In-Sn on Cu. The creep behavior of Bi-Sn changes with temperature. Two independent mechanisms operate at lower temperatures, but there is still some question as to whether one or both of these, or a third mechanism, operates at higher temperatures.

  6. H, not O or pressure, causes eutectic T depression in the Fe-FeS System to 8 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buono, Antonio S.; Walker, David

    2015-04-01

    The Fe-FeS system maintains a eutectic temperature of 990 ± 10 °C to at least 8 GPa if starting materials and pressure media are rigorously dehydrated. Literature reports of pressure-induced freezing point depression of the eutectic for the Fe-FeS system are not confirmed. Modest addition of oxygen alone is confirmed to cause negligible freezing point depression at 6 GPa. Addition of H alone causes a progressive decrease in the eutectic temperature with P in the Fe-FeS-H system to below 965 °C at 6 GPa to below 950 °C at 8 GPa. It is our hypothesis that moisture contamination in unrigorously dried experiments may be an H source for freezing point depression. O released from H2O disproportionation reacts with Fe and is sequestered as ferropericlase along the sample capsules walls, leaving the H to escape the system and/or enter the Fe-FeS mixture. The observed occurrence of ferropericlase on undried MgO capsule margins is otherwise difficult to explain, because an alternate source for the oxygen in the ferropericlase layer is difficult to identify. This study questions the use of pressure-depressed Fe-S eutectic temperatures and suggests that the lower eutectic temperatures sometimes reported are achieved by moving into the ternary Fe-S-H system. These results adjust slightly the constraints on eutectic temperatures allowed for partly solidified cores on small planets. H substantially diminishes the temperature extent of the melting interval in Fe-S by reducing the melting points of the crystalline phases more than it depresses the eutectic.

  7. X-Ray Fluorescence Solvent Detection at the Substrate-Adhesive Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wurth, Laura; Evans, Kurt; Weber, Bart; Headrick, Sarah

    2005-01-01

    With environmental regulations limiting the use of volatile organic compounds, low-vapor pressure solvents have replaced traditional degreasing solvents for bond substrate preparation. When used to clean and prepare porous bond substrates such as phenolic composites, low vapor pressure solvents can penetrate deep into substrate pore networks and remain there for extended periods. Trapped solvents can interact with applied adhesives either prior to or during cure, potentially compromising bond properties. Currently, methods for characterizing solvent time-depth profiles in bond substrates are limited to bulk gravimetric or sectioning techniques. While sectioning techniques such as microtome allow construction of solvent depth profiles, their depth resolution and reliability are limited by substrate type. Sectioning techniques are particularly limited near the adhesive-substrate interface where depth resolution is further limited by adhesive-substrate hardness and, in the case of a partially cured adhesive, mechanical properties differences. Additionally, sectioning techniques cannot provide information about lateral solvent diffusion. Cross-section component mapping is an alternative method for measuring solvent migration in porous substrates that eliminates the issues associated with sectioning techniques. With cross-section mapping, the solvent-wiped substrate is sectioned perpendicular rather than parallel to the wiped surface, and the sectioned surface is analyzed for the solvent or solvent components of interest using a two-dimensional mapping or imaging technique. Solvent mapping can be performed using either direct or indirect methods. With a direct method, one or more solvent components are mapped using red or Raman spectroscopy together with a moveable sample stage and/or focal plane array detector. With an indirect method, an elemental "tag" not present in the substrate is added to the solvent before the substrate is wiped. Following cross sectioning, the tag element can then be mapped by its characteristic x-ray emission using either x-ray fluorescence, or electron-beam energy-and wavelength-dispersive x-ray spectrometry. The direct mapping techniques avoid issues of different diffusion or migration rates of solvents and elemental tags, while the indirect techniques avoid spectral resolution issues in cases where solvents and substrates have adjacent or overlapping peaks. In this study, cross-section component indirect mapping is being evaluated as a method for measuring migration of d-limonene based solvents in glass-cloth phenolic composite (GCP) prior to and during subsequent bonding and epoxy adhesive cure.

  8. Solvent-regenerated activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, H. )

    1988-07-01

    This report summarizes the results of a University/Industry research project, sponsored by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority and Fluids Design Corporation. The research project studied the solvent regeneration of activated carbon. Activate carbon was used to remove trace organics from aqueous streams, then regenerated by desorbing the adsorbates with organic solvents. The project included a survey of the potential applications in New York State industries, fundamental research on the adsorption/desorption phenomena, and design of a full-scale process. The economics of the full-scale process were evaluated and compared to alternate available technologies. The result of this work is a versatile process with attractive economics. A wide range of adsorbates and solvents were found to be acceptable for this process. The design methodologies are developed and the techniques for evaluating a new application are delineated. 13 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Solvent sensitive polymer composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiappini, A.; Armellini, C.; Carpentiero, A.; Minati, L.; Righini, G. C.; Ferrari, M.

    2013-11-01

    In this paper we describe a composite system based on polystyrene colloidal nanoparticles assembled and embedded in an elastomeric matrix (polymer colloidal crystal, PCC), in the specific we have designed a PCC structure which displays an iridescent green color that can be attributed to the photonic crystal effect. This effect has been exploited to create a chemical sensor, in fact optical measurements have evidenced that the composite structure presents a different optical response as a function of the solvent applied on the surface. In particular we have demonstrated that the PCC possess, for specific solvents: (i) high sensitivity, (ii) fast response (less than 1s), and (iii) reversibility of the signal change. Finally preliminary results on the PCC have shown that this system can be also used as optical writing substrate using a specific solvent as ink, moreover an erasing procedure is also reported and discussed.

  10. Solvent reorganization of electron transitions in viscous solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Ghorai, Pradip K.; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2006-04-14

    We develop a model of electron transfer reactions at conditions of nonergodicity when the time of solvent relaxation crosses the observation time window set up by the reaction rate. Solvent reorganization energy of intramolecular electron transfer in a charge-transfer molecule dissolved in water and acetonitrile is studied by molecular dynamics simulations at varying temperatures. We observe a sharp decrease of the reorganization energy at a temperature identified as the temperature of structural arrest due to cage effect, as discussed by the mode-coupling theory. This temperature also marks the onset of the enhancement of translational diffusion relative to rotational relaxation signaling the breakdown of the Stokes-Einstein relation. The change in the reorganization energy at the transition temperature reflects the dynamical arrest of the slow, collective relaxation of the solvent related to the relaxation of the solvent dipolar polarization. An analytical theory proposed to describe this effect agrees well with both the simulations and experimental Stokes shift data. The theory is applied to the analysis of charge-transfer kinetics in a low-temperature glass former. We show that the reorganization energy is substantially lower than its equilibrium value for the low-temperature portion of the data. The theory predicts the possibility of discontinuous changes in the dependence of the electron transfer rate on the free energy gap when the reaction switches between ergodic and nonergodic regimes.

  11. Exxon donor solvent liquefaction process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neavel, R. C.

    1981-03-01

    The Exxon donor solvent (EDS) coal liquefaction system is a direct liquefaction procedure. Coal is chemically reacted and dissolved in a recycle solvent that is hydrogenated between passes to the liquefaction reactor. More than 2.6 barrels of a synthetic crude boiling below 1000 F are produced per ton of dry, high volatile coal feed. Other ranks of coal can be effectively liquefied. The process development has proceeded to a 250 ton/day pilot plant stage that went into operation in June 1980. The presentation addresses the chemical reactions and process conditions that result in ease of operability and flexibility of the EDS process.

  12. Deep Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    Deep vein thrombosis, or DVT, is a blood clot that forms in a vein deep in the body. Most deep vein clots occur in the lower leg or ... vein swells, the condition is called thrombophlebitis. A deep vein thrombosis can break loose and cause a ...

  13. A Comparison between Growth Morphology of "Eutectic" Cells/Dendrites and Single-Phase Cells/Dendrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tewari, S. N.; Raj, S. V.; Locci, I. E.

    2003-01-01

    Directionally solidified (DS) intermetallic and ceramic-based eutectic alloys with an in-situ composite microstructure containing finely distributed, long aspect ratio, fiber, or plate reinforcements are being seriously examined for several advanced aero-propulsion applications. In designing these alloys, additional solutes need to be added to the base eutectic composition in order to improve heir high-temperature strength, and provide for adequate toughness and resistance to environmental degradation. Solute addition, however, promotes instability at the planar liquid-solid interface resulting in the formation of two-phase eutectic "colonies." Because morphology of eutectic colonies is very similar to the single-phase cells and dendrites, the stability analysis of Mullins and Sekerka has been extended to describe their formation. Onset of their formation shows a good agreement with this approach; however, unlike the single-phase cells and dendrites, there is limited examination of their growth speed dependence of spacing, morphology, and spatial distribution. The purpose of this study is to compare the growth speed dependence of the morphology, spacing, and spatial distribution of eutectic cells and dendrites with that for the single-phase cells and dendrites.

  14. Microstructure of the Sn-Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} fibrous eutectic and its modification by segregation

    SciTech Connect

    Drevet, B.; Camel, D.; Favier, J.J.

    1996-10-01

    The influence of segregation due to thermal convection on the microstructure of Sn-Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} fibrous eutectic alloys is studied in a Bridgman type configuration. The eutectic microstructure is characterized by means of image analysis, X-ray diffraction and scanning and transmission electron microscopy. In the absence of segregation, the eutectic is regular and its growth controlled by that of the Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} fibers. The effect of interphases on eutectic spacing, through orientation relationships between fibers and matrix, is also evidenced. The influence of segregation can be summed up by the following effects. At first, in agreement with the Jackson and Hunt model, it leads to a variation of the eutectic spacing which results from a variation of the fiber volume fraction. Then, the spacing is much greater than the one obtained in the absence of segregation, due to a different tin growth plane and non-optimized fiber/matrix orientation relationships. Finally, the absence of steady state leads to a large dispersion of the spacing associated with a microstructural disorder.

  15. Organic Solvent Effects in Biomass Conversion Reactions.

    PubMed

    Shuai, Li; Luterbacher, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Transforming lignocellulosic biomass into fuels and chemicals has been intensely studied in recent years. A large amount of work has been dedicated to finding suitable solvent systems, which can improve the transformation of biomass into value-added chemicals. These efforts have been undertaken based on numerous research results that have shown that organic solvents can improve both conversion and selectivity of biomass to platform molecules. We present an overview of these organic solvent effects, which are harnessed in biomass conversion processes, including conversion of biomass to sugars, conversion of sugars to furanic compounds, and production of lignin monomers. A special emphasis is placed on comparing the solvent effects on conversion and product selectivity in water with those in organic solvents while discussing the origins of the differences that arise. We have categorized results as benefiting from two major types of effects: solvent effects on solubility of biomass components including cellulose and lignin and solvent effects on chemical thermodynamics including those affecting reactants, intermediates, products, and/or catalysts. Finally, the challenges of using organic solvents in industrial processes are discussed from the perspective of solvent cost, solvent stability, and solvent safety. We suggest that a holistic view of solvent effects, the mechanistic elucidation of these effects, and the careful consideration of the challenges associated with solvent use could assist researchers in choosing and designing improved solvent systems for targeted biomass conversion processes. PMID:26676907

  16. Nanopapers for organic solvent nanofiltration.

    PubMed

    Mautner, A; Lee, K-Y; Lahtinen, P; Hakalahti, M; Tammelin, T; Li, K; Bismarck, A

    2014-06-01

    Would it not be nice to have an organic solvent nanofiltration membrane made from renewable resources that can be manufactured as simply as producing paper? Here the production of nanofiltration membranes made from nanocellulose by applying a papermaking process is demonstrated. Manufacture of the nanopapers was enabled by inducing flocculation of nanofibrils upon addition of trivalent ions. PMID:24752201

  17. NATURAL ATTENUATION OF CHLORINATED SOLVENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The protocol will simply describe in detail, with references and illustrations, the approach currently used by staff of the SPRD to evaluate natural attenuation of chlorinated solvents in ground water. Staff of SPRD, and staff of the Air Force Center for environmental excellence...

  18. Improved Purex solvent scrubbing methods

    SciTech Connect

    Mailen, J.C.; Tallent, O.K.

    1984-01-01

    Studies of hydrazine and hydroxylamine salts as solvent scrubbing agents that can be decomposed into gases are summarized. Results from testing of countercurrent scrubbers and solid sorber columns that produce lesser amounts of permanent salts are reported. The status of studies of the acid-degradation of paraffin diluent and the options for removal of long-chain organic acids is given.

  19. Kinetic Monte Carlo Simulations of Rod Eutectics and the Surface Roughening Transition in Binary Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bentz, Daniel N.; Betush, William; Jackson, Kenneth A.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we report on two related topics: Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of the steady state growth of rod eutectics from the melt, and a study of the surface roughness of binary alloys. We have implemented a three dimensional kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) simulation with diffusion by pair exchange only in the liquid phase. Entropies of fusion are first chosen to fit the surface roughness of the pure materials, and the bond energies are derived from the equilibrium phase diagram, by treating the solid and liquid as regular and ideal solutions respectively. A simple cubic lattice oriented in the {100} direction is used. Growth of the rods is initiated from columns of pure B material embedded in an A matrix, arranged in a close packed array with semi-periodic boundary conditions. The simulation cells typically have dimensions of 50 by 87 by 200 unit cells. Steady state growth is compliant with the Jackson-Hunt model. In the kMC simulations, using the spin-one Ising model, growth of each phase is faceted or nonfaceted phases depending on the entropy of fusion. There have been many studies of the surface roughening transition in single component systems, but none for binary alloy systems. The location of the surface roughening transition for the phases of a eutectic alloy determines whether the eutectic morphology will be regular or irregular. We have conducted a study of surface roughness on the spin-one Ising Model with diffusion using kMC. The surface roughness was found to scale with the melting temperature of the alloy as given by the liquidus line on the equilibrium phase diagram. The density of missing lateral bonds at the surface was used as a measure of surface roughness.

  20. Mechanical behavior of the directionally solidified gamma/gamma prime - delta eutectic alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barkalow, R. H.; Jackson, J. J.; Gell, M.; Leverant, G. R.

    1975-01-01

    The eutectic alloy Ni-20.0%Cb-2.5%Al-6.0%Cr was tested in short-term creep and long-term exposure to service conditions to assess its suitability for high temperature turbine blade applications. Long-time exposure showed the lamellar microstructure of the alloy to be exceptionally stable. Other properties tested were notch sensitivity, isothermal and thermomechanical fatigue strength, shear strength, and transverse ductility. It was shown that this alloy is superior to the best currently available directionally solidified superalloys over the temperature/stress conditions encountered in turbine airfoils.

  1. Embedded binary eutectic alloy nanostructures: a new class of phase change materials.

    PubMed

    Shin, S J; Guzman, J; Yuan, C-W; Liao, Christopher Y; Boswell-Koller, Cosima N; Stone, P R; Dubon, O D; Minor, A M; Watanabe, Masashi; Beeman, Jeffrey W; Yu, K M; Ager, J W; Chrzan, D C; Haller, E E

    2010-08-11

    Phase change materials are essential to a number of technologies ranging from optical data storage to energy storage and transport applications. This widespread interest has given rise to a substantial effort to develop bulk phase change materials well suited for desired applications. Here, we suggest a novel and complementary approach, the use of binary eutectic alloy nanoparticles embedded within a matrix. Using GeSn nanoparticles embedded in silica as an example, we establish that the presence of a nanoparticle/matrix interface enables one to stabilize both nanobicrystal and homogeneous alloy morphologies. Further, the kinetics of switching between the two morphologies can be tuned simply by altering the composition. PMID:20698591

  2. Spatial profile of thermoelectric effects during Peltier pulsing in Bi and Bi/MnBi eutectic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silberstein, R. P.; Larson, D. J., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The spatial profile of the thermal transients that occur during and following the current pulsing associated with Peltier Interface Demarcation during directional solidification is studied. Results for pure Bi are presented in detail and compared with corresponding results for the Bi/MnBi eutectic. Significant thermal transients occur throughout the sample that can be accounted for by the Peltier effect, the Thomson effect, and Joule heating. These effects are separated and their behavior is studied as a function of time, current density, and position with respect to the solid/liquid interface.

  3. Frequency-Switchable Metamaterial Absorber Injecting Eutectic Gallium-Indium (EGaIn) Liquid Metal Alloy

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Kenyu; Kim, Hyung Ki; Yoo, Minyeong; Lim, Sungjoon

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrated a new class of frequency-switchable metamaterial absorber in the X-band. Eutectic gallium-indium (EGaIn), a liquid metal alloy, was injected in a microfluidic channel engraved on polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) to achieve frequency switching. Numerical simulation and experimental results are presented for two cases: when the microfluidic channels are empty, and when they are filled with liquid metal. To evaluate the performance of the fabricated absorber prototype, it is tested with a rectangular waveguide. The resonant frequency was successfully switched from 10.96 GHz to 10.61 GHz after injecting liquid metal while maintaining absorptivity higher than 98%. PMID:26561815

  4. A study of two binary eutectic aluminum alloys as selective absorbers for solar photothermal conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, V.; Bolsaitis, P.

    1980-12-01

    The fine microstructure found in two eutectic aluminum alloys, Al-6% Ni and Al-33% Cu, is used to study their probable applications as textured selective surfaces. A solar calorimeter has been used to determine the bulk absorptivity and emissivity of sample surfaces. For the studied samples the figure of merit for bulk absorptivity/emissivity is 2.08 for the Al-Cu alloy and 1.38 for the Al-Ni alloy. It is found that solidification rate and etching time are the two important parameters controlling the optical properties, i.e. the bulk absorptivity/emissivity ratio of the surface.

  5. Loss of Anatomical Landmarks with Eutectic Mixture of Local Anesthetic Cream for Neonatal Male Circumcision

    PubMed Central

    Plank, Rebeca M.; Kubiak, David W.; Abdullahi, Rasak Bamidele; Ndubuka, Nnamdi; Nkgau, Maggie M.; Dapaah-Siakwan, Fredrick; Powis, Kathleen M.; Lockman, Shahin

    2012-01-01

    We report two cases of newborns who developed marked local edema after application of a eutectic mixture of local anesthetic (EMLA) topical anesthetic cream for neonatal male circumcision (NMC). Although local edema and erythema are known potential side effects of EMLA cream, a common anesthetic used for NMC, the loss of landmarks precluding safe NMC has not previously been reported, and is described here. Although we cannot recommend an alternate local anesthetic for neonates with this reaction to EMLA, based on a review of the published data we think that serious systemic adverse events related to EMLA are extremely rare. PMID:23102766

  6. Atomic-Scale Surface Demixing in a Eutectic Liquid BiSn Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Shpyrko, Oleg G.; Grigoriev, Alexei Yu.; Streitel, Reinhard; Pontoni, Diego; Pershan, Peter S.; Deutsch, Moshe; Ocko, Ben; Meron, Mati; Lin Binhua

    2005-09-02

    Resonant x-ray reflectivity of the surface of the liquid phase of the Bi{sub 43}Sn{sub 57} eutectic alloy reveals atomic-scale demixing extending over three near-surface atomic layers. Because of the absence of an underlying atomic lattice which typically defines adsorption in crystalline alloys, studies of adsorption in liquid alloys provide unique insight on interatomic interactions at the surface. The observed composition modulation could be accounted for quantitatively by the Defay-Prigogine and Strohl-King multilayer extensions of the single-layer Gibbs model, revealing a near-surface domination of the attractive Bi-Sn interaction over the entropy.

  7. Zero-gravity growth of NaCl-LiF eutectic. Experiment MA-131

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yue, A. S.; Yeh, C. W.; Yue, B. K.

    1977-01-01

    Continuous and discontinuous lithium fluoride fibers embedded in a sodium chloride matrix were produced in space and on earth, respectively. The production of continuous fibers in an eutectic mixture was attributed to the absence of convection current in the liquid during solidification in space. Image transmission and optical transmittance measurements of transverse sections of the space-grown and earth-grown ingots were made with a light microscope and a spectrometer. It was found that better optical properties were obtained from samples grown in space. This was attributed to a better alignment of lithium fluoride fibers along the growth direction.

  8. Eu-doped 6LiF-SrF2 eutectic scintillators for neutron detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagida, Takayuki; Fukuda, Kentaro; Fujimoto, Yutaka; Kawaguchi, Noriaki; Kurosawa, Shunsuke; Yamazaki, Atsushi; Watanabe, Kenichi; Futami, Yoshisuke; Yokota, Yuui; Pejchal, Jan; Yoshikawa, Akira; Uritani, Akira; Iguchi, Tetsuo

    2012-03-01

    Eu2+ 0.05%, 0.1%, and 0.2% activated LiF-SrF2 eutectic scintillators were prepared by the Bridgman method using 6Li enriched (95%) raw material. The α-ray-induced radio luminescence spectra showed intense emission peak at 430 nm due to an emission from Eu2+ 5d-4f transition in the Eu:SrF2 layers. When excited by 252Cf neutrons, all the samples exhibited almost the same light yields of 5000-7000 ph/n with a typical decay times of several hundreds ns.

  9. Evaluation of an advanced directionally solidified gamma/gamma'-alpha Mo eutectic alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, M. F.; Jackson, M. R.; Gigliotti, M. F. X.; Nelson, P. B.

    1979-01-01

    An attempt was made to improve on the properties of the candidate jet engine turbine blade material AG-60, a gamma/gamma prime-alpha Mo eutectic composite. Alloy 38 (AG-170) was evaluated in the greatest detail. This alloy, Ni-5.88 A1-29.74 Mo-1.65 V-1.2C Re (weight percent), represents an improvement beyond AG-60, based on mechanical testing of the transverse and/or longitudinal orientations over a range of temperatures in tension, shear, rupture, and rupture after thermal exposure. It is likely that other alloys in the study represent a similar improvement.

  10. Compatibility of AISI 316 L stainless steel with the Li 17Pbg, eutectic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coen, V.; Fenici, P.; Kolbe, H.; Orecchia, L.; Sasaki, T.

    1982-09-01

    The compatibility of AISI 316 L stainless steel with the Li 17Pb 83, eutectic has been studied in the temperature range 623-873 K for times up to 6000 h. In the corrosion layers formed there is a strong Ni depletion and Pb and Li penetration in the matrix. Tests at 623 K in Li 17Pb 83 on notched tensile specimens under a constant uniaxial tensile load, below the engineering yield stress, have evidenced that. many cracks filled with Pb and possibly Li are formed after relatively short times.

  11. (abstract) A Brief, Selective Review of Thermal Cycling Fatigue in Eutectic Tin-Lead Solder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winslow, J. W.; Silveira, C. de

    1993-01-01

    This paper reviews selected parts of the current literature relevant to thermo-mechanical fatigue mechanisms in eutectic tin-lead solder, and suggests a general outline to account for some observed failures. The field is found to be complex. One recent experimental study finds some failure modes to be sensitive to joint geometry. Attempts to extrapolate from test environments to service environments have had only limited success. Much work remains to be done before fatigue failures in this material can be considered as under practical control.

  12. Phase selection during crystallization of undercooled liquid eutectic lead-tin alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fecht, H. J.

    1991-01-01

    During rapid solidification substantial amounts of undercooling are in general required for formation of metastable phases. Crystallization at varying levels of undercooling and melting of metastable phases were studied during slow cooling and heating of emulsified PB-Sn alloys. Besides the experimental demonstration of the reversibility of metastable phase equilibra, two different principal solidification paths have been identified and compared with the established metastable phase diagram and predictions from classical nucleation theory. The results suggest that the most probable solidification path is described by the 'step rule' resulting in the formation of metastable phases at low undercooling, whereas the stable eutectic phase mixture crystallizes without metastable phase formation at high undercooling.

  13. Internal zone growth method for producing metal oxide metal eutectic composites

    DOEpatents

    Clark, Grady W.; Holder, John D.; Pasto, Arvid E.

    1980-01-01

    An improved method for preparing a cermet comprises preparing a compact having about 85 to 95 percent theoretical density from a mixture of metal and metal oxide powders from a system containing a eutectic composition, and inductively heating the compact in a radiofrequency field to cause the formation of an internal molten zone. The metal oxide particles in the powder mixture are effectively sized relative to the metal particles to permit direct inductive heating of the compact by radiofrequency from room temperature. Surface melting is prevented by external cooling or by effectively sizing the particles in the powder mixture.

  14. Zero-gravity growth of a sodium chloride-lithium fluoride eutectic mixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yue, A. S.; Yeh, C. W.; Yue, B. K.

    1982-01-01

    Continuous and discontinuous lithium fluoride fibers embedded in a sodium chloride matrix were produced in space and on Earth, respectively. The production of continuous fibers in a eutectic mixture was attributed to the absence of convective current in the liquid during solidification in space. Image transmission and optical transmittance measurements of transverse sections of the space-grown and Earth-grown ingots were made with a light microscope and a spectrometer. It was found that better optical properties were obtained from samples grown in space. This was attributed to a better alignment of lithium fluoride fibers along the growth direction.

  15. An electrochemical study of uranium behaviour in LiCl-KCl-CsCl eutectic melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltsev, D. S.; Volkovich, V. A.; Vasin, B. D.; Vladykin, E. N.

    2015-12-01

    Electrochemical behaviour of uranium was studied in the low melting ternary LiCl-KCl-CsCl eutectic at 573-1073 K employing potentiometry, cyclic voltammetry and chronopotentiometry. Uranium electrode potentials were measured directly and U(III)/U(IV) red-ox potentials were determined from the results of cyclic voltammetry measurements. Formal standard electrode and red-ox potentials of uranium, and thermodynamic properties of uranium chlorides in the studied melt were calculated. Diffusion coefficients of U(III) and U(IV) ions were determined using cyclic voltammetry and chronopotentiometry.

  16. A Directionally Solidified Iron-chromium-aluminum-tantalum Carbide Eutectic Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harf, F. H.

    1977-01-01

    A eutectic alloy, Fe-13.6CR-3.7Al+9TaC, was directionally solidified in a high gradient furnace, producing a microstructure of alined TaC fibers in an oxidation resistant alpha-iron matrix. Tensile and stress rupture properties, thermal cycling resistance, and microstructures were evaluated. The alloy displays at 1000 C an ultimate tensile strength of 58 MPa and a 100-hour rupture life at a stress of 21 MPa. Thermal cycling to 1100 C induces faceting in the TaC fibers.

  17. Resistance of a gamma/gamma prime - delta directionally solidified eutectic alloy to recrystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tewari, S. N.; Scheuermann, C. M.; Andrews, C. W.

    1975-01-01

    The lamellar directionally solidified nickel-base eutectic alloy gamma/gamma prime-delta has potential as an advanced turbine blade material. The microstructural stability of this alloy was investigated. Specimens were plastically deformed by uniform compression or Brinell indentation, then annealed between 705 and 1120 C. Microstructural changes observed after annealing included gamma prime coarsening, pinch-off and spheroidization of delta lamellae, and the appearance of an unidentified blocky phase in surface layers. All but the first of these was localized in severely deformed regions, suggesting that microstructural instability is not a serious problem in the use of this alloy.

  18. Replacement solvents for use in chemical synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Molnar, Linda K.; Hatton, T. Alan; Buchwald, Stephen L.

    2001-05-15

    Replacement solvents for use in chemical synthesis include polymer-immobilized solvents having a flexible polymer backbone and a plurality of pendant groups attached onto the polymer backbone, the pendant groups comprising a flexible linking unit bound to the polymer backbone and to a terminal solvating moiety. The polymer-immobilized solvent may be dissolved in a benign medium. Replacement solvents for chemical reactions for which tetrahydrofuran or diethyl may be a solvent include substituted tetrahydrofurfuryl ethers and substituted tetrahydro-3-furan ethers. The replacement solvents may be readily recovered from the reaction train using conventional methods.

  19. Directional solidification of Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3}-MoSi{sub 2} eutectic

    SciTech Connect

    Borowicz, S.M.; Heatherly, L.; Zee, R.H.; George, E.P.

    1999-07-01

    The Mo-Si phase diagram exhibits a Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3}-MoSi{sub 2} eutectic at the 54% Si composition. Since the terminal phases have comparable melting points and are equidistant from the eutectic composition, there is the possibility of obtaining lamellar microstructures in this system. In addition, if the alloys are directionally solidified, there is the further possibility of obtaining aligned lamellae. In this study, a high temperature (xenon-arc-lamp) optical floating zone furnace is utilized to directionally solidify Mo-Si alloys of the eutectic composition. Growth conditions are systematically varied to investigate their effects on the solidification microstructure. Growth rates and rotation speeds are identified that result in lamellar microstructures.

  20. Containerless processing and rapid solidification of Nb-Si alloys in the niobium-rich eutectic range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofmeister, W. H.; Bayuzick, R. J.; Robinson, M. B.; Bertero, G. A.

    1991-01-01

    Containerless processing and rapid solidification techniques were used to process Nb-Si alloys in the Nb-rich eutectic range. Electromagnetically levitated drops were melted and subsequently splat-quenched from different temperatures. A variety of eutectic morphologies was obtained as a function of the degree of superheating or undercooling of the drops prior to splatting. Metallic glass was observed only in drops quenched from above the melting temperature. Microstructures of splats deeply undercooled prior to quenching were very fine and uniform. These results are discussed in terms of classic nucleation theory concepts and the expected heat evolution at different regions of the splat during the rapid quenching process. The locations of the coupled-zone boundaries for the alpha-Nb + Nb3Si eutectic are also suggested.

  1. Rapid solidification of Al 2O 3/Y 3Al 5O 12/ZrO 2 eutectic in situ composites by laser zone remelting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Haijun; Zhang, Jun; Cui, Chunjuan; Liu, Lin; Fu, Hengzhi

    2007-09-01

    Directionally solidified rods and plates of Al 2O 3/YAG/ZrO 2 ternary eutectic in situ composites were grown by the laser zone remelting technique under different growth conditions, aiming to reveal the effect of rapid solidification on the microstructure characteristics, solidification behaviors and mechanical properties. The as-solidified eutectics presented smooth surfaces, well-defined phases, no pores and grain boundaries in their microstructures. The eutectic microstructure displayed a refined entangled network of Al 2O 3 (40%), YAG (43%) and ZrO 2 (17%) phases with sizes in the submicron range. Moreover, the refined ordered/aligned eutectic structure with the lamellar/fibrous and rod-type ZrO 2 in the nano-micron range was also observed. Two kinds of microstructures primarily resulted from the high-temperature gradient and solidification rate of the laser zone remelting. The eutectic interspacing decreased with increasing the scanning rate and the minimal spacing observed was as fine as 0.1-0.2 μm. The eutectic interfaces showed a typical faceted/faceted growth characteristic and the formation mechanism was detailedly discussed. The mechanical characterization at ambient temperature showed that the hardness and fracture toughness of the eutectic were 16.67 GPa and 8.0 MPa m 1/2, respectively. The small size effect of eutectic phases related with the rapid solidification, the addition of the third component of ZrO 2 and the crack deflection contributed to the improved fracture toughness.

  2. Directional crystallization of B 4C-NbB 2 and B 4C-MoB 2 eutectic compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paderno, Varvara; Paderno, Yuriy; Filippov, Vladimir; Liashchenko, Alfred

    2004-02-01

    We studied the directional crystallization of different compositions in B 4C-NbB 2 and B 4C-MoB 2 systems. The eutectic compositions for both systems are evaluated. It is shown that in the first system the rod-like eutectic structure is formed, in second, the "Chinese hieroglyphics". In both cases high hardness and high microplasticity are observed, which are much more than for individual component phases. These compositions may be considered as a new kind of self-strengthening composite materials.

  3. Some effects of eutectic liquid under reducing conditions in the alumina-tin dioxide-tin composite system

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, P.E.D.; Housley, R.M.

    1995-01-01

    Tin dioxide (SnO{sub 2}, cassiterite) is one of the few simple oxides that do not react with alumina below a eutectic at 1,620 C in air. Consequently it has been of interest for weak interfacial coatings on alumina for ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs). However, at low oxygen potentials in the Al-Sn-O ternary system an oxidic eutectic liquid containing dissolved tin appears at 1,045 C and readily attacks the alumina; this bears some resemblance to liquid phenomena encountered in the Ag-HTSC (high-temperature superconductor) systems.

  4. Ag3Sn plate formation in the solidification of near-ternary eutectic Sn-Ag-Cu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Sung K.; Shih, Da-Yuan; Donald, Ny.; Henderson, W.; Gosselin, Timothy; Sarkhel, Amit; Charles Goldsmith, Ny.; Puttlitz, Karl J.; Choi, Won Kyoung

    2003-06-01

    Near-ternary eutectic Sn-Ag-Cu alloys are leading lead-free candidate solders for various applications. These alloys yield three phases upon solidification: β-Sn,Ag3Sn, and Cu6Sn5. Large, plate-like, pro-eutectic Ag3Sn structures can grow rapidly within the liquid phase, potentially adversely affecting the mechanical behavior and reducing the fatigue life of solder joints. This article reports on the formation of such plates in Sn-Ag-Cu solder balls and joints and demonstrates how large Ag3Sn plate formation can be minimized.

  5. Effects of temperature and strain rate on the tensile behaviors of SIMP steel in static lead bismuth eutectic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian; Yan, Wei; Sha, Wei; Wang, Wei; Shan, Yiyin; Yang, Ke

    2016-05-01

    In order to assess the susceptibility of candidate structural materials to liquid metal embrittlement, this work investigated the tensile behaviors of ferritic-martensitic steel in static lead bismuth eutectic (LBE). The tensile tests were carried out in static lead bismuth eutectic under different temperatures and strain rates. Pronounced liquid metal embrittlement phenomenon is observed between 200 °C and 450 °C. Total elongation is reduced greatly due to the liquid metal embrittlement in LBE environment. The range of ductility trough is larger under slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) test.

  6. Modeling solvent effects in optical lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mack, Chris Alan

    A theoretical and experimental study into the effects of residual casting solvent on the lithographic properties of photoresist films is described. A modification to the common Fujita-Doolittle equation is proposed which provides an accurate description of the temperature and concentration dependence of solvent diffusivity in polymer systems. This model, in combination with a variable grid, finite difference time domain numerical solution to the diffusion equation, allows for calculation of the residual casting solvent content as a function of bake conditions. Using measurements of solvent content of a commercial i-line photoresist after post apply bake from a quartz crystal microbalance and radio-labeled solvent with scintillation counting, the model was verified. Analysis of this data has led to a calibrated model of solvent diffusivity as a function of solvent content and bake temperature, which can then predict solvent content as a function of depth into the photoresist for any bake conditions.

  7. Pyrochemical extraction of transition metals from Pacific Ocean deep sea nodules

    SciTech Connect

    von Winbush, S.; Maroni, V.A.

    1987-01-01

    Considerable success has been achieved in lixiviation transition metals from Pacific Ocean deep sea nodules. These nodules typically contain approx.30 wt% Mn, approx.7 wt% Fe, approx.1 wt% Ni, approx.1 wt% Cu, and approx.0.3 wt% Co. Samples of the nodules have been subjected to extraction tests at 450C using LiCl-KCl eutectic and MgCl2-NaCl-KCl eutectic. The most impressive results came from studies using the Mg, Na, K/Cl eutectic. With this salt, nearly 100% of the Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, and Ni are brought into solution. The dissolution reaction is quite vigorous, with nearly complete extraction occurring in a very short time (minutes) following melting of the eutectic. Quantitative recovery of cobalt is achieved with nodule-to-salt weight ratios as high as 1:3. Electronic absorption spectroscopy (carried out on the molten extract solution at the test temperature) showed that the oxidation state of the dissolved transition metals are CoS , CuS , FeT , MnS , and NiS . At temperatures greater than or equal to450C, the FeT and CuS distill out of the extract solution at a rapid rate and condense as binary halides or halide complexes. Using a combination of distillation followed by electrochemical reduction of the CoS and NiS in the extract salt, it appears possible to recover a fairly high grade of cobalt metal and nickel metal as well as high grade CuS , FeT , and MnS in the form of a halide salt (CuCl2, FeCl3) or an oxide precipitate (Mn2O3).

  8. Eutectic combinations as a pathway to the formation of substrate-based Au-Ge heterodimers and hollowed au nanocrescents with tunable optical properties.

    PubMed

    Sundar, Aarthi; Farzinpour, Pouyan; Gilroy, Kyle D; Tan, Teng; Hughes, Robert A; Neretina, Svetlana

    2014-08-27

    Pairs of immiscible elements with deep eutectics are used to synthesize periodic arrays of heterodimers and hollowed metal nanocrescents. In the devised route, substrate-immobilized Au or Ag nanostructures act as heterogeneous nucleation sites for Ge adatoms. At elevated temperatures the adatoms collect in sufficient quantities to transform each site into a AuGe liquid alloy which, upon cooling, phase separates into elemental components sharing a common interface. The so-formed Au-Ge and Ag-Ge heterodimers exhibit a complex morphology characterized by a noble metal nanocrescent which partially encapsulates one end of the Ge domain. Through the use of a selective etch the Ge component is removed, leaving behind a periodic array of hollow noble metal nanocrescents on the surface of the substrate. Optical characterization of both the heterodimers and nanocrescents indicates that the presence of Ge gives rise to a relative blue-shift in the localized surface plasmon peak, a result that is in stark contrast to the red-shifts typically observed when plasmonic nanostructures are in contact with a dielectric medium. Simulations are used to both rationalize the observed shift and show the potential for deriving unexpected behaviors when semishell-like noble metal structures are in contact with high permittivity dielectric mediums. PMID:24729512

  9. Nucleation and Growth of Graphite in Eutectic Spheroidal Cast Iron: Modeling and Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carazo, Fernando D.; Dardati, Patricia M.; Celentano, Diego J.; Godoy, Luis A.

    2016-06-01

    A new model of graphite growth during the continuous cooling of eutectic spheroidal cast iron is presented in this paper. The model considers the nucleation and growth of graphite from pouring to room temperature. The microstructural model of solidification accounts for the eutectic as divorced and graphite growth rate as a function of carbon gradient at the liquid in contact with the graphite. In the solid state, the microstructural model takes into account three stages for graphite growth, namely (1) from the end of solidification to the upper bound of intercritical stable eutectoid, (2) during the intercritical stable eutectoid, and (3) from the lower bound of intercritical stable eutectoid to room temperature. The micro- and macrostructural models are coupled using a sequential multiscale approach. Numerical results for graphite fraction and size distribution are compared with experimental results obtained from a cylindrical cup, in which the graphite volumetric fraction and size distribution were obtained using the Schwartz-Saltykov approach. The agreements between the experimental and numerical results for the fraction of graphite and the size distribution of spheroids reveal the importance of numerical models in the prediction of the main aspects of graphite in spheroidal cast iron.

  10. Thermodynamics of neptunium in LiCl-KCl eutectic/liquid bismuth systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamura, Y.; Shirai, O.; Iwai, T.; Suzuki, Y.

    2000-02-01

    Thermodynamic properties of neptunium in LiCl-KCl eutectic/liquid bismuth systems in the temperature range 400--500 C have been studied using a galvanic cell method for the pyrometallurgical reprocessing of nuclear spent fuels. The standard potential of the Np/Np(III) couple vs. the Ag/AgCl (1 wt% AgCl) reference electrode in LiCl-KCl eutectic was measured and given by the equation E{sub Np/Np(III)}{sup 0} = {minus}2.0667 + 0.0007892 T ({sigma} = 0.0009), where E is in volts, T is in kelvin, and {sigma} is the standard deviation. The potential of neptunium-bismuth alloy, E{sub Np-Bi}, was measured as a function of neptunium concentration, X{sub Np in Bi}. The curves for E{sub Bi-Np} vs. log X{sub Np in Bi} indicated the neptunium solubility in liquid bismuth to be 0.34 {+-} 0.02, 0.61 {+-} 0.08, and 1.06 {+-} 0.09 ({+-}{sigma}) atom % at 400, 450, and 500 C, respectively. The excess partial free energy of neptunium in liquid bismuth was represented by the equation, {Delta}{bar G}{sub Np}{sup xs} (kcal/g atom) = {minus}32.5 ({+-}0.7) + 0.0072 ({+-}0.0010) T. The values of the solubility and excess partial free energy for neptunium were closer to those for plutonium rather than uranium.

  11. Low tritium partial pressure permeation system for mass transport measurement in lead lithium eutectic

    SciTech Connect

    Pawelko, R. J.; Shimada, M.; Katayama, K.; Fukada, S.; Humrickhouse, P. W.; Terai, T.

    2015-11-28

    This paper describes a new experimental system designed to investigate tritium mass transfer properties in materials important to fusion technology. Experimental activities were carried out at the Safety and Tritium Applied Research (STAR) facility located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The tritium permeation measurement system was developed as part of the Japan/US TITAN collaboration to investigate tritium mass transfer properties in liquid lead lithium eutectic (LLE) alloy. The experimental system is configured to measure tritium mass transfer properties at low tritium partial pressures. Initial tritium permeation scoping tests were conducted on a 1 mm thick α-Fe plate to determine operating parameters and to validate the experimental technique. A second series of permeation tests was then conducted with the α-Fe plate covered with an approximately 8.5 mm layer of liquid lead lithium eutectic alloy (α-Fe/LLE). We present preliminary tritium permeation data for α-Fe and α-Fe/LLE at temperatures between 400 and 600°C and at tritium partial pressures between 1.7E-3 and 2.5 Pa in helium. Preliminary results for the α-Fe plate and α-Fe/LLE indicate that the data spans a transition region between the diffusion-limited regime and the surface-limited regime. In conclusion, additional data is required to determine the existence and range of a surface-limited regime.

  12. Local coordination state of rare earth in eutectic scintillators for neutron detector applications

    PubMed Central

    Masai, Hirokazu; Yanagida, Takayuki; Mizoguchi, Teruyasu; Ina, Toshiaki; Miyazaki, Takamichi; Kawaguti, Noriaki; Fukuda, Kentaro

    2015-01-01

    Atomic distribution in phosphors for neutron detection has not been fully elucidated, although their ionization efficiency is strongly dependent on the state of the rare earth in the matrix. In this work, we examine optical properties of Eu-doped 80LiF-20CaF2 eutectics for neutron detector applications based on the Eu distribution. At low concentrations, aggregation of Eu cations is observed, whereas homogeneous atomic dispersion in the CaF2 layer, to substitute Ca2+ ions, is observed in the eutectics at high concentrations. Eu LIII edge X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) analysis suggests that neutron responses do not depend on the amount of Eu2+ ions. However, transparency, which depends on an ordered lamellar structure, is found to be important for a high light yield in neutron detection. The results confirm the effectiveness of the basic idea concerning the separation of radiation absorbers and activators in particle radiation scintillation and present potential for further improvement of novel bulk detectors. PMID:26292726

  13. Anomalous Angular Nonstoichiometric Sputtering Yield of a Ga-In Eutectic Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerbacher, Mariel; Deaton, J. W.; Burns, L. R.; Deoli, N. T.; Weathers, D. L.

    2007-10-01

    Sputtering is a thin film deposition technique in which an ion beam fired at a target ejects atoms from the top several layers of the target's surface allowing these atoms to deposit as a thin film on any nearby surface. We employed this technique to deposit the first layers of the Ga-In target onto an aluminum foil which we then analyzed using RBS to determine the angular distribution of sputtered material. The purpose of this experiment is to expand the base of scientific knowledge on sputtering and better understand the sputtering process in hopes of improving models of this process. The Ga-In eutectic alloy used in this experiment has a Gibbsian segregation, in which the first atomic monolayer of the surface is at least 94% Indium, while the second layer is primarily Gallium, as reflected in the alloy's bulk concentration (16.5% Indium). Therefore, the majority of Gallium deposited by sputtering originates from the second atomic monolayer or deeper in the sample. The eutectic alloy is a liquid at room temperature, which is ideal for sputtering processes. Liquid targets are self-healing; their composition does not change over time as atoms are ejected from their surface. Since we know that the majority of Gallium sputtered from the Ga-In target originates from below the first atomic monolayer, studying the angular distribution of Gallium isotopes reveals the behavior of atoms ejected from atomic layers beneath the first monolayer of a target during sputtering.

  14. A Promising New Class of High-Temperature Alloys: Eutectic High-Entropy Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yiping; Dong, Yong; Guo, Sheng; Jiang, Li; Kang, Huijun; Wang, Tongmin; Wen, Bin; Wang, Zhijun; Jie, Jinchuan; Cao, Zhiqiang; Ruan, Haihui; Li, Tingju

    2014-08-01

    High-entropy alloys (HEAs) can have either high strength or high ductility, and a simultaneous achievement of both still constitutes a tough challenge. The inferior castability and compositional segregation of HEAs are also obstacles for their technological applications. To tackle these problems, here we proposed a novel strategy to design HEAs using the eutectic alloy concept, i.e. to achieve a microstructure composed of alternating soft fcc and hard bcc phases. As a manifestation of this concept, an AlCoCrFeNi2.1 (atomic portion) eutectic high-entropy alloy (EHEA) was designed. The as-cast EHEA possessed a fine lamellar fcc/B2 microstructure, and showed an unprecedented combination of high tensile ductility and high fracture strength at room temperature. The excellent mechanical properties could be kept up to 700°C. This new alloy design strategy can be readily adapted to large-scale industrial production of HEAs with simultaneous high fracture strength and high ductility.

  15. Vibration Monitoring Using Fiber Optic Sensors in a Lead-Bismuth Eutectic Cooled Nuclear Fuel Assembly.

    PubMed

    De Pauw, Ben; Lamberti, Alfredo; Ertveldt, Julien; Rezayat, Ali; van Tichelen, Katrien; Vanlanduit, Steve; Berghmans, Francis

    2016-01-01

    Excessive fuel assembly vibrations in nuclear reactor cores should be avoided in order not to compromise the lifetime of the assembly and in order to prevent the occurrence of safety hazards. This issue is particularly relevant to new reactor designs that use liquid metal coolants, such as, for example, a molten lead-bismuth eutectic. The flow of molten heavy metal around and through the fuel assembly may cause the latter to vibrate and hence suffer degradation as a result of, for example, fretting wear or mechanical fatigue. In this paper, we demonstrate the use of optical fiber sensors to measure the fuel assembly vibration in a lead-bismuth eutectic cooled installation which can be used as input to assess vibration-related safety hazards. We show that the vibration characteristics of the fuel pins in the fuel assembly can be experimentally determined with minimal intrusiveness and with high precision owing to the small dimensions and properties of the sensors. In particular, we were able to record local strain level differences of about 0.2 μϵ allowing us to reliably estimate the vibration amplitudes and modal parameters of the fuel assembly based on optical fiber sensor readings during different stages of the operation of the facility, including the onset of the coolant circulation and steady-state operation. PMID:27110782

  16. Research into the microstructure and mechanical behavior of eutectic Bi-Sn and In-Sn

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, J.L.F.; Mei, Z.; Morris, J.W. Jr. |

    1993-08-01

    This manuscript reports on research into two low-melting, lead-free solder alloys, eutectic Bi-Sn and eutectic In-Sn. The microstructures were found to depend on both cooling rate and substrate, with the greatest variability in the In-Sn alloy. The nature of the intermetallic layer formed at the solder-substrate interface depends on both the solder and the substrate (Cu versus Ni). Also, the microstructure of the Bi-Sn can recrystallize during deformation, which is not the case with In-Sn. Data from creep and constant strain rate tests are given for slowly cooled samples. The creep behavior of In-Sn is constant with temperature, but the creep seems to be controlled by the In-rich phase in In-Sn on Cu and by the Sn-rich phase in In-Sn on Ni. Bi-Sn exhibits different creep behavior at temperatures above 40 {degrees}C than at 20 {degrees}C or lower. Stress-strain curves of Bi-Sn on Cu and In-Sn on Cu are similar, while In-Sn on Ni behaves differently. This is explained in terms of the deformation patterns in the alloys.

  17. Thermodynamics of reaction of praseodymium with gallium-indium eutectic alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melchakov, S. Yu.; Ivanov, V. A.; Yamshchikov, L. F.; Volkovich, V. A.; Osipenko, A. G.; Kormilitsyn, M. V.

    2013-06-01

    Thermodynamic properties of Ga-In eutectic alloys saturated with praseodymium were determined for the first time employing the electromotive force method. The equilibrium potentials of the Pr-In alloys saturated with praseodymium (8.7-12.1 mol.% Pr) and Pr-Ga-In alloys (containing 0.0012-6.71 mol.% Pr) were measured between 573-1073 K. Pr-In alloy containing solid PrIn3 with known thermodynamic properties was used as the reference electrode when measuring the potentials of ternary Pr-In-Ga alloys. Activity, partial and excessive thermodynamic functions of praseodymium in alloys with indium and Ga-In eutectic were calculated. Activity (a), activity coefficients (γ) and solubility (X) of praseodymium in the studied temperature range can be expressed by the following equations: lgaα-Pr(In) = 4.425 - 11965/T ± 0.026. lgаα-Pr(Ga-In) = 5.866 - 14766/T ± 0.190. lgγα-Pr(Ga-In) = 2.351 - 9996/T ± 0.39. lgХPr(Ga-In) = 3.515 - 4770/T ± 0.20.

  18. A promising new class of high-temperature alloys: eutectic high-entropy alloys.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yiping; Dong, Yong; Guo, Sheng; Jiang, Li; Kang, Huijun; Wang, Tongmin; Wen, Bin; Wang, Zhijun; Jie, Jinchuan; Cao, Zhiqiang; Ruan, Haihui; Li, Tingju

    2014-01-01

    High-entropy alloys (HEAs) can have either high strength or high ductility, and a simultaneous achievement of both still constitutes a tough challenge. The inferior castability and compositional segregation of HEAs are also obstacles for their technological applications. To tackle these problems, here we proposed a novel strategy to design HEAs using the eutectic alloy concept, i.e. to achieve a microstructure composed of alternating soft fcc and hard bcc phases. As a manifestation of this concept, an AlCoCrFeNi2.1 (atomic portion) eutectic high-entropy alloy (EHEA) was designed. The as-cast EHEA possessed a fine lamellar fcc/B2 microstructure, and showed an unprecedented combination of high tensile ductility and high fracture strength at room temperature. The excellent mechanical properties could be kept up to 700°C. This new alloy design strategy can be readily adapted to large-scale industrial production of HEAs with simultaneous high fracture strength and high ductility. PMID:25160691

  19. Microstructure and thermoelectric properties of mechanically robust PbTe-Si eutectic composites.

    SciTech Connect

    Sootsman, J. R.; He, J.; Dravid, V. P.; Ballikaya, S.; Vermeulen, D.; Uher, C.; Kanatzidis, M. G.

    2010-01-01

    The microstructure and thermoelectric properties of the PbTe-Si eutectic system are presented in detail. When rapidly quenched from the melt this system yields materials with thermoelectric properties similar to PbTe itself but with improved mechanical properties. Doping optimization was performed using PbI{sub 2} as an n-type dopant giving precise control of the thermoelectric properties. Electron microscopy indicates that the PbTe-Si system is both a nanocomposite and microcomposite. Despite the added Si, the thermal conductivity of this composite follows closely that of PbTe. The temperature dependence of the Lorenz number was estimated, and it shows a significant departure from the value of metals (L{sub 0}) reaching only 45% of L{sub 0} at 650 K. The optimized ZT for the PbTe-Si(8%) eutectic was 0.9 at 675 K. The improved mechanical robustness of these composites makes them attractive for use in large scale thermoelectric device fabrication.

  20. Nucleation and Growth of Graphite in Eutectic Spheroidal Cast Iron: Modeling and Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carazo, Fernando D.; Dardati, Patricia M.; Celentano, Diego J.; Godoy, Luis A.

    2016-03-01

    A new model of graphite growth during the continuous cooling of eutectic spheroidal cast iron is presented in this paper. The model considers the nucleation and growth of graphite from pouring to room temperature. The microstructural model of solidification accounts for the eutectic as divorced and graphite growth rate as a function of carbon gradient at the liquid in contact with the graphite. In the solid state, the microstructural model takes into account three stages for graphite growth, namely (1) from the end of solidification to the upper bound of intercritical stable eutectoid, (2) during the intercritical stable eutectoid, and (3) from the lower bound of intercritical stable eutectoid to room temperature. The micro- and macrostructural models are coupled using a sequential multiscale approach. Numerical results for graphite fraction and size distribution are compared with experimental results obtained from a cylindrical cup, in which the graphite volumetric fraction and size distribution were obtained using the Schwartz-Saltykov approach. The agreements between the experimental and numerical results for the fraction of graphite and the size distribution of spheroids reveal the importance of numerical models in the prediction of the main aspects of graphite in spheroidal cast iron.

  1. Thermal Effects in the HTBB-3200pg Furnace on Metal-Carbon Eutectic Point Implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadli, M.; Anhalt, K.; Bourson, F.; Schiller, S.; Hartmann, J.

    2009-02-01

    The general statement that a temperature fixed-point cell will show better melting and freezing plateaux with better temperature uniformity along the dimensions of the fixed point is understood to be valid for metal-carbon (M-C) eutectics as well as for pure metal fixed points. In this article, it is shown that improved temperature uniformity in the central part of the high-temperature blackbody BB3200pg (HTBB), where the M-C fixed point is implemented, results in flatter and longer plateaux. Pyrolitic graphite rings, clamped together by a spring, form the heated cavity of the HTBB. As a first step, the relative electrical resistivity of each pyrolitic graphite ring was measured using a method advised by the furnace manufacturer. Next, the ring positions were optimized, taking into account their relative resistivities, in order to obtain a more homogeneous temperature distribution. Subsequent measurement of the temperature uniformity at the furnace walls confirmed the improvement. Measuring the melting plateaux of the Pt-C eutectic with different arrangements of the rings, and thereby operating the fixed-point cell in different temperature distributions, confirmed the influence of the temperature distribution on the plateau shape, with the best plateau shape corresponding to the most homogeneous temperature distribution.

  2. Structure of molten Al and eutectic Al-Si alloy studied by neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlborg, U.; Kramer, Matthew J.; Besser, M.; Morris, J. R.; Calvo-Dahlborg, M.

    2012-11-24

    The structure of molten eutectic Al87.8Si12.2 alloy has been studied by neutron diffraction during a temperature cycle. For comparison measurements were performed on pure molten Al. The measurements show that the alloy after heating above the liquidus contains particles of two kinds, aluminum-rich and silicon-rich. The silicon-rich particles are partly dissolved after a further heating. Earlier published data obtained by the γ-ray absorption technique of the density of the molten eutectic Al–Si alloy had demonstrated the existence of two temperatures above the liquidus temperature: A dissolution temperature Td, at which the microstructure of the melt inherited from the ingot starts to dissolve and a branching temperature, Tb, at which the melt reaches a fully mixed state. The highest temperature that was possible to reach during the neutron experiments lies between Td and Tb. The obtained results support these conclusions that molten alloys after melting are inhomogeneous up to a temperature well above the liquidus. Moreover, the difference in shape between the static structure factors measured by neutron and X-ray diffraction on molten aluminum is observed and is found to be more accentuated and to extend to larger wavevectors than in earlier works.

  3. Microstructures in a ternary eutectic alloy: devising metrics based on neighbourhood relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennstedt, A.; Choudhury, A.; Ratke, L.; Nestler, B.

    2016-03-01

    Ternary eutectics, where three phases form simultaneously from the melt, present an opportunity to study the fundamental science of microstructural pattern formation during the process of solidification. In this paper we investigate these phenomena, both experimentally and by phase-field simulations. The aim is to develop necessary characterisation tools which can be applied to both experimentally determined and simulated microstructures for a quantitative comparison between simulations and experiments. In SEM images of experimental cross sections of directionally solidified Ag-Al-Cu ternary eutectic alloy at least six different types of microstructures are observed. Corresponding 3D phase-field simulations for different solidification conditions and compositions allow us to span and isolate the material parameters which influence the formation of three-phase patterns. Both experimental and simulated microstructures were analysed regarding interface lengths, triple points and number of neighbours. As a result of this integrated experimental and computational effort we conclude that neighbourhood relationships as described herein, turn out to be an appropriate basis to characterise order in patterns.

  4. Low tritium partial pressure permeation system for mass transport measurement in lead lithium eutectic

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pawelko, R. J.; Shimada, M.; Katayama, K.; Fukada, S.; Humrickhouse, P. W.; Terai, T.

    2015-11-28

    This paper describes a new experimental system designed to investigate tritium mass transfer properties in materials important to fusion technology. Experimental activities were carried out at the Safety and Tritium Applied Research (STAR) facility located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The tritium permeation measurement system was developed as part of the Japan/US TITAN collaboration to investigate tritium mass transfer properties in liquid lead lithium eutectic (LLE) alloy. The experimental system is configured to measure tritium mass transfer properties at low tritium partial pressures. Initial tritium permeation scoping tests were conducted on a 1 mm thick α-Fe plate to determinemore » operating parameters and to validate the experimental technique. A second series of permeation tests was then conducted with the α-Fe plate covered with an approximately 8.5 mm layer of liquid lead lithium eutectic alloy (α-Fe/LLE). We present preliminary tritium permeation data for α-Fe and α-Fe/LLE at temperatures between 400 and 600°C and at tritium partial pressures between 1.7E-3 and 2.5 Pa in helium. Preliminary results for the α-Fe plate and α-Fe/LLE indicate that the data spans a transition region between the diffusion-limited regime and the surface-limited regime. In conclusion, additional data is required to determine the existence and range of a surface-limited regime.« less

  5. Effect of Eutectic Concentration on Conductivity in PEO:LiX Based Solid Polymer Electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Pengfei; Ganapatibhotla, Lalitha; Maranas, Janna

    Polyethylene oxide (PEO) and lithium salt based solid polymer electrolytes (SPEs) have been widely proposed as a substitution for the liquid electrolyte in Li-ion batteries. As salt concentration varies, these systems demonstrate rich phase behavior. Conductivity as a function of salt concentration has been measured for decades and various concentration dependences have been observed. A PEO:LiX mixture can have one or two conductivity maximums, while some mixtures with salt of high ionic strength will have higher conductivity as the salt concentration decrease. The factors that affect the conductivity are specific for each sample. The universal factor that affects conductivity is still not clear. In this work, we measured the conductivity of a series of PEO:LiX mixtures and statistical analysis shows conductivity is affected by the concentration difference from the eutectic concentration (Δc). The correlation with Δc is stronger than the correlation with glass transition temperature. We believe that at the eutectic concentration, during the solidification process, unique structures can form which aid conduction. Currently at Dow Chemical.

  6. A Promising New Class of High-Temperature Alloys: Eutectic High-Entropy Alloys

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yiping; Dong, Yong; Guo, Sheng; Jiang, Li; Kang, Huijun; Wang, Tongmin; Wen, Bin; Wang, Zhijun; Jie, Jinchuan; Cao, Zhiqiang; Ruan, Haihui; Li, Tingju

    2014-01-01

    High-entropy alloys (HEAs) can have either high strength or high ductility, and a simultaneous achievement of both still constitutes a tough challenge. The inferior castability and compositional segregation of HEAs are also obstacles for their technological applications. To tackle these problems, here we proposed a novel strategy to design HEAs using the eutectic alloy concept, i.e. to achieve a microstructure composed of alternating soft fcc and hard bcc phases. As a manifestation of this concept, an AlCoCrFeNi2.1 (atomic portion) eutectic high-entropy alloy (EHEA) was designed. The as-cast EHEA possessed a fine lamellar fcc/B2 microstructure, and showed an unprecedented combination of high tensile ductility and high fracture strength at room temperature. The excellent mechanical properties could be kept up to 700°C. This new alloy design strategy can be readily adapted to large-scale industrial production of HEAs with simultaneous high fracture strength and high ductility. PMID:25160691

  7. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Vvvv of... - Default Organic HAP Contents of Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Solvents and Solvent Blends 5 Table 5 to Subpart VVVV of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Solvents and Solvent Blends As specified in § 63.5758(a)(6), when detailed organic HAP content data for solvent blends are not available, you may use the values in the following table: Solvent/solvent blend...

  8. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Vvvv of... - Default Organic HAP Contents of Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Solvents and Solvent Blends 5 Table 5 to Subpart VVVV of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Solvents and Solvent Blends As specified in § 63.5758(a)(6), when detailed organic HAP content data for solvent blends are not available, you may use the values in the following table: Solvent/solvent blend...

  9. Solvent Extraction of Furfural From Biomass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphrey, M. F.

    1984-01-01

    Solvent-extraction method reduces energy required to remove furfural produced during acid hydrolysis of biomass. Acid hydrolysis performed in vessel containing both solvents and reacting ingredients. With intimate contact between solvents and aqueous hydrolyis liqour, furfural removed form liquor almost as fast as it forms.

  10. Restoring solvent for nuclear separation processes

    SciTech Connect

    Rief, D.J.

    1988-10-01

    Solvent extraction separation processes are used to recover usable nuclear materials from spent fuels. These processes involve the use of an extractant/diluent (solvent) for separation of the reusable actinides from unwanted fission products. The most widely used processes employ tributyl phosphate as an extractant diluted with a normal-paraffin hydrocarbon. During use, the solvent is altered due to hydrolysis and radiolysis, forming materials that influence product losses, product decontamination, and separation efficiencies. In most processes, the solvent is recycled after cleaning. Solvent cleaning generally involves scrubbing with a sodium carbonate solution. Studies at the Savannah River Laboratory have shown that carbonate washing, although removing residual solvent activity, does not removed more solvent-soluble binding ligands (formed by solvent degradation), which hold fission products in the solvent. Treatment of the solvent with a solid adsorbent after carbonate washing removes binding ligands and significantly improves recycled solvent performance. Laboratory work to establish the advantage of adsorbent cleaning and the development of a full-scale adsorption process will be described. The application of this process for cleaning the first cycle solvent of a Savannah River Plant production process will be discussed.

  11. Restoring solvent for nuclear separation processes

    SciTech Connect

    Reif, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    Solvent extraction separation processes are used to recover usable nuclear materials from spent fuels. These processes involve the use of an extractant/diluent (solvent) for separation of the reusable actinides from unwanted fission products. The most widely used processes employ tributyl phosphate as an extractant diluted with a normal-paraffin hydrocarbon. During use, the solvent is altered due to hydrolysis and radiolysis, forming materials that influence product losses, product decontamination, and separation efficiencies. In most processes, the solvent is recycled after cleaning. Solvent cleaning generally involves scrubbing with a sodium carbonate solution. Studies at the Savannah River Laboratory have shown that carbonate washing, although removing residual solvent activity, does not remove more solvent-soluble binding ligands (formed by solvent degradation), which hold fission products in the solvent. Treatment of the solvent with a solid adsorbent after carbonate washing removes binding ligands and significantly improves recycled solvent performance. Laboratory work to establish the advantage of adsorbent cleaning and the development of a full-scale adsorption process is described. The application of this process for cleaning the first cycle solvent of a Savannah River Plant production process is discussed.

  12. Firing of pulverized solvent refined coal

    DOEpatents

    Derbidge, T. Craig; Mulholland, James A.; Foster, Edward P.

    1986-01-01

    An air-purged burner for the firing of pulverized solvent refined coal is constructed and operated such that the solvent refined coal can be fired without the coking thereof on the burner components. The air-purged burner is designed for the firing of pulverized solvent refined coal in a tangentially fired boiler.

  13. Investigation on the effect of metallic impurity Zn in solvent during photolithography process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Byoung-Tak; Kim, Ook-Hyun; Baik, Jeong-Heon; Ha, Jeong-Hyuk; Lee, Il-Ho; Yang, Weon-Sik

    2005-05-01

    The trend toward narrower line widths in the manufacture of integrated circuits has put an increasing burden on contamination control in every aspect of semiconductor fabrication. For a deep sub micrometer device, metal contamination appearing on the device can cause fatal problems including increasing the leakage current at the p-n junction, decreasing the breakdown voltage of oxide. Many lithographic defects have been known and evaluated, however, the effects of metallic impurity (Zn) in solvent are seldom reported during lithography process. Solvents are component material for Photoresist and have been used for prewet, strippers, EBR, rinse and so on during photolithography process. Lithography plays a very important role because it is applied repeatedly onto the wafer surface during device manufacturing. Unfortunately, pattern lifting happened to well formation layer wafers that were reworked on a normal iline litho process after stripping the Photoresist with solvent (PGMEA). We also detected blocked pattern defect at 0.18 CMOS gate pattern coated with DUV resist applied solvent prewet step after BARC coating. From various investigations, we could know that pattern lifting and blocked defect were derived from solvent (PGMEA). In this paper, we show mechanism of adhesion fails and blocked defect happened by metallic impurity Zn in solvent during solvent rework and prewet on organic BARC film. It shows that proper control of metallic impurities in thinner is an important item in FAB.

  14. Deep vein thrombosis - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    You were treated for deep venous thrombosis (DVT). This is a condition in which a blood clot forms in a vein that is not on ... especially if it gets worse upon taking a deep breath in You cough up blood

  15. Taoism and Deep Ecology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sylvan, Richard; Bennett, David

    1988-01-01

    Contrasted are the philosophies of Deep Ecology and ancient Chinese. Discusses the cosmology, morality, lifestyle, views of power, politics, and environmental philosophies of each. Concludes that Deep Ecology could gain much from Taoism. (CW)

  16. Deep Ecology and Subjectivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foley, Grover

    1988-01-01

    Describes Deep Ecology and criticizes its limitations. Discusses mysticism, the bomb, freedom, subjectivity and power as they are addressed by Deep Ecology. Stresses the need to teach ecological balance. (CW)

  17. Solvent cleaning system and method for removing contaminants from solvent used in resin recycling

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert, George W.; Hand, Thomas E.; DeLaurentiis, Gary M.

    2009-01-06

    A two step solvent and carbon dioxide based system that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material and which further includes a solvent cleaning system for periodically removing the contaminants from the solvent so that the solvent can be reused and the contaminants can be collected and safely discarded in an environmentally safe manner.

  18. Deep Web video

    SciTech Connect

    None Available

    2009-06-01

    To make the web work better for science, OSTI has developed state-of-the-art technologies and services including a deep web search capability. The deep web includes content in searchable databases available to web users but not accessible by popular search engines, such as Google. This video provides an introduction to the deep web search engine.

  19. Deep Space Telecommunications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuiper, T. B. H.; Resch, G. M.

    2000-01-01

    The increasing load on NASA's deep Space Network, the new capabilities for deep space missions inherent in a next-generation radio telescope, and the potential of new telescope technology for reducing construction and operation costs suggest a natural marriage between radio astronomy and deep space telecommunications in developing advanced radio telescope concepts.

  20. Deep Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Deep Vein Thrombosis? Español Deep vein thrombosis (throm-BO-sis), or DVT, is a blood clot that forms in a vein deep in the body. Blood clots occur when blood ...